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Sample records for dynamic speciation analysis

  1. Dynamic speciation analysis and bioavailability of metals in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Herman P; Town, Raewyn M; Buffle, Jacques; Cleven, Rob F M J; Davison, William; Puy, Jaume; van Riemsdijk, Willem H; Sigg, Laura

    2005-11-15

    Dynamic metal speciation analysis in aquatic ecosystems is emerging as a powerful basis for development of predictions of bioavailability and reliable risk assessment strategies. A given speciation sensor is characterized by an effective time scale or kinetic window that defines the measurable metal species via their labilities. Here we review the current state of the art for the theory and application of dynamic speciation sensors. We show that a common dynamic interpretation framework, based on rigorous flux expressions incorporating the relevant diffusion and reaction steps, is applicable for a suite of sensors that span a range of time scales. Interpolation from a kinetic spectrum of speciation data is proposed as a practical strategy for addressing questions of bioavailability. Case studies illustrate the practical significance of knowledge on the dynamic features of metal complex species in relation to biouptake, and highlight the limitations of equilibrium-based models. PMID:16323747

  2. ARSENIC SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SALIVA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Determination of arsenic species in human saliva is potentially useful for biomonitoring of human exposure to arsenic and for studying arsenic metabolism. However, there is no report on the speciation analysis of arsenic in saliva. Methods: Arsenic species in saliva ...

  3. Biosensor for metal analysis and speciation

    DOEpatents

    Aiken, Abigail M.; Peyton, Brent M.; Apel, William A.; Petersen, James N.

    2007-01-30

    A biosensor for metal analysis and speciation is disclosed. The biosensor comprises an electron carrier immobilized to a surface of an electrode and a layer of an immobilized enzyme adjacent to the electrode. The immobilized enzyme comprises an enzyme having biological activity inhibited by a metal to be detected by the biosensor.

  4. Mercury speciation analysis in terrestrial animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Berzas Nevado, J J; Rodríguez Martín-Doimeadios, R C; Guzmán Bernardo, F J; Rodríguez Fariñas, N; Patiño Ropero, M J

    2012-09-15

    No previous analytical procedures are available and validated for mercury speciation analysis in terrestrial animal tissues. This analysis is a difficult task both because the expected concentrations are low, since important accumulation process are not likely to occur, and also because there are not commercially available certified reference material. Thus, an analytical methodology has been developed and validated for mercury speciation for the specific case of terrestrial animal tissues. The proposed method is based on the quantitative extraction of the species by closed-vessel microwave assisted heating with an alkaline reagent, followed by ethylation. The ethylated derivatives were then submitted to head-space solid phase microextraction with a 100 μm polidimethylsiloxane-coated fiber, and desorbed onto a gas chromatograph coupled to atomic fluorescence detection via pyrolysis unit (HS-SPME-GC-pyro-AFS). Procedural detection limits were 31.8 ng g(-1) and 52.5 ng g(-1) for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+), respectively, for liver and 35.3 ng g(-1) and 58.1 ng g(-1) for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+), respectively, for kidney. These limits of detection are 5.5 and 6 times better than the obtained without solid phase microextraction for CH(3)Hg(+) and Hg(2+), respectively. The methodology was found linear up to 120 μg L(-1) and reproducible from one day to the following. It was validated with certified reference materials NCS ZC 71001 (beef liver) and BCR No 186 (pig kidney) for total mercury, calculated as the sum of species, and with spiked red deer liver and kidney for speciation. Finally, it was applied to the analysis of samples of red deer liver, red deer kidney and wild boar kidney coming from the Almadén's mercury mining area (Ciudad Real, Spain), the longest and largest producer of mercury in the world until its closure in 2002. PMID:22967634

  5. Speciation dynamics and biogeography of Neotropical spiral gingers (Costaceae).

    PubMed

    André, Thiago; Salzman, Shayla; Wendt, Tânia; Specht, Chelsea D

    2016-10-01

    Species can arise via the divisive effects of allopatry as well as due to ecological and/or reproductive character displacement within sympatric populations. Two separate lineages of Costaceae are native to the Neotropics; an early-diverging clade endemic to South America (consisting of ca. 16 species in the genera Monocostus, Dimerocostus and Chamaecostus); and the Neotropical Costus clade (ca. 50 species), a diverse assemblage of understory herbs comprising nearly half of total familial species richness. We use a robust dated molecular phylogeny containing most of currently known species to inform macroevolutionary reconstructions, enabling us to examine the context of speciation in Neotropical lineages. Analyses of speciation rate revealed a significant variation among clades, with a rate shift at the most recent common ancestor of the Neotropical Costus clade. There is an overall predominance of allopatric speciation in the South American clade, as most species display little range overlap. In contrast, sympatry is much higher within the Neotropical Costus clade, independent of node age. Our results show that speciation dynamics during the history of Costaceae is strongly heterogeneous, and we suggest that the Costus radiation in the Neotropics arose at varied geographic contexts. PMID:27400627

  6. Speciation dynamics and biogeography of Neotropical spiral gingers (Costaceae).

    PubMed

    André, Thiago; Salzman, Shayla; Wendt, Tânia; Specht, Chelsea D

    2016-10-01

    Species can arise via the divisive effects of allopatry as well as due to ecological and/or reproductive character displacement within sympatric populations. Two separate lineages of Costaceae are native to the Neotropics; an early-diverging clade endemic to South America (consisting of ca. 16 species in the genera Monocostus, Dimerocostus and Chamaecostus); and the Neotropical Costus clade (ca. 50 species), a diverse assemblage of understory herbs comprising nearly half of total familial species richness. We use a robust dated molecular phylogeny containing most of currently known species to inform macroevolutionary reconstructions, enabling us to examine the context of speciation in Neotropical lineages. Analyses of speciation rate revealed a significant variation among clades, with a rate shift at the most recent common ancestor of the Neotropical Costus clade. There is an overall predominance of allopatric speciation in the South American clade, as most species display little range overlap. In contrast, sympatry is much higher within the Neotropical Costus clade, independent of node age. Our results show that speciation dynamics during the history of Costaceae is strongly heterogeneous, and we suggest that the Costus radiation in the Neotropics arose at varied geographic contexts.

  7. Dynamic of lead speciation in sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Zheng, G D; Chen, T B; Gao, D; Luo, W

    2004-01-01

    A large-scale sewage sludge composting experiment was conducted to develop an understanding of changes that occur to Pb chemical speciation, distribution and bio-availability during the course of composting. The four-stage Tessier sequential extraction method was employed to investigate the dynamics of heavy metal Pb speciation (exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to Fe-Mn oxides, bound to organic matter and sulphides, residual) during the course of sewage sludge composting. The concentrations of the total Pb and the five Pb fractions concentrations were increased during the whole stage of compost. However, the percentages of Pb distribution with respect to total Pb were changed in the following manner: exchangeable, bound to Fe-Mn oxides and bound to carbonates Pb with respect to total Pb were increased, while the percentages of bound to organic matter and sulphides, and residual Pb with respect to total Pb were decreased during composting. The data showed that the quantity of Pb in the less toxic portion, such as consisting of organic matter and sulphides bound and residual Pb, was increased, and that the contamination and bio-availability of heavy metal Pb in sewage sludge was reduced during the composting process.

  8. Microwave-assisted extraction and ion chromatography dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the speciation analysis of arsenic and selenium in cereals.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Ying; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2011-01-01

    An ion chromatography dynamic reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (IC-DRC-ICP-MS) method for the speciation of arsenic and selenium compounds is described. Chromatographic separation was performed in a gradient elution mode using 0.5 mmol L(-1) ammonium citrate in 1% methanol (pH 4.5) and 15 mmol L(-1) ammonium citrate in 1% methanol (pH 8.0). The potentially interfering (38)Ar(40)Ar(+) and (40)Ar(40)Ar(+) at selenium masses of m/z 78 and 80 were reduced in intensity by approximately 3 orders of magnitude by using 1.0 mL min(-1) CH(4) as a reactive cell gas in the DRC. Arsenic was determined as the adduct ion (75)As(12)CH(2)(+) at m/z 89. The detection limits of the procedure were in the ranges of 0.006-0.009 ng As mL(-1) and 0.009-0.03 ng Se mL(-1), respectively. This method has been applied to determine various arsenic and selenium compounds in cereal samples. The accuracy of the method has been verified by comparing the sum of the concentrations of individual species obtained by the present procedure with the total concentration of elements. The arsenic and selenium compounds were quantitatively extracted with a Protease XIV and α-amylase solution in a microwave field at 70°C during a period of 30 min. The spike recoveries were in the range of 94-105% for all determinations.

  9. Elemental speciation analysis, from environmental to biochemical challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitaru, P.; Barbante, C.

    2006-12-01

    Information regarding the distribution of metallic/metalloid chemical species in biological compartments is required for understanding their biochemical impact on living organisms. To obtain such information implies the use of a dedicated measurement approach, namely speciation analysis. The current trend in (elemental) speciation analysis regards bioinorganic applications. New analytical methodologies are therefore necessary for identification, detection and characterization of metal(loids) complexed or incorporated into biomolecules. The established element-speciation approaches developed for the determination of low molecular mass metal(loid) species (e.g. organometallic compounds) in environmental, food, toxicological and health sciences are presently being adapted for the determination of high molecular mass metal-species, generally related to biological processes. This is one of the newest approaches in terms of element speciation and is called metallomics; this concept refers to the totality of metal species in a cell and covers the inorganic element content and the ensemble of its complexes with biomolecules, particularly proteins, participating in the organisms' response to beneficial or harmful conditions. Compared to conventional elemental speciation analysis, the approach applied to bioinorganic analysis is challenging, particularly given the difficulties in identification/characterization of the organic (e.g. protein) content of such species. In addition, quantification is not feasible with the conventional approaches, which led to the exploitation of the unique feature of (post-column) online isotope dilution-mass spectrometry for species quantification in metallomics.

  10. Speciation dynamics during the global radiation of extant bats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jeff J; Rabosky, Daniel L

    2015-06-01

    Species richness varies widely across extant clades, but the causes of this variation remain poorly understood. We investigate the role of diversification rate heterogeneity in shaping patterns of diversity across families of extant bats. To provide a robust framework for macroevolutionary inference, we assemble a time-calibrated, species-level phylogeny using a supermatrix of mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data. We analyze the phylogeny using a Bayesian method for modeling complex evolutionary dynamics. Surprisingly, we find that variation in family richness can largely be explained without invoking heterogeneous diversification dynamics. We document only a single well-supported shift in diversification dynamics across bats, occurring at the base of the subfamily Stenodermatinae. Bat diversity is phylogenetically imbalanced, but-contrary to previous hypotheses-this pattern is unexplained by any simple patterns of diversification rate heterogeneity. This discordance may indicate that diversification dynamics are more complex than can be captured using the statistical tools available for modeling data at this scale. We infer that bats as a whole are almost entirely united into one macroevolutionary cohort, with decelerating speciation through time. There is also a significant relationship between clade age and richness, suggesting that global bat diversity may still be expanding.

  11. Cadmium speciation and accumulation in periphyton in a small stream with dynamic concentration variations.

    PubMed

    Bradac, Philippe; Wagner, Bettina; Kistler, David; Traber, Jacqueline; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura

    2010-03-01

    Accumulation of cadmium in periphyton was investigated under field conditions while Cd concentration and speciation were dynamically varying in a small stream during rain events. Speciation in water was determined in situ by diffusion gradient in thin-films (DGT) and by modeling of complexation with fulvic acids. During the rain events, dissolved Cd concentrations increased from 0.17 nM to 0.27-0.36 nM, and 70-97% were DGT-labile. Cd content in periphyton closely followed Cd concentrations in water, despite higher concentrations of Zn and Mn, and may be controlled by either free or DGT-labile Cd concentrations. Decrease of Cd content in periphyton after the rain events was slower than the decrease of Cd concentration in water. Concentrations of Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb and Fe in periphyton also followed the dynamic variations of metal concentrations in water. Repeated exposure of periphyton to elevated dissolved Cd may lead to Cd accumulation.

  12. Dynamics of aluminum speciation in forest-well drainage waters from the Rhode River watershed, Maryland.

    PubMed

    Bi, S P; An, S Q; Yang, M; Chen, T

    2001-05-01

    This paper reports an investigation of the dynamics of aluminum (Al) speciation in the forest-well waters from study site 110 of the Rhode River watershed, a representative sub-unit of Chesapeake Bay. Seasonal changes of Al speciation are evaluated by a modified MINEQL computer model using chemical equilibrium calculation. It was found that Al-F and Al-Org complexes were the dominate forms, whereas toxic forms of Al3+ and Al-OH were not significant. This indicates that Al toxicity is not very serious in the Rhode River area due to the high concentrations of fluoride and organic materials, even though sometimes pH is very low (approximately 4). Increased H+ or some other associated factors may be responsible for the decline in fish and amphibian population on the watershed.

  13. Alteration of biological samples in speciation analysis of metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Christian; Wenda, Nadine; Richter, Andrea; Kyriakopoulos, Antonios

    2007-10-01

    For investigations of metalloproteins by speciation analysis, the integrity of the protein-metal complexes before and during separation is crucial. Knowledge about potential alterations of the samples is thus essential to avoid misinterpretations of the analytical results. Chromatographic element profiles of different cytosolic samples from animal tissues were measured repeatedly to estimate the sample stability. The dependence of the signals on the dwell time of the sample in an autosampling device at 4 degrees C for a period of 10 h was observed. Alterations in the element content of different metal-containing fractions were quantified by means of recovery values. Some metalloprotein fractions (e.g. approximately 27-kDa arsenic, approximately 27-kDa iron and different zinc fractions) were stable or only minor alterations were observed and for their investigation an autosampling device is therefore suitable. However, most of the other metalloprotein fractions, especially nickel-containing proteins, showed major alterations: these samples should therefore be analysed immediately after preparation or directly after thawing.

  14. Cadmium speciation and accumulation in periphyton in a small stream with dynamic concentration variations.

    PubMed

    Bradac, Philippe; Wagner, Bettina; Kistler, David; Traber, Jacqueline; Behra, Renata; Sigg, Laura

    2010-03-01

    Accumulation of cadmium in periphyton was investigated under field conditions while Cd concentration and speciation were dynamically varying in a small stream during rain events. Speciation in water was determined in situ by diffusion gradient in thin-films (DGT) and by modeling of complexation with fulvic acids. During the rain events, dissolved Cd concentrations increased from 0.17 nM to 0.27-0.36 nM, and 70-97% were DGT-labile. Cd content in periphyton closely followed Cd concentrations in water, despite higher concentrations of Zn and Mn, and may be controlled by either free or DGT-labile Cd concentrations. Decrease of Cd content in periphyton after the rain events was slower than the decrease of Cd concentration in water. Concentrations of Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb and Fe in periphyton also followed the dynamic variations of metal concentrations in water. Repeated exposure of periphyton to elevated dissolved Cd may lead to Cd accumulation. PMID:19913341

  15. Genetic hitchhiking and the dynamic buildup of genomic divergence during speciation with gene flow.

    PubMed

    Flaxman, Samuel M; Feder, Jeffrey L; Nosil, Patrik

    2013-09-01

    A major issue in evolutionary biology is explaining patterns of differentiation observed in population genomic data, as divergence can be due to both direct selection on a locus and genetic hitchhiking. "Divergence hitchhiking" (DH) theory postulates that divergent selection on a locus reduces gene flow at physically linked sites, facilitating the formation of localized clusters of tightly linked, diverged loci. "Genome hitchhiking" (GH) theory emphasizes genome-wide effects of divergent selection. Past theoretical investigations of DH and GH focused on static snapshots of divergence. Here, we used simulations assessing a variety of strengths of selection, migration rates, population sizes, and mutation rates to investigate the relative importance of direct selection, GH, and DH in facilitating the dynamic buildup of genomic divergence as speciation proceeds through time. When divergently selected mutations were limiting, GH promoted divergence, but DH had little measurable effect. When populations were small and divergently selected mutations were common, DH enhanced the accumulation of weakly selected mutations, but this contributed little to reproductive isolation. In general, GH promoted reproductive isolation by reducing effective migration rates below that due to direct selection alone, and was important for genome-wide "congealing" or "coupling" of differentiation (F(ST)) across loci as speciation progressed.

  16. Anthropogenic and Climate Influences on Biogeochemical Dynamics and Molecular-Level Speciation of Soil Sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, D.; Lehmann, J; Kinyangi, J; Pell, A; Theis , J; Riha , S; Ngoze, S; Amelung, W; du Preez, C; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    The soil environment is a primary component of the global biogeochemical sulfur (S) cycle, acting as a source and sink of various S species and mediating oxidation state changes. However, ecological significance of the various S forms and the impacts of human intervention and climate on the amount and structural composition of these compounds are still poorly understood. We investigated the long-term influences of anthropogenically mediated transitions from natural to managed ecosystems on molecular-level speciation, biogeochemical dynamics, and the apparent temperature sensitivity of S moieties in temperate, subtropical, and tropical environments with mean annual temperature (MAT) ranging from 5C to 21C, using elemental analysis and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. Land-use and land-cover changes led to the depletion of total soil S in all three ecoregions over a period of up to 103 years. The largest decline occurred from tropical forest agroecosystems (67% Kakamega and 76% Nandi, Kenya), compared to losses from temperate (36% at Lethbridge, Canada, and 40% at Pendleton, USA) and subtropical (48% at South Africa) grassland agroecosystems. The total S losses correlated significantly with MAT. Anthropogenic interventions profoundly altered the molecular-level composition and resulted in an apparent shift in oxidation states of organic S from native ecosystems composed primarily of S moieties in intermediate and highly reduced oxidation states toward managed agroecosystems dominated by organic S rich in strongly oxidized functionalities. The most prominent change occurred in thiols and sulfides, the proportion of which decreased by 46% (Lethbridge) and 57% (Pendleton) in temperate agroecosystems, by 46% in subtropical agroecosystems, and by 79% (Nandi) and 81% (Kakamega) in tropical agroecosystems. The proportion of organic S directly linked to O increased by 81%, 168%, 40%, 92%, and 85%, respectively. Among the various organic S

  17. Analysis and stability of mercury speciation in petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Bloom, N S

    2000-03-01

    Raw petroleum and natural gas often contain high concentrations of mercury, which can be damaging to the metal components of production facilities, as well as to the environment. Various Hg species have different properties in terms of mobility, reactivity and bioavailability. Thus, for cost-effective decisions regarding plant design, Hg extraction, and pollution control, speciation information must be available at the production facility. In this paper, a simple, wet chemical speciation method, which provides data on Hg(o), dissolved and particulate total Hg, Hg(II), and methyl Hg is presented. The method incorporates species-specific extraction and separation procedures, followed by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). For each species, detection limits of approximately 0.1 ng/g were obtained. Storage experiments in various containers showed that organo-mercury species were stable for at least 30 days in all containers except those made of polyethylene; and Hg(o) was stable in all containers except those made of stainless steel or polyethylene. Hg(II) was rapidly lost from all containers except those made of aluminum, which rapidly converted it to Hg(o), which was stable. In general, most of the total Hg in petroleum products was particulate Hg, followed by dissolved Hg(II) and Hg(o). Sub-ng/g concentrations of methyl-Hg were observed in most samples.

  18. Mercury speciation in fluorescent lamps by thermal release analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Raposo, Claudio; Windmoeller, Claudia Carvalhinho; Durao Junior, Walter Alves

    2003-07-01

    In this work, mercury speciation in phosphorus powder matrices and soda lime glass waste from new and spent fluorescent lamp wastes has been studied by thermo-desorption/atomic absorption spectrometry (TDAAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cold vapor-atomic absorption (CV-AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry/inductively coupled plasma (ICP/AES). TDAAS results show the presence of oxidized forms of mercury, i.e., Hg{sup 1+} and Hg{sup 2+}, especially in wastes with high mercury concentration. Such forms are mobile, and therefore represent a potential hazard waste material. Glass TD profiles of spent fluorescent lamps suggested the presence of mercury strongly linked to the matrix, which desorbs only at high temperatures.

  19. Mercury speciation in fluorescent lamps by thermal release analysis.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Cláudio; Windmöller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Durão, Walter Alves

    2003-01-01

    In this work, mercury speciation in phosphorus powder matrices and soda lime glass waste from new and spent fluorescent lamp wastes has been studied by thermo-desorption/atomic absorption spectrometry (TDAAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), cold vapor-atomic absorption (CV-AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry/inductively coupled plasma (ICP/AES). TDAAS results show the presence of oxidized forms of mercury, i.e., Hg(1+) and Hg(2+), especially in wastes with high mercury concentration. Such forms are mobile, and therefore represent a potential hazard waste material. Glass TD profiles of spent fluorescent lamps suggested the presence of mercury strongly linked to the matrix, which desorbs only at high temperatures.

  20. New method for speciation analysis of aluminium fluoride complexes by HPLC-FAAS hyphenated technique.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, M; Zioła-Frankowska, A; Siepak, J

    2010-03-15

    Speciation analysis of aluminium in the presented system of HPLC-FAAS hyphenated technique lasts 4min. Using the bifunctional column in model analysis and using the calculation methods for modelling using the Mineql program enabled the authors to presume that particular forms will be subjected to elution in the following order: (1) AlF(2)(+) and AlF(4)(-), (2) AlF(2+) and AlF(3)(0) and (3) Al(3+). Based on the obtained results for model solutions, the presented method enables the determination of aluminium fluoride complexes and Al(3+) speciation form. The study compares the tendency of occurrence variability of aluminium fluoride complexes and Al(3+) form, determined based on the results obtained using the HPLC-FAAS hyphenated technique with the trend defined based on the Mineql program calculation method. The method was successfully applied to soil samples. PMID:20152461

  1. [The progress in speciation analysis of trace elements by atomic spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zeng-Huan; Wang, Xu-Nuo; Ke, Chang-Liang; Lin, Qin

    2013-12-01

    The main purpose of the present work is to review the different non-chromatographic methods for the speciation analysis of trace elements in geological, environmental, biological and medical areas. In this paper, the sample processing methods in speciation analysis were summarized, and the main strategies for non-chromatographic technique were evaluated. The basic principles of the liquid extractions proposed in the published literatures recently and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed, such as conventional solvent extraction, cloud point extraction, single droplet microextraction, and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Solid phase extraction, as a non-chromatographic technique for speciation analysis, can be used in batch or in flow detection, and especially suitable for the online connection to atomic spectrometric detector. The developments and applications of sorbent materials filled in the columns of solid phase extraction were reviewed. The sorbents include chelating resins, nanometer materials, molecular and ion imprinted materials, and bio-sorbents. Other techniques, e. g. hydride generation technique and coprecipitation, were also reviewed together with their main applications. PMID:24611406

  2. [The progress in speciation analysis of trace elements by atomic spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zeng-Huan; Wang, Xu-Nuo; Ke, Chang-Liang; Lin, Qin

    2013-12-01

    The main purpose of the present work is to review the different non-chromatographic methods for the speciation analysis of trace elements in geological, environmental, biological and medical areas. In this paper, the sample processing methods in speciation analysis were summarized, and the main strategies for non-chromatographic technique were evaluated. The basic principles of the liquid extractions proposed in the published literatures recently and their advantages and disadvantages were discussed, such as conventional solvent extraction, cloud point extraction, single droplet microextraction, and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Solid phase extraction, as a non-chromatographic technique for speciation analysis, can be used in batch or in flow detection, and especially suitable for the online connection to atomic spectrometric detector. The developments and applications of sorbent materials filled in the columns of solid phase extraction were reviewed. The sorbents include chelating resins, nanometer materials, molecular and ion imprinted materials, and bio-sorbents. Other techniques, e. g. hydride generation technique and coprecipitation, were also reviewed together with their main applications.

  3. Stability of Tl(III) in the context of speciation analysis of thallium in plants.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Monika; Biaduń, Ewa; Krasnodębska-Ostręga, Beata

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents both "good" and "bad" results obtained during speciation analysis of thallium in plant tissues of a hyperaccumulator of this metal. The object was white mustard - Sinapis alba L. In this plant there were found traces of trivalent thallium. The crucial point of this study (especially in the case of so unstable thallium form as Tl(III)) was to prove that the presence of Tl(III) was not caused by the procedure of sample preparation itself, and that the whole analytical method provides reliable results. Choice of the method for conservation of the initial speciation, extraction with the highest efficiency and proving the correctness of the obtained data were the most difficult parts of the presented study. It was found that: both freezing and drying cause significant changes in the speciation of thallium; quantitative analysis could be performed only with fresh tissues of mustard plants; only short-term storage of an extract from fresh plant tissues is possible; the methodology is not the source of thallium (III); only the presence of DTPA can greatly limit the reduction of TI(III) to TI(I) (up to 1-3%); the UV irradiation results in disintegration of TI(III)DTPA in the presence of plant matrix (reduction up to 90%). PMID:26465967

  4. Application of Hyphenated Techniques in Speciation Analysis of Arsenic, Antimony, and Thallium

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Rajmund; Szopa, Sebastian; Jabłońska, Magdalena; Łyko, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Due to the fact that metals and metalloids have a strong impact on the environment, the methods of their determination and speciation have received special attention in recent years. Arsenic, antimony, and thallium are important examples of such toxic elements. Their speciation is especially important in the environmental and biomedical fields because of their toxicity, bioavailability, and reactivity. Recently, speciation analytics has been playing a unique role in the studies of biogeochemical cycles of chemical compounds, determination of toxicity and ecotoxicity of selected elements, quality control of food products, control of medicines and pharmaceutical products, technological process control, research on the impact of technological installation on the environment, examination of occupational exposure, and clinical analysis. Conventional methods are usually labor intensive, time consuming, and susceptible to interferences. The hyphenated techniques, in which separation method is coupled with multidimensional detectors, have become useful alternatives. The main advantages of those techniques consist in extremely low detection and quantification limits, insignificant interference, influence as well as high precision and repeatability of the determinations. In view of their importance, the present work overviews and discusses different hyphenated techniques used for arsenic, antimony, and thallium species analysis, in different clinical, environmental and food matrices. PMID:22654649

  5. Stability of Tl(III) in the context of speciation analysis of thallium in plants.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, Monika; Biaduń, Ewa; Krasnodębska-Ostręga, Beata

    2016-02-01

    The paper presents both "good" and "bad" results obtained during speciation analysis of thallium in plant tissues of a hyperaccumulator of this metal. The object was white mustard - Sinapis alba L. In this plant there were found traces of trivalent thallium. The crucial point of this study (especially in the case of so unstable thallium form as Tl(III)) was to prove that the presence of Tl(III) was not caused by the procedure of sample preparation itself, and that the whole analytical method provides reliable results. Choice of the method for conservation of the initial speciation, extraction with the highest efficiency and proving the correctness of the obtained data were the most difficult parts of the presented study. It was found that: both freezing and drying cause significant changes in the speciation of thallium; quantitative analysis could be performed only with fresh tissues of mustard plants; only short-term storage of an extract from fresh plant tissues is possible; the methodology is not the source of thallium (III); only the presence of DTPA can greatly limit the reduction of TI(III) to TI(I) (up to 1-3%); the UV irradiation results in disintegration of TI(III)DTPA in the presence of plant matrix (reduction up to 90%).

  6. Miniaturization in voltammetry: ultratrace element analysis and speciation with twenty-fold sample size reduction.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, D; Laglera, L M; Caprara, S

    2014-10-01

    Voltammetric techniques have emerged as powerful methods for the determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace elements without any preconcentration in several research fields. Nevertheless, large sample volumes are typically required (10 mL), which strongly limits their application and/or the precision of the results. In this work, we report a 20-fold reduction in sample size for trace and ultratrace elemental determination and speciation by conventional voltammetric instrumentation, introducing the lowest amount of sample (0.5 mL) in which ultratrace detection has been performed up to now. This goal was achieved by a careful design of a new sample holder. Reliable, validated results were obtained for the determination of trace/ultratrace elements in rainwater (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb) and seawater (Cu). Moreover, copper speciation in seawater samples was consistently determined by competitive ligand equilibration-cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-CSV). The proposed apparatus showed several advantages: (1) 20-fold reduction in sample volume (the sample size is lowered from 120 to 6 mL for the CLE-CSV procedure); (2) decrease in analysis time due to the reduction in purging time up to 2.5 fold; (3) 20-fold drop in reagent consumption. Moreover, the analytical performances were not affected: similar detection capabilities, precision and accuracy were obtained. Application to sample of limited availability (e.g. porewaters, snow, rainwater, open ocean water, biological samples) and to the description of high resolution temporal trends may be easily foreseen.

  7. Capillary microextraction (CME) and its application to trace elements analysis and their speciation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Zheng, Fei; He, Man; Zhang, Nan

    2009-09-14

    As a solvent-free miniaturized sample preparation technique, capillary microextraction (CME) has been hyphenated with different analytical instruments for trace elements analysis of environmental, biological, food and pharmaceutical samples. This review discusses the fundamentals and recent development of CME, including the theoretical basis, extraction modes (packed, open-tubular and monolithic CME) and capillary materials for CME. The emphasis is placed on the application of CME to trace/ultra-trace elements analysis and their speciation. Existing coating/monolithic materials used for CME are summarized together with a detailed overview of their preparation methods. PMID:19720168

  8. XANES Spectroscopic Analysis of Phosphorus Speciation in Alum-Amended Poultry Litter

    SciTech Connect

    Seiter,J.; Staats-Borda, K.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Sparks, D.

    2008-01-01

    Aluminum sulfate (alum; Al2(SO4)3{center_dot}14H2O) is used as a chemical treatment of poultry litter to reduce the solubility and release of phosphate, thereby minimizing the impacts on adjacent aquatic ecosystems when poultry litter is land applied as a crop fertilizer. The objective of this study was to determine, through the use of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and sequential extraction, how alum amendments alter P distribution and solid-state speciation within the poultry litter system. Our results indicate that traditional sequential fractionation procedures may not account for variability in P speciation in heterogeneous animal manures. Analysis shows that NaOH-extracted P in alum amended litters is predominantly organic ({approx}80%), whereas in the control samples, >60% of NaOH-extracted P was inorganic P. Linear least squares fitting (LLSF) analysis of spectra collected of sequentially extracted litters showed that the P is present in inorganic (P sorbed on Al oxides, calcium phosphates) and organic forms (phytic acid, polyphosphates, and monoesters) in alum- and non-alum-amended poultry litter. When determining land application rates of poultry litter, all of these compounds must be considered, especially organic P. Results of the sequential extractions in conjunction with LLSF suggest that no P species is completely removed by a single extractant. Rather, there is a continuum of removal as extractant strength increases. Overall, alum-amended litters exhibited higher proportions of Al-bound P species and phytic acid, whereas untreated samples contained Ca-P minerals and organic P compounds. This study provides in situ information about P speciation in the poultry litter solid and about P availability in alum- and non-alum-treated poultry litter that will dictate P losses to ground and surface water systems.

  9. Speciation analysis of aluminium and aluminium fluoride complexes by HPIC-UVVIS.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta

    2010-10-15

    The study presents a new analytical method for speciation analysis in fractionation of aluminium fluoride complexes and free Al(3+) in soil samples. Aluminium speciation was studied in model solutions and soil extract samples by means of high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) with UV-VIS detection using post-column reaction with tiron for the separation and detection of aluminium fluoride complex and Al(3+) forms during one analysis. The paper presents particular stages of the chromatographic process optimization involving selecting the appropriate eluent strength, type of elution or concentration and quantity of derivatization reagent. HPIC was performed on a bifunctional analytical column Dionex IonPac CS5A. The use of gradient elution and the eluents A: 1M NH(4)Cl and B: water acidified to pH of eluent phase, enabled full separation of fluoride aluminium forms as AlF(2)(+), AlF(3)(0), AlF(4)(-) (first signal), AlF(2+) (second signal) and form Al(3+) in a single analytical procedure. The proposed new method HPIC-UVVIS was applied successfully in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of soil samples.

  10. Microwave-enhanced cold vapor generation for speciation analysis of mercury by atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Long, Zhou; Liu, Liwei; Zhou, Qin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Zheng, Chengbin

    2012-05-30

    A new and simple cold vapor generation technique utilizing microwave irradiation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry is developed for the speciation analysis of mercury in biological and geological samples. In the presence of formic acid, inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) and total mercury (both Hg(2+) and methylmercury (MeHg)) can be converted to mercury cold vapor (Hg(0)) by microwave irradiation without and with H(2)O(2), respectively. The cold vapor was subsequently released from the liquid phase and rapidly transported to an atomic fluorescence spectrometer for the mercury detection. Optimum conditions for vapor generation as well as interferences from concomitant ions were carefully investigated. The conventionally required evaporation of the remnants of acid or oxidants was avoided because no significant interferences from these substances were observed, and thus analyte loss and potential contamination were minimized. A limit of detection of 0.005 ng mL(-1) for total mercury or inorganic mercury was obtained. A precision of less than 3% (RSD) at 2 μg L(-1) of mercury species was typical. The accuracy of the method was validated by determination of mercury in geological and biological certified reference materials. The speciation analysis of Hg(2+) and MeHg was achieved by controlling the conditions of microwave-enhanced cold vapor generation and validated via determination of Certified Reference Materials DORM-2, DORM-3 and a real river water sample.

  11. Speciation Dynamics of Phosphorus during (Hydro)Thermal Treatments of Sewage Sludge.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rixiang; Tang, Yuanzhi

    2015-12-15

    (Hydro)thermal treatments of sewage sludge from wastewater treatment process can significantly reduce waste volume and transform sludge into valuable products such as pyrochar and hydrochar. Given the global concern with phosphorus (P) resource depletion, P recycling/reclamation from or direct soil application of the derived chars can be potential P recycling practices. In order to evaluate P recyclability as well as the selection and optimization of treatment techniques, it is critical to understand the effects of different treatment techniques and conditions on P speciation and distribution. In the present study, we systematically characterized P speciation in chars derived from thermal (i.e., pyrolysis) and hydrothermal treatments of municipal sewage sludge using complementary chemical extraction and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy methods. P species in the raw activated sludge was dominated by orthophosphate and long-chain polyphosphates, whereas increased amounts of pyrophosphate and short-chain polyphosphates formed after pyrolysis at 250-600 °C. In contrast, hydrothermal treatments resulted in the production of only inorganic orthophosphate in the hydrochar. In addition to the change of molecular speciation, thermal treatments also altered the physical state and extractability of different P species in the pyrochars from pyrolysis, with both total P and polyphosphate being less extractable with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Results from this study suggest that P speciation and availability in sludge-derived chars are tunable by varying treatment techniques and conditions, and provide fundamental knowledge basis for the design and selection of waste management strategies for better nutrient (re)cycling and reclamation.

  12. Speciation analysis of Arsenic from Contaminated Soils and Plants from an abandoned mine in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Yoon, C.

    2008-12-01

    The analytical technique for true separation of different chemical species such as arsenic has been challenging in contaminated environmental samples because of their importance in environmental toxicity. Arsenic species can be transformed rapidly by slight changes in redox condition during experimental manipulation. It has been documented frequently by researchers including USEPA to standardize the analytical technique for arsenic from many environmental samples. The toxicity of elements depends not only on their total concentrations but also on their chemical forms. In real environment where arsenic was considered as contaminant, we often experience difficulty in measuring mobility of them from constituent soils. Compare to the previously documented techniques, measurement of total concentration, analytical techniques often called hyphenated or hybrid for analyzing different chemical species are being suggested and is regarded as essential method to resolve toxicities of different species. The reference materials with different mineral composition were selected and used. One is composed of mostly with Al-silicate minerals and another is mostly composed with calcite and ferrosilite. This study focuses on analytical method in order to set a research system for environmental assessment and restoration for general use. Various hyphenated analytical techniques for the speciation of toxic elements of interest must be preceded which is now expert in KBSI for collaborative researches. Speciation analysis results show that metals toxicity in different chemical species such as arsenic can be resolved.

  13. Speciation analysis: where is it going? An attempt at a forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welz, Bernhard

    1998-02-01

    In the foreseeable future many more laboratories will be forced by legislation and/or by economic considerations to carry out speciation analyses. In the selection of the methods of choice, parameters such as time, cost and automation will play a much more important role than they do today. Because of the numerous manual pretreatment steps involved, conventional gas chromatographic (GC) separation procedures will decrease in importance. Vapor-generation cryotrapping-GC is significantly faster and easily automated. The recently described integrated dissolution, extraction, and derivatization in a focused microwave field may, however, introduce new dimensions in sample preparation for GC coupled to atomic spectrometry. High pressure liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) will further gain in importance, particularly in research, because it is the most powerful system for speciation analysis currently available. However, there will be a revival of simple non-chromatographic procedures that are easily automated using flow injection techniques and that for many routine applications perfectly serve the purpose.

  14. Redox speciation and biogeochemical gradients: Assessing spatial niches and monitoring dynamics in natural systems with voltammetric microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druschel, G. K.; Lorenson, G. W.; Eastmann, D. A.; Macalady, J. L.

    2005-12-01

    Biogeochemical gradients may be described by the spatial distribution of redox species distributed in water, where overlap of electron donors and acceptors out of equilibrium defines available sources of potential energy and essentially determines possible microbial metabolisms. Observed changes in redox speciation along a gradient associated with microbial biofilms may additionally provide some environmental basis for assessing physiology of sampled microorganisms. Voltammetric microelectrodes have been used in a variety of environments to describe the links between ecology and geochemistry (Luther et al., 2001). Recent work in Yellowstone National Park hydrothermal waters, the Frassassi caves in central Italy (a sulfidic cave system), and Green Lake in New York (a meromictic lake) have expanded our abilities to use microelectrodes for assessing As(III) concentrations and uncovering more details of sulfur speciation in a wide range of natural waters. We are using these data to design redox-specific culture media, make inferences about microbial physiology, constrain biogeochemical gradients over very fine scales, and observe dynamics in biogeochemical systems. Describing microbial communities and the geochemical environments that surround them at appropriate scales is of importance to begin assessing the links between microbial activity and geochemical cycling. Diversity in an environment may be better assessed if we first know how many different geochemical environments there are in that environment and if the microbial ecology in those environments is essentially independent from environments neighboring it. Because microelectrodes measure multiple redox species simultaneously and do so in matter of seconds, they are also useful in monitoring the dynamics of a biogeochemical system, which will be of use in studying the response of communities to perturbation. We will present results showing the characterization of lateral and vertical gradients over different

  15. Speciation of Fe adsorbed onto and assimilated by bacteria: XAS structural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Aridane G.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Shirikova, Ludmilla S.; Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Magdalena Santana-Casiano, J.; González-Dávila, Melchor; Emnova, Ecaterina E.

    2010-05-01

    The speciation of iron has been studied in natural waters in order to elucidate the biogeochemical cycle of this element in the environment. One important aspect of Fe biogeochemistry that remains poorly investigated is the speciation of this element within the living organisms, notably bacteria. In this study, iron speciation has been measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) structural analysis in bacterial samples having surface adsorbed or intracellular incorporated Fe. Three typical and abundant cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp., Planktothrix sp. and Gloeocapsa sp.) and one soil bacteria (rhizospheric Pseudomonas aureofaciens) were used both in assimilation (from Fe3+-containing nutrient solution) and adsorption (from Fe3+ and Fe2+- containing inert electrolyte) experiments. Aquatic cyanobacteria were selected for their well-known requirement for Fe and Pseudomonas aureofaciens was used due to its capacity to produce high exopolysacharide on the cell surface under environmental stress. Results of this work demonstrated that Fe uptake during growth of EPS-producing and EPS-poor cultures produces octahedral oxygen environment of trivalent iron with no polymers of Fe-O-Fe structures even at pH 7 (P. aurefaciens) and 10.5 (cyanobacteria). Intracellular Fe storage in the form of Fe(III) phosphate is the most likely scavenging mechanism during growth at high concentration (10-100 mg/L of Fe(aq)). Fe(III)-phosphate complexes at the surface and inside the cells were detected for Synechochoccus sp., Planthotrix sp. and P. aureofaciens. In contrast, studies with Gloeocapsa sp. showed mainly Fe-Alginate structures. Fe(II) were not detected by XANES analysis, being all oxidized to Fe(III) under aerobic environmental conditions. Our results strongly suggest that, in the presence of surface organic ligands, the oxidation of divalent iron does occur but the polymerization of formed Fe(III) oxyhydroxides is completely inhibited and adsorbed iron presents in the form

  16. Contact zone dynamics during early stages of speciation in a chorus frog (Pseudacris crucifer).

    PubMed

    Stewart, K A; Austin, J D; Zamudio, K R; Lougheed, S C

    2016-02-01

    Characterizing the genetic and behavioural consequences of contact between previously geographically isolated lineages provides insights into the mechanisms underlying diversification and ultimately speciation. The spring peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) is a widespread Nearctic chorus frog with six divergent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages, many of which came into secondary contact during the Holocene. We examined genetics, morphology, advertisement calls and female preference for two lineages that began diverging in allopatry in the Pliocene and now overlap in southwestern Ontario, Canada. We found non-coincident clines in mtDNA and nuclear DNA, mirroring directionality of premating isolation barriers. We also found divergence in a range of traits between these two lineages, displacement in male call attributes and female preference for calls of their natal lineage in sympatry. Hybrids were morphologically distinct from both parental lineages, but hybrid male calls were acoustically intermediate. Female hybrids showed asymmetrical preference for Eastern male calls. These results considered together provide evidence of either unidirectional hybridization or selection against hybrids, potentially implying reproductive character displacement. Our work demonstrates the utility of integrated, multi-character approaches to understanding the processes of divergence and the nature of speciation. PMID:26626576

  17. Episodic chromosomal evolution in Planipapillus (Onychophora: Peripatopsidae): a phylogenetic approach to evolutionary dynamics and speciation.

    PubMed

    Rockman, Matthew V; Rowell, David M

    2002-01-01

    Planipapillus, a clade of onychophorans from southeastern Australia, exhibits substantial chromosomal variation. In the context of a robust phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial sequence data, we evaluate models of chromosomal evolution and speciation that differ in the roles assigned to selection, mutation, and drift. Permutation tests suggest that all chromosome rearrangements in the clade have been centric fusions and, on the basis of parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods with independent estimates of branch lengths, we conclude that at least 31 centric fusions have been fixed in Planipapillus. A likelihood-ratio test approach, which is independent of our point estimates of ancestral states, rejects an evolutionary model in which the mutation rate is constant and centric fusions are effectively neutral. In contrast to the nucleotide sequence data, which are consistent with neutrality and rate constancy, centric fusions in Planipapillus are underdominant, spontaneous fusion rates vary among lineages, or both. We predict an inverse relationship between rates of chromosomal evolution and historical population size. Chromosomal evolution may play a role in speciation in Planipapillus, both by interactions between centric fusions with monobrachial homology and by the accumulation of multiple weakly underdominant fusions.

  18. Speciational view of macroevolution: Are micro and macroevolution decoupled?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwämmle, V.; Brigatti, E.

    2006-07-01

    We introduce a simple computational model that, with microscopic dynamics driven by natural selection and mutation alone, allows the description of true speciation events. A statistical analysis of the evolutionary tree so generated captures realistic features showing power laws for frequency distributions in time and size. Finally, some possible interpretations of the absence of punctuated dynamics with mass extinctions are worked out.

  19. A comparative analysis of island floras challenges taxonomy-based biogeographical models of speciation.

    PubMed

    Igea, Javier; Bogarín, Diego; Papadopulos, Alexander S T; Savolainen, Vincent

    2015-02-01

    Speciation on islands, and particularly the divergence of species in situ, has long been debated. Here, we present one of the first, complete assessments of the geographic modes of speciation for the flora of a small oceanic island. Cocos Island (Costa Rica) is pristine; it is located 550 km off the Pacific coast of Central America. It harbors 189 native plant species, 33 of which are endemic. Using phylogenetic data from insular and mainland congeneric species, we show that all of the endemic species are derived from independent colonization events rather than in situ speciation. This is in sharp contrast to the results of a study carried out in a comparable system, Lord Howe Island (Australia), where as much as 8.2% of the plant species were the product of sympatric speciation. Differences in physiography and age between the islands may be responsible for the contrasting patterns of speciation observed. Importantly, comparing phylogenetic assessments of the modes of speciation with taxonomy-based measures shows that widely used island biogeography approaches overestimate rates of in situ speciation. PMID:25522772

  20. Molecular Dynamics Studies on the Effects of Water Speciation on Interfacial Structure and Dynamics in Silica-Filled PDMS Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R H; Maxwell, R S; Dinh, L N; Balazs, B

    2001-11-21

    Significant changes in materials properties of siloxane based polymers can be obtained by the addition of inorganic fillers. In silica-filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based composites the mechanism of this reinforcing behavior is presumably hydrogen bonding between surface hydroxyls and backbone siloxane species. We have chosen to investigate in detail the effect of chemisorbed and physisorbed water on the interfacial structure and dynamics in silica-filled PDMS based composites. Toward this end, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and experimental studies employing DMA and Nh4R analysis. Our results suggest that the polymer-silica contact distance and the mobility of interfacial polymer chains significantly decreased as the hydration level at the interface was reduced. The reduced mobility of the PDMS chains in the interfacial domain reduced the overall, bulk, motional properties of the polymer, thus causing an effective ''stiffening'' of the polymer matrix. The role of the long-ranged Coulombic interactions on the structural features and chain dynamics of the polymer were also examined. Both are found to be strongly influenced by the electrostatic interactions as identified by the bond orientation time correlation function and local density distribution functions. These results have important implications for the design of nanocomposite silica-siloxane materials.

  1. Arsenic speciation and fucoxanthin analysis from seaweed dietary supplements using LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    The study involves the analysis of total arsenic (As) in metallic form, and organic and inorganic As species from seaweeds and dietary supplements. The analysis provides data for dietary exposure estimates of inorganic species that are considered more toxic to humans than organic and total As. Total As was determined by acid digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-MS. To characterize the As species, solvent extraction with sonication and microwave extraction using various aqueous and aqueous/organic solvent mixtures were initially evaluated. The optimum As speciation method was determined to be water extraction followed by anion exchange HPLC coupled with ICP-MS. Optimization of chromatographic conditions led to baseline separation for six As species, including As acid, arsenous acid, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, arsenobetaine, and arsenocholine, in approximately 8 min using gradient elution. Detection limits for all six compounds were in the range of 10-15 ng/mL. The data presented here will be valuable for the QA of analytical method development and surveys of total As and As species in dietary supplements. The most abundant As species found were arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. The sum of inorganic As species present in the dietary supplements ranged from 1.2 to 31 μg/day. In addition, the dietary supplements purported to contain fucoxanthin, a carotenoid having pharmacological activities, were analyzed using ultra-performance LC-UV/MS.

  2. Particle beam sample introduction into glow discharge plasmas for speciation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Tim M.; Castro, Joaudimir; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    2006-02-01

    This paper reviews the use of the particle beam (PB) as a transport-type interface for the introduction of liquid samples into glow discharge (GD) plasmas. Emphasis is placed on the PB interface as a coupling for liquid chromatography (LC) with optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection methods. Advantages and disadvantages of the particle beam sample introduction for LC-MS and LC-OES as well as a comparison with other interfaces (i.e. moving belt) are covered. Fundamental aspects of the particle beam such as solvent removal and analyte delivery are highlighted. Furthermore, the development of the particle beam interface is discussed regarding its potential for providing "comprehensive speciation" analysis of solution-phase samples. Specifically, the particle beam/hollow cathode-optical emission spectroscopy (PB/HC-OES) technique provides information towards metal and non-metals determinations as well molecular species identification of organic compounds, organometallics, and small biomolecules via empirical formulae determinations. Particle beam-glow discharge mass spectrometry (PB/GDMS) also provides molecular species information through fragmentation pattern analysis of plasma-produced mass spectra that are similar in structure to electron impact (EI) sources. The evolving capabilities of the PB/GD couplings deliver analytical information that is not available from any other spectrochemical source. The technique has relevance to an incredible range of analytical applications and warrants further investigation by other researchers and instrument manufacturers.

  3. Room Temperature Cation Exchange Reaction in Nanocrystals for Ultrasensitive Speciation Analysis of Silver Ions and Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Xu, Kailai; Tang, Jie; Yang, Lu; Zhou, Jingrong; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and Ag(+) and gain deep insight into the transformation of AgNPs in the environment or organisms, ultrasensitive analytical methods are needed for their speciation analysis. About 40-fold of Cd(2+) in CdTe ionic nanocrystals can be "bombarded-and-exploded" (exchanged) in less than 1 min simply by mixing the nanocrystals with Ag(+) solution at room temperature, while this cation exchange reaction did not occur when only silver nanoparticles were present. On the basis of this striking difference, an ultrasensitive method was developed for speciation analysis of Ag(+) and AgNPs in complex matrices. The released Cd(2+) was reduced to its volatile species by sodium tetrahydroborate, which was separated and swept to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) or an atomic fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) for the indirect but ultrasensitive detection of Ag(+). Owing to the remarkable signal amplification via the cation exchange reaction and the advantages of chemical vapor generation for sampling, the limit of detection was 0.0003 μg L(-1) for Ag(+) by ICPMS, which was improved by 100-fold compared to the conventional method. Relative standard deviations are better than 2.5% at a concentration of 0.5 μg L(-1) Ag(+) or AgNPs regardless of the detector. The proposed method retains several unique advantages, including ultrahigh sensitivity, speciation analysis, simplicity and being organic reagent-free, and has been successfully utilized for speciation analysis of Ag(+) and AgNPs in environmental water samples and paramecium cells. PMID:26017198

  4. The Dynamics of Mercury Speciation and Transport at a Central California Coastal Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P. M.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Dimova, N. T.; Merckling, J.; Kehrlein, N. C.; Hohn, R. A.; Richardson, C. M.; Johnson, C. D.; Fisher, A. T.; Lamborg, C. H.; Flegal, A. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated spatial and temporal trends in total mercury and monomethylmercury (MMHg) in groundwater, lagoon water, and nearshore seawater to assess the drivers of MMHg production in a coastal lagoon system. Many West Coast streams transition from estuarine to lagoon conditions in the dry season when a sand berm develops at the stream mouth, restricting surface water exchange with the ocean. Because lagoons accumulate nutrients from their upstream watershed they are susceptible to eutrophication, which can promote the growth of anaerobic bacteria. In nearshore settings, these bacteria are primarily responsible for producing MMHg, a bioaccumulative neurotoxin. We found that MMHg concentrations in lagoon water (1 - 5 pM) were higher than in groundwater (0.2 - 1 pM) and coastal seawater (0.1 - 0.6 pM). Groundwater depth profiles combined with subsurface resistivity images suggest MMHg in lagoon water was transported through the sand berm to adjacent seawater. MMHg in seawater and groundwater followed similar trends, providing additional evidence of groundwater-surface water interaction. MMHg in groundwater directly below the lagoon was consistently higher where dissolved oxygen and NO3- decreased, implying MMHg production by anaerobic bacteria. Over a ~7-hour period we observed a 0.6 pM decrease in groundwater MMHg (1 to 0.4 pM) that coincided with a decrease in water temperature (16.5 to 13 °C). We hypothesize that microbial activity, and consequently MMHg production, were enhanced in warmer water. Because coastal lagoons support intricate food webs and serve as nurseries for a variety of organisms, processes that influence mercury speciation and transport in these ecosystems may have a disproportionate impact on nearshore mercury biogeochemical cycling.

  5. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Tom; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in fiscal year 2000. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics, spacecraft trajectory, attitude analysis, and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, government, university, and private industry.

  6. Minimal effects of latitude on present-day speciation rates in New World birds.

    PubMed

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Title, Pascal O; Huang, Huateng

    2015-06-22

    The tropics contain far greater numbers of species than temperate regions, suggesting that rates of species formation might differ systematically between tropical and non-tropical areas. We tested this hypothesis by reconstructing the history of speciation in New World (NW) land birds using BAMM, a Bayesian framework for modelling complex evolutionary dynamics on phylogenetic trees. We estimated marginal distributions of present-day speciation rates for each of 2571 species of birds. The present-day rate of speciation varies approximately 30-fold across NW birds, but there is no difference in the rate distributions for tropical and temperate taxa. Using macroevolutionary cohort analysis, we demonstrate that clades with high tropical membership do not produce species more rapidly than temperate clades. For nearly any value of present-day speciation rate, there are far more species in the tropics than the temperate zone. Any effects of latitude on speciation rate are marginal in comparison to the dramatic variation in rates among clades.

  7. Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  8. Cesium Speciation in Dust from Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge Incineration by Synchrotron Radiation Micro-X-ray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Kenji; Takaoka, Masaki; Fujimori, Takashi; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Terada, Yasuko

    2015-11-17

    The chemical behavior of Cs in waste incineration processes is important to consider when disposing of radionuclide-contaminated waste from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan. To determine the speciation of Cs, we attempted the direct speciation of trace amounts of stable Cs in the dust from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and sewage sludge incineration (SSI) by micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-XAFS) at the SPring-8 facility. The μ-XRF results revealed that locally produced Cs was present in MSWI and SSI dust within the cluster size range of 2-10 μm. The μ-XAFS analysis confirmed that the speciation of Cs in MSWI dust was similar to that of CsCl, while in SSI dusts it was similar to pollucite. The solubility of Cs was considered to be influenced by the exact Cs species present in incineration residue.

  9. Cesium Speciation in Dust from Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge Incineration by Synchrotron Radiation Micro-X-ray Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Kenji; Takaoka, Masaki; Fujimori, Takashi; Oshita, Kazuyuki; Terada, Yasuko

    2015-11-17

    The chemical behavior of Cs in waste incineration processes is important to consider when disposing of radionuclide-contaminated waste from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident in Japan. To determine the speciation of Cs, we attempted the direct speciation of trace amounts of stable Cs in the dust from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and sewage sludge incineration (SSI) by micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (μ-XAFS) at the SPring-8 facility. The μ-XRF results revealed that locally produced Cs was present in MSWI and SSI dust within the cluster size range of 2-10 μm. The μ-XAFS analysis confirmed that the speciation of Cs in MSWI dust was similar to that of CsCl, while in SSI dusts it was similar to pollucite. The solubility of Cs was considered to be influenced by the exact Cs species present in incineration residue. PMID:26477930

  10. Special Speciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Countryman, Lyn L.; Maroo, Jill D.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable anecdotal evidence indicates that some of the most difficult concepts that both high school and undergraduate elementary-education students struggle with are those surrounding evolutionary principles, especially speciation. It's no wonder that entry-level biology students are confused, when biologists have multiple definitions of…

  11. Drop Dynamics and Speciation in Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes by Reactive Scavenging

    SciTech Connect

    Arne J. Pearlstein; Alexander Scheeline

    2002-08-30

    Computational and experimental studies of the motion and dynamics of liquid drops in gas flows were conducted with relevance to reactive scavenging of metals from atomized liquid waste. Navier-Stoke's computations of deformable drops revealed a range of conditions from which prolate drops are expected, and showed how frajectiones of deformable drops undergoing deceleration can be computed. Experimental work focused on development of emission fluorescence, and scattering diagnostics. The instrument developed was used to image drop shapes, soot, and nonaxisymmetric departures from steady flow in a 22kw combustor

  12. Motorcycle dynamics by multibody dynamics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Imaizumi, Hirohide; Fujioka, Takehiko

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to construct simulation models of a motorcycle with a rider by use of multibody dynamics analysis (MDA). Three types of MDA models are developed for evaluation of the effectiveness of MDA for motorcycle dynamics. Impulse responses with parameter study and lane change maneuvers are calculated. The results of simulations agree with that of experiments well and effectiveness of MDA to the motorcycle dynamics field is shown.

  13. Evolutionary dynamics at high latitudes: speciation and extinction in polar marine faunas.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Andrew; Crame, J Alistair

    2010-11-27

    Ecologists have long been fascinated by the flora and fauna of extreme environments. Physiological studies have revealed the extent to which lifestyle is constrained by low temperature but there is as yet no consensus on why the diversity of polar assemblages is so much lower than many tropical assemblages. The evolution of marine faunas at high latitudes has been influenced strongly by oceanic cooling during the Cenozoic and the associated onset of continental glaciations. Glaciation eradicated many shallow-water habitats, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, and the cooling has led to widespread extinction in some groups. While environmental conditions at glacial maxima would have been very different from those existing today, fossil evidence indicates that some lineages extend back well into the Cenozoic. Oscillations of the ice-sheet on Milankovitch frequencies will have periodically eradicated and exposed continental shelf habitat, and a full understanding of evolutionary dynamics at high latitude requires better knowledge of the links between the faunas of the shelf, slope and deep-sea. Molecular techniques to produce phylogenies, coupled with further palaeontological work to root these phylogenies in time, will be essential to further progress.

  14. Evolutionary dynamics at high latitudes: speciation and extinction in polar marine faunas

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Andrew; Crame, J. Alistair

    2010-01-01

    Ecologists have long been fascinated by the flora and fauna of extreme environments. Physiological studies have revealed the extent to which lifestyle is constrained by low temperature but there is as yet no consensus on why the diversity of polar assemblages is so much lower than many tropical assemblages. The evolution of marine faunas at high latitudes has been influenced strongly by oceanic cooling during the Cenozoic and the associated onset of continental glaciations. Glaciation eradicated many shallow-water habitats, especially in the Southern Hemisphere, and the cooling has led to widespread extinction in some groups. While environmental conditions at glacial maxima would have been very different from those existing today, fossil evidence indicates that some lineages extend back well into the Cenozoic. Oscillations of the ice-sheet on Milankovitch frequencies will have periodically eradicated and exposed continental shelf habitat, and a full understanding of evolutionary dynamics at high latitude requires better knowledge of the links between the faunas of the shelf, slope and deep-sea. Molecular techniques to produce phylogenies, coupled with further palaeontological work to root these phylogenies in time, will be essential to further progress. PMID:20980314

  15. Speciation and dynamics of dissolved inorganic nitrogen export in the Danshui River, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-Y.; Shih, Y.-T.; Huang, J.-C.; Kao, S.-J.; Shiah, F.-K.; Liu, K.-K.

    2014-10-01

    Human-induced excess nitrogen outflowing from land through rivers to oceans has resulted in serious impacts on terrestrial and coastal ecosystems. Oceania, which occupies < 2.5% of the global land surface, delivers 12% of the freshwater and dissolved materials to the ocean on a global scale. However, there are few empirical data sets on riverine dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) fluxes in the region, and their dynamics are poorly understood. In this study, a river monitoring network covering different types of land uses and population densities was implemented to investigate the mechanism of DIN export. The results show that DIN concentration/yield varied from ∼20 μM/∼300 kg-N km-2 yr-1 to ∼378 μM/∼10 000 kg-N km-2 yr-1 from the relatively pristine headwaters to the populous estuary. Agriculture and population density control DIN export in less densely populated regions and urban areas, respectively, and runoff controls DIN at the watershed scale. Compared to documented estimates from global models, the observed DIN export from the Danshui River is 2.3 times larger, which results from the region-specific response of DIN yield to dense population and abundant runoff. The dominating DIN species change gradually from NO3- in the headwaters (∼97%) to NH4+ in the estuary (∼60%) following the urbanization gradient. The prominent existence of NH4+ is probably the result of the anaerobic water body and short residence time, unlike in large river basins. Given the analogous watershed characteristics of the Danshui River to the rivers in Oceania, our study could serve as a first example to examine riverine DIN fluxes in Oceania.

  16. Iron speciation in natural waters by sequential injection analysis with a hexadentate 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone chelator as chromogenic agent.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Joana L A; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Nunes, Ana; Rangel, Maria; Rangel, António O S S

    2016-02-01

    A sequential injection method for iron speciation in various types of natural waters was developed using a synthesised hexadentate 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone chelator (CP256). The denticity of the ligand that allow formation of the corresponding iron(III) complex in a 1:1 stoichiometry proved to be highly advantageous, in comparison with parent bidentate, hydroxy-4-piridinone chelators, with a two fold increase of reaction sensitivity and over 65% decrease of the LOD. A solid phase extraction approach was employed to attain matrix elimination, facilitating iron(III) determination and application to high salinity waters. The combination with the total iron determination obtained by the direct reaction of the ligand resulted in iron speciation. Two detection spectrophotometric cells were tested, a conventional flow cell (CFC) and a liquid waveguide capillary cell (LWCC). The dynamic concentration ranges were 0.1-2 mg/L with the CFC detection and 0.005-0.1 mg/L with the LWCC, with limit of detection of 30 µg/L and 6 µg/L, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to a variety of natural waters.

  17. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  18. Localization and speciation of arsenic in Glomus intraradices by synchrotron radiation spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Chávez, Ma del Carmen A; Miller, Bradley; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo; Scheckel, Kirk; Carrillo-González, Rogelio

    2014-01-01

    The protective mechanisms employed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to reduce the toxic effects of arsenic on host plants remain partially unknown. The goal of this research was identifying the in situ localization and speciation of arsenic (As) in the AM fungus Rhizophagus intraradices [formerly named Glomus intraradices] exposed to arsenate [As(V)]. By using a two-compartment in vitro fungal cultures of R. intraradices-transformed carrot roots, microspectroscopic X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and microspectroscopic X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES), we observed that As(V) is absorbed after 1 h in the hyphae of AMF. Three hours after exposure a decrease in the concentration of As was noticed and after 24 and 72 h no detectable As concentrations were perceived suggesting that As taken up was pumped out from the hyphae. No As was detected within the roots or hyphae in the root compartment zone three or 45 h after exposure. This suggests a dual protective mechanism to the plant by rapidly excluding As from the fungus and preventing As translocation to the plant root. μ-XANES data showed that gradual As(V) reduction occurred in the AM hyphae between 1 and 3 h after arsenic exposure and was completed after 6 h. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear combination fitting (LCF) of μ-XANES data showed that the dominant species after reduction of As(V) by R. intraradices extra-radical hyphal was As(III) complexed with a reduced iron(II) carbonate compound. The second most abundant As species present was As(V)-iron hydroxides. The remaining As(III) compounds identified by the LCF analyses suggested these molecules were made of reduced As and S. These results increase our knowledge on the mechanism of As transport in AMF and validate our hypotheses that R. intraradices directly participates in arsenic detoxification. These fungal mechanisms may help AMF colonized plants to increase their tolerance to As at contaminated sites. PMID:24863473

  19. Localization and speciation of arsenic in Glomus intraradices by synchrotron radiation spectroscopic analysis.

    PubMed

    González-Chávez, Ma del Carmen A; Miller, Bradley; Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio Eduardo; Scheckel, Kirk; Carrillo-González, Rogelio

    2014-01-01

    The protective mechanisms employed by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) to reduce the toxic effects of arsenic on host plants remain partially unknown. The goal of this research was identifying the in situ localization and speciation of arsenic (As) in the AM fungus Rhizophagus intraradices [formerly named Glomus intraradices] exposed to arsenate [As(V)]. By using a two-compartment in vitro fungal cultures of R. intraradices-transformed carrot roots, microspectroscopic X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), and microspectroscopic X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES), we observed that As(V) is absorbed after 1 h in the hyphae of AMF. Three hours after exposure a decrease in the concentration of As was noticed and after 24 and 72 h no detectable As concentrations were perceived suggesting that As taken up was pumped out from the hyphae. No As was detected within the roots or hyphae in the root compartment zone three or 45 h after exposure. This suggests a dual protective mechanism to the plant by rapidly excluding As from the fungus and preventing As translocation to the plant root. μ-XANES data showed that gradual As(V) reduction occurred in the AM hyphae between 1 and 3 h after arsenic exposure and was completed after 6 h. Principal component analysis (PCA) and linear combination fitting (LCF) of μ-XANES data showed that the dominant species after reduction of As(V) by R. intraradices extra-radical hyphal was As(III) complexed with a reduced iron(II) carbonate compound. The second most abundant As species present was As(V)-iron hydroxides. The remaining As(III) compounds identified by the LCF analyses suggested these molecules were made of reduced As and S. These results increase our knowledge on the mechanism of As transport in AMF and validate our hypotheses that R. intraradices directly participates in arsenic detoxification. These fungal mechanisms may help AMF colonized plants to increase their tolerance to As at contaminated sites.

  20. Analysis of siphon dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Dim, D.

    1986-01-01

    The analytical modeling of the dynamics of a hydraulic siphon is important in many applications, including the safety analysis of hypothetical nuclear reactor accidents. In particular, during certain postulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) events, reflux condensation on the primary side of a U-tube steam generator can represent an important mode of core cooling. Due to the relatively large amount of vapor produced in the core, a countercurrent flow limitation can be established at the inlet of the steam generator tubes. As a consequence, countercurrent liquid flow back into the core may be severely limited, and the steam that condenses in the tubes on the primary side can cause the inlet leg of the U-tubes to fill with condensate. Naturally, as long as this condensate is trapped in the steam generators, it will be unavailable for core cooling. When the condensate level reaches the top of the U-bend, spillover is initiated into the outlet bank of the U-tubes. This may cause the remaining condensate in the inlet legs to be siphoned off and delivered to the downcomer and then the core. Subsequently, the cycle may be repeated. The dynamics of the siphoning process must be accurately modeled if the delivery of coolant to the core is to be predicted. It is the purpose of this paper to present a simple closed-form analytical solution that may be useful in the analysis of a wide range of problems involving siphoning dynamics, such as may occur during a PWR SBLOCA.

  1. Atmospheric mercury speciation dynamics at the high-altitude Pic du Midi Observatory, southern France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuewu; Marusczak, Nicolas; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Sauvage, Bastien; Gheusi, François; Prestbo, Eric M.; Sonke, Jeroen E.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous measurements of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), particulate bound mercury (PBM) and gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) at the high-altitude Pic du Midi Observatory (PDM Observatory, 2877 m a.s.l.) in southern France were made from November 2011 to November 2012. The mean GEM, PBM and GOM concentrations were 1.86 ng m-3, 14 pg m-3 and 27 pg m-3, respectively and we observed 44 high PBM (peak PBM values of 33-98 pg m-3) and 61 high GOM (peak GOM values of 91-295 pg m-3) events. The high PBM events occurred mainly in cold seasons (winter and spring) whereas high GOM events were mainly observed in the warm seasons (summer and autumn). In cold seasons the maximum air mass residence times (ARTs) associated with high PBM events were observed in the upper troposphere over North America. The ratios of high PBM ARTs to total ARTs over North America, Europe, the Arctic region and Atlantic Ocean were all elevated in the cold season compared to the warm season, indicating that the middle and upper free troposphere of the Northern Hemisphere may be more enriched in PBM in cold seasons. PBM concentrations and PBM / GOM ratios during the high PBM events were significantly anti-correlated with atmospheric aerosol concentrations, air temperature and solar radiation, suggesting in situ formation of PBM in the middle and upper troposphere. We identified two distinct types of high GOM events with the GOM concentrations positively and negatively correlated with atmospheric ozone concentrations, respectively. High GOM events positively correlated with ozone were mainly related to air masses from the upper troposphere over the Arctic region and middle troposphere over the temperate North Atlantic Ocean, whereas high GOM events anti-correlated with ozone were mainly related to air masses from the lower free troposphere over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. The ARTs analysis demonstrates that the lower and middle free troposphere over the North Atlantic Ocean was

  2. Preconcentration and Speciation of Trace Elements and Trace-Element Analogues of Radionuclides by Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chatt, A.

    1999-11-14

    We have developed a number of preconcentration neutron activation analysis (PNAA) methods in our laboratory for the determination of trace elements in a variety of complex sample matrices. We developed a number of cocrystallization and coprecipitation methods for the determination of trace elements in water samples. We developed several methods for the determination of I in foods and diets. We have developed a number of PNAA methods in our laboratory We determined As and Sb in geological materials and natural waters by coprecipitation with Se and Au in silicate rocks and ores by coprecipitation with Te followed by NAA. We developed an indirect NAA method for the determination of B in leachates of borosilicate glass. We have been interested in studying the speciation of Am, Tc, and Np in simulated vitrified groundwater leachates of high-level wastes under oxid and anoxic conditions using a number of techniques. We then used PNAA methods to study speciation of trace-element analogues of radionuclides. We have been able to apply biochemical techniques and NAA for the separation, preconcentration, and characterization of metalloprotein and protein-bound trace-element species in subcellular fractions of bovine kidneys. Lately, we have concentrated our efforts to develop chemical and biochemical methods in conjunction with NAA, NMR, and MS for the separation and identification of extractable organohalogens (EOX) in tissues of beluga whales, cod, and northern pink shrimp

  3. Analysis of the Mo speciation in the JEB tailings management facility at McClean Lake, Saskatchewan.

    PubMed

    Hayes, John R; Grosvenor, Andrew P; Rowson, John; Hughes, Kebbi; Frey, Ryan A; Reid, Joel

    2014-04-15

    The JEB Tailings Management Facility (TMF) is central to reducing the environmental impact of the uranium ore processing operation located at the McClean Lake facility and operated by AREVA Resources Canada (AREVA). The geochemical controls of this facility are largely designed around the idea that elements of concern, such as Mo, will be controlled in the very long term through equilibrium with supporting minerals. However, these systems are far from equilibrium when the tailings are first placed in the TMF, and it can take years, decades, or centuries to reach equilibrium. Therefore, it is necessary to understand how these reactions evolve toward an equilibrium state to understand the very long-term behavior of the TMF and to ensure that the elements of concern will be adequately contained. To this end, the Mo speciation in a series of samples taken from the JEB TMF during the 2008 sampling campaign has been analyzed. This analysis was performed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence mapping (μ-XRF), and X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). These results show that only XANES was effective in speciating Mo in the tailings samples, because it was both element-specific and sensitive enough to detect the low concentrations of Mo present. These results show that the predominant Mo-bearing phases present in the TMF are powellite, ferrimolybdite, and molybdate adsorbed on ferrihydrite.

  4. Using FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy for phosphorus speciation analysis of biochars.

    PubMed

    Bekiaris, Georgios; Peltre, Clément; Jensen, Lars S; Bruun, Sander

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, numerous studies have evaluated the benefits of biochar for improving soil quality. The purposes of the current study were to use Fourier transform infrared-photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) to analyse P species in biochar and to determine the effect of pyrolysis temperature on P speciation. The photoacoustic detector has a range of advantages for the very dark biochar samples in comparison to more traditional reflectance or transmission FTIR detectors. The spectra turned out to be more informative in the regions with P vibrations for biochar produced at temperatures above 400°C, where most of the remaining organic compounds were aromatic and therefore not overlapping with the P vibrations. For biochars produced from the solid fraction of digestate from biogas production, an increase in the pyrolysis temperature led to the formation of a large variety of P species. Hydroxylapatite and tricalcium phosphate were the most dominant P species in the mid to high temperature range (600-900°C), while at 1050°C apatite, iron phosphates, variscite and calcium phosphates were identified. However, the changes in P speciation in biochars produced from bone meal at different temperatures were smaller than in the biochars from digestate. Hydroxylapatite and calcium phosphates were identified in biochar produced at all temperatures, while there was some indication of struvite formation.

  5. Using FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy for phosphorus speciation analysis of biochars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekiaris, Georgios; Peltre, Clément; Jensen, Lars S.; Bruun, Sander

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, numerous studies have evaluated the benefits of biochar for improving soil quality. The purposes of the current study were to use Fourier transform infrared-photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) to analyse P species in biochar and to determine the effect of pyrolysis temperature on P speciation. The photoacoustic detector has a range of advantages for the very dark biochar samples in comparison to more traditional reflectance or transmission FTIR detectors. The spectra turned out to be more informative in the regions with P vibrations for biochar produced at temperatures above 400 °C, where most of the remaining organic compounds were aromatic and therefore not overlapping with the P vibrations. For biochars produced from the solid fraction of digestate from biogas production, an increase in the pyrolysis temperature led to the formation of a large variety of P species. Hydroxylapatite and tricalcium phosphate were the most dominant P species in the mid to high temperature range (600-900 °C), while at 1050 °C apatite, iron phosphates, variscite and calcium phosphates were identified. However, the changes in P speciation in biochars produced from bone meal at different temperatures were smaller than in the biochars from digestate. Hydroxylapatite and calcium phosphates were identified in biochar produced at all temperatures, while there was some indication of struvite formation.

  6. Field and laboratory arsenic speciation methods and their application to natural-water analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bednar, A.J.; Garbarino, J.R.; Burkhardt, M.R.; Ranville, J.F.; Wildeman, T.R.

    2004-01-01

    The toxic and carcinogenic properties of inorganic and organic arsenic species make their determination in natural water vitally important. Determination of individual inorganic and organic arsenic species is critical because the toxicology, mobility, and adsorptivity vary substantially. Several methods for the speciation of arsenic in groundwater, surface-water, and acid mine drainage sample matrices using field and laboratory techniques are presented. The methods provide quantitative determination of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], monomethylarsonate (MMA), dimethylarsinate (DMA), and roxarsone in 2-8min at detection limits of less than 1??g arsenic per liter (??g AsL-1). All the methods use anion exchange chromatography to separate the arsenic species and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry as an arsenic-specific detector. Different methods were needed because some sample matrices did not have all arsenic species present or were incompatible with particular high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) mobile phases. The bias and variability of the methods were evaluated using total arsenic, As(III), As(V), DMA, and MMA results from more than 100 surface-water, groundwater, and acid mine drainage samples, and reference materials. Concentrations in test samples were as much as 13,000??g AsL-1 for As(III) and 3700??g AsL-1 for As(V). Methylated arsenic species were less than 100??g AsL-1 and were found only in certain surface-water samples, and roxarsone was not detected in any of the water samples tested. The distribution of inorganic arsenic species in the test samples ranged from 0% to 90% As(III). Laboratory-speciation method variability for As(III), As(V), MMA, and DMA in reagent water at 0.5??g AsL-1 was 8-13% (n=7). Field-speciation method variability for As(III) and As(V) at 1??g AsL-1 in reagent water was 3-4% (n=3). ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Speciation and thermodynamic properties of zinc in sulfur-rich hydrothermal fluids: Insights from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Yuan; Etschmann, Barbara; Liu, Weihua; Sherman, David M.; Testemale, Denis; Brugger, Joël

    2016-04-01

    Chlorine and sulfur are the main elements involved in the complexing of metals in ore-forming fluids. The nature and thermodynamic properties of the Zn(II)-Cl complexes have been investigated by previous experimental and theoretical studies and are now well established up to high temperatures (600 °C). In contrast, the role of bisulfide complexes for zinc speciation in sulfur-bearing fluids remains poorly known, and a better understanding of Zn(II)-HS complexation is required for modeling zinc transport in magmatic and metamorphic fluids and for optimizing the hydrometallurgical processing of sulfide ores. We have conducted ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to calculate the speciation of Zn(II)-HS complexes from ambient to hydrothermal-magmatic conditions (25-600 °C, up to 2000 bar). These theoretical calculations were complemented by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements of Zn(II) in HS--rich solutions at 200-500 °C and 600-1000 bar. The speciation and geometrical properties predicted by the ab initio MD simulations and the in situ XAS data are in excellent agreement. Upon heating from room temperature to 250 °C, Zn(II) speciation in HS--rich solutions shows a transition from the sixfold octahedral hexaaquo complex [Zn(H2O)6]2+ to fourfold tetrahedral [Zn(HS)n(H2O)4-n]2-n complexes (n = 1-4). Ab initio MD simulations also show that at temperatures > 250 °C, the threefold trigonal-planar [Zn(HS)3]- complex becomes increasingly stable, and predominates in S-rich solutions; in contrast, chloro-complexes display a tetrahedral geometry at 25-500 °C, while trigonal planar ZnCl3- predominates at temperatures > 500 °C. The stability constants of Zn(II)-HS complexes were calculated by thermodynamic integration of constrained ab initio MD simulations at 200, 350 and 600 °C. The stability constants generated from this study predict that zinc can be transported by HS- at high temperature in reduced, neutral to alkaline solutions, while Zn

  8. Dynamic recurrent neural networks: a dynamical analysis.

    PubMed

    Draye, J S; Pavisic, D A; Cheron, G A; Libert, G A

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the dynamical features of a neural network model which presents two types of adaptative parameters: the classical weights between the units and the time constants associated with each artificial neuron. The purpose of this study is to provide a strong theoretical basis for modeling and simulating dynamic recurrent neural networks. In order to achieve this, we study the effect of the statistical distribution of the weights and of the time constants on the network dynamics and we make a statistical analysis of the neural transformation. We examine the network power spectra (to draw some conclusions over the frequential behaviour of the network) and we compute the stability regions to explore the stability of the model. We show that the network is sensitive to the variations of the mean values of the weights and the time constants (because of the temporal aspects of the learned tasks). Nevertheless, our results highlight the improvements in the network dynamics due to the introduction of adaptative time constants and indicate that dynamic recurrent neural networks can bring new powerful features in the field of neural computing.

  9. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  10. Disequilibrium Experiments and Micro-XANES Analysis: Novel Tools to Unravel the Speciation of Sulfur in Silicate Melts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugo, P. J.; Wilke, M.; Susini, J.

    2007-12-01

    Sulfur is an element of interest in magmatic processes for several reasons, some of which are related to the oxidation state of S during magma generation and evolution. For example, S as sulfide (S2-) controls the behavior of chalcophile and highly siderophile elements, whereas S as sulfate (S6+) is responsible for high- S explosive volcanic eruptions, which can cause global cooling by increasing the Earth's albedo. An adequate understanding of the speciation of S in magmatic systems and the transition from S2- to S6+ is therefore needed to understand these processes. Data from natural samples is incomplete and experimental data are required to link natural data with oxygen fugacity (fO2). However, the change in speciation from sulfide to sulfate in silicate melts is difficult to simulate experimentally because: (a) common capsule materials react with S (e.g. Pt) or have low melting points (e.g. Au); (b) the change in speciation occurs over a very narrow fO2 interval (FMQ to FMQ+2) and common buffering techniques (e.g. "double capsule" technique with FMQ or NNO buffers) are not sufficient to investigate a wide-enough range in fO2; (c) sulfur solubility in silicate melts in the fO2 range of interest is too low at atmospheric pressures, limiting the use of gas-mixing furnaces to either very oxidized or very reduced conditions. We have used disequilibrium experiments in which sulfate-saturated (i.e. oxidized) basaltic and andesitic melts were reacted with graphite (a reductant) and quenched before the system reached equilibrium. Quenching of the experiments before complete re-equilibration (i.e. complete reduction by graphite) preserved reduction profiles in which sulfate-saturated glass (in the center of the capsule) coexisted with sulfide-saturated glass (at the edge of graphite capsule). We used the ID-21 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to perform micro-XANES analysis at the S K- edge to determine the speciation of sulfur along the

  11. Speciation along a depth gradient in a marine adaptive radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Travis

    2011-01-01

    Oceans are home to much of the world's biodiversity, but we know little about the processes driving speciation in marine ecosystems with few geographical barriers to gene flow. Ecological speciation resulting from divergent natural selection between ecological niches can occur in the face of gene flow. Sister species in the young and ecologically diverse rockfish genus Sebastes coexist in the northeast Pacific, implying that speciation may not require geographical isolation. Here, I use a novel phylogenetic comparative analysis to show that rockfish speciation is instead associated with divergence in habitat depth and depth-associated morphology, consistent with models of parapatric speciation. Using the same analysis, I find no support for alternative hypotheses that speciation involves divergence in diet or life history, or that speciation involves geographic isolation by latitude. These findings support the hypothesis that rockfishes undergo ecological speciation on an environmental gradient. PMID:20810434

  12. Real-time analysis of total, elemental, and total speciated mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Schlager, R.J.; Wilson, K.G.; Sappey, A.D.

    1995-11-01

    ADA Technologies, Inc., is developing a continuous emissions monitoring system that measures the concentrations of mercury in flue gas. Mercury is emitted as an air pollutant from a number of industrial processes. The largest contributors of these emissions are coal and oil combustion, municipal waste combustion, medical waste combustion, and the thermal treatment of hazardous materials. It is difficult, time consuming, and expensive to measure mercury emissions using current testing methods. Part of the difficulty lies in the fact that mercury is emitted from sources in several different forms, such as elemental mercury and mercuric chloride. The ADA analyzer measures these emissions in real time, thus providing a number of advantages over existing test methods: (1) it will provide a real-time measure of emission rates, (2) it will assure facility operators, regulators, and the public that emissions control systems are working at peak efficiency, and (3) it will provide information as to the nature of the emitted mercury (elemental mercury or speciated compounds). This update presents an overview of the CEM and describes features of key components of the monitoring system--the mercury detector, a mercury species converter, and the analyzer calibration system.

  13. [Application of bionic technology to speciation analysis and bioavailability assessment of nickel in transgenic soybean].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Hui; Li, Shun-Xing; Mou, Yang; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Li, Yan-Cai; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Na-Yan; Xie, He-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The safety of transgenic food has been paid the most attention to by the public and scientists. Trace metal bioavailability could provide information for safety assessment of transgenic food. The critical functional digestion and absorption in the gastrointestinal tract were simulated by bionic gastrointestinal digestion, metabolism of gut microbiota, and bionic biomembrane adsorption with liposome and then used for the pretreatment of transgenic and general soybeans. Ni speciation in the chyme was defined as affinity-liposome and water soluble Ni. Nickel bioavailability was assessed by the content of affinity-liposome Ni. Water soluble Ni was the main species of nickel complex in the chyme. Nickel bioavailability was 4.1% for transgenic soybean and 3.3% for general soybean, which could be enhanced by gastrointestinal digestion and metabolism of gut microbiota. After transgene, nickel bioavailability was increased 24% but the content of affinity-liposome Ni was 122.3 ng x g(-1) for transgenic soybean, just as 36% as that of general soybean.

  14. Multigene analysis suggests ecological speciation in the fungal pathogen Claviceps purpurea

    PubMed Central

    DOUHAN, G. W.; SMITH, M. E.; HUYRN, K. L.; WESTBROOK, A.; Beerli, P.; FISHER, A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Claviceps purpurea is an important pathogen of grasses and source of novel chemical compounds. Three groups within this species (G1, G2, and G3) have been recognized based on habitat association, sclerotia and conidia morphology, and alkaloid production. These groups have further been supported by RAPD and AFLP markers, suggesting this species may be more accurately described as a species complex. However, all divergent ecotypes can coexist in sympatric populations with no obvious physical barriers to prevent gene flow. In this study, we used both phylogenetic and population genetic analyses to test for speciation within C. purpurea using DNA sequences from ITS, a RAS-like locus, and a portion of beta-tubulin. The G1 types are significantly divergent from the G2/G3 types based on each of the three loci and the combined dataset, whereas the G2/G3 types are more integrated with one another. Although the G2 and G3 lineages have not diverged as much as the G1 lineage based on DNA sequence data, the use of three DNA loci does reliably separate the G2 and G3 lineages. However, the population genetic analyses strongly suggest little to no gene flow occurring between the different ecotypes and we argue that this process is driven by adaptations to ecological habitats; G1 isolates are associated with terrestrial grasses, G2 isolates are found in wet and shady environments, and G3 isolates are found in salt marsh habitats. PMID:18373531

  15. A sensitive flow-based procedure for spectrophotometric speciation analysis of inorganic bromine in waters.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Diogo L; Machado, Marcos C; Melchert, Wanessa R

    2014-11-01

    A flow-based system with solenoid micro-pumps and long path-length spectrophotometry for bromate and bromide determination in drinking water is proposed. The method is based on the formation of an unstable dye from the reaction between bromate, 2-(5-dibromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-(diethylamino)phenol (5-Br-PADAP) and thiocyanate ions. A multivariate optimization was carried out. A linear response was observed between 5.0 and 100 µg L(-1) BrO3(-) and the detection limit was estimated as 2.0 µg L(-1) (99.7% confidence level). The coefficient of variation (n=20) and sampling rate were estimated as 1.0% and 40 determinations per hour, respectively. Reagent consumption was estimated as 0.17 µg of 5-Br-PADAP and 230 μg of NaSCN per measurement, generating 6.0 mL of waste. Bromide determination was carried out after UV-assisted conversion with K2S2O8 using 300 µL of sample within the range 20-400 µg L(-1) Br(-). The generated bromate was then determined by the proposed flow system. The results for tap and commercial mineral water samples agreed with those obtained with the reference procedure at the 95% confidence level. The proposed procedure is therefore a sensitive, environmentally friendly and reliable alternative for inorganic bromine speciation.

  16. Speciation analysis of inorganic antimony in sediment samples from São Paulo Estuary, Bahia State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mario Marques; Leao, Danilo Junqueira; Moreira, Ícaro Thiago Andrade; de Oliveira, Olívia Maria Cordeiro; de Souza Queiroz, Antônio Fernando; Ferreira, Sergio Luis Costa

    2015-06-01

    This paper proposes an extraction procedure for the speciation analysis of inorganic antimony in sediment samples using slurry sampling and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimization step of extraction of the species was performed employing a full two-level factorial design (2(3)) and a Box-Behnken matrix where the studied factors in both experiments were: extraction temperature, ultrasonic radiation time, and hydrochloric acid concentration. Using the optimized conditions, antimony species can be extracted in closed system using a 6.0 M hydrochloric acid solution at temperature of 70 °C and an ultrasonic radiation time of 20 min. The determination of antimony is performed in presence of 2.0 M hydrochloric acid solution using HG AAS by external calibration technique with limits of detection and quantification of 5.6 and 19.0 ng L(-1) and a precision expressed as relative standard deviation of 5.6 % for an antimony solution with concentration of 6.0 μg L(-1). The accuracy of the method was confirmed by analysis of two certified reference materials of sediments. For a sample mass of sediment of 0.20 g, the limits of detection and quantification obtained were 0.70 and 2.34 ng g(-1), respectively. During speciation analysis, antimony(III) is determined in presence of citrate, while total antimony is quantified after reduction of antimony(V) to antimony(III) using potassium iodide and ascorbic acid. The method was applied for analysis of six sediment samples collected in São Paulo Estuary (Bahia State, Brazil). The antimony contents obtained varied from 45.3 to 89.1 ng g(-1) for total antimony and of 17.7 to 31.4 ng g(-1) for antimony(III). These values are agreeing with other data reported by the literature for this element in uncontaminated sediment samples.

  17. Dynamical pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Choe, Yoonsuck

    2008-01-01

    Background Although a great deal is known about one gene or protein and its functions under different environmental conditions, little information is available about the complex behaviour of biological networks subject to different environmental perturbations. Observing differential expressions of one or more genes between normal and abnormal cells has been a mainstream method of discovering pertinent genes in diseases and therefore valuable drug targets. However, to date, no such method exists for elucidating and quantifying the differential dynamical behaviour of genetic regulatory networks, which can have greater impact on phenotypes than individual genes. Results We propose to redress the deficiency by formulating the functional study of biological networks as a control problem of dynamical systems. We developed mathematical methods to study the stability, the controllability, and the steady-state behaviour, as well as the transient responses of biological networks under different environmental perturbations. We applied our framework to three real-world datasets: the SOS DNA repair network in E. coli under different dosages of radiation, the GSH redox cycle in mice lung exposed to either poisonous air or normal air, and the MAPK pathway in mammalian cell lines exposed to three types of HIV type I Vpr, a wild type and two mutant types; and we found that the three genetic networks exhibited fundamentally different dynamical properties in normal and abnormal cells. Conclusion Difference in stability, relative stability, degrees of controllability, and transient responses between normal and abnormal cells means considerable difference in dynamical behaviours and different functioning of cells. Therefore differential dynamical properties can be a valuable tool in biomedical research. PMID:18221557

  18. Advances in analytical methodology for bioinorganic speciation analysis: metallomics, metalloproteomics and heteroatom-tagged proteomics and metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Szpunar, Joanna

    2005-04-01

    The recent developments in analytical techniques capable of providing information on the identity and quantity of heteroatom-containing biomolecules are critically discussed. Particular attention is paid to the emerging areas of bioinorganic analysis including: (i) a comprehensive analysis of the entirety of metal and metalloid species within a cell or tissue type (metallomics), (ii) the study of the part of the metallome involving the protein ligands (metalloproteomics), and (iii) the use of a heteroelement, naturally present in a protein or introduced in a tag added by means of derivatisation, for the spotting and quantification of proteins (heteroatom-tagged proteomics). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP MS), used as detector in chromatography and electrophoresis, and supported by electrospray and MALDI MS, appears as the linchpin analytical technique for these emerging areas. This review focuses on the recent advances in ICP MS in biological speciation analysis including sensitive detection of non-metals, especially of sulfur and phosphorus, couplings to capillary and nanoflow HPLC and capillary electrophoresis, laser ablation ICP MS detection of proteins in gel electrophoresis, and isotope dilution quantification of biomolecules. The paper can be considered as a followup of a previous review by the author on a similar topic (J. Szpunar, Analyst, 2000, 125, 963).

  19. SPECIATE - EPA'S DATABASE OF SPECIATED EMISSION PROFILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) repository of total organic compound (TOC) and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles for emissions from air pollution sources. The data base has recently been updated and an associated report has recently been re...

  20. Iron Speciation in Urban Dust

    SciTech Connect

    E Elzinga; Y Gao; J Fitts; R Tappero

    2011-12-31

    An improved understanding of anthropogenic impacts on ocean fertility requires knowledge of anthropogenic dust mineralogy and associated Fe speciation as a critical step toward developing Fe solubility models constrained by mineralogical composition. This study explored the utility of micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy ({mu}-XAS) in characterizing the speciation of Fe in urban dust samples. A micro-focused beam of 10 x 7 {micro}m made possible the measurement of the Fe K edge XAS spectra of individual dust particles in the PM5.6 size fraction collected in Newark, New Jersey, USA. Spectral analysis indicated the presence of mixtures of Fe-containing minerals within individual dust particles; we observed significant magnetite content along with other Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide minerals which could not be conclusively identified. Our data indicate that detailed quantitative determination of Fe speciation requires extended energy scans to constrain the types and relative abundance of Fe species present. We observe heterogeneity in Fe speciation at the dust particle level, which underscores the importance of analyzing a statistically adequate number of particles within each dust sample. Where possible, {mu}-XAS measurements should be complemented with additional characterization techniques such as {mu}-XRD and bulk XAS to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Fe speciation in dust materials. X-ray microprobes should be used to complement bulk methods used to determine particle composition, methods that fail to record particle heterogeneity.

  1. Population Genomic Analysis Reveals a Rich Speciation and Demographic History of Orang-utans (Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Kelley, Joanna L.; Eilertson, Kirsten; Musharoff, Shaila; Degenhardt, Jeremiah D.; Martins, André L.; Vinar, Tomas; Kosiol, Carolin; Siepel, Adam; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2013-01-01

    To gain insights into evolutionary forces that have shaped the history of Bornean and Sumatran populations of orang-utans, we compare patterns of variation across more than 11 million single nucleotide polymorphisms found by previous mitochondrial and autosomal genome sequencing of 10 wild-caught orang-utans. Our analysis of the mitochondrial data yields a far more ancient split time between the two populations (∼3.4 million years ago) than estimates based on autosomal data (0.4 million years ago), suggesting a complex speciation process with moderate levels of primarily male migration. We find that the distribution of selection coefficients consistent with the observed frequency spectrum of autosomal non-synonymous polymorphisms in orang-utans is similar to the distribution in humans. Our analysis indicates that 35% of genes have evolved under detectable negative selection. Overall, our findings suggest that purifying natural selection, genetic drift, and a complex demographic history are the dominant drivers of genome evolution for the two orang-utan populations. PMID:24194868

  2. Elemental bioimaging and speciation analysis for the investigation of Wilson's disease using μXRF and XANES.

    PubMed

    Hachmöller, Oliver; Buzanich, Ana Guilherme; Aichler, Michaela; Radtke, Martin; Dietrich, Dörthe; Schwamborn, Kristina; Lutz, Lisa; Werner, Martin; Sperling, Michael; Walch, Axel; Karst, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    A liver biopsy specimen from a Wilson's disease (WD) patient was analyzed by means of micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) spectroscopy to determine the elemental distribution. First, bench-top μXRF was utilized for a coarse scan of the sample under laboratory conditions. The resulting distribution maps of copper and iron enabled the determination of a region of interest (ROI) for further analysis. In order to obtain more detailed elemental information, this ROI was analyzed by synchrotron radiation (SR)-based μXRF with a beam size of 4 μm offering a resolution at the cellular level. Distribution maps of additional elements to copper and iron like zinc and manganese were obtained due to a higher sensitivity of SR-μXRF. In addition to this, X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) was performed to identify the oxidation states of copper in WD. This speciation analysis indicated a mixture of copper(i) and copper(ii) within the WD liver tissue. PMID:26999628

  3. Elemental bioimaging and speciation analysis for the investigation of Wilson's disease using μXRF and XANES.

    PubMed

    Hachmöller, Oliver; Buzanich, Ana Guilherme; Aichler, Michaela; Radtke, Martin; Dietrich, Dörthe; Schwamborn, Kristina; Lutz, Lisa; Werner, Martin; Sperling, Michael; Walch, Axel; Karst, Uwe

    2016-07-13

    A liver biopsy specimen from a Wilson's disease (WD) patient was analyzed by means of micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) spectroscopy to determine the elemental distribution. First, bench-top μXRF was utilized for a coarse scan of the sample under laboratory conditions. The resulting distribution maps of copper and iron enabled the determination of a region of interest (ROI) for further analysis. In order to obtain more detailed elemental information, this ROI was analyzed by synchrotron radiation (SR)-based μXRF with a beam size of 4 μm offering a resolution at the cellular level. Distribution maps of additional elements to copper and iron like zinc and manganese were obtained due to a higher sensitivity of SR-μXRF. In addition to this, X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) was performed to identify the oxidation states of copper in WD. This speciation analysis indicated a mixture of copper(i) and copper(ii) within the WD liver tissue.

  4. Dynamic Analysis of Event Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuma, Nancy Brandon; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Demonstrates the value of dynamic analysis of event-history data for the sociological study of change in categorical variables. An event history records dates of events that occur for some unit of analysis (i.e., an individual's marital or employment status, or outbreaks of riots or wars). (Author/AV)

  5. Dynamic analysis of process reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shadle, L.J.; Lawson, L.O.; Noel, S.D.

    1995-06-01

    The approach and methodology of conducting a dynamic analysis is presented in this poster session in order to describe how this type of analysis can be used to evaluate the operation and control of process reactors. Dynamic analysis of the PyGas{trademark} gasification process is used to illustrate the utility of this approach. PyGas{trademark} is the gasifier being developed for the Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) by Jacobs-Siffine Engineering and Riley Stoker. In the first step of the analysis, process models are used to calculate the steady-state conditions and associated sensitivities for the process. For the PyGas{trademark} gasifier, the process models are non-linear mechanistic models of the jetting fluidized-bed pyrolyzer and the fixed-bed gasifier. These process sensitivities are key input, in the form of gain parameters or transfer functions, to the dynamic engineering models.

  6. Flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to analyze the general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of a bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. The effects of rotor material mechanical hysteresis, rotor torsion flexibility, transverse effects of rotor axial and torsional loading and the anisotropic, in-phase and out-of-phase bearing stiffness and damping force and moment coefficients were included in the program to broaden its capability. An optimum solution method was found and incorporated in the computer program. Computer simulation of experimental data was made and qualitative agreements observed. The mathematical formulations, computer program verification, test data simulation, and user instruction was presented and discussed.

  7. Ultrasensitive Speciation Analysis of Mercury in Rice by Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction Using Porous Carbons and Gas Chromatography-Dielectric Barrier Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yao; Yang, Yuan; Li, Yuxuan; Yang, Lu; Hou, Xiandeng; Feng, Xinbin; Zheng, Chengbin

    2016-03-01

    Rice consumption is a primary pathway for human methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in inland mercury mining areas of Asia. In addition, the use of iodomethane, a common fumigant that significantly accelerates the methylation of mercury in soil under sunlight, could increase the MeHg exposure from rice. Conventional hyphenated techniques used for mercury speciation analysis are usually too costly for most developing countries. Consequently, there is an increased interest in the development of sensitive and inexpensive methods for the speciation of mercury in rice. In this work, gas chromatography (GC) coupled to dielectric barrier discharge optical emission spectrometry (DBD-OES) was developed for the speciation analysis of mercury in rice. Prior to GC-DBD-OES analysis, mercury species were derivatized to their volatile species with NaBPh4 and preconcentrated by headspace solid phase microextraction using porous carbons. Limits of detection of 0.5 μg kg(-1) (0.16 ng), 0.75 μg kg(-1) (0.24 ng), and 1.0 μg kg(-1) (0.34 ng) were obtained for Hg(2+), CH3Hg(+), and CH3CH2Hg(+), respectively, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) better than 5.2% and 6.8% for one fiber or fiber-to-fiber mode, respectively. Recoveries of 90-105% were obtained for the rice samples, demonstrating the applicability of the proposed technique. Owing to the small size, low power, and low gas consumption of DBD-OES as well as efficient extraction of mercury species by porous carbons headspace solid phase micro-extraction, the proposed technique provides several advantages including compactness, cost-effectiveness, and potential to couple with miniature GC to accomplish the field speciation of mercury in rice compared to conventional hyphenated techniques.

  8. Speciation genetics: current status and evolving approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jochen B. W.; Lindell, Johan; Backström, Niclas

    2010-01-01

    The view of species as entities subjected to natural selection and amenable to change put forth by Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace laid the conceptual foundation for understanding speciation. Initially marred by a rudimental understanding of hereditary principles, evolutionists gained appreciation of the mechanistic underpinnings of speciation following the merger of Mendelian genetic principles with Darwinian evolution. Only recently have we entered an era where deciphering the molecular basis of speciation is within reach. Much focus has been devoted to the genetic basis of intrinsic postzygotic isolation in model organisms and several hybrid incompatibility genes have been successfully identified. However, concomitant with the recent technological advancements in genome analysis and a newfound interest in the role of ecology in the differentiation process, speciation genetic research is becoming increasingly open to non-model organisms. This development will expand speciation research beyond the traditional boundaries and unveil the genetic basis of speciation from manifold perspectives and at various stages of the splitting process. This review aims at providing an extensive overview of speciation genetics. Starting from key historical developments and core concepts of speciation genetics, we focus much of our attention on evolving approaches and introduce promising methodological approaches for future research venues. PMID:20439277

  9. Speciation genetics: current status and evolving approaches.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jochen B W; Lindell, Johan; Backström, Niclas

    2010-06-12

    The view of species as entities subjected to natural selection and amenable to change put forth by Charles Darwin and Alfred Wallace laid the conceptual foundation for understanding speciation. Initially marred by a rudimental understanding of hereditary principles, evolutionists gained appreciation of the mechanistic underpinnings of speciation following the merger of Mendelian genetic principles with Darwinian evolution. Only recently have we entered an era where deciphering the molecular basis of speciation is within reach. Much focus has been devoted to the genetic basis of intrinsic postzygotic isolation in model organisms and several hybrid incompatibility genes have been successfully identified. However, concomitant with the recent technological advancements in genome analysis and a newfound interest in the role of ecology in the differentiation process, speciation genetic research is becoming increasingly open to non-model organisms. This development will expand speciation research beyond the traditional boundaries and unveil the genetic basis of speciation from manifold perspectives and at various stages of the splitting process. This review aims at providing an extensive overview of speciation genetics. Starting from key historical developments and core concepts of speciation genetics, we focus much of our attention on evolving approaches and introduce promising methodological approaches for future research venues.

  10. Speciation analysis of antimony in extracts of size-classified volcanic ash by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Miravet, R; López-Sánchez, J F; Rubio, R; Smichowski, P; Polla, G

    2007-03-01

    Although there is concern about the presence of toxic elements and their species in environmental matrices, for example water, sediment, and soil, speciation analysis of volcanic ash has received little attention. Antimony, in particular, an emerging element of environmental concern, has been less studied than other potentially toxic trace elements. In this context, a study was undertaken to assess the presence of inorganic Sb species in ash emitted from the Copahue volcano (Argentina). Antimony species were extracted from size-classified volcanic ash (<36 microm, 35-45 microm, 45-150 microm, and 150-300 microm) by use of 1 mol L(-1) citrate buffer at pH 5. Antimony(III) and (V) in the extracts were separated and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography combined on-line with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Antimony species concentrations (microg g(-1)) in the four fractions varied from 0.14 to 0.67 for Sb(III) and from 0.02 to 0.03 for Sb(V). The results reveal, for the first time, the occurrence of both inorganic Sb species in the extractable portion of volcanic ash. Sb(III) was always the predominant species.

  11. Tracing gadolinium-based contrast agents from surface water to drinking water by means of speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Wehe, Christoph A; Hachmöller, Oliver; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, a significant amount of anthropogenic gadolinium has been released into the environment as a result of the broad application of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since this anthropogenic gadolinium anomaly has also been detected in drinking water, it has become necessary to investigate the possible effect of drinking water purification on these highly polar microcontaminats. Therefore, a novel highly sensitive method for speciation analysis of gadolinium is presented. For that purpose, the hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed. In order to enhance the detection power, sample introduction was carried out by ultrasonic nebulization. In combination with a novel HILIC method using a diol-based stationary phase, it was possible to achieve superior limits of detection for frequently applied gadolinium-based contrast agents below 20pmol/L. With this method, the contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A were determined in concentrations up to 159pmol/L in samples from several waterworks in a densely populated region of Germany alongside the river Ruhr as well as from a waterworks near a catchment lake. Thereby, the direct impact of anthropogenic gadolinium species being present in the surface water on the amount of anthropogenic gadolinium in drinking water was shown. There was no evidence for the degradation of contrast agents, the release of Gd(3+) or the presence of further Gd species. PMID:26931429

  12. Tracing gadolinium-based contrast agents from surface water to drinking water by means of speciation analysis.

    PubMed

    Birka, Marvin; Wehe, Christoph A; Hachmöller, Oliver; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, a significant amount of anthropogenic gadolinium has been released into the environment as a result of the broad application of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Since this anthropogenic gadolinium anomaly has also been detected in drinking water, it has become necessary to investigate the possible effect of drinking water purification on these highly polar microcontaminats. Therefore, a novel highly sensitive method for speciation analysis of gadolinium is presented. For that purpose, the hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed. In order to enhance the detection power, sample introduction was carried out by ultrasonic nebulization. In combination with a novel HILIC method using a diol-based stationary phase, it was possible to achieve superior limits of detection for frequently applied gadolinium-based contrast agents below 20pmol/L. With this method, the contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A were determined in concentrations up to 159pmol/L in samples from several waterworks in a densely populated region of Germany alongside the river Ruhr as well as from a waterworks near a catchment lake. Thereby, the direct impact of anthropogenic gadolinium species being present in the surface water on the amount of anthropogenic gadolinium in drinking water was shown. There was no evidence for the degradation of contrast agents, the release of Gd(3+) or the presence of further Gd species.

  13. Measurement, time series analysis and source apportionment of inorganic and organic speciated PM(2.5) air pollution in Denver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, Steven James

    Particulate air pollution has demonstrated significant health effects ranging from worsening of asthma to increased rates of respiratory and cardiopulmonary mortality. These results have prompted the US-EPA to include particulate matter (PM) as one of the six criteria air pollutants regulated under the Clean Air Act. The diverse chemical make-up and physical characteristics of PM make it a challenging pollutant to characterize and regulate. Particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5) has the ability to travel deep into the lungs and therefore has been linked with some of the more significant health effects. The toxicity of any given particle is likely dependent on its chemical composition. The goal of this project has been to chemically characterize a long time series of PM 2.5 measurements collected at a receptor site in Denver to a level of detail that has not been done before on this size data set. This has involved characterization of inorganic ions using ion chromatography, total elemental and organic carbon using thermal optical transmission, and organic molecular marker species using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Methods have been developed to allow for daily measurement and speciation for these compounds over a six year period. Measurement methods, novel approaches to uncertainty estimation, time series analysis, spectral and pattern analyses and source apportionment using two multivariate factor analysis models are presented. Analysis results reveal several natural and anthropogenic sources contributing to PM2.5 in Denver. The most distinguishable sources are motor vehicles and biomass combustion. This information will be used in a health effect analysis as part of a larger study called the Denver Aerosol Sources and Health (DASH) study. Such results will inform regulatory decisions and may help create a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms for the observed adverse health effects associated with PM2.5.

  14. Analysis for dynamic metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dienstfrey, Andrew; Hale, Paul D.

    2014-03-01

    Diverse measurement contexts require estimates of time-varying quantities. Ideally the measurement device responds to signal variations more rapidly than the modulation of the signal itself. If so, then well-developed techniques may be used for the calibration and analysis of the measurement system. By contrast, as the characteristic timescales for signal modulation and measurement response become commensurate, the situation becomes more complicated; directly measured quantities may require correction for the finite bandwidth of the measurement system response. Toward this goal heuristic estimation rules have evolved over time and are now widely used. We rederive these common rules of thumb, and present sufficient conditions for their validity. Furthermore, we investigate their quantitative performance in cases for which these conditions are violated and encounter surprisingly poor results. As an alternative, we demonstrate that regularized deconvolution analysis exhibits more general quantitative utility at the expense of increased measurement burden and analytical complexity.

  15. Simultaneous speciation of arsenic, selenium, and chromium: species, stability, sample preservation, and analysis of ash and soil leachates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Morman, Suzette A.; Hageman, Philip L.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography separation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection previously developed for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been adapted to allow the determination of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) under the same chromatographic conditions. Using this method, all six inorganic species can be determined in less than 3 min. A dynamic reaction cell (DRC)-ICP-MS system was used to detect the species eluted from the chromatographic column in order to reduce interferences. A variety of reaction cell gases and conditions may be utilized with the DRC-ICP-MS, and final selection of conditions is determined by data quality objectives. Results indicated all starting standards, reagents, and sample vials should be thoroughly tested for contamination. Tests on species stability indicated that refrigeration at 10° C was preferential to freezing for most species, particularly when all species were present, and that sample solutions and extracts should be analyzed as soon as possible to eliminate species instability and interconversion effects. A variety of environmental and geological samples, including waters and deionized water [leachates] and simulated biological leachates from soils and wildfire ashes have been analyzed using this method. Analytical spikes performed on each sample were used to evaluate data quality. Speciation analyses were conducted on deionized water leachates and simulated lung fluid leachates of ash and soils impacted by wildfires. These results show that, for leachates containing high levels of total Cr, the majority of the chromium was present in the hexavalent Cr(VI) form. In general, total and hexavalent chromium levels for samples taken from burned residential areas were higher than those obtained from non-residential forested areas. Arsenic, when found, was generally in the more oxidized As(V) form. Selenium (IV) and (VI) were present

  16. Simultaneous speciation of arsenic, selenium, and chromium: Species stability, sample preservation, and analysis of ash and soil leachates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, R.E.; Morman, S.A.; Hageman, P.L.; Hoefen, T.M.; Plumlee, G.S.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical method using high-performance liquid chromatography separation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection previously developed for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) has been adapted to allow the determination of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) under the same chromatographic conditions. Using this method, all six inorganic species can be determined in less than 3 min. A dynamic reaction cell (DRC)-ICP-MS system was used to detect the species eluted from the chromatographic column in order to reduce interferences. A variety of reaction cell gases and conditions may be utilized with the DRC-ICP-MS, and final selection of conditions is determined by data quality objectives. Results indicated all starting standards, reagents, and sample vials should be thoroughly tested for contamination. Tests on species stability indicated that refrigeration at 10 ??C was preferential to freezing for most species, particularly when all species were present, and that sample solutions and extracts should be analyzed as soon as possible to eliminate species instability and interconversion effects. A variety of environmental and geological samples, including waters and deionized water [leachates] and simulated biological leachates from soils and wildfire ashes have been analyzed using this method. Analytical spikes performed on each sample were used to evaluate data quality. Speciation analyses were conducted on deionized water leachates and simulated lung fluid leachates of ash and soils impacted by wildfires. These results show that, for leachates containing high levels of total Cr, the majority of the chromium was present in the hexavalent Cr(VI) form. In general, total and hexavalent chromium levels for samples taken from burned residential areas were higher than those obtained from non-residential forested areas. Arsenic, when found, was generally in the more oxidized As(V) form. Selenium (IV) and (VI) were present

  17. Iron speciation in urban dust

    SciTech Connect

    Elzinga, E.J.; Fitts, J.; Gao, Y.; Tappero, R.

    2011-08-01

    An improved understanding of anthropogenic impacts on ocean fertility requires knowledge of anthropogenic dust mineralogy and associated Fe speciation as a critical step toward developing Fe solubility models constrained by mineralogical composition. This study explored the utility of micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy ({mu}-XAS) in characterizing the speciation of Fe in urban dust samples. A micro-focused beam of 10 x 7 {mu}m made possible the measurement of the Fe K edge XAS spectra of individual dust particles in the PM5.6 size fraction collected in Newark, New Jersey, USA. Spectral analysis indicated the presence of mixtures of Fe-containing minerals within individual dust particles; we observed significant magnetite content along with other Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide minerals which could not be conclusively identified. Our data indicate that detailed quantitative determination of Fe speciation requires extended energy scans to constrain the types and relative abundance of Fe species present. We observe heterogeneity in Fe speciation at the dust particle level, which underscores the importance of analyzing a statistically adequate number of particles within each dust sample. Where possible, {mu}-XAS measurements should be complemented with additional characterization techniques such as {mu}-XRD and bulk XAS to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Fe speciation in dust materials. X-ray microprobes should be used to complement bulk methods used to determine particle composition, methods that fail to record particle heterogeneity. Keywords - Urban dust; Iron; Speciation; Micro-focused X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  18. Method optimization and quality assurance in speciation analysis using high performance liquid chromatography with detection by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Erik H.

    1998-02-01

    Achievement of optimum selectivity, sensitivity and robustness in speciation analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection requires that each instrumental component is selected and optimized with a view to the ideal operating characteristics of the entire hyphenated system. An isocratic HPLC system, which employs an aqueous mobile phase with organic buffer constituents, is well suited for introduction into the ICP-MS because of the stability of the detector response and high degree of analyte sensitivity attained. Anion and cation exchange HPLC systems, which meet these requirements, were used for the seperation of selenium and arsenic species in crude extracts of biological samples. Furthermore, the signal-to-noise ratios obtained for these incompletely ionized elements in the argon ICP were further enhanced by a factor of four by continously introducing carbon as methanol via the mobile phase into the ICP. Sources of error in the HPLC system (column overload), in the sample introduction system (memory by organic solvents) and in the ICP-MS (spectroscopic interferences) and their prevention are also discussed. The optimized anion and cation exchange HPLC-ICP-MS systems were used for arsenic speciation in contaminated ground water and in an in-house shrimp reference sample. For the purpose of verification, HPLC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization was additionally used for arsenic speciation in the shrimp sample. With this analytical technique the HPLC retention time in combination with mass analysis of the molecular ions and their collision-induced fragments provide almost conclusive evidence of the identity of the analyte species. The speciation methods are validated by establishing a mass balance of the analytes in each fraction of the extraction procedure, by recovery of spikes and by employing and comparing independent techniques. The urgent need for

  19. Catalysis in a Cage: Condition-Dependent Speciation and Dynamics of Exchanged Cu Cations in SSZ-13 Zeolites.

    PubMed

    Paolucci, Christopher; Parekh, Atish A; Khurana, Ishant; Di Iorio, John R; Li, Hui; Albarracin Caballero, Jonatan D; Shih, Arthur J; Anggara, Trunojoyo; Delgass, W Nicholas; Miller, Jeffrey T; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Gounder, Rajamani; Schneider, William F

    2016-05-11

    The relationships among the macroscopic compositional parameters of a Cu-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolite catalyst, the types and numbers of Cu active sites, and activity for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with NH3 are established through experimental interrogation and computational analysis of materials across the catalyst composition space. Density functional theory, stochastic models, and experimental characterizations demonstrate that within the synthesis protocols applied here and across Si:Al ratios, the volumetric density of six-membered-rings (6MR) containing two Al (2Al sites) is consistent with a random Al siting in the SSZ-13 lattice subject to Löwenstein's rule. Further, exchanged Cu(II) ions first populate these 2Al sites before populating remaining unpaired, or 1Al, sites as Cu(II)OH. These sites are distinguished and enumerated ex situ through vibrational and X-ray absorption spectroscopies (XAS) and chemical titrations. In situ and operando XAS follow Cu oxidation state and coordination environment as a function of environmental conditions including low-temperature (473 K) SCR catalysis and are rationalized through first-principles thermodynamics and ab initio molecular dynamics. Experiment and theory together reveal that the Cu sites respond sensitively to exposure conditions, and in particular that Cu species are solvated and mobilized by NH3 under SCR conditions. While Cu sites are spectroscopically and chemically distinct away from these conditions, they exhibit similar turnover rates, apparent activation energies and apparent reaction orders at the SCR conditions, even on zeolite frameworks other than SSZ13. PMID:27070199

  20. Selective hydride generation- cryotrapping- ICP-MS for arsenic speciation analysis at picogram levels: analysis of river and sea water reference materials and human bladder epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, Jenna M.; Trojánková, Nikola; Saunders, R. Jesse; Ishida, María C.; González-Horta, Carmen; Musil, Stanislav; Mester, Zoltán; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    An ultra sensitive method for arsenic (As) speciation analysis based on selective hydride generation (HG) with preconcentration by cryotrapping (CT) and inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection is presented. Determination of valence of the As species is performed by selective HG without prereduction (trivalent species only) or with L-cysteine prereduction (sum of tri- and pentavalent species). Methylated species are resolved on the basis of thermal desorption of formed methyl substituted arsines after collection at −196°C. Limits of detection of 3.4, 0.04, 0.14 and 0.10 pg mL−1 (ppt) were achieved for inorganic As, mono-, di- and trimethylated species, respectively, from a 500 μL sample. Speciation analysis of river water (NRC SLRS-4 and SLRS-5) and sea water (NRC CASS-4, CASS-5 and NASS-5) reference materials certified to contain 0.4 to 1.3 ng mL−1 total As was performed. The concentrations of methylated As species in tens of pg mL−1 range obtained by HG-CT-ICP-MS systems in three laboratories were in excellent agreement and compared well with results of HG-CT-atomic absorption spectrometry and anion exchange liquid chromatography- ICP-MS; sums of detected species agreed well with the certified total As content. HG-CT-ICP-MS method was successfully used for analysis of microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. Here, samples of lysates of 25 to 550 thousand cells contained typically tens pg up to ng of iAs species and from single to hundreds pg of methylated species, well within detection power of the presented method. A significant portion of As in the cells was found in the form of the highly toxic trivalent species. PMID:24014931

  1. Cytogenetic and symbiont analysis of five members of the B. dorsalis complex (Diptera, Tephritidae): no evidence of chromosomal or symbiont-based speciation events.

    PubMed

    Augustinos, Antonios A; Drosopoulou, Elena; Gariou-Papalexiou, Aggeliki; Asimakis, Elias D; Cáceres, Carlos; Tsiamis, George; Bourtzis, Kostas; Penelope Mavragani-Tsipidou; Zacharopoulou, Antigone

    2015-01-01

    The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, currently comprising about 90 entities has received much attention. During the last decades, considerable effort has been devoted to delimiting the species of the complex. This information is of great importance for agriculture and world trade, since the complex harbours several pest species of major economic importance and other species that could evolve into global threats. Speciation in Diptera is usually accompanied by chromosomal rearrangements, particularly inversions that are assumed to reduce/eliminate gene flow. Other candidates currently receiving much attention regarding their possible involvement in speciation are reproductive symbionts, such as Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, Arsenophonus, Rickettsia and Cardinium. Such symbionts tend to spread quickly through natural populations and can cause a variety of phenotypes that promote pre-mating and/or post-mating isolation and, in addition, can affect the biology, physiology, ecology and evolution of their insect hosts in various ways. Considering all these aspects, we present: (a) a summary of the recently gained knowledge on the cytogenetics of five members of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex, namely Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera philippinensis, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera carambolae, supplemented by additional data from a Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. colony from China, as well as by a cytogenetic comparison between the dorsalis complex and the genetically close species, Bactrocera tryoni, and, (b) a reproductive symbiont screening of 18 different colonized populations of these five taxa. Our analysis did not reveal any chromosomal rearrangements that could differentiate among them. Moreover, screening for reproductive symbionts was negative for all colonies derived from different geographic origins and/or hosts. There are many different factors that can lead to speciation, and our data do not support chromosomal and/or symbiotic

  2. Cytogenetic and symbiont analysis of five members of the B. dorsalis complex (Diptera, Tephritidae): no evidence of chromosomal or symbiont-based speciation events

    PubMed Central

    Augustinos, Antonios A.; Drosopoulou, Elena; Gariou-Papalexiou, Aggeliki; Asimakis, Elias D.; Cáceres, Carlos; Tsiamis, George; Bourtzis, Kostas; Penelope Mavragani-Tsipidou; Zacharopoulou, Antigone

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The Bactrocera dorsalis species complex, currently comprising about 90 entities has received much attention. During the last decades, considerable effort has been devoted to delimiting the species of the complex. This information is of great importance for agriculture and world trade, since the complex harbours several pest species of major economic importance and other species that could evolve into global threats. Speciation in Diptera is usually accompanied by chromosomal rearrangements, particularly inversions that are assumed to reduce/eliminate gene flow. Other candidates currently receiving much attention regarding their possible involvement in speciation are reproductive symbionts, such as Wolbachia, Spiroplasma, Arsenophonus, Rickettsia and Cardinium. Such symbionts tend to spread quickly through natural populations and can cause a variety of phenotypes that promote pre-mating and/or post-mating isolation and, in addition, can affect the biology, physiology, ecology and evolution of their insect hosts in various ways. Considering all these aspects, we present: (a) a summary of the recently gained knowledge on the cytogenetics of five members of the Bactrocera dorsalis complex, namely Bactrocera dorsalis s.s., Bactrocera invadens, Bactrocera philippinensis, Bactrocera papayae and Bactrocera carambolae, supplemented by additional data from a Bactrocera dorsalis s.s. colony from China, as well as by a cytogenetic comparison between the dorsalis complex and the genetically close species, Bactrocera tryoni, and, (b) a reproductive symbiont screening of 18 different colonized populations of these five taxa. Our analysis did not reveal any chromosomal rearrangements that could differentiate among them. Moreover, screening for reproductive symbionts was negative for all colonies derived from different geographic origins and/or hosts. There are many different factors that can lead to speciation, and our data do not support chromosomal and/or symbiotic

  3. Speciation analysis of mercury in water samples using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhongben; Ma, Xiaoguo

    2011-09-19

    A novel approach for preconcentration and speciation analysis of trace amount of mercury from water samples was proposed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Mercury species (Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg(+)) and phenylmercury (PhHg(+))) were complexed with dithizone (DZ) to form hydrophobic chelates and then extracted into the fine drops of extraction solvent dispersed in the aqueous sample by dispersive solvent. After extraction, the sedimented phase was analyzed by HPLC-DAD. Some important parameters affecting the DLLME such as extraction solvent and dispersive solvent type and volume, concentration of dithizone solution, sample pH, extraction time and salt effect were investigated. Ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM][PF(6)]) was found to be a suitable extractant for the chelates. Under the optimized conditions (extraction solvent: 70 μL of ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([HMIM][PF(6)]); dispersive solvent: 0.75 mL of methanol containing dithizone (0.02%, m/v); pH: 4; extraction time: 5 min; and without salt addition), the limits of detection for Hg(2+), MeHg(+) and PhHg(+) were 0.32, 0.96 and 1.91 μg L(-1) (SN(-1)=3) respectively, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was between 4.1 and 7.3% (n=5). Three real water samples (tap water, river water and lake water) spiked with mercury species were detected by the developed method, and the relative recoveries obtained for Hg(2+), MeHg(+) and PhHg(+) were 89.6-101.3%, 85.6-102.0% and 81.3-97.6%, respectively. PMID:21819859

  4. Analysis of animal and plant selenometabolites in roots of a selenium accumulator, Brassica rapa var. peruviridis, by speciation.

    PubMed

    Ogra, Yasumitsu; Katayama, Ayane; Ogihara, Yurie; Yawata, Ayako; Anan, Yasumi

    2013-05-01

    Many studies have examined the metabolic pathway of selenium (Se) compounds in Se-accumulating plants (hereafter "Se accumulators") when the plants are exposed to inorganic Se, such as selenite and selenate. However, if we were to consider Se circulation in the biosphere, the metabolism of organic Se, in particular, selenometabolites of animals and plants, in plants should be elucidated. In this study, Brassica rapa var. peruviridis, a known Se accumulator, was hydroponically cultivated and then exposed to selenometabolites of animals and plants, such as methyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-1-seleno-β-d-galactopyranoside (selenosugar, SeSug), trimethylselenonium (TMSe), selenomethionine (SeMet), and Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys). Then, the metabolic pathway of the organic Se compounds/selenometabolites in B. rapa var. peruviridis was investigated by speciation analysis. Two selenometabolites were detected in the roots when the plant was exposed to SeMet, MeSeCys, and SeSug. They were assigned to S-(methylseleno)-glutathione and MeSeCys using electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS-MS) and HPLC-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Contrary to SeMet, MeSeCys, and SeSug, TMSe was not metabolized even if it was more efficiently incorporated into the roots than the other Se compounds. The identified metabolites enabled us to propose a metabolic pathway for the organic Se metabolites except TMSe in the plant roots: a monomethylseleno moiety (CH3Se-) commonly existing in SeMet, MeSeCys, and SeSug was cleaved off and conjugated with GSH, and then the CH3Se group was transferred to O-acetylserine to form MeSeCys.

  5. Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: 1. Analysis of Individual Particles Using Complementary Microprobe Methods.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desyaterik, Y.; Hopkins, R. J.; Tivanski, A. V.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Gilles, M. K.; Laskin, A.

    2006-12-01

    Chemical speciation of dry residues of individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected from sea-fog during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) in July 2005 was facilitated using a complementary combination of computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of x-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission x-ray microscopy with near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Particle samples were collected at the ground site located in Pt. Reyes National Seashore, about 0.5 miles from the ocean coast over the period of time when the air plume, that originated over the open ocean, passed the area of the cold stream along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and microstructure, two externally mixed, distinct types of sea-fog particles were identified in the samples: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate excessive formation of methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) rather then non-sea-salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in the sea salt particles. This observation is consistent with the recent modeling studies of dimethylsulfide (DMS) oxidation chemistry in the marine boundary layer (MDL). Modeling studies predict enhanced formation of CH3SO3- in activated sea salt particles under cloudy MBL conditions over the areas with low ocean surface temperatures. We discuss the climate related effects of this chemistry which likely results in: a) increasing size and hygroscopicity of the pre-existing CCN (sea salt particles), and b) reducing the production of gaseous H2SO4 and subsequent new sulfate particle formation.

  6. Selenium speciation analysis of Misgurnus anguillicaudatus selenoprotein by HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analytical methods for selenium (Se) speciation were developed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to either inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) or electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Separations of selenomethionine (Se-Met) and sel...

  7. Arsenic speciation and fucoxanthin analysis from seaweed dietary supplements using LC-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inorganic species are considered more toxic to humans than organic arsenic and total arsenic. Analysis of total arsenic in metallic form, organic and inorganic arsenic species from seaweeds and dietary supplements using LC-ICP-MS was developed. Solvent extraction with sonication and microwave extr...

  8. Dynamic analysis of process reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shadle, L.J.; Lawson, L.O.; Noel, S.D.

    1996-12-31

    The process design for integration of advanced gasifiers for combined-cycle facilities requires a dynamic analysis tool for predicting the gasifier performance and stability. Such a tool provides an understanding of both process reactions and the interaction of process components. To illustrate the utility of the process dynamic tool, a Gasifier Dynamic Model (GDM) was developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to investigate alternative designs and operational scenarios during process design development. Empirical data and first principles were combined into steady-state process models to develop sensitivity parameters around a nominal process design condition. These gain factors were then coupled with time-dependent functions for process mass and energy inventories to develop the dynamic model (GDM). Engineering calculations performed in the GDM were used to predict process responses such as gas make, flow, pressure, and temperature. Small research facilities were constructed and operated to validate both the steady-state process and dynamic models. GDM predictions provided engineers insights into the design integrity and operational safety of the reactions, components, and control elements.

  9. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  10. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    A novel analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Linear gradient elution from 100% water to 100% 0.7 M NaCl was applied for chromatographic separation of metal species. In standard aqueous solution at neutral pH molybdate, tungstate and vanadate exist in several aqueous species, while chromate is present as a single CrO4(2-) species. Consequently, only chromate can be separated from this solution in a sharp chromatographic peak. For obtaining sharp chromatographic peaks for molybdate, tungstate and vanadate, the pH of aqueous standard solutions was raised to 12. At highly alkaline conditions single CrO4(2-), MoO4(2-) and WO4(2-) are present and were eluted in sharp chromatographic peaks, while VO4(3-) species, which predominates at pH 12 was eluted in slightly broaden peak. In a mixture of aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate were eluted at retention times from 380 to 420 s, 320 to 370 s, 300 to 350 s and 240 to 360 s, respectively. Eluted species were simultaneously detected on-line by ICP-MS recording m/z 52, 95, 182 and 51. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of leachable concentrations of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in alkaline extracts (2% NaOH+3% Na2CO3) of manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes loaded on filters. Good repeatability and reproducibility of measurement (RSD±3.0%) for the investigated species were obtained in both aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) and in alkaline extracts of welding fumes. Low limits of detection (LODs) were found for chromate (0.02 ng Cr mL(-1)), molybdate (0.1 ng Mo mL(-1)), tungstate (0.1 ng W mL(-1)) and vanadate (0.2 ng V mL(-1)). The accuracy of analytical procedure for the determination of chromate was checked by analysis of

  11. Simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in welding fume alkaline extracts by HPLC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Ščančar, Janez; Berlinger, Balázs; Thomassen, Yngvar; Milačič, Radmila

    2015-09-01

    A novel analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous speciation analysis of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate by anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). Linear gradient elution from 100% water to 100% 0.7 M NaCl was applied for chromatographic separation of metal species. In standard aqueous solution at neutral pH molybdate, tungstate and vanadate exist in several aqueous species, while chromate is present as a single CrO4(2-) species. Consequently, only chromate can be separated from this solution in a sharp chromatographic peak. For obtaining sharp chromatographic peaks for molybdate, tungstate and vanadate, the pH of aqueous standard solutions was raised to 12. At highly alkaline conditions single CrO4(2-), MoO4(2-) and WO4(2-) are present and were eluted in sharp chromatographic peaks, while VO4(3-) species, which predominates at pH 12 was eluted in slightly broaden peak. In a mixture of aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate were eluted at retention times from 380 to 420 s, 320 to 370 s, 300 to 350 s and 240 to 360 s, respectively. Eluted species were simultaneously detected on-line by ICP-MS recording m/z 52, 95, 182 and 51. The developed procedure was successfully applied to the analysis of leachable concentrations of chromate, molybdate, tungstate and vanadate in alkaline extracts (2% NaOH+3% Na2CO3) of manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes loaded on filters. Good repeatability and reproducibility of measurement (RSD±3.0%) for the investigated species were obtained in both aqueous standard solutions (pH 12) and in alkaline extracts of welding fumes. Low limits of detection (LODs) were found for chromate (0.02 ng Cr mL(-1)), molybdate (0.1 ng Mo mL(-1)), tungstate (0.1 ng W mL(-1)) and vanadate (0.2 ng V mL(-1)). The accuracy of analytical procedure for the determination of chromate was checked by analysis of

  12. Complex dynamics of text analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yongqiang; Ma, Qinghua; Zhu, Lin

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the analysis of nonlinear text quality in Chinese language. Texts produced by university students in China were represented as scale-free networks (word adjacency model), from which typical network features such as the in/outdegree, clustering coefficient and network dynamics were obtained. The method integrates the classical concepts of network feature representation and text quality series variation. The analytical and numerical scheme leads to a parameter space representation that constitutes a valid alternative to represent the network features. The results reveal that complex network features of different text qualities can be clearly revealed and applied to potential applications in other instances of text analysis.

  13. Heavy metal speciation in various grain sizes of industrially contaminated street dust using multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Gülşen; Tokalıoğlu, Şerife

    2016-02-01

    A total of 36 street dust samples were collected from the streets of the Organised Industrial District in Kayseri, Turkey. This region includes a total of 818 work places in various industrial areas. The modified BCR (the European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure was applied to evaluate the mobility and bioavailability of trace elements (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in street dusts of the study area. The BCR was classified into three steps: water/acid soluble fraction, reducible and oxidisable fraction. The remaining residue was dissolved by using aqua regia. The concentrations of the metals in street dust samples were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Also the effect of the different grain sizes (<38µm, 38-53µm and 53-74µm) of the 36 street dust samples on the mobility of the metals was investigated using the modified BCR procedure. The mobility sequence based on the sum of the first three phases (for <74µm grain size) was: Cd (71.3)>Cu (48.9)>Pb (42.8)=Cr (42.1)>Ni (41.4)>Zn (40.9)>Co (36.6)=Mn (36.3)>Fe (3.1). No significant difference was observed among metal partitioning for the three particle sizes. Correlation, principal component and cluster analysis were applied to identify probable natural and anthropogenic sources in the region. The principal component analysis results showed that this industrial district was influenced by traffic, industrial activities, air-borne emissions and natural sources. The accuracy of the results was checked by analysis of both the BCR-701 certified reference material and by recovery studies in street dust samples. PMID:26595510

  14. Heavy metal speciation in various grain sizes of industrially contaminated street dust using multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Gülşen; Tokalıoğlu, Şerife

    2016-02-01

    A total of 36 street dust samples were collected from the streets of the Organised Industrial District in Kayseri, Turkey. This region includes a total of 818 work places in various industrial areas. The modified BCR (the European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction procedure was applied to evaluate the mobility and bioavailability of trace elements (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in street dusts of the study area. The BCR was classified into three steps: water/acid soluble fraction, reducible and oxidisable fraction. The remaining residue was dissolved by using aqua regia. The concentrations of the metals in street dust samples were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Also the effect of the different grain sizes (<38µm, 38-53µm and 53-74µm) of the 36 street dust samples on the mobility of the metals was investigated using the modified BCR procedure. The mobility sequence based on the sum of the first three phases (for <74µm grain size) was: Cd (71.3)>Cu (48.9)>Pb (42.8)=Cr (42.1)>Ni (41.4)>Zn (40.9)>Co (36.6)=Mn (36.3)>Fe (3.1). No significant difference was observed among metal partitioning for the three particle sizes. Correlation, principal component and cluster analysis were applied to identify probable natural and anthropogenic sources in the region. The principal component analysis results showed that this industrial district was influenced by traffic, industrial activities, air-borne emissions and natural sources. The accuracy of the results was checked by analysis of both the BCR-701 certified reference material and by recovery studies in street dust samples.

  15. Tritium speciation in nuclear reactor bioshield concrete and its impact on accurate analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Ji; E Warwick, Phillip; Croudace, Ian W

    2008-07-15

    Tritium ((3)H) is produced in nuclear reactors via several neutron-induced reactions [(2)H(n, gamma)(3)H, (6)Li(n, alpha)(3)H, (10)B(n, 2alpha)(3)H, (14)N(n, (3)H)(12)C, and ternary fission (fission yield <0.01%)]. Typically, (3)H is present as tritiated water (HTO) and can become adsorbed into structural concrete from the surface inward where it will be held in a weakly bound form. However, a systematic analysis of a sequence of subsamples taken from a reactor bioshield using combustion and liquid scintillation analysis has identified two forms of (3)H, one weakly bound and one strongly bound. The strongly bound tritium, which originates from neutron capture on trace lithium ((6)Li) within mineral phases, requires temperatures in excess of 350 degrees C to achieve quantitative recovery. The weakly bound form of tritium can be liberated at significantly lower temperatures (100 degrees C) as HTO and is associated with dehydration of hydrous mineral components. Without an appreciation that two forms of tritium can exist in reactor bioshields, the (3)H content of samples may be severely underestimated using conventional analytical approaches. These findings exemplify the need to develop robust radioactive waste characterization procedures in support of nuclear decommissioning programs. PMID:18543953

  16. Tritium speciation in nuclear reactor bioshield concrete and its impact on accurate analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Ji; E Warwick, Phillip; Croudace, Ian W

    2008-07-15

    Tritium ((3)H) is produced in nuclear reactors via several neutron-induced reactions [(2)H(n, gamma)(3)H, (6)Li(n, alpha)(3)H, (10)B(n, 2alpha)(3)H, (14)N(n, (3)H)(12)C, and ternary fission (fission yield <0.01%)]. Typically, (3)H is present as tritiated water (HTO) and can become adsorbed into structural concrete from the surface inward where it will be held in a weakly bound form. However, a systematic analysis of a sequence of subsamples taken from a reactor bioshield using combustion and liquid scintillation analysis has identified two forms of (3)H, one weakly bound and one strongly bound. The strongly bound tritium, which originates from neutron capture on trace lithium ((6)Li) within mineral phases, requires temperatures in excess of 350 degrees C to achieve quantitative recovery. The weakly bound form of tritium can be liberated at significantly lower temperatures (100 degrees C) as HTO and is associated with dehydration of hydrous mineral components. Without an appreciation that two forms of tritium can exist in reactor bioshields, the (3)H content of samples may be severely underestimated using conventional analytical approaches. These findings exemplify the need to develop robust radioactive waste characterization procedures in support of nuclear decommissioning programs.

  17. Arsenic speciation in natural sulfidic geothermal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Nicole S.; Stefánsson, Andri; Sigfússon, Bergur

    2014-10-01

    -order estimation of the dominant species, discrepancies between the model results and the field data highlight the fact that for such dynamic chemical systems the exact speciation cannot be calculated, thus on-site and preferentially in-situ analysis is of crucial importance.

  18. Speciation of Eu3+ bound to humic substances by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukman, Steven; Saito, Takumi; Aoyagi, Noboru; Kimura, Takaumi; Nagasaki, Shinya

    2012-07-01

    The bioavailability and toxicity of metal ions including radionuclides in the biosphere are greatly influenced by their speciation. Humic substances (HSs) are important constituents of various soil and water systems and have significant impact on the speciation and mobility of metal ions because of their high affinity to metal ions. In this study, the speciation of europium (Eu3+), a chemical homologue of trivalent actinides, with HSs collected from various origins was investigated by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The difficulties associated with the separation of the contribution of different Eu3+ species due to overlapping spectra or similar fluorescence lifetimes were addressed and mitigated by applying a multi-mode factor analysis, parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which resulted in the number, spectra, decay curves and relative fluorescence intensity profiles of different Eu3+ species. Subsequently, the interpretation of the Eu3+ species, was tackled by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial linear square (PLS) regression to deduce the nature of the Eu3+ species by taking into account the physicochemical properties of the HSs. Three factors corresponding to different Eu3+ species were obtained at 70 μM Eu3+ for all HSs investigated except for one humic acid. One of the factors corresponded to free Eu3+ ion interacting with HSs via diffusion. The remaining two factors were thought to be Eu3+ bound to HSs: one bound to acidic functional groups of HSs and the other to the sites of HSs influenced by the carbon backbone structures. It was also found that the latter factor exhibited strong energy transfer from the excited Eu3+ center to HSs. At lower Eu3+ concentration (10 μM), two factors having similar fluorescent characteristics to those of the second and third factors were obtained.

  19. Analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequences increases phylogenetic resolution of bears (Ursidae), a mammalian family that experienced rapid speciation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Li; Li, Yi-Wei; Ryder, Oliver A; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite the small number of ursid species, bear phylogeny has long been a focus of study due to their conservation value, as all bear genera have been classified as endangered at either the species or subspecies level. The Ursidae family represents a typical example of rapid evolutionary radiation. Previous analyses with a single mitochondrial (mt) gene or a small number of mt genes either provide weak support or a large unresolved polytomy for ursids. We revisit the contentious relationships within Ursidae by analyzing complete mt genome sequences and evaluating the performance of both entire mt genomes and constituent mtDNA genes in recovering a phylogeny of extremely recent speciation events. Results This mitochondrial genome-based phylogeny provides strong evidence that the spectacled bear diverged first, while within the genus Ursus, the sloth bear is the sister taxon of all the other five ursines. The latter group is divided into the brown bear/polar bear and the two black bears/sun bear assemblages. These findings resolve the previous conflicts between trees using partial mt genes. The ability of different categories of mt protein coding genes to recover the correct phylogeny is concordant with previous analyses for taxa with deep divergence times. This study provides a robust Ursidae phylogenetic framework for future validation by additional independent evidence, and also has significant implications for assisting in the resolution of other similarly difficult phylogenetic investigations. Conclusion Identification of base composition bias and utilization of the combined data of whole mitochondrial genome sequences has allowed recovery of a strongly supported phylogeny that is upheld when using multiple alternative outgroups for the Ursidae, a mammalian family that underwent a rapid radiation since the mid- to late Pliocene. It remains to be seen if the reliability of mt genome analysis will hold up in studies of other difficult phylogenetic

  20. Hybridization and speciation.

    PubMed

    Abbott, R; Albach, D; Ansell, S; Arntzen, J W; Baird, S J E; Bierne, N; Boughman, J; Brelsford, A; Buerkle, C A; Buggs, R; Butlin, R K; Dieckmann, U; Eroukhmanoff, F; Grill, A; Cahan, S H; Hermansen, J S; Hewitt, G; Hudson, A G; Jiggins, C; Jones, J; Keller, B; Marczewski, T; Mallet, J; Martinez-Rodriguez, P; Möst, M; Mullen, S; Nichols, R; Nolte, A W; Parisod, C; Pfennig, K; Rice, A M; Ritchie, M G; Seifert, B; Smadja, C M; Stelkens, R; Szymura, J M; Väinölä, R; Wolf, J B W; Zinner, D

    2013-02-01

    Hybridization has many and varied impacts on the process of speciation. Hybridization may slow or reverse differentiation by allowing gene flow and recombination. It may accelerate speciation via adaptive introgression or cause near-instantaneous speciation by allopolyploidization. It may have multiple effects at different stages and in different spatial contexts within a single speciation event. We offer a perspective on the context and evolutionary significance of hybridization during speciation, highlighting issues of current interest and debate. In secondary contact zones, it is uncertain if barriers to gene flow will be strengthened or broken down due to recombination and gene flow. Theory and empirical evidence suggest the latter is more likely, except within and around strongly selected genomic regions. Hybridization may contribute to speciation through the formation of new hybrid taxa, whereas introgression of a few loci may promote adaptive divergence and so facilitate speciation. Gene regulatory networks, epigenetic effects and the evolution of selfish genetic material in the genome suggest that the Dobzhansky-Muller model of hybrid incompatibilities requires a broader interpretation. Finally, although the incidence of reinforcement remains uncertain, this and other interactions in areas of sympatry may have knock-on effects on speciation both within and outside regions of hybridization.

  1. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer: achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, Jenna M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-10-21

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L(-1) for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry).

  2. Use of ion-pairing reagent for improving iodine speciation analysis in seaweed by pressure-driven capillary electrophoresis and ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiannan; Wang, Dan; Cheng, Heyong; Liu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanchao; Xu, Zigang

    2015-01-30

    This study achieved resolution improvement for iodine speciation in the presence of an ion-pairing reagent by a pressure-driven capillary electrophoresis (CE) system. Addition of 0.01mM tetrabutyl ammonium hydroxide (TBAH) as the ion-pairing reagent into the electrophoretic buffer resulted in the complete separation of four iodine species (I(-), IO3(-), mono-iodothyrosine-MIT and di-iodothyrosine-DIT), because of the electrostatic interaction between TBAH and the negatively charged analytes. A +16kV separation voltage was applied along the separation capillary (50μm i.d., 80cm total and 60cm effective) with the inlet grounded. The detection wavelength was fixed at 210nm, and the pressure-driven flow rate was set at 0.12mLmin(-1) with an injected volume of 2μL. The optimal electrolyte consisted of 2mM borate, 2mM TBAH and 80% methanol with pH adjusted to 8.5. Baseline separation of iodine species was achieved within 7min. The detection limits for I(-), IO3(-), MIT and DIT were 0.052, 0.040, 0.032 and 0.025mgL(-1), respectively. The relative standard deviations of peak heights and areas were all below 3% for 5mgL(-1) and 5% for 1mgL(-1). Application of the proposed method was demonstrated by speciation analysis of iodine in two seaweed samples. The developed method offered satisfactory recoveries in the 91-99% range and good precisions (<5%). Good agreement between the determined values by the proposed CE method and the HPLC-ICP-MS method was also obtained. All results proved its great potential in routine analysis of iodine speciation in environmental, food and biological samples.

  3. SPECIATE 4.2: speciation Database Development Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. Among the many uses of speciation data, these source profiles are used to: (1) create speciated emissions inve...

  4. Towards silicon speciation in light petroleum products using gas chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry equipped with a dynamic reaction cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainet, Fabien; Lienemann, Charles-Philippe; Ponthus, Jeremie; Pécheyran, Christophe; Castro, Joaudimir; Tessier, Emmanuel; Donard, Olivier François Xavier

    2014-07-01

    Silicon speciation has recently gained interest in the oil and gas industry due to the significant poisoning problems caused by silicon on hydrotreatment catalysts. The poisoning effect clearly depends on the structure of the silicon species which must be determined and quantified. The hyphenation of gas chromatography (GC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) allows a specific detection to determine the retention times of all silicon species. The aim of this work is to determine the retention indices of unknown silicon species to allow their characterization by a multi-technical approach in order to access to their chemical structure. The optimization of the dynamic reaction cell (DRC) of the ICP-MS using hydrogen as reactant gas successfully demonstrated the resolution of the interferences (14N14N+ and 12C16O+) initially present on 28Si. The linearity was excellent for silicon compounds and instrumental detection limits ranged from 20 to 140 μg of Si/kg depending on the response of the silicon compounds. A continuous release of silicon in the torch was observed most likely due to the use of a torch and an injector which was made of quartz. A non-universal response for silicon was observed and it was clearly necessary to use response coefficients to quantify silicon compounds. Known silicon compounds such as cyclic siloxanes (D3-D16) coming from PDMS degradation were confirmed. Furthermore, more than 10 new silicon species never characterized before in petroleum products were highlighted in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) degradation samples produced under thermal cracking of hydrocarbons. These silicon species mainly consisted of linear and cyclic structures containing reactive functions such as ethoxy, peroxide and hydroxy groups which can be able to react with the alumina surface and hence, poison the catalyst. This characterization will further allow the development of innovative solutions such as trapping silicon compounds or

  5. Speciation and Long- and Short-term Molecular-level Dynamics of Soil Organic Sulfur Studied by X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    D Solomon; J Lehmann; K Knoth de Zarruk; J Dathe; J Kinyangi; B Liang; S Machado

    2011-12-31

    We investigated speciation, oxidative state changes, and long- and short-term molecular-level dynamics of organic S after 365 d of aerobic incubation with and without the addition of sugarcane residue using XANES spectroscopy. Soil samples were collected from the upper 15 cm of undisturbed grasslands since 1880, from undisturbed grasslands since 1931, and from cultivated fields since 1880 in the western United States. We found three distinct groups of organosulfur compounds in these grassland-derived soils: (i) strongly reduced (S{sup 0} to S{sup 1+}) organic S that encompasses thiols, monosulfides, disulfides, polysulfides, and thiophenes; (ii) organic S in intermediate oxidation (S{sup 2+} to S{sup 5+}) states, which include sulfoxides and sulfonates; and (iii) strongly oxidized (S{sup 6+}) organic S, which comprises ester-SO{sub 4}-S. The first two groups represent S directly linked to C and accounted for 80% of the total organic S detected by XANES from the undisturbed soils. Aerobic incubation without the addition of sugarcane residue led to a 21% decline in organanosulfur compounds directly linked to C and to up to an 82% increase inorganic S directly bonded to O. Among the C-bonded S compounds, low-valence thiols, sulfides, thiophenic S, and intermediate-valence sulfoxide S seem to be highly susceptible to microbial attack and may represent the most reactive components of organic S pool in these grassland soils. Sulfonate S exhibited a much lower short-term reactivity. The incorporation of sugarcane residue resulted in an increase in organosulfur compounds directly bonded to C at the early stage of incubation. However, similar to soils incubated without residue addition, the proportion of organic S directly linked to C continued to decline with increasing duration of aerobic incubation, whereas the proportion of organic S directly bonded to O showed a steady rise.

  6. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karčiauskas, Mindaugas

    2016-06-01

    The inflaton coupling to a vector field via the f(φ)2F μνFμν term is used in several contexts in the literature, such as to generate primordial magnetic fields, to produce statistically anisotropic curvature perturbation, to support anisotropic inflation, and to circumvent the η-problem. In this work, I perform dynamical analysis of this system allowing for the most general Bianchi I initial conditions. I also confirm the stability of attractor fixed points along phase-space directions that had not been investigated before.

  7. Nonlinear analysis of pupillary dynamics.

    PubMed

    Onorati, Francesco; Mainardi, Luca Tommaso; Sirca, Fabiola; Russo, Vincenzo; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Pupil size reflects autonomic response to different environmental and behavioral stimuli, and its dynamics have been linked to other autonomic correlates such as cardiac and respiratory rhythms. The aim of this study is to assess the nonlinear characteristics of pupil size of 25 normal subjects who participated in a psychophysiological experimental protocol with four experimental conditions, namely “baseline”, “anger”, “joy”, and “sadness”. Nonlinear measures, such as sample entropy, correlation dimension, and largest Lyapunov exponent, were computed on reconstructed signals of spontaneous fluctuations of pupil dilation. Nonparametric statistical tests were performed on surrogate data to verify that the nonlinear measures are an intrinsic characteristic of the signals. We then developed and applied a piecewise linear regression model to detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Two joinpoints and three scaling intervals were identified: slope α0, at slow time scales, represents a persistent nonstationary long-range correlation, whereas α1 and α2, at middle and fast time scales, respectively, represent long-range power-law correlations, similarly to DFA applied to heart rate variability signals. Of the computed complexity measures, α0 showed statistically significant differences among experimental conditions (p<0.001). Our results suggest that (a) pupil size at constant light condition is characterized by nonlinear dynamics, (b) three well-defined and distinct long-memory processes exist at different time scales, and (c) autonomic stimulation is partially reflected in nonlinear dynamics. PMID:26351899

  8. Shifting distributions and speciation: species divergence during rapid climate change.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Bryan C; Knowles, L Lacey

    2007-02-01

    Questions about how shifting distributions contribute to species diversification remain virtually without answer, even though rapid climate change during the Pleistocene clearly impacted genetic variation within many species. One factor that has prevented this question from being adequately addressed is the lack of precision associated with estimates of species divergence made from a single genetic locus and without incorporating processes that are biologically important as populations diverge. Analysis of DNA sequences from multiple variable loci in a coalescent framework that (i) corrects for gene divergence pre-dating speciation, and (ii) derives divergence-time estimates without making a priori assumptions about the processes underlying patterns of incomplete lineage sorting between species (i.e. allows for the possibility of gene flow during speciation), is critical to overcoming the inherent logistical and analytical difficulties of inferring the timing and mode of speciation during the dynamic Pleistocene. Estimates of species divergence that ignore these processes, use single locus data, or do both can dramatically overestimate species divergence. For example, using a coalescent approach with data from six loci, the divergence between two species of montane Melanoplus grasshoppers is estimated at between 200,000 and 300,000 years before present, far more recently than divergence estimates made using single-locus data or without the incorporation of population-level processes. Melanoplus grasshoppers radiated in the sky islands of the Rocky Mountains, and the analysis of divergence between these species suggests that the isolation of populations in multiple glacial refugia was an important factor in promoting speciation. Furthermore, the low estimates of gene flow between the species indicate that reproductive isolation must have evolved rapidly for the incipient species boundaries to be maintained through the subsequent glacial periods and shifts in species

  9. Shifting distributions and speciation: species divergence during rapid climate change.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Bryan C; Knowles, L Lacey

    2007-02-01

    Questions about how shifting distributions contribute to species diversification remain virtually without answer, even though rapid climate change during the Pleistocene clearly impacted genetic variation within many species. One factor that has prevented this question from being adequately addressed is the lack of precision associated with estimates of species divergence made from a single genetic locus and without incorporating processes that are biologically important as populations diverge. Analysis of DNA sequences from multiple variable loci in a coalescent framework that (i) corrects for gene divergence pre-dating speciation, and (ii) derives divergence-time estimates without making a priori assumptions about the processes underlying patterns of incomplete lineage sorting between species (i.e. allows for the possibility of gene flow during speciation), is critical to overcoming the inherent logistical and analytical difficulties of inferring the timing and mode of speciation during the dynamic Pleistocene. Estimates of species divergence that ignore these processes, use single locus data, or do both can dramatically overestimate species divergence. For example, using a coalescent approach with data from six loci, the divergence between two species of montane Melanoplus grasshoppers is estimated at between 200,000 and 300,000 years before present, far more recently than divergence estimates made using single-locus data or without the incorporation of population-level processes. Melanoplus grasshoppers radiated in the sky islands of the Rocky Mountains, and the analysis of divergence between these species suggests that the isolation of populations in multiple glacial refugia was an important factor in promoting speciation. Furthermore, the low estimates of gene flow between the species indicate that reproductive isolation must have evolved rapidly for the incipient species boundaries to be maintained through the subsequent glacial periods and shifts in species

  10. Nonlinear analysis of drought dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, M.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is an extreme natural hazard and becomes a severe problem in the world. It arises as a result of interactions between climate input and human activity, displaying the nonlinearity and complexity. Nonlinear time series analyses open a way to study the underlying dynamic characteristics of drought, and then provide the forward knowledge to understanding the physical mechanism of drought event. The rationale behind this idea is that information about the representation of nonlinear properties could be used as an additional quality indicator. To that end, the correlation dimension method, a powerful nonlinear time series analysis method based on the chaos theory, has been suggested to assess the intrinsic dimensionality or degree of freedom of time series according to Takens (1981). It can provide an assessment of the dominant processes that is required to map the observed dynamics. In this study, daily discharge and hourly groundwater level data of 63 catchments in Germany and China were investigated with correlation dimension method. The results indicated that the correlation dimension values of studied discharge exhibited none clear spatial patterns, but showed significant correlations with the spatial heterogeneity within the catchments. In contrast, the correlation dimension values of groundwater level displayed spatial patterns due to the different aquifer conditions (confined or unconfined). High correlation dimension values indicate partly confined conditions. In addition, Hurst analysis was involved to qualify the persistence of drought. It seems that drought mechanisms can be learnt from the data themselves in an inverse manner.

  11. Geochemical speciation and dynamic of copper in tropical semi-arid soils exposed to metal-bearing mine wastes.

    PubMed

    Perlatti, Fabio; Otero, Xosé Luis; Macias, Felipe; Ferreira, Tiago Osório

    2014-12-01

    The potentially hazardous effects of rock wastes disposed at open pit in three different areas (Pr: Ore processing; Wr: Waste rock and Bd: Border) of an abandoned copper mine were evaluated in this study, with emphasis on acid drainage generation, metal contamination and copper geochemical dynamics in soils. Samples of waste rock were analyzed by Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy with microanalysis (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Soil samples were analyzed to determine the total metal contents (XRF), mineralogy (XRD), pH (H2O and H2O2), organic and inorganic carbon, % of total N, S and P, particle size, and a sequential extraction procedure was used to identify the different copper fractions. As a result of the prevalence of carbonates over sulphides in the wastes, the soil pH remained close to neutral, with absence of acid mine drainage. The geochemical interaction between these mineral phases seems to be the main mechanism to release Cu(2)(+) ions. Total Cu in soils from the Pr area reached 11,180mg.kg(-1), while in Wr and Bd areas the values reached, on average, 4683 and 1086mg.kg(-1), respectively, indicating a very high level of soil contamination. In the Pr and Wr, the Cu was mainly associated with carbonates and amorphous iron oxides. In the Bd areas, the presence of vegetation has influenced the geochemical behavior of copper by increasing the dissolution of carbonates, affecting the buffer capacity of soils against sulphide oxidation, reducing the pH levels and enhancing the proportion of exchangeable and organic bound Cu. The present findings show that the use of plants or organic amendments in mine sites with high concentration of Cu carbonate-containing wastes should be viewed with caution, as the practice may enhance the mobilization of copper to the environment due to an increase in the rate of carbonates dissolution. PMID:25217748

  12. Geochemical speciation and dynamic of copper in tropical semi-arid soils exposed to metal-bearing mine wastes.

    PubMed

    Perlatti, Fabio; Otero, Xosé Luis; Macias, Felipe; Ferreira, Tiago Osório

    2014-12-01

    The potentially hazardous effects of rock wastes disposed at open pit in three different areas (Pr: Ore processing; Wr: Waste rock and Bd: Border) of an abandoned copper mine were evaluated in this study, with emphasis on acid drainage generation, metal contamination and copper geochemical dynamics in soils. Samples of waste rock were analyzed by Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy with microanalysis (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Soil samples were analyzed to determine the total metal contents (XRF), mineralogy (XRD), pH (H2O and H2O2), organic and inorganic carbon, % of total N, S and P, particle size, and a sequential extraction procedure was used to identify the different copper fractions. As a result of the prevalence of carbonates over sulphides in the wastes, the soil pH remained close to neutral, with absence of acid mine drainage. The geochemical interaction between these mineral phases seems to be the main mechanism to release Cu(2)(+) ions. Total Cu in soils from the Pr area reached 11,180mg.kg(-1), while in Wr and Bd areas the values reached, on average, 4683 and 1086mg.kg(-1), respectively, indicating a very high level of soil contamination. In the Pr and Wr, the Cu was mainly associated with carbonates and amorphous iron oxides. In the Bd areas, the presence of vegetation has influenced the geochemical behavior of copper by increasing the dissolution of carbonates, affecting the buffer capacity of soils against sulphide oxidation, reducing the pH levels and enhancing the proportion of exchangeable and organic bound Cu. The present findings show that the use of plants or organic amendments in mine sites with high concentration of Cu carbonate-containing wastes should be viewed with caution, as the practice may enhance the mobilization of copper to the environment due to an increase in the rate of carbonates dissolution.

  13. Speciation and Structural Properties of Hydrothermal Solutions of Sodium and Potassium Sulfate Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Joachim; Vogel, Frédéric; Steele-MacInnis, Matthew

    2016-05-18

    Aqueous solutions of salts at elevated pressures and temperatures play a key role in geochemical processes and in applications of supercritical water in waste and biomass treatment, for which salt management is crucial for performance. A major question in predicting salt behavior in such processes is how different salts affect the phase equilibria. Herein, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate molecular-scale structures of solutions of sodium and/or potassium sulfate, which show contrasting macroscopic behavior. Solutions of Na-SO4 exhibit a tendency towards forming large ionic clusters with increasing temperature, whereas solutions of K-SO4 show significantly less clustering under equivalent conditions. In mixed systems (Nax K2-x SO4 ), cluster formation is dramatically reduced with decreasing Na/(K+Na) ratio; this indicates a structure-breaking role of K. MD results allow these phenomena to be related to the characteristics of electrostatic interactions between K(+) and SO4 (2-) , compared with the analogous Na(+) -SO4 (2-) interactions. The results suggest a mechanism underlying the experimentally observed increasing solubility in ternary mixtures of solutions of Na-K-SO4 . Specifically, the propensity of sodium to associate with sulfate, versus that of potassium to break up the sodium-sulfate clusters, may affect the contrasting behavior of these salts. Thus, mutual salting-in in ternary hydrothermal solutions of Na-K-SO4 reflects the opposing, but complementary, natures of Na-SO4 versus K-SO4 interactions. The results also provide clues towards the reported liquid immiscibility in this ternary system. PMID:26888426

  14. Speciation and Structural Properties of Hydrothermal Solutions of Sodium and Potassium Sulfate Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Joachim; Vogel, Frédéric; Steele-MacInnis, Matthew

    2016-05-18

    Aqueous solutions of salts at elevated pressures and temperatures play a key role in geochemical processes and in applications of supercritical water in waste and biomass treatment, for which salt management is crucial for performance. A major question in predicting salt behavior in such processes is how different salts affect the phase equilibria. Herein, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to investigate molecular-scale structures of solutions of sodium and/or potassium sulfate, which show contrasting macroscopic behavior. Solutions of Na-SO4 exhibit a tendency towards forming large ionic clusters with increasing temperature, whereas solutions of K-SO4 show significantly less clustering under equivalent conditions. In mixed systems (Nax K2-x SO4 ), cluster formation is dramatically reduced with decreasing Na/(K+Na) ratio; this indicates a structure-breaking role of K. MD results allow these phenomena to be related to the characteristics of electrostatic interactions between K(+) and SO4 (2-) , compared with the analogous Na(+) -SO4 (2-) interactions. The results suggest a mechanism underlying the experimentally observed increasing solubility in ternary mixtures of solutions of Na-K-SO4 . Specifically, the propensity of sodium to associate with sulfate, versus that of potassium to break up the sodium-sulfate clusters, may affect the contrasting behavior of these salts. Thus, mutual salting-in in ternary hydrothermal solutions of Na-K-SO4 reflects the opposing, but complementary, natures of Na-SO4 versus K-SO4 interactions. The results also provide clues towards the reported liquid immiscibility in this ternary system.

  15. SPECIATE 4.3: Addendum to SPECIATE 4.2--Speciation database development documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. Among the many uses of speciation data, these source profiles are used to: (1) create speciated emissions inve...

  16. Dualism and conflicts in understanding speciation.

    PubMed

    Schilthuizen, M

    2000-12-01

    Speciation is a central but elusive issue in evolutionary biology. Over the past sixty years, the subject has been studied within a framework conceived by Ernst Mayr and Theodosius Dobzhansky and subsequently developed further by numerous other workers. In this "isolation" theory, the evolution of reproductive isolation is a key element of speciation; natural selection is given only secondary importance while gene flow is considered prohibitive to the process. In this paper, I argue that certain elements in this approach have produced confusion and irreconcilability among students of speciation. The more prominent debates in speciation (i.e., the species definition, sympatry/allopatry, and the role of reinforcement) all derive from an inherent conflict between the "isolation" theory and Darwin's "selection" view on species and speciation (in which disruptive selection is crucial). New data, mainly from field ecology, molecular population genetics, laboratory studies with Drosophila and computer analysis, all suggest that the isolation theory may no longer be the most desirable vantage point from which to explore speciation. Instead, environmental selection in large populations, often unimpeded by ongoing gene flow, appears to be the decisive element. The traditional preoccupation with reproductive isolation has created gaps in our knowledge of several crucial issues, mainly regarding the role of environmental selection and its connection with mate selection.

  17. Theory and speciation.

    PubMed

    Turelli, M; Barton, N H.; Coyne, J A.

    2001-07-01

    The study of speciation has become one of the most active areas of evolutionary biology, and substantial progress has been made in documenting and understanding phenomena ranging from sympatric speciation and reinforcement to the evolutionary genetics of postzygotic isolation. This progress has been driven largely by empirical results, and most useful theoretical work has concentrated on making sense of empirical patterns. Given the complexity of speciation, mathematical theory is subordinate to verbal theory and generalizations about data. Nevertheless, mathematical theory can provide a useful classification of verbal theories; can help determine the biological plausibility of verbal theories; can determine whether alternative mechanisms of speciation are consistent with empirical patterns; and can occasionally provide predictions that go beyond empirical generalizations. We discuss recent examples of progress in each of these areas.

  18. What Is Speciation?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, B Jesse; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Mallet, James

    2016-03-01

    Concepts and definitions of species have been debated by generations of biologists and remain controversial. Microbes pose a particular challenge because of their genetic diversity, asexual reproduction, and often promiscuous horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, microbes also present an opportunity to study and understand speciation because of their rapid evolution, both in nature and in the lab, and small, easily sequenced genomes. Here, we review how microbial population genomics has enabled us to catch speciation "in the act" and how the results have challenged and enriched our concepts of species, with implications for all domains of life. We describe how recombination (including HGT and introgression) has shaped the genomes of nascent microbial, animal, and plant species and argue for a prominent role of natural selection in initiating and maintaining speciation. We ask how universal is the process of speciation across the tree of life, and what lessons can be drawn from microbes? Comparative genomics showing the extent of HGT in natural populations certainly jeopardizes the relevance of vertical descent (i.e., the species tree) in speciation. Nevertheless, we conclude that species do indeed exist as clusters of genetic and ecological similarity and that speciation is driven primarily by natural selection, regardless of the balance between horizontal and vertical descent. PMID:27030977

  19. What Is Speciation?

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, B. Jesse; Leducq, Jean-Baptiste; Mallet, James

    2016-01-01

    Concepts and definitions of species have been debated by generations of biologists and remain controversial. Microbes pose a particular challenge because of their genetic diversity, asexual reproduction, and often promiscuous horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, microbes also present an opportunity to study and understand speciation because of their rapid evolution, both in nature and in the lab, and small, easily sequenced genomes. Here, we review how microbial population genomics has enabled us to catch speciation “in the act” and how the results have challenged and enriched our concepts of species, with implications for all domains of life. We describe how recombination (including HGT and introgression) has shaped the genomes of nascent microbial, animal, and plant species and argue for a prominent role of natural selection in initiating and maintaining speciation. We ask how universal is the process of speciation across the tree of life, and what lessons can be drawn from microbes? Comparative genomics showing the extent of HGT in natural populations certainly jeopardizes the relevance of vertical descent (i.e., the species tree) in speciation. Nevertheless, we conclude that species do indeed exist as clusters of genetic and ecological similarity and that speciation is driven primarily by natural selection, regardless of the balance between horizontal and vertical descent. PMID:27030977

  20. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  1. [Analysis of washing efficiency and change in lead speciation in lead-contaminated soil of a battery factory].

    PubMed

    Ren, Bei; Huang, Jin-lou; Miao, Ming-sheng

    2013-09-01

    Lead-contaminated soil with different pollution load in a lead battery factory in the southwest of China was chosen as the research object, the lead content and speciation were analyzed, and different washing agents were screened. The lead washing efficiency and lead speciation were analyzed under different pH conditions, and the soil of different particle size was washed using different duration to determine the best washing time. The results showed that the soil of sites A and B in the factory was severely contaminated, the lead concentration reaching 15,703.22 mg x kg(-1) and 1747.78 mg x kg(-1), respectively, and the proportion of the active-state lead was relatively high, while the residue state accounted for only 17.32%, 11.64%, 14.6% and 10.2%. EDTA and hydrochloric acid showed the best extraction effect in the 5 washing agents tested, which included EDTA, hydrochloric acid, citric acid, rhamnolipid and SDS. Cleaning under acidic conditions could not only effectively extract the total amount of lead but also effectively reduce the environmental risk of active-state lead. pH 4-7 was suggested as the most appropriate condition. The cleaning effect of coarse sand and fine sand was good, while for washing powder clay, it is better to improve the process, with the optimal washing time determined as 240 min. PMID:24289026

  2. [Analysis of washing efficiency and change in lead speciation in lead-contaminated soil of a battery factory].

    PubMed

    Ren, Bei; Huang, Jin-lou; Miao, Ming-sheng

    2013-09-01

    Lead-contaminated soil with different pollution load in a lead battery factory in the southwest of China was chosen as the research object, the lead content and speciation were analyzed, and different washing agents were screened. The lead washing efficiency and lead speciation were analyzed under different pH conditions, and the soil of different particle size was washed using different duration to determine the best washing time. The results showed that the soil of sites A and B in the factory was severely contaminated, the lead concentration reaching 15,703.22 mg x kg(-1) and 1747.78 mg x kg(-1), respectively, and the proportion of the active-state lead was relatively high, while the residue state accounted for only 17.32%, 11.64%, 14.6% and 10.2%. EDTA and hydrochloric acid showed the best extraction effect in the 5 washing agents tested, which included EDTA, hydrochloric acid, citric acid, rhamnolipid and SDS. Cleaning under acidic conditions could not only effectively extract the total amount of lead but also effectively reduce the environmental risk of active-state lead. pH 4-7 was suggested as the most appropriate condition. The cleaning effect of coarse sand and fine sand was good, while for washing powder clay, it is better to improve the process, with the optimal washing time determined as 240 min.

  3. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  4. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; arsenic speciation in natural-water samples using laboratory and field methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, John R.; Bednar, Anthony J.; Burkhardt, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    Analytical methods for the determination of arsenite [As(III)], arsenate [As(V)], dimethylarsinate (DMA), monomethylarsonate (MMA), and roxarsone in filtered natural-water samples are described. Various analytical methods can be used for the determination, depending on the arsenic species being determined. Arsenic concentration is determined by using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as an arsenic-specific detector for all methods. Laboratory-speciation methods are described that use an ion chromatographic column to separate the arsenic species; the column length, column packing, and mobile phase are dependent on the species of interest. Regardless of the separation technique, the arsenic species are introduced into plasma by eithe rpneumatic nebulization or arsine generation. Analysis times range from 2 to 8 minutes and method detection limits range from 0.1 to 0.6 microgram-arsenic per liter (ug-As/L), 10 to 60 picograms absolute (for a 100-microliter injection), depending on the arsenic species determined and the analytical method used. A field-generation specciation method also is described that uses a strong anion exchange cartridge to separate As(III) from As(V) in the field. As(III) in the eluate and the As(V) in the cartridge extract are determined by direct nebulization ICP-MS. Methylated arsenic species that also are retained on the cartridge will positively bias As(V) results without further laboratory separations. The method detection limit for field speciation is 0.3 ug-As/L. The distribution of arsenic species must be preserved in the field to eliminate changes caused by photochemical oxidation or metal oxyhydroxide precipitation. Preservation techniques, such as refrigeration, the addition of acides, or the additoin of ethylene-diaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and the effects of ambient light were tested. Of the preservatives evaluated, EDTA was found to work best with the laboratory- and field-speciation methods for all sample

  5. Dynamic Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic hurricane data analysis tool allows users of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) to analyze data over a Web medium. The TCIS software is described in the previous article, Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) (NPO-45748). This tool interfaces with the TCIS database to pull in data from several different atmospheric and oceanic data sets, both observed by instruments. Users can use this information to generate histograms, maps, and profile plots for specific storms. The tool also displays statistical values for the user-selected parameter for the mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values. There is little wait time, allowing for fast data plots over date and spatial ranges. Users may also zoom-in for a closer look at a particular spatial range. This is version 1 of the software. Researchers will use the data and tools on the TCIS to understand hurricane processes, improve hurricane forecast models and identify what types of measurements the next generation of instruments will need to collect.

  6. Systems-Dynamic Analysis for Neighborhood Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems-dynamic analysis (or system dynamics (SD)) helps planners identify interrelated impacts of transportation and land-use policies on neighborhood-scale economic outcomes for households and businesses, among other applications. This form of analysis can show benefits and tr...

  7. In situ redox speciation analysis of chromium in water by diffusive gradients in thin films using a DE81 anion exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Carlos A; de Simone, Thays V; Menegário, Amauri A; Rolisola, Ana M C M; Luko, Karen S; Gastmans, Didier; da Conceição, Fabiano T; Kiang, Chang H

    2016-07-01

    A method for the in situ redox speciation analysis of chromium in water by the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) technique using a DE81 anion exchange membrane was successfully developed. For the selective uptake of Cr(VI), a DGT device containing an anion exchange membrane DE81 (cellulose acetate chromatographic paper) was used (DE81-DGT), while selective uptake of Cr(III) was carried out using DGT devices containing the Chelex-100 resin (Chelex-100-DGT). A correlation coefficient of 0.993 was obtained for the linearity of the immersion curves (mass versus time) using DE81-DGT. The diffusion coefficient values for Cr(VI) through the agarose diffusive layer were equal to 4.89±0.5×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) and 3.95±0.02×10(-6)cm(2)s(-1) (T=23±1°C, I=0.03molL(-1) NaNO3) were obtained by using diffusion cell and immersion curves, respectively. The retention of Cr(VI) by the DE81 membrane in a synthetic sample and river water was not affected by the pH over a wide range 4-9). Recoveries of Cr(VI) between 90% and 120% from solutions of ionic strength ranging from 0.01 to 0. 5molL(-1) NaNO3 were achieved. Finally, the redox speciation analysis of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in spiked river water and synthetic samples was performed with recoveries greater than 80% and 87% by using Chelex-100-DGT and DE81-DGT devices, respectively. Those results were in excellent agreement with the diphenylcarbazide spectrophotometric method. PMID:27154678

  8. Speciation and bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, M V; Livshits, M A

    1989-01-01

    The interrelations of physics and biology are discussed. It is shown that Darwin can be considered as one of the founders of the important field of contemporary physics called physics of dissipative structures or synergetics. The theories of gradual and punctual evolution are presented. The contradiction between these theories can be solved on the basis of molecular theory of evolution and on the basis of the phenomenological physical treatment. The general physical properties of living systems, considered as open systems being far from equilibrium, are listed and simple non-linear mathematical models describing gradual and punctual speciation are suggested. The usual pictures which present these two kinds of speciation can possess physico-mathematical sense. Punctuated speciation means bifurcation, a kind of non-equilibrium phase transition.

  9. Newspaper Subscribing: A Dynamic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Jian-Hua; Weaver, David

    1989-01-01

    Uses a dynamic modelling procedure to show that newspaper subscribing behavior is more complex than static perspectives have suggested. Argues that a dynamic model, tested with longitudinal data, improves understanding of the complexity of the stopping and restarting processes in newspaper subscribing. (RS)

  10. Sexual selection and speciation.

    PubMed

    Panhuis, T M.; Butlin, R; Zuk, M; Tregenza, T

    2001-07-01

    The power of sexual selection to drive changes in mate recognition traits gives it the potential to be a potent force in speciation. Much of the evidence to support this possibility comes from comparative studies that examine differences in the number of species between clades that apparently differ in the intensity of sexual selection. We argue that more detailed studies are needed, examining extinction rates and other sources of variation in species richness. Typically, investigations of extant natural populations have been too indirect to convincingly conclude speciation by sexual selection. Recent empirical work, however, is beginning to take a more direct approach and rule out confounding variables.

  11. Phylogenetics and speciation.

    PubMed

    Barraclough, T G.; Nee, S

    2001-07-01

    Species-level phylogenies derived from molecular data provide an indirect record of the speciation events that have led to extant species. This offers enormous potential for investigating the general causes and rates of speciation within clades. To make the most of this potential, we should ideally sample all the species in a higher group, such as a genus, ensure that those species reflect evolutionary entities within the group, and rule out the effects of other processes, such as extinction, as explanations for observed patterns. We discuss recent practical and theoretical advances in this area and outline how future work should benefit from incorporating data from genealogical and phylogeographical scales.

  12. Cloud point extraction preconcentration prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis of mercury in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Ping

    2005-12-14

    A cloud point extraction methodology was developed for simultaneous preconcentration of Hg(II), methylmercury (MeHg), ethylmercury (EtHg), and phenylmercury (PhHg) prior to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on-line coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis of mercury in fish. The four mercury species were taken into complexes with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) in aqueous nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 medium and concentrated in the surfactant-rich phase by bringing the solution to the temperature of 40 degrees C. Baseline separation of the enriched complexes was achieved on an RP-C(18) column with a mixture of methanol, acetonitrile, and water (65:15:20, v/v) containing 200 mmol L(-1) HAc (pH 3.5) as the mobile phase. An on-line postcolumn oxidation of the effluent from HPLC, in the presence of K2S2O8 in HCl, was applied in the system followed by an optimal cold vapor generation of mercury species. The variables affecting the complexation and extraction steps were examined. The preconcentration of 10 mL of solution with 0.08% w/v Triton X-114 and 0.04% w/v APDC at pH 3.5 gave enrichment factors of 29, 43, 80, and 98 for MeHg, EtHg, PhHg, and Hg(II), respectively. Low detection limits (S/N = 3) were obtained, ranging from 2 to 9 ng L(-1) (as Hg) for all species. The developed method was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury in real fish samples.

  13. Cloud point extraction preconcentration prior to high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with cold vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis of mercury in fish samples.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li-Ping

    2005-12-14

    A cloud point extraction methodology was developed for simultaneous preconcentration of Hg(II), methylmercury (MeHg), ethylmercury (EtHg), and phenylmercury (PhHg) prior to reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on-line coupled with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry for speciation analysis of mercury in fish. The four mercury species were taken into complexes with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) in aqueous nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 medium and concentrated in the surfactant-rich phase by bringing the solution to the temperature of 40 degrees C. Baseline separation of the enriched complexes was achieved on an RP-C(18) column with a mixture of methanol, acetonitrile, and water (65:15:20, v/v) containing 200 mmol L(-1) HAc (pH 3.5) as the mobile phase. An on-line postcolumn oxidation of the effluent from HPLC, in the presence of K2S2O8 in HCl, was applied in the system followed by an optimal cold vapor generation of mercury species. The variables affecting the complexation and extraction steps were examined. The preconcentration of 10 mL of solution with 0.08% w/v Triton X-114 and 0.04% w/v APDC at pH 3.5 gave enrichment factors of 29, 43, 80, and 98 for MeHg, EtHg, PhHg, and Hg(II), respectively. Low detection limits (S/N = 3) were obtained, ranging from 2 to 9 ng L(-1) (as Hg) for all species. The developed method was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury in real fish samples. PMID:16332112

  14. [XANES study of lead speciation in duckweed].

    PubMed

    Chu, Bin-Bin; Luo, Li-Qiang; Xu, Tao; Yuan, Jing; Sun, Jian-Ling; Zeng, Yuan; Ma, Yan-Hong; Yi, Shan

    2012-07-01

    Qixiashan lead-zinc mine of Nanjing was one of the largest lead zinc deposits in East China Its exploitation has been over 50 years, and the environmental pollution has also been increasing. The lead concentration in the local environment was high, but lead migration and toxic mechanism has not been clear. Therefore, biogeochemistry research of the lead zinc mine was carried out. Using ICP-MS and Pb-L III edge XANES, lead concentration and speciation were analyzed respectively, and duckweed which can tolerate and enriched heavy metals was found in the pollution area. The results showed that the lead concentration of duckweed was 39.4 mg x kg(-1). XANES analysis and linear combination fit indicated that lead stearate and lead sulfide accounted for 65% and 36.9% respectively in the lead speciation of duckweed, suggesting that the main lead speciation of duckweed was sulfur-containing lead-organic acid.

  15. Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coggiola, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Using support from NASA Grant No. NAG 2-963, SRI International successfully completed the project, entitled, 'Instrumentation for Aerosol and Gas Speciation.' This effort (SRI Project 7383) covered the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a real-time aerosol speciation instrument in NASA's DC-8 aircraft during the Spring 1996 SUbsonic aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study (SUCCESS) mission. This final technical report describes the pertinent details of the instrument design, its abilities, its deployment during SUCCESS and the data acquired from the mission, and the post-mission calibration, data reduction, and analysis.

  16. Speciation analysis of bromine-containing drug metabolites in feces samples from a human in vivo study by means of HPLC/ICP-MS combined with on-line isotope dilution.

    PubMed

    Meermann, Björn; Bockx, Marc; Laenen, Aline; Van Looveren, Cis; Cuyckens, Filip; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was speciation analysis of metabolites in feces samples collected within a clinical study during which a bromine-containing anti-tuberculosis drug (TMC207) was administered to patients with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis infection. Owing to slow elimination of the drug, no (14)C label was used within this study. Quantification of the bromine species was accomplished using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP-MS) in combination with on-line isotope dilution (on-line ID), while structural elucidation of the species was performed using HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The ICP-MS-based method developed shows a good intra- and inter-day reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 3.5%, N = 9); the limit of detection (1.5 mg TMC207 L(-1)) is of the same order of magnitude as that for HPLC/radiodetection; the dynamic range of the method covers more than two orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the column recovery was demonstrated to be quantitative (recoveries between 90.6% and 99.5%). Based on the excellent figures of merit, the "cold" HPLC/ICP-MS approach could be deployed for the actual human in vivo metabolism study, such that exposure of the human volunteers to the (14)C radiolabel was avoided.

  17. Chapter A5. Section 6.4.A. Arsenic Speciation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Two sample-processing methods (field speciation and laboratory speciation) used at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) are specific to sample analysis by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for determining the concentration of inorganic and organic arsenic species in a water sample. The field-speciation method requires NWQL Schedule 1729. The laboratory-speciation method requires use either of NWQL Schedule 1730, 1731, or 1732, as appropriate for study objectives. For either the field- or laboratory-speciation method, prior knowledge is needed of sample matrix-composition characteristics (that is, major-ion concentrations in filtered samples). Major-ion data are necessary to determine (1) the volume of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) that will be required for sample preservation, and (2) if sample dilution is required.

  18. ORGANIC SPECIATION SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling artifacts for molecular markers from organic speciation of particulate matter were investigated by analyzing forty-one samples collected in Philadelphia as a part of the Northeast Oxidant and Particulate Study (NEOPS). Samples were collected using a high volume sampler ...

  19. Arsenic speciation in edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Nearing, Michelle M; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2014-12-16

    The fruiting bodies, or mushrooms, of terrestrial fungi have been found to contain a high proportion of the nontoxic arsenic compound arsenobetaine (AB), but data gaps include a limited phylogenetic diversity of the fungi for which arsenic speciation is available, a focus on mushrooms with higher total arsenic concentrations, and the unknown formation and role of AB in mushrooms. To address these, the mushrooms of 46 different fungus species (73 samples) over a diverse range of phylogenetic groups were collected from Canadian grocery stores and background and arsenic-contaminated areas. Total arsenic was determined using ICP-MS, and arsenic speciation was determined using HPLC-ICP-MS and complementary X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The major arsenic compounds in mushrooms were found to be similar among phylogenetic groups, and AB was found to be the major compound in the Lycoperdaceae and Agaricaceae families but generally absent in log-growing mushrooms, suggesting the microbial community may influence arsenic speciation in mushrooms. The high proportion of AB in mushrooms with puffball or gilled morphologies may suggest that AB acts as an osmolyte in certain mushrooms to help maintain fruiting body structure. The presence of an As(III)-sulfur compound, for the first time in mushrooms, was identified in the XAS analysis. Except for Agaricus sp. (with predominantly AB), inorganic arsenic predominated in most of the store-bought mushrooms (albeit with low total arsenic concentrations). Should inorganic arsenic predominate in these mushrooms from contaminated areas, the risk to consumers under these circumstances should be considered.

  20. Selective sorption behavior of iodine species on an activated carbon disk and its implication for the speciation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H.; Lee, J.; An, J.

    2013-12-01

    In recent times, iodate (IO3-) which can be generated under highly oxidized conditions such as the ozonation process in a water treatment plant has been receiving increasing attention due to its high toxicity to human and environment. In this respect, sorption behavior of iodide (I-) and IO3- on an activated carbon (AC) disk as a solid sorbent was investigated for the further development of efficient removal and analytical techniques. To this end, batch sorption tests were performed as a function of pH, sample volume, and initial concentration. Sorption of I- occurred preferentially on the surface of AC disk, regardless of pH levels (i.e., 4, 6, and 8). However, IO3- was quite sensitive to pH levels and the sorption capability of IO3- on the AC disk was much smaller than that of I-. Maximum sorption capacities of I- and IO3- in the different matrices (i.e., deionized water and seawater) were also assessed. In addition, the analytical strategy for the iodine speciation was also introduced. Iodine species were separated and pre-concentrated onto the AC disk based on their selective sorption properties according to the pH levels. Then, the AC disk pre-concentrated was directly analyzed using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Acknowledgement This research was supported by a grant from the Korea Basic Science Institute (project No. E33300).

  1. Population differentiation without speciation

    PubMed Central

    Magurran, A. E.

    1998-01-01

    Population differentiation is often viewed as an important step towards speciation, and part of the rationale for conserving variation at the intraspecific level is that the potential to generate more biological diversity should be retained. Yet, speciation is not an inevitable consequence of population divergence. This paper reviews recent work on the Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata, a species that is renowned for its capacity for population differentiation. Guppy populations evolve rapidly, within 101 to 102 generations, as a response to changes in selection exerted by predators. The rates of evolution involved can be up to seven orders of magnitude greater than those seen in the fossil record. Sexual selection, particuarly female choice, appears to reinforce the divergence that natural selection has generated. Perplexingly, however, there is no reproductive isolation (either prezygotic or postzygotic) between populations, even those that have been separated for at least 106 generations. Sexual conflict may be the key to explaining this absence of speciation. Male reproductive behaviour, particularly the high incidence of sneaky mating, may be instrumental in producing sufficient gene flow to prevent reproductive isolation. Sneaky mating has the potential to undermine female choice, and is known to be an important means of sperm transfer in wild populations. Sexual dimorphism, also a result of sexual conflict in guppies, may inhibit speciation in another way. Morphological differences between the sexes, that have arisen for reproductive reasons, mean that males and females are pre-adapted for different foraging niches. This, in turn, reduces the opportunity for the development of feeding polymorphisms, a mechanism that seems to have been important in the sympatric speciation of other fish species.

  2. Guidelines for dynamic data acquisition and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1992-01-01

    The recommendations concerning pyroshock data presented in the final draft of a proposed military handbook on Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis are reviewed. The structural responses produced by pyroshocks are considered to be one of the most difficult types of dynamic data to accurately measure and analyze.

  3. Dynamic analysis of moored tankers

    SciTech Connect

    Dercksen, A.

    1995-12-31

    A loaded 200 kDWT tanker moored, in shallow water, by means of a single bow anchor chain is subjected to wind and waves. Wind loads on the tanker were measured in a stiff mooring arrangement. The measured wind loads together with the calibrated wave train were used as input to a numerical model to predict the dynamic behavior of the anchored tanker. A good correlation with the measured tanker motions and mooring loads was found. The model can be used in the design of mooring systems and anchoring equipment for arbitrary water depths. Important features which are accounted for include bottom friction, low and high frequency tanker motions and chain dynamics.

  4. Finite-element analysis and multibody dynamics issues in rotorcraft dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzicka, Gene C.; Ormiston, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    There is general agreement that the development of effective rotorcraft analysis software will require the use of modern computational mechanics methodologies, especially finite element analysis and multibody dynamics. This paper examines the analysis of rotorcraft dynamics from the perspective of these methodologies. First, a general discussion of rotorcraft analysis and modeling is presented. Then, a hierarchy of rotorcraft analyses is presented, ranging from simple to complex kinematics, where it is shown that in comprehensive rotorcraft software, finite element analysis must be augmented by multibody dynamics in order to properly analyze large motions of rotorcraft components. Finally, a review of multibody dynamics is presented to further familiarize the rotorcraft community with this technology.

  5. Bimolecular dynamics by computer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    As numerical tools (computers and display equipment) become more powerful and the atomic structures of important biological molecules become known, the importance of detailed computation of nonequilibrium biomolecular dynamics increases. In this manuscript we report results from a well developed study of the hydrogen bonded polypeptide crystal acetanilide, a model protein. Directions for future research are suggested. 9 references, 6 figures.

  6. Direct ion speciation analysis with ion-selective membranes operated in a sequential potentiometric/time resolved chronopotentiometric sensing mode.

    PubMed

    Ghahraman Afshar, Majid; Crespo, Gastón A; Bakker, Eric

    2012-10-16

    Ion-selective membranes based on porous polypropylene membranes doped with an ionophore and a lipophilic cation-exchanger are used here in a new tandem measurement mode that combines dynamic electrochemistry and zero current potentiometry into a single protocol. Open circuit potential measurements yield near-nernstian response slopes in complete analogy to established ion-selective electrode methodology. Such measurements are well established to give direct information on the so-called free ion concentration (strictly, activity) in the sample. The same membrane is here also operated in a constant current mode, in which the localized ion depletion at a transition time is visualized by chronopotentiometry. This dynamic electrochemistry methodology gives information on the labile ion concentration in the sample. The sequential protocol is established on potassium and calcium ion-selective membranes. An increase of the ionophore concentration in the membrane to 180 mM makes it possible to determine calcium concentrations as high as 3 mM by chronopotentiometry, thereby making it possible to directly detect total calcium in undiluted blood samples. Recovery times after current perturbation depend on the current amplitude but can be kept to below 1 min for the polypropylene based ion-selective membranes studied here. Plasticized PVC as membrane material is less suited for this protocol, especially when the measurement at elevated concentrations is desired. An analysis of current amplitudes, transition times, and concentrations shows that the data are described by the Sand equation and that migration effects are insignificant. A numerical model describes the experimental findings with good agreement and gives guidance on the required selectivity in order to observe a well-resolved transition time and on the expected errors due to insufficient selectivity. The simulations suggest that the methodology compares well to that of open circuit potentiometry, despite giving

  7. Coupled dynamics analysis of wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative description of all key elements of a complete wind energy system computer analysis code is presented. The analysis system addresses the coupled dynamics characteristics of wind energy systems, including the interactions of the rotor, tower, nacelle, power train, control system, and electrical network. The coupled dynamics are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain to provide the basic motions and loads data required for design, performance verification and operations analysis activities. Elements of the coupled analysis code were used to design and analyze candidate rotor articulation concepts. Fundamental results and conclusions derived from these studies are presented.

  8. Speciation analysis of mercury in cereals by liquid chromatography chemical vapor generation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang-Yen; Chang, Lan-Fang; Jiang, Shiuh-Jen

    2008-08-27

    A simple and rapid procedure for the separation and determination of inorganic, methyl, and ethyl mercury compounds was described using liquid chromatography (LC) followed by vapor generation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (VG-ICP-MS). Well resolved chromatograms were obtained within 5 min by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with a C8 column as the stationary phase and a pH 4.7 solution containing 0.5% v/v 2-mercaptoethanol and 5% v/v methanol as the mobile phase. The separated mercury compounds were converted to mercury vapors by an in situ nebulizer/vapor generation system for their introduction into ICP. The concentrations of NaBH4 and HNO3 required for vapor generation were also optimized. The method was applied for the speciation of mercury in reference materials NIST SRM 1568a Rice Flour and NIST SRM 1567a Wheat Flour and also rice flour and wheat flour samples purchased locally. The accuracy of the procedure was verified by analyzing the certified reference material NRCC DOLT-3 Dogfish Liver for methyl mercury. Precision between sample replicates was better than 13% for all the determinations. The detection limits of the mercury compounds studied were in the range 0.003-0.006 ng Hg mL(-1) in the injected solutions, which correspond to 0.02-0.06 ng g(-1) in original flour samples. A microwave-assisted extraction procedure was adopted for the extraction of mercury compounds from rice flour, wheat flour, and fish samples using a mobile phase solution.

  9. Session 6: Dynamic Modeling and Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey; Chapman, Jeffryes; May, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    These presentations cover some of the ongoing work in dynamic modeling and dynamic systems analysis. The first presentation discusses dynamic systems analysis and how to integrate dynamic performance information into the systems analysis. The ability to evaluate the dynamic performance of an engine design may allow tradeoffs between the dynamic performance and operability of a design resulting in a more efficient engine design. The second presentation discusses the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS). T-MATS is a Simulation system with a library containing the basic building blocks that can be used to create dynamic Thermodynamic Systems. Some of the key features include Turbo machinery components, such as turbines, compressors, etc., and basic control system blocks. T-MAT is written in the Matlab-Simulink environment and is open source software. The third presentation focuses on getting additional performance from the engine by allowing the limit regulators only to be active when a limit is danger of being violated. Typical aircraft engine control architecture is based on MINMAX scheme, which is designed to keep engine operating within prescribed mechanical/operational safety limits. Using a conditionally active min-max limit regulator scheme, additional performance can be gained by disabling non-relevant limit regulators

  10. Dynamic sensitivity analysis of biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wu Hsiung; Wang, Feng Sheng; Chang, Maw Shang

    2008-01-01

    Background A mathematical model to understand, predict, control, or even design a real biological system is a central theme in systems biology. A dynamic biological system is always modeled as a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) system. How to simulate the dynamic behavior and dynamic parameter sensitivities of systems described by ODEs efficiently and accurately is a critical job. In many practical applications, e.g., the fed-batch fermentation systems, the system admissible input (corresponding to independent variables of the system) can be time-dependent. The main difficulty for investigating the dynamic log gains of these systems is the infinite dimension due to the time-dependent input. The classical dynamic sensitivity analysis does not take into account this case for the dynamic log gains. Results We present an algorithm with an adaptive step size control that can be used for computing the solution and dynamic sensitivities of an autonomous ODE system simultaneously. Although our algorithm is one of the decouple direct methods in computing dynamic sensitivities of an ODE system, the step size determined by model equations can be used on the computations of the time profile and dynamic sensitivities with moderate accuracy even when sensitivity equations are more stiff than model equations. To show this algorithm can perform the dynamic sensitivity analysis on very stiff ODE systems with moderate accuracy, it is implemented and applied to two sets of chemical reactions: pyrolysis of ethane and oxidation of formaldehyde. The accuracy of this algorithm is demonstrated by comparing the dynamic parameter sensitivities obtained from this new algorithm and from the direct method with Rosenbrock stiff integrator based on the indirect method. The same dynamic sensitivity analysis was performed on an ethanol fed-batch fermentation system with a time-varying feed rate to evaluate the applicability of the algorithm to realistic models with time

  11. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  12. Chemical Speciation of Sulfur in Marine Cloud Droplets and Particles: Analysis of Individual Particles from Marine Boundary Layer over the California Current

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Wiley Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Gilles, Mary K; Hopkins, Rebecca J.; Desyaterik, Yury; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2008-03-12

    Detailed chemical speciation of the dry residue particles from individual cloud droplets and interstitial aerosol collected during the Marine Stratus Experiment (MASE) was performed using a combination of complementary microanalysis techniques. Techniques include computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersed analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), time-of-flight secondary ionization mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Samples were collected at the ground site located in Point Reyes National Seashore, approximately 1 km from the coast. This manuscript focuses on the analysis of individual particles sampled from air masses that originated over the open ocean and then passed through the area of the California current located along the northern California coast. Based on composition, morphology, and chemical bonding information, two externally mixed, distinct classes of sulfur containing particles were identified: chemically modified (aged) sea salt particles and secondary formed sulfate particles. The results indicate substantial heterogeneous replacement of chloride by methanesulfonate (CH3SO3-) and non-sea salt sulfate (nss-SO42-) in sea-salt particles with characteristic ratios of nss-S/Na>0.10 and CH3SO3-/nss-SO42->0.6.

  13. Rapid speciation analysis of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Abul; Kumita, Mikio; Michigami, Yoshimasa; Islam, Tajmeri S A; Mori, Shigeru

    2005-02-01

    A simple and rapid method is developed for the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) based on the formation of their different complexes with ammonium pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (APDC). Separation is performed using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV detection. The conditions for complex formation and speciation are determined, such as solution pH, amount of APDC, temperature, and type of mobile phase. In order to substantially reduce the analysis time, the separation is carried out without extraction of chromium-APDC complexes from the mother liquor. Under the optimum analysis conditions, the chromatograms obtained show good peak separation, and the absolute detection limits (3s) are 2.2 microg/L for Cr(VI) and 4.5 microg/L for Cr(III). The calibration curves are linear from 3 to 5000 microg/L for Cr(VI) and 5 to 3000 microg/L for Cr(III). The relative standard deviations of peak areas in five measurements using a sample solution of 200 microg/L are less than 2% for Cr(VI) and 4% for Cr(III), indicating good reproducibility for this analytical method. Furthermore, simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) is successful with the application of the proposed procedure in the synthetic wastewaters containing common heavy metal ions: Fe(III), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), and Zn(II). PMID:15826369

  14. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis of Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerin, John A.; Sporrer, Justin M.; Egolf, David A.

    2013-03-01

    The development of spatiotemporal chaotic behavior in heart tissue, termed fibrillation, is a devastating, life-threatening condition. The chaotic behavior of electrochemical signals, in the form of spiral waves, causes the muscles of the heart to contract in an incoherent manner, hindering the heart's ability to pump blood. We have applied the mathematical tools of nonlinear dynamics to large-scale simulations of a model of fibrillating heart tissue to uncover the dynamical modes driving this chaos. By studying the evolution of Lyapunov vectors and exponents over short times, we have found that the fibrillating tissue is sensitive to electrical perturbations only in narrow regions immediately in front of the leading edges of spiral waves, especially when these waves collide, break apart, or hit the edges of the tissue sample. Using this knowledge, we have applied small stimuli to areas of varying sensitivity. By studying the evolution of the effects of these perturbations, we have made progress toward controlling the electrochemical patterns associated with heart fibrillation. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (DMR-0094178) and Research Corporation.

  15. Contextual analysis framework for bursty dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Pan, Raj Kumar; Perotti, Juan I.; Kaski, Kimmo

    2013-06-01

    To understand the origin of bursty dynamics in natural and social processes we provide a general analysis framework in which the temporal process is decomposed into subprocesses and then the bursts in subprocesses, called contextual bursts, are combined to collective bursts in the original process. For the combination of subprocesses, it is required to consider the distribution of different contexts over the original process. Based on minimal assumptions for interevent time statistics, we present a theoretical analysis for the relationship between contextual and collective interevent time distributions. Our analysis framework helps to exploit contextual information available in decomposable bursty dynamics.

  16. The evolutionary genetics of speciation.

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, J A; Orr, H A

    1998-01-01

    The last decade has brought renewed interest in the genetics of speciation, yielding a number of new models and empirical results. Defining speciation as 'the origin of reproductive isolation between two taxa', we review recent theoretical studies and relevant data, emphasizing the regular patterns seen among genetic analyses. Finally, we point out some important and tractable questions about speciation that have been neglected. PMID:9533126

  17. A novel strategy for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) analysis in dietary supplements by speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Unceta, Nora; Astorkia, Maider; Abrego, Zuriñe; Gómez-Caballero, Alberto; Goicolea, M Aránzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, Cr speciation in dietary supplements has become decisive in the evaluation of their health risks. Despite being an beneficial micronutrient, Cr(III) can be toxic at living organisms at high concentrations, while Cr(VI) is known to be highly toxic and carcinogenic. The main objective of this work was to optimize an analytical methodology for the extraction and accurate quantification of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in dietary supplements. The extraction of Cr species was carried out with 50mM EDTA solution on a hotplate under optimized conditions. Special attention was paid to bidirectional species transformations. No noticeable oxidation of Cr(III) into Cr(VI) was observed and the reduction to Cr(III) only occurred at very high Cr(VI) concentrations. Cr(III) as Cr(EDTA)(-) complex was chromatographically separated from Cr(VI), retained as CrO4(2-), on an anion exchange column coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS). The limit of quantification (0.08µgg(-1)) was below the limit established for Cr enriched yeasts by the European Union. Eleven dietary supplements were analyzed and Cr(III) and Cr(VI) quantification was carried out by external calibration monitoring (52)Cr isotope and by speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) adding (50)Cr(III) and (53)Cr(VI) spikes. Total Cr was also quantified by ICP-MS and mass balance between total Cr and the sum of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) was achieved. In eight of the eleven tested supplements Cr(III) calculated amounts were higher than those indicated by the manufacturer, but only one of them exceeded the 250µgday(-1) recommended by World Health Organization (WHO). In contrast, it is worth noting that Cr(VI) amounts beyond the recommendations of the European Union for Cr enriched yeasts were found in five supplements. These results revealed that more accurate and rigorous quality assurance protocols should be applied to the testing of the final products, including the analysis of both

  18. A novel strategy for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) analysis in dietary supplements by speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Unceta, Nora; Astorkia, Maider; Abrego, Zuriñe; Gómez-Caballero, Alberto; Goicolea, M Aránzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, Cr speciation in dietary supplements has become decisive in the evaluation of their health risks. Despite being an beneficial micronutrient, Cr(III) can be toxic at living organisms at high concentrations, while Cr(VI) is known to be highly toxic and carcinogenic. The main objective of this work was to optimize an analytical methodology for the extraction and accurate quantification of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in dietary supplements. The extraction of Cr species was carried out with 50mM EDTA solution on a hotplate under optimized conditions. Special attention was paid to bidirectional species transformations. No noticeable oxidation of Cr(III) into Cr(VI) was observed and the reduction to Cr(III) only occurred at very high Cr(VI) concentrations. Cr(III) as Cr(EDTA)(-) complex was chromatographically separated from Cr(VI), retained as CrO4(2-), on an anion exchange column coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS). The limit of quantification (0.08µgg(-1)) was below the limit established for Cr enriched yeasts by the European Union. Eleven dietary supplements were analyzed and Cr(III) and Cr(VI) quantification was carried out by external calibration monitoring (52)Cr isotope and by speciated isotope dilution mass spectrometry (SIDMS) adding (50)Cr(III) and (53)Cr(VI) spikes. Total Cr was also quantified by ICP-MS and mass balance between total Cr and the sum of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) was achieved. In eight of the eleven tested supplements Cr(III) calculated amounts were higher than those indicated by the manufacturer, but only one of them exceeded the 250µgday(-1) recommended by World Health Organization (WHO). In contrast, it is worth noting that Cr(VI) amounts beyond the recommendations of the European Union for Cr enriched yeasts were found in five supplements. These results revealed that more accurate and rigorous quality assurance protocols should be applied to the testing of the final products, including the analysis of both

  19. Study on multielemental speciation analysis of Cr(VI), As(III) and As(V) in water by advanced hyphenated technique HPLC/ICP-DRC-MS. Fast and reliable procedures.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska, Monika; Komorowicz, Izabela; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2015-11-01

    Analytical procedures for multielemental speciation analysis of arsenite - As(III), arsenate - As(V) and hexavalent chromium - Cr(VI) in water using high performance liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC/ICP-DRC-MS) hyphenated technique have been developed. A dynamic reaction cell (DRC) for spectral interferences elimination has been involved in the experiment. Application of oxygen and ammonia as reaction gases in the DRC under various conditions has been verified. Optimization of the following chromatographic conditions: mobile phase composition, concentration of particular components, mobile phase pH and flow rate, injection volume and column temperature, has been conducted. Species separation has been carried out on anion-exchange chromatographic column using isocratic elution with: 22 mM (NH4)2HPO4, 25 mM NH4NO3 (for procedure A) and 22 mM (NH4)2HPO4, 65 mM NH4NO3 (for procedure B) as mobile phases. Detection limits (LD) for procedure A were 0.16 µg L(-1), 0.090 µg L(-1), 0.073 µg L(-1), and for procedure B were 0.14 µg L(-1), 0.062 µg L(-1), 0.15 µg L(-1) for As(III), As(V) and Cr(VI), respectively. Linearity was tested at two concentration ranges of: (0.5-10.0) µg L(-1) for procedure A and (5-50) µg L(-1) for procedure B, and showed correlation coefficients for each of the analytes to be above 0.999. Repeatability values obtained for spiked real water samples were in the range of (4.2-7.6)% and (2.0-2.4)% for procedure A and B respectively. Accuracy was calculated based on the analysis of spiked real water samples at three concentration levels. Obtained recoveries were from 94% to 102%. PMID:26452815

  20. Arsenic Speciation in Groundwater: Role of Thioanions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behavior of arsenic in groundwater environments is fundamentally linked to its speciation. Understanding arsenic speciation is important because chemical speciation impacts reactivity, bioavailability, toxicity, and transport and fate processes. In aerobic environments arsen...

  1. Mercury speciation analysis in sea water by solid phase microextraction?gas chromatography?inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using ethyl and propyl derivatization. Matrix effects evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Sánchez, Luis R.; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; Fidalgo Martínez, José I.; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    An approach to the speciation analysis of mercury in sea-water samples at sub-ppt levels by means of the hyphenation of solid phase microextraction to gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was developed. Blank values turned out to be the limiting factor for lower detection limits of inorganic mercury. Thus, all the reagents were thoroughly cleaned using laboratory made microcolumns packed with 8-hydroxyquinoline on TSK gel. Sodium tetrapropylborate (NaBPr 4) synthesized for the purpose of derivatization of the mercury species resulted in better analytical performances of the method, probably due to lower mercury contamination, than commercial sodium tetraethylborate (NaBEt 4). Detection limits down to a few picogram per liter for both mercury and methylmercury were obtained using NaBPr 4. The high salt content of sea-water samples was responsible for strong matrix effects, which were overcome by using standards additions to the samples. The validation of the methodology was carried out by direct comparison of the results for inorganic mercury with those obtained using a flow injection system followed by preconcentration/trapping of the species and its detection by atomic absorption spectrometry. The proposed method was applied to the determination of mercury and methylmercury in coastal sea-water samples from Gijón (Asturias, Spain) and results obtained are discussed in the light of the butyltin levels previously determined in the same area.

  2. Speciation analysis of tellurium by solid-phase extraction in the presence of ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chunhai; Cai, Qiantao; Guo, Zhong-Xian; Yang, Zhaoguang; Khoo, Soo Beng

    2003-05-01

    Under acidic conditions tellurium(IV) formed a complex with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC). The tellurium(IV) complex was completely retained on a non-polar Isolute silica-based octadecyl (C(18)) sorbent-containing solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, while the uncomplexed Te(VI) passed through the cartridge and remained as a free species in the solution. Only partial Te(IV) was retained on the SPE cartridge for samples without addition of APDC. On the basis of different retention behaviours of the complexed Te(IV) and uncomplexed Te(VI), a simple and highly sensitive method is proposed for the determination of total tellurium and Te(VI) by SPE separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection. The Te(IV) concentration was calculated as the difference between total tellurium and Te(VI) concentrations. The detection limit (3 sigma) is 3 ng L(-1) tellurium. Factors affecting the separation and detection of tellurium species were investigated. Coexisting ions did not show significant interferences with the Te(IV)-APDC complex retention and the subsequent ICP-MS detection of Te. The method has been successfully applied to the tellurium speciation analysis in waters with spiked recoveries for Te(IV) and Te(VI) of 86.0-108% and 87.1-97.4%, respectively.

  3. Surface speciation of Eu3+ adsorbed on kaolinite by time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).

    PubMed

    Ishida, Keisuke; Saito, Takumi; Aoyagi, Noboru; Kimura, Takaumi; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Nagasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoru

    2012-05-15

    Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) is an effective speciation technique for fluorescent metal ions and can be further extended by the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The adsorption of Eu(3+) on kaolinite as well as gibbsite as a reference mineral was investigated by TRLFS together with batch adsorption measurements. The PAFAFAC modeling provided the fluorescence spectra, decay lifetimes, and relative intensity profiles of three Eu(3+) surface complexes with kaolinite; an outer-sphere (factor A) complex and two inner-sphere (factors B and C) complexes. Their intensity profiles qualitatively explained the measured adsorption of Eu(3+). Based on the TRLFS results in varied H(2)O/D(2)O media, it was shown that the outer-sphere complex exhibited more rapid fluorescence decay than Eu(3+) aquo ion, because of the energy transfer to the surface. Factor B was an inner-sphere complex, which became dominant at relatively high pH, high salt concentration and low Eu(3+) concentration. Its spectrum and lifetime were similar to those of Eu(3+) adsorbed on gibbsite, suggesting its occurrence on the edge face of the gibbsite layer of kaolinite. From the comparison with the spectra and lifetimes of crystalline or aqueous Eu(OH)(3), factor C was considered as a poly-nuclear surface complex of Eu(3+) formed at relatively high Eu(3+) concentration.

  4. Hard X-Ray Spectro Microprobe Analysis of Inhomogeneous Solids: A Case Study. Element Distribution and Speciation in Selected Iron Meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Cavell, R.G.; Feng, R.; Barnes, E.M.; Cavell, P.A.; McCready, A.J.; Webb, M.A.

    2007-06-08

    The hard X-ray microprobe provides an effective methodology for the non-destructive analysis of inhomogeneous materials. Application of X-ray absorption/fluroescence spectroscopy techniques (XANES and EXAFS) permits the speciation of the elements and yields information about the local structural environment. Microfocussed, monochromatic, tunable X-rays allows examination of small areas of micrometer dimensions with spectroscopic procedures. Typically the materials which are presented are thick and cannot be altered for the experiment. This condition introduces difficulties which may compromise the results. Herein we discuss those difficulties and show that the system can yield reliable results in spite of the compromises. Some results are presented on the two iron meteorites we have examined. These specimens are representative of highly inhomogeneous materials and illustrate the difficulties encountered with compositional variations which may occur at sub-millimeter dimensions and also illustrate the difficulties presented by the need to analyze components present at ppm concentration levels in a concentrated matrix. In these particular samples the major constituent is Fe which ranges from 90% to 70%, balanced by Ni which ranges from 10% to 30%. The critical diagnostic trace elements Ga and Ge which must also be analyzed are present at the 80 and 340 ppm level respectively. These diagnostic elements have been shown by EXAFS to be substitutionally placed in the matrix of the major element species in these meteorite samples.

  5. Visual Analysis of Dynamic Data Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Singhal, Mudita; Nakamura, Grant C.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Freeman-Cadoret, Natalie A.

    2009-09-01

    For scientific data visualizations, real-time data streams present many interesting challenges when compared to static data. Real-time data are dynamic, transient, high-volume, and temporal. Effective visualizations need to be able to accommodate dynamic data behavior as well as abstract and present the data in ways that make sense to and are usable by humans. The Visual Content Analysis of Real-Time Data Streams project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is researching and prototyping dynamic visualization techniques and tools to help facilitate human understanding and comprehension of high-volume, real-time data. The general strategy of the project is to develop and evolve visual contexts that will organize and orient complex dynamic data in conceptual and perceptive views. The goal is to allow users to quickly grasp dynamic data in forms that are intuitive and natural without requiring intensive training in the use of specific visualization or analysis tools and methods. Thus far, the project has prototyped four different visualization prototypes that represents and convey dynamic data through human-recognizable contexts and paradigms such as hierarchies, relationships, time, and geography. We describe the design considerations and unique features of these dynamic visualization prototypes as well as our findings in the exploration and evaluation of their use.

  6. Post Flight Dynamic Analysis Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, B. R.

    1970-01-01

    Digital six-degrees-of-freedom, open loop Saturn 5 first stage flight evaluation simulation program obtains post flight simulation of the launch vehicle using actual flight data as input. Results are compared with measured data. For preflight analysis, the program uses predicted flight data as input.

  7. Zirconium speciation in lactate solutions and polyacrylate gels.

    PubMed

    Rose, J; Chauveteau, G; Tabary, R; Renard, M; Omari, A; Toulhoat, H

    2001-03-01

    Controlling gelation kinetics is an important objective for several applications (ceramic and thin film syntheses, reduction in permeability of porous rock, etc). There is a growing interest in studying the gelation of polymers by zirconium, a crosslinker of lower toxicity than the chromium which is still commonly used. XAS at the Zr K-edge was performed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) on the BM32 beamline. The fluorescence detection was used to carry out successful in situ speciation at concentrations as low as 36 ppm. The Zr speciation was determined both in ZrLa (where La stands for lactate) aqueous solutions and in gels of a terpolymer of acrylamide having 2% of zirconium reactive acrylate side groups and 2% of sulfonate groups introduced to prevent syneresis. XANES results show that Zr is always in a dodecahedral geometry. In ZrLa solutions. EXAFS results indicate that Zr species grow from a dimer Zr2(La)6 to a tetramer (Zr4(La)x) and then to larger polymers resulting from tetramer associations, as the Zr concentration decreases from 51840 ppm to 36ppm. In polymer gels, Zr species appear to be dimers at pH 6 while tetramers are found when gelation occurred at pH 7. Calculations taking into account multiple scattering effects as well as dynamic molecular calculation confirmed conclusions derived from conventional EXAFS analysis.

  8. Analytical signal analysis of strange nonchaotic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kopal; Prasad, Awadhesh; Singh, Harinder P; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2008-04-01

    We apply an analytical signal analysis to strange nonchaotic dynamics. Through this technique it is possible to obtain the spectrum of instantaneous intrinsic mode frequencies that are present in a given signal. We find that the second-mode frequency and its variance are good order parameters for dynamical transitions from quasiperiodic tori to strange nonchaotic attractors (SNAs) and from SNAs to chaotic attractors. Phase fluctuation analysis shows that SNAs and chaotic attractors behave identically within short time windows as a consequence of local instabilities in the dynamics. In longer time windows, however, the globally stable character of SNAs becomes apparent. This methodology can be of great utility in the analysis of experimental time series, and representative applications are made to signals obtained from Rössler and Duffing oscillators. PMID:18517723

  9. SPECIATE--EPA'S DATABASE OF SPECIATED EMISSION PROFILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is EPA's repository of Total Organic Compound and Particulate Matter speciated profiles for a wide variety of sources. The profiles in this system are provided for air quality dispersion modeling and as a library for source-receptor and source apportionment type models. ...

  10. Method development for the redox speciation analysis of iron by ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and carryover assessment using isotopically labeled analyte analogues.

    PubMed

    Wolle, Mesay Mulugeta; Fahrenholz, Timothy; Rahman, G M Mizanur; Pamuku, Matt; Kingston, H M 'Skip'; Browne, Damien

    2014-06-20

    An ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS) method was developed for the redox speciation analysis of iron (Fe) based on in-column complexation of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) by dipicolinic acid (DPA). The effects of column type, mobile phase composition and molecular ion interference were studied in the method optimization. The carryover of the target species in the IC-ICP-MS method was uniquely and effectively evaluated using isotopically enriched analogues of the analytes ((54)Fe(2+) and (57)Fe(3+)). Standard solutions of the enriched standards were injected into the system following analysis of a sample, and the ratios of the isotopes of iron in the enriched standards were calculated based on the chromatographic peak areas. The concentrations of the analytes carried over from the sample to the enriched standards were determined using the quantitative relationship in isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In contrast to the routine way of evaluating carryover effect by injecting a blank solution after sample analysis, the use of isotopically enriched standards identified significant analyte carryover in the present method. Extensive experiments were carried out to systematically identify the source of the carryover and to eliminate the problem; the separation column was found to be the exclusive source. More than 95% of the analyte carryover was eliminated by reducing the length of the column. The detection limit of the IC-ICP-MS method (MDL) for the iron species was 2ngg(-1). The method was used to determine Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) in synthetic aqueous standard solutions and a beverage sample.

  11. Dynamic analysis of a surface towed riser

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, D.L.; Watters, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    An investigation of the dynamic response of a slightly buoyant, surface towed riser (or pipeline) to waves is presented. A time domain numerical model is described. Analysis results for response to regular and random waves are discussed and compared to published experimental data. Response is examined in some detail for a 2m diameter riser. The dynamic response to waves is described in terms of the response to regular waves. Analysis results for random waves are presented and compared to the regular wave response. Fatigue damage estimates are calculated for a riser subjected to a severe summer storm and found to be acceptable for a tow of several days duration.

  12. Structural Dynamics and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthman, Briana L.

    2013-01-01

    This project consists of two parts, the first will be the post-flight analysis of data from a Delta IV launch vehicle, and the second will be a Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. Shock and vibration data was collected on WGS-5 (Wideband Global SATCOM- 5) which was launched on a Delta IV launch vehicle. Using CAM (CAlculation with Matrices) software, the data is to be plotted into Time History, Shock Response Spectrum, and SPL (Sound Pressure Level) curves. In this format the data is to be reviewed and compared to flight instrumentation data from previous flights of the same launch vehicle. This is done to ensure the current mission environments, such as shock, random vibration, and acoustics, are not out of family with existing flight experience. In family means the peaks on the SRS curve for WGS-5 are similar to the peaks from the previous flights and there are no major outliers. The curves from the data will then be compiled into a useful format so that is can be peer reviewed then presented before an engineering review board if required. Also, the reviewed data will be uploaded to the Engineering Review Board Information System (ERBIS) to archive. The second part of this project is conducting Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. In 2010, Merritt Island High School partnered with NASA to design, build and launch a CubeSat. The team is now called StangSat in honor of their mascot, the mustang. Over the past few years, the StangSat team has built a satellite and has now been manifested for flight on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch in 2014. To prepare for the final launch, a test flight was conducted in Mojave, California. StangSat was launched on a Prospector 18D, a high altitude rocket made by Garvey Spacecraft Corporation, along with their sister satellite CP9 built by California Polytechnic University. However, StangSat was damaged during an off nominal landing and this project will give beneficial insights into what loads the CubeSat experienced during the crash

  13. Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

    2013-09-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

  14. Speciation in granitic melts

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, C.W.; Nekvasil, H.

    1985-01-01

    Refinement of the cryoscopic equations for the major granitic melt components, NaAlSi/sub 3/O/sub 8/(ab), CaAl/sub 2/O/sub 8/(an), KAlSi/sub 3/O/sub 8/(or), and Si/sub 4/O/sub 8/(qz), has led to the recognition of several major speciation reactions in anhydrous and hydrous melts of the system Ab-An-Or-Qz-H/sub 2/O. These reactions involve either dissociation of the feldspar-like components, as in incongruent melting, or interaction between them and qz. In all cases of interaction, one of the speciation products has the stoichiometry of dpy or py (pyrophyllite) (Al/sub 1.455/Si/sub 2.91/O/sub 8/ +/- 0.73H/sub 2/O), in which Al is presumed to be in either fivefold (dpy) or sixfold (py) coordination. The py component also is a major product of speciation by interaction between sil (Al/sub 3.2/Si/sub 1.6/O/sub 8/) and qz in peraluminous melts of the system Ab-Or-Qz-Sil-H/sub 2/O; as a consequence, the quartz liquidus field boundary is shifted to lower temperatures and toward qz. There is no evidence in peraluminous haplogranite melts for the existence of a muscovite-like species. Application of the refined thermodynamic model to the system Ab-Qz-Eu - H/sub 2/O at 2.0 kbar predicts the occurrence of a eu and qz-consuming reaction that produces a petalite-like species and a consequent dramatic shift in liquidus field boundaries. Higher pressures favor conversion of pe to qz + sp. In the spodumene-like species, sp, Al presumably is six-coordinated.

  15. The drivers of tropical speciation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian Tilston; McCormack, John E; Cuervo, Andrés M; Hickerson, Michael J; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Burney, Curtis W; Xie, Xiaoou; Harvey, Michael G; Faircloth, Brant C; Glenn, Travis C; Derryberry, Elizabeth P; Prejean, Jesse; Fields, Samantha; Brumfield, Robb T

    2014-11-20

    Since the recognition that allopatric speciation can be induced by large-scale reconfigurations of the landscape that isolate formerly continuous populations, such as the separation of continents by plate tectonics, the uplift of mountains or the formation of large rivers, landscape change has been viewed as a primary driver of biological diversification. This process is referred to in biogeography as vicariance. In the most species-rich region of the world, the Neotropics, the sundering of populations associated with the Andean uplift is ascribed this principal role in speciation. An alternative model posits that rather than being directly linked to landscape change, allopatric speciation is initiated to a greater extent by dispersal events, with the principal drivers of speciation being organism-specific abilities to persist and disperse in the landscape. Landscape change is not a necessity for speciation in this model. Here we show that spatial and temporal patterns of genetic differentiation in Neotropical birds are highly discordant across lineages and are not reconcilable with a model linking speciation solely to landscape change. Instead, the strongest predictors of speciation are the amount of time a lineage has persisted in the landscape and the ability of birds to move through the landscape matrix. These results, augmented by the observation that most species-level diversity originated after episodes of major Andean uplift in the Neogene period, suggest that dispersal and differentiation on a matrix previously shaped by large-scale landscape events was a major driver of avian speciation in lowland Neotropical rainforests.

  16. The drivers of tropical speciation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian Tilston; McCormack, John E; Cuervo, Andrés M; Hickerson, Michael J; Aleixo, Alexandre; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Pérez-Emán, Jorge; Burney, Curtis W; Xie, Xiaoou; Harvey, Michael G; Faircloth, Brant C; Glenn, Travis C; Derryberry, Elizabeth P; Prejean, Jesse; Fields, Samantha; Brumfield, Robb T

    2014-11-20

    Since the recognition that allopatric speciation can be induced by large-scale reconfigurations of the landscape that isolate formerly continuous populations, such as the separation of continents by plate tectonics, the uplift of mountains or the formation of large rivers, landscape change has been viewed as a primary driver of biological diversification. This process is referred to in biogeography as vicariance. In the most species-rich region of the world, the Neotropics, the sundering of populations associated with the Andean uplift is ascribed this principal role in speciation. An alternative model posits that rather than being directly linked to landscape change, allopatric speciation is initiated to a greater extent by dispersal events, with the principal drivers of speciation being organism-specific abilities to persist and disperse in the landscape. Landscape change is not a necessity for speciation in this model. Here we show that spatial and temporal patterns of genetic differentiation in Neotropical birds are highly discordant across lineages and are not reconcilable with a model linking speciation solely to landscape change. Instead, the strongest predictors of speciation are the amount of time a lineage has persisted in the landscape and the ability of birds to move through the landscape matrix. These results, augmented by the observation that most species-level diversity originated after episodes of major Andean uplift in the Neogene period, suggest that dispersal and differentiation on a matrix previously shaped by large-scale landscape events was a major driver of avian speciation in lowland Neotropical rainforests. PMID:25209666

  17. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Den Durpel, Luc Van

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims at performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.

  18. Development of a non-chromatographic method for the speciation analysis of inorganic antimony in mushroom samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa Ferreira, Hadla; Costa Ferreira, Sergio Luis; Cervera, M. Luisa; de la Guardia, Miguel

    2009-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the direct determination of toxic species of antimony in mushroom samples by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG AFS). The determination of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was based on the efficiency of hydride generation employing NaBH 4, with and without a previous KI reduction, using proportional equations corresponding to the two different measurement conditions. The extraction efficiency of total antimony and the stability of Sb(III) and Sb(V) in different extraction media (nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric, acetic acid, methanol and ethanol) were evaluated. Results demonstrated that, based on the extraction yield and the stability of extracts, 0.5 mol L - 1 H 2SO 4 proved to be the best extracting solution for the speciation analysis of antimony in mushroom samples. The limits of detection of the developed methodology were 0.6 and 1.1 ng g - 1 for Sb(III) and Sb(V), respectively. The relative standard derivation was 3.8% (14.7 ng g - 1 ) for Sb(V) and 5.1% (4.6 ng g - 1 ) for Sb(III). The recovery values obtained for Sb(III) and Sb(V) varied from 94 to 106% and from 98 to 105%, respectively. The method has been applied to determine Sb(III), Sb(V) and total Sb in five different mushroom samples; the Sb(III) content varied from 4.6 to 11.4 ng g - 1 and Sb(V) from 14.7 to 21.2 ng g - 1 . The accuracy of the method was confirmed by the analysis of a certified reference material of tomato leaves.

  19. Speciation in the Deep Sea: Multi-Locus Analysis of Divergence and Gene Flow between Two Hybridizing Species of Hydrothermal Vent Mussels

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Baptiste; Jollivet, Didier; Tanguy, Arnaud; Bonhomme, François; Bierne, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Background Reconstructing the history of divergence and gene flow between closely-related organisms has long been a difficult task of evolutionary genetics. Recently, new approaches based on the coalescence theory have been developed to test the existence of gene flow during the process of divergence. The deep sea is a motivating place to apply these new approaches. Differentiation by adaptation can be driven by the heterogeneity of the hydrothermal environment while populations should not have been strongly perturbed by climatic oscillations, the main cause of geographic isolation at the surface. Methodology/Principal Finding Samples of DNA sequences were obtained for seven nuclear loci and a mitochondrial locus in order to conduct a multi-locus analysis of divergence and gene flow between two closely related and hybridizing species of hydrothermal vent mussels, Bathymodiolus azoricus and B. puteoserpentis. The analysis revealed that (i) the two species have started to diverge approximately 0.760 million years ago, (ii) the B. azoricus population size was 2 to 5 time greater than the B. puteoserpentis and the ancestral population and (iii) gene flow between the two species occurred over the complete species range and was mainly asymmetric, at least for the chromosomal regions studied. Conclusions/Significance A long history of gene flow has been detected between the two Bathymodiolus species. However, it proved very difficult to conclusively distinguish secondary introgression from ongoing parapatric differentiation. As powerful as coalescence approaches could be, we are left by the fact that natural populations often deviates from standard assumptions of the underlying model. A more direct observation of the history of recombination at one of the seven loci studied suggests an initial period of allopatric differentiation during which recombination was blocked between lineages. Even in the deep sea, geographic isolation may well be a crucial promoter of speciation

  20. Dynamic analysis for shuttle design verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralich, R. W.; Green, C. E.; Rheinfurth, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Two approaches that are used for determining the modes and frequencies of space shuttle structures are discussed. The first method, direct numerical analysis, involves finite element mathematical modeling of the space shuttle structure in order to use computer programs for dynamic structural analysis. The second method utilizes modal-coupling techniques of experimental verification made by vibrating only spacecraft components and by deducing modes and frequencies of the complete vehicle from results obtained in the component tests.

  1. Final Report Computational Analysis of Dynamical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenheimer, John

    2012-05-08

    This is the final report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-93ER25164, initiated in 1993. This grant supported research of John Guckenheimer on computational analysis of dynamical systems. During that period, seventeen individuals received PhD degrees under the supervision of Guckenheimer and over fifty publications related to the grant were produced. This document contains copies of these publications.

  2. Sulfur speciation in natural hydrothermal waters, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasalainen, Hanna; Stefánsson, Andri

    2011-05-01

    The speciation of aqueous dissolved sulfur was determined in hydrothermal waters in Iceland. The waters sampled included hot springs, acid-sulfate pools and mud pots, sub-boiling well discharges and two-phase wells. The water temperatures ranged from 4 to 210 °C, the pH T was between 2.20 and 9.30 at the discharge temperature and the SO 4 and Cl concentrations were 0.020-52.7 and <0.01-10.0 mmol kg -1, respectively. The analyses were carried out on-site within ˜10 min of sampling using ion chromatography (IC) for sulfate (SO 42-), thiosulfate (S 2O 32-) and polythionates (S xO 62-) and titration and/or colorimetry for total dissolved sulfide (S 2-). Sulfite (SO 32-) could also be determined in a few cases using IC. Alternatively, for few samples in remote locations the sulfur oxyanions were stabilized on a resin on site following elution and analysis by IC in the laboratory. Dissolved sulfate and with few exceptions also S 2- were detected in all samples with concentrations of 0.02-52.7 mmol kg -1 and <1-4100 μmol kg -1, respectively. Thiosulfate was detected in 49 samples of the 73 analyzed with concentrations in the range of <1-394 μmol kg -1 (S-equivalents). Sulfite was detected in few samples with concentrations in the range of <1-3 μmol kg -1. Thiosulfate and SO 32- were not detected in <100 °C well waters and S 2O 32- was observed only at low concentrations (<1-8 μmol kg -1) in ˜200 °C well waters. In alkaline and neutral pH hot springs, S 2O 32- was present in significant concentrations sometimes corresponding to up to 23% of total dissolved sulfur (S TOT). In steam-heated acid-sulfate waters, S 2O 32- was not a significant sulfur species. The results demonstrate that S 2O 32- and SO 32- do not occur in the deeper parts of <150 °C hydrothermal systems and only in trace concentrations in ˜200-300 °C systems. Upon ascent to the surface and mixing with oxygenated ground and surface waters and/or dissolution of atmospheric O 2, S 2- is degassed and

  3. Application of chemometric analysis and self Organizing Map-Artificial Neural Network as source receptor modeling for metal speciation in river sediment.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Mayank; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Mishra, Ashutosh; Tripathi, B D

    2015-09-01

    Present study deals with the river Ganga water quality and its impact on metal speciation in its sediments. Concentration of physico-chemical parameters was highest in summer season followed by winter and lowest in rainy season. Metal speciation study in river sediments revealed that exchangeable, reducible and oxidizable fractions were dominant in all the studied metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) except Mn and Fe. High pollution load index (1.64-3.89) recommends urgent need of mitigation measures. Self-organizing Map-Artificial Neural Network (SOM-ANN) was applied to the data set for the prediction of major point sources of pollution in the river Ganga.

  4. A question of time: the land snail Murella muralis (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) reveals constraints on past ecological speciation.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, V; Manganelli, G; Giusti, F; Tiedemann, R; Ketmaier, V

    2013-01-01

    The lively debate about speciation currently focuses on the relative importance of factors driving population differentiation. While many studies are increasingly producing results on the importance of selection, little is known about the interaction between drift and selection. Moreover, there is still little knowledge on the spatial-temporal scales at which speciation occurs, that is, arrangement of habitat patches, abruptness of habitat transitions, climate and habitat changes interacting with selective forces. To investigate these questions, we quantified variation on a fine geographical scale analysing morphological (shell) and genetic data sets coupled with environmental data in the land snail Murella muralis, endemic to the Mediterranean island of Sicily. Analysis of a fragment of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI) and eight nuclear microsatellite loci showed that genetic variation is highly structured at a very fine spatial scale by local palaeogeographical events and historical population dynamics. Molecular clock estimates, calibrated here specifically for Tyrrhenian land snails, provided a framework of palaeogeographical events responsible for the observed geographical variations and migration routes. Finally, we showed for the first time well-documented lines of evidence of selection in the past, which explains divergence of land snail shell shapes. We suggest that time and palaeogeographical history acted as constraints in the progress along the ecological speciation continuum. Our study shows that testing for correlation among palaeogeography, morphology and genetic data on a fine geographical scale provides information fundamental for a detailed understanding of ecological speciation processes.

  5. Automated dynamic hollow fiber liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction combined with capillary electrophoresis for speciation of mercury in biological and environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Pingjing; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-10-01

    A simple home-made automatic dynamic hollow fiber based liquid-liquid-liquid microextraction (AD-HF-LLLME) device was designed and constructed for the simultaneous extraction of organomercury and inorganic mercury species with the assistant of a programmable flow injection analyzer. With 18-crown-6 as the complexing reagent, mercury species including methyl-, ethyl-, phenyl- and inorganic mercury were extracted into the organic phase (chlorobenzene), and then back-extracted into the acceptor phase of 0.1% (m/v) 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid (MPS) aqueous solution. Compared with automatic static (AS)-HF-LLLME system, the extraction equilibrium of target mercury species was obtained in shorter time with higher extraction efficiency in AD-HF-LLLME system. Based on it, a new method of AD-HF-LLLME coupled with large volume sample stacking (LVSS)-capillary electrophoresis (CE)/UV detection was developed for the simultaneous analysis of methyl-, phenyl- and inorganic mercury species in biological samples and environmental water. Under the optimized conditions, AD-HF-LLLME provided high enrichment factors (EFs) of 149-253-fold within relatively short extraction equilibrium time (25min) and good precision with RSD between 3.8 and 8.1%. By combining AD-HF-LLLME with LVSS-CE/UV, EFs were magnified up to 2195-fold and the limits of detection (at S/N=3) for target mercury species were improved to be sub ppb level.

  6. Redox stratification of the ocean 2.7 billion years ago: Preliminary results from Fe speciation analysis of shallow- and deep-facies black shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, A.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Haraguchi, S.; Naraoka, H.; Yahagi, T. R.

    2012-12-01

    Rise of atmospheric oxygen, or as known as GOE (Great Oxidation Event: e.g., Holland, 1994), has been widely believed to have occurred at around 2.4 billion years ago. Contrary, however, some studies have suggested that such oxygenation could have occurred much earlier (e.g., Hoashi et al., 2009). Geochemical behaviors of Fe, a redox-sensitive element, have played crucial roles in constraining past redox environments and the timing of the inferred GOE. In order to examine if there was intra-basinal heterogeneity in the redox conditions before the inferred GOE, we applied Fe speciation analysis to two contrasting sets of pyrite-bearing black shales; WRL1 (deeper facies) and RHDH2A (shallow facies). Both of these semi-contemporaneous black shales, deposited about 2.7 billion years ago and recovered as drillcores in Pilbara, northwestern Australia, have been previously used by Brocks et al. (1999), Yamaguchi et al. (2005), and Eigenbrode and Freeman (2006). Chemical compositions of major and some minor elements were measured by a standard XRF method, S content by elemental analysis, and Fe speciation by the method of Poulton et al. (2005) and Leventhal and Taylor (1990). Contrasting Fe/Al ratios of the examined samples suggest that Fe in WRL1 and RHDH2A is mostly from submarine hydrothermal activity and continental weathering, respectively. Relationships between organic carbon (Corg) and S contents suggest that oxic, normal marine setting is favored for WRL1 and euxinic environment for RHDH2A (S/Corg > 0.37). Oxygen in deep environment (WRL1) must have been supplied by sinking of O2-rich surface water through ocean circulation, because there was no source of oxygen in deep sea. In the 2.7 Ga surface ocean, oxygenic photosynthetic organisms (e.g., cyanobacteria) are considered to have been active. A large amount of organic matter was produced and sank, consuming a large amount of dissolved oxygen for decomposition/respiration. This led to the formation of euxinic

  7. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch 2005 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based); spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning; attitude analysis; attitude determination and sensor calibration; and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  8. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of sandwich panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lush, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Two analytical techniques applicable to large deflection dynamic response calculations for pressure loaded composite sandwich panels are demonstrated. One technique utilizes finite element modeling with a single equivalent layer representing the face sheets and core. The other technique utilizes the modal analysis computer code DEPROP which was recently modified to include transverse shear deformation in a core layer. The example problem consists of a simply supported rectangular sandwich panel. Included are comparisons of linear and nonlinear static response calculations, in addition to dynamic response calculations.

  9. Dynamic analysis: a new point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Eduardo W. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, an alternative to the classical dynamic equation formulation is presented. To achieve this goal, we need to derive the reciprocal theorem in rates and the principle of virtual work in rates, in a small deformation regime, with which we will be able to obtain an expression for damping force. In this new formulation, some terms that are not commonly considered in the classical formulation appear, e.g., the term that is function of jerk (the rate of change of acceleration). Moreover, in this formulation the term that characterizes material nonlinearity, in dynamic analysis, appears naturally.

  10. Dynamical analysis of generalized Galileon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N. E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu

    2013-03-01

    We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of generalized Galileon cosmology, incorporating also the requirements of ghost and instabilities absence. We find that there are not any new stable late-time solutions apart from those of standard quintessence. Furthermore, depending on the model parameters the Galileons may survive at late times or they may completely disappear by the dynamics, however the corresponding observables are always independent of the Galileon terms, determined only by the usual action terms. Thus, although the Galileons can play an important role at inflationary or at recent times, in the future, when the universe will asymptotically reach its stable state, they will not have any effect on its evolution.

  11. Non-chromatographic speciation analysis of mercury by flow injection on-line preconcentration in combination with chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Jin, Yan; Han, Weiying; Miao, Qiang; Bi, Shuping

    2006-07-01

    A novel non-chromatographic approach for direct speciation of mercury, based on the selective retention inorganic mercury and methylmercury on the inner wall of a knotted reactor by using ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate and dithizone as complexing agents respectively, was developed for flow injection on-line sorption preconcentration coupled with chemical vapor generation non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrometry. With the sample pH kept at 2.0, the preconcentration of inorganic mercury on the inner walls of the knotted reactor was carried out based on the exclusive retention of Hg-DDP complex in the presence of methylmercury via on-line merging the sample solution with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate solution, and selective preconcentration methylmercury was achieved with dithizone instead of ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate. A 15% (v/v) HCl was introduced to elute the retained mercury species and merge with KBH 4 solution for atomic fluorescence spectrometry detection. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the sample throughputs of inorganic mercury and methylmercury were 30 and 20 h - 1 with the enhancement factors of 13 and 24. The detection limits were found to be 3.6 ng l - 1 for Hg 2+ and 2.0 ng l - 1 for CH 3Hg +. The precisions (RSD) for the 11 replicate measurements of each 0.2 μg l - 1 of Hg 2+ and CH 3Hg + were 2.2% and 2.8%, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of certified reference materials (simulated natural water, rice flour and pork) and by recovery measurements on spiked samples, and was applied to the determination of inorganic mercury and methylmercury in biological and environmental water samples.

  12. Speciation analysis of arsenic in prenatal and children's dietary supplements using microwave-enhanced extraction and ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolle, Mesay M; Rahman, G M Mizanur; Kingston, H M Skip; Pamuku, Matt

    2014-03-25

    A study was conducted to develop a microwave-enhanced extraction method for the determination of arsenic species in prenatal and children's dietary supplements prepared from plant materials. The method was optimized by evaluating the efficiency of various solutions previously used to extract arsenic from the types of plant materials used in the dietary supplement formulations. A multivitamin standard reference material (NIST SRM 3280) and a prenatal supplement sample were analyzed in the method optimization. The identified optimum conditions were 0.25 g of sample, 5 mL of 0.3 mol L(-1) orthophosphoric acid (H3PO4) and microwave heating at 90 °C for 30 min. The extracted arsenic was speciated by cation exchange ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). The method detection limit (MDL) for the arsenic species was in the range 2-8 ng g(-1). Ten widely consumed prenatal and children's dietary supplements were analyzed using the optimized protocol. The supplements were found to have total arsenic in the concentration range 59-531 ng g(-1). The extraction procedure recovered 61-92% of the arsenic from the supplements. All the supplementary products were found to contain arsenite (As(3+)) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA). Arsenate (As(5+)) was found in two of the supplements, and an unknown specie of arsenic was detected in one product. The results of the analysis were validated using mass balance by comparing the sum of the extracted and non-extracted arsenic with the total concentration of the element in the corresponding samples.

  13. SPECIATE 4.0: SPECIATION DATABASE DEVELOPMENT DOCUMENTATION--FINAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. EPA's repository of total organic compounds (TOC) and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. This report documents how EPA developed the SPECIATE 4.0 database that replaces the prior version, SPECIATE 3.2. SPECIATE 4.0 includes ...

  14. Chemical Speciation Analysis of Sports Drinks by Acid-Base Titrimetry and Ion Chromatography: A Challenging Beverage Formulation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossman, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Students have standardized a sodium hydroxide solution and analyzed commercially available sports drinks by titrimetric analysis of the triprotic citric acid, dihydrogen phosphate, and dihydrogen citrate and by ion chromatography for chloride, total phosphate and citrate. These experiments are interesting examples of analyzing real-world food and…

  15. Cluster analysis of word frequency dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu S.; Bochkarev, V. V.; Belashova, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and modelling of word usage frequency time series. During one of previous studies, an assumption was put forward that all word usage frequencies have uniform dynamics approaching the shape of a Gaussian function. This assumption can be checked using the frequency dictionaries of the Google Books Ngram database. This database includes 5.2 million books published between 1500 and 2008. The corpus contains over 500 billion words in American English, British English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Hebrew, and Chinese. We clustered time series of word usage frequencies using a Kohonen neural network. The similarity between input vectors was estimated using several algorithms. As a result of the neural network training procedure, more than ten different forms of time series were found. They describe the dynamics of word usage frequencies from birth to death of individual words. Different groups of word forms were found to have different dynamics of word usage frequency variations.

  16. Environmental speciation of actinides.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kate; Bargar, John R; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-04-01

    Although minor in abundance in Earth's crust (U, 2-4 ppm; Th, 10-15 ppm) and in seawater (U, 0.003 ppm; Th, 0.0007 ppm), light actinides (Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are important environmental contaminants associated with anthropogenic activities such as the mining and milling of uranium ores, generation of nuclear energy, and storage of legacy waste resulting from the manufacturing and testing of nuclear weapons. In this review, we discuss the abundance, production, and environmental sources of naturally occurring and some man-made light actinides. As is the case with other environmental contaminants, the solubility, transport properties, bioavailability, and toxicity of actinides are dependent on their speciation (composition, oxidation state, molecular-level structure, and nature of the phase in which the contaminant element or molecule occurs). We review the aqueous speciation of U, Np, and Pu as a function of pH and Eh, their interaction with common inorganic and organic ligands in natural waters, and some of the common U-containing minerals. We also discuss the interaction of U, Np, Pu, and Am solution complexes with common Earth materials, including minerals, colloids, gels, natural organic matter (NOM), and microbial organisms, based on simplified model system studies. These surface interactions can inhibit (e.g., sorption to mineral surfaces, formation of insoluble biominerals) or enhance (e.g., colloid-facilitated transport) the dispersal of light actinides in the biosphere and in some cases (e.g., interaction with dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, NOM, or Mn- and Fe-containing minerals) can modify the oxidation states and, consequently, the behavior of redox-sensitive light actinides (U, Np, and Pu). Finally, we review the speciation of U and Pu, their chemical transformations, and cleanup histories at several U.S. Department of Energy field sites that have been used to mill U ores, produce fissile materials for reactors and weapons, and store

  17. Environmental speciation of actinides.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kate; Bargar, John R; Brown, Gordon E

    2013-04-01

    Although minor in abundance in Earth's crust (U, 2-4 ppm; Th, 10-15 ppm) and in seawater (U, 0.003 ppm; Th, 0.0007 ppm), light actinides (Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) are important environmental contaminants associated with anthropogenic activities such as the mining and milling of uranium ores, generation of nuclear energy, and storage of legacy waste resulting from the manufacturing and testing of nuclear weapons. In this review, we discuss the abundance, production, and environmental sources of naturally occurring and some man-made light actinides. As is the case with other environmental contaminants, the solubility, transport properties, bioavailability, and toxicity of actinides are dependent on their speciation (composition, oxidation state, molecular-level structure, and nature of the phase in which the contaminant element or molecule occurs). We review the aqueous speciation of U, Np, and Pu as a function of pH and Eh, their interaction with common inorganic and organic ligands in natural waters, and some of the common U-containing minerals. We also discuss the interaction of U, Np, Pu, and Am solution complexes with common Earth materials, including minerals, colloids, gels, natural organic matter (NOM), and microbial organisms, based on simplified model system studies. These surface interactions can inhibit (e.g., sorption to mineral surfaces, formation of insoluble biominerals) or enhance (e.g., colloid-facilitated transport) the dispersal of light actinides in the biosphere and in some cases (e.g., interaction with dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria, NOM, or Mn- and Fe-containing minerals) can modify the oxidation states and, consequently, the behavior of redox-sensitive light actinides (U, Np, and Pu). Finally, we review the speciation of U and Pu, their chemical transformations, and cleanup histories at several U.S. Department of Energy field sites that have been used to mill U ores, produce fissile materials for reactors and weapons, and store

  18. Progress in understanding uranium(IV) speciation and dynamics in biologically reduced sediments: Research at molecular to centimeter scales by the SLAC SFA program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargar, J.; Williams, K. H.; Campbell, K. M.; Stubbs, J. E.; Suvorova, E.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Alessi, D.; Stylo, M.; Handley, K. M.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Cerrato, J.; Davis, J. A.; Fox, P. M.; Giammar, D.; Long, P. E.

    2011-12-01

    The chemical and physical forms of U(IV) in reduced sediments, as well as the biogeochemical processes by which they form and transform, profoundly influence the stability of reduced U(IV) species and the behavior of uranium in biostimulated aquifers. Obtaining such information in field sediments is important because biogeochemical field conditions and their time dependence are difficult to replicate in the laboratory. The majority of contaminated aquifers in which bioremediation is of potential interest, including the Old Rifle, CO IFRC site, exhibit relatively low uranium sediment concentrations, i.e., < 10 ppm, presenting a formidable challenge to the use of spectroscopy and microscopy techniques that typically require 10-fold or higher uranium loadings. We have developed an in-situ column technique to study U(IV) species and evolving microbial communities in the Old Rifle aquifer and to correlate them with changes in trace and major ion groundwater composition during biostimulation treatments. Sediments were examined using x-ray and electron microscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and chemical extractions. XAS analysis showed that U(IV) occurred predominantly or exclusively as monomeric U(IV) complexes coordinated to oxo (or similar N/C) neighbors, and is associated with biomass or Fe sulfides. Even in the latter case, U(IV) was not coordinated directly to S neighbors. Sediment-hosted monomeric U(IV) complexes were found to partially transform into uraninite in the aquifer over a subsequent 12 month period. This work establishes the importance of monomeric U(IV) complexes in subsurface sediments at the Old Rifle site and provides a conceptual framework in which previously observed U(IV) reduction products can be related. These experiments also establish that U(IV) species are dynamic in aquifers and can undergo non-oxidative transformation reactions. These new results have important implications for uranium reactive transport models, long

  19. Double-sided Microfluidic Device for Speciation Analysis of Iron in Water Samples: Towards Greener Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Youngvises, Napaporn; Thanurak, Porapichcha; Chaida, Thanatcha; Jukmunee, Jaroon; Alsuhaimi, Awadh

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics minimize the amounts of reagents and generate less waste. While microdevices are commonly single-sided, producing a substrate with microchannels on multiple surfaces would increase their usefulness. Herein, a polymethymethacrylate substrate incorporating microchannel structures on two sides was sandwiched between two polydimethylsiloxane sheets to create a multi-analysis device, which was used for the spectrophotometric analysis of the ferrous ion (Fe(2+)) and the ferric ion (Fe(3+)), by utilizing colorimetric detection. To monitor the signals from both channel networks, dual optical sensors were integrated into the system. The linear ranges for Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) analyses were 0.1 - 20 mg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9988) and 1.0 - 40 mg L(-1) (R(2) = 0.9974), respectively. The detection limits for Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) were 0.1 and 0.5 mg L(-1), respectively. The percent recoveries of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) were 93.5 - 104.3 with an RSD < 8%. The microdevice demonstrated capabilities for simultaneous analysis, low waste generation (7.2 mL h(-1)), and high sample throughput (180 h(-1)), making it ideal for greener analytical chemistry applications. PMID:25958864

  20. Precise Analysis of Polymer Rotational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Mo; Baig, Chunggi

    2016-01-01

    Through the analysis of individual chain dynamics alongside the corresponding molecular structures under shear via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of C178H358 linear and short-chain branched polyethylene melts under shear flow, we observed that the conventional method based on the chain end-to-end vector (and/or the gyration tensor of chain) is susceptible to quantitatively inaccurate measurements and often misleading information in describing the rotational dynamics of polymers. Identifying the flaw as attributed to strong irregular Brownian fluctuations inherent to the chain ends associated with their large free volume and strong molecular collisions, we propose a simple, robust way based on the chain center-to-center vector connecting the two centers of mass of the bisected chain, which is shown to adequately describe polymer rotational dynamics without such shortcomings. We present further consideration that the proposed method can be useful in accurately measuring the overall chain structure and dynamics of polymeric materials with various molecular architectures, including branched and ring polymers. PMID:26743689

  1. Precise Analysis of Polymer Rotational Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Mo; Baig, Chunggi

    2016-01-01

    Through the analysis of individual chain dynamics alongside the corresponding molecular structures under shear via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of C178H358 linear and short-chain branched polyethylene melts under shear flow, we observed that the conventional method based on the chain end-to-end vector (and/or the gyration tensor of chain) is susceptible to quantitatively inaccurate measurements and often misleading information in describing the rotational dynamics of polymers. Identifying the flaw as attributed to strong irregular Brownian fluctuations inherent to the chain ends associated with their large free volume and strong molecular collisions, we propose a simple, robust way based on the chain center-to-center vector connecting the two centers of mass of the bisected chain, which is shown to adequately describe polymer rotational dynamics without such shortcomings. We present further consideration that the proposed method can be useful in accurately measuring the overall chain structure and dynamics of polymeric materials with various molecular architectures, including branched and ring polymers.

  2. Epock: rapid analysis of protein pocket dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Benoist; Chavent, Matthieu; Cragnolini, Tristan; Dahl, Anna Caroline E.; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Baaden, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The volume of an internal protein pocket is fundamental to ligand accessibility. Few programs that compute such volumes manage dynamic data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Limited performance often prohibits analysis of large datasets. We present Epock, an efficient command-line tool that calculates pocket volumes from MD trajectories. A plugin for the VMD program provides a graphical user interface to facilitate input creation, run Epock and analyse the results. Availability and implementation: Epock C++ source code, Python analysis scripts, VMD Tcl plugin, documentation and installation instructions are freely available at http://epock.bitbucket.org. Contact: benoist.laurent@gmail.com or baaden@smplinux.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25505095

  3. XAS Studies of Se Speciation in Selenite-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Weekley, Claire M.; Aitken, Jade B.; Witting, Paul K.; Harris, Hugh H.

    2014-01-01

    The biological activity of selenium is dependent on its chemical form. Therefore, knowledge of Se chemistry in vivo is required for efficacious use of selenium compounds in disease prevention and treatment. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Se speciation in the kidney, liver, heart, spleen, testis and red blood cells of rats fed control (~0.3 ppm Se) or selenite-supplemented (1 ppm or 5 ppm Se) diets for 3 or 6 weeks, was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed the presence of Se–Se and Se–C species in the kidney and liver, and Se–S species in the kidney, but not the liver. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra showed that there was variation in speciation in the liver and kidneys, but Se speciation was much more uniform in the remaining organs. Using principal component analysis (PCA) to interpret the Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectra, we were able to directly compare the speciation of Se in two different models of selenite metabolism – human lung cancer cells and rat tissues. The effects of Se dose, tissue type and duration of diet on selenium speciation in rat tissues were investigated, and a relationship between the duration of the diet (3 weeks versus 6 weeks) and selenium speciation was observed. PMID:25363824

  4. Simplified Dynamic Analysis of Grinders Spindle Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demec, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution deals with the simplified dynamic analysis of surface grinding machine spindle node. Dynamic analysis is based on the use of the transfer matrix method, which is essentially a matrix form of method of initial parameters. The advantage of the described method, despite the seemingly complex mathematical apparatus, is primarily, that it does not require for solve the problem of costly commercial software using finite element method. All calculations can be made for example in MS Excel, which is advantageous especially in the initial stages of constructing of spindle node for the rapid assessment of the suitability its design. After detailing the entire structure of spindle node is then also necessary to perform the refined dynamic analysis in the environment of FEM, which it requires the necessary skills and experience and it is therefore economically difficult. This work was developed within grant project KEGA No. 023TUKE-4/2012 Creation of a comprehensive educational - teaching material for the article Production technique using a combination of traditional and modern information technology and e-learning.

  5. Dynamic analysis of plunger lift operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    Presented is a description of a dynamic model of plunger lift operations which, as opposed to previous methods of analysis. includes calculation of the plunger velocity as the plunger and liquid slug travel up the tubing. Also an analysis of plunger cycles in a high gas-liquid ratio well is presented to indicate the maximum rate of slug buildup, and the maximum casing pressure necessary to lift the plunger and accumulated liquids. The information presented allows a more detailed engineering approach to analyzing the performance of a plunger lifted well. Refs.

  6. Speciation Mapping of Environmental Samples Using XANES Imaging

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fast X-ray detectors with large solid angles and high dynamic ranges open the door to XANES imaging, in which millions of spectra are collected to image the speciation of metals at micrometre resolution, over areas up to several square centimetres. This paper explores how such mu...

  7. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims atmore » performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.« less

  8. CORRELATING METAL SPECIATION IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding bioavailability of metals from exposure to contaminated soils is a challenging aspect of environmental research. This presentation will examine three areas of research with respect to metal speciation in soils as it relates to bioavailability: 1) Pb immobilization a...

  9. Nanometer-sized alumina packed microcolumn solid-phase extraction combined with field-amplified sample stacking-capillary electrophoresis for the speciation analysis of inorganic selenium in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jiankuan; Hu, Bin; He, Man

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a new method of nanometer-sized alumina packed microcolumn SPE combined with field-amplified sample stacking (FASS)-CE-UV detection was developed for the speciation analysis of inorganic selenium in environmental water samples. Self-synthesized nanometer-sized alumina was packed in a microcolumn as the SPE adsorbent to retain Se(IV) and Se(VI) simultaneously at pH 6 and the retained inorganic selenium was eluted by concentrated ammonia. The eluent was used for FASS-CE-UV analysis after NH₃ evaporation. The factors affecting the preconcentration of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) by SPE and FASS were studied and the optimal CE separation conditions for Se(IV) and Se(VI) were obtained. Under the optimal conditions, the LODs of 57 ng L⁻¹ (Se(IV)) and 71 ng L⁻¹ (Se(VI)) were obtained, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material of GBW(E)080395 environmental water and the determined value was in a good agreement with the certified value. It was also successfully applied to the speciation analysis of inorganic selenium in environmental water samples, including Yangtze River water, spring water, and tap water.

  10. Nanometer-sized alumina packed microcolumn solid-phase extraction combined with field-amplified sample stacking-capillary electrophoresis for the speciation analysis of inorganic selenium in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jiankuan; Hu, Bin; He, Man

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a new method of nanometer-sized alumina packed microcolumn SPE combined with field-amplified sample stacking (FASS)-CE-UV detection was developed for the speciation analysis of inorganic selenium in environmental water samples. Self-synthesized nanometer-sized alumina was packed in a microcolumn as the SPE adsorbent to retain Se(IV) and Se(VI) simultaneously at pH 6 and the retained inorganic selenium was eluted by concentrated ammonia. The eluent was used for FASS-CE-UV analysis after NH₃ evaporation. The factors affecting the preconcentration of both Se(IV) and Se(VI) by SPE and FASS were studied and the optimal CE separation conditions for Se(IV) and Se(VI) were obtained. Under the optimal conditions, the LODs of 57 ng L⁻¹ (Se(IV)) and 71 ng L⁻¹ (Se(VI)) were obtained, respectively. The developed method was validated by the analysis of a certified reference material of GBW(E)080395 environmental water and the determined value was in a good agreement with the certified value. It was also successfully applied to the speciation analysis of inorganic selenium in environmental water samples, including Yangtze River water, spring water, and tap water. PMID:22996935

  11. Simultaneous speciation analysis of inorganic nitrogen with the use of ion chromatography in highly salinated environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Kurzyca, Iwona; Niedzielski, Przemyslaw; Frankowski, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    We present the development of a method for the simultaneous determination of inorganic nitrogen species in oxidized (NO2 (-) , NO3 (-) ) and reduced (NH4 (+) ) forms using ion chromatography with diode-array detection (205, 208, and 425 nm, respectively). The oxidized forms were determined directly after the separation in the anion exchanger, while the reduced form was determined in the column hold-up time after derivatization with the Nessler reagent. The use of an appropriate modifier (Seignette reagent) and mobile phase (NaCl) enabled the determination of inorganic nitrogen species in highly salinated environmental samples (water, sediments). Moreover, low detection limits were obtained of 0.04 mg/L for NH4 (+) and 0.006 and 0.005 mg/L for NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) , respectively. The analysis of environmental samples indicated NH4 (+) contents of up to 1161 ± 47 mg/kg and NO3 (-) of up to 148 ± 6 mg/kg for sediment samples, as well as the NH4 (+) concentrations of up to 0.98 ± 0.10 mg/L, NO2 (-) of up to 24 ± 1 mg/L and NO3 (-) of up to 20 ± 1 mg/L for water samples.

  12. Simultaneous speciation analysis of inorganic nitrogen with the use of ion chromatography in highly salinated environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Kurzyca, Iwona; Niedzielski, Przemyslaw; Frankowski, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    We present the development of a method for the simultaneous determination of inorganic nitrogen species in oxidized (NO2 (-) , NO3 (-) ) and reduced (NH4 (+) ) forms using ion chromatography with diode-array detection (205, 208, and 425 nm, respectively). The oxidized forms were determined directly after the separation in the anion exchanger, while the reduced form was determined in the column hold-up time after derivatization with the Nessler reagent. The use of an appropriate modifier (Seignette reagent) and mobile phase (NaCl) enabled the determination of inorganic nitrogen species in highly salinated environmental samples (water, sediments). Moreover, low detection limits were obtained of 0.04 mg/L for NH4 (+) and 0.006 and 0.005 mg/L for NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) , respectively. The analysis of environmental samples indicated NH4 (+) contents of up to 1161 ± 47 mg/kg and NO3 (-) of up to 148 ± 6 mg/kg for sediment samples, as well as the NH4 (+) concentrations of up to 0.98 ± 0.10 mg/L, NO2 (-) of up to 24 ± 1 mg/L and NO3 (-) of up to 20 ± 1 mg/L for water samples. PMID:27422313

  13. Speciation analysis of mercury in natural water and fish samples by using capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, YunQiang; Zheng, JinPing; Fang, Ling; Lin, Qin; Wu, YongNing; Xue, ZhiMin; Fu, FengFu

    2012-01-30

    A environment-friendly microwave-assisted extraction used to extract trace mercury compounds from fish samples, and a ultra-sensitive method for the analysis of Hg(II), methylmercury (MeHg) and ethylmercury (EtHg) by using capillary electrophoresis-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CE-ICP-MS) were described in this study. The extraction method is environment-friendly, simple, effective, and can be used to extract trace mercury compounds in fish samples with a satisfied recovery within several minutes. The CE-ICP-MS analytical method has a detection limit as lower as 0.021-0.032 ng Hg/mL for MeHg, EtHg and Hg(II), and can be used to determined ultratrace MeHg, EtHg and Hg(II) in natural water and fish samples directly without any preconcentration. With the help of the above methods, we have successfully determined MeHg, EtHg and Hg(II) in dried fish (Tapertail anchovy) muscle and natural water within 25 min with a RSD (relative standard deviation, n=6) <5% and a recovery of 94-103%. Our results showed that dried muscle of T. anchovy contained only one species of mercury, MeHg, indicating that MeHg is easier to be accumulated by aquatic organisms. PMID:22284493

  14. Vehicle dynamic analysis using neuronal network algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oloeriu, Florin; Mocian, Oana

    2014-06-01

    Theoretical developments of certain engineering areas, the emergence of new investigation tools, which are better and more precise and their implementation on-board the everyday vehicles, all these represent main influence factors that impact the theoretical and experimental study of vehicle's dynamic behavior. Once the implementation of these new technologies onto the vehicle's construction had been achieved, it had led to more and more complex systems. Some of the most important, such as the electronic control of engine, transmission, suspension, steering, braking and traction had a positive impact onto the vehicle's dynamic behavior. The existence of CPU on-board vehicles allows data acquisition and storage and it leads to a more accurate and better experimental and theoretical study of vehicle dynamics. It uses the information offered directly by the already on-board built-in elements of electronic control systems. The technical literature that studies vehicle dynamics is entirely focused onto parametric analysis. This kind of approach adopts two simplifying assumptions. Functional parameters obey certain distribution laws, which are known in classical statistics theory. The second assumption states that the mathematical models are previously known and have coefficients that are not time-dependent. Both the mentioned assumptions are not confirmed in real situations: the functional parameters do not follow any known statistical repartition laws and the mathematical laws aren't previously known and contain families of parameters and are mostly time-dependent. The purpose of the paper is to present a more accurate analysis methodology that can be applied when studying vehicle's dynamic behavior. A method that provides the setting of non-parametrical mathematical models for vehicle's dynamic behavior is relying on neuronal networks. This method contains coefficients that are time-dependent. Neuronal networks are mostly used in various types' system controls, thus

  15. Expansion of epicyclic gear dynamic analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Linda Smith; Pike, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The multiple mesh/single stage dynamics program is a gear tooth analysis program which determines detailed geometry, dynamic loads, stresses, and surface damage factors. The program can analyze a variety of both epicyclic and single mesh systems with spur or helical gear teeth including internal, external, and buttress tooth forms. The modifications refine the options for the flexible carrier and flexible ring gear rim and adds three options: a floating Sun gear option; a natural frequency option; and a finite element compliance formulation for helical gear teeth. The option for a floating Sun incorporates two additional degrees of freedom at the Sun center. The natural frequency option evaluates the frequencies of planetary, star, or differential systems as well as the effect of additional springs at the Sun center and those due to a flexible carrier and/or ring gear rim. The helical tooth pair finite element calculated compliance is obtained from an automated element breakup of the helical teeth and then is used with the basic gear dynamic solution and stress postprocessing routines. The flexible carrier or ring gear rim option for planetary and star spur gear systems allows the output torque per carrier and ring gear rim segment to vary based on the dynamic response of the entire system, while the total output torque remains constant.

  16. Application of chemometric analysis and self Organizing Map-Artificial Neural Network as source receptor modeling for metal speciation in river sediment.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Mayank; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Mishra, Ashutosh; Tripathi, B D

    2015-09-01

    Present study deals with the river Ganga water quality and its impact on metal speciation in its sediments. Concentration of physico-chemical parameters was highest in summer season followed by winter and lowest in rainy season. Metal speciation study in river sediments revealed that exchangeable, reducible and oxidizable fractions were dominant in all the studied metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) except Mn and Fe. High pollution load index (1.64-3.89) recommends urgent need of mitigation measures. Self-organizing Map-Artificial Neural Network (SOM-ANN) was applied to the data set for the prediction of major point sources of pollution in the river Ganga. PMID:25912888

  17. Phylogeographic analysis of a temperate-deciduous forest restricted plant (Bupleurum longiradiatum Turcz.) reveals two refuge areas in China with subsequent refugial isolation promoting speciation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cai; Wang, Chang-Bao; Ma, Xiang-Guang; Liang, Qian-Long; He, Xing-Jin

    2013-09-01

    . Additionally, geological conditions that restricted gene flow might also be responsible for the observed high genetic and geographic differentiation. A nested clade analysis (NCA) revealed that allopatric fragmentation was a major factor responsible for the phylogeographic pattern observed, and also supported a role for historical vicariance factors. Our results therefore support the inference that Quaternary refugial isolation promoted allopatric speciation of temperate plants in East Asia. This may help to explain the existence of high diversity and endemism of plant species in East Asia. PMID:23624194

  18. Phylogeographic analysis of a temperate-deciduous forest restricted plant (Bupleurum longiradiatum Turcz.) reveals two refuge areas in China with subsequent refugial isolation promoting speciation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Cai; Wang, Chang-Bao; Ma, Xiang-Guang; Liang, Qian-Long; He, Xing-Jin

    2013-09-01

    . Additionally, geological conditions that restricted gene flow might also be responsible for the observed high genetic and geographic differentiation. A nested clade analysis (NCA) revealed that allopatric fragmentation was a major factor responsible for the phylogeographic pattern observed, and also supported a role for historical vicariance factors. Our results therefore support the inference that Quaternary refugial isolation promoted allopatric speciation of temperate plants in East Asia. This may help to explain the existence of high diversity and endemism of plant species in East Asia.

  19. Sexual conflict and speciation.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, G A; Partridge, L

    1998-01-01

    We review the significance of two forms of sexual conflict (different evolutionary interests of the two sexes) for genetic differentiation of populations and the evolution of reproductive isolation. Conflicting selection on the alleles at a single locus can occur in males and females if the sexes have different optima for a trait, and there are pleiotropic genetic correlations between the sexes for it. There will then be selection for sex limitation and hence sexual dimorphism. This sex limitation could break down in hybrids and reduce their fitness. Pleiotropic genetic correlations between the sexes could also affect the likelihood of mating in interpopulation encounters. Conflict can also occur between (sex-limited) loci that determine behaviour in males and those that determine behaviour in females. Reproductive isolation may occur by rapid coevolution of male trait and female mating preference. This would tend to generate assortative mating on secondary contact, hence promoting speciation. Sexual conflict resulting from sensory exploitation, polyspermy and the cost of mating could result in high levels of interpopulation mating. If females evolve resistance to make pre- and postmating manipulation, males from one population could be more successful with females from the other, because females would have evolved resistance to their own (but not to the allopatric) males. Between-locus sexual conflict could also occur as a result of conflict between males and females of different populations over the production of unfit hybrids. We develop models which show that females are in general selected to resist such matings and males to persist, and this could have a bearing on both the initial level of interpopulation matings and the likelihood that reinforcement will occur. In effect, selection on males usually acts to promote gene flow and to restrict premating isolation, whereas selection on females usually acts in the reverse direction. We review theoretical models

  20. DynaMod: dynamic functional modularity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Choong-Hyun; Hwang, Taeho; Oh, Kimin; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of enriched functional categories in differentially expressed genes is important to extract the underlying biological processes of genome-wide expression profiles. Moreover, identification of the network of significant functional modules in these dynamic processes is an interesting challenge. This study introduces DynaMod, a web-based application that identifies significant functional modules reflecting the change of modularity and differential expressions that are correlated with gene expression profiles under different conditions. DynaMod allows the inspection of a wide variety of functional modules such as the biological pathways, transcriptional factor–target gene groups, microRNA–target gene groups, protein complexes and hub networks involved in protein interactome. The statistical significance of dynamic functional modularity is scored based on Z-statistics from the average of mutual information (MI) changes of involved gene pairs under different conditions. Significantly correlated gene pairs among the functional modules are used to generate a correlated network of functional categories. In addition to these main goals, this scoring strategy supports better performance to detect significant genes in microarray analyses, as the scores of correlated genes show the superior characteristics of the significance analysis compared with those of individual genes. DynaMod also offers cross-comparison between different analysis outputs. DynaMod is freely accessible at http://piech.kaist.ac.kr/dynamod. PMID:20460468

  1. Complementary arsenic speciation methods: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, Michelle M.; Koch, Iris; Reimer, Kenneth J.

    2014-09-01

    The toxicity of arsenic greatly depends on its chemical form and oxidation state (speciation) and therefore accurate determination of arsenic speciation is a crucial step in understanding its chemistry and potential risk. High performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) is the most common analysis used for arsenic speciation but it has two major limitations: it relies on an extraction step (usually from a solid sample) that can be incomplete or alter the arsenic compounds; and it provides no structural information, relying on matching sample peaks to standard peaks. The use of additional analytical methods in a complementary manner introduces the ability to address these disadvantages. The use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) with HPLC-ICP-MS can be used to identify compounds not extracted for HPLC-ICP-MS and provide minimal processing steps for solid state analysis that may help preserve labile compounds such as those containing arsenicsbnd sulfur bonds, which can degrade under chromatographic conditions. On the other hand, HPLC-ICP-MS is essential in confirming organoarsenic compounds with similar white line energies seen by using XAS, and identifying trace arsenic compounds that are too low to be detected by XAS. The complementary use of electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) with HPLC-ICP-MS provides confirmation of arsenic compounds identified during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis, identification of unknown compounds observed during the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis and further resolves HPLC-ICP-MS by identifying co-eluting compounds. In the complementary use of HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS, HPLC-ICP-MS helps to focus the ESI-MS selection of ions. Numerous studies have shown that the information obtained from HPLC-ICP-MS analysis can be greatly enhanced by complementary approaches.

  2. Speciation has a spatial scale that depends on levels of gene flow.

    PubMed

    Kisel, Yael; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2010-03-01

    Area is generally assumed to affect speciation rates, but work on the spatial context of speciation has focused mostly on patterns of range overlap between emerging species rather than on questions of geographical scale. A variety of geographical theories of speciation predict that the probability of speciation occurring within a given region should (1) increase with the size of the region and (2) increase as the spatial extent of intraspecific gene flow becomes smaller. Using a survey of speciation events on isolated oceanic islands for a broad range of taxa, we find evidence for both predictions. The probability of in situ speciation scales with island area in bats, carnivorous mammals, birds, flowering plants, lizards, butterflies and moths, and snails. Ferns are an exception to these findings, but they exhibit high frequencies of polyploid and hybrid speciation, which are expected to be scale independent. Furthermore, the minimum island size for speciation correlates across groups with the strength of intraspecific gene flow, as is estimated from a meta-analysis of published population genetic studies. These results indicate a general geographical model of speciation rates that are dependent on both area and gene flow. The spatial scale of population divergence is an important but neglected determinant of broad-scale diversity patterns. PMID:20100106

  3. Speciation has a spatial scale that depends on levels of gene flow.

    PubMed

    Kisel, Yael; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2010-03-01

    Area is generally assumed to affect speciation rates, but work on the spatial context of speciation has focused mostly on patterns of range overlap between emerging species rather than on questions of geographical scale. A variety of geographical theories of speciation predict that the probability of speciation occurring within a given region should (1) increase with the size of the region and (2) increase as the spatial extent of intraspecific gene flow becomes smaller. Using a survey of speciation events on isolated oceanic islands for a broad range of taxa, we find evidence for both predictions. The probability of in situ speciation scales with island area in bats, carnivorous mammals, birds, flowering plants, lizards, butterflies and moths, and snails. Ferns are an exception to these findings, but they exhibit high frequencies of polyploid and hybrid speciation, which are expected to be scale independent. Furthermore, the minimum island size for speciation correlates across groups with the strength of intraspecific gene flow, as is estimated from a meta-analysis of published population genetic studies. These results indicate a general geographical model of speciation rates that are dependent on both area and gene flow. The spatial scale of population divergence is an important but neglected determinant of broad-scale diversity patterns.

  4. Architectural Analysis of Dynamically Reconfigurable Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindvall, Mikael; Godfrey, Sally; Ackermann, Chris; Ray, Arnab; Yonkwa, Lyly

    2010-01-01

    oTpics include: the problem (increased flexibility of architectural styles decrease analyzability, behavior emerges and varies depending on the configuration, does the resulting system run according to the intended design, and architectural decisions can impede or facilitate testing); top down approach to architecture analysis, detection of defects and deviations, and architecture and its testability; currently targeted projects GMSEC and CFS; analyzing software architectures; analyzing runtime events; actual architecture recognition; GMPUB in Dynamic SAVE; sample output from new approach; taking message timing delays into account; CFS examples of architecture and testability; some recommendations for improved testablity; and CFS examples of abstract interfaces and testability; CFS example of opening some internal details.

  5. Dynamical Analysis of the SHIELD Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Andrew Thomas; Teich, Yaron G.; Cannon, John M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the 12 extremely low-mass dwarf galaxies that comprise SHIELD, a product of the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey (ALFALFA). We use multi-configuration, high spatial (˜ 150 - 350 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution data obtained from 21 cm observations conducted with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For each source, we attempt to derive an inclination-corrected rotation curve, to calculate the maximum rotation velocity (≤ 30 km s-1 for the survey population), and to further constrain the H I mass. For sources from which a sufficiently precise rotation curve can be derived, we use spatially resolved Spitzer Space Telescope 3.6 and 4.5 μm images to determine the stellar mass as a function of radius. The gaseous and stellar mass estimates are then used to decompose the total dynamical mass values and to obtain neutral gas fractions and relative baryonic content. Characterizing the kinematics of the SHIELD galaxies allows us to draw more general conclusions about the structure and dynamical evolution of low mass dwarf galaxies in the local universe.This work is a result of collaboration with the SHIELD Team and is supported by NSF grant 1211683.

  6. Dynamic analysis of optical microfiber coil resonators.

    PubMed

    Kowsari, A; Ahmadi, V; Darvish, G; Moravvej-Farshi, M K

    2016-08-20

    We present transient time analysis of a two-turn optical microfiber coil resonator (MCR). Our dynamic model is based on two sets of equations, coupled mode and nonlinear Schrödinger equations. The pulse response of this device is obtained by numerically solving the modified sets of equations in a dynamic regime. The results show that if the input pulse of the MCR is set at an off-resonance wavelength, this resonator operates as an all-pass filter with neither loss nor time delay. But in the case of resonance, the output pulse may have loss and a relatively long time delay, according to the continuous rotation of light between the first and the second turns of the MCR. Tunable time delays up to td=320  ps are obtained by choosing different values of the coupling coefficients. Furthermore, the material and structural dispersions of the MCR are studied, and it is shown that strong dispersive effects can occur even in this millimeter dimensions photonic device. Pulse broadening and distortion effects of the MCR are studied in the dynamic regime. The results show that, for high bit rate applications, the dispersion effects of the MCR should be carefully considered. Finally, fundamental soliton solution and its conditions in the MCR are investigated. PMID:27556989

  7. Perturbation analysis for patch occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D.; McIntyre, Carol L.; Ferraz, Goncalo; Hines, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Perturbation analysis is a powerful tool to study population and community dynamics. This article describes expressions for sensitivity metrics reflecting changes in equilibrium occupancy resulting from small changes in the vital rates of patch occupancy dynamics (i.e., probabilities of local patch colonization and extinction). We illustrate our approach with a case study of occupancy dynamics of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories. Examination of the hypothesis of system equilibrium suggests that the system satisfies equilibrium conditions. Estimates of vital rates obtained using patch occupancy models are used to estimate equilibrium patch occupancy of eagles. We then compute estimates of sensitivity metrics and discuss their implications for eagle population ecology and management. Finally, we discuss the intuition underlying our sensitivity metrics and then provide examples of ecological questions that can be addressed using perturbation analyses. For instance, the sensitivity metrics lead to predictions about the relative importance of local colonization and local extinction probabilities in influencing equilibrium occupancy for rare and common species.

  8. Perturbation analysis for patch occupancy dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D; McIntyre, Carol L; Ferraz, Gonçalo; Hines, James E

    2009-01-01

    Perturbation analysis is a powerful tool to study population and community dynamics. This article describes expressions for sensitivity metrics reflecting changes in equilibrium occupancy resulting from small changes in the vital rates of patch occupancy dynamics (i.e., probabilities of local patch colonization and extinction). We illustrate our approach with a case study of occupancy dynamics of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories. Examination of the hypothesis of system equilibrium suggests that the system satisfies equilibrium conditions. Estimates of vital rates obtained using patch occupancy models are used to estimate equilibrium patch occupancy of eagles. We then compute estimates of sensitivity metrics and discuss their implications for eagle population ecology and management. Finally, we discuss the intuition underlying our sensitivity metrics and then provide examples of ecological questions that can be addressed using perturbation analyses. For instance, the sensitivity metrics lead to predictions about the relative importance of local colonization and local extinction probabilities in influencing equilibrium occupancy for rare and common species. PMID:19294907

  9. Sexual selection drives speciation in an Amazonian frog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boul, K.E.; Funk, W.C.; Darst, C.R.; Cannatella, D.C.; Ryan, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    One proposed mechanism of speciation is divergent sexual selection, whereby divergence in female preferences and male signals results in behavioural isolation. Despite the appeal of this hypothesis, evidence for it remains inconclusive. Here, we present several lines of evidence that sexual selection is driving behavioural isolation and speciation among populations of an Amazonian frog (Physalaemus petersi). First, sexual selection has promoted divergence in male mating calls and female preferences for calls between neighbouring populations, resulting in strong behavioural isolation. Second, phylogenetic analysis indicates that populations have become fixed for alternative call types several times throughout the species' range, and coalescent analysis rejects genetic drift as a cause for this pattern, suggesting that this divergence is due to selection. Finally, gene flow estimated with microsatellite loci is an average of 30 times lower between populations with different call types than between populations separated by a similar geographical distance with the same call type, demonstrating genetic divergence and incipient speciation. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that sexual selection is driving behavioural isolation and speciation, supporting sexual selection as a cause for speciation in the wild. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  10. Dynamic Factor Analysis Models with Time-Varying Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Zu, Jiyun; Shifren, Kim; Zhang, Guangjian

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis models with time-varying parameters offer a valuable tool for evaluating multivariate time series data with time-varying dynamics and/or measurement properties. We use the Dynamic Model of Activation proposed by Zautra and colleagues (Zautra, Potter, & Reich, 1997) as a motivating example to construct a dynamic factor model…

  11. Dynamic analysis of plunger lift operations

    SciTech Connect

    Lea, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    Plunger lift is a method of artificial lift that uses a free piston traveling up and down inside the tubing in a cyclic manner. The piston serves to increase the efficiency of lifting liquids in gas/liquid production by reducing liquid fallback through the gas. Presented here is a description of a dynamic model of plunger lift operations that, as opposed to previous methods of analysis, includes calculation of the plunger velocity as the plunger and liquid slug travel up the tubing. Also, an analysis of plunger cycles in a high gas/liquid ratio (GLR) well is presented to indicate the maximum rate of slug buildup and the maximum casing pressure necessary to lift the plunger and accumulated liquids. The information presented allows a more detailed engineering approach to analyzing the performance of a plunger-lifted well.

  12. Dynamic analysis of the Milad Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Edwin; Ford, Mitchell; Coelho, Darren; Lawler, Lachlan; Ansourian, Peter; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Tahmasebinia, Faham

    2016-08-01

    This report involves the modelling of the Milad Tower using the finite element analysis program Strand7. A dynamic analysis was performed on the structure in order to understand the deflections and stresses as a result of earthquake and wind loading. In particular, Linear Static as well as Natural Frequency and Spectral Response solvers were used to determine the behaviour of the structure under loading. The findings of the report highlight that the structure was modelled accurately with the outputs representing realistic values. The report suggests that the design of the beams, columns, slabs and all structural members was sufficient enough to support the tower during maximum loading cases. The governing load case was earthquake loading.

  13. Speciation of Energy Critical Elements in Marine Ferromanganese Crusts and Nodules by Principal Component Analysis and Least-squares fits to XAFS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, A. L.; Klofas, J. M.; Hein, J. R.; Koschinsky, A.; Bargar, J.; Dunham, R. E.; Conrad, T. A.

    2011-12-01

    Marine ferromanganese crusts and nodules ("Fe-Mn crusts") are considered a potential mineral resource due to their accumulation of several economically-important elements at concentrations above mean crustal abundances. They are typically composed of intergrown Fe oxyhydroxide and Mn oxide; thicker (older) crusts can also contain carbonate fluorapatite. We used X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy, a molecular-scale structure probe, to determine the speciation of several elements (Te, Bi, Mo, Zr, Pt) in Fe-Mn crusts. As a first step in analysis of this dataset, we have conducted principal component analysis (PCA) of Te K-edge and Mo K-edge, k3-weighted XAFS spectra. The sample set consisted of 12 homogenized, ground Fe-Mn crust samples from 8 locations in the global ocean. One sample was subjected to a chemical leach to selectively remove Mn oxides and the elements associated with it. The samples in the study set contain 50-205 mg/kg Te (average = 88) and 97-802 mg/kg Mo (average = 567). PCAs of background-subtracted, normalized Te K-edge and Mo K-edge XAFS spectra were performed on a data matrix of 12 rows x 122 columns (rows = samples; columns = Te or Mo fluorescence value at each energy step) and results were visualized without rotation. The number of significant components was assessed by the Malinowski indicator function and ability of the components to reconstruct the features (minus noise) of all sample spectra. Two components were significant by these criteria for both Te and Mo PCAs and described a total of 74 and 75% of the total variance, respectively. Reconstruction of potential model compounds by the principal components derived from PCAs on the sample set ("target transformation") provides a means of ranking models in terms of their utility for subsequent linear-combination, least-squares (LCLS) fits (the next step of data analysis). Synthetic end-member models of Te4+, Te6+, and Mo adsorbed to Fe(III) oxyhydroxide and Mn oxide were

  14. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  15. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  16. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-14

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  17. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  18. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  19. Dynamic characterization and analysis of space shuttle SRM solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hufferd, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of the space shuttle solid rocket moter (TP-H1148) propellant were characterized and the expected limits of propellant variability were established. Dynamic shear modulus tests conducted on six production batches of TP-H1148 at various static and dynamic strain levels over the temperature range from 40 F to 90 F. A heat conduction analysis and dynamic response analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) were also conducted. The dynamic test results show significant dependence on static and dynamic strain levels and considerable batch-to-batch and within-batch variability. However, the results of the SRM dynamic response analyses clearly demonstrate that the stiffness of the propellant has no consequential on the overall SRM dynamic response. Only the mass of the propellant needs to be considered in the dynamic analysis of the space shuttle SRM.

  20. Microscale characterization of sulfur speciation in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Teng; Arnold, William A; Toner, Brandy M

    2013-02-01

    Prairie pothole lakes (PPLs) are naturally sulfur-enriched wetlands in the glaciated prairie region of North America. High sulfate levels and dynamic hydrogeochemistry in combination render PPLs a unique environment to explore the speciation of sedimentary sulfur (S). The goals of this research were to define and quantify the solid-phase S pools in PPL sediments and track seasonal dynamics of S speciation. A quantitative X-ray microprobe method was developed based on S 1s X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and multienergy X-ray fluorescence mapping. Three S pools-pyritic S, reduced organic S (organic mono- and disulfide), and oxidized S (inorganic sulfate, ester sulfate, and sulfonate)-were identified in PPL sediments. No significant seasonal variation was evident for total S, but S speciation showed a seasonal response. During the spring-summer transition, the reduced organic S decreased from 55 to 15 mol %, with a concomitant rise in the oxidized S. During the summer-fall transition, the trend reversed and the reduced organic S grew to 75 mol % at the expense of the oxidized S. The pyritic S, on the other hand, remained relatively constant (∼22 mol %) over time. The seasonal changes in S speciation have strong potential to force the cycling of elements such as mercury in prairie wetlands.

  1. Dynamic analysis of flexible multibody structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernried, Alan G.

    1989-01-01

    A system composed of several interconnected elastic components that may experience large angular motion relative to each other during operation is referred to as a flexible multibody structure. Several formulations were proposed for the determination of the dynamic response of controlled flexible multibody structures. In general, these formulations consist of superposing elastic deformations of the component body onto the large rigid body motion of the component. It was shown that this particular methodology for combining linear structural deformations with nonlinear kinematics can lead to erroneous response predictions when either the beam member is very flexible or the rotational speed is high. In addition, previous formulations introduce constraint equations to define the interrelations among system components. This approach increases the number of equations that must be solved, and may result in contraint violation when numerical error accumulates during the integration process. In order to overcome the difficulties, a new approach was suggested. The approach is essentially a finite element formulation which takes advantage of the fact that many multibody structures are joint dominated. The Large Angle Transient Dynamic Analysis (LATDYN) program for clarity of documentation, ease of use, user friendliness, modeling generality, and accuracy of results was evaluated. This required gaining a working familiarity with the code and performing several case studies.

  2. Pixel Dynamics Analysis of Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in solar observations have led to higher-resolution surface (photosphere) images that reveal bipolar magnetic features operating near the resolution limit during emerging flux events. Further improvements in resolution are expected to reveal even smaller dynamic features. Such photospheric features provide observable indications of what is happening before, during, and after flux emergence, eruptions in the corona, and other phenomena. Visible changes in photospheric active regions also play a major role in predicting eruptions that are responsible for geomagnetic plasma disturbances. A new method has been developed to extract physical information from photospheric data (e.g., SOLIS Stokes parameters) based on the statistics of pixel-by-pixel variations in spectral (absorption or emission) line quantities such as line profile Doppler shift, width, asymmetry, and flatness. Such properties are determined by the last interaction between detected photons and optically thick photospheric plasmas, and may contain extractable information on local plasma properties at sub-pixel scales. Applying the method to photospheric data with high spectral resolution, our pixel-by-pixel analysis is performed for various regions on the solar disk, ranging from quiet-Sun regions to active regions exhibiting eruptions, characterizing photospheric dynamics using spectral profiles. In particular, the method quantitatively characterizes the time profile of changes in spectral properties in photospheric features and provides improved physical constraints on observed quantities.

  3. Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Device Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Corey Thuen

    2013-01-01

    The On-Device Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Applications (ODAMA) project was started in an effort to protect mobile devices used in Industrial Control Systems (ICS) from cyber attack. Because mobile devices hide as much of the “computer” as possible, the user’s ability to assess the software running on their system is limited. The research team chose Google’s Android platform for this initial research because it is open source and it would give us freedom in our approach, including the ability to modify the mobile device’s operating system itself. The research team concluded that a Privileged Application was the right approach, and the result was ODAMA. This project is an important piece of the work to secure the expanding use of mobile devices with our nation’s critical infrastructure.

  4. Interval prediction in structural dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, Timothy K.; Chrostowski, Jon D.; Ross, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Methods for assessing the predictive accuracy of structural dynamic models are examined with attention given to the effects of modal mass, stiffness, and damping uncertainties. The methods are based on a nondeterministic analysis called 'interval prediction' in which interval variables are used to describe parameters and responses that are unknown. Statistical databases for generic modeling uncertainties are derived from experimental data and incorporated analytically to evaluate responses. Covariance matrices of modal mass, stiffness, and damping parameters are propagated numerically in models of large space structures by means of three methods. The test data tend to fall within the predicted intervals of uncertainty determined by the statistical databases. The present findings demonstrate the suitability of using data from previously analyzed and tested space structures for assessing the predictive accuracy of an analytical model.

  5. Dynamic analysis of truss-beam system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abu-Saba, Elias G.; Mcginley, William M.; Montgomery, Raymond C.

    1991-01-01

    A simple truss-beam method for determining the dynamic characteristics of the space structures intended to perform various tasks in orbit is presented. Algorithms are provided to determine the flexibility matrix of the truss beam for use in the equation of motion. The natural frequencies obtained through this method are compared with those obtained through the finite element method. An experimental procedure for verifying the theoretical results is described. It is concluded that the truss-beam method is a simple analysis technique that yields reasonably accurate results with a minimum of computational effort, especially for the critical lower bending modes of flexible structures. The method takes less computer time than more conventional methods and can be programed in both BASIC and FORTRAN for use in micro- and mainframe computers.

  6. A genomic perspective on hybridization and speciation

    PubMed Central

    Payseur, Bret A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2016-01-01

    Hybridization among diverging lineages is common in nature. Genomic data provide a special opportunity to characterize the history of hybridization and the genetic basis of speciation. We review existing methods and empirical studies to identify recent advances in the genomics of hybridization, as well as issues that need to be addressed. Notable progress has been made in the development of methods for detecting hybridization and inferring individual ancestries. However, few approaches reconstruct the magnitude and timing of gene flow, estimate the fitness of hybrids or incorporate knowledge of recombination rate. Empirical studies indicate that the genomic consequences of hybridization are complex, including a highly heterogeneous landscape of differentiation. Inferred characteristics of hybridization differ substantially among species groups. Loci showing unusual patterns – which may contribute to reproductive barriers – are usually scattered throughout the genome, with potential enrichment in sex chromosomes and regions of reduced recombination. We caution against the growing trend of interpreting genomic variation in summary statistics across genomes as evidence of differential gene flow. We argue that converting genomic patterns into useful inferences about hybridization will ultimately require models and methods that directly incorporate key ingredients of speciation, including the dynamic nature of gene flow, selection acting in hybrid populations and recombination rate variation. PMID:26836441

  7. XANES Identification of Plutonium Speciation in RFETS Samples

    SciTech Connect

    LoPresti, V.; Conradson, S.D.; Clark, D.L.

    2009-06-03

    Using primarily X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) with standards run in tandem with samples, probable plutonium speciation was determined for 13 samples from contaminated soil, acid-splash or fire-deposition building interior surfaces, or asphalt pads from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Save for extreme oxidizing situations, all other samples were found to be of Pu(IV) speciation, supporting the supposition that such contamination is less likely to show mobility off site. EXAFS analysis conducted on two of the 13 samples supported the validity of the XANES features employed as determinants of the plutonium valence.

  8. Heavy metal pollution in vegetables grown in the vicinity of a multi-metal mining area in Gejiu, China: total concentrations, speciation analysis, and health risk.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Wang, Hongbin; Wang, Haijuan; Yin, Fei; Yang, Xiaoyan; Hu, Yongjun

    2014-11-01

    A field survey was conducted to investigate the present situation and health risk of arsenic (As), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) in soils and vegetables in a multi-metal mining area, Gejiu, China. Furthermore, three vegetables (water spinach, potato, and summer squash) containing high metal concentrations were selected to further analyze metal speciation. The results showed that the average concentrations of five metals in soil exceeded the limiting values, and their bioavailable concentrations were significantly positively correlated to the total ones. Heavy metals in the edible parts of vegetables also exceeded the corresponding standards. The leaves of pakchoi, peppermint, and coriander had a strong metal-accumulative ability and they were not suitable for planting. Except the residue forms, the main forms of metals in the edible parts of three selected vegetables were ethanol-, NaCl-, and HAc-extractable fractions for As, Pb, and Cd, respectively; however, Cu was mainly presented as NaCl-extractable and Zn as HAc-extractable fractions. A high proportion of ethanol-extractable As showed that As bioactivity and toxic effects were the highest. Although the total and bioavailable Cd were high in soil, its speciation in vegetables was mainly presented as HAc-extractable fraction, which has a relatively low bioactivity. Lead and arsenic were imposing a serious threat on the local residents via vegetable consumption.

  9. Dynamic modelling and analysis of space webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Baoyin, HeXi; Li, JunFeng

    2011-04-01

    Future space missions demand operations on large flexible structures, for example, space webs, the lightweight cable nets deployable in space, which can serve as platforms for very large structures or be used to capture orbital objects. The interest in research on space webs is likely to increase in the future with the development of promising applications such as Furoshiki sat-ellite of JAXA, Robotic Geostationary Orbit Restorer (ROGER) of ESA and Grapple, Retrieve And Secure Payload (GRASP) of NASA. Unlike high-tensioned nets in civil engineering, space webs may be low-tensioned or tensionless, and extremely flexible, owing to the microgravity in the orbit and the lack of support components, which may cause computational difficulties. Mathematical models are necessary in the analysis of space webs, especially in the conceptual design and evaluation for prototypes. A full three-dimensional finite element (FE) model was developed in this work. Trivial truss elements were adopted to reduce the computational complexity. Considering cable is a compression-free material and its tensile stiffness is also variable, we introduced the cable material constitutive relationship to work out an accurate and feasible model for prototype analysis and design. In the static analysis, the stress distribution and global deformation of the webs were discussed to get access to the knowledge of strength of webs with different types of meshes. In the dynamic analysis, special attention was paid to the impact problem. The max stress and global deformation were investigated. The simulation results indicate the interesting phenomenon which may be worth further research.

  10. How common is homoploid hybrid speciation?

    PubMed

    Schumer, Molly; Rosenthal, Gil G; Andolfatto, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Hybridization has long been considered a process that prevents divergence between species. In contrast to this historical view, an increasing number of empirical studies claim to show evidence for hybrid speciation without a ploidy change. However, the importance of hybridization as a route to speciation is poorly understood, and many claims have been made with insufficient evidence that hybridization played a role in the speciation process. We propose criteria to determine the strength of evidence for homoploid hybrid speciation. Based on an evaluation of the literature using this framework, we conclude that although hybridization appears to be common, evidence for an important role of hybridization in homoploid speciation is more circumscribed.

  11. Passivhaus: indoor comfort and energy dynamic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Antonella; Pagliuca, Antonello; Cardinale, Nicola; Rospi, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    The research aims to verify the energy performance as well as the indoor comfort of an energy class A+ building, built so that the sum of the heat passive contributions of solar radiation, transmitted through the windows, and the heat generated inside the building, are adeguate to compensate for the envelope loss during the cold season. The building, located in Emilia Romagna (Italy), was built using a wooden structure, an envelope realized using a pinewood sandwich panels (transmittance U = 0.250 W/m2K) and, inside, a wool flax insulation layer and thermal window frame with low-emissivity glass (U = 0524 W/m2K). The building design and construction process has followed the guidelines set by "CasaClima". The building has been modeled in the code of dynamic calculation "Energy Plus" by the Design Builder application and divided it into homogenous thermal zones, characterized by winter indoor temperature set at 20 ° (+ / - 1 °) and summer indoor temperature set at 26 ° (+ / - 1 °). It has modeled: the envelope, as described above, the "free" heat contributions, the air conditioning system, the Mechanical Ventilation system as well as home automation solutions. The air conditioning system is an heat pump, able to guarantee an optimization of energy consumption (in fact, it uses the "free" heat offered by the external environment for conditioning indoor environment). As regards the air recirculation system, it has been used a mechanical ventilation system with internal heat cross-flow exchanger, with an efficiency equal to 50%. The domotic solutions, instead, regard a system for the control of windows external screening using reeds, adjustable as a function of incident solar radiation and a lighting management system adjusted automatically using a dimmer. A so realized building meets the requirement imposed from Italian standard UNI/TS 11300 1, UNI/TS 11300 2 and UNI/TS 11300 3. The analysis was performed according to two different configurations: in "spontaneous

  12. Coupling analysis of transient cardiovascular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Müller, Andreas; Riedl, Maik; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2013-04-01

    The analysis of effects from coupling in and between systems is important in data-driven investigations as practiced in many scientific fields. It allows deeper insights into the mechanisms of interaction emerging among individual smaller systems when forming complex systems as in the human circulatory system. For systems featuring various regimes, usually only the epochs before and after a transition between different regimes are analyzed, although relevant information might be hidden within these transitions. Transient behavior of cardiovascular variables may emerge, on the one hand, from the recovery of the system after a severe disturbance or, on the other hand, from adaptive behavior throughout changes of states. It contains important information about the processes involved and the relations between state variables such as heart rate, blood pressure, and respiration. Therefore, we apply an ensemble approach to extend the method of symbolic coupling traces to time-variant coupling analysis. These new ensemble symbolic coupling traces are capable of determining coupling direction, strength, and time offset τ from transient dynamics in multivariate cardiovascular data. We use this method to analyze data recorded during an orthostatic test to reveal a transient structure that cannot be detected by classic methods.

  13. PM 2.5 ORGANIC SPECIATION INTERCOMPARISON RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a poster on results to a laboratory intercomparison of organic aerosol speciation analysis to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on September 10-15. T...

  14. Sequential photocatalyst-assisted digestion and vapor generation device coupled with anion exchange chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for speciation analysis of selenium species in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yun-ni; Lin, Cheng-hsing; Hsu, I-hsiang; Sun, Yuh-chang

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an on-line sequential photocatalyst-assisted digestion and vaporization device (SPADVD), which operates through the nano-TiO2-catalyzed photo-oxidation and reduction of selenium (Se) species, for coupling between anion exchange chromatography (LC) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) systems to provide a simple and sensitive hyphenated method for the speciation analysis of Se species without the need for conventional chemical digestion and vaporization techniques. Because our proposed on-line SPADVD allows both organic and inorganic Se species in the column effluent to be converted on-line into volatile Se products, which are then measured directly through ICP-MS, the complexity of the procedure and the probability of contamination arising from the use of additional chemicals are both low. Under the optimized conditions for SPADVD - using 1g of nano-TiO2 per liter, at pH 3, and illuminating for 80 s - we found that Se(IV), Se(VI), and selenomethionine (SeMet) were all converted quantitatively into volatile Se products. In addition, because the digestion and vaporization efficiencies of all the tested selenicals were improved when using our proposed on-line LC/SPADVD/ICP-MS system, the detection limits for Se(IV), Se(VI), and SeMet were all in the nanogram-per-liter range (based on 3σ). A series of validation experiments - analysis of neat and spiked extracted samples - indicated that our proposed methods could be applied satisfactorily to the speciation analysis of organic and inorganic Se species in the extracts of Se-enriched supplements. PMID:24331052

  15. Global dynamics analysis of nappe oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, Fortunato; Girfoglio, Michele; de Luca, Luigi

    2014-12-01

    The unsteady global dynamics of a gravitational liquid sheet interacting with a one-sided adjacent air enclosure, typically referred to as nappe oscillation, is addressed, under the assumptions of potential flow and absence of surface tension effects. To the purpose of shedding physical insights, the investigation examines both the dynamics and the energy aspects. An interesting re-formulation of the problem consists of recasting the nappe global behavior as a driven damped spring-mass oscillator, where the inertial effects are linked to the liquid sheet mass and the spring is represented by the equivalent stiffness of the air enclosure acting on the average displacement of the compliant nappe centerline. The investigation is carried out through a modal (i.e., time asymptotic) and a non-modal (i.e., short-time transient) linear approach, which are corroborated by direct numerical simulations of the governing equation. The modal analysis shows that the flow system is characterized by low-frequency and high-frequency oscillations, the former related to the crossing time of the perturbations over the whole domain and the latter related to the spring-mass oscillator. The low-frequency oscillations, observed in real life systems, are produced by the (linear) combination of multiple modes. The non-normality of the operator is responsible for short-time energy amplifications even in asymptotically stable configurations, which are confirmed by numerical simulations and justified by energy budget considerations. Strong analogies with the edge-tone problem are encountered; in particular, the integer-plus-one-quarter resonance criterion is uncovered, where the basic frequency to be multiplied by n + /1 4 is just the one related to the spacing among the imaginary parts of the eigenvalues.

  16. Two numerical models for landslide dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungr, Oldrich; McDougall, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Two microcomputer-based numerical models (Dynamic ANalysis (DAN) and three-dimensional model DAN (DAN3D)) have been developed and extensively used for analysis of landslide runout, specifically for the purposes of practical landslide hazard and risk assessment. The theoretical basis of both models is a system of depth-averaged governing equations derived from the principles of continuum mechanics. Original features developed specifically during this work include: an open rheological kernel; explicit use of tangential strain to determine the tangential stress state within the flowing sheet, which is both more realistic and beneficial to the stability of the model; orientation of principal tangential stresses parallel with the direction of motion; inclusion of the centripetal forces corresponding to the true curvature of the path in the motion direction and; the use of very simple and highly efficient free surface interpolation methods. Both models yield similar results when applied to the same sets of input data. Both algorithms are designed to work within the semi-empirical framework of the "equivalent fluid" approach. This approach requires selection of material rheology and calibration of input parameters through back-analysis of real events. Although approximate, it facilitates simple and efficient operation while accounting for the most important characteristics of extremely rapid landslides. The two models have been verified against several controlled laboratory experiments with known physical basis. A large number of back-analyses of real landslides of various types have also been carried out. One example is presented. Calibration patterns are emerging, which give a promise of predictive capability.

  17. Introducing Dynamic Analysis Using Malthus's Principle of Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pingle, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Declares the use of dynamic models is increasing in macroeconomics. Explains how to introduce dynamic models to students whose technical skills are modest or varied. Chooses Malthus's Principle of Population as a natural context for introducing dynamic analysis because it provides a method for reviewing the mathematical tools and theoretical…

  18. Dynamic analysis of news streams: institutional versus environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin; Corman, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Many societal phenomena are studied through analysis of their representation in media-related texts, such as news articles. The dynamics of such data reflect the phenomenon's underlying generative mechanism. Media artifacts are assumed to mirror the social activity occurring in the environment, thus observed dynamics are assumed to reflect environmental dynamics. The institutional mechanics of media production also affect the observed dynamics however. In this study we examine the extent to which institutional versus environmental effects explain the observed dynamics of media content, in particular focusing on semi-continuous "news streams". We examine the dynamics of news streams produced by the electronic news organization Reuters, immediately following the events of September 11, 2001. We find that many of the observed dynamics appear institutionally generated. We conclude with methodological suggestions concerning the dynamic analysis of media content.

  19. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A general engine dynamic analysis as a standard design study computational tool is described for the prediction and understanding of complex engine dynamic behavior. Improved definition of engine dynamic response provides valuable information and insights leading to reduced maintenance and overhaul costs on existing engine configurations. Application of advanced engine dynamic simulation methods provides a considerable cost reduction in the development of new engine designs by eliminating some of the trial and error process done with engine hardware development.

  20. Simultaneous speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic, chromium and selenium in environmental waters by 3-(2-aminoethylamino) propyltrimethoxysilane modified multi-wall carbon nanotubes packed microcolumn solid phase extraction and ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hanyong; Zhang, Nan; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic, chromium and selenium in environmental waters is of great significance for the monitoring of environmental pollution. In this work, 3-(2-aminoethylamino) propyltrimethoxysilane (AAPTS) functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were synthesized and employed as the adsorbent for simultaneous speciation analysis of inorganic arsenic, chromium and selenium in environmental waters by microcolumn solid-phase extraction (SPE)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It was found that As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI) could be selectively adsorbed on the microcolumn packed with AAPTS-MWCNTs adsorbent at pH around 2.2, while As(III), Cr(III) and Se(IV) could not be retained at this pH and passed through the microcolumn directly. Total inorganic arsenic, chromium and selenium was determined after the oxidation of As(III), Cr(III) and Se(IV) to As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI) with 10.0 μmol L(-1) KMnO4. The assay of As(III), Cr(III) and Se(IV) was based on subtracting As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI) from the total As, Cr and Se, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limits of 15, 38 and 16 ng L(-1) with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 7.4, 2.4 and 6.2% (c=1 µg L(-1), n=7) were obtained for As(V), Cr(VI) and Se(VI), respectively. The developed method was validated by analyzing four Certified Reference Materials, rainwater, Yangtze River and East Lake waters. PMID:25281102

  1. A dynamic human motion: coordination analysis.

    PubMed

    Pchelkin, Stepan; Shiriaev, Anton S; Freidovich, Leonid B; Mettin, Uwe; Gusev, Sergei V; Kwon, Woong; Paramonov, Leonid

    2015-02-01

    This article is concerned with the generic structure of the motion coordination system resulting from the application of the method of virtual holonomic constraints (VHCs) to the problem of the generation and robust execution of a dynamic humanlike motion by a humanoid robot. The motion coordination developed using VHCs is based on a motion generator equation, which is a scalar nonlinear differential equation of second order. It can be considered equivalent in function to a central pattern generator in living organisms. The relative time evolution of the degrees of freedom of a humanoid robot during a typical motion are specified by a set of coordination functions that uniquely define the overall pattern of the motion. This is comparable to a hypothesis on the existence of motion patterns in biomechanics. A robust control is derived based on a transverse linearization along the configuration manifold defined by the coordination functions. It is shown that the derived coordination and control architecture possesses excellent robustness properties. The analysis is performed on an example of a real human motion recorded in test experiments.

  2. Dynamic analysis of the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calleson, Robert E.; Scott, A. Don

    1987-01-01

    The Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) is to be an astronomical observatory orbiting above Earth's obscuring atmosphere and operating in the spectral range between 30 microns and 1000 microns wavelength. The LDR will be used to study such astronomical phenomena as stellar and galactic formation, cosmology, and planetary atmospheres. The LDR will be the first observatory to be erected and assembled in space. This distinction brings with it several major technological challenges such as the development of ultra-lightweight deployable mirrors, advanced mirror fabrication techniques, advanced structures, and control of vibrations due to various sources of excitation. The purpose of this analysis is to provide an assessment of the vibrational response due to secondary mirror chopping and LDR slewing. The dynamic response of two 20-m LDR configurations was studied. Two mirror support configurations were investigated for the Ames concept, the first employs a six-strut secondary mirror support structure, while the second uses a triple-bipod support design. All three configurations were modeled using a tetrahedral truss design for the primary mirror support structure. Response resulting from secondary mirror chopping was obtained for the two Ames configurations, and the response of the primary mirror from slewing was obtained for all three configurations.

  3. DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    As part of the characterization of various glovebox glove material from four vendors, the permeability of gas through each type as a function of temperature was determined and a discontinuity in the permeability with temperature was revealed. A series of tests to determine the viscoelastic properties of the glove materials as a function of temperature using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was initiated. The glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were -60 C for butyl, -30 C for polyurethane, -16 C Hypalon{reg_sign}, - 16 C for Viton{reg_sign}, and -24 C for polyurethane-Hypalon{reg_sign}. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} and butyl-Viton{reg_sign} composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.

  4. Modal combination in response spectrum modal dynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, C.R.; Singhal, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    UCRL-15910 does not give explicit requirements for combining the values of the resonse of individual modes in a response spectrum modal dynamic analysis. Since UCRL-15910 references ASE 4-86, modal combination methods given in ASCE 4-86 are described in this paper. Efficient use of typical dynamic analysis computer programs while complying with ASCE 4-86 is also described.

  5. Simultaneous Speciation of Arsenic, Selenium, and Chromium by HPLC-ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, Ruth E.; Morman, Suzette A.; Morrison, Jean M.; Lamothe, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptation of an analytical method developed for chromium speciation has been utilized for the simultaneous determination of As(III), As(V), Se(IV), Se(VI), Cr(III), and Cr(VI) species using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation with ICP-MS detection. Reduction of interferences for the determination of As, Se, and Cr by ICP-MS is a major consideration for this method. Toward this end, a Dynamic Reaction Cell (DRC) ICP-MS system was used to detect the species eluted from the chromatographic column. A variety of reaction cell gases and conditions may be utilized, and the advantages and limitations of the gases tested to date will be presented and discussed. The separation and detection of the As, Se, and Cr species of interest can be achieved using the same chromatographic conditions in less than 2 minutes by complexing the Cr(III) with EDTA prior to injection on the HPLC column. Practical aspects of simultaneous speciation analysis will be presented and discussed, including issues with HPLC sample vial contamination, standard and sample contamination, species stability, and considerations regarding sample collection and preservation methods. The results of testing to determine the method's robustness to common concomitant element and anion effects will also be discussed. Finally, results will be presented using the method for the analysis of a variety of environmental and geological samples including waters, soil leachates and simulated bio-fluid leachates.

  6. Mercury speciation by CE: an update.

    PubMed

    Kubán, Petr; Pelcová, Pavlína; Margetínová, Jana; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2009-01-01

    This review provides an update on mercury speciation by CE. It includes a brief discussion on physicochemical properties, toxicity and transformation pathways of mercury species (i.e. methyl-, ethyl-, phenyl- and inorganic mercury) and outlines recent trends in Hg speciation by CE. CE is presented as a complementary technique to chromatographic separation techniques, especially in cases when speed, high efficiency and low sample volumes are required. The development of suitable sample preconcentration/isolation (sample stacking, ion exchange, liquid-liquid-liquid extraction, dual-cloud point extraction) to achieve low LODs for analysis of trace concentrations of mercury species in real samples is emphasized. Hyphenation of CE to element specific detectors (i.e. electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry) is discussed as well as a potential of CE in interaction studies that may provide useful information on interaction of various Hg species with selected bio-macromolecules.

  7. Homoploid hybrid speciation in animals.

    PubMed

    Mavárez, Jesús; Linares, Mauricio

    2008-10-01

    Among animals, evidence for homoploid hybrid speciation (HHS, i.e. the creation of a hybrid lineage without a change in chromosome number) was limited until recently to the virgin chub, Gila seminuda, and some controversial data in support of hybrid status for the red wolf, Canis rufus. This scarcity of evidence, together with pessimistic attitudes among zoologists about the evolutionary importance of hybridisation, prompted the view that HHS is extremely rare among animals, especially as compared with plants. However, in recent years, the literature on animal HHS has expanded to include several new putative examples in butterflies, ants, flies and fishes. We argue that this evidence suggests that HHS is far more common than previously thought and use it to provide insights into some of the genetic and ecological aspects associated with this type of speciation among animals.

  8. MODELING MONOMETHYLMERCURY AND TRIBUTYLTIN SPECIATION WITH EPA'S GEOCHEMICAL SPECIATION MODEL MINTEQA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given the complexity of the various, simultaneous (and competing) equilibrium reactions governing the speciation of ionic species in aquatic systems, EPA has developed and distributed the geochemical speciation model MINTEQA2 (Brown and Allison, 1987, Allison et al., 1991; Hydrog...

  9. Dynamic Analysis of Fuel Cycle Transitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Steve Piet; David Shropshire; Gretchen Matthern

    2009-09-01

    This paper examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. The once-through system involves only Light Water Reactors (LWRs) operating on uranium oxide fuel UOX), while the closed cycle includes both LWRs and fast spectrum reactors (FRs) in either a single-tier system or two-tier fuel system. The single-tier system includes full transuranic recycle in FRs while the two-tier system adds one pass of mixed oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX U-Pu) fuel in the LWR. While the analysis primarily focuses on burner fast reactors, transuranic conversion ratios up to 1.0 are assessed and many of the findings apply to any fuel cycle transitioning from a thermal once-through system to a synergistic thermal-fast recycle system. These findings include uranium requirements for a range of nuclear electricity growth rates, the importance of back end fuel cycle facility timing and magnitude, the impact of employing a range of fast reactor conversion ratios, system sensitivity to used fuel cooling time prior to recycle, impacts on a range of waste management indicators, and projected electricity cost ranges for once-through, single-tier and two-tier systems. The study confirmed that significant waste management benefits can be realized as soon as recycling is initiated, but natural uranium savings are minimal in this century. The use of MOX in LWRs decouples the development of recycle facilities from fast reactor fielding, but also significantly delays and limits fast reactor deployment. In all cases, fast reactor deployment was significantly below than predicted by static equilibrium analyses.

  10. Arsenic Speciation of Terrestrial Invertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moriarty, M.M.; Koch, I.; Gordon, R.A.; Reimer, K.J. ); )

    2009-07-01

    The distribution and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic in terrestrial food chains determines both the amount of arsenic available to higher organisms, and the toxicity of this metalloid in affected ecosystems. Invertebrates are part of complex terrestrial food webs. This paper provides arsenic concentrations and arsenic speciation profiles for eight orders of terrestrial invertebrates collected at three historical gold mine sites and one background site in Nova Scotia, Canada. Total arsenic concentrations, determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), were dependent upon the classification of invertebrate. Arsenic species were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ICP-MS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Invertebrates were found by HPLC ICP-MS to contain predominantly arsenite and arsenate in methanol/water extracts, while XAS revealed that most arsenic is bound to sulfur in vivo. Examination of the spatial distribution of arsenic within an ant tissue highlighted the differences between exogenous and endogenous arsenic, as well as the extent to which arsenic is transformed upon ingestion. Similar arsenic speciation patterns for invertebrate groups were observed across sites. Trace amounts of arsenobetaine and arsenocholine were identified in slugs, ants, and spiders.

  11. Visibility graph analysis on heartbeat dynamics of meditation training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Sen; Bian, Chunhua; Ning, Xinbao; Ma, Qianli D. Y.

    2013-06-01

    We apply the visibility graph analysis to human heartbeat dynamics by constructing the complex networks of heartbeat interval time series and investigating the statistical properties of the network before and during chi and yoga meditation. The experiment results show that visibility graph analysis can reveal the dynamical changes caused by meditation training manifested as regular heartbeat, which is closely related to the adjustment of autonomous neural system, and visibility graph analysis is effective to evaluate the effect of meditation.

  12. Enabling in-situ observation of organic aerosol speciated composition: Advances in TAG instrumentation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, A. H.; Worton, D. R.; Zhao, Y.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Teng, A. P.; Hering, S. V.; Gorecki, T.; Ranjan, M.; Hennigan, C. J.; Lambe, A.; Nguyen, N.; Donahue, N. M.; Robinson, A. L.; Jayne, J. T.; Williams, B. J.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    The complex chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, particularly the organic carbon portion, presents unique measurement challenges. We developed the Thermal Desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (TAG) system for hourly in-situ speciation of a wide range of primary and secondary organic compounds in aerosols. This instrument combines an impactor particle collector with thermal desorption followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometric detection to provide separation, identification, and quantification of organic constituents at the molecular level. Observed compounds include alkanes, aldehydes, ketones, PAHs, monocarboxylic acids, and many more. The hourly time resolution measurements provided by TAG capture dynamic and frequent changes in aerosol composition that would not be resolved using traditional filter collection. TAG measurements also provide a much larger data set, facilitating the use of statistical approaches such as positive matrix factorization to identify source categories and their contributions to the total observed aerosol. Because TAG identifies organic compounds at the molecular level, it can build on the extensive work obtained by traditional GC/MS analysis of filter samples on source emission profiles and secondary organic aerosol formation. We report here continued developments in the capabilities of our TAG system. Most recently, we have incorporated a two-dimensional chromatography (GC×GC) capability into TAG, and now have that instrument operating with a time of flight (TOF) MS detector. Two-dimensional chromatography provides two types of compound separation, most typically by volatility and polarity. It uses two columns with different stationary phases connected in series separated by a modulator. The modulator periodically traps analytes eluting from the first column, and injects fractions of this effluent onto the second column in the form of narrow pulses providing additional separation for co-eluting peaks. The approach

  13. Sexual behaviour: rapid speciation in an arthropod.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, Tamra C; Shaw, Kerry L

    2005-01-27

    Theory predicts that sexual behaviour in animals can evolve rapidly, accelerating the rate of species formation. Here we estimate the rate of speciation in Laupala, a group of forest-dwelling Hawaiian crickets that is characterized primarily through differences in male courtship song. We find that Laupala has the highest rate of speciation so far recorded in arthropods, supporting the idea that divergence in courtship or sexual behaviour drives rapid speciation in animals.

  14. A recombination suppressor contributes to ecological speciation in OSTRINIA moths.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, C B; Li, X; Dopman, E B

    2015-06-01

    Despite unparalleled access to species' genomes in our post-genomic age, we often lack adequate biological explanations for a major hallmark of the speciation process-genetic divergence. In the presence of gene flow, chromosomal rearrangements such as inversions are thought to promote divergence and facilitate speciation by suppressing recombination. Using a combination of genetic crosses, phenotyping of a trait underlying ecological isolation, and population genetic analysis of wild populations, we set out to determine whether evidence supports a role for recombination suppressors during speciation between the Z and E strains of European corn borer moth (Ostrinia nubilalis). Our results are consistent with the presence of an inversion that has contributed to accumulation of ecologically adaptive alleles and genetic differentiation across roughly 20% of the Ostrinia sex chromosome (~4 Mb). Patterns in Ostrinia suggest that chromosomal divergence may involve two separate phases-one driving its transient origin through local adaptation and one determining its stable persistence through differential introgression. As the evolutionary rate of rearrangements in lepidopteran genomes appears to be one of the fastest among eukaryotes, structural mutations may have had a disproportionate role during adaptive divergence and speciation in Ostrinia and in other moths and butterflies. PMID:25626887

  15. Selenium speciation in soil and rice: influence of water management and Se fertilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Fen; Lombi, Enzo; Stroud, Jacqueline L; McGrath, Steve P; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2010-11-24

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is the staple food for half of the world's population, but the selenium (Se) concentrations in rice grain are low in many rice-growing regions. This study investigated the effects of water management on the Se speciation dynamics in the soil solution and Se uptake and speciation in rice in a pot experiment. A control containing no Se or 0.5 mg kg(-1) of soil of selenite or selenate was added to the soil, and plants were grown under aerobic or flooded conditions. Flooding soil increased soluble Se concentration when no Se or selenite was added to the soil, but decreased it markedly when selenate was added. Selenate was the main species in the +selenate treatment, whereas selenite and selenomethionine selenium oxide were detected in the flooded soil solutions of the control and +selenite treatments. Grain Se concentration was 49% higher in the flooded than in the aerobic treatments without Se addition. In contrast, when selenate or selenite was added, the aerobically grown rice contained 25- and 2-fold, respectively, more Se in grain than the anaerobically grown rice. Analysis of Se in rice grain using enzymatic hydrolysis followed by HPLC-ICP-MS and in situ X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) showed selenomethionine to be the predominant Se species. The study showed that selenate addition to aerobic soil was the most effective way to increase Se concentration in rice grain. PMID:20964343

  16. Dynamic deformation analysis of light-weight mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingtao; Cao, Xuedong; Kuang, Long; Yang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    In the process of optical dynamic target work, under the effort of the arm of dynamic target, the mirror needs to do circular motion, additional accelerated motion and uniform motion. The maximum acceleration is 10°/s2 and the maximum velocity is 30°/s. In this paper, we mostly analyze the dynamic deformation of a 600 mm honeycomb light-weight mirror of a certain dynamic target. Using the FEA (finite element analysis) method, first of all, we analyze the deformation of the light-weight mirror induced in gravity at different position; later, the dynamic deformation of light-weight mirror is analyzed in detailed. The analysis results indicate that, when the maximum acceleration is 10°/s2 and the maximum velocity is 30°/s, the centripetal force is 5% of the gravity at the equal mass, and the dynamic deformation of the mirror is 6.1% of the deformation induced by gravity.

  17. Hybridization Reveals the Evolving Genomic Architecture of Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Kronforst, Marcus R.; Hansen, Matthew E.B.; Crawford, Nicholas G.; Gallant, Jason R.; Zhang, Wei; Kulathinal, Rob J.; Kapan, Durrell D.; Mullen, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The rate at which genomes diverge during speciation is unknown, as are the physical dynamics of the process. Here, we compare full genome sequences of 32 butterflies, representing five species from a hybridizing Heliconius butterfly community, to examine genome-wide patterns of introgression and infer how divergence evolves during the speciation process. Our analyses reveal that initial divergence is restricted to a small fraction of the genome, largely clustered around known wing-patterning genes. Over time, divergence evolves rapidly, due primarily to the origin of new divergent regions. Furthermore, divergent genomic regions display signatures of both selection and adaptive introgression, demonstrating the link between microevolutionary processes acting within species and the origin of species across macroevolutionary timescales. Our results provide a uniquely comprehensive portrait of the evolving species boundary due to the role that hybridization plays in reducing the background accumulation of divergence at neutral sites. PMID:24183670

  18. Arsenic Speciation in Geothermal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, N. S.; Stefansson, A.; Sigfusson, B.

    2011-12-01

    Various arsenic species have been observed or inferred in geothermal waters in recent years, in particular thio- and oxyanions. However their exact stoechiometry and their oxidation state has been subjected to a sustained debate over the last decade. Most of the As species seen in geothermal waters are unstable under laboratory conditions, thus it is crucial that appropriate sampling and analytical techniques are used in order to minimise post-sampling changes. The goals of this study were to determine how many As species can be seen in geothermal systems and how geochemical parameters control the number and relative abundance of the species. Furthermore, we tested the stability of the As-S compounds after sampling, in particular whether the traditionally used flash-freezing method quantitatively preserves the species. Samples were collected from wells at the Hellisheidi Power Plant and from natural hot springs in the Geysir Geothermal Area in SW Iceland. The samples were analysed on-site immediately after sampling by first separating the various As species by Ion Chromatography followed by quantification by Hydride-Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometer (HG-AFS). Preliminary results show that analysis of the samples immediately after sampling is crucial, as sample storage and flash-freezing/thawing appear to modify the As speciation. Using the retention times of the analytes through the chromatographic column, a minimum of seven As species were observed. Two of the species are oxides of AsIII and AsV, based on the comparison of their retention times with standards. The other five species have yet to be unequivocally identified, but based on prior studies it is assumed that at least some of them are thioarsenic species with various S:O ratios, with longer retention times for increasing S:O. Clear differences can be seen between samples from Hellisheidi and Geysir. In the case of the oxyanions, only AsIII is present at Hellisheidi whereas both oxidation states

  19. Aeroservoelastic and Flight Dynamics Analysis Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This document in large part is based on the Masters Thesis of Cole Stephens. The document encompasses a variety of technical and practical issues involved when using the STARS codes for Aeroservoelastic analysis of vehicles. The document covers in great detail a number of technical issues and step-by-step details involved in the simulation of a system where aerodynamics, structures and controls are tightly coupled. Comparisons are made to a benchmark experimental program conducted at NASA Langley. One of the significant advantages of the methodology detailed is that as a result of the technique used to accelerate the CFD-based simulation, a systems model is produced which is very useful for developing the control law strategy, and subsequent high-speed simulations.

  20. Dynamic fuzzy hierarchy analysis for evaluation of professionalization degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lin; Min, Luo; Ma, Jingxi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the model of dynamic fuzzy hierarchy analysis for evaluation of professionalization degree, as a combination of the dynamic fuzzy theory and the AHP, which can show the changes and trends of the value of each index of professionalization.

  1. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  2. DynamicBC: a MATLAB toolbox for dynamic brain connectome analysis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei; Wu, Guo-Rong; Xu, Qiang; Ji, Gong-Jun; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zang, Yu-Feng; Lu, Guangming

    2014-12-01

    The brain connectome collects the complex network architectures, looking at both static and dynamic functional connectivity. The former normally requires stationary signals and connections. However, the human brain activity and connections are most likely time dependent and dynamic, and related to ongoing rhythmic activity. We developed an open-source MATLAB toolbox DynamicBC with user-friendly graphical user interfaces, implementing both dynamic functional and effective connectivity for tracking brain dynamics from functional MRI. We provided two strategies for dynamic analysis: (1) the commonly utilized sliding-window analysis and (2) the flexible least squares based time-varying parameter regression strategy. The toolbox also implements multiple functional measures including seed-to-voxel analysis, region of interest (ROI)-to-ROI analysis, and voxel-to-voxel analysis. We describe the principles of the implemented algorithms, and then present representative results from simulations and empirical data applications. We believe that this toolbox will help neuroscientists and neurologists to easily map dynamic brain connectomics.

  3. Dynamic analysis of noncontacting face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a noncontacting coned face seal is analyzed taking into account various design parameters and operating conditions. The primary seal ring motion is expressed by a set of nonlinear equations for three degrees of freedom. These equations, which are solved numerically, allow identification of two dimensionless groups of parameters that affect the seal dynamic behavior. Stability maps for various seals are presented. These maps contain a stable-to-unstable transition region in which the ring wobbles at half the shaft frequency. The effect of various parameters on seal stability is discussed and an empirical expression for critical stability is offered.

  4. Dynamical scaling analysis of plant callus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, J.; Buceta, J.; Juarez, K.; Pumariño, B.; de la Torre, J.; Iriondo, J. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present experimental results for the dynamical scaling properties of the development of plant calli. We have assayed two different species of plant calli, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa, under different growth conditions, and show that their dynamical scalings share a universality class. From a theoretical point of view, we introduce a scaling hypothesis for systems whose size evolves in time. We expect our work to be relevant for the understanding and characterization of other systems that undergo growth due to cell division and differentiation, such as, for example, tumor development.

  5. Trace element analytical speciation in biological systems: importance, challenges and trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    1998-02-01

    Speciation of trace elements is a relatively new field and it was in toxicology that the relationship between the chemical form of a metal and its harmful effects was first recognized. The present need for chemical speciation information in biochemistry bioinorganic and clinical chemistry is documented in an attempt to justify the present demand for innovative chemical speciation strategies and analytical technologies. The challenge and complexity of speciation is stressed and three different categories of analytical speciation of increasing analytical difficulty are proposed. Analytical strategies developed so far to try to tackle speciation problems (computational approaches, direct species-specific and hybrid techniques) are reviewed and critically assessed for biological materials. It is indisputable these days that in most cases of real-life analytical speciation we have to resort to the development and use of hybrid techniques combining an adequate separation technique for the species physical separation and an element specific detector such as those based in atomic spectrometry. Examples of such strategies, as developed mainly in the author's laboratory and including chromatographic and non-chromatographic type hybrid strategies coupled to flame, plasma and electrothermal vaporization atomic detectors, are discussed in more detail. Finally, in light of the latest trends observed in this new field, the author attempts to cast a forward look into the foreseeable future of analytical speciation research in biological and biomedical sciences. The urgent plea for quality assurance in non-routine analysis and the concept of using complementary analytical techniques and definitive methods to attack the complexity of chemical speciation in biological systems are particularly highlighted.

  6. Theoretical and software considerations for nonlinear dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. J.; Dodds, R. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In the finite element method for structural analysis, it is generally necessary to discretize the structural model into a very large number of elements to accurately evaluate displacements, strains, and stresses. As the complexity of the model increases, the number of degrees of freedom can easily exceed the capacity of present-day software system. Improvements of structural analysis software including more efficient use of existing hardware and improved structural modeling techniques are discussed. One modeling technique that is used successfully in static linear and nonlinear analysis is multilevel substructuring. This research extends the use of multilevel substructure modeling to include dynamic analysis and defines the requirements for a general purpose software system capable of efficient nonlinear dynamic analysis. The multilevel substructuring technique is presented, the analytical formulations and computational procedures for dynamic analysis and nonlinear mechanics are reviewed, and an approach to the design and implementation of a general purpose structural software system is presented.

  7. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time.

  8. Evolutionary history of the four-spotted megrim ( Lepidorhombus boscii) and speciation time within the genus based on mitochondrial genes analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Daniel; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2010-10-01

    The evolutionary history and geographic distribution of North-Atlantic and Mediterranean marine taxa has been largely affected by past geological and climatic events, like the Messinian salinity crisis, the opening of the Strait of Gibraltar and the Quaternary glacial cycles. The four-spotted megrim Lepidorhombus boscii is a demersal flatfish of the family Scophthalmidae (Pleuronectiformes), distributed in the Northeast Atlantic and the Mediterranean Sea. During its larval development it is planktonic, being passively drifted by marine currents, while adults are more or less sedentary living near the sea bottom. In order to investigate whether past geological and climatic events have influenced the evolutionary and demographic history of L.boscii, we analyzed a fragment of the highly variable mitochondrial control region in 163 individuals from different North-Atlantic areas and from the Mediterranean Sea. Contemporary processes of moderate gene flow, partially restricted by isolation by distance, as well as recent paleoecological events like the last Pleistocene glaciation, seem to play key roles in shaping the current phylogeographic pattern of the four-spotted megrim. On the other hand, we also analyzed 94 individuals from different North-Atlantic areas of its congeneric species L. whiffiagonis in order to compare genetic variation patterns within this genus. Finally, we used a fragment of the protein-coding mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase I to estimate the time of speciation in megrims. Results suggest that divergence between the two species likely took place 5.3 MYA, which can be correlated with the end of the Messinian salinity crisis.

  9. Origin and speciation of haplochromine fishes in East African crater lakes investigated by the analysis of their mtDNA, Mhc genes, and SINEs.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akie; Takezaki, Naoko; Tichy, Herbert; Figueroa, Felipe; Mayer, Werner E; Klein, Jan

    2003-09-01

    The Western Branch of the East African Great Rift Valley is pocketed with craters of extinct or dormant volcanoes. Many of the craters are filled with water, and the lakes are inhabited by fishes. The objective of the present study was to determine the amount and nature of genetic variation in haplochromine fishes inhabiting two of these crater lakes, Lake Lutoto and Lake Nshere, and to use this information to infer the origin and history of the two populations. To this end, sequences of mitochondrial (mt) DNA control region, exon 2 of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II B genes, and short interspersed elements (SINEs) were analyzed. The results indicate that the Lake Nshere and Lake Lutoto fishes originated from different but related large founding populations derived from the Kazinga Channel, which connects Lake Edward and Lake George. Some of the genetic polymorphism that existed in the ancestral populations was lost in the populations of the two lakes. The polymorphism that has been retained has persisted for some 50000 generations (years). During this time, new mutations arose and became fixed in each of the two populations in the mtDNA, giving rise to sets of diagnostic substitutions. Each population evolved in isolation after the colonization of the lakes less than 50000 years ago. There appears to be no population structure within the crater lake fishes, and their present effective population sizes are in the order of 104 to 105 individuals. Comparisons with the endemic haplochromine species of Lake Victoria reveal interesting parallels, as well as differences, which may help to understand the nature of the speciation process.

  10. Molecular Analysis of Echinostome Metacercariae from Their Second Intermediate Host Found in a Localised Geographic Region Reveals Genetic Heterogeneity and Possible Cryptic Speciation

    PubMed Central

    Noikong, Waraporn; Wongsawad, Chalobol; Chai, Jong-Yil; Saenphet, Supap; Trudgett, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Echinostome metacercariae are the infective stage for humans and animals. The identification of echinostomes has been based until recently on morphology but molecular techniques using sequences of ribosomal RNA and mitochondrial DNA have indicated major clades within the group. In this study we have used the ITS2 region of ribosomal RNA and the ND1 region of mitochondrial DNA to identify metacercariae from snails collected from eight well-separated sites from an area of 4000 km2 in Lamphun Province, Thailand. The derived sequences have been compared to those collected from elsewhere and have been deposited in the nucleotide databases. There were two aims of this study; firstly, to determine the species of echinostome present in an endemic area, and secondly, to assess the intra-specific genetic diversity, as this may be informative with regard to the potential for the development of anthelmintic resistance and with regard to the spread of infection by the definitive hosts. Our results indicate that the most prevalent species are most closely related to E. revolutum, E. trivolvis, E. robustum, E. malayanum and Euparyphium albuferensis. Some sites harbour several species and within a site there could be considerable intra-species genetic diversity. There is no significant geographical structuring within this area. Although the molecular techniques used in this study allowed the assignment of the samples to clades within defined species, however, within these groupings there were significant differences indicating that cryptic speciation may have occurred. The degree of genetic diversity present would suggest the use of targeted regimes designed to minimise the selection of anthelmintic resistance. The apparent lack of geographic structuring is consistent with the transmission of the parasites by the avian hosts. PMID:24699358

  11. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time. PMID:25770602

  12. Discussion Dynamics: An Analysis of Classroom Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mary Canice

    Dynamics of discussion in the classroom are analyzed based on data from 64 classrooms in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. Among the discourse problems considered are the separation of answers from questions, the relationship between the presupposition of an utterance and the speaker/hearer assumptions, and the relationship between utterance form and…

  13. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  14. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  15. Using Dynamic Sensitivity Analysis to Assess Testability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey; Morell, Larry; Miller, Keith

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses sensitivity analysis and its relationship to random black box testing. Sensitivity analysis estimates the impact that a programming fault at a particular location would have on the program's input/output behavior. Locations that are relatively \\"insensitive" to faults can render random black box testing unlikely to uncover programming faults. Therefore, sensitivity analysis gives new insight when interpreting random black box testing results. Although sensitivity analysis is computationally intensive, it requires no oracle and no human intervention.

  16. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  17. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    PubMed Central

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26075210

  18. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. Metal speciation and toxicity of Tamar Estuary water to larvae of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Money, Cathryn; Braungardt, Charlotte B; Jha, Awadhesh N; Worsfold, Paul J; Achterberg, Eric P

    2011-07-01

    As part of the PREDICT Tamar Workshop, the toxicity of estuarine waters in the Tamar Estuary (southwest England) was assessed by integration of metal speciation determination with bioassays. High temporal resolution metal speciation analysis was undertaken in situ by deployment of a Voltammetric In situ Profiling (VIP) system. The VIP detects Cd (cadmium), Pb (lead) and Cu (copper) species smaller than 4 nm in size and this fraction is termed 'dynamic' and considered biologically available. Cadmium was mainly present in the dynamic form and constituted between 56% and 100% of the total dissolved concentration, which was determined subsequently in the laboratory in filtered discrete samples. In contrast, the dynamic Pb and Cu fractions were less important, with a much larger proportion of these metals associated with organic ligands and/or colloids (45-90% Pb and 46-85% Cu), which probably reduced the toxicological impact of these elements in this system. Static toxicity tests, based on the response of Crassostrea gigas larva exposed to discrete water samples showed a high level of toxicity (up to 100% abnormal development) at two stations in the Tamar, particularly during periods of the tidal cycle when the influence of more pristine coastal water was at its lowest. Competitive ligand-exchange Cu titrations showed that natural organic ligands reduced the free cupric ion concentration to levels that were unlikely to have been the sole cause of the observed toxicity. Nonetheless, it is probable that the combined effect of the metals determined in this work contributed significantly to the bioassay response. PMID:21704365

  20. Mercury speciation in floodplain soils and sediments along a contaminated river transect

    SciTech Connect

    Wallschlaeger, D.; Desai, M.V.M.; Spengler, M.; Wilken, R.D.

    1998-09-01

    A novel mercury-specific sequential extraction procedure (SEP) for the assessment of mercury (Hg) speciation in soils and sediments, with emphasis on studying the interaction between Hg and organic matter (OM), was developed and tested. It was applied to determine Hg speciation in floodplain topsoils and surface sediments along the Hg-contaminated part of the river Elbe, and to simultaneously derive some information on the (re)mobilization potentials for Hg from these matrices. The majority of the total Hg in the ecosystem today is bound in the floodplains, which also still geographically reflect the historic emission record. Most of the Hg in both matrices is bound strongly to OM, suggesting low availability. However, distinct differences between Hg speciation in the floodplain soils and sediments were also discovered. Mercury deposited in the floodplains shows speciation patterns that indicate stronger fixation compared with Hg in the sediments. This difference is attributed to the association of Hg with larger quantities of OM, which presumably also has higher molecular weight (MW). By comparison, Hg in the sediments was distributed among weaker binding forms, which are more likely to liberate Hg. Particularly, sediments showed a total lack of sulfidic binding forms for Hg. Pronounced geographical trends were detected in the Hg speciation along the river transect, with a general downstream shift from weaker to stronger binding forms, probably due to increased association with OM. These studies indicate that Hg speciation in riverine ecosystems is dynamic and reflects the chemical mechanisms underlying (bio) geochemical processes like distribution and transport.

  1. Speciation in fungal and oomycete plant pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The process of speciation by definition involves evolution of one or more reproductive isolating mechanisms that split a single species into two that can no longer interbreed. Determination of which processes are responsible for speciation is important yet challenging. Several studies have proposed ...

  2. Structural dynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, L. P.; Jamison, G. T.; Mccutcheon, W. A.; Price, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    This structural dynamic analysis supports development of the SSME by evaluating components subjected to critical dynamic loads, identifying significant parameters, and evaluating solution methods. Engine operating parameters at both rated and full power levels are considered. Detailed structural dynamic analyses of operationally critical and life limited components support the assessment of engine design modifications and environmental changes. Engine system test results are utilized to verify analytic model simulations. The SSME main chamber injector assembly is an assembly of 600 injector elements which are called LOX posts. The overall LOX post analysis procedure is shown.

  3. Speciation and distribution of cadmium and lead in salinized horizons of antrosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgariu, D.; Bulgariu, L.; Astefanei, D.

    2009-04-01

    The utilization of intensive technologies for the vegetable cultivation in glass houses by the administration of high doses of organic fertilizes, the supra-dimensional irrigation and the maintaining of soil at high humidity state, in special in case of vicious drainage have as result the rapid degradation of morphological, chemical and physical characteristics of soils, concretized by: (i) decrease of structural aggregates stability; (ii) more dense packing of soil; (iii) accumulation of easy soluble salts (in special at superior horizons level); (iv) limitation of organic compounds and micro-elements biodisponibility. All these determined a significant reduction of productivity and of exploitation duration of soils from glass houses. These phenomena modified continuously the dynamic of speciation processes and inter-phases distribution, of heavy metals in soils from glass houses, and can determined a non-controlled accumulation of heavy metals, in special as mobile forms with high biodisponibility. Ours studied have been performed using soil profiles drawing from Copou-glass house, Iasi (Romania). Has been followed the modification of distribution for speciation forms of cadmium and lead (two heavy metals with high toxicity degree), between hortic antrosol horizons, and between chemical-mineralogical components of this, with the progressive salinization of superior horizons, in 2007-2008 period. The separation, differentiation and determination of cadmium and lead speciation forms was done by combined solid-liquid sequential extraction (SPE) and extraction in aqueous polymer-inorganic salt two-phase systems (ABS) procedure, presented in some of ours previous studies. After extraction, the total contents of the two heavy metals and fractions from these differential bonded by mineral and organic components of hortic antrosol have been determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The specific interaction mechanisms of Cd and Pb with organic-mineral components of

  4. Advances in Ecological Speciation: an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Faria, Rui; Renaut, Sebastien; Galindo, Juan; Pinho, Catarina; Melo-Ferreira, José; Melo, Martim; Jones, Felicity; Salzburger, Walter; Schluter, Dolph; Butlin, Roger

    2014-02-01

    The role of natural selection in promoting reproductive isolation has received substantial renewed interest within the last two decades. As a consequence, the study of ecological speciation has become an extremely productive research area in modern evolutionary biology. Recent innovations in sequencing technologies offer an unprecedented opportunity to study the mechanisms involved in ecological speciation. Genome scans provide significant insights but have some important limitations; efforts are needed to integrate them with other approaches to make full use of the sequencing data deluge. An international conference 'Advances in Ecological Speciation' organized by the University of Porto (Portugal) aimed to review current progress in ecological speciation. Using some of the examples presented at the conference, we highlight the benefits of integrating ecological and genomic data and discuss different mechanisms of parallel evolution. Finally, future avenues of research are suggested to advance our knowledge concerning the role of natural selection in the establishment of reproductive isolation during ecological speciation.

  5. Rates of speciation in the fossil record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Data from palaeontology and biodiversity suggest that the global biota should produce an average of three new species per year. However, the fossil record shows large variation around this mean. Rates of origination have declined through the Phanerozoic. This appears to have been largely a function of sorting among higher taxa (especially classes), which exhibit characteristic rates of speciation (and extinction) that differ among them by nearly an order of magnitude. Secular decline of origination rates is hardly constant, however; many positive deviations reflect accelerated speciation during rebounds from mass extinctions. There has also been general decline in rates of speciation within major taxa through their histories, although rates have tended to remain higher among members in tropical regions. Finally, pulses of speciation appear sometimes to be associated with climate change, although moderate oscillations of climate do not necessarily promote speciation despite forcing changes in species' geographical ranges.

  6. Rates of speciation in the fossil record.

    PubMed Central

    Sepkoski, J J

    1998-01-01

    Data from palaeontology and biodiversity suggest that the global biota should produce an average of three new species per year. However, the fossil record shows large variation around this mean. Rates of origination have declined through the Phanerozoic. This appears to have been largely a function of sorting among higher taxa (especially classes), which exhibit characteristic rates of speciation (and extinction) that differ among them by nearly an order of magnitude. Secular decline of origination rates is hardly constant, however; many positive deviations reflect accelerated speciation during rebounds from mass extinctions. There has also been general decline in rates of speciation within major taxa through their histories, although rates have tended to remain higher among members in tropical regions. Finally, pulses of speciation appear sometimes to be associated with climate change, although moderate oscillations of climate do not necessarily promote speciation despite forcing changes in species' geographical ranges. PMID:11541734

  7. Error Analysis of Modified Langevin Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon, Stephane; Stoltz, Gabriel; Trstanova, Zofia

    2016-08-01

    We consider Langevin dynamics associated with a modified kinetic energy vanishing for small momenta. This allows us to freeze slow particles, and hence avoid the re-computation of inter-particle forces, which leads to computational gains. On the other hand, the statistical error may increase since there are a priori more correlations in time. The aim of this work is first to prove the ergodicity of the modified Langevin dynamics (which fails to be hypoelliptic), and next to analyze how the asymptotic variance on ergodic averages depends on the parameters of the modified kinetic energy. Numerical results illustrate the approach, both for low-dimensional systems where we resort to a Galerkin approximation of the generator, and for more realistic systems using Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Ultrasensitive DNAzyme beacon for lanthanides and metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Lin, Jenny; Cao, Jing; Vazin, Mahsa; Liu, Juewen

    2014-02-01

    Metal-ion detection and speciation analysis is crucial for environmental monitoring. Despite the importance of lanthanides, few sensors are available for their detection. DNAzymes have been previously used to detect divalent metals, while no analytical work was carried out for trivalent and tetravalent ions. Herein, in vitro selection was performed using a Ce(4+) salt as the target metal, and a new DNAzyme (named Ce13) with a bulged hairpin structure was isolated and characterized. Interestingly, Ce13 has almost no activity with Ce(4+) but is highly active with all trivalent lanthanides and Y(3+), serving as a general probe for rare earth metals (omitting Sc). A DNAzyme beacon was engineered detecting down to 1.7 nM Ce(3+) (240 parts per trillion), and other lanthanides showed similar sensitivity. The feasibility of metal speciation analysis was demonstrated by measuring the reduction of Ce(4+) to Ce(3+).

  9. Network analysis of human heartbeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang

    2010-02-01

    We construct the complex networks of human heartbeat dynamics and investigate their statistical properties, using the visibility algorithm proposed by Lacasa and co-workers [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 4972 (2008)]. Our results show that the associated networks for the time series of heartbeat interval are always scale-free, high clustering, hierarchy, and assortative mixing. In particular, the assortative coefficient of associated networks could distinguish between healthy subjects and patients with congestive heart failure.

  10. Dynamic analysis of a parasite population model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibona, G. J.; Condat, C. A.

    2002-03-01

    We study the dynamics of a model that describes the competitive interaction between an invading species (a parasite) and its antibodies in an living being. This model was recently used to examine the dynamical competition between Tripanosoma cruzi and its antibodies during the acute phase of Chagas' disease. Depending on the antibody properties, the model yields three types of outcomes, corresponding, respectively, to healing, chronic disease, and host death. Here, we study the dynamics of the parasite-antibody interaction with the help of simulations, obtaining phase trajectories and phase diagrams for the system. We show that, under certain conditions, the size of the parasite inoculation can be crucial for the infection outcome and that a retardation in the stimulated production of an antibody species may result in the parasite gaining a definitive advantage. We also find a criterion for the relative sizes of the parameters that are required if parasite-generated decoys are indeed to help the invasion. Decoys may also induce a qualitatively different outcome: a limit cycle for the antibody-parasite population phase trajectories.

  11. Unsupervised analysis of small animal dynamic Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Clustering analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to dynamic Cerenkov luminescence images (dCLI). In order to investigate the performances of the proposed approaches, two distinct dynamic data sets obtained by injecting mice with 32P-ATP and 18F-FDG were acquired using the IVIS 200 optical imager. The k-means clustering algorithm has been applied to dCLI and was implemented using interactive data language 8.1. We show that cluster analysis allows us to obtain good agreement between the clustered and the corresponding emission regions like the bladder, the liver, and the tumor. We also show a good correspondence between the time activity curves of the different regions obtained by using CA and manual region of interest analysis on dCLIT and PCA images. We conclude that CA provides an automatic unsupervised method for the analysis of preclinical dynamic Cerenkov luminescence image data.

  12. Arsenic distribution and speciation in Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Caumette, Guilhem; Koch, Iris; Moriarty, Maeve; Reimer, Kenneth J

    2012-08-15

    Rat Lake, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, is situated on arsenic-rich tailings from a historical gold mine. The abundant zooplankton species Daphnia pulex in this lake was used to study the impact of arsenic at the base of the freshwater food web; the speciation and distribution of arsenic in D. pulex and its food sources; and the origin of formation of organoarsenicals in freshwater systems. The arsenic concentration in lake water was measured as 0.25 mg L(-1), while the zooplankton organisms contained up to 35 mg kg(-1) d.w. arsenic. Plankton samples were analyzed for arsenic speciation, by using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) on the whole, dried samples and High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) on water extracts. XANES data suggest that D. pulex mainly contain inorganic arsenicals with 56% of arsenic with +5 oxidation state and 10% of arsenic with +3 oxidation state, but also 34% of organoarsenic compounds that were identified with HPLC-ICP-MS as monomethylarsonate (MMA), dimethylarsinate (DMA), and arsenosugars. The most abundant of the organoarsenicals was the glycerol sugar (Sugar 1). X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) mapping of D. pulex for arsenic distribution showed that arsenic was mainly distributed in the gut of the animal, where its concentration was ten times higher than in the surrounding tissues. Moreover, the analysis of residues from extractions targeting water-soluble and lipid-soluble arsenicals suggested that part of the measured arsenic signal comes from ingested sediments, phytoplankton, or other food sources. These food sources contain inorganic arsenic only, with As(V)-O in phytoplankton and As(III)-S in sediments, suggesting the possibility that the organoarsenicals compounds detected in the tissues of the organism are created by the Daphnia. PMID:22750169

  13. Speciation of lead in contaminated soil under the influence of plants and phosphate amendment type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diyab, C.; Juillot, F.; Dumat, C.; Morin, G.; Benedetti, M.; Mariotti, A.

    2003-05-01

    The toxicity of an element and its behaviour depend on its chemical form (speciation) and concentration. The objective of our work is to study the speciation of Pb under the influence of phosphate amendments (solide, soluble) and type of plants: peas, tomato (pH variation, organic acid complexes formation) in a polluted soil near one of Europe's largest lead contaminated area in the north of France. Chemical and physical methods were used to determine the speciation of lead in rhizospheric soil (chemical extraction, μFX, EXAFS, SEM.). The formation of lead phosphate complexe was confirmed in rhizospheric soil of both plants. Quantity and chemical structure of phosphate lead complexe formed in soil, varied with the type of plante and phosphate amendement added. Analysis of organic acids secreted by the two plantes were performed to understand the effect of organic acids on the speciation of lead in the rhizospheric soil.

  14. Selenium speciation in framboidal and euhedral pyrites in shales.

    PubMed

    Matamoros-Veloza, Adriana; Peacock, Caroline L; Benning, Liane G

    2014-08-19

    The release of Se from shales is poorly understood because its occurrence, distribution, and speciation in the various components of shale are unknown. To address this gap we combined bulk characterization, sequential extractions, and spatially resolved μ-focus spectroscopic analyses and investigated the occurrence and distribution of Se and other associated elements (Fe, As, Cr, Ni, and Zn) and determined the Se speciation at the μ-scale in typical, low bulk Se containing shales. Our results revealed Se primarily correlated with the pyrite fraction with exact Se speciation highly dependent on pyrite morphology. In euhedral pyrites, we found Se(-II) substitutes for S in the mineral structure. However, we also demonstrate that Se is associated with framboidal pyrite grains as a discrete, independent FeSex phase. The presence of this FeSex species has major implications for Se release, because FeSex species oxidize much faster than Se substituted in the euhedral pyrite lattice. Thus, such an FeSex species will enhance and control the dynamics of Se weathering and release into the aqueous environment. PMID:25032506

  15. Selenium speciation in framboidal and euhedral pyrites in shales.

    PubMed

    Matamoros-Veloza, Adriana; Peacock, Caroline L; Benning, Liane G

    2014-08-19

    The release of Se from shales is poorly understood because its occurrence, distribution, and speciation in the various components of shale are unknown. To address this gap we combined bulk characterization, sequential extractions, and spatially resolved μ-focus spectroscopic analyses and investigated the occurrence and distribution of Se and other associated elements (Fe, As, Cr, Ni, and Zn) and determined the Se speciation at the μ-scale in typical, low bulk Se containing shales. Our results revealed Se primarily correlated with the pyrite fraction with exact Se speciation highly dependent on pyrite morphology. In euhedral pyrites, we found Se(-II) substitutes for S in the mineral structure. However, we also demonstrate that Se is associated with framboidal pyrite grains as a discrete, independent FeSex phase. The presence of this FeSex species has major implications for Se release, because FeSex species oxidize much faster than Se substituted in the euhedral pyrite lattice. Thus, such an FeSex species will enhance and control the dynamics of Se weathering and release into the aqueous environment.

  16. Literal algebra for satellite dynamics. [perturbation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A description of the rather general class of operations available is given and the operations are related to problems in satellite dynamics. The implementation of an algebra processor is discussed. The four main categories of symbol processors are related to list processing, string manipulation, symbol manipulation, and formula manipulation. Fundamental required operations for an algebra processor are considered. It is pointed out that algebra programs have been used for a number of problems in celestial mechanics with great success. The advantage of computer algebra is its accuracy and speed.

  17. Analytical analysis of particle-core dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2010-01-01

    Particle-core interaction is a well-developed model of halo formation in high-intensity beams. In this paper, we present an analytical solution for averaged, single particle dynamics, around a uniformly charged beam. The problem is analyzed through a sequence of canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian, which describes nonlinear particle oscillations. A closed form expression for maximum particle deviation from the axis is obtained. The results of this study are in good agreement with numerical simulations and with previously obtained data.

  18. Speciation Progress: A Case Study on the Bushcricket Poecilimon veluchianus

    PubMed Central

    Eweleit, Lucienne; Reinhold, Klaus; Sauer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Different mechanisms such as selection or genetic drift permitted e.g. by geographical isolation can lead to differentiation of populations and could cause subsequent speciation. The two subspecies of Poecilimon veluchianus, a bushcricket endemic to central Greece, show a parapatric distribution and are partially reproductively isolated. Therefore, P. veluchianus is suitable to investigate an ongoing speciation process. We based our analysis on sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the mitochondrial control region (CR). The population genetic analysis based on the nuclear marker ITS revealed a barrier to gene flow within the range of Poecilimon veluchianus, which corresponds well to the described subspecies. In contrast to the results based on the nuclear ITS marker, the mitochondrial CR marker does not clearly support the separation into two subspecies with restricted gene flow and a clear contact zone. Furthermore, we could identify isolation by distance (IBD) as one important mechanism responsible for the observed genetic structure (based on the ITS marker). The population genetic analysis based on the nuclear marker ITS also suggests the existence of hybrids in the wild. Furthermore, the simultaneous lack of strong prezygotic barriers and the presence of postzygotic mating barriers, observed in previous laboratory experiments, suggest that a secondary contact after an allopatric phase is more likely than parapatric speciation. PMID:26436732

  19. Stability analysis of dynamic thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Crawford, Paulo

    2005-11-01

    We analyse the stability of generic spherically symmetric thin shells to linearized perturbations around static solutions. We include the momentum flux term in the conservation identity, deduced from the 'ADM' constraint and the Lanczos equations. Following the Ishak Lake analysis, we deduce a master equation which dictates the stable equilibrium configurations. Considering the transparency condition, we study the stability of thin shells around black holes, showing that our analysis is in agreement with previous results. Applying the analysis to traversable wormhole geometries, by considering specific choices for the form function, we deduce stability regions and find that the latter may be significantly increased by considering appropriate choices for the redshift function.

  20. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Managing Dynamic Tensions within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the third of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail examines the dynamic tensions within the process of qualitative data analysis that qualitative researchers must manage in order to produce credible and creative results. These tensions include (a) the qualities of the data and the qualitative data…

  1. Bootstrap Standard Error Estimates in Dynamic Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Browne, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis summarizes changes in scores on a battery of manifest variables over repeated measurements in terms of a time series in a substantially smaller number of latent factors. Algebraic formulae for standard errors of parameter estimates are more difficult to obtain than in the usual intersubject factor analysis because of the…

  2. Equations simplify dynamic analysis of deepwater drilling risers

    SciTech Connect

    Huagui, Li )

    1993-12-13

    A set of nonlinear equations with practical simplifying assumptions on the governing motion equations and operational boundary conditions can improve the dynamic analysis of marine drilling risers. The dynamic analysis of marine drilling risers includes time domain and frequency domain analyses. This article simplifies the four-order nonlinear partial differential equation and boundary conditions used to describe marine drilling riser motion. The nonlinear dynamic analysis is numerically simulated by using a finite difference method. The top tension on marine risers was studied using four sea states that correspond to increasingly difficult drilling modes. The results from this numerical method are consistent with those from an analysis of a riser in operation. The paper describes the mathematical model, the numerical method, and drilling limitations, and gives an example calculation.

  3. Analysis of dynamic brain imaging data.

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, P P; Pesaran, B

    1999-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques for probing brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, intrinsic and extrinsic contrast optical imaging, and magnetoencephalography, generate large data sets with complex content. In this paper we develop appropriate techniques for analysis and visualization of such imaging data to separate the signal from the noise and characterize the signal. The techniques developed fall into the general category of multivariate time series analysis, and in particular we extensively use the multitaper framework of spectral analysis. We develop specific protocols for the analysis of fMRI, optical imaging, and MEG data, and illustrate the techniques by applications to real data sets generated by these imaging modalities. In general, the analysis protocols involve two distinct stages: "noise" characterization and suppression, and "signal" characterization and visualization. An important general conclusion of our study is the utility of a frequency-based representation, with short, moving analysis windows to account for nonstationarity in the data. Of particular note are 1) the development of a decomposition technique (space-frequency singular value decomposition) that is shown to be a useful means of characterizing the image data, and 2) the development of an algorithm, based on multitaper methods, for the removal of approximately periodic physiological artifacts arising from cardiac and respiratory sources. PMID:9929474

  4. US EPA's SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. EPA released SPECIATE 4.4 in early 2014 and, in total, the SPECIATE 4.4 database includes 5,728 PM, volatile o...

  5. Selective and sensitive speciation analysis of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in water samples by fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry after ion pair based-surfactant assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Seyedeh Mahboobeh; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2013-06-15

    A simple ion pair based-surfactant assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (IP-SA-DLLME) was evaluated for extraction and preconcentration of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in aqueous samples. In this method, which was used for the first time for chromium speciation analysis, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as both ion-pairing and disperser agent. Cr(VI) ions were converted into their cationic complex with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) and then extracted into 1-octanol dispersed in aqueous solution. Cr(III) ion also can be determined by this procedure after oxidation to Cr(VI). After extraction and phase separation, upper organic phase was transferred to a micro cell of a fiber optic-linear array detection spectrophotometry (FO-LADS). The effects of various parameters on the extraction recovery were investigated. Under the optimized conditions and preconcentration of 10 mL of sample, the enrichment factor of 159 and the detection limit of 0.05 μgL(-1) were obtained. Validation of the method was performed by spiking-recovery method and comparison of results with those obtained by ET-AAS method.

  6. Environmental harshness, latitude and incipient speciation.

    PubMed

    Weir, Jason T

    2014-02-01

    Are rates of evolution and speciation fastest where diversity is greatest - the tropics? A commonly accepted theory links the latitudinal diversity gradient to a speciation pump model whereby the tropics produce species at a faster rate than extra-tropical regions. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Botero et al. () test the speciation pump model using subspecies richness patterns for more than 9000 species of birds and mammals as a proxy for incipient speciation opportunity. Rather than using latitudinal centroids, the authors investigate the role of various environmental correlates of latitude as drivers of subspecies richness. Their key finding points to environmental harshness as a positive predictor of subspecies richness. The authors link high subspecies richness in environmental harsh areas to increased opportunities for geographic range fragmentation and/or faster rates of trait evolution as drivers of incipient speciation. Because environmental harshness generally increases with latitude, these results suggest that opportunity for incipient speciation is lowest where species richness is highest. The authors interpret this finding as incompatible with the view of the tropics as a cradle of diversity. Their results are consistent with a growing body of evidence that reproductive isolation and speciation occur fastest at high latitudes. PMID:26010836

  7. Genomic divergence during speciation: causes and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Nosil, Patrik; Feder, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Speciation is a fundamental process responsible for the diversity of life. Progress has been made in detecting individual ‘speciation genes’ that cause reproductive isolation. In contrast, until recently, less attention has been given to genome-wide patterns of divergence during speciation. Thus, major questions remain concerning how individual speciation genes are arrayed within the genome, and how this affects speciation. This theme issue is dedicated to exploring this genomic perspective of speciation. Given recent sequencing and computational advances that now allow genomic analyses in most organisms, the goal is to help move the field towards a more integrative approach. This issue draws upon empirical studies in plants and animals, and theoretical work, to review and further document patterns of genomic divergence. In turn, these studies begin to disentangle the role that different processes, such as natural selection, gene flow and recombination rate, play in generating observed patterns. These factors are considered in the context of how genomes diverge as speciation unfolds, from beginning to end. The collective results point to how experimental work is now required, in conjunction with theory and sequencing studies, to move the field from descriptive studies of patterns of divergence towards a predictive framework that tackles the causes and consequences of genome-wide patterns. PMID:22201163

  8. Drift promotes speciation by sexual selection.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, Josef C; Arnold, Stevan J; Hohenlohe, Paul A; Mead, Louise S

    2009-03-01

    Quantitative genetic models of sexual selection have generally failed to provide a direct connection to speciation and to explore the consequences of finite population size. The connection to speciation has been indirect because the models have treated only the evolution of male and female traits and have stopped short of modeling the evolution of sexual isolation. In this article we extend Lande's (1981) model of sexual selection to quantify predictions about the evolution of sexual isolation and speciation. Our results, based on computer simulations, support and extend Lande's claim that drift along a line of equilibria can rapidly lead to sexual isolation and speciation. Furthermore, we show that rapid speciation can occur by drift in populations of appreciable size (N(e) >or= 1000). These results are in sharp contrast to the opinion of many researchers and textbook writers who have argued that drift does not play an important role in speciation. We argue that drift may be a powerful amplifier of speciation under a wide variety of modeling assumptions, even when selection acts directly on female mating preferences.

  9. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauchau, Olivier A.; Kang, Nam Kook

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches are developed to analyze the dynamic behavior of flexible multibody systems. In the first approach each body is modeled with a modal methodology in a local non-inertial frame of reference, whereas in the second approach, each body is modeled with a finite element methodology in the inertial frame. In both cases, the interaction among the various elastic bodies is represented by constraint equations. The two approaches were compared for accuracy and efficiency: the first approach is preferable when the nonlinearities are not too strong but it becomes cumbersome and expensive to use when many modes must be used. The second approach is more general and easier to implement but could result in high computation costs for a large system. The constraints should be enforced in a time derivative fashion for better accuracy and stability.

  10. Dynamic asset trees and portfolio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onnela, J.-P.; Chakraborti, A.; Kaski, K.; Kertiész, J.

    2002-12-01

    The minimum spanning tree, based on the concept of ultrametricity, is constructed from the correlation matrix of stock returns and provides a meaningful economic taxonomy of the stock market. In order to study the dynamics of this asset tree we characterise it by its normalised length and by the mean occupation layer, as measured from an appropriately chosen centre called the `central node'. We show how the tree evolves over time, and how it shrinks strongly, in particular, during a stock market crisis. We then demonstrate that the assets of the optimal Markowitz portfolio lie practically at all times on the outskirts of the tree. We also show that the normalised tree length and the investment diversification potential are very strongly correlated.

  11. Baryon Spectrum Analysis using Covariant Constraint Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Joshua; Crater, Horace

    2012-03-01

    The energy spectrum of the baryons is determined by treating each of them as a three-body system with the interacting forces coming from a set of two-body potentials that depend on both the distance between the quarks and the spin and orbital angular momentum coupling terms. The Two Body Dirac equations of constraint dynamics derived by Crater and Van Alstine, matched with the quasipotential formalism of Todorov as the underlying two-body formalism are used, as well as the three-body constraint formalism of Sazdjian to integrate the three two-body equations into a single relativistically covariant three body equation for the bound state energies. The results are analyzed and compared to experiment using a best fit method and several different algorithms, including a gradient approach, and Monte Carlo method. Results for all well-known baryons are presented and compared to experiment, with good accuracy.

  12. Crustal Dynamics Project data analysis, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caprette, D. S.; Ma, C.; Ryan, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The Goddard Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) group reports the results of analyzing 1073 Mark 3 data sets acquired from fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1989 and available to the Crustal Dynamics Project. Two large solutions, GLB656 and GLB657, were used to establish a VLBI reference frame with an origin coincident with the ITRF89. Another large solution, GLB658, was used to obtain Earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, and global source positions. Site velocities were obtained from another large solution, GLB659. A fifth large solution, GLB660, was used to obtain baseline evolution. Site positions are tabulated on a yearly basis from 1979 through 1992. Site velocities are presented in both Cartesian and topocentric coordinates. The results include 76 sources, 80 sites, and 422 baselines.

  13. Decision Analysis of Dynamic Spectrum Access Rules

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Luiz A. DaSilva; Christian Wernz

    2011-12-01

    A current trend in spectrum regulation is to incorporate spectrum sharing through the design of spectrum access rules that support Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). This paper develops a decision-theoretic framework for regulators to assess the impacts of different decision rules on both primary and secondary operators. We analyze access rules based on sensing and exclusion areas, which in practice can be enforced through geolocation databases. Our results show that receiver-only sensing provides insufficient protection for primary and co-existing secondary users and overall low social welfare. On the other hand, using sensing information between the transmitter and receiver of a communication link, provides dramatic increases in system performance. The performance of using these link end points is relatively close to that of using many cooperative sensing nodes associated to the same access point and large link exclusion areas. These results are useful to regulators and network developers in understanding in developing rules for future DSA regulation.

  14. Condensed Antenna Structural Models for Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1985-01-01

    Condensed degree-of-freedom models are compared with large degree-of-freedom finite-element models of a representative antenna-tipping and alidade structure, for both locked and free-rotor configurations. It is shown that: (1) the effective-mass models accurately reproduce the lower-mode natural frequencies of the finite element model; (2) frequency responses for the two types of models are in agreement up to at least 16 rad/s for specific points; and (3) transient responses computed for the same points are in good agreement. It is concluded that the effective-mass model, which best represents the five lower modes of the finite-element model, is a sufficient representation of the structure for future incorporation with a total servo control structure dynamic simulation.

  15. Spectrum analysis with quantum dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Shilin; Ang, Shan Zheng; Wheatley, Trevor A.; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira; Huntington, Elanor H.; Tsang, Mankei

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the power spectral density of a stochastic process, such as a stochastic force or magnetic field, is a fundamental task in many sensing applications. Quantum noise is becoming a major limiting factor to such a task in future technology, especially in optomechanics for temperature, stochastic gravitational wave, and decoherence measurements. Motivated by this concern, here we prove a measurement-independent quantum limit to the accuracy of estimating the spectrum parameters of a classical stochastic process coupled to a quantum dynamical system. We demonstrate our results by analyzing the data from a continuous-optical-phase-estimation experiment and showing that the experimental performance with homodyne detection is close to the quantum limit. We further propose a spectral photon-counting method that can attain quantum-optimal performance for weak modulation and a coherent-state input, with an error scaling superior to that of homodyne detection at low signal-to-noise ratios.

  16. Dynamic mechanical analysis of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. E.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical and thermal properties were determined for unidirectional epoxy/glass composites at various fiber orientation angles. Resonant frequency and relative logarithmic decrement were measured as functions of temperature. In low angle and longitudinal specimens a transition was observed above the resin glass transition temperature which was manifested mechanically as an additional damping peak and thermally as a change in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The new transition was attributed to a heterogeneous resin matrix induced by the fiber. The temperature span of the glass-rubber relaxation was found to broaden with decreasing orientation angle, reflecting the growth of fiber contribution and exhibiting behavior similar to that of Young's modulus. The change in resonant frequency through the glass transition was greatest for samples of intermediate fiber angle, demonstrating behavior similar to that of the longitudinal shear modulus.

  17. Analysis & Simulation of Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmatad, Yael Sarah

    2011-12-01

    The nature of supercooled liquids and the glass transition has been debated by many scientists. Several theories have been put forth to describe the remarkable properties of this out-of-equilibrium material. Each of these theories makes specific predictions as to how the scaling of various transport properties in supercooled materials should behave. Given access to a large pool of high-quality supercooled liquid data we seek to compare these theories to one another. Moreover, we explore properties of a pair of models which are the basis for one particularly attractive theory---Chandler-Garrahan theory---and discuss the models' behavior in space-time and possible implications to the behavior of experimental supercooled liquids. Here we investigate the nature of dynamics in supercooled liquids using a two pronged approach. First we analyze the transport properties found in experiments and simulations of supercooled liquids. Then, we analyze simulation trajectories for lattice models which reproduce many of the interesting properties of supercooled liquids. In doing so, we illuminate several glass universalities, common properties of a wide variety of glass formers. By analyzing relaxation time and viscosity data for over 50 data sets and 1200 points, we find that relaxation time can be collapsed onto a single, parabolic curve. This collapse supports a theory of universal glass behavior based on facilitated models proposed by David Chandler and Juan Garrahan in 2003. We then show that the parabolic fit parameters for any particular liquid are a material property: they converge fast and are capable of predicting behavior in regions beyond the included data sets. We compare this property to other popular fitting schemes such as the Vogel-Fulcher, double exponential, and fractional exponential forms and conclude that these three forms result in parameters which are non predictive and therefore not material properties. Additionally, we examine the role of attractive

  18. Blade loss transient dynamic analysis of turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallone, M. J.; Gallardo, V.; Storace, A. F.; Bach, L. J.; Black, G.; Gaffney, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on work completed to develop an analytical method for predicting the transient non-linear response of a complete aircraft engine system due to the loss of a fan blade, and to validate the analysis by comparing the results against actual blade loss test data. The solution, which is based on the component element method, accounts for rotor-to-casing rubs, high damping and rapid deceleration rates associated with the blade loss event. A comparison of test results and predicted response show good agreement except for an initial overshoot spike not observed in test. The method is effective for analysis of large systems.

  19. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  20. Machine analysis of facial behaviour: naturalistic and dynamic behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces recent advances in the machine analysis of facial expressions. It describes the problem space, surveys the problem domain and examines the state of the art. Two recent research topics are discussed with particular attention: analysis of facial dynamics and analysis of naturalistic (spontaneously displayed) facial behaviour. Scientific and engineering challenges in the field in general, and in these specific subproblem areas in particular, are discussed and recommendations for accomplishing a better facial expression measurement technology are outlined. PMID:19884145

  1. SLM-based optical simulator for dynamic speckle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberova, Nataliya; Stoykova, Elena; Ivanov, Branimir

    2014-08-01

    The phenomenon of dynamic speckle allows for non-invasive whole-field detection of physical or biological activity in objects through statistical description of laser speckle dynamics. Effective way to improve the statistical analysis is generation of controlled speckle patterns. SLM implementation of an optical simulator of dynamic speckle patterns is proposed by feeding a correlated sequence of 2D random phase distributions to the phase-only SLM. Atthevarying in space correlation radius of the phase fluctuations in the successive frames, the SLM produces regions of different activity on a screen under laser illumination. Feasibility of the proposed approach is proved both by simulation and experiment.

  2. DANPOS: dynamic analysis of nucleosome position and occupancy by sequencing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaifu; Xi, Yuanxin; Pan, Xuewen; Li, Zhaoyu; Kaestner, Klaus; Tyler, Jessica; Dent, Sharon; He, Xiangwei; Li, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Recent developments in next-generation sequencing have enabled whole-genome profiling of nucleosome organizations. Although several algorithms for inferring nucleosome position from a single experimental condition have been available, it remains a challenge to accurately define dynamic nucleosomes associated with environmental changes. Here, we report a comprehensive bioinformatics pipeline, DANPOS, explicitly designed for dynamic nucleosome analysis at single-nucleotide resolution. Using both simulated and real nucleosome data, we demonstrated that bias correction in preliminary data processing and optimal statistical testing significantly enhances the functional interpretation of dynamic nucleosomes. The single-nucleotide resolution analysis of DANPOS allows us to detect all three categories of nucleosome dynamics, such as position shift, fuzziness change, and occupancy change, using a uniform statistical framework. Pathway analysis indicates that each category is involved in distinct biological functions. We also analyzed the influence of sequencing depth and suggest that even 200-fold coverage is probably not enough to identify all the dynamic nucleosomes. Finally, based on nucleosome data from the human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we demonstrated that DANPOS is also robust in defining functional dynamic nucleosomes, not only in promoters, but also in distal regulatory regions in the mammalian genome. PMID:23193179

  3. Traffic chaotic dynamics modeling and analysis of deterministic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiqiang; Huang, Ning; Wu, Zhitao

    2016-07-01

    Network traffic is an important and direct acting factor of network reliability and performance. To understand the behaviors of network traffic, chaotic dynamics models were proposed and helped to analyze nondeterministic network a lot. The previous research thought that the chaotic dynamics behavior was caused by random factors, and the deterministic networks would not exhibit chaotic dynamics behavior because of lacking of random factors. In this paper, we first adopted chaos theory to analyze traffic data collected from a typical deterministic network testbed — avionics full duplex switched Ethernet (AFDX, a typical deterministic network) testbed, and found that the chaotic dynamics behavior also existed in deterministic network. Then in order to explore the chaos generating mechanism, we applied the mean field theory to construct the traffic dynamics equation (TDE) for deterministic network traffic modeling without any network random factors. Through studying the derived TDE, we proposed that chaotic dynamics was one of the nature properties of network traffic, and it also could be looked as the action effect of TDE control parameters. A network simulation was performed and the results verified that the network congestion resulted in the chaotic dynamics for a deterministic network, which was identical with expectation of TDE. Our research will be helpful to analyze the traffic complicated dynamics behavior for deterministic network and contribute to network reliability designing and analysis.

  4. The dynamic analysis of an asymmetric rotary system

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.M.; Wang, C.M.

    1996-12-01

    This study presents the transient dynamic analysis of an asymmetric rotary system which consists of a disk-supported by two identical bearings. Because the maximum displacements of components often occur during the transient state, the transient dynamic analysis becomes important. The combined methodologies of the finite element, transfer matrix, time marching numerical integration and the Houbolt numerical integration methods are developed for this analysis. The effects of rotary inertia, gyroscopics, shear deformation and internal damping on the dynamic behavior of a rotor-bearing system are included. After the system is linearized, the results of the transient and the steady displacements of the disk at various rotational speeds are compared and show good agreement with the available data.

  5. Dynamical analysis in scalar field cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Tsamparlis, Michael; Basilakos, Spyros; Barrow, John D.

    2015-06-01

    We give a general method to find exact cosmological solutions for scalar-field dark energy in the presence of perfect fluids. We use the existence of invariant transformations for the Wheeler De Witt (WdW) equation. We show that the existence of a point transformation under which the WdW equation is invariant is equivalent to the existence of conservation laws for the field equations, which indicates the existence of analytical solutions. We extend previous work by providing exact solutions for the Hubble parameter and the effective dark-energy equation of state parameter for cosmologies containing a combination of perfect fluid and a scalar field whose self-interaction potential is a power of hyperbolic functions. We find solutions explicitly when the perfect fluid is radiation or cold dark matter and determine the effects of nonzero spatial curvature. Using the Planck 2015 data, we determine the evolution of the effective equation of state of the dark energy. Finally, we study the global dynamics using dimensionless variables. We find that if the current cosmological model is Liouville integrable (admits conservation laws) then there is a unique stable point which describes the de-Sitter phase of the universe.

  6. Rocketdyne automated dynamics data analysis and management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    An automated dynamics data analysis and management systems implemented on a DEC VAX minicomputer cluster is described. Multichannel acquisition, Fast Fourier Transformation analysis, and an online database have significantly improved the analysis of wideband transducer responses from Space Shuttle Main Engine testing. Leakage error correction to recover sinusoid amplitudes and correct for frequency slewing is described. The phase errors caused by FM recorder/playback head misalignment are automatically measured and used to correct the data. Data compression methods are described and compared. The system hardware is described. Applications using the data base are introduced, including software for power spectral density, instantaneous time history, amplitude histogram, fatigue analysis, and rotordynamics expert system analysis.

  7. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  8. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  9. VOCs Speciation From Steam Boiler Stacks of Industries Located in Naucalpan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia, G. M.; Tejeda, D. D.; Bremauntz, M. P.; Valdez, A.; Montufar, P. C.; Martinez, M. A.; Sierra, M. J.; Gonzalez, C. A.

    2007-05-01

    Results of VOCs speciation from industrial steam boiler stacks located in Naucalpan are presented and discussed. This municipality is located north of the Metropolitan Zone of the Valley of Mexico (MZVM). Speciation of VOCs is important to generate information about sources of pollution, to update emission inventories, to study the dynamics of pollutants in the atmosphere, and to estimate possible risks of population exposure. This information is valuable for decision making on air pollution control strategies. Samples from 35 steam boilers form industries burning Diesel, LPG, or CNG were taken using the US-EPA Method 18. Selected samples from the use of different fuels were analyzed using gas chromatography and flame ionization detection (GC-FID) according to US-EPA protocol TO-14. The VOCs analyzed included alkanes of 9 carbons or less, alkenes of 7 carbons or less and aromatics (families of benzene). The results show consistency on the VOCs detected on Diesel samples. The main compounds found were 1- Butene+iButylene, m/p-Xylene, Ethane, Propene, Propane, Acetylene, 2Me-1Butene, and Toluene. The average concentrations of these compounds were in the range of 130 to 385 ppbC. The results of LPG samples did not show a definite pattern of VOCs, although light components predominate and, in some samples, Toluene and Xylene. These last components were not expected for industries reporting the use of LPG, perhaps due to the use of a combination of fuels and mistakes in the reports of fuel used at the time of sampling. The analysis of CNG samples show predominance of light VOCs, in the range of 90 to 300 ppbC. As in the case of LPG, some aromatics showed high concentrations in some samples analyzed perhaps due to the use of different fuels in the boiler. The results of this study are the first results of VOCs speciation obtained form exhaust gases from stacks of Mexican industries. The data reported are valuable to analyze emission inventories of VOCs and to better

  10. Dynamic competitive probabilistic principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, Ezequiel; Ortiz-DE-Lazcano-Lobato, Juan Miguel

    2009-04-01

    We present a new neural model which extends the classical competitive learning (CL) by performing a Probabilistic Principal Components Analysis (PPCA) at each neuron. The model also has the ability to learn the number of basis vectors required to represent the principal directions of each cluster, so it overcomes a drawback of most local PCA models, where the dimensionality of a cluster must be fixed a priori. Experimental results are presented to show the performance of the network with multispectral image data.

  11. Phase transition analysis of the dynamic instability of microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarahmadian, Shantia; Yari, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides the phase transition analysis of a reaction diffusion equations system modelling the dynamic instability of microtubules (MTs). For this purpose, we have generalized the macroscopic model studied by Mourão et al (2011 Comput. Biol. Chem. 35 269-81). This model investigates the interaction between the MT nucleation, the essential dynamics parameters and extinction, and their impact on the stability of the system. The considered framework encompasses a system of partial differential equations for the elongation and shortening of MTs, where the rates of elongation as well as the lifetimes of the elongating shortening phases are linear functions of GTP-tubulin concentration. In a novel way, this paper investigates the stability analysis and provides a bifurcation analysis for the dynamic instability of MTs in the presence of diffusion and all of the fundamental dynamics parameters. Our stability analysis introduces the phase transition method as a new mathematical tool in the study of MT dynamics. The mathematical tools introduced to handle the problem should be of general use.

  12. Dynamic Network-Based Epistasis Analysis: Boolean Examples

    PubMed Central

    Azpeitia, Eugenio; Benítez, Mariana; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo; Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we focus on how the hierarchical and single-path assumptions of epistasis analysis can bias the inference of gene regulatory networks. Here we emphasize the critical importance of dynamic analyses, and specifically illustrate the use of Boolean network models. Epistasis in a broad sense refers to gene interactions, however, as originally proposed by Bateson, epistasis is defined as the blocking of a particular allelic effect due to the effect of another allele at a different locus (herein, classical epistasis). Classical epistasis analysis has proven powerful and useful, allowing researchers to infer and assign directionality to gene interactions. As larger data sets are becoming available, the analysis of classical epistasis is being complemented with computer science tools and system biology approaches. We show that when the hierarchical and single-path assumptions are not met in classical epistasis analysis, the access to relevant information and the correct inference of gene interaction topologies is hindered, and it becomes necessary to consider the temporal dynamics of gene interactions. The use of dynamical networks can overcome these limitations. We particularly focus on the use of Boolean networks that, like classical epistasis analysis, relies on logical formalisms, and hence can complement classical epistasis analysis and relax its assumptions. We develop a couple of theoretical examples and analyze them from a dynamic Boolean network model perspective. Boolean networks could help to guide additional experiments and discern among alternative regulatory schemes that would be impossible or difficult to infer without the elimination of these assumption from the classical epistasis analysis. We also use examples from the literature to show how a Boolean network-based approach has resolved ambiguities and guided epistasis analysis. Our article complements previous accounts, not only by focusing on the implications of the hierarchical and

  13. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  14. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark; Gera, Dinesh

    2001-11-06

    In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

  15. Dynamical analysis for a vector-like dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landim, Ricardo C. G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we perform a dynamical analysis for a vector field as a candidate for the dark energy, in the presence of a barotropic fluid. The vector is one component of the so-called cosmic triad, which is a set of three identical copies of an abelian field pointing mutually in orthogonal directions. In order to generalize the analysis, we also assumed the interaction between dark energy and the barotropic fluid, with a phenomenological coupling. Both matter and dark energy eras can be successfully described by the critical points, indicating that the dynamical system theory is a viable tool to analyze asymptotic states of such cosmological models.

  16. Speciation: Genomic Archipelagos in a Crater Lake.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Fabrizia; Salzburger, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The opening stages of speciation remain poorly understood, especially from a genomic perspective. The genomes of newly discovered crater-lake cichlid fish shed light on the early phases of diversification and suggest that selection acts on multiple genomic regions.

  17. CORRELATING METAL SPECIATION IN SOILS TO RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding bioavailability of metals from exposure to contaminated soils is a challenging aspect of environmental research. This presentation will examine three areas of research with respect to metal speciation in soils as it relates to bioavailability: 1) Pb immobilization a...

  18. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    1999-01-01

    This document summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The document is intended to serve as both an introduction to the type of support carried out by the FDAB (Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch), as well as a concise reference summarizing key analysis results and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles assumed over the past year. The major accomplishments in the FDAB in FY99 were: 1) Provided flight dynamics support to the Lunar Prospector and TRIANA missions among a variety of spacecraft missions; 2) Sponsored the Flight Mechanics Symposium; 3) Supported the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) workshops; 4) Performed numerous analyses and studies for future missions; 5) Started the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch Lab for in-house mission analysis and support; and 6) Complied with all requirements in support of GSFC IS09000 certification.

  19. Metal Ion Speciation and Dissolved Organic Matter Composition in Soil Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, M. F.; Ren, Z. L.; Bravin, M.; Tella, M.; Dai, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of the speciation of heavy metals and the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soil solution is a key to understand metal mobility and ecotoxicity. In this study, soil column-Donnan membrane technique (SC-DMT) was used to measure metal speciation of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in eighteen soil solutions, covering a wide range of metal sources and concentrations. DOM composition in these soil solutions was also determined. Our results show that in soil solution Pb and Cu are dominant in complex form, whereas Cd, Ni and Zn mainly exist as free ions; for the whole range of soil solutions, only 26.2% of DOM is reactive and consists mainly of fulvic acid (FA). The metal speciation measured by SC-DMT was compared to the predicted ones obtained via the NICA-Donnan model using the measured FA concentrations. The free ion concentrations predicted by speciation modelling were in good agreement with the measurements. Diffusive gradients in thin-films gels (DGT) were also performed to quantify the labile metal species in the fluxes from solid phase to solution in fourteen soils. The concentrations of metal species detected by DGT were compared with the free ion concentrations measured by DMT and the maximum concentrations calculated based on the predicted metal speciation in SC-DMT soil solutions. It is concluded that both inorganic species and a fraction of FA bound species account for the amount of labile metals measured by DGT, consistent with the dynamic features of this technique. The comparisons between measurements using analytical techniques and mechanistic model predictions provided mutual validation in their performance. Moreover, we show that to make accurate modelling of metal speciation in soil solutions, the knowledge of DOM composition is the crucial information, especially for Cu; like in previous studies the modelling of Pb speciation is not optimal and an updated of Pb generic binding parameters is required to reduce model prediction uncertainties.

  20. Dynamic performances analysis of a real vehicle driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. A.; Jamil, J. F.; Salim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vehicle dynamic is the effects of movement of a vehicle generated from the acceleration, braking, ride and handling activities. The dynamic behaviours are determined by the forces from tire, gravity and aerodynamic which acting on the vehicle. This paper emphasizes the analysis of vehicle dynamic performance of a real vehicle. Real driving experiment on the vehicle is conducted to determine the effect of vehicle based on roll, pitch, and yaw, longitudinal, lateral and vertical acceleration. The experiment is done using the accelerometer to record the reading of the vehicle dynamic performance when the vehicle is driven on the road. The experiment starts with weighing a car model to get the center of gravity (COG) to place the accelerometer sensor for data acquisition (DAQ). The COG of the vehicle is determined by using the weight of the vehicle. A rural route is set to launch the experiment and the road conditions are determined for the test. The dynamic performance of the vehicle are depends on the road conditions and driving maneuver. The stability of a vehicle can be controlled by the dynamic performance analysis.

  1. Dynamic social network analysis using conversational dynamics in social networking and microblogging environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocco, Gabriel; Savell, Robert; Cybenko, George

    2010-04-01

    In many security environments, the textual content of communications may be unavailable. In these instances, it is often desirable to infer the status of the network and its component entities from patterns of communication flow. Conversational dynamics among entities in the network may provide insight into important aspects of the underlying social network such as the formational dynamics of group structures, the active state of these groups, individuals' roles within groups, and the likelihood of individual participation in conversations. To gain insight into the use of conversational dynamics to facilitate Dynamic Social Network Analysis, we explore the use of interevent timings to associate entities in the Twitter social networking and micro-blogging environment. Specifically, we use message timings to establish inter-nodal relationships among participants. In addition, we demonstrate a new visualization technique for tracking levels of coordination or synchronization within the community via measures of socio-temporal coherence of the participants.

  2. Optimization of an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometric method for the speciation analysis of oxyanion-forming metals and metalloids in leachates from cement-based materials.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Mesay; Wibetoe, Grethe; Engelsen, Christian J; Lund, Walter

    2010-10-01

    A method was developed for the speciation analysis of the oxyanions of As(III), As(V), Cr(VI), Mo(VI), Sb(III), Sb(V), Se(IV), Se(VI) and V(V) in leachates from cement-based materials, based on anion-exchange HPLC coupled with ICP-MS. The method was optimized in a two-step multivariate approach: the effect of sample pH and mobile phase composition on resolution, peak symmetry and analysis time was studied. Optimum conditions were then identified for the significant experimental factors by studying their interdependence. A mobile phase composition of 20 mM ammonium nitrate, 50 mM ammonium tartrate and pH 9.5 was found to be a compromise optimum for the separation of the target analytes using isocratic elution. The optimum condition provided separation of the analytes in less than 6 min, at a mobile phase flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The signal intensities of the analytes were improved by adding 1% methanol to the mobile phase. The limit of detection of the method was in the range 0.2-2.2 μg/L for the various species. The effect of sample constituents was studied using spiked concrete leachates. The method was used to determine the target oxyanionic species in leachates generated from a concrete material in the pH range 3.5-12.4; CrO(4)(2-), MoO(4)(2-) and VO(4)(3-) were detected in most of the leachates.

  3. Digital data processing system dynamic loading analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagas, J. J.; Peterka, J. J.; Tucker, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Simulation and analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Digital Data Processing System (DDPS) are reported. The mated flight and postseparation flight phases of the space shuttle's approach and landing test configuration were modeled utilizing the Information Management System Interpretative Model (IMSIM) in a computerized simulation modeling of the ALT hardware, software, and workload. System requirements simulated for the ALT configuration were defined. Sensitivity analyses determined areas of potential data flow problems in DDPS operation. Based on the defined system requirements and the sensitivity analyses, a test design is described for adapting, parameterizing, and executing the IMSIM. Varying load and stress conditions for the model execution are given. The analyses of the computer simulation runs were documented as results, conclusions, and recommendations for DDPS improvements.

  4. Preliminary analysis of turbochargers rotors dynamic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monoranu, R.; Ştirbu, C.; Bujoreanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Turbocharger rotors for the spark and compression ignition engines are resistant steels manufactured in order to support the exhaust gas temperatures exceeding 1200 K. In fact, the mechanical stress is not large as the power consumption of these systems is up to 10 kW, but the operating speeds are high, ranging between 30000 ÷ 250000 rpm. Therefore, the correct turbochargers functioning involves, even from the design stage, the accurate evaluation of the temperature effects, of the turbine torque due to the engine exhaust gases and of the vibration system behaviour caused by very high operating speeds. In addition, the turbocharger lubrication complicates the model, because the classical hydrodynamic theory cannot be applied to evaluate the floating bush bearings. The paper proposes a FEM study using CATIA environment, both as modeling medium and as tool for the numerical analysis, in order to highlight the turbocharger complex behaviour. An accurate design may prevent some major issues which can occur during its operation.

  5. Molecular dynamics analysis on impact behavior of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifoori, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of impact of a nanoparticle on carbon nanotubes is investigated based on two degree of freedom model. The accuracy and stability of the present methods are verified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effect of different types of boundary condition on the maximum dynamic deflections is studied for zigzag and armchair SWCNTs with various aspect ratios (length/diameter). Besides, the influences of velocity of impactor on the dynamic deflections are studied. It is shown that the dynamic behavior on the armchair and zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost similar. Finally, by making use of the above MD simulation and theoretical results some insight has been obtained about the dynamic characteristics of the impact problems of nanobeam structures. Nonlocal Timoshenko beam models TBT2 should be employed for an accurate prediction of the dynamic deflection rather than nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam models EBT2 which ignores the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia that is especially significant for short beams. The results from nonlocal EBT2 and TBT2 models demonstrated good agreement with MD simulation. The EBT2 and TBT2 models also account for the relative motion between the nanoparticle and the nanobeam that is due to local indentation as can be seen in MD simulation.

  6. Patient-adaptive lesion metabolism analysis by dynamic PET images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic PET imaging provides important spatial-temporal information for metabolism analysis of organs and tissues, and generates a great reference for clinical diagnosis and pharmacokinetic analysis. Due to poor statistical properties of the measurement data in low count dynamic PET acquisition and disturbances from surrounding tissues, identifying small lesions inside the human body is still a challenging issue. The uncertainties in estimating the arterial input function will also limit the accuracy and reliability of the metabolism analysis of lesions. Furthermore, the sizes of the patients and the motions during PET acquisition will yield mismatch against general purpose reconstruction system matrix, this will also affect the quantitative accuracy of metabolism analyses of lesions. In this paper, we present a dynamic PET metabolism analysis framework by defining a patient adaptive system matrix to improve the lesion metabolism analysis. Both patient size information and potential small lesions are incorporated by simulations of phantoms of different sizes and individual point source responses. The new framework improves the quantitative accuracy of lesion metabolism analysis, and makes the lesion identification more precisely. The requirement of accurate input functions is also reduced. Experiments are conducted on Monte Carlo simulated data set for quantitative analysis and validation, and on real patient scans for assessment of clinical potential. PMID:23286175

  7. Dynamic response analysis procedure for landfills with geosynthetic liners

    SciTech Connect

    Yegian, M.K.; Harb, J.N.; Kadakal, U.

    1998-10-01

    The dynamic response of geosynthetic interfaces commonly encountered in municipal solid waste landfills were investigated using a shaking table facility. The force-slip relationships for the tested interfaces showed almost rigid and then plastic deformation where the maximum shear force transmitted through the interface increases slightly with increasing slip. The force-slip relationships were modeled with equivalent stiffness and damping ratios. These equivalent parameters were established as a function of slip displacements to account for the nonlinear behavior of the interfaces. Using the equivalent stiffness and damping, the dynamic properties of an equivalent soil layer were established such that the dynamic response of the equivalent soil layer is similar to that of the geosynthetic interface it represents. The purpose of this representation was to allow the modeling of geosynthetic interfaces in wave propagation analysis, such as SHAKE analysis. The properties of the equivalent soil layer were validated by comparing the measured dynamic response of a rigid block placed on geosynthetics with that computed using the SHAKEW program and the properties of the equivalent soil layer developed. A procedure for analysis of the dynamic response of landfills with geosynthetic liners is proposed.

  8. Operationalizing sustainability in urban coastal systems: a system dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavrommati, Georgia; Bithas, Kostas; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2013-12-15

    We propose a system dynamics approach for Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) in urban coastal systems. A systematic analysis based on theoretical considerations, policy analysis and experts' knowledge is followed in order to define the concept of ESD. The principles underlying ESD feed the development of a System Dynamics Model (SDM) that connects the pollutant loads produced by urban systems' socioeconomic activities with the ecological condition of the coastal ecosystem that it is delineated in operational terms through key biological elements defined by the EU Water Framework Directive. The receiving waters of the Athens Metropolitan area, which bears the elements of typical high population density Mediterranean coastal city but which currently has also new dynamics induced by the ongoing financial crisis, are used as an experimental system for testing a system dynamics approach to apply the concept of ESD. Systems' thinking is employed to represent the complex relationships among the components of the system. Interconnections and dependencies that determine the potentials for achieving ESD are revealed. The proposed system dynamics analysis can facilitate decision makers to define paths of development that comply with the principles of ESD. PMID:24200010

  9. Trajectory analysis of the rotational dynamics of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S. V. Lokshtanov, S. E.

    2015-08-15

    A method for analysis of the rotational dynamics of molecular systems has been proposed on the basis of the calculation of the set of exact classical vibrational–rotational trajectories. It has been proposed to compose and to numerically solve the complete system of dynamic equations consisting of Hamilton’s equations and generalized Euler equations for an arbitrary system. The computer algebra system can be applied to automatize the process of derivation and subsequent solution of dynamic equations. The variation of the picture of known bifurcation in the rotational dynamics of symmetric triatomic hydride molecules with an increase in vibrational excitation has been studied within the proposed approach. It has been shown that manifestations of bifurcation completely disappear at a quite high level of vibrational excitations.

  10. Dynamic analysis of a gear drive system in aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangdong; Zhou, Chuanrong

    1993-04-01

    A new technique of structural dynamic analysis especially for analysis of a gear drive system has been developed, which combines the principle of substructure analysis with the idea of structure modification. A gear stiffness model of the degrees of the freedom of the structure node in which the gear relation exists has also been developed. It has the advantages of both the method of substructure analysis and vibration reanalysis of modified structure. The natural frequencies and modes calculated by the present program are in quite good agreement with the results calculated by FEM.

  11. Dynamic response and stability analysis of flexible, multibody systems. [spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodley, C. S.; Park, A. C.; Devers, A. D.; Frisch, H. P.

    1977-01-01

    A general version of Lagrange's equations, including auxiliary nonholonomic, rheonomic conditions of constraint, is used in the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of interconnected flexible bodies. Modeling of the nonlinear flexible/rigid dynamic coupling effects, the interaction forces/torques, and the elastic deformation effects is discussed. A digital computer program is developed to obtain time-domain solution for the nonlinear response of systems represented as a collection of individual bodies, numerical linearization of system-governing equations, time-domain solution for the perturbation response about a nominal state, and a frequency-domain stability analysis corresponding to the linearization. The digital simulation code is employed to study the dynamic behavior of a typical satellite and a spacecraft with deployable experiment booms.

  12. Dynamic analysis of spur gears using computer program DANST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Lin, Hsiang H.; Liou, Chuen-Huei; Valco, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    DANST is a computer program for static and dynamic analysis of spur gear systems. The program can be used for parametric studies to predict the effect on dynamic load and tooth bending stress of spur gears due to operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile. DANST performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. DANST can simulate gear systems with contact ratio ranging from one to three. It was designed to be easy to use, and it is extensively documented by comments in the source code. This report describes the installation and use of DANST. It covers input data requirements and presents examples. The report also compares DANST predictions for gear tooth loads and bending stress to experimental and finite element results.

  13. Dynamic analysis of spur gears using computer program DANST

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, F.B.; Lin, H.H.; Liou, Chuenheui; Valco, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    DANST is a computer program for static and dynamic analysis of spur gear systems. The program can be used for parametric studies to predict the effect on dynamic load and tooth bending stress of spur gears due to operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile. DANST performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. DANST can simulate gear systems with contact ratio ranging from one to three. It was designed to be easy to use, and it is extensively documented by comments in the source code. This report describes the installation and use of DANST. It covers input data requirements and presents examples. The report also compares DANST predictions for gear tooth loads and bending stress to experimental and finite element results. 14 refs.

  14. Bifurcation analysis of bubble dynamics in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Blomgren, Peter; Palacios, Antonio; Zhu, Bing; Daw, C Stuart; FINNEY, Charles E A; Halow, John; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2007-01-01

    We use a low-dimensional, agent-based bubble model to study the changes in the global dynamics of fluidized beds in response to changes in the frequency of the rising bubbles. The computationally based bifurcation analysis shows that at low frequencies, the global dynamics is attracted towards a fixed point since the bubbles interact very little with one another. As the frequency of injection increases, however, the global dynamics undergoes a series of bifurcations to new behaviors that include highly periodic orbits, chaotic attractors, and intermittent behavior between periodic orbits and chaotic sets. Using methods from time-series analysis, we are able to approximate nonlinear models that allow for long-term predictions and the possibility of developing control algorithms.

  15. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR OSCILLATING DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    WILKINS, A. KATHARINA; TIDOR, BRUCE; WHITE, JACOB; BARTON, PAUL I.

    2012-01-01

    Boundary value formulations are presented for exact and efficient sensitivity analysis, with respect to model parameters and initial conditions, of different classes of oscillating systems. Methods for the computation of sensitivities of derived quantities of oscillations such as period, amplitude and different types of phases are first developed for limit-cycle oscillators. In particular, a novel decomposition of the state sensitivities into three parts is proposed to provide an intuitive classification of the influence of parameter changes on period, amplitude and relative phase. The importance of the choice of time reference, i.e., the phase locking condition, is demonstrated and discussed, and its influence on the sensitivity solution is quantified. The methods are then extended to other classes of oscillatory systems in a general formulation. Numerical techniques are presented to facilitate the solution of the boundary value problem, and the computation of different types of sensitivities. Numerical results are verified by demonstrating consistency with finite difference approximations and are superior both in computational efficiency and in numerical precision to existing partial methods. PMID:23296349

  16. Bayesian Analysis of Individual Level Personality Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Edward; Wood, Robert E; Beckmann, Nadin; Lau, John; Beckmann, Jens F; Cripps, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian technique with analyses of within-person processes at the level of the individual is presented. The approach is used to examine whether the patterns of within-person responses on a 12-trial simulation task are consistent with the predictions of ITA theory (Dweck, 1999). ITA theory states that the performance of an individual with an entity theory of ability is more likely to spiral down following a failure experience than the performance of an individual with an incremental theory of ability. This is because entity theorists interpret failure experiences as evidence of a lack of ability which they believe is largely innate and therefore relatively fixed; whilst incremental theorists believe in the malleability of abilities and interpret failure experiences as evidence of more controllable factors such as poor strategy or lack of effort. The results of our analyses support ITA theory at both the within- and between-person levels of analyses and demonstrate the benefits of Bayesian techniques for the analysis of within-person processes. These include more formal specification of the theory and the ability to draw inferences about each individual, which allows for more nuanced interpretations of individuals within a personality category, such as differences in the individual probabilities of spiraling. While Bayesian techniques have many potential advantages for the analyses of processes at the level of the individual, ease of use is not one of them for psychologists trained in traditional frequentist statistical techniques.

  17. Bayesian Analysis of Individual Level Personality Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Edward; Wood, Robert E; Beckmann, Nadin; Lau, John; Beckmann, Jens F; Cripps, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian technique with analyses of within-person processes at the level of the individual is presented. The approach is used to examine whether the patterns of within-person responses on a 12-trial simulation task are consistent with the predictions of ITA theory (Dweck, 1999). ITA theory states that the performance of an individual with an entity theory of ability is more likely to spiral down following a failure experience than the performance of an individual with an incremental theory of ability. This is because entity theorists interpret failure experiences as evidence of a lack of ability which they believe is largely innate and therefore relatively fixed; whilst incremental theorists believe in the malleability of abilities and interpret failure experiences as evidence of more controllable factors such as poor strategy or lack of effort. The results of our analyses support ITA theory at both the within- and between-person levels of analyses and demonstrate the benefits of Bayesian techniques for the analysis of within-person processes. These include more formal specification of the theory and the ability to draw inferences about each individual, which allows for more nuanced interpretations of individuals within a personality category, such as differences in the individual probabilities of spiraling. While Bayesian techniques have many potential advantages for the analyses of processes at the level of the individual, ease of use is not one of them for psychologists trained in traditional frequentist statistical techniques. PMID:27486415

  18. Bayesian Analysis of Individual Level Personality Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Edward; Wood, Robert E.; Beckmann, Nadin; Lau, John; Beckmann, Jens F.; Cripps, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian technique with analyses of within-person processes at the level of the individual is presented. The approach is used to examine whether the patterns of within-person responses on a 12-trial simulation task are consistent with the predictions of ITA theory (Dweck, 1999). ITA theory states that the performance of an individual with an entity theory of ability is more likely to spiral down following a failure experience than the performance of an individual with an incremental theory of ability. This is because entity theorists interpret failure experiences as evidence of a lack of ability which they believe is largely innate and therefore relatively fixed; whilst incremental theorists believe in the malleability of abilities and interpret failure experiences as evidence of more controllable factors such as poor strategy or lack of effort. The results of our analyses support ITA theory at both the within- and between-person levels of analyses and demonstrate the benefits of Bayesian techniques for the analysis of within-person processes. These include more formal specification of the theory and the ability to draw inferences about each individual, which allows for more nuanced interpretations of individuals within a personality category, such as differences in the individual probabilities of spiraling. While Bayesian techniques have many potential advantages for the analyses of processes at the level of the individual, ease of use is not one of them for psychologists trained in traditional frequentist statistical techniques. PMID:27486415

  19. Empirical analysis of online human dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Patterns of human activities have attracted increasing academic interests, since the quantitative understanding of human behavior is helpful to uncover the origins of many socioeconomic phenomena. This paper focuses on behaviors of Internet users. Six large-scale systems are studied in our experiments, including the movie-watching in Netflix and MovieLens, the transaction in Ebay, the bookmark-collecting in Delicious, and the posting in FreindFeed and Twitter. Empirical analysis reveals some common statistical features of online human behavior: (1) The total number of user's actions, the user's activity, and the interevent time all follow heavy-tailed distributions. (2) There exists a strongly positive correlation between user's activity and the total number of user's actions, and a significantly negative correlation between the user's activity and the width of the interevent time distribution. We further study the rescaling method and show that this method could to some extent eliminate the different statistics among users caused by the different activities, yet the effectiveness depends on the data sets.

  20. Wavelet analysis and applications to some dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendjoya, Ph.; Slezak, E.

    1993-05-01

    The main properties of the wavelet transform as a new time-frequency method which is particularly well suited for detecting and localizing discontinuities and scaling behavior in signals are reviewed. Particular attention is given to first applications of the wavelet transform to dynamical systems including solution of partial differential equations, fractal and turbulence characterization, and asteroid family determination from cluster analysis. Advantages of the wavelet transform over classical analysis methods are summarized.

  1. Onsite analysis of data from the Dynamics Explorer (DE) spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Candey, Robert M.; Humphreys, Josephine N.

    1992-01-01

    The tasks performed by ARC Professional Services Group, Inc. fell into five parts: (1) dynamics explorer (DE) data analysis and modeling; (2) DE project support; (3) chemical release observations support; (4) VLF emissions and plasma instability studies; and (5) modeling of planetary radio emissions. Some recommendations for future considerations are also addressed.

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Education Policies: Extending Cost-Benefit Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jon R.; Ammentorp, William

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic analysis offers a comprehensive view of the cost benefit and cost effective dimensions of policy problems. It also provides the computational power to investigate the long term effects of policy decisions on the flow of resources in organizations and government agencies. (Author/MV)

  3. A generalized shell for dynamic security analysis in operations planning

    SciTech Connect

    Marceau, R.J.; Mailhot, R.; Galiana, F.D. )

    1993-08-01

    This paper introduces the concept of a generalized shell for performing power-system dynamic security analysis. The generalized shell mechanizes routines traditionally carried out by human experts and that are essential to power-system dynamic security analysis, thereby greatly accelerating the realization of complex processes. The shell semantics express high-level goals and tasks using a friendly, highly compact syntax which closely matches the language of operations planners. Typically, the shell will execute appropriate load-flow and transient-stability simulations (i.e. using commercially available simulation software), perform result analysis, make input changes and repeat this process until a user-defined goal has been achieved. A working shell prototype for performing key algorithmic processes is described and results of a typical sensitivity study are presented using a 700-bus model of the Hydro-Quebec network. It is expected that the prototype will reduce study-cycle time, improve the accuracy of dynamic security limits and, indeed, transform the working environment of operations and system planners. Eventually, it can be foreseen that the approach will gravitate towards supporting on-line dynamic security analysis.

  4. An Efficient Crankshaft Dynamic Analysis Using Substructuring with Ritz Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MOURELATOS, Z. P.

    2000-11-01

    A structural analysis using dynamic substructuring with Ritz vectors is presented for predicting the dynamic response of an engine crankshaft, based on the finite-element method. A two-level dynamic substructuring is performed using a set of load-dependent Ritz vectors. The rotating crankshaft is properly coupled with the non-rotating, compliant engine block. The block compliance is represented by a distributed linear elastic foundation at each main bearing location. The stiffness of the elastic foundation can be different in the vertical and horizontal planes, thereby considering the anisotropy of the engine block compliance with respect to the crankshaft rotation. The analysis accounts for the kinematic non-linearity resulting from the crankangle-dependent circumferential contact location between each journal and the corresponding bore of the engine block. Crankshaft “bent” and block “misboring” effects due to manufacturing imperfections are considered in the analysis. The superior accuracy and reduced computational effort of the present method as compared with the equivalent superelement analysis in MSC/NASTRAN, are demonstrated using the free and forced vibrations of a slender cylindrical beam and free vibrations of a four-cylinder engine crankshaft. Subsequently, the accuracy of the present method in calculating the dynamic response of engine crankshafts is shown through comparisons between the analytical predictions and experimental results for the torsional vibrations of an in-line five cylinder engine and the bending vibrations of the crankshaft-flywheel assembly of a V6 engine.

  5. Potential applications of computational fluid dynamics to biofluid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.; Kwak, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was developed to the stage where it has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. In view of advances made in aerospace applications, the computational approach can be used for biofluid mechanics research. Several flow simulation methods developed for aerospace problems are briefly discussed for potential applications to biofluids, especially to blood flow analysis.

  6. Static and dynamic analysis of the APT superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Schrage, D.; Swensen, E.; Rusnak, B.

    1995-09-01

    Static and dynamic analysis of 4-, 6-, and 12-cell {beta}=0.428 niobium cavities proposed for the superconducting linac for the Accelerator Production of Tritium were carried out using COSMOS/M{copyright}, a commercial finite-element code. The benefits of external stiffeners, the tuning sensitivities, and the mechanical resonant frequencies are reported.

  7. A Model of Practice in Special Education: Dynamic Ecological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannant, Barbara; Lim, Eng Leong; McAllum, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic Ecological Analysis (DEA) is a model of practice which increases a teams' efficacy by enabling the development of more effective interventions through collaboration and collective reflection. This process has proved to be useful in: a) clarifying thinking and problem-solving, b) transferring knowledge and thinking to significant parties,…

  8. A test of the chromosomal theory of ecotypic speciation in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Manoukis, Nicholas C; Powell, Jeffrey R; Touré, Mahamoudou B; Sacko, Adama; Edillo, Frances E; Coulibaly, Mamadou B; Traoré, Sekou F; Taylor, Charles E; Besansky, Nora J

    2008-02-26

    The role of chromosomal inversions in speciation has long been of interest to evolutionists. Recent quantitative modeling has stimulated reconsideration of previous conceptual models for chromosomal speciation. Anopheles gambiae, the most important vector of human malaria, carries abundant chromosomal inversion polymorphism nonrandomly associated with ecotypes that mate assortatively. Here, we consider the potential role of paracentric inversions in promoting speciation in A. gambiae via "ecotypification," a term that refers to differentiation arising from local adaptation. In particular, we focus on the Bamako form, an ecotype characterized by low inversion polymorphism and fixation of an inversion, 2Rj, that is very rare or absent in all other forms of A. gambiae. The Bamako form has a restricted distribution by the upper Niger River and its tributaries that is associated with a distinctive type of larval habitat, laterite rock pools, hypothesized to be its optimal breeding site. We first present computer simulations to investigate whether the population dynamics of A. gambiae are consistent with chromosomal speciation by ecotypification. The models are parameterized using field observations on the various forms of A. gambiae that exist in Mali, West Africa. We then report on the distribution of larvae of this species collected from rock pools and more characteristic breeding sites nearby. Both the simulations and field observations support the thesis that speciation by ecotypification is occurring, or has occurred, prompting consideration of Bamako as an independent species. PMID:18287019

  9. A test of the chromosomal theory of ecotypic speciation in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Manoukis, Nicholas C; Powell, Jeffrey R; Touré, Mahamoudou B; Sacko, Adama; Edillo, Frances E; Coulibaly, Mamadou B; Traoré, Sekou F; Taylor, Charles E; Besansky, Nora J

    2008-02-26

    The role of chromosomal inversions in speciation has long been of interest to evolutionists. Recent quantitative modeling has stimulated reconsideration of previous conceptual models for chromosomal speciation. Anopheles gambiae, the most important vector of human malaria, carries abundant chromosomal inversion polymorphism nonrandomly associated with ecotypes that mate assortatively. Here, we consider the potential role of paracentric inversions in promoting speciation in A. gambiae via "ecotypification," a term that refers to differentiation arising from local adaptation. In particular, we focus on the Bamako form, an ecotype characterized by low inversion polymorphism and fixation of an inversion, 2Rj, that is very rare or absent in all other forms of A. gambiae. The Bamako form has a restricted distribution by the upper Niger River and its tributaries that is associated with a distinctive type of larval habitat, laterite rock pools, hypothesized to be its optimal breeding site. We first present computer simulations to investigate whether the population dynamics of A. gambiae are consistent with chromosomal speciation by ecotypification. The models are parameterized using field observations on the various forms of A. gambiae that exist in Mali, West Africa. We then report on the distribution of larvae of this species collected from rock pools and more characteristic breeding sites nearby. Both the simulations and field observations support the thesis that speciation by ecotypification is occurring, or has occurred, prompting consideration of Bamako as an independent species.

  10. Ecological speciation in marine v. freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Puebla, O

    2009-10-01

    Absolute barriers to dispersal are not common in marine systems, and the prevalence of planktonic larvae in marine taxa provides potential for gene flow across large geographic distances. These observations raise the fundamental question in marine evolutionary biology as to whether geographic and oceanographic barriers alone can account for the high levels of species diversity observed in marine environments such as coral reefs, or whether marine speciation also operates in the presence of gene flow between diverging populations. In this respect, the ecological hypothesis of speciation, in which reproductive isolation results from divergent or disruptive natural selection, is of particular interest because it may operate in the presence of gene flow. Although important insights into the process of ecological speciation in aquatic environments have been provided by the study of freshwater fishes, comparatively little is known about the possibility of ecological speciation in marine teleosts. In this study, the evidence consistent with different aspects of the ecological hypothesis of speciation is evaluated in marine fishes. Molecular approaches have played a critical role in the development of speciation hypotheses in marine fishes, with a role of ecology suggested by the occurrence of sister clades separated by ecological factors, rapid cladogenesis or the persistence of genetically and ecologically differentiated species in the presence of gene flow. Yet, ecological speciation research in marine fishes is still largely at an exploratory stage. Cases where the major ingredients of ecological speciation, namely a source of natural divergent or disruptive selection, a mechanism of reproductive isolation and a link between the two have been explicitly documented are few. Even in these cases, specific predictions of the ecological hypothesis of speciation remain largely untested. Recent developments in the study of freshwater fishes illustrate the potential for

  11. [Study on Speciation Analysis and Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Surface Sediments in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia Sections of the Yellow River in Wet Season with HR-ICP-MS].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-ling; Liu, Jing-jun; Zuo, Hang; Huang, Fang; Liu, Ying

    2015-04-01

    In order to continuously study the contents, pollution condition and potential ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections of the Yellow River in wet seasons in different years, the speciation analysis of 9 kinds of heavy metals including Cd, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cu, V, Co, Zn and Mn, pollution condition and potential ecological risk of heavy metals in surface sediments from 10 sampling sites like Baotoufuqiao (S2), Shizuishantaolezhen (S6) and Wujinxia (S9) in Gansu, Ningxia and Inner Mongolia sections of the Yellow River in 2012 wet season were studied with BCR sequential extraction and high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS) based on our previous works. The results implied that the order of heavy metals average contents in the 10 sediment samples were the same: Mn>V> Zn>Cr>Cu>Ni>Pb>Co>Cd. In the sediments, heavy metals mainly existed in the form of residual fraction, which indicated that the bioavailability or environmental impact was low. Results of geo-accumulation indices (Igeo) showed that Igeo(CD), was the largest among the heavy metals with the strongest pollution, while IGEO(Mn)was the smallest. Enrichment factor (EF) indicated that only Cd and Cu were enriched at some sampling sites. In S5, because EFcd reached 4. 69, Cd was affected by human activities obviously and the result was consistent with I. Potential ecological risk index (RI) implied that the RI values in S1, S2 and S5 were between 150 and 300, which belonged to moderate polluting degree, while others were less than 150, belonging to light pollution degree. The results of this paper could not only provide reliable experimental data and theoretical basis for the relevant departments, but also supply the technical support for constructing mathematics model of sediments-pollutants transport, systematically researching the migration and transformation rule of persistent toxic substances and environmental assessment in

  12. Some properties of the speciation model for food-web structure-mechanisms for degree distributions and intervality.

    PubMed

    Rossberg, A G; Matsuda, H; Amemiya, T; Itoh, K

    2006-01-21

    We present a mathematical analysis of the speciation model for food-web structure, which had in previous work been shown to yield a good description of empirical data of food-web topology. The degree distributions of the network are derived. Properties of the speciation model are compared to those of other models that successfully describe empirical data. It is argued that the speciation model unifies the underlying ideas of previous theories. In particular, it offers a mechanistic explanation for the success of the niche model of Williams and Martinez and the frequent observation of intervality in empirical food webs.

  13. Acceleration of dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography with principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guanglei; He, Wei; Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Maomao; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is an attractive imaging technique for three-dimensionally resolving the metabolic process of fluorescent biomarkers in small animal. When combined with compartmental modeling, dynamic FMT can be used to obtain parametric images which can provide quantitative pharmacokinetic information for drug development and metabolic research. However, the computational burden of dynamic FMT is extremely huge due to its large data sets arising from the long measurement process and the densely sampling device. In this work, we propose to accelerate the reconstruction process of dynamic FMT based on principal component analysis (PCA). Taking advantage of the compression property of PCA, the dimension of the sub weight matrix used for solving the inverse problem is reduced by retaining only a few principal components which can retain most of the effective information of the sub weight matrix. Therefore, the reconstruction process of dynamic FMT can be accelerated by solving the smaller scale inverse problem. Numerical simulation and mouse experiment are performed to validate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method can greatly accelerate the reconstruction of parametric images in dynamic FMT almost without degradation in image quality. PMID:26114027

  14. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  15. Improved dynamic analysis method using load-dependent Ritz vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobedo-Torres, J.; Ricles, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of large space structures is important in order to predict their behavior under operating conditions. Computer models of large space structures are characterized by having a large number of degrees of freedom, and the computational effort required to carry out the analysis is very large. Conventional methods of solution utilize a subset of the eigenvectors of the system, but for systems with many degrees of freedom, the solution of the eigenproblem is in many cases the most costly phase of the analysis. For this reason, alternate solution methods need to be considered. It is important that the method chosen for the analysis be efficient and that accurate results be obtainable. It is important that the method chosen for the analysis be efficient and that accurate results be obtainable. The load dependent Ritz vector method is presented as an alternative to the classical normal mode methods for obtaining dynamic responses of large space structures. A simplified model of a space station is used to compare results. Results show that the load dependent Ritz vector method predicts the dynamic response better than the classical normal mode method. Even though this alternate method is very promising, further studies are necessary to fully understand its attributes and limitations.

  16. Dynamic Systems Analysis for Turbine Based Aero Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The aircraft engine design process seeks to optimize the overall system-level performance, weight, and cost for a given concept. Steady-state simulations and data are used to identify trade-offs that should be balanced to optimize the system in a process known as systems analysis. These systems analysis simulations and data may not adequately capture the true performance trade-offs that exist during transient operation. Dynamic systems analysis provides the capability for assessing the dynamic tradeoffs at an earlier stage of the engine design process. The dynamic systems analysis concept, developed tools, and potential benefit are presented in this paper. To provide this capability, the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) was developed to provide the user with an estimate of the closed-loop performance (response time) and operability (high pressure compressor surge margin) for a given engine design and set of control design requirements. TTECTrA along with engine deterioration information, can be used to develop a more generic relationship between performance and operability that can impact the engine design constraints and potentially lead to a more efficient engine.

  17. Selenium speciation in flue desulfurization residues.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liping; Cao, Yan; Li, Wenying; Xie, Kechang; Pan, Wei-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Flue gas from coal combustion contains significant amounts of volatile selenium (Se). The capture of Se in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber unit has resulted in a generation of metal-laden residues. It is important to determine Se speciation to understand the environmental impact of its disposal. A simple method has been developed for selective inorganic Se(IV), Se(VI) and organic Se determination in the liquid-phase FGD residues by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). It has been determined that Se(IV), Se(VI) and organic Se can be accurately determined with detection limits (DL) of 0.05, 0.06 and 0.06 microg/L, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated by analyzing the certified reference material, NIST CRM 1632c, and also by analyzing spiked tap-water samples. Analysis indicates that the concentration of Se is high in FGD liquid residues and primarily exists in a reduced state as selenite (Se(IV)). The toxicity of Se(IV) is the strongest of all Se species. Flue gas desulfurization residues pose a serious environmental risk.

  18. Speciation and phylogeography of giant petrels Macronectes.

    PubMed

    Techow, N M S M; O'Ryan, C; Phillips, R A; Gales, R; Marin, M; Patterson-Fraser, D; Quintana, F; Ritz, M S; Thompson, D R; Wanless, R M; Weimerskirch, H; Ryan, P G

    2010-02-01

    We examine global phylogeography of the two forms of giant petrel Macronectes spp. Although previously considered to be a single taxon, and despite debate over the status of some populations and the existence of minimal genetic data (one mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence per form), the current consensus based on morphology is that there are two species, Northern Giant Petrel M. halli and Southern Giant Petrel M. giganteus. This study examined genetic variation at cytochrome b as well as six microsatellite loci in giant petrels from 22 islands, representing most island groups at which the two species breed. Both markers support separate species status, although sequence divergence in cytochrome b was only 0.42% (corrected). Divergence was estimated to have occurred approximately 0.2mya, but with some colonies apparently separated for longer (up to 0.5 my). Three clades were found within giant petrels, which separated approximately 0.7mya, with the Southern Giant Petrel paraphyletic to a monophyletic Northern Giant Petrel. There was evidence of past fragmentation during the Pleistocene, with subsequent secondary contact within Southern Giant Petrels. The analysis also suggested a period of past population expansion that corresponded roughly to the timing of speciation and the separation of an ancestral giant petrel population from the fulmar Fulmarus clade. PMID:19755164

  19. A personal particle speciation sampler.

    PubMed

    Hering, Susanne; Kreisberg, Nathan; John, Walter

    2003-02-01

    Fuller understanding of personal exposures to particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters below 2.5 microm (PM2.5*) requires a personal sampler suitable for assaying not only PM2.5 mass but also its major chemical constituents: elemental carbon, organic carbon, sulfates, and nitrates. The goal to measure these constituents simultaneously imposes several constraints on personal sampler design. The aim of this project was to develop a sampler within these constraints that would be suitable for personal monitoring over 8 hours. In addition, with the intent to improve the precision of mass measurements, we investigated offline use of beta attenuation. The personal particle speciation sampler (PPSS) includes an inlet to remove particles larger than 2.5 microm, 2 sampling channels, and a pump with flow control. One channel serves for measuring particle mass and inorganic ions; the other, for measuring organic carbon and elemental carbon. Denuders can be placed in either channel or both channels. A backup filter can be placed on the denuded channel to collect volatilized particulate nitrate. Two prototype PPSS units were built and tested. The results of both laboratory testing of key PPSS components and a limited field study of the prototype in comparison to an AIHL (Air and Industrial Hygiene Laboratory) cyclone-based sampler are reported. PMID:12670062

  20. Integrative Analysis of Metabolic Models – from Structure to Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Anja; Schreiber, Falk

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of biological systems with respect to their behavior and functionality based on versatile biochemical interactions is a major challenge. To understand these complex mechanisms at systems level modeling approaches are investigated. Different modeling formalisms allow metabolic models to be analyzed depending on the question to be solved, the biochemical knowledge and the availability of experimental data. Here, we describe a method for an integrative analysis of the structure and dynamics represented by qualitative and quantitative metabolic models. Using various formalisms, the metabolic model is analyzed from different perspectives. Determined structural and dynamic properties are visualized in the context of the metabolic model. Interaction techniques allow the exploration and visual analysis thereby leading to a broader understanding of the behavior and functionality of the underlying biological system. The System Biology Metabolic Model Framework (SBM2 – Framework) implements the developed method and, as an example, is applied for the integrative analysis of the crop plant potato. PMID:25674560

  1. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 2004 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLion, Anne (Editor); Stengle, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based); spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning; attitude analysis; attitude determination and sensor calibration; and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  2. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, T.; Flores-Amaya, F.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key analysis results and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the discipline of flight dynamics, which involves spacecraft trajectory (orbit) and attitude analysis, as well as orbit and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions involving NASA, government, university, and commercial space missions, at various stages in the mission life cycle.

  3. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 2005 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based), spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning, attitude analysis, attitude determination and sensor calibration, and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  4. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Dynamic Analysis of Event Histories. Part III, Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuma, Nancy Brandon; Hannan, Michael T.

    The document, part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759, examines sociological research methods for the study of change. The advantages and procedures for dynamic analysis of event-history data (data giving the number, timing, and sequence of changes in a categorical dependent variable) are considered. The authors argue for grounding…

  5. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze (SB) rotation over an island at the middle latitudes. Earlier research on sea breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anticlockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously studied sea-breeze days, and is shown to capture the circulation on all coasts accurately. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined, and patterns of clockwise and anticlockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with a complex topography and/or coastline.

  6. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze rotation over an island in the mid-latitudes. Earlier research on sea-breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anti-clockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously-studied sea-breeze days and is shown to accurately capture the circulation on all coasts. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined and patterns of clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography, yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with complex topography and/or coastline.

  7. Propellant Slosh Analysis for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A. C.; Starin, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, part of the Living With a Star program, is a geosynchronous satellite with tight pointing requirements. Due to a large amount of liquid propellant, a detailed slosh analysis is required to ensure the tight pointing budget can be satisfied. Much of the high fidelity slosh analysis and simulation has been performed via computational fluid dynamics. Even though this method of simulation is very accurate, it requires significant computational effort and specialized knowledge, limiting the ability of the SDO project to access fluid dynamics simulations at will. Furthermore, it is very difficult to incorporate most of these models into simulations of the overall spacecraft and its environment. Ultimately, the effects of the propellant slosh on the attitude stability and pointing performance of the entire spacecraft are of great interest to attitude control engineers. Equivalent mechanical models, such as models that approximate the fluid slosh effects by analogy to the movements of a point-mass pendulum, are important tools in simulating propellant slosh dynamics as part of the entire attitude determination and control system. This paper describes some of the current methods used to analyze and model slosh. It focuses on equivalent mechanical models and their incorporation into control-based analysis tools such as Simulink. The SDO mission is used as the case study for this work.

  8. Interactive Finite Elements for General Engine Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    General nonlinear finite element codes were adapted for the purpose of analyzing the dynamics of gas turbine engines. In particular, this adaptation required the development of a squeeze-film damper element software package and its implantation into a representative current generation code. The ADINA code was selected because of prior use of it and familiarity with its internal structure and logic. This objective was met and the results indicate that such use of general purpose codes is viable alternative to specialized codes for general dynamics analysis of engines.

  9. Multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared imaging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimova, E.; Audit, B.; Roux, S. G.; Khalil, A.; Argoul, F.; Naimark, O.; Arneodo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method was used in a multifractal analysis of skin breast temperature time-series recorded using dynamic infrared (IR) thermography. Multifractal scaling was found for healthy breasts as the signature of a continuous change in the shape of the probability density function (pdf) of temperature fluctuations across time scales from \\sim0.3 to 3 s. In contrast, temperature time-series from breasts with malignant tumors showed homogeneous monofractal temperature fluctuations statistics. These results highlight dynamic IR imaging as a very valuable non-invasive technique for preliminary screening in asymptomatic women to identify those with risk of breast cancer.

  10. Trace metal characterization and speciation in geothermal effluent by multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry and atomic absorpotion analysis. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, B R

    1980-01-01

    Only the actual application of the ultratrace metal analysis methods to samples taken from geothermal sites in Washington and Oregon is covered. The in-field sampling equipment constructed for the studies, procedures developed or adapted, and the results obtained on representative samples taken from geothermal sites are described. (MHR)

  11. Dynamic analysis using superelements for a large helicopter model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, M. P.; Shah, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    Using superelements (substructures), modal and frequency response analysis was performed for a large model of the Advanced Attack Helicopter developed for the U.S. Army. Whiffletree concept was employed so that the residual structure along with the various superelements could be represented as beam-like structures for economical and accurate dynamic analysis. A very large DMAP alter to the rigid format was developed so that the modal analysis, the frequency response, and the strain energy in each component could be computed in the same run.

  12. Speciation analysis of organotin compounds in human urine by headspace solid-phase micro-extraction and gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Aníbal; Lespes, Gaëtane; Quiroz, Waldo; Aguilar, Luis F; Bravo, Manuel A

    2014-07-01

    A new headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME) method followed by gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD) analysis has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 11 organotin compounds, including methyl-, butyl-, phenyl- and octyltin derivates, in human urine. The methodology has been validated by the analysis of urine samples fortified with all analytes at different concentration levels, and recovery rates above 87% and relative precisions between 2% and 7% were obtained. Additionally, an experimental-design approach has been used to model the storage stability of organotin compounds in human urine, demonstrating that organotins are highly degraded in this medium, although their stability is satisfactory during the first 4 days of storage at 4 °C and pH=4. Finally, this methodology was applied to urine samples collected from harbor workers exposed to antifouling paints; methyl- and butyltins were detected, confirming human exposure in this type of work environment. PMID:24840433

  13. An aeroelastic analysis with a generalized dynamic wake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Cheng J.; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    An aeroelastic model with generalized dynamic wake is developed for application in the integration of aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural optimization of a rotor blade. The investigation is carried out with special attention to efficiency and accuracy of aeroelastic modeling. Each blade is assumed to be an elastic beam undergoing flap bending, lead-lag bending, elastic twist and axial deflections. The nonuniform blade is discretized into finite beam elements, each of which consists of twelve degrees of freedom. Such important blade design variables as pretwist, and chordwise offsets of the blade center of gravity and of the aerodynamic center from the elastic axis have been included in the analysis. Aerodynamic loads are computed from unsteady blade element theory where the rotor three-dimensional unsteady wake is modeled using a generalized dynamic wake theory. The noncirculatory loads based on unsteady thin airfoil theory are also included.

  14. Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

    2009-10-09

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Dynamic frequency/temperature sweep tests were conducted over the ranges 0.1-100 rad/s and 30-100 C using a parallel plate test geometry. A strain of 0.2% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on initial dynamic strain sweep tests. Master curves of G{prime} and G{double_prime} as a function of frequency were generated using time-temperature superposition (horizontal shift with initial vertical correction). The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius fit to the horizontal shift factors was 178-355 kJ/mol. The calculated percent load retention at {approx}50 years was 61-68%.

  15. Undersampled dynamic magnetic resonance imaging using kernel principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a promising approach to accelerate dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Most existing CS methods employ linear sparsifying transforms. The recent developments in non-linear or kernel-based sparse representations have been shown to outperform the linear transforms. In this paper, we present an iterative non-linear CS dynamic MRI reconstruction framework that uses the kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to exploit the sparseness of the dynamic image sequence in the feature space. Specifically, we apply KPCA to represent the temporal profiles of each spatial location and reconstruct the images through a modified pre-image problem. The underlying optimization algorithm is based on variable splitting and fixed-point iteration method. Simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms conventional CS method in terms of aliasing artifact reduction and kinetic information preservation. PMID:25570262

  16. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors

    PubMed Central

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-01-01

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed. PMID:25688287

  17. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, K K; Wielandt, D; Schiller, M; Bizzarro, M

    2016-04-22

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr(3+), CrCl(2+) and CrCl2(+)) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ∼1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr(3+), intermediates in CrCl(2+) and the lightest in CrCl2(+)/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ∼25% Cr (in the form of Cr(3+)) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected (53)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(53)Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and (54)Cr/(52)Cr (μ(54)Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr(3+) by >5 days exposure to HNO3H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >∼98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a

  18. Chromatographic speciation of Cr(III)-species, inter-species equilibrium isotope fractionation and improved chemical purification strategies for high-precision isotope analysis

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, K.K.; Wielandt, D.; Schiller, M.; Bizzarro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatographic purification of chromium (Cr), which is required for high-precision isotope analysis, is complicated by the presence of multiple Cr-species with different effective charges in the acid digested sample aliquots. The differing ion exchange selectivity and sluggish reaction rates of these species can result in incomplete Cr recovery during chromatographic purification. Because of large mass-dependent inter-species isotope fractionation, incomplete recovery can affect the accuracy of high-precision Cr isotope analysis. Here, we demonstrate widely differing cation distribution coefficients of Cr(III)-species (Cr3+, CrCl2+ and CrCl2+) with equilibrium mass-dependent isotope fractionation spanning a range of ~1‰/amu and consistent with theory. The heaviest isotopes partition into Cr3+, intermediates in CrCl2+ and the lightest in CrCl2+/CrCl3°. Thus, for a typical reported loss of ~25% Cr (in the form of Cr3+) through chromatographic purification, this translates into 185 ppm/amu offset in the stable Cr isotope ratio of the residual sample. Depending on the validity of the mass-bias correction during isotope analysis, this further results in artificial mass-independent effects in the mass-bias corrected 53Cr/52Cr (μ53 Cr* of 5.2 ppm) and 54Cr/52Cr (μ54Cr* of 13.5 ppm) components used to infer chronometric and nucleosynthetic information in meteorites. To mitigate these fractionation effects, we developed strategic chemical sample pre-treatment procedures that ensure high and reproducible Cr recovery. This is achieved either through 1) effective promotion of Cr3+ by >5 days exposure to HNO3 —H2O2 solutions at room temperature, resulting in >~98% Cr recovery for most types of sample matrices tested using a cationic chromatographic retention strategy, or 2) formation of Cr(III)-Cl complexes through exposure to concentrated HCl at high temperature (>120 °C) for several hours, resulting in >97.5% Cr recovery using a chromatographic elution strategy that

  19. Speciation without Pre-Defined Fitness Functions

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Robin; Golestani, Abbas; Hendry, Andrew P.; Cristescu, Melania E.

    2015-01-01

    The forces promoting and constraining speciation are often studied in theoretical models because the process is hard to observe, replicate, and manipulate in real organisms. Most models analyzed to date include pre-defined functions influencing fitness, leaving open the question of how speciation might proceed without these built-in determinants. To consider the process of speciation without pre-defined functions, we employ the individual-based ecosystem simulation platform EcoSim. The environment is initially uniform across space, and an evolving behavioural model then determines how prey consume resources and how predators consume prey. Simulations including natural selection (i.e., an evolving behavioural model that influences survival and reproduction) frequently led to strong and distinct phenotypic/genotypic clusters between which hybridization was low. This speciation was the result of divergence between spatially-localized clusters in the behavioural model, an emergent property of evolving ecological interactions. By contrast, simulations without natural selection (i.e., behavioural model turned off) but with spatial isolation (i.e., limited dispersal) produced weaker and overlapping clusters. Simulations without natural selection or spatial isolation (i.e., behaviour model turned off and high dispersal) did not generate clusters. These results confirm the role of natural selection in speciation by showing its importance even in the absence of pre-defined fitness functions. PMID:26372462

  20. Accelerated speciation in colour-polymorphic birds.

    PubMed

    Hugall, Andrew F; Stuart-Fox, Devi

    2012-05-09

    Colour polymorphism exemplifies extreme morphological diversity within populations. It is taxonomically widespread but generally rare. Theory suggests that where colour polymorphism does occur, processes generating and maintaining it can promote speciation but the generality of this claim is unclear. Here we confirm, using species-level molecular phylogenies for five families of non-passerine birds, that colour polymorphism is associated with accelerated speciation rates in the three groups in which polymorphism is most prevalent. In all five groups, colour polymorphism is lost at a significantly greater rate than it is gained. Thus, the general rarity and phylogenetic dispersion of colour polymorphism is accounted for by a combination of higher speciation rate and higher transition rate from polymorphism to monomorphism, consistent with theoretical models where speciation is driven by fixation of one or more morphs. This is corroborated by evidence from a species-level molecular phylogeny of passerines, incorporating 4,128 (66.5%) extant species, that polymorphic species tend to be younger than monomorphic species. Our results provide empirical support for the general proposition, dating from classical evolutionary theory, that colour polymorphism can increase speciation rates.

  1. Speciation by Symbiosis: the Microbiome and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shropshire, J. Dylan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Species are fundamental units of comparison in biology. The newly discovered importance and ubiquity of host-associated microorganisms are now stimulating work on the roles that microbes can play in animal speciation. We previously synthesized the literature and advanced concepts of speciation by symbiosis with notable attention to hybrid sterility and lethality. Here, we review recent studies and relevant data on microbes as players in host behavior and behavioral isolation, emphasizing the patterns seen in these analyses and highlighting areas worthy of additional exploration. We conclude that the role of microbial symbionts in behavior and speciation is gaining exciting traction and that the holobiont and hologenome concepts afford an evolving intellectual framework to promote research and intellectual exchange between disciplines such as behavior, microbiology, genetics, symbiosis, and speciation. Given the increasing centrality of microbiology in macroscopic life, microbial symbiosis is arguably the most neglected aspect of animal and plant speciation, and studying it should yield a better understanding of the origin of species. PMID:27034284

  2. Effective field theory of dark energy: a dynamical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frusciante, Noemi; Raveri, Marco; Silvestri, Alessandra E-mail: mraveri@sissa.it

    2014-02-01

    The effective field theory (EFT) of dark energy relies on three functions of time to describe the dynamics of background cosmology. The viability of these functions is investigated here by means of a thorough dynamical analysis. While the system is underdetermined, and one can always find a set of functions reproducing any expansion history, we are able to determine general compatibility conditions for these functions by requiring a viable background cosmology. In particular, we identify a set of variables that allows us to transform the non-autonomous system of equations into an infinite-dimensional one characterized by a significant recursive structure. We then analyze several autonomous sub-systems, obtained truncating the original one at increasingly higher dimension, that correspond to increasingly general models of dark energy and modified gravity. Furthermore, we exploit the recursive nature of the system to draw some general conclusions on the different cosmologies that can be recovered within the EFT formalism and the corresponding compatibility requirements for the EFT functions. The machinery that we set up serves different purposes. It offers a general scheme for performing dynamical analysis of dark energy and modified gravity models within the model independent framework of EFT; the general results, obtained with this technique, can be projected into specific models, as we show in one example. It also can be used to determine appropriate ansätze for the three EFT background functions when studying the dynamics of cosmological perturbations in the context of large scale structure tests of gravity.

  3. Major and trace-element speciation in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes of Eastern Lau Spreading Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, J. V.; Toner, B.; Dick, G.; Breier, J. A.; Jiang, H.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting at mid-ocean ridge systems results in the flux of heat and chemical species from the crust to the cold, oxic waters of the deep ocean. The mixing of these fluids creates a buoyant, rising plume with dynamic biogeochemical processes and rapid physical mixing. The global distribution of these vent systems makes hydrothermal plumes an important source and sink of biogeochemically active elements to ocean basins. The goal of this study is to characterize the transport and fate of the chemical species within individual hydrothermal plumes. By doing so, we hope to understand the interrelationship of physical-chemical gradients present in plumes with trace element uptake by plume particles. To achieve this goal a field study was undertaken at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). The larger study will include analysis of all sites, however here we report the geochemical and trace-element speciation of a single buoyant plume within ABE vent field. A series of replicate sample sets were collected by in situ filtration at 0.5m, 40m, 200m within a buoyant plume using the ROV JASON. Above plume background and near bottom background sample sets were also collected. Hydrothermal plume particles in sample replicates have been analysed for bulk geochemistry, chemical speciation, and particle-by-particle mineralogy. The speciation of iron, a major particle forming element, and the distribution of select trace elements (arsenic, vanadium) is described using chemical mapping, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Particle morphology and carbon speciation are described using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). This data is being integrated into a physical-geochemical model, and will be used to estimate the energy available to chemlithoautotrophic organisms in plumes. The distribution of minerals and incorporated trace elements (e.g. arsenic) will be used to interpret uptake mechanisms. The research will help us understand processes

  4. Structural Dynamics Verification of Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System (RCAS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bir, G. S.

    2005-02-01

    The Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System (RCAS) was acquired and evaluated as part of an ongoing effort by the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide state-of-the-art wind turbine modeling and analysis technology for Government and industry. RCAS is an interdisciplinary tool offering aeroelastic modeling and analysis options not supported by current codes. RCAS was developed during a 4-year joint effort among the U.S. Army's Aeroflightdynamics Directorate, Advanced Rotorcraft Technology Inc., and the helicopter industry. The code draws heavily from its predecessor 2GCHAS (Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System), which required an additional 14 years to develop. Though developed for the rotorcraft industry, its general-purpose features allow it to model or analyze a general dynamic system. Its key feature is a specialized finite element that can model spinning flexible parts. The code, therefore, appears particularly suited for wind turbines whose dynamics is dominated by massive flexible spinning rotors. In addition to the simulation capability of the existing codes, RCAS [1-3] offers a range of unique capabilities, including aeroelastic stability analysis, trim, state-space modeling, operating modes, modal reduction, multi-blade coordinate transformation, periodic-system-specific analysis, choice of aerodynamic models, and a controls design/implementation graphical interface.

  5. Hydroxyl speciation in felsic magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfait, Wim J.; Xue, Xianyu

    2014-09-01

    The hydroxyl speciation of hydrous, metaluminous potassium and calcium aluminosilicate glasses was investigated by 27Al-1H cross polarization and quantitative 1H MAS NMR spectroscopy. Al-OH is present in both the potassium and the calcium aluminosilicate glasses and its 1H NMR partial spectrum was derived from the 27Al-1H cross polarization data. For the calcium aluminosilicate glasses, the abundance of Al-OH could not be determined because of the low spectral resolution. For the potassium aluminosilicate glasses, the fraction of Al-OH was quantified by fitting its partial spectrum to the quantitative 1H NMR spectra. The degree of aluminum avoidance and the relative tendency for Si-O-Si, Si-O-Al and Al-O-Al bonds to hydrolyze were derived from the measured species abundances. Compared to the sodium, lithium and calcium systems, potassium aluminosilicate glasses display a much stronger degree of aluminum avoidance and a stronger tendency for the Al-O-Al linkages to hydrolyze. Combining our results with those for sodium aluminosilicate glasses (Malfait and Xue, 2010a), we predict that the hydroxyl groups in rhyolitic and phonolitic magmas are predominantly present as Si-OH (84-89% and 68-78%, respectively), but with a significant fraction of Al-OH (11-16% and 22-32%, respectively). For both rhyolitic and phonolitic melts, the AlOH/(AlOH + SiOH) ratio is likely smaller than the Al/(Al + Si) ratio for the lower end of the natural temperature range but may approach the Al/(Al + Si) ratio at higher temperatures.

  6. Transient analysis techniques in performing impact and crash dynamic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A. B.; Winter, R.

    1989-01-01

    Because of the emphasis being placed on crashworthiness as a design requirement, increasing demands are being made by various organizations to analyze a wide range of complex structures that must perform safely when subjected to severe impact loads, such as those generated in a crash event. The ultimate goal of crashworthiness design and analysis is to produce vehicles with the ability to reduce the dynamic forces experienced by the occupants to specified levels, while maintaining a survivable envelope around them during a specified crash event. DYCAST is a nonlinear structural dynamic finite element computer code that started from the plans systems of a finite element program for static nonlinear structural analysis. The essential features of DYCAST are outlined.

  7. Musical structure analysis using similarity matrix and dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiu, Yu; Jeong, Hong; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2005-10-01

    Automatic music segmentation and structure analysis from audio waveforms based on a three-level hierarchy is examined in this research, where the three-level hierarchy includes notes, measures and parts. The pitch class profile (PCP) feature is first extracted at the note level. Then, a similarity matrix is constructed at the measure level, where a dynamic time warping (DTW) technique is used to enhance the similarity computation by taking the temporal distortion of similar audio segments into account. By processing the similarity matrix, we can obtain a coarse-grain music segmentation result. Finally, dynamic programming is applied to the coarse-grain segments so that a song can be decomposed into several major parts such as intro, verse, chorus, bridge and outro. The performance of the proposed music structure analysis system is demonstrated for pop and rock music.

  8. Dynamic Analysis of Communication and Collaboration in OSS Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzger, Martin; Gall, Harald C.

    Software repositories, such as versioning, bug reporting, and developer mailing list archives contain valuable data for analyzing the history of software projects and its dynamics. In this chapter, we focus on the analysis of the communication and collaboration in software projects and present an approach that works on software archives with social network analysis techniques. Our tool called STNA-CockpitSTNA-cockpit provides both, a meta-model to represent communication and collaboration and a graph visualization technique to interactively explore instances of the meta-model. These instances are reconstructed from CVS, Bugzilla, and mailing list data. In a case study with the Eclipse Platform Core project data we demonstrate that with STNA-Cockpit one can observe project dynamics for certain periods of time. This allows, for example, project managers to early identify communication bottlenecks, contributor and expertise networks, or to understand how newcomers can be integrated fast and efficiently into their team.

  9. Dynamic Analysis of Large In-Space Deployable Membrane Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Yang, Bingen; Ding, Hongli; Hah, John; Quijano, Ubaldo; Huang, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a vibration analysis of an eight-meter diameter membrane reflectarray antenna, which is composed of a thin membrane and a deployable frame. This analysis process has two main steps. In the first step, a two-variable-parameter (2-VP) membrane model is developed to determine the in-plane stress distribution of the membrane due to pre-tensioning, which eventually yields the differential stiffness of the membrane. In the second step, the obtained differential stiffness is incorporated in a dynamic equation governing the transverse vibration of the membrane-frame assembly. This dynamic equation is then solved by a semi-analytical method, called the Distributed Transfer Function Method (DTFM), which produces the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the antenna. The combination of the 2-VP model and the DTFM provides an accurate prediction of the in-plane stress distribution and modes of vibration for the antenna.

  10. RAVEN, a New Software for Dynamic Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi; Joshua Cogliati; Diego Mandelli; Robert Kinoshita

    2014-06-01

    RAVEN is a generic software driver to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis of code simulating complex systems. Initially developed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the RELAP-7 code [1] is currently being generalized with the addition of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These interfaces are used to extend RAVEN capabilities to any software as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or directly via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable to investigate the system response probing the input space using Monte Carlo, grid strategies, or Latin Hyper Cube schemes, but its strength is its focus toward system feature discovery like limit surfaces separating regions of the input space leading to system failure using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The paper will present an overview of the software capabilities and their implementation schemes followed by same application examples.

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Geared Rotors by Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, A.; Ozguven, H. Nevzat; Houser, D. R.; Zakrajsek, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element model of a geared rotor system on flexible bearings has been developed. The model includes the rotary inertia of on shaft elements, the axial loading on shafts, flexibility and damping of bearings, material damping of shafts and the stiffness and the damping of gear mesh. The coupling between the torsional and transverse vibrations of gears were considered in the model. A constant mesh stiffness was assumed. The analysis procedure can be used for forced vibration analysis geared rotors by calculating the critical speeds and determining the response of any point on the shafts to mass unbalances, geometric eccentricities of gears, and displacement transmission error excitation at the mesh point. The dynamic mesh forces due to these excitations can also be calculated. The model has been applied to several systems for the demonstration of its accuracy and for studying the effect of bearing compliances on system dynamics.

  12. DYNAMIC NON LINEAR IMPACT ANALYSIS OF FUEL CASK CONTAINMENT VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D

    2008-06-10

    Large fuel casks present challenges when evaluating their performance in the accident sequence specified in 10CFR 71. Testing is often limited because of cost, difficulty in preparing test units and the limited availability of facilities which can carry out such tests. In the past, many casks were evaluated without testing using simplified analytical methods. This paper details the use of dynamic non-linear analysis of large fuel casks using advanced computational techniques. Results from the dynamic analysis of two casks, the T-3 Spent Fuel Cask and the Hanford Un-irradiated Fuel Package are examined in detail. These analyses are used to fully evaluate containment vessel stresses and strains resulting from complex loads experienced by cask components during impacts. Importantly, these advanced analytical analyses are capable of examining stresses in key regions of the cask including the cask closure. This paper compares these advanced analytical results with the results of simplified cask analyses like those detailed in NUREG 3966.

  13. Dynamic analysis of a structure with Coulomb friction

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; Gilmore, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    A modal superposition method for the dynamic analysis of a structure with Coulomb friction is presented. The finite element method is used to derive the equations of motion, and the nonlinearities due to friction are represented by a pseudoforce vector. A structure standing freely on the ground may slide during a seismic event. The relative displacement response may be divided into two parts: elastic deformation and rigid body motion. The presence of rigid body motion necessitates the inclusion of the higher modes in the transient analysis. Three single degree-of-freedom problems are solved to verify this method. In a fourth problem, the dynamic response of a platform standing freely on the ground is analyzed during a seismic event.

  14. Dynamic analysis of a structure with Coulomb friction

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.N.; Gilmore, C.B.

    1982-01-01

    A modal superposition method for the dynamic analysis of a structure with Coulomb friction is presented. The finite element method is used to derive the equations of motion, and the nonlinearities due to friction are represented by pseudo-force vector. A structure standing freely on the ground may slide during a seismic event. The relative displacement response may be divided into two parts: elastic deformation and rigid body motion. The presence of rigid body motion necessitates the inclusion of the higher modes in the transient analysis. Three single degree-of-freedom problems are solved to verify this method. In a fourth problem, the dynamic response of a platform standing freely on the ground is analyzed during a seismic event.

  15. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangus, David (Editor); Mendelsohn, Chad (Editor); Starin, Scott (Editor); Stengle, Tom (Editor); Truong, Son (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2002. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including navigation, spacecraft trajectory design, attitude analysis, attitude determination and attitude control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, government, university, and private industry.

  16. Dynamic analysis of geared rotors by finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, Ahmet; Ozguven, H. Nevzat; Houser, Donald R.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element model of a geared rotor system on flexible bearings was developed. The model includes the rotary inertia of shaft elements, the axial loading on shafts, flexibility and damping of bearings, material damping of shafts and the stiffness and the damping of gear mesh. The coupling between the torsional and transverse vibrations of gears were considered in the model. A constant mesh stiffness was assumed. The analysis procedure can be used for forced vibration analysis of geared rotors by calculating the critical speeds and determining the response of any point on the shaft to mass unbalances, geometric eccentricities of gears and displacement transmission error excitation at the mesh point. The dynamic mesh forces due to these excitations can also be calculated. The model has been applied to several systems for the demonstration of its accuracy and for studying the effect of bearing compliances on system dynamics.

  17. Random dynamic analysis of multi-body offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general method for the dynamic analysis of multi-body offshore structures is presented, based on a constraint matrix approach. A method of deriving the constraint matrix for a general structure is given, and used to derive the equations of motion of a whole system from those of it's component parts. The response of the system to both first and second order random wave forces is found and used to calculate the forces and moments in the connecting mechanisms.

  18. Sensitivity analysis of dynamic biological systems with time-delays

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mathematical modeling has been applied to the study and analysis of complex biological systems for a long time. Some processes in biological systems, such as the gene expression and feedback control in signal transduction networks, involve a time delay. These systems are represented as delay differential equation (DDE) models. Numerical sensitivity analysis of a DDE model by the direct method requires the solutions of model and sensitivity equations with time-delays. The major effort is the computation of Jacobian matrix when computing the solution of sensitivity equations. The computation of partial derivatives of complex equations either by the analytic method or by symbolic manipulation is time consuming, inconvenient, and prone to introduce human errors. To address this problem, an automatic approach to obtain the derivatives of complex functions efficiently and accurately is necessary. Results We have proposed an efficient algorithm with an adaptive step size control to compute the solution and dynamic sensitivities of biological systems described by ordinal differential equations (ODEs). The adaptive direct-decoupled algorithm is extended to solve the solution and dynamic sensitivities of time-delay systems describing by DDEs. To save the human effort and avoid the human errors in the computation of partial derivatives, an automatic differentiation technique is embedded in the extended algorithm to evaluate the Jacobian matrix. The extended algorithm is implemented and applied to two realistic models with time-delays: the cardiovascular control system and the TNF-α signal transduction network. The results show that the extended algorithm is a good tool for dynamic sensitivity analysis on DDE models with less user intervention. Conclusions By comparing with direct-coupled methods in theory, the extended algorithm is efficient, accurate, and easy to use for end users without programming background to do dynamic sensitivity analysis on complex

  19. Trace metal speciation in natural waters: Computational vs. analytical

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirk, Nordstrom D.

    1996-01-01

    Improvements in the field sampling, preservation, and determination of trace metals in natural waters have made many analyses more reliable and less affected by contamination. The speciation of trace metals, however, remains controversial. Chemical model speciation calculations do not necessarily agree with voltammetric, ion exchange, potentiometric, or other analytical speciation techniques. When metal-organic complexes are important, model calculations are not usually helpful and on-site analytical separations are essential. Many analytical speciation techniques have serious interferences and only work well for a limited subset of water types and compositions. A combined approach to the evaluation of speciation could greatly reduce these uncertainties. The approach proposed would be to (1) compare and contrast different analytical techniques with each other and with computed speciation, (2) compare computed trace metal speciation with reliable measurements of solubility, potentiometry, and mean activity coefficients, and (3) compare different model calculations with each other for the same set of water analyses, especially where supplementary data on speciation already exist. A comparison and critique of analytical with chemical model speciation for a range of water samples would delineate the useful range and limitations of these different approaches to speciation. Both model calculations and analytical determinations have useful and different constraints on the range of possible speciation such that they can provide much better insight into speciation when used together. Major discrepancies in the thermodynamic databases of speciation models can be evaluated with the aid of analytical speciation, and when the thermodynamic models are highly consistent and reliable, the sources of error in the analytical speciation can be evaluated. Major thermodynamic discrepancies also can be evaluated by simulating solubility and activity coefficient data and testing various

  20. Speciation and stasis in marine Ostracoda: Climatic modulation of evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Morphologic and paleozoogeographic analysis of Cenozoic marine Ostracoda from the Atlantic, Caribbean, and Pacific indicates that climatic change modulates evolution by disrupting long-term stasis and catalyzing speciation during sustained, unidirectional climatic transitions and, conversely, by maintaining morphologic stasis during rapid, high-frequency climatic osculations. In the middle Pliocene, 4 to 3 million years ago, at least six new species of Puriana suddenly appeared as the Isthmus of Panama closed, changing oceanographic circulation and global climate. Since then morphologic stasis has characterized ancestral and descendant species during many glacial-interglacial cycles. The frequency and duration of climatic events have more impact on ostracode evolution than the magnitude of climatic changes.

  1. Ecology: is speciation driven by species diversity?

    PubMed

    Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Ricklefs, Robert E; Jiménez, Iván; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2005-11-01

    Emerson and Kolm show that the proportion of species endemic to an island is positively related to its species richness and, assuming that endemism indexes speciation rate, they infer that greater species diversity accelerates diversification. Here we demonstrate that the same correlation between species richness and percentage endemism can arise even if within-island speciation is negligible, particularly when both endemism and species richness depend on attributes of islands (such as area) that influence the average age of resident populations. Island biogeography theory indicates that, where the average time to extinction is relatively long, diversity increases through colonization, irrespective of whether new species are formed; at the same time, islands on which populations persist for longer accumulate more endemic species as local populations differentiate and populations on neighbouring islands become extinct. We therefore suggest that species richness and endemism are correlated fortuitously owing to their mutual dependence on the life spans of populations on islands, which is unrelated to speciation itself.

  2. Evidence for ecology's role in speciation.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Jeffrey S; Mori, Seiichi; Blackman, Benjamin K; David, Lior; Kingsley, David M; Jamieson, Leia; Chou, Jennifer; Schluter, Dolph

    2004-05-20

    A principal challenge in testing the role of natural selection in speciation is to connect the build-up of reproductive isolation between populations to divergence of ecologically important traits. Demonstrations of 'parallel speciation', or assortative mating by selective environment, link ecology and isolation, but the phenotypic traits mediating isolation have not been confirmed. Here we show that the parallel build-up of mating incompatibilities between stickleback populations can be largely accounted for by assortative mating based on one trait, body size, which evolves predictably according to environment. In addition to documenting the influence of body size on reproductive isolation for stickleback populations spread across the Northern Hemisphere, we have confirmed its importance through a new experimental manipulation. Together, these results suggest that speciation may arise largely as a by-product of ecological differences and divergent selection on a small number of phenotypic traits. PMID:15152252

  3. Speciation analysis of mercury in sediments using vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography-cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leng, Geng; Yin, Hui; Li, Shaobo; Chen, Yong; Dan, Dezhong

    2012-09-15

    A simple and fast solvent microextraction method termed vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (VALLME) coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-CVAFS) has been developed for the trace analysis of methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)) and inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) in sediment samples. Carbon tetrachloride was used as collecting solvent for the extraction of mercury species from sediment by a vortex-assisted extraction. In VALLME, 100 μL 1% (m/v) l-Cysteine were used as extraction solvent and were injected into 4 mL carbon tetrachloride. The extraction solvent dispersed into carbon tetrachloride under vigorously shaking by a vortex agitator. The fine droplets could extract mercury species within few minutes because of the shorter diffusion distance and larger specific surface area. After centrifugation, the floating extractant phase restored its initial single microdrop shape and was used for HPLC-CVAFS analysis. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of the proposed VALLME such as extraction solvent, vortex time, volumes of extraction solvent and salt addition etc. were investigated. Under the optimum conditions, linearity was found in the concentration range from 0.1 to 25 ng g(-1) for MeHg(+), 0.2 to 65 ng g(-1) for EtHg(+), and 0.1 to 30 ng g(-1) for Hg(2+). Coefficients of determination (R(2)) ranged from 0.9938 to 0.9972. The limits of detection (LODs, signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)=3) were 0.028 ng g(-1) for MeHg(+), 0.057 ng g(-1) for EtHg(+), and 0.029 ng g(-1) for Hg(2+). Reproducibility and recoveries were assessed by testing a series of 6 sediment samples, which were spiked with different concentration levels. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied in analyses of real nature sediment samples. In this work, VALLME was applied to the extraction of mercury species in sediment samples for the first time. Using l-Cys as extraction solvent, the

  4. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient computational method for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures is proposed. The application of mixed models simplifies the analytical development and improves the accuracy of the response predictions, and operator splitting allows the reduction of the analysis model of the quasi-symmetric structure to that of the corresponding symmetric structure. The preconditoned conjugate gradient provides a stable and effective technique for generating the unsymmetric response of the structure as the sum of a symmetrized response plus correction modes. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated with the example of a laminated anisotropic shallow shell of quadrilateral planform subjected to uniform normal loading.

  5. Dynamic analysis of evolutive conservative systems. Discussion of eigenmode crossings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morand, H. J. P.

    1984-01-01

    After an analysis of the close connection between the symmetries of a dynamical system and the multiplicity of its vibrational natural frequencies, it is proved by variational arguments that for a system of invariable symmetry the eigenfrequencies associated with the eigenmodes of a given symmetry type do not cross, in general, during the evolution of this system. The theory is implemented by some numerical calculations applied to the analysis of the evolution of the axisymmetric hydroelastic modes of the Ariane launch vehicle during burning of the first stage.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik; Fan, Yi; Cheng, Stephen; Chow, Kwok

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD) is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality. An aortic dissection is formed when blood infiltrates the layers of the vascular wall, and a new artificial channel, the false lumen, is created. The expansion of the blood vessel due to the weakened wall enhances the risk of rupture. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. Both idealized geometry and realistic patient configurations from computed tomography (CT) images are investigated. Physiological boundary conditions from in vivo measurements are employed. Flow configuration and biomechanical forces are studied. Quantitative analysis allows clinicians to assess the risk of rupture in making decision regarding surgical intervention.

  7. Dynamic analysis of piping using the structural overlap method

    SciTech Connect

    Curreri, J.; Bezler, P.; Hartzman, M.

    1981-03-01

    The structural overlap method is a procedure for analyzing the dynamic response of a piping system by performing a separate analysis on subsystems of the complete structure. Specific cases were investigated to obtain an estimate of the validity and application of the method. The case studies were increased in complexity in order to examine some of the problems involved in implementing the method. It is concluded that the overlap method should not be substituted for a complete analysis of a full system. However, if a sufficiently high natural frequency is associated with the overlap section or the overlap section is a substantial portion of the system, acceptable results could be obtained.

  8. Detecting Hidden Diversification Shifts in Models of Trait-Dependent Speciation and Extinction.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M; O'Meara, Brian C

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of diversity can vary considerably from clade to clade. Attempts to understand these patterns often employ state-dependent speciation and extinction models to determine whether the evolution of a particular novel trait has increased speciation rates and/or decreased extinction rates. It is still unclear, however, whether these models are uncovering important drivers of diversification, or whether they are simply pointing to more complex patterns involving many unmeasured and co-distributed factors. Here we describe an extension to the popular state-dependent speciation and extinction models that specifically accounts for the presence of unmeasured factors that could impact diversification rates estimated for the states of any observed trait, addressing at least one major criticism of BiSSE (Binary State Speciation and Extinction) methods. Specifically, our model, which we refer to as HiSSE (Hidden State Speciation and Extinction), assumes that related to each observed state in the model are "hidden" states that exhibit potentially distinct diversification dynamics and transition rates than the observed states in isolation. We also demonstrate how our model can be used as character-independent diversification models that allow for a complex diversification process that is independent of the evolution of a character. Under rigorous simulation tests and when applied to empirical data, we find that HiSSE performs reasonably well, and can at least detect net diversification rate differences between observed and hidden states and detect when diversification rate differences do not correlate with the observed states. We discuss the remaining issues with state-dependent speciation and extinction models in general, and the important ways in which HiSSE provides a more nuanced understanding of trait-dependent diversification.

  9. Detecting Hidden Diversification Shifts in Models of Trait-Dependent Speciation and Extinction.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jeremy M; O'Meara, Brian C

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of diversity can vary considerably from clade to clade. Attempts to understand these patterns often employ state-dependent speciation and extinction models to determine whether the evolution of a particular novel trait has increased speciation rates and/or decreased extinction rates. It is still unclear, however, whether these models are uncovering important drivers of diversification, or whether they are simply pointing to more complex patterns involving many unmeasured and co-distributed factors. Here we describe an extension to the popular state-dependent speciation and extinction models that specifically accounts for the presence of unmeasured factors that could impact diversification rates estimated for the states of any observed trait, addressing at least one major criticism of BiSSE (Binary State Speciation and Extinction) methods. Specifically, our model, which we refer to as HiSSE (Hidden State Speciation and Extinction), assumes that related to each observed state in the model are "hidden" states that exhibit potentially distinct diversification dynamics and transition rates than the observed states in isolation. We also demonstrate how our model can be used as character-independent diversification models that allow for a complex diversification process that is independent of the evolution of a character. Under rigorous simulation tests and when applied to empirical data, we find that HiSSE performs reasonably well, and can at least detect net diversification rate differences between observed and hidden states and detect when diversification rate differences do not correlate with the observed states. We discuss the remaining issues with state-dependent speciation and extinction models in general, and the important ways in which HiSSE provides a more nuanced understanding of trait-dependent diversification. PMID:27016728

  10. [Speciation of metals in occupational medicine].

    PubMed

    Apostoli, P

    1998-01-01

    The identification and quantification of elements as such (that make up the historical analytical method used in toxicological studies) are necessary but not sufficient, in all cases, to understand and evaluate the mechanism of interaction between elements and biological targets. In fact, in order to approximate the factors that control the concentrations of elements in environmental or biological media, we need to know the occurrence of species of the elements themselves. This is element speciation, i.e. the capability of separating, identifying and determining the species in which an element is present and/or transformed. There are few, although increasing in latter years, examples of element speciation able to confirm the importance of this research approach in toxicological studies. Some basic information from these studies have found specific application in selecting the most appropriate indicators and the most representative matrices for biological monitoring. Furthermore, element speciation provides additional and often essential information in evaluating metal toxicity. The toxicity of the three oxidation states of Mercury differ considerably. For arsenic, a decreasing order of toxicity arsenite > arsenate > monomethylarsonic (MMA) > dimethylarsenite (DMA) has been proposed. However, the use of speciation in investigating toxicokinetic aspects appears to be difficult to apply to many other metals, mainly due to the lack of information about the existence and significance of species whose determination would be worthwhile and to the lack of analytical methods enabling us to measure species in biological media. Nonetheless, the horizon for speciation is more extensive and less linear than expected since about 15 elements, 20 oxidation states, and 25 organic compounds have been just involved in speciation. Problems might arise for biological monitoring practices, and the following topics should be considered: (i) identification of species and determination of

  11. Transmission noise identification using two-dimensional dynamic signal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Min-Chun; Chen, Jeng-Xin

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at identifying transmission noise of two types of electrical vehicles with different transmission systems using the developed two-dimensional dynamic signal analysis (2DSA). Two electrical scooters, more specifically, with a gear transmission system and a continuous variable transmission (CVT) system, respectively, have been taken as test benches due to the whistle-like noise emitting from their transmission systems. To effectively process dynamic signatures measured from rotary machinery with varying speed, and even varying orders during operation, such as a machine with a CVT system or gear-shifting operation, the 2DSA approaches including the order analysis (OA) and the time-frequency analysis have been developed and implemented as processing tools. The specifications of vehicle transmission systems, especially the ratio of each speed reduction, and the tooth (cog, blade, etc.) number of transmission elements, i.e., geometric analysis, are firstly to be examined. After the 2DSA processes the noise measured from test vehicles during wide-open-throttle operation, dominant annoying transmission noise components can be extracted, and their sources can be identified through comparing feature orders obtained from geometric analysis. The procedure can not only identify noise sources but conclude transmission components to be further modified in respect of annoying noise.

  12. Evidence for nonallopatric speciation among closely related sympatric Heliotropium species in the Atacama Desert

    PubMed Central

    Luebert, Federico; Jacobs, Pit; Hilger, Hartmut H; Muller, Ludo A H

    2014-01-01

    The genetic structure of populations of closely related, sympatric species may hold the signature of the geographical mode of the speciation process. In fully allopatric speciation, it is expected that genetic differentiation between species is homogeneously distributed across the genome. In nonallopatric speciation, the genomes may remain undifferentiated to a large extent. In this article, we analyzed the genetic structure of five sympatric species from the plant genus Heliotropium in the Atacama Desert. We used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) to characterize the genetic structure of these species and evaluate their genetic differentiation as well as the number of loci subject to positive selection using divergence outlier analysis (DOA). The five species form distinguishable groups in the genetic space, with zones of overlap, indicating that they are possibly not completely isolated. Among-species differentiation accounts for 35% of the total genetic differentiation (FST = 0.35), and FST between species pairs is positively correlated with phylogenetic distance. DOA suggests that few loci are subject to positive selection, which is in line with a scenario of nonallopatric speciation. These results support the idea that sympatric species of Heliotropium sect. Cochranea are under an ongoing speciation process, characterized by a fluctuation of population ranges in response to pulses of arid and humid periods during Quaternary times. PMID:24558582

  13. Evidence for nonallopatric speciation among closely related sympatric Heliotropium species in the Atacama Desert.

    PubMed

    Luebert, Federico; Jacobs, Pit; Hilger, Hartmut H; Muller, Ludo A H

    2014-02-01

    The genetic structure of populations of closely related, sympatric species may hold the signature of the geographical mode of the speciation process. In fully allopatric speciation, it is expected that genetic differentiation between species is homogeneously distributed across the genome. In nonallopatric speciation, the genomes may remain undifferentiated to a large extent. In this article, we analyzed the genetic structure of five sympatric species from the plant genus Heliotropium in the Atacama Desert. We used amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) to characterize the genetic structure of these species and evaluate their genetic differentiation as well as the number of loci subject to positive selection using divergence outlier analysis (DOA). The five species form distinguishable groups in the genetic space, with zones of overlap, indicating that they are possibly not completely isolated. Among-species differentiation accounts for 35% of the total genetic differentiation (F ST = 0.35), and F ST between species pairs is positively correlated with phylogenetic distance. DOA suggests that few loci are subject to positive selection, which is in line with a scenario of nonallopatric speciation. These results support the idea that sympatric species of Heliotropium sect. Cochranea are under an ongoing speciation process, characterized by a fluctuation of population ranges in response to pulses of arid and humid periods during Quaternary times. PMID:24558582

  14. Benefits Analysis of Multi-Center Dynamic Weather Routes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Kapil; McNally, David; Morando, Alexander; Clymer, Alexis; Lock, Jennifer; Petersen, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic weather routes are flight plan corrections that can provide airborne flights more than user-specified minutes of flying-time savings, compared to their current flight plan. These routes are computed from the aircraft's current location to a flight plan fix downstream (within a predefined limit region), while avoiding forecasted convective weather regions. The Dynamic Weather Routes automation has been continuously running with live air traffic data for a field evaluation at the American Airlines Integrated Operations Center in Fort Worth, TX since July 31, 2012, where flights within the Fort Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center are evaluated for time savings. This paper extends the methodology to all Centers in United States and presents benefits analysis of Dynamic Weather Routes automation, if it was implemented in multiple airspace Centers individually and concurrently. The current computation of dynamic weather routes requires a limit rectangle so that a downstream capture fix can be selected, preventing very large route changes spanning several Centers. In this paper, first, a method of computing a limit polygon (as opposed to a rectangle used for Fort Worth Center) is described for each of the 20 Centers in the National Airspace System. The Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool, a nationwide simulation and analysis tool, is used for this purpose. After a comparison of results with the Center-based Dynamic Weather Routes automation in Fort Worth Center, results are presented for 11 Centers in the contiguous United States. These Centers are generally most impacted by convective weather. A breakdown of individual Center and airline savings is presented and the results indicate an overall average savings of about 10 minutes of flying time are obtained per flight.

  15. EPAs SPECIATE 4.4 Database: Development and Uses

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of source category-specific particulate matter (PM), volatile organic gas, and other gas speciation profiles of air pollutant emissions. Abt Associates, Inc. developed SPECIATE 4.4 through a collaborat...

  16. SPECIATE Version 4.4 Database Development Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPECIATE is the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) repository of volatile organic gas and particulate matter (PM) speciation profiles of air pollution sources. Some of the many uses of these source profiles include: (1) creating speciated emissions inventories for regi...

  17. Selenium Metabolism in Cancer Cells: The Combined Application of XAS and XFM Techniques to the Problem of Selenium Speciation in Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weekley, Claire M.; Aitken, Jade B.; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; Witting, Paul K.; Harris, Hugh H.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the speciation of selenium in vivo is crucial to understanding the biological activity of this essential element, which is a popular dietary supplement due to its anti-cancer properties. Hyphenated techniques that combine separation and detection methods are traditionally and effectively used in selenium speciation analysis, but require extensive sample preparation that may affect speciation. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption and fluorescence techniques offer an alternative approach to selenium speciation analysis that requires minimal sample preparation. We present a brief summary of some key HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS/MS studies of the speciation of selenium in cells and rat tissues. We review the results of a top-down approach to selenium speciation in human lung cancer cells that aims to link the speciation and distribution of selenium to its biological activity using a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). The results of this approach highlight the distinct fates of selenomethionine, methylselenocysteine and selenite in terms of their speciation and distribution within cells: organic selenium metabolites were widely distributed throughout the cells, whereas inorganic selenium metabolites were compartmentalized and associated with copper. New data from the XFM mapping of electrophoretically-separated cell lysates show the distribution of selenium in the proteins of selenomethionine-treated cells. Future applications of this top-down approach are discussed. PMID:23698165

  18. Dynamic-Mechanical Analysis of Monodomain Nematic Liquid Crystalline Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Atsushi; Terentjev, Eugene

    2003-03-01

    Dynamic-mechanical analysis was performed in the glassy, nematic and isotropic states of several monodomain nematic liquid crystalline elastomers (LCE) which differ in their degrees of anisotropy and internal microstructure. It was found that the type of network crosslinker makes a significant difference in the equilibrium properties of these elastomers, in particular, in their effective anisotropy. In spite of these differences, the observed dynamic-mechanical behaviour was very similar. The fact that there is a consistently high and wide loss over the whole nematic region, where storage modulus G' behaves non-monotonically, is most likely an indicator of the fact that the dynamic-mechanical response is not linear. Master curves have been built between the glassy state and the nematic-isotropic phase transition, where the modulus reaches a low-level soft plateau. Above the nematic-isotropic transition temperature Tni, the modulus rises substantially, since internal relaxation is no longer able to reduce the elastic response - and further time-temperature superposition fails. The dynamics of these elastomers are dominated by power laws, which was confirmed by the successful procedure of the master curve inversion (time-frequency inversion) to describe the static stress relaxation. Interestingly, it was found that mechanical properties characterized by power laws (in time) of stress relaxation match very well with the dynamic properties, where power laws (in frequency) were also observed in the dynamic modulus in the appropriate range of temperatures. The work demonstrates the potential for the use of nematic liquid crystalline elastomers in many acoustic and vibration damping applications.

  19. Phenotypic plasticity's impacts on diversification and speciation.

    PubMed

    Pfennig, David W; Wund, Matthew A; Snell-Rood, Emilie C; Cruickshank, Tami; Schlichting, Carl D; Moczek, Armin P

    2010-08-01

    Phenotypic plasticity (the ability of a single genotype to produce multiple phenotypes in response to variation in the environment) is commonplace. Yet its evolutionary significance remains controversial, especially in regard to whether and how it impacts diversification and speciation. Here, we review recent theory on how plasticity promotes: (i) the origin of novel phenotypes, (ii) divergence among populations and species, (iii) the formation of new species and (iv) adaptive radiation. We also discuss the latest empirical support for each of these evolutionary pathways to diversification and identify potentially profitable areas for future research. Generally, phenotypic plasticity can play a largely underappreciated role in driving diversification and speciation.

  20. Arsenic speciation in manufactured seafood products.

    PubMed

    Vélez, D; Montoro, R

    1998-09-01

    The literature on the speciation of arsenic (As) in seafoods was critically reviewed. Most research has been directed toward fresh seafood products with few papers dealing with As speciation in manufactured seafoods. Predictions concerning As species made on the basis of fresh seafood products cannot be extrapolated to manufactured seafoods. Therefore, due to the numerous species of As, the scarcity of data concerning their presence in foods, the transformations each species may undergo during industrial processing and cooking, and the lack of legislation on permitted As levels in seafood products, As species in manufactured seafood products need to be determined and quantified.

  1. GPU accelerated dynamic functional connectivity analysis for functional MRI data.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Devrim; Sakoğlu, Ünal; Esquivel, Johnny; Adinoff, Bryon; Mete, Mutlu

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in multi-core processors and graphics card based computational technologies have paved the way for an improved and dynamic utilization of parallel computing techniques. Numerous applications have been implemented for the acceleration of computationally-intensive problems in various computational science fields including bioinformatics, in which big data problems are prevalent. In neuroimaging, dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) analysis is a computationally demanding method used to investigate dynamic functional interactions among different brain regions or networks identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. In this study, we implemented and analyzed a parallel DFC algorithm based on thread-based and block-based approaches. The thread-based approach was designed to parallelize DFC computations and was implemented in both Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming platforms. Another approach developed in this study to better utilize CUDA architecture is the block-based approach, where parallelization involves smaller parts of fMRI time-courses obtained by sliding-windows. Experimental results showed that the proposed parallel design solutions enabled by the GPUs significantly reduce the computation time for DFC analysis. Multicore implementation using OpenMP on 8-core processor provides up to 7.7× speed-up. GPU implementation using CUDA yielded substantial accelerations ranging from 18.5× to 157× speed-up once thread-based and block-based approaches were combined in the analysis. Proposed parallel programming solutions showed that multi-core processor and CUDA-supported GPU implementations accelerated the DFC analyses significantly. Developed algorithms make the DFC analyses more practical for multi-subject studies with more dynamic analyses. PMID:25805449

  2. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of hydrodynamically-coupled stainless steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel is usually stored temporarily on the site of nuclear power plants. The spent fuel storage racks are nuclear-safety-related stainless steel structures required to be analyzed for seismic loads. When the storage pool is subjected to three-dimensional (3-D) floor seismic excitations, rack modules, stored fuel bundles, adjacent racks and pool walls, and surrounding water are hydrodynamically coupled. Hydrodynamic coupling (HC) significantly affects the dynamic responses of the racks that are free-standing and submerged in water within the pool. A nonlinear time-history dynamic analysis is usually needed to describe the motion behavior of the racks that are both geometrically nonlinear and material nonlinear in nature. The nonlinearities include the friction resistance between the rack supporting legs and the pool floor, and various potential impacts of fuel-rack, rack-rack, and rack-pool wall. The HC induced should be included in the nonlinear dynamic analysis using the added-hydrodynamic-mass concept based on potential theory per the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) acceptance criteria. To this end, a finite element analysis constitutes a feasible and effective tool. However, most people perform somewhat simplified 1-D, or 2-D, or 3-D single rack and 2-D multiple rack analyses. These analyses are incomplete because a 3-D single rack model behaves quite differently from a 2-D mode. Furthermore, a 3-D whole pool multi-rack model behaves differently than a 3-D single rack model, especially when the strong HC effects are unsymmetrical. In this paper 3-D nonlinear dynamic time-history analyses were performed in a more quantitative manner using sophisticated finite element models developed for a single rack as well as all twelve racks in the whole-pool. Typical response results due to different HC effects are determined and discussed.

  3. Dynamical modeling and analysis of large cellular regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérenguier, D.; Chaouiya, C.; Monteiro, P. T.; Naldi, A.; Remy, E.; Thieffry, D.; Tichit, L.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamical analysis of large biological regulatory networks requires the development of scalable methods for mathematical modeling. Following the approach initially introduced by Thomas, we formalize the interactions between the components of a network in terms of discrete variables, functions, and parameters. Model simulations result in directed graphs, called state transition graphs. We are particularly interested in reachability properties and asymptotic behaviors, which correspond to terminal strongly connected components (or "attractors") in the state transition graph. A well-known problem is the exponential increase of the size of state transition graphs with the number of network components, in particular when using the biologically realistic asynchronous updating assumption. To address this problem, we have developed several complementary methods enabling the analysis of the behavior of large and complex logical models: (i) the definition of transition priority classes to simplify the dynamics; (ii) a model reduction method preserving essential dynamical properties, (iii) a novel algorithm to compact state transition graphs and directly generate compressed representations, emphasizing relevant transient and asymptotic dynamical properties. The power of an approach combining these different methods is demonstrated by applying them to a recent multilevel logical model for the network controlling CD4+ T helper cell response to antigen presentation and to a dozen cytokines. This model accounts for the differentiation of canonical Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes, as well as of inflammatory Th17 and regulatory T cells, along with many hybrid subtypes. All these methods have been implemented into the software GINsim, which enables the definition, the analysis, and the simulation of logical regulatory graphs.

  4. Trace metal speciation and bioavailability in anaerobic digestion: A review.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Pham Minh; Ketheesan, Balachandran; Yan, Zhou; Stuckey, David

    2016-01-01

    Trace metals are essential for the growth of anaerobic microorganisms, however, in practice they are often added to anaerobic digesters in excessive amounts, which can lead to inhibition. The concept of bioavailability of metals in anaerobic digestion has been poorly understood in the past, and a lack of deep understanding of the relationship between trace metal speciation and bioavailability can result in ineffective metal dosing strategies for anaerobic digesters. Sequential extraction schemes are useful for fractionating trace metals into their different forms, and metal sulfides can serve as a store and source for trace metals during anaerobic digestion, while natural/synthetic chelating agents (soluble microbial products-SMPs, extracellular polysaccharides-EPS, and EDTA/NTA) are capable of controlling trace metal bioavailability. Nevertheless, more work is needed to: investigate the speciation and bioavailability of Ca, Mg, Mn, W, and Se; compare the bioavailability of different forms of trace metals e.g. carbonates, sulfides, phosphates to different anaerobic trophic groups; determine what factors influence metal sulfide dissolution; investigate whether chelating agents can increase trace metal bioavailability; develop and adapt specialized analytical techniques, and; determine how trace metal dynamics change in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR).

  5. Sulfur K-edge XANES analysis of natural and synthetic basaltic glasses: Implications for S speciation and S content as function of oxygen fugacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugo, Pedro J.; Wilke, Max; Botcharnikov, Roman E.

    2010-05-01

    -dominated (most likely because of photo-reduction effects during analysis) whereas S6+/ΣS data from XANES provide a close match to the expected theoretical values. The XANES-derived relationship for S6+/ΣS as a function of fO2 indicates that the transition from S2- to S6+ with increasing fO2 occurs over a narrower interval than what is predicted by the EPMA-derived relationship. The implications for natural systems is that small variation of fO2 above FMQ+1 will have a large effect on S behavior in basaltic systems, in particular regarding the amount of S that can be transported by basaltic melts before sulfide saturation can occur.

  6. Sulfur K-edge XANES analysis of natural and synthetic basaltic glasses: Implications for S speciation and S content as function of oxygen fugacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugo, Pedro J.; Wilke, Max; Botcharnikov, Roman E.

    2010-10-01

    are sulfate-dominated (most likely because of photo-reduction effects during analysis) whereas S 6+/ΣS from XANES provide a close match to the expected theoretical values. The XANES-derived relationship for S 6+/ΣS as a function of fO 2 indicates that the transition from S 2- to S 6- with increasing fO 2 occurs over a narrower interval than what is predicted by the EPMA-derived relationship. The implications for natural systems is that small variation of fO 2 above FMQ + 1 will have a large effect on S behavior in basaltic systems, in particular regarding the amount of S that can be transported by basaltic melts before sulfide saturation can occur.

  7. Design improvement and dynamic finite element analysis of novel ITI dental implant under dynamic chewing loads.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this article was to introduce the application of a uniform design for experimental methods to drop the micromotion of a novel ITI dental implant model under the dynamic loads. Combining the characteristics of the traditional ITI and Nano-Tite implants, a new implant with concave holes has been constructed. Compared to the traditional ITI dental implant model, the micromotion of the new dental implant model was significantly reduced by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. From uniform design of experiments, the dynamic finite element analysis method was applied to caluculated the maximum micromotion of the full model. Finally, the chief design in all the experiment simulations which cause the minimum micromotion is picked as the advanced model of the design. Related to the original design, which was associated with a micromotion of 45.11 μm, the micromotion of the improved version was 31.37 μm, for an improvement rate of 30.5%. PMID:26406049

  8. Applications of analysis of dynamic adaptations in parameter trajectories

    PubMed Central

    van Riel, Natal A. W.; Tiemann, Christian A.; Vanlier, Joep; Hilbers, Peter A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic profiling in combination with pathway-based analyses and computational modelling are becoming increasingly important in clinical and preclinical research. Modelling multi-factorial, progressive diseases requires the integration of molecular data at the metabolome, proteome and transcriptome levels. Also the dynamic interaction of organs and tissues needs to be considered. The processes involved cover time scales that are several orders of magnitude different. We report applications of a computational approach to bridge the scales and different levels of biological detail. Analysis of dynamic adaptations in parameter trajectories (ADAPTs) aims to investigate phenotype transitions during disease development and after a therapeutic intervention. ADAPT is based on a time-dependent evolution of model parameters to describe the dynamics of metabolic adaptations. The progression of metabolic adaptations is predicted by identifying necessary dynamic changes in the model parameters to describe the transition between experimental data obtained during different stages. To get a better understanding of the concept, the ADAPT approach is illustrated in a theoretical study. Its application in research on progressive changes in lipoprotein metabolism is also discussed. PMID:23853705

  9. Toxicity, bioavailability and metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, S B; Rao, P V

    1993-11-01

    1. Environmental toxicology emphasizes the difference from traditional toxicology in which pure compounds of interest are added to purified diets, or injected into the test animals. When the objective is to study the fate and effects of trace elements in the environment, knowledge of the speciation of the elements and their physico-chemical forms is important. 2. Cadmium salts such as the sulfides, carbonates or oxides, are practically insoluble in water. However, these can be converted to water-soluble salts in nature under the influence of oxygen and acids. Chronic exposure to Cd is associated with renal toxicity in humans once a critical body burden is reached. 3. The solubility of As(III) oxide in water is fairly low, but high in either acid or alkali. In water, arsenic is usually in the form of the arsenate or arsenite. As(III) is systemically more poisonous than the As(V), and As(V) is reduced to the As(III) form before exerting any toxic effects. Organic arsenicals also exert their toxic effects in vivo in animals by first metabolizing to the trivalent arsenoxide form. Some methyl arsenic compounds, such as di- and trimethylarsines, occur naturally as a consequence of biological activity. The toxic effect of arsenite can be potentiated by dithiols, while As has a protective effect against the toxicity of a variety of forms of Se in several species. 4. Selenium occurs in several oxidation states and many selenium analogues of organic sulfur compounds exist in nature. Selenium in selenate form occurs in alkaline soils, where it is soluble and easily available to plants. Selenite binds tightly to iron and aluminum oxides and thus is quite insoluble in soils. Hydrogen selenide is a very toxic gas at room temperature. The methylated forms of Se are much less toxic for the organism than selenite. However, the methylated Se derivatives have strong synergistic toxicity with other minerals such as arsenic. 5. Aquatic organisms absorb and retain Hg in the tissues, as

  10. Toxicity, bioavailability and metal speciation.

    PubMed

    Jonnalagadda, S B; Rao, P V

    1993-11-01

    1. Environmental toxicology emphasizes the difference from traditional toxicology in which pure compounds of interest are added to purified diets, or injected into the test animals. When the objective is to study the fate and effects of trace elements in the environment, knowledge of the speciation of the elements and their physico-chemical forms is important. 2. Cadmium salts such as the sulfides, carbonates or oxides, are practically insoluble in water. However, these can be converted to water-soluble salts in nature under the influence of oxygen and acids. Chronic exposure to Cd is associated with renal toxicity in humans once a critical body burden is reached. 3. The solubility of As(III) oxide in water is fairly low, but high in either acid or alkali. In water, arsenic is usually in the form of the arsenate or arsenite. As(III) is systemically more poisonous than the As(V), and As(V) is reduced to the As(III) form before exerting any toxic effects. Organic arsenicals also exert their toxic effects in vivo in animals by first metabolizing to the trivalent arsenoxide form. Some methyl arsenic compounds, such as di- and trimethylarsines, occur naturally as a consequence of biological activity. The toxic effect of arsenite can be potentiated by dithiols, while As has a protective effect against the toxicity of a variety of forms of Se in several species. 4. Selenium occurs in several oxidation states and many selenium analogues of organic sulfur compounds exist in nature. Selenium in selenate form occurs in alkaline soils, where it is soluble and easily available to plants. Selenite binds tightly to iron and aluminum oxides and thus is quite insoluble in soils. Hydrogen selenide is a very toxic gas at room temperature. The methylated forms of Se are much less toxic for the organism than selenite. However, the methylated Se derivatives have strong synergistic toxicity with other minerals such as arsenic. 5. Aquatic organisms absorb and retain Hg in the tissues, as

  11. Nanomaterial-based approaches for the detection and speciation of mercury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohan; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Jiating; Li, Yunyun; Lin, Jing; Li, Bai; Gao, Yuxi; Chen, Chunying

    2015-12-01

    Mercury is toxic with widespread contamination. Highly sensitive and selective approaches for mercury analysis are desired. Although conventional techniques are accurate and sensitive in the determination of mercury, these procedures are time-consuming, labor-intensive and dependent heavily on expensive instrumentation. In recent years, nanomaterial-based approaches have been proved to be effective alternatives in the detection and speciation of mercury. In this review, the development of different nanomaterial-based approaches was summarized, as well as their utilization for the detection of mercury in environmental and biological samples, such as gold nanomaterials, carbon nanomaterials, quantum dots and so on. Moreover, the speciation of mercury using nanomaterials was also reviewed.

  12. Analysis of Dynamic Stall Through Chirp Signal Pitch Excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, Kyle; Coleman, Dustin; Wicks, Michael; Corke, Thomas; Thomas, Flint

    2013-11-01

    An augmentation of the typical pitching airfoil experiment has been performed where the pitching frequency and amplitude are dynamically varied in a short-time event to produce a ``chirp'' trajectory, α (t) =α0 +α1 (t) sin (tω (t)) . The frequency evolution followed a Schroeder-phase relation, ω (t) =ωmin + K (ωmax -ωmin) . The frequencies ranged from 0.5 Hz to 30 Hz, resulting in reduced frequencies from 0.02 to 0.1. The free-stream Mach number ranged from Mach 0.4 to 0.6, giving chord Reynolds numbers from 5 ×105 to 3 ×106 . The airfoil was a NACA 23012 section shape that was fully instrumented with 31 flush-mounted high-bandwidth pressure transducers. The pressure transducer outputs were simultaneously sampled with the instantaneous angle of attack, α (t) . The motivation for this study was to compare dynamic stall under non-equilibrium conditions. A particular interest is on the flow features that occur when dynamically passing between light and deep stall regimes. The results include phase analysis of aerodynamic loads, wavelet-based spectral analysis, and the determination of the intra-cycle aerodynamic damping factors.

  13. Dynamic analysis of bi-stable composite plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaconu, Cezar G.; Weaver, Paul M.; Arrieta, Andres F.

    2009-05-01

    The static and dynamic transitions between stable states for rectangular bi-stable laminated composite plates are considered. The laminated composite plates have nonsymmetric laminate configurations and are subjected to thermal curing in order to introduce residual stresses and to achieve bi-stability. As geometrically nonlinear effects occur, after curing, the plates are able to take multiple stable shapes at service or room temperature. A simple model for dynamic analysis of the snap-through phenomena is proposed based on strain field approximations for the plates. Hamilton's principle is applied in conjunction with the Rayleigh-Ritz method in order to achieve fast results. The model is used to evaluate the initial displacements for the stable states and also to investigate the static and dynamic transitions from one stable state to another. Parametric studies are carried out for various aspect ratios, laminate configurations and actuation loads and the results are compared with those obtained with finite element analysis in order to evaluate the accuracy of the model.

  14. Dynamic self-guiding analysis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurakin, Alexei; Bredesen, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    We applied a self-guiding evolutionary algorithm to initiate the synthesis of the Alzheimer's disease-related data and literature. A protein interaction network associated with amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) and a seed model that treats Alzheimer's disease as progressive dysregulation of APP-associated signaling were used as dynamic “guides” and structural “filters” in the recursive search, analysis, and assimilation of data to drive the evolution of the seed model in size, detail, and complexity. Analysis of data and literature across sub-disciplines and system-scale discovery platforms suggests a key role of dynamic cytoskeletal connectivity in the stability, plasticity, and performance of multicellular networks and architectures. Chronic impairment and/or dysregulation of cell adhesions/synapses, cytoskeletal networks, and/or reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal-like transitions, which enable and mediate the stable and coherent yet dynamic and reconfigurable multicellular architectures, may lead to the emergence and persistence of the disordered, wound-like pockets/microenvironments of chronically disconnected cells. Such wound-like microenvironments support and are supported by pro-inflammatory, pro-secretion, de-differentiated cellular phenotypes with altered metabolism and signaling. The co-evolution of wound-like microenvironments and their inhabitants may lead to the selection and stabilization of degenerated cellular phenotypes, via acquisition of epigenetic modifications and mutations, which eventually result in degenerative disorders such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26041885

  15. Dynamical glucometry: Use of multiscale entropy analysis in diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Madalena D.; Henriques, Teresa; Munshi, Medha N.; Segal, Alissa R.; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the world's most prevalent medical conditions. Contemporary management focuses on lowering mean blood glucose values toward a normal range, but largely ignores the dynamics of glucose fluctuations. We probed analyte time series obtained from continuous glucose monitor (CGM) sensors. We show that the fluctuations in CGM values sampled every 5 min are not uncorrelated noise. Next, using multiscale entropy analysis, we quantified the complexity of the temporal structure of the CGM time series from a group of elderly subjects with type 2 DM and age-matched controls. We further probed the structure of these CGM time series using detrended fluctuation analysis. Our findings indicate that the dynamics of glucose fluctuations from control subjects are more complex than those of subjects with type 2 DM over time scales ranging from about 5 min to 5 h. These findings support consideration of a new framework, dynamical glucometry, to guide mechanistic research and to help assess and compare therapeutic interventions, which should enhance complexity of glucose fluctuations and not just lower mean and variance of blood glucose levels.

  16. Selecting Earthquake Records for Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Mario E.

    2008-07-08

    An area in earthquake risk reduction that needs an urgent examination is the selection of earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. An often-mentioned shortcoming from results of nonlinear dynamic analyses of structures is that these results are limited to the type of records that these analyses use as input data. This paper proposes a procedure for selecting earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. This procedure uses a seismic damage index evaluated using the hysteretic energy dissipated by a Single Degree of Freedom System (SDOF) representing a multi-degree-of freedom structure responding to an earthquake record, and the plastic work capacity of the system at collapse. The type of structural system is considered using simple parameters. The proposed method is based on the evaluation of the damage index for a suite of earthquake records and a selected type of structural system. A set of 10 strong ground motion records is analyzed to show an application of the proposed procedure for selecting earthquake records for structural design.

  17. Speciation distribution and mass balance of copper and zinc in urban rain, sediments, and road runoff.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiaojun; Fu, Dafang; Li, He

    2012-11-01

    Heavy metal pollution in road runoff had caused widespread concern since the last century. However, there are little references on metal speciation in multiple environmental media (e.g., rain, road sediments, and road runoff). Our research targeted the investigation of metal speciation in rain, road sediments, and runoff; the analysis of speciation variation and mass balance of metals among rain, road sediments, and runoff; the selection of main factors by principal component analysis (PCA); and the establishment of equation to evaluate the impact of rain and road sediments to metals in road runoff. Sequential extraction procedure contains five steps for the chemical fractionation of metals. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (Shimadzu, AA-6800) was used to determine metal speciation concentration, as well as the total and dissolved fractions. The dissolved fractions for both Cu and Zn were dominant in rain. The speciation distribution of Zn was different from that of Cu in road sediments, while speciation distribution of Zn is similar to that of Cu in runoff. The bound to carbonates for both Cu and Zn in road sediments were prone to be dissolved by rain. The levels of Cu and Zn in runoff were not obviously influenced by rain, but significantly influenced by road sediments. The masses for both Cu and Zn among rain, road sediments, and road runoff approximately meet the mass balance equation for all rainfall patterns. Five principal factors were selected for metal regression equation based on PCA, including rainfall, average rainfall intensity, antecedent dry periods, total suspended particles, and temperature. The established regression equations could be used to predict the effect of road runoff on receiving environments.

  18. Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, Hans; Pruss, Jan; Webb, Glenn F.

    2006-12-01

    A new mathematical model for the dynamics of prion proliferation involving an ordinary differential equation coupled with a partial integro-differential equation is analyzed, continuing the work in [J. Pruss, L. Pujo-Menjouet, G.F. Webb, R. Zacher, Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 6 (2006) 225-235]. We show the well-posedness of this problem in its natural phase space , i.e., there is a unique global semiflow on Z+ associated to the problem. A theorem of threshold type is derived for this model which is typical for mathematical epidemics. If a certain combination of kinetic parameters is below or at the threshold, there is a unique steady state, the disease-free equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable in Z+; above the threshold it is unstable, and there is another unique steady state, the disease equilibrium, which inherits that property.

  19. Analysis methods for wind turbine control and electrical system dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.

    1995-05-01

    The integration of new energy technologies into electric power systems requires methods which recognize the full range of dynamic events in both the new generating unit and the power system. Since new energy technologies are initially perceived as small contributors to large systems, little attention is generally paid to system integration, i.e. dynamic events in the power system are ignored. As a result, most new energy sources are only capable of base-load operation, i.e. they have no load following or cycling capability. Wind turbines are no exception. Greater awareness of this implicit (and often unnecessary) limitation is needed. Analysis methods are recommended which include very low penetration (infinite bus) as well as very high penetration (stand-alone) scenarios.

  20. Behavioural analysis of the pull-in dynamic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, L. A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2004-09-01

    A careful analysis of the dynamics of the pull-in displacement reveals a metastable transient interval for devices with a Q factor lower than 1.2. The duration of this metastable regime could be up to 20 ms for the structure used in this work, depending on the damping. For typical device dimensions this regime dominates pull-in dynamics. This paper explicitly focuses on the metastable regime. The results of numerical simulations are confirmed with measurement results with the purpose of providing a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. This may contribute to both improved actuator design and enhanced sensitivity of pressure sensors and accelerometers operating on pull-in time interval measurement. The sensitivity of the pull-in time to external accelerations is 6 × 10-2 s/ms-2 (~0.6 ms mg-1) for current devices and can be increased by design.