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Sample records for dynamic stability enhancement

  1. The dynamics of mobile promoters: Enhanced stability in promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Mahnaz; Wahl, Lindi M

    2016-10-21

    Mobile promoters are emerging as a new class of mobile genetic elements, first identified by examining prokaryote genome sequences, and more recently confirmed by experimental observations in bacteria. Recent datasets have identified over 40,000 putative mobile promoters in sequenced prokaryote genomes, however only one-third of these are in regions of the genome directly upstream from coding sequences, that is, in promoter regions. The presence of many promoter sequences in non-promoter regions is unexplained. Here we develop a general mathematical model for the dynamics of mobile promoters, extending previous work to capture the dynamics both within and outside promoter regions. From this general model, we apply rigorous model selection techniques to identify which parameters are statistically justified in describing the available mobile promoter data, and find best-fit values of these parameters. Our results suggest that high rates of horizontal gene transfer maintain the population of mobile promoters in promoter regions, and that once established at these sites, mobile promoters are rarely lost, but are commonly copied to other genomic regions. In contrast, mobile promoter copies in non-promoter regions are more numerous and more volatile, experiencing substantially higher rates of duplication, loss and diversification.

  2. Correlation-induced superconductivity dynamically stabilized and enhanced by laser irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ido, Kota; Ohgoe, Takahiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2017-01-01

    Studies on out-of-equilibrium dynamics have paved a way to realize a new state of matter. Superconductor-like properties above room temperatures recently suggested to be in copper oxides achieved by selectively exciting vibrational phonon modes by laser have inspired studies on an alternative and general strategy to be pursued for high-temperature superconductivity. We show that the superconductivity can be enhanced by irradiating laser to correlated electron systems owing to two mechanisms: First, the effective attractive interaction of carriers is enhanced by the dynamical localization mechanism, which drives the system into strong coupling regions. Second, the irradiation allows reaching uniform and enhanced superconductivity dynamically stabilized without deteriorating into equilibrium inhomogeneities that suppress superconductivity. The dynamical superconductivity is subject to the Higgs oscillations during and after the irradiation. Our finding sheds light on a way to enhance superconductivity that is inaccessible in equilibrium in strongly correlated electron systems. PMID:28835923

  3. Correlation-induced superconductivity dynamically stabilized and enhanced by laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ido, Kota; Ohgoe, Takahiro; Imada, Masatoshi

    2017-08-01

    Studies on out-of-equilibrium dynamics have paved a way to realize a new state of matter. Superconductor-like properties above room temperatures recently suggested to be in copper oxides achieved by selectively exciting vibrational phonon modes by laser have inspired studies on an alternative and general strategy to be pursued for high-temperature superconductivity. We show that the superconductivity can be enhanced by irradiating laser to correlated electron systems owing to two mechanisms: First, the effective attractive interaction of carriers is enhanced by the dynamical localization mechanism, which drives the system into strong coupling regions. Second, the irradiation allows reaching uniform and enhanced superconductivity dynamically stabilized without deteriorating into equilibrium inhomogeneities that suppress superconductivity. The dynamical superconductivity is subject to the Higgs oscillations during and after the irradiation. Our finding sheds light on a way to enhance superconductivity that is inaccessible in equilibrium in strongly correlated electron systems.

  4. Steps to take to enhance gait stability: the effect of stride frequency, stride length, and walking speed on local dynamic stability and margins of stability.

    PubMed

    Hak, Laura; Houdijk, Han; Beek, Peter J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether adaptations of stride length, stride frequency, and walking speed, independently influence local dynamic stability and the size of the medio-lateral and backward margins of stability during walking. Nine healthy subjects walked 25 trials on a treadmill at different combinations of stride frequency, stride length, and consequently at different walking speeds. Visual feedback about the required and the actual combination of stride frequency and stride length was given during the trials. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to investigate the independent contribution of stride length, stride frequency, and walking speed on the measures of gait stability. Increasing stride frequency was found to enhance medio-lateral margins of stability. Backward margins of stability became larger as stride length decreased or walking speed increased. For local dynamic stability no significant effects of stride frequency, stride length or walking speed were found. We conclude that adaptations in stride frequency, stride length and/or walking speed can result in an increase of the medio-lateral and backward margins of stability, while these adaptations do not seem to affect local dynamic stability. Gait training focusing on the observed stepping strategies to enhance margins of stability might be a useful contribution to programs aimed at fall prevention.

  5. Steps to Take to Enhance Gait Stability: The Effect of Stride Frequency, Stride Length, and Walking Speed on Local Dynamic Stability and Margins of Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hak, Laura; Houdijk, Han; Beek, Peter J.; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether adaptations of stride length, stride frequency, and walking speed, independently influence local dynamic stability and the size of the medio-lateral and backward margins of stability during walking. Nine healthy subjects walked 25 trials on a treadmill at different combinations of stride frequency, stride length, and consequently at different walking speeds. Visual feedback about the required and the actual combination of stride frequency and stride length was given during the trials. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to investigate the independent contribution of stride length, stride frequency, and walking speed on the measures of gait stability. Increasing stride frequency was found to enhance medio-lateral margins of stability. Backward margins of stability became larger as stride length decreased or walking speed increased. For local dynamic stability no significant effects of stride frequency, stride length or walking speed were found. We conclude that adaptations in stride frequency, stride length and/or walking speed can result in an increase of the medio-lateral and backward margins of stability, while these adaptations do not seem to affect local dynamic stability. Gait training focusing on the observed stepping strategies to enhance margins of stability might be a useful contribution to programs aimed at fall prevention. PMID:24349379

  6. Noise-Enhanced Vestibular Input Improves Dynamic Walking Stability in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Wuehr, M; Nusser, E; Krafczyk, S; Straube, A; Brandt, T; Jahn, K; Schniepp, R

    2016-01-01

    White noise galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is thought to enhance the sensitivity of vestibular organs. To examine the effects of noise-enhanced vestibular input on the walking performance in healthy subjects walking with eyes closed. Walking performance of 17 healthy subjects (mean age 28.8 ± 1.7 years) at slow, preferred, and fast speeds was examined during three different conditions: (1) walking with eyes open (EO) as baseline condition, (2) walking with eyes closed and sham noisy GVS (EC), and (3) walking with eyes closed and non-zero amplitude noisy GVS set to 80% of the individual sensory threshold for GVS (EC-GVS). Ten gait parameters were examined: stride time, stride length, base of support, swing time percentage, double support time percentage as well as gait asymmetry, bilateral phase coordination and the coefficient of variation (CV) of stride time, stride length and base of support. Noisy GVS improved stride time CV by 36% (p < 0.034), stride length CV by 31% (p < 0.037), base of support CV by 14% (p < 0.009), and bilateral phase coordination by 23% (p < 0.034). The ameliorating effects of noisy GVS on locomotion function were primarily observable during slow walking speeds. Noise-enhanced vestibular input is effective in improving locomotion function and is accompanied by a subjectively felt improvement of walking balance. It predominantly targets the variability and bilateral coordination characteristics of the walking pattern, which are critically linked to dynamic walking stability. Noisy GVS might present an effective treatment option to improve walking performance in patients with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamics of bad-cavity-enhanced interaction with cold Sr atoms for laser stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, S. A.; Christensen, B. T. R.; Henriksen, M. R.; Thomsen, J. W.

    2017-07-01

    Hybrid systems of cold atoms and optical cavities are promising systems for increasing the stability of laser oscillators used in quantum metrology and atomic clocks. In this paper we map out the atom-cavity dynamics in such a system and demonstrate limitations as well as robustness of the approach. We investigate the phase response of an ensemble of cold 88Sr atoms inside an optical cavity for use as an error signal in laser frequency stabilization. With this system we realize a regime where the high atomic phase shift limits the dynamical locking range. The limitation is caused by the cavity transfer function relating input field to output field. The cavity dynamics is shown to have only little influence on the prospects for laser stabilization, making the system robust towards cavity fluctuations and ideal for the improvement of future narrow linewidth lasers.

  8. Silver-mediated base pairings: towards dynamic DNA nanostructures with enhanced chemical and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swasey, Steven M.; Gwinn, Elisabeth G.

    2016-04-01

    The thermal and chemical fragility of DNA nanomaterials assembled by Watson-Crick (WC) pairing constrain the settings in which these materials can be used and how they can be functionalized. Here we investigate use of the silver cation, Ag+, as an agent for more robust, metal-mediated self-assembly, focusing on the simplest duplex building blocks that would be required for more elaborate Ag+-DNA nanostructures. Our studies of Ag+-induced assembly of non-complementary DNA oligomers employ strands of 2-24 bases, with varied base compositions, and use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to determine product compositions. High yields of duplex products containing narrowly distributed numbers of Ag+ can be achieved by optimizing solution conditions. These Ag+-mediated duplexes are stable to at least 60 mM Mg2+, higher than is necessary for WC nanotechnology schemes such as tile assemblies and DNA origami, indicating that sequential stages of Ag+-mediated and WC-mediated assembly may be feasible. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests simple helical structures for Ag+-mediated duplexes with lengths to at least 20 base pairs, and further indicates that the structure of cytosine-rich duplexes is preserved at high urea concentrations. We therefore propose an approach towards dynamic DNA nanomaterials with enhanced thermal and chemical stability through designs that combine sturdy silver-mediated ‘frames’ with WC paired ‘pictures’.

  9. End-use load control for power system dynamic stability enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dagle, J.E.; Winiarski, D.W.; Donnelly, M.K.

    1997-02-01

    Faced with the prospect of increasing utilization of the transmission and distribution infrastructure without significant upgrade, the domestic electric power utility industry is investing heavily in technologies to improve network dynamic performance through a program loosely referred to as Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS). Devices exploiting recent advances in power electronics are being installed in the power system to offset the need to construct new transmission lines. These devices collectively represent investment potential of several billion dollars over the next decade. A similar development, designed to curtail the peak loads and thus defer new transmission, distribution, and generation investment, falls under a category of technologies referred to as demand side management (DSM). A subset of broader conservation measures, DSM acts directly on the load to reduce peak consumption. DSM techniques include direct load control, in which a utility has the ability to curtail specific loads as conditions warrant. A novel approach has been conceived by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to combine the objectives of FACTS and the technologies inherent in DSM to provide a distributed power system dynamic controller. This technology has the potential to dramatically offset major investments in FACTS devices by using direct load control to achieve dynamic stability objectives. The potential value of distributed versus centralized grid modulation has been examined by simulating the western power grid under extreme loading conditions. In these simulations, a scenario is analyzed in which active grid stabilization enables power imports into the southern California region to be increased several hundred megawatts beyond present limitations. Modeling results show distributed load control is up to 30 percent more effective than traditional centralized control schemes in achieving grid stability.

  10. Elderly Fallers Enhance Dynamic Stability Through Anticipatory Postural Adjustments during a Choice Stepping Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Tisserand, Romain; Robert, Thomas; Chabaud, Pascal; Bonnefoy, Marc; Chèze, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    In the case of disequilibrium, the capacity to step quickly is critical to avoid falling in elderly. This capacity can be simply assessed through the choice stepping reaction time test (CSRT), where elderly fallers (F) take longer to step than elderly non-fallers (NF). However, the reasons why elderly F elongate their stepping time remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to assess the characteristics of anticipated postural adjustments (APA) that elderly F develop in a stepping context and their consequences on the dynamic stability. Forty-four community-dwelling elderly subjects (20 F and 24 NF) performed a CSRT where kinematics and ground reaction forces were collected. Variables were analyzed using two-way repeated measures ANOVAs. Results for F compared to NF showed that stepping time is elongated, due to a longer APA phase. During APA, they seem to use two distinct balance strategies, depending on the axis: in the anteroposterior direction, we measured a smaller backward movement and slower peak velocity of the center of pressure (CoP); in the mediolateral direction, the CoP movement was similar in amplitude and peak velocity between groups but lasted longer. The biomechanical consequence of both strategies was an increased margin of stability (MoS) at foot-off, in the respective direction. By elongating their APA, elderly F use a safer balance strategy that prioritizes dynamic stability conditions instead of the objective of the task. Such a choice in balance strategy probably comes from muscular limitations and/or a higher fear of falling and paradoxically indicates an increased risk of fall. PMID:27965561

  11. Dynamic stabilization of a bistable suspension system attached to a flexible host structure for operational safety enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Harne, R. L.; Wang, K. W.; Huang, Hai

    2014-12-01

    In engineering applications, a suspension system may be attached to a flexible host structure, e.g. spacecraft truss, to provide vibration isolation for sensitive instrumentation, where the suspension and host structure dynamics are strongly coupled. For linear suspensions, a resonance normally occurs adjacent to the roll-off frequency band, which significantly and detrimentally amplifies vibration transmission. To avoid the adverse resonance for operational safety enhancement, this research proposes a nonlinear bistable suspension and evaluates its performance when attached to a flexible host structure. Dynamic models of the bistable and comparable linear suspensions attached to the host structure are formulated, and steady-state responses are predicted using analytical and numerical methods. Results show that the bistable suspension can eliminate the harmful resonance via a dynamic stabilization phenomenon, and simultaneously retains the favorable isolation performance in the roll-off bandwidth as compared to the linear suspension. Series of experimental investigations support the analytical and numerical findings and help define design guidelines for operational safety improvement.

  12. Dynamically stabilized magnetic skyrmions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Iacocca, E.; Awad, A. A.; Dumas, R. K.; Zhang, F. C.; Braun, H. B.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically non-trivial spin textures that manifest themselves as quasiparticles in ferromagnetic thin films or noncentrosymmetric bulk materials. So far attention has focused on skyrmions stabilized either by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) or by dipolar interaction, where in the latter case the excitations are known as bubble skyrmions. Here we demonstrate the existence of a dynamically stabilized skyrmion, which exists even when dipolar interactions and DMI are absent. We establish how such dynamic skyrmions can be nucleated, sustained and manipulated in an effectively lossless medium under a nanocontact. As quasiparticles, they can be transported between two nanocontacts in a nanowire, even in complete absence of DMI. Conversely, in the presence of DMI, we observe that the dynamical skyrmion experiences strong breathing. All of this points towards a wide range of skyrmion manipulation, which can be studied in a much wider class of materials than considered so far. PMID:26351104

  13. A Saturation Balancing Control Method for Enhancing Dynamic Vehicle Stability (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    summarized form in Appendix A. The model is subsequently reduced to the usual two degree of freedom ( bicycle ) model consisting of the lateral and yaw...Schematic of Vehicle Dynamics Model The front and rear lateral forces can be determined by inverting the bicycle handling model given measured lateral...It is often taken to be the steady state yaw rate from a linear bicycle model at speed Vx and steering input . It is given by: desired 2( ) x us

  14. Stability of Dynamic Trunk Movement

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; England, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Nonlinear systems analyses of trunk kinematics were performed to estimate control of dynamic stability during repetitive flexion and extension movements. Objective. Determine whether movement pace and movement direction of dynamic trunk flexion and extension influence control of local dynamic stability. Summary of Background Data. Spinal stability has been previously characterizedz in static, but not in dynamic movements. Biomechanical models make inferences about static spinal stability, but existing analyses provide limited insight into stability of dynamic movement. Stability during dynamic movements can be estimated from Lyapunov analyses of empirical data. Methods. There were 20 healthy subjects who performed repetitive trunk flexion and extension movements at 20 and 40 cycles per minute. Maximum Lyapunov exponents describing the expansion of the kinematic state-space were calculated from the measured trunk kinematics to estimate stability of the dynamic system. Results. The complexity of torso movement dynamics required at least 5 embedded dimensions, which suggests that stability components of lumbar lordosis may be empirically measurable in addition to global stability of trunk dynamics. Repeated trajectories from fast paced movements diverged more quickly than slower movement, indicating that local dynamic stability is limited in fast movements. Movements in the midsagittal plane showed higher multidimensional kinematic divergence than asymmetric movements. Conclusion. Nonlinear dynamic systems analyses were successfully applied to empirically measured data, which were used to characterize the neuromuscular control of stability during repetitive dynamic trunk movements. Movement pace and movement direction influenced the control of spinal stability. These stability assessment techniques are recommended for improved workplace design and the clinical assessment of spinal stability in patients with low back pain. PMID:16648732

  15. Mechanism of enhanced mechanical stability of a minimal RNA kissing complex elucidated by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Alan A; García, Angel E

    2012-06-12

    An RNA kissing loop from the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MMLV) exhibits unusual mechanical stability despite having only two intermolecular base pairs. Mutations at this junction have been shown to destabilize genome dimerization, with concomitant reductions in viral packaging efficiency and infectivity. Optical tweezers experiments have shown that it requires as much force to break the MMLV kissing-loop complex as is required to unfold an 11-bp RNA hairpin [Li PTX, Bustamante C, Tinoco I (2006) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103:15847-15852]. Using nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we have developed a detailed model for the kinetic intermediates of the force-induced dissociation of the MMLV dimerization initiation site kissing loop. Two hundred and eight dissociation events were simulated (approximately 16 μs total simulation time) under conditions of constant applied external force, which we use to construct a Markov state model for kissing-loop dissociation. We find that the complex undergoes a conformational rearrangement, which allows for equal distribution of the applied force among all of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which is intrinsically more stable than the sequential unzipping of an ordinary hairpin. Stacking interactions with adjacent, unpaired loop adenines further stabilize the complex by increasing the repair rate of partially broken H-bonds. These stacking interactions are prominently featured in the transition state, which requires additional coordinates orthogonal to the end-to-end extension to be uniquely identified. We propose that these stabilizing features explain the unusual stability of other retroviral kissing-loop complexes such as the HIV dimerization site.

  16. DYNAMIC NEUROMUSCULAR STABILIZATION & SPORTS REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    Kobesova, Alena; Kolar, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic neuromuscular (core) stability is necessary for optimal athletic performance and is not achieved purely by adequate strength of abdominals, spinal extensors, gluteals or any other musculature; rather, core stabilization is accomplished through precise coordination of these muscles and intra‐abdominal pressure regulation by the central nervous system. Understanding developmental kinesiology provides a framework to appreciate the regional interdependence and the inter‐linking of the skeleton, joints, musculature during movement and the importance of training both the dynamic and stabilizing function of muscles in the kinetic chain. The Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) approach provides functional tools to assess and activate the intrinsic spinal stabilizers in order to optimize the movement system for both pre‐habilitation and rehabilitation of athletic injuries and performance. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:23439921

  17. Stability in dynamical astronomy*

    PubMed Central

    Szebehely, Victor

    1978-01-01

    Hill's concept of stability is generalized and its relation to bifurcation theory is shown. A quantitative measure of stability is introduced that allows the comparison of the stability of different astronomical systems. Theoretical stability limits for triple stellar systems, for planetary systems, and for satellite systems are established. The measure of stability is evaluated for several known triple stellar systems as well as for the planets and for the natural satellites of the solar system. The model of the restricted problem of three bodies and values of the Jacobian constant are used to study planetary and satellite systems. The model of the general problem of three bodies is used to establish criteria for triple stellar systems. In general, the results show a hierarchy of stability: the existing triple systems are more stable than the planetary orbits of the solar system. The satellites of the solar system are least stable; in fact, some of the satellites are close to the line of instability (the Earth's Moon) and some are actually unstable (the four outermost satellites of Jupiter). PMID:16592589

  18. Enhanced colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borum, La Rhonda Terese

    Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2 is the most thermodynamically stable calcium phosphate in physiological environments. Hence, it is the main inorganic mineral found in bone and teeth. Its colloidal stability, however, is poor because hydroxyapatite (HAp) particles exhibit sediment formation upon standing at short time periods, where agglomerates form and lead to non-homogeneous suspensions. Surface modification is a promising method to tailor the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite for biomaterial applications. Three techniques to modify the HAp surface and enhance the colloidal stability of HAp were investigated. Modified particles were characterized by methods sensitive to surface chemistry changes, such as sedimentation studies, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and electrophoresis. Sedimentation studies demonstrated how effective each technique was in improving the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite particles. Electrophoresis provided information on electrostatic interactions within each system. The first technique entailed an esterification reaction of the HAp surface with dodecyl alcohol at elevated temperatures. DRIFT results showed that dodecyl groups from the alcohol replaced acidic hydroxyl and phosphate sites on the HAp surface, giving rise to enhanced colloidal stability through steric interactions in ethanol suspensions. TGA curves gave insight to the degree of esterification for the esterified particles. Higher reaction temperatures give rise to a higher degree of esterification resulting in better colloidal stability. The second technique applied a silica coating on the HAp surface by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate in ethanol. Silica was coated onto the HAp surface at 5--75 wt% loading amounts. A combination of acid dissolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD), along with BET showed that the silica coating is complete at 50 wt% silica loading. The silica coating

  19. Dynamic Stability Derivatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    the needed characteristic motions while avoiding sting /support interference effects, keeping the model near the center of the test section (where the...mounted between the model and sting . Other methods have been used. One example is the free-oscillation technique where the model is free to rotate...technique, the model is connected to the sting through a "flexure" or torsion spring. Again the decay rate is related to the dynamic derivative

  20. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  1. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-09-01

    Since the occurrence of dynamic instabilities is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider the dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study is to consider the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on the guideway which consists of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev system.

  2. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1994-05-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  3. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  4. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics. PMID:26907568

  5. Dynamic stability of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1992-04-01

    Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev systems, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The theory and analysis developed in this study identifies basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  6. Stabilization Strategies for Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Devjani J.; Morasso, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Background When humans are faced with an unstable task, two different stabilization mechanisms are possible: a high-stiffness strategy, based on the inherent elastic properties of muscles/tools/manipulated objects, or a low-stiffness strategy, based on an explicit positional feedback mechanism. Specific constraints related to the dynamics of the task and/or the neuromuscular system often force people to adopt one of these two strategies. Methodology/Findings This experiment was designed such that subjects could achieve stability using either strategy, with a marked difference in terms of effort and control requirements between the two strategies. The task was to balance a virtual mass in an unstable environment via two elastic linkages that connected the mass to each hand. The dynamics of the mass under the influence of the unstable force field and the forces applied through the linkages were simulated using a bimanual, planar robot. The two linkages were non-linear, with a stiffness that increased with the amount of stretch. The mass could be stabilized by stretching the linkages to achieve a stiffness that was greater than the instability coefficient of the unstable field (high-stiffness), or by balancing the mass with sequences of small force impulses (low-stiffness). The results showed that 62% of the subjects quickly adopted the high-stiffness strategy, with stiffness ellipses that were aligned along the direction of instability. The remaining subjects applied the low-stiffness strategy, with no clear preference for the orientation of the stiffness ellipse. Conclusions The choice of a strategy was based on the bimanual coordination of the hands: high-stiffness subjects achieved stability quickly by separating the hands to stretch the linkages, while the low-stiffness subjects kept the hands close together and took longer to achieve stability but with lower effort. We suggest that the existence of multiple solutions leads to different types of skilled behavior

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations on pars intercerebralis major peptide-C (PMP-C) reveal the role of glycosylation and disulfide bonds in its enhanced structural stability and function.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Sandeep; Mohanty, Debasisa; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2012-01-01

    Fucosylation of Thr 9 in pars intercerebralis major peptide-C (PMP-C) enhances its structural stability and functional ability as a serine protease inhibitor. In order to understand the role of disulfide bonds and glycosylation on the structure and function of PMP-C, we have carried out multiple explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on fucosylated and non-fucosylated forms of PMP-C, both in the presence and absence of the disulfide bonds. Our simulations revealed that there were no significant structural changes in the native disulfide bonded forms of PMP-C due to fucosylation. On the other hand, the non-fucosylated form of PMP-C without disulfide bonds showed larger deviations from the starting structure than the fucosylated form. However, the structural deviations were restricted to the terminal regions while core β-sheet retained its hydrogen bonded structure even in absence of disulfide bonds as well as fucosylation. Interestingly, fucosylation of disulfide bonded native PMP-C led to a decreased thermal flexibility in the residue stretch 29-32 which is known to interact with the active site of the target proteases. Our analysis revealed that disulfide bonds covalently connect the residue stretch 29-32 to the central β-sheet of PMP-C and using a novel network of side chain interactions and disulfide bonds fucosylation at Thr 9 is altering the flexibility of the stretch 29-32 located at a distal site. Thus, our simulations explain for the first time, how presence of disulfide bonds between conserved cysteines and fucosylation enhance the function of PMP-C as a protease inhibitor.

  8. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short period oscillation not including combined lateral-directional oscillations...

  9. Enhancement of calcium signalling dynamics and stability by delayed modulation of the plasma-membrane calcium-ATPase in human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Diana M; Hoth, Markus; Lewis, Richard S

    2002-01-01

    In addition to its homeostatic role of maintaining low resting levels of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), the plasma-membrane calcium-ATPase (PMCA) may actively contribute to the generation of complex Ca2+ signals. We have investigated the role of the PMCA in shaping Ca2+ signals in Jurkat human leukaemic T cells using single-cell voltage-clamp and calcium-imaging techniques. Crosslinking the T-cell receptor with the monoclonal antibody OKT3 induces a biphasic elevation in [Ca2+]i consisting of a rapid overshoot to a level > 1 μM, followed by a slow decay to a plateau of ≈0.5 μM. A similar overshoot was triggered by a constant level of Ca2+ influx through calcium-release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels in thapsigargin-treated cells, due to a delayed increase in the rate of Ca2+ clearance by the PMCA. Following a rise in [Ca2+]i, PMCA activity increased in two phases: a rapid increase followed by a further calcium-dependent increase of up to approximately fivefold over 10-60 s, termed modulation. After the return of [Ca2+]i to baseline levels, the PMCA recovered slowly from modulation (τ ≈4 min), effectively retaining a ‘memory’ of the previous [Ca2+]i elevation. Using a Michaelis-Menten model with appropriate corrections for cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffering, we found that modulation extended the dynamic range of PMCA activity by increasing both the maximal pump rate and Ca2+ sensitivity (reduction of KM). A simple flux model shows how pump modulation and its reversal produce the initial overshoot of the biphasic [Ca2+]i response. The modulation of PMCA activity enhanced the stability of Ca2+ signalling by adjusting the efflux rate to match influx through CRAC channels, even at high [Ca2+]i levels that saturate the transport sites and would otherwise render the cell defenceless against additional Ca2+ influx. At the same time, the delay in modulation enables small Ca2+ fluxes to transiently elevate [Ca2+]i, thus enhancing Ca2+ signalling dynamics. PMID:12068047

  10. Hybrid Control of Electric Vehicle Lateral Dynamics Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabti, Khatir; Bourahla, Mohamend; Mostefai, Lotfi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for motion control applied to driver stability system of an electric vehicle with independently driven wheels. By formulating the vehicle dynamics using an approximating the tire-force characteristics into piecewise affine functions, the vehicle dynamics cen be described as a linear hybrid dynamical system to design a hybrid model predictive controller. This controller is expected to make the yaw rate follow the reference ensuring the safety of the car passengers. The vehicle speed is estimated using a multi-sensor data fusion method. Simulation results in Matlab/Simulink have shown that the proposed control scheme takes advantages of electric vehicle and enhances the vehicle stability.

  11. Rational Design of Biobetters with Enhanced Stability.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Fabienne; Schneider, Curtiss P; Agrawal, Neeraj J; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2015-08-01

    Biotherapeutics are the fastest growing class of pharmaceutical with a rapidly evolving market facing the rise of biosimilar and biobetter products. In contrast to a biosimilar, which is derived from the same gene sequence as the innovator product, a biobetter has enhanced properties, such as enhanced efficacy or reduced immunogenicity. Little work has been carried out so far to increase the intrinsic stability of biotherapeutics via sequence changes, even though, aggregation, the primary degradation pathway of proteins, leads to issues ranging from manufacturing failure to immunological response and to loss of therapeutic activity. Using our spatial aggregation propensity tool as a first step to a rational design approach to identify aggregation-prone regions, biobetters of rituximab have been produced with enhanced stability by introducing site-specific mutations. Significant stabilization against aggregation was achieved for rituximab with no decrease in its binding affinity to the antigen.

  12. Thermal stability enhancement of rubbery ormosils

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.J.; Mackenzie, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Thermal stability of a novel rubbery ORMOSIL of condensed tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was investigated along with methods by which to improve this stability. Based upon literature review of siloxane systems, modifications of the base ORMOSIL system was made which included substitution of polydimethyldiphenylsiloxane (PDMDPS) for PDMS, adding antioxidant, and adding iron compounds. Relative enhancement was investigated in terms of resilience measurements, and was also analyzed with thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA).

  13. Report of the Stability and Dynamics Session

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Iwan; Chato, David; Collicott, Steven; Dadzic, Nihad; Duval, Walter; Garoff, Steven; Grayson, Gary; Hochstein, John; Kassemi, Mo; Nelson, Emily

    2003-01-01

    Important issues: Mass gauging; Stability dynamics of disconnected capillary surfaces; Slow capillary driven flow (i.e. wicking); Long-term material property evolution in micro-g; Dumping problem with freezing of dump lines.

  14. Can distributed delays perfectly stabilize dynamical networks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omi, Takahiro; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2008-04-01

    Signal transmission delays tend to destabilize dynamical networks leading to oscillation, but their dispersion contributes oppositely toward stabilization. We analyze an integrodifferential equation that describes the collective dynamics of a neural network with distributed signal delays. With the Γ distributed delays less dispersed than exponential distribution, the system exhibits reentrant phenomena, in which the stability is once lost but then recovered as the mean delay is increased. With delays dispersed more highly than exponential, the system never destabilizes.

  15. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  16. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic stability. 23.181 Section 23.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181...

  17. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short period... allowable speed appropriate to the configuration of the airplane must be heavily damped with the...

  18. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short period... allowable speed appropriate to the configuration of the airplane must be heavily damped with the...

  19. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short period... allowable speed appropriate to the configuration of the airplane must be heavily damped with the...

  20. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short period... allowable speed appropriate to the configuration of the airplane must be heavily damped with the...

  1. 14 CFR 25.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 25.181 Dynamic stability. (a) Any short period... allowable speed appropriate to the configuration of the airplane must be heavily damped with the...

  2. Stability and enhancement of berry juice color.

    PubMed

    Rein, Maarit J; Heinonen, Marina

    2004-05-19

    Attractive color is one of the main sensory characteristics of fruit and berry products. Unfortunately, the color of red juices is unstable and easily susceptible to degradation, leading to a dull and weak juice color. This study was designed to investigate the color stability and copigmentation of four different berry juices enhanced by phenolic acids and commercial color enhancers. Phenolic acid enrichment improved and stabilized the color of the berry juices during storage. The commercial color enhancers immediately produced an intensive color to the juices, which, however, was not very stable. The color enhancement was intensive in strawberry and raspberry juices and effective in lingonberry and cranberry juices. Sinapic acid induced the strongest color in strawberry juice. Ferulic and sinapic acids improved raspberry juice color equally. Rosmarinic acid enhanced the color of lingonberry and cranberry juices the most. The addition of the simple cinnamic acids produced novel peaks to the end of the high-performance liquid chromatography chromatogram, indicating a formation of new compounds. It can be assumed that sinapic and ferulic acids formed new intramolecular copigmentation compounds with berry anthocyanins whereas rosmarinic acid stabilized anthocyanins intermolecularly.

  3. Stability of Dynamical Systems with Discontinuous Motions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Anthony N.; Hou, Ling

    In this paper we present a stability theory for discontinuous dynamical systems (DDS): continuous-time systems whose motions are not necessarily continuous with respect to time. We show that this theory is not only applicable in the analysis of DDS, but also in the analysis of continuous dynamical systems (continuous-time systems whose motions are continuous with respect to time), discrete-time dynamical systems (systems whose motions are defined at discrete points in time) and hybrid dynamical systems (HDS) (systems whose descriptions involve simultaneously continuous-time and discrete-time). We show that the stability results for DDS are in general less conservative than the corresponding well-known classical Lyapunov results for continuous dynamical systems and discrete-time dynamical systems. Although the DDS stability results are applicable to general dynamical systems defined on metric spaces (divorced from any kind of description by differential equations, or any other kinds of equations), we confine ourselves to finite-dimensional dynamical systems defined by ordinary differential equations and difference equations, to make this paper as widely accessible as possible. We present only sample results, namely, results for uniform asymptotic stability in the large.

  4. Nutrient dynamics and food-web stability

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Mulholland, P.J.; Palumbo, A.V.; Steinman, A.D.; Huston, M.A.; Elwood, J.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The importance of nutrient limitation and recycling in ecosystems is widely recognized. Nutrients, defined in the broad sense as all material elements vital to biological functions, are in such small supply that they limit production in many ecosystems. Such limitation can affect ecosystem properties, including the structure and dynamics of the food webs that link species through their feeding relationships. What are the effects of limiting nutrients on the stability of ecosystem food webs Most of the literature on food web stability centers around the dynamics of population numbers and/or biomasses. Nevertheless, a growing body of theoretical and empirical research considers the role that both nutrient limitation and recycling can play in stability. In this paper, it is the authors objective to summarize the current understanding of several important types of stability. The theoretical and empirical evidence relating these types of stability and nutrient cycling is described. A central generalization is produced in each case.

  5. A Systematic Review of Interspinous Dynamic Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seon-Heui; Seol, Aram; Cho, Tae-Young; Kim, Soo-Young; Lim, Hyung-Mook

    2015-01-01

    Background A systematic literature review of interspinous dynamic stabilization, including DIAM, Wallis, Coflex, and X-STOP, was conducted to assess its safety and efficacy. Methods The search was done in Korean and English, by using eight domestic databases which included KoreaMed and international databases, such as Ovid Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. A total of 306 articles were identified, but the animal studies, preclinical studies, and studies that reported the same results were excluded. As a result, a total of 286 articles were excluded and the remaining 20 were included in the final assessment. Two assessors independently extracted data from these articles using predetermined selection criteria. Qualities of the articles included were assessed using Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). Results The complication rate of interspinous dynamic stabilization has been reported to be 0% to 32.3% in 3- to 41-month follow-up studies. The complication rate of combined interspinous dynamic stabilization and decompression treatment (32.3%) was greater than that of decompression alone (6.5%), but no complication that significantly affected treatment results was found. Interspinous dynamic stabilization produced slightly better clinical outcomes than conservative treatments for spinal stenosis. Good outcomes were also obtained in single-group studies. No significant difference in treatment outcomes was found, and the studies compared interspinous dynamic stabilization with decompression or fusion alone. Conclusions No particular problem was found regarding the safety of the technique. Its clinical outcomes were similar to those of conventional techniques, and no additional clinical advantage could be attributed to interspinous dynamic stabilization. However, few studies have been conducted on the long-term efficacy of interspinous dynamic stabilization. Thus, the authors suggest further clinical studies be conducted to validate the theoretical

  6. Enhanced stability of freestanding lipid bilayer and its stability criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Dae-Woong; Jang, Hyunwoo; Choi, Siyoung Q.; Choi, Myung Chul

    2016-12-01

    We present a new strategy to dramatically enhance the stability of freestanding lipid bilayers. We found that an addition of a water in oil emulsion stabilizer, SPAN 80 to a solvent phase guarantees nearly millimeter-scale stable freestanding lipid bilayers. The water permeability, bilayer area, contact angle, and interfacial tension were measured as a function of time and SPAN 80-to-lipid weight ratio (ΦSPAN 80) with several different solvents. Surprisingly, the SPAN 80, instead of remaining in the bilayer, was moved out of the bilayer during the bilayer formation. Also we studied the effect of solvent on freestanding bilayer formation, and found that squalene was the only solvent that was not incorporated into the bilayer. The regime of stable bilayer formation was experimentally determined to be 3/1 < ΦSPAN 80 < 15/1, and we suggest general stability criteria for bilayer formation. This technique and the suggested stability criteria can be potentially helpful to many model membrane-based researches in life sciences, physical sciences and biomedical engineering fields.

  7. Enhanced stability of freestanding lipid bilayer and its stability criteria

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Dae-Woong; Jang, Hyunwoo; Choi, Siyoung Q.; Choi, Myung Chul

    2016-01-01

    We present a new strategy to dramatically enhance the stability of freestanding lipid bilayers. We found that an addition of a water in oil emulsion stabilizer, SPAN 80 to a solvent phase guarantees nearly millimeter-scale stable freestanding lipid bilayers. The water permeability, bilayer area, contact angle, and interfacial tension were measured as a function of time and SPAN 80-to-lipid weight ratio (ΦSPAN 80) with several different solvents. Surprisingly, the SPAN 80, instead of remaining in the bilayer, was moved out of the bilayer during the bilayer formation. Also we studied the effect of solvent on freestanding bilayer formation, and found that squalene was the only solvent that was not incorporated into the bilayer. The regime of stable bilayer formation was experimentally determined to be 3/1 < ΦSPAN 80 < 15/1, and we suggest general stability criteria for bilayer formation. This technique and the suggested stability criteria can be potentially helpful to many model membrane-based researches in life sciences, physical sciences and biomedical engineering fields. PMID:27982049

  8. Unifying dynamical and structural stability of equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoldi, Jean-François; Haegeman, Bart

    2016-09-01

    We exhibit a fundamental relationship between measures of dynamical and structural stability of linear dynamical systems-e.g. linearized models in the vicinity of equilibria. We show that dynamical stability, quantified via the response to external perturbations (i.e. perturbation of dynamical variables), coincides with the minimal internal perturbation (i.e. perturbations of interactions between variables) able to render the system unstable. First, by reformulating a result of control theory, we explain that harmonic external perturbations reflect the spectral sensitivity of the Jacobian matrix at the equilibrium, with respect to constant changes of its coefficients. However, for this equivalence to hold, imaginary changes of the Jacobian's coefficients have to be allowed. The connection with dynamical stability is thus lost for real dynamical systems. We show that this issue can be avoided, thus recovering the fundamental link between dynamical and structural stability, by considering stochastic noise as external and internal perturbations. More precisely, we demonstrate that a linear system's response to white-noise perturbations directly reflects the intensity of internal white-noise disturbance that it can accommodate before becoming stochastically unstable.

  9. U31: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Electronic Stability Control

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Delorenzis, Damon; LaClair, Tim J; Lim, Alvin; Pape, Doug

    2011-01-01

    A team led by NTRCI is working to improve the roll and yaw stability of heavy duty combination trucks through developing stability algorithms, assembling demonstration hardware, and investigating robust wireless communication. Modern electronic stability control (ESC) products automatically slow a vehicle rounding a corner too quickly or apply individual brakes when necessary to improve the steering characteristics of a vehicle. Air brake systems in North America provide no electronic communication between a tractor and semitrailer, limiting the degree to which control systems can be optimized. Prior research has demonstrated stability improvements where dynamic measurements and control commands are communicated between units of a vehicle. Three related activities were undertaken: (1) Develop an algorithm for the optimum yaw and roll control of a combination vehicle. Vehicle state parameters needed to control the vehicle and the proper brake response were determined. An integrated stability control for the tractor and semitrailer requires communication between the two units. Dynamic models were used to assess the algorithm. (2) Implement the ESC algorithm in the laboratory. Hardware components suitable for the harsh environment for measurement, sensor-to-controller communication, and semitrailer-to-tractor communication and brake actuation were specified and assembled as a working system. The goal was to collect the needed vehicle state information, transmit the information to the ESC system, and then actuate the brakes in response to controller commands. (3) Develop a wireless network with the data rate and reliability necessary to communicate dynamic signals for a vehicle stability control system. Adaptive connectivity-aware, multi-hop routing was selected because it can perform in the harsh environment where packet collisions and fading often will exist. The protocol is to give high priority to urgent messages.

  10. Mechanical stability of trees under dynamic loads.

    PubMed

    James, Kenneth R; Haritos, Nicholas; Ades, Peter K

    2006-10-01

    Tree stability in windstorms and tree failure are important issues in urban areas where there can be risks of damage to people and property and in forests where wind damage causes economic loss. Current methods of managing trees, including pruning and assessment of mechanical strength, are mainly based on visual assessment or the experience of people such as trained arborists. Only limited data are available to assess tree strength and stability in winds, and most recent methods have used a static approach to estimate loads. Recent research on the measurement of dynamic wind loads and the effect on tree stability is giving a better understanding of how different trees cope with winds. Dynamic loads have been measured on trees with different canopy shapes and branch structures including a palm (Washingtonia robusta), a slender Italian cypress (Cupressus sempervirens) and trees with many branches and broad canopies including hoop pine (Araucaria cunninghamii) and two species of eucalypt (Eucalyptus grandis, E. teretecornus). Results indicate that sway is not a harmonic, but is very complex due to the dynamic interaction of branches. A new dynamic model of a tree is described, incorporating the dynamic structural properties of the trunk and branches. The branch mass contributes a dynamic damping, termed mass damping, which acts to reduce dangerous harmonic sway motion of the trunk and so minimizes loads and increases the mechanical stability of the tree. The results from 12 months of monitoring sway motion and wind loading forces are presented and discussed.

  11. Role of the bile salt surfactant sodium cholate in enhancing the aqueous dispersion stability of single-walled carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shangchao; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2010-12-02

    Very recently, bile salt biosurfactants have been utilized extensively to disperse individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous solution with high weight fractions, as well as to sort SWNTs according to their electronic properties with the aid of ultracentrifugation. To help elucidate the role of bile salts in the SWNT dispersion process, we report the first detailed large-scale all-atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study of the adsorption and surface self-assembly of a common bile salt surfactant, sodium cholate (SC), on a SWNT in aqueous solution. We find that the cholate ions wrap around the SWNT like a ring and have a small tendency to orient perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of the SWNT, a unique feature that has not been observed for conventional linear surfactants such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). In addition, we carry out a series of simulations to compute the potential of mean force (PMF) between two parallel SC-covered SWNTs as a function of the intertube separation. By comparing our simulated PMF profile of SC with the PMF profile of SDS reported in the literature, we found that, at the saturated surface coverages, SC is a better stabilizer than SDS, a finding that is consistent with the widespread use of SC to disperse SWNTs in aqueous media. Indeed, the superior dispersion-induced stability of SC over SDS results from a higher repulsive energy barrier and a shallower attractive energy well induced by SC in the PMF profile. In particular, we found that the shallower attractive energy well induced by SC is due to the rigid, bean-like structure of SC which allows this bile salt surfactant to more effectively accommodate the intertube gap.

  12. Enhanced Product Stability in the Hammerhead Ribozyme†

    PubMed Central

    Shepotinovskaya, Irina; Uhlenbeck, Olke C.

    2010-01-01

    The rate of dissociation of P1, the 5′ product of hammerhead cleavage, is 100–300-fold slower in full-length hammerheads than in hammerheads that either lack or have disrupting mutations in the loop-loop tertiary interaction. The added stability requires the presence of residue 17 at the 3′ terminus of P1 but not the 2′, 3′ terminal phosphate. Since residue 17 is buried within the catalytic core of the hammerhead in the x-ray structure, we propose that the enhanced P1 stability is the result of the cooperative folding of the hammerhead around this residue. However, since the P1 is fully stabilized above 2.5 mM MgCl2 while hammerhead activity continues to increase with increasing MgCl2, it is clear that the hammerhead structure in the transition state must differ from that of the product complex. The product stabilization assay is used to test our earlier proposal that different tertiary interactions modulate the cleavage rate by differentially stabilizing the core. PMID:20423112

  13. Dynamic stability of electrodynamic maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Rote, D.M.

    1997-01-01

    Because dynamic instabilities are not acceptable in any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider dynamic instability in the development of all maglev systems. This study considers the stability of maglev systems based on mathematical models and experimental data. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis for motion-dependent magnetic-force-induced instability developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  14. Enhanced Mechanical Stability of Gold Nanotips through Carbon Nanocone Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Cano-Marquez, Abraham G.; Schmidt, Wesller G.; Ribeiro-Soares, Jenaina; Gustavo Cançado, Luiz; Rodrigues, Wagner N.; Santos, Adelina P.; Furtado, Clascidia A.; Autreto, Pedro A.S.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Jorio, Ado

    2015-01-01

    Gold is a noble metal that, in comparison with silver and copper, has the advantage of corrosion resistance. Despite its high conductivity, chemical stability and biocompatibility, gold exhibits high plasticity, which limits its applications in some nanodevices. Here, we report an experimental and theoretical study on how to attain enhanced mechanical stability of gold nanotips. The gold tips were fabricated by chemical etching and further encapsulated with carbon nanocones via nanomanipulation. Atomic force microscopy experiments were carried out to test their mechanical stability. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the encapsulated nanocone changes the strain release mechanisms at the nanoscale by blocking gold atomic sliding, redistributing the strain along the whole nanostructure. The carbon nanocones are conducting and can induce magnetism, thus opening new avenues on the exploitation of transport, mechanical and magnetic properties of gold covered by sp2 carbon at the nanoscale. PMID:26083864

  15. Enhanced stabilization of collagen by furfural.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Rachita; Kiran, Manikantan Syamala; Usha, Ramamoorthy; Mohan, Ranganathan; Sundaresan, Raja; Korrapati, Purna Sai

    2014-04-01

    Furfural (2-furancarboxaldehyde), a product derived from plant pentosans, has been investigated for its interaction with collagen. Introduction of furfural during fibril formation enhanced the thermal and mechanical stability of collagen. Collagen films treated with furfural exhibited higher denaturation temperature (Td) (p<0.04) and showed a 3-fold increase in Young's modulus (p<0.04) at higher concentration. Furfural and furfural treated collagen films did not have any cytotoxic effect. Rheological characterization showed an increase in shear stress and shear viscosity with increasing shear rate for treated collagen. Circular dichroism (CD) studies indicated that the furfural did not have any impact on triple helical structure of collagen. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of furfural treated collagen exhibited small sized porous structure in comparison with untreated collagen. Thus this study provides an alternate ecologically safe crosslinking agent for improving the stability of collagen for biomedical and industrial applications.

  16. Nanojets: Electrification, Energetics, Dynamics, Stability and Breakup

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    20/2007 FINAL 02/15/2004-12/31/2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Nanojets: Electrification , Energetics, Dynamics, Stability and Breakup...NUMBER finclude area code)UUU64 404.894.3368 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI SId. Z39.18 FINAL REPORT Nanojets: Electrification

  17. DYNAMIC LANDSCAPES, STABILITY AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The image of a ball rolling along a series of hills and valleys is an effective heuristic by which to communicate stability concepts in ecology. However, the dynamics of this landscape model have little to do with ecological systems. Other landscape representations, however, are ...

  18. Dynamic stabilization of an optomechanical oscillator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-20

    focus on these issues, including the role of quantum noise, includ- ing shot noise and radiation pressure noise, and bipartite entanglement ...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Quantum optomechanics offers the potential to investigate quantum effects in macroscopic quantum systems in extremely well...quantumoptomechanics, macroscopic quantum system, dynamic stabilization, Kapitza pendulum REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S

  19. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Stability § 23.181 Dynamic... to meet the flight characteristic requirements of this part, the primary control requirements of... suddenly released, the response of the airplane must not exhibit any dangerous characteristics nor be...

  20. DYNAMIC LANDSCAPES, STABILITY AND ECOLOGICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The image of a ball rolling along a series of hills and valleys is an effective heuristic by which to communicate stability concepts in ecology. However, the dynamics of this landscape model have little to do with ecological systems. Other landscape representations, however, are ...

  1. Ceramic membranes with enhanced thermal stability

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Marc A.; Xu, Qunyin; Bischoff, Brian L.

    1993-01-01

    A method of creating a ceramic membrane with enhanced thermal stability is disclosed. The method involves combining quantities of a first metal alkoxide with a second metal, the quantities selected to give a preselected metal ratio in the resultant membrane. A limited amount of water and acid is added to the combination and stirred until a colloidal suspension is formed. The colloid is dried to a gel, and the gel is fired at a temperature greater than approximately 400.degree. C. The porosity and surface area of ceramic membranes formed by this method are not adversely affected by this high temperature firing.

  2. Estimating Gait Stability: Asymmetrical Loading Effects Measured Using Margin of Stability and Local Dynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Worden, Timothy A; Beaudette, Shawn M; Brown, Stephen H M; Vallis, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    Changes to intersegmental locomotor control patterns may affect body stability. Our study aimed to (a) characterize upper body dynamic stability in response to the unilateral addition of mass to the lower extremity and (b) evaluate the efficacy of 2 different stability measures commonly used in the literature to detect resulting symmetrical step pattern modifications across the weighted segments (spatial) and between epochs of the gait cycle (temporal). Young adults walked on a treadmill while unloaded or with weights applied unilaterally to their foot, shank, or thigh. Both margin of stability and local dynamic stability (LDS) estimates detected similar trends of distal segment weighting resulting in more unstable upper body movement compared to proximal weighting; however only LDS detected anteroposterior changes in upper body stability over time.

  3. Multiple diversity-stability mechanisms enhance population and community stability in aquatic food webs.

    PubMed

    Downing, Amy L; Brown, Bryan L; Leibold, Mathew A

    2014-01-01

    Biodiversity has been shown to increase the temporal stability of community and ecosystem attributes through multiple mechanisms, but these same mechanisms make less consistent predictions about the effects of richness on population stability. The overall effects of biodiversity on population and community stability will therefore depend on the dominant mechanisms that are likely to vary with the nature of biodiversity loss and the degree of environmental variability. We conducted a mesocosm experiment in which we generated a gradient in zooplankton species richness by directly manipulating dominant species and by allowing/preventing immigration from a metacommunity. The mesocosms were maintained under either constant or variable nutrient environments. Population, community, and ecosystem data were collected for five months. We found that zooplankton population and community stability is enhanced in species-rich communities in both constant and variable environments. Species richness increased primarily through the addition of species with low abundance. The communities that were connected to a metacommunity via immigration were the most diverse and the most stable, indicating the importance of both metacommunity dynamics and rare species for stability. We found little evidence for selection effects or overyielding as stabilizing forces. We did find support for asynchronous dynamics and statistical averaging, both of which predict destabilizing effects at the population level. We also found support for weak interactions, which predicts that both populations and communities will become more stable as richness increases. In order to understand the effects of biodiversity loss on stability, we will need to understand when different stabilizing mechanisms tend to operate but also how multiple mechanisms interact.

  4. Insect flight dynamics: Stability and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mao

    2014-04-01

    Insects can hover, fly forward, climb, and descend with ease while demonstrating amazing stability, and they can also maneuver in impressive ways as no other organisms can. Is their flight inherently stable? If so, how can they maneuver so well? In recent years, significant progress has been made in revealing the dynamic flight stability and flight control mechanisms of insects and has partially answered these questions. Here the most recent advances in this active area are reviewed. The aim is to provide the background necessary to do research in the area and raise questions that need to be addressed in the future. This review begins with an overview of the flapping kinematics and aerodynamics of insect flight. It is followed by a summary of the governing equations of insect motion and the simplified theoretical models used for analysis of dynamic stability and control. Next, the stability properties of hovering flight and forward flight are scrutinized. Then the flight control properties are explored, dealing in turn with flight stabilization control, steady-state control for changing from hovering to forward flight and from one forward-flight speed to another, and control for maneuvers near hovering. Finally, remarks are given on the state of the art of this research field and speculation is made on its outlook in the near future.

  5. Dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Rote, D.M.; Coffey, H.T.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic response of maglev systems is important in several respects: Safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. The dynamic response of vehicles is the key element in the determination of ride quality, and vehicle stability is one of the important elements relative to safety. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, the vehicle dynamics must be understood. The trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. This paper is a summary of our previous work on dynamics, stability and control of maglev systems. First of all, the importance of dynamics of vehicle/guideway of maglev systems is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the modeling vehicle/guideway interactions of maglev systems with a multicar, or multiload vehicle traversing on a single or double-span flexible guideway. Coupled effects of vehicle/guideway interactions in wide range of vehicle speeds with various vehicle and guideway parameters for maglev systems are investigated. Secondly, the alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems are investigated in this study to achieve safe, stable operation and acceptable ride comfort requires some form of vehicle motion control. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. Finally, this paper discusses the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  6. Dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S. S.; Rote, D. M.; Coffey, H. T.

    The dynamic response of maglev systems is important in several respects: Safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. The dynamic response of vehicles is the key element in the determination of ride quality, and vehicle stability is one of the important elements relative to safety. To design a proper guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, the vehicle dynamics must be understood. The trade-off between guideway smoothness and the levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. This paper is a summary of our previous work on dynamics, stability, and control of maglev systems. First of all, the importance of dynamics of vehicle/guideway of maglev systems is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the modeling vehicle/guideway interactions of maglev systems with a multicar, or multiload vehicle traversing on a single or double-span flexible guideway. Coupled effects of vehicle/guideway interactions in wide range of vehicle speeds with various vehicle and guideway parameters for maglev systems are investigated. Secondly, the alternative control designs of maglev vehicle suspension systems are investigated in this study to achieve safe, stable operation and acceptable ride comfort requires some form of vehicle motion control. Active and semi-active control law designs are introduced into primary and secondary suspensions of maglev vehicles. Finally, this paper discusses the stability of maglev systems based on experimental data, scoping calculations, and simple mathematical models. Divergence and flutter are obtained for coupled vibration of a three-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments. The theory and analysis developed in this study provides basic stability characteristics and identifies future research needs for maglev systems.

  7. Stability threshold approach for complex dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A new measure to characterize the stability of complex dynamical systems against large perturbations is suggested, the stability threshold (ST). It quantifies the magnitude of the weakest perturbation capable of disrupting the system and switch it to an undesired dynamical regime. In the phase space, the ST corresponds to the ‘thinnest site’ of the attraction basin and therefore indicates the most ‘dangerous’ direction of perturbations. We introduce a computational algorithm for quantification of the ST and demonstrate that the suggested approach is effective and provides important insights. The generality of the obtained results defines their vast potential for application in such fields as engineering, neuroscience, power grids, Earth science and many others where the robustness of complex systems is studied.

  8. Topological stabilization for synchronized dynamics on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencetti, Giulia; Bagnoli, Franco; Battistelli, Giorgio; Chisci, Luigi; Di Patti, Francesca; Fanelli, Duccio

    2017-01-01

    A general scheme is proposed and tested to control the symmetry breaking instability of a homogeneous solution of a spatially extended multispecies model, defined on a network. The inherent discreteness of the space makes it possible to act on the topology of the inter-nodes contacts to achieve the desired degree of stabilization, without altering the dynamical parameters of the model. Both symmetric and asymmetric couplings are considered. In this latter setting the web of contacts is assumed to be balanced, for the homogeneous equilibrium to exist. The performance of the proposed method are assessed, assuming the Complex Ginzburg-Landau equation as a reference model. In this case, the implemented control allows one to stabilize the synchronous limit cycle, hence time-dependent, uniform solution. A system of coupled real Ginzburg-Landau equations is also investigated to obtain the topological stabilization of a homogeneous and constant fixed point.

  9. Parachute Dynamic Stability Variations Due to Atmospheric Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginn, J. M.; Braun, R. D.; Clark, I. G.

    2014-06-01

    Apparent inertia effects on parachute dynamics are investigated. Both static and dynamic stability are examined as a function of apparent inertia parameters. Conclusions are drawn describing changes in stability based on atmospheric density.

  10. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed from.... Ground and Water Handling Characteristics ...

  11. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed from.... Ground and Water Handling Characteristics ...

  12. Superamphiphobic cotton fabrics with enhanced stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bi; Ding, Yinyan; Qu, Shaobo; Cai, Zaisheng

    2015-11-01

    Superamphiphobic cotton fabrics were prepared by alternately depositing organically modified silica alcogel (ormosil) particles onto chitosan precoated cotton fabrics and subsequent 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctyltrimethoxysilane (PFOTMS) modification. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy images reveal that the ormosil particles display a fluffy, sponge-like nanoporous structure, and the entire cotton fiber surface is covered with highly porous networks. PFOTMS acts as not only a modifier to lower the surface energy of the cotton fabric but also a binder to enhance the coating stability against abrasion and washing. The treated cotton fabrics show highly liquid repellency with the water, cooking oil and hexadecane contact angels reaching to 164.4°, 160.1° and 156.3°, respectively. Meanwhile, the treated cotton fabrics exhibit good abrasion resistance and high laundering durability, which can withstand 10,000 cycles of abrasion and 30 cycles of machine wash without apparently changing the superamphiphobicity. The superamphiphobic cotton fabric also shows high acid stability, and can withstand 98% H2SO4. Moreover, the superamphiphobic coating has almost no influence on the other physical properties of the cotton fabrics including tensile strength, whiteness and air permeability. This durable non-wetting surface may provide a wide range of new applications in the future.

  13. Photovoltaic panel having enhanced conversion efficiency stability

    SciTech Connect

    Cannella, V. D.

    1985-10-01

    A photovoltaic panel for converting light into electrical energy has enhanced energy conversion efficiency stability. The panel includes a photovoltaic device having an active region formed from a semiconductor material which exhibits an energy conversion efficiency stability directly related to the operating temperature of the device. The panel also includes means for maintaining the operating temperature of the device upon exposure to light at an elevated temperature above the ambient temperature external to the device. The active region semiconductor material is preferably an amorphous semiconductor alloy such as, for example, an amorphous silicon alloy. The operating temperature elevating means can include a thermal insulating material such as glass wool, styrofoam, or cork applied to the back side of the device to minimize heat conduction from the device. The panel can also include an enclosure for enclosing the device having a transparent cover overlying the device to seal the enclosure and provide a still air space adjacent the device. The panel is thereby arranged to maintain the operating temperature of the device at a temperature which is from about twenty degrees Centigrade to about one hundred and fifty degrees Centigrade above the ambient temperature external to the device.

  14. Dynamical stability of nascent neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuk Tung

    This thesis presents a study of the dynamical stability of nascent neutron stars resulting from the accretion induced collapse of rapidly rotating white dwarfs. Chapter 2 and part of Chapter 3 study the equilibrium models for these neutron stars. They are constructed by assuming that the neutron stars have the same masses, angular momenta, and specific angular momentum distributions as the pre-collapse white dwarfs. If the pre-collapse white dwarf is rapidly rotating, the collapsed object will contain a high density central core of size about 20 km, surrounded by a massive accretion torus extending to hundreds of kilometers from the rotation axis. The ratio of the rotational kinetic energy to gravitational binding energy, β, of these neutron stars is all found to be less than 0.27. Chapter 3 studies the dynamical stability of these neutron stars by numerically evolving the linearized hydrodynamical equations. A dynamical bar-mode instability is observed when the β of the star is greater than the critical value β d ≈ 0.25. It is expected that the unstable mode will persist until a substantial amount of angular momentum is carried away by gravitational radiation. The detectability of these sources is studied and it is estimated that LIGO II is unlikely to detect them unless the event rate is greater than 10-6/year/galaxy. All the calculations on the structure and stability of the neutron stars in Chapters 2 and 3 are carried out using Newtonian hydrodynamics and gravity. Chapter 4 studies the relativistic effects on the structure of these neutron stars. New techniques are developed and used to construct neutron star models to the first post- Newtonian (1PN) order. The structures of the ON models are qualitatively similar to the corresponding Newtonian models, but the values of β are somewhat smaller. The maximum β for these ON neutron stars is found to be 0.24, which is 8% smaller than the Newtonian result (0.26). However, relativistic effects will also change

  15. Computational stability analysis of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishkov, Yuri Gennadievich

    2000-10-01

    Due to increased available computer power, the analysis of nonlinear flexible multi-body systems, fixed-wing aircraft and rotary-wing vehicles is relying on increasingly complex, large scale models. An important aspect of the dynamic response of flexible multi-body systems is the potential presence of instabilities. Stability analysis is typically performed on simplified models with the smallest number of degrees of freedom required to capture the physical phenomena that cause the instability. The system stability boundaries are then evaluated using the characteristic exponent method or Floquet theory for systems with constant or periodic coefficients, respectively. As the number of degrees of freedom used to represent the system increases, these methods become increasingly cumbersome, and quickly unmanageable. In this work, a novel approach is proposed, the Implicit Floquet Analysis, which evaluates the largest eigenvalues of the transition matrix using the Arnoldi algorithm, without the explicit computation of this matrix. This method is far more computationally efficient than the classical approach and is ideally suited for systems involving a large number of degrees of freedom. The proposed approach is conveniently implemented as a postprocessing step to any existing simulation tool. The application of the method to a geometrically nonlinear multi-body dynamics code is presented. This work also focuses on the implementation of trimming algorithms and the development of tools for the graphical representation of numerical simulations and stability information for multi-body systems.

  16. Longitudinal dynamic stability of a shuttle vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinh, N. X.; Laitone, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical study of the longitudinal dynamic stability of a nonrolling, lifting vehicle gliding at hypersonic speeds. The analysis applies to shuttle vehicles designed for operating up to the rim of a planetary atmosphere. A general nondimensional time transformation is introduced to derive a unified second-order linear differential equation for the angle of attack, valid for all types of reentry of a general type of vehicle. The stability of motion is discussed for two fundamental regimes of flight that are based on widely different assumptions. For near ballistic entry along a straight line trajectory, the equation reduces to a confluent hypergeometric equation, the solution of which can be expressed in terms of Whittaker's function. Using a theorem in the theory of stability of differential equations, criteria for damped oscillations are derived. It is shown that the aerodynamic criteria for stability are the same as for the case of ballistic entry. In addition, for each vehicle configuration, and specified planetary atmosphere, there exists an altitude range where the angle of attack frequency is nearly equal to the orbital frequency causing instability in pitch. This resonance instability is due to the ellipticity of the orbit. Criteria for eccentricity instability are derived.

  17. Switching quantum dynamics for fast stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaramuzza, Pierre; Ticozzi, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Control strategies for dissipative preparation of target quantum states, both pure and mixed, and subspaces are obtained by switching between a set of available semigroup generators. We show that the class of problems of interest can be recast, from a control-theoretic perspective, into a switched-stabilization problem for linear dynamics. This is attained by a suitable affine transformation of the coherence-vector representation. In particular, we propose and compare stabilizing time-based and state-based switching rules for entangled state preparation, showing that the latter not only ensure faster convergence with respect to nonswitching methods, but can be designed so that they retain robustness with respect to initialization, as long as the target is a pure state or a subspace.

  18. Isomers and Enhanced Stability of Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondev, Filip; Anl, Lbnl, Anu, Csnsm, Llnl, Usna, U. Of Edinburgh, U. Of Jyväskylä, U. Of Massachusetts, Lowell Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    There has been continuing activity addressing the complex question of whether excited isomeric states would lead to enhanced stability of superheavy nuclei, given changes in the fission barriers, α-decay probabilities and the effects of nuclear structure (such as K-hindrance). Recently, we have carried out new studies of the 254Rf isotope using the 50Ti + 206Pb reaction at Argonne National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A digital data acquisition system was deployed in both experiments, which allowed the identification of implant and decay events that were separated by time as short as hundreds of nanoseconds. Two isomeric states were discovered in 254Rf with half-lives of ~4 μs and ~300 μs, the latter being an order of magnitude longer lived than the ground state. In addition, K-isomers in 244Cm and 246Cm were also studied following β- decays of 244Am (Kπ = 6+) and 246Am (Kπ = 7-) mass-separated sources, respectively. The emphasis was on elucidating details of the level schemes, which allowed reliable values for the strength of the K-forbidden transitions to be determined and compared with systematics in other regions of the nuclear chart. There has been continuing activity addressing the complex question of whether excited isomeric states would lead to enhanced stability of superheavy nuclei, given changes in the fission barriers, α-decay probabilities and the effects of nuclear structure (such as K-hindrance). Recently, we have carried out new studies of the 254Rf isotope using the 50Ti + 206Pb reaction at Argonne National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A digital data acquisition system was deployed in both experiments, which allowed the identification of implant and decay events that were separated by time as short as hundreds of nanoseconds. Two isomeric states were discovered in 254Rf with half-lives of ~4 μs and ~300 μs, the latter being an order of magnitude longer lived than the ground state. In

  19. Beam stability & nonlinear dynamics. Formal report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    his Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on Beam Stability and Nonlinear Dynamics, December 3-5, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  20. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  1. Dynamic and galvanic stability of stretchable supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Gu, Taoli; Wei, Bingqing

    2012-12-12

    Stretchable electronics are emerging as a new technological advancement, since they can be reversibly stretched while maintaining functionality. To power stretchable electronics, rechargeable and stretchable energy storage devices become a necessity. Here, we demonstrate a facile and scalable fabrication of full stretchable supercapacitor, using buckled single-walled carbon nanotube macrofilms as the electrodes, an electrospun membrane of elastomeric polyurethane as the separator, and an organic electrolyte. We examine the electrochemical performance of the fully stretchable supercapacitors under dynamic stretching/releasing modes in different stretching strain rates, which reveal the true performance of the stretchable cells, compared to the conventional method of testing the cells under a statically stretched state. In addition, the self-discharge of the supercapacitor and the electrochemical behavior under bending mode are also examined. The stretchable supercapacitors show excellent cyclic stability under electrochemical charge/discharge during in situ dynamic stretching/releasing.

  2. Stochastic Dynamics Underlying Cognitive Stability and Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ueltzhöffer, Kai; Armbruster-Genç, Diana J. N.; Fiebach, Christian J.

    2015-01-01

    dopaminergic modulation of cognitive flexibility. These results show that stochastic dynamical systems can implement the basic computations underlying cognitive stability and flexibility and explain neurobiological bases of individual differences. PMID:26068119

  3. Stability precision dynamic testing system on artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Li, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic feature of Weapon equipments is one of important performance index for evaluating the performance of the whole weapon system. The construction of target range in our country in fire control dynamic testing is relatively backward; therefore, it has greatly influenced the evaluation on the fire control system. In order to solve this problem, it's urgent to develop a new testing instrument so as to adjust to the armament research process and promote weapon system working more efficiently and thereby meeting the needs of modernization in national defense. This paper proposes a new measure which is used to test the stability precision of the fire control system, and it is installed on the moving base. Using the method, we develop a testing system which can test the stability precision of the fire control system and achieve a high precision results after testing. The innovation of the system is we can receive the image not only by CCD, but our eyes. It also adopts digital image-forming and image processing technique for real-time measurement and storing of the target information; it simultaneously adopts the method adjusting the platform and the corresponding fixture mounted on a sample to measure the stable precision and the precision of corner of stabilizator. In this paper, we make a description on the construction of the system and the idea of the designing of the optical system. Finally, we introduce the actual application of the system and testing results.

  4. Assembly, stability and dynamics of virus capsids.

    PubMed

    Mateu, Mauricio G

    2013-03-01

    Most viruses use a hollow protein shell, the capsid, to enclose the viral genome. Virus capsids are large, symmetric oligomers made of many copies of one or a few types of protein subunits. Self-assembly of a viral capsid is a complex oligomerization process that proceeds along a pathway regulated by ordered interactions between the participating protein subunits, and that involves a series of (usually transient) assembly intermediates. Assembly of many virus capsids requires the assistance of scaffolding proteins or the viral nucleic acid, which interact with the capsid subunits to promote and direct the process. Once assembled, many capsids undergo a maturation reaction that involves covalent modification and/or conformational rearrangements, which may increase the stability of the particle. The final, mature capsid is a relatively robust protein complex able to protect the viral genome from physicochemical aggressions; however, it is also a metastable, dynamic structure poised to undergo controlled conformational transitions required to perform biologically critical functions during virus entry into cells, intracellular trafficking, and viral genome uncoating. This article provides an updated general overview on structural, biophysical and biochemical aspects of the assembly, stability and dynamics of virus capsids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Peroneal Muscles Fatigue on Dynamic Stability Following Lateral Hop Landing: Time to Stabilization vs. Dynamic Postural Stability Index.

    PubMed

    Malmir, Kazem; Olyaei, Gholam Reza; Talebian, Saeed; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Ganguie, Majid Ashraf

    2017-07-17

    Dynamic stability is a necessary requirement in many sports competitions. Muscle fatigue, which can impair stability, may be occurred in many sports competitions in which lateral movements and landing repeated frequently. To assess the effects of peroneal muscles fatigue on dynamic stability following lateral hop landing through measuring time to stabilization (TTS) and dynamic postural stability index (DPSI). Quasi-experimental. Laboratory study. Twenty recreationally active, healthy males with no lower extremity injury during the previous six months. Participants performed a lateral hop on a force plate before and immediately after a fatigue intervention using a Biodex dynamometer. For inducing fatigue, the participant made a prolonged eversion effort with 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction. Fatigue was met when the eversion torque declined by 50% of the initial value. TTS and DPSI were calculated using sequential averaging method and relevant formulas, respectively. Pre- and post-measures of TTS in the anteroposterior, mediolateral and vertical directions, resultant vector of TTS, stability indices in the anteroposterior, mediolateral and vertical directions and DPSI. Means of the DPSI or its components did not change significantly due to fatigue (p>0.05). Means of the TTS in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions, and the mean of the resultant vector of the TTS increased significantly after fatigue (p<0.05). The question that the dynamic stability is affected or not affected by fatigue depends on which of the TTS or DPSI is used for analysis. The TTS may be a sensitive measure to detect subtle changes in postural stability due to fatigue. But, the DPSI which may be changed after a more strenuous fatigue may be related to actual fatiguing situations.

  6. Sheared Rotation Effects on Kinetic Stability in Enhanced Confinement Tokamak Plasmas, and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fluctuations and Flows in Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-11-01

    Sheared rotation dynamics are widely believed to have signficant influence on experimentally observed confinement transitions in advanced operating modes in major tokamak experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [D.J. Grove and D.M. Meade, Nuclear Fusion 25, 1167 (1985)], with reversed magnetic shear regions in the plasma interior. The high-n toroidal drift modes destabilized by the combined effects of ion temperature gradients and trapped particles in toroidal geometry can be strongly affected by radially sheared toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. In previous work with the FULL linear microinstability code, a simplified rotation model including only toroidal rotation was employed, and results were obtained. Here, a more complete rotation model, that includes contributions from toroidal and poloidal rotation and the ion pressure gradient to the total radial electric field, is used for a proper self-consistent treatment of this key problem. Relevant advanced operating mode cases for TFTR are presented. In addition, the complementary problem of the dynamics of fluctuation-driven E x B flow is investigated by an integrated program of gyrokinetic simulation in annulus geometry and gyrofluid simulation in flux tube geometry.

  7. Sheared Rotation Effects on Kinetic Stability in Enhanced Confinement Tokamak Plasmas, and Nonlinear Dynamics of Fluctuations and Flows in Axisymmetric Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rewoldt, G.; Beer, M.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-12-01

    Sheared rotation dynamics are widely believed to have significant influence on experimentally observed confinement transitions in advanced operating modes in major tokamak experiments, such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with reversed magnetic shear regions in the plasma interior. The high-n toroidal drift modes destabilized by the combined effects of ion temperature gradients and trapped particles in toroidal geometry can be strongly affected by radially sheared toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation. In previous work with the FULL linear microinstability code, a simplified rotation model including only toroidal rotation was employed, and results were obtained. Here, a more complete rotation model, that includes contributions from toroidal and poloidal rotation and the ion pressure gradient to the total radial electric field, is used for a proper self-consistent treatment of this key problem. Relevant advanced operating mode cases for TFTR are presented. In addition, the complementary problem of the dynamics of fluctuation-driven E x B flow is investigated by an integrated program of gyrokinetic simulation in annulus geometry and gyrofluid simulation in flux tube geometry.

  8. Homeochaos: dynamics stability of a symbiotic network with population dynamics and evolving mutation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Ikegami, Takashi

    1992-06-01

    Evolution of mutation rates is studied, in a population model with mutation of species coded by bit sequences and mutation rates. Even without interaction among species, the mutation rate is initially enhanced to search for fitted species and then is lowered towards zero. This enhancement opens a possibility of automatic simulated annealing. With the interaction among species (hosts versus parasites), high mutation rates are sustained. The rates go up with the interaction strength abruptly if the fitness landscape is rugged. A large cluster of species, connected by mutation, is formed by a sustained high mutation rate. With the formation of this symbiotic network resolved is the paradox of mutation rates; paradox on the stability of a rule to change itself. Population dynamics of each species shows high-dimensional chaos with small positive Lyapunov exponents. Stability of our symbiotic network is dynamically sustained through this weak high-dimensional chaos, termed “homeochaos”.

  9. Dynamic stability of an aerodynamically efficient motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amrit; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycles exhibit two potentially dangerous oscillatory modes known as 'wobble' and 'weave'. The former is reminiscent of supermarket castor shimmy, while the latter is a low frequency 'fish-tailing' motion that involves a combination of rolling, yawing, steering and side-slipping motions. These unwanted dynamic features, which can occur when two-wheeled vehicles are operated at speed, have been studied extensively. The aim of this paper is to use mathematical analysis to identify important stability trends in the on-going design of a novel aerodynamically efficient motorcycle known as the ECOSSE Spirit ES1. A mathematical model of the ES1 is developed using a multi-body dynamics software package called VehicleSim [Anon, VehicleSim Lisp Reference Manual Version 1.0, Mechanical Simulation Corporation, 2008. Available at http://www.carsim.com]. This high-fidelity motorcycle model includes realistic tyre-road contact geometry, a comprehensive tyre model, tyre relaxation and a flexible frame. A parameter set representative of a modern high-performance machine and rider is used. Local stability is investigated via the eigenvalues of the linearised models that are associated with equilibrium points of interest. A comprehensive study of the effects of frame flexibilities, acceleration, aerodynamics and tyre variations is presented, and an optimal passive steering compensator is derived. It is shown that the traditional steering damper cannot be used to stabilise the ES1 over its entire operating speed range. A simple passive compensator, involving an inerter is proposed. Flexibility can be introduced deliberately into various chassis components to change the stability characteristics of the vehicle; the implications of this idea are studied.

  10. High gain 1.3-μm GaInNAs SOA with fast gain dynamics and enhanced temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitsios, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Iliadis, N.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Viheriälä, J.; Laakso, A.; Dris, S.; Spyropoulou, M.; Avramopoulos, H.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.; Guina, M.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are a well-established solution of optical access networks. They could prove an enabling technology for DataCom by offering extended range of active optical functionalities. However, in such costand energy-critical applications, high-integration densities increase the operational temperatures and require powerhungry external cooling. Taking a step further towards improving the cost and energy effectiveness of active optical components, we report on the development of a GaInNAs/GaAs (dilute nitride) SOA operating at 1.3μm that exhibits a gain value of 28 dB and combined with excellent temperature stability owing to the large conduction band offset between GaInNAs quantum well and GaAs barrier. Moreover, the characterization results reveal almost no gain variation around the 1320 nm region for a temperature range from 20° to 50° C. The gain recovery time attained values as short as 100 ps, allowing implementation of various signal processing functionalities at 10 Gb/s. The combined parameters are very attractive for application in photonic integrated circuits requiring uncooled operation and thus minimizing power consumption. Moreover, as a result of the insensitivity to heating issues, a higher number of active elements can be integrated on chip-scale circuitry, allowing for higher integration densities and more complex optical on-chip functions. Such component could prove essential for next generation DataCom networks.

  11. Passive Endwall Treatments for Enhancing Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes were presented at the von Karman Institutes lecture series on Advances in Axial Compressor Aerodynamics, May 2006. They provide a fairly extensive overview of what's been learned from numerous investigations of various passive casing endwall technologies that have been proposed for alleviating the stall limiting physics associated with the compressor endwall flow field. The lecture notes are organized to give an appreciation for the inventiveness and understanding of the earliest compressor technologists and to provide a coherent thread of understanding that has arisen out of the early investigations. As such the lecture notes begin with a historical overview of casing treatments from their infancy through the earliest proposed concepts involving blowing, suction and flow recirculation. A summary of lessons learned from these early investigations is provided at the end of this section. The lecture notes then provide a somewhat more in-depth overview of recent advancements in the development of passive casing treatments from the late 1990's through 2006, including advancements in understanding the flow mechanism of circumferential groove casing treatments, and the development of discrete tip injection and self-recirculating casing treatments. At the conclusion of the lecture notes a final summary of lessons learned throughout the history of the development of passive casing treatments is provided. Finally, a list of future needs is given. It is hoped that these lecture notes will be a useful reference for future research endeavors to improve our understanding of the fluid physics of passive casing treatments and how they act to enhance compressor stability, and that they will perhaps provide a springboard for future research activities in this area of interest

  12. Dynesys dynamic stabilization-related facet arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Wang, Chun-Hao; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dynamic stabilization devices are designed to stabilize the spine while preserving some motion. However, there have been reports demonstrating limited motion at the instrumented level of the lumbar spine after Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS). The causes of this limited motion and its actual effects on outcomes after DDS remain elusive. In this study, the authors investigate the incidence of unintended facet arthrodesis after DDS and clinical outcomes. METHODS This retrospective study included 80 consecutive patients with 1- or 2-level lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent laminectomy and DDS. All medical records, radiological data, and clinical evaluations were analyzed. Imaging studies included pre- and postoperative radiographs, MR images, and CT scans. Clinical outcomes were measured by a visual analog scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores. Furthermore, all patients had undergone postoperative CT for the detection of unintended arthrodesis of the facets at the indexed level, and range of motion was measured on standing dynamic radiographs. RESULTS A total of 70 patients (87.5%) with a mean age of 64.0 years completed the minimum 24-month postoperative follow-up (mean duration 29.9 months). Unintended facet arthrodesis at the DDS instrumented level was demonstrated by CT in 38 (54.3%) of the 70 patients. The mean age of patients who had facet arthrodesis was 9.8 years greater than that of the patients who did not (68.3 vs 58.5 years, p = 0.009). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes, including VAS back and leg pain, ODI, and JOA scores between patients with and without the unintended facet arthrodesis. Furthermore, those patients older than 60 years were more likely to have unintended facet arthrodesis (OR 12.42) and immobile spinal segments (OR 2.96) after DDS. Regardless of whether unintended facet arthrodesis was present or not, clinical

  13. Stability at systems of usual differential equations in virus dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröer, H.

    In this paper we discuss different models of differential equations systems, that describe virus dynamics in different situations (HIV-virus and Hepatitis B-virus). We inquire the stability of differential equations. We use theorems of the stability theory.

  14. Graphene at the edge: stability and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Girit, Caglar O; Meyer, Jannik C; Erni, Rolf; Rossell, Marta D; Kisielowski, C; Yang, Li; Park, Cheol-Hwan; Crommie, M F; Cohen, Marvin L; Louie, Steven G; Zettl, A

    2009-03-27

    Although the physics of materials at surfaces and edges has been extensively studied, the movement of individual atoms at an isolated edge has not been directly observed in real time. With a transmission electron aberration-corrected microscope capable of simultaneous atomic spatial resolution and 1-second temporal resolution, we produced movies of the dynamics of carbon atoms at the edge of a hole in a suspended, single atomic layer of graphene. The rearrangement of bonds and beam-induced ejection of carbon atoms are recorded as the hole grows. We investigated the mechanism of edge reconstruction and demonstrated the stability of the "zigzag" edge configuration. This study of an ideal low-dimensional interface, a hole in graphene, exhibits the complex behavior of atoms at a boundary.

  15. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    11-1-0229 TITLE: Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Digital Breast Tomosynthesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Andrew Maidment...5 Introduction We propose a new technique for obtaining 4D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) im...seconds. One com plete tomosynthesis projection series consists of a set of projection im ages acquired at distinct angles. In the proposed m ethod

  16. Predator interference and stability of predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Přibylová, Lenka; Berec, Luděk

    2015-08-01

    Predator interference, that is, a decline in the per predator consumption rate as predator density increases, is generally thought to promote predator-prey stability. Indeed, this has been demonstrated in many theoretical studies on predator-prey dynamics. In virtually all of these studies, the stabilization role is demonstrated as a weakening of the paradox of enrichment. With predator interference, stable limit cycles that appear as a result of environmental enrichment occur for higher values of the environmental carrying capacity of prey, and even a complete absence of the limit cycles can happen. Here we study predator-prey dynamics using the Rosenzweig-MacArthur-like model in which the Holling type II functional response has been replaced by a predator-dependent family which generalizes many of the commonly used descriptions of predator interference. By means of a bifurcation analysis we show that sufficiently strong predator interference may bring about another stabilizing mechanism. In particular, hysteresis combined with (dis)appearance of stable limit cycles imply abrupt increases in both the prey and predator densities and enhanced persistence and resilience of the predator-prey system. We encourage refitting the previously collected data on predator consumption rates as well as for conducting further predation experiments to see what functional response from the explored family is the most appropriate.

  17. Kleptoparasitism and Scavenging Can Stabilize Ecosystem Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Focardi, Stefano; Materassi, Massimo; Innocenti, Giacomo; Berzi, Duccio

    2017-09-01

    Scavenging is ubiquitous in nature, but its implications have rarely been investigated. We used camera traps on wolf kills to investigate the role of scavenging on predator and multiprey dynamics in a northern Apennine system in Italy. In contrast to North American systems, the omnivorous wild boar successfully competes with wolves for the meat of their kills. We developed a deterministic, multitrophic web model (wolf, vegetation, deer, and wild boar), tunable through a parameter that governs the impact of prey sharing between wolves and wild boar. When prey sharing is scarce, populations oscillate, but above a threshold value the trophic web is stabilized, with the regime solution becoming a fixed, stable point. Both deer and wild boar then increase as a function of prey sharing, and the impact of herbivores on the vegetation increases. When prey sharing exceeds another threshold, the system collapses due to the extinction of both wolves and wild boar. Our analysis shows that scavenging is crucial for the dynamics of this ecosystem, and thus it should not be overlooked in food web modeling. The exploitation of wolf kills by wild boar may allow juveniles and yearlings to obtain high-quality resources that are not usually available, helping the wild boar to compensate for losses caused by hunting. This is likely to make them even more invasive and difficult to control.

  18. Physical stability enhancement of theophylline via cocrystallization.

    PubMed

    Trask, Andrew V; Motherwell, W D Sam; Jones, William

    2006-08-31

    The crystal form adopted by the respiratory drug theophylline was modified using a crystal engineering strategy in order to search for a solid material with improved physical stability. Cocrystals, also referred to as crystalline molecular complexes, were prepared with theophylline and one of several dicarboxylic acids. Four cocrystals of theophylline are reported, one each with oxalic, malonic, maleic and glutaric acids. Crystal structures were obtained for each cocrystal material, allowing an examination of the hydrogen bonding and crystal packing features. The cocrystal design scheme was partly based upon a series of recently reported cocrystals of the molecular analogue, caffeine, and comparisons in packing features are drawn between the two cocrystal series. The theophylline cocrystals were subjected to relative humidity challenges in order to assess their stability in relation to crystalline theophylline anhydrate and the equivalent caffeine cocrystals. None of the cocrystals in this study converted into a hydrated cocrystal upon storage at high relative humidity. Furthermore, the theophylline:oxalic acid cocrystal demonstrated superior humidity stability to theophylline anhydrate under the conditions examined, while the other cocrystals appeared to offer comparable stability to that of theophylline anhydrate. The results demonstrate the feasibility of pharmaceutical cocrystal design based upon the crystallization preferences of a molecular analogue, and furthermore show that avoidance of hydrate formation and improvement in physical stability is possible via pharmaceutical cocrystallization.

  19. Enhanced dynamical stability with harmonic slip stacking

    DOE PAGES

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2016-10-26

    We develop a configuration of radio-frequency (rf) cavities to dramatically improve the performance of slip-stacking. Slip-stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab to nearly double proton intensity by maintaining two beams of different momenta in the same storage ring. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused in the Recycler by two 53 MHz 100 kV rf cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV rf cavity with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main rf frequencies. We show the harmonic rf cavity cancels out themore » resonances generated between the two main rf cavities and we derive the relationship between the harmonic rf voltage and the main rf voltage. We find the area factors that can be used to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 99\\% slip-stacking efficiency. We measure the longitudinal distribution of the Booster beam and use it to generate a realistic beam model for slip-stacking simulation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the harmonic rf cavity can not only reduce particle loss during slip-stacking, but also reduce the final longitudinal emittance.« less

  20. Enhanced dynamical stability with harmonic slip stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2016-10-01

    We develop a configuration of radio-frequency (rf) cavities to dramatically improve the performance of slip stacking. Slip stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab to nearly double proton intensity by maintaining two beams of different momenta in the same storage ring. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused in the Recycler by two 53 MHz 100 kV rf cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV rf cavity with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main rf frequencies. We show the harmonic rf cavity cancels out the resonances generated between the two main rf cavities and we derive the relationship between the harmonic rf voltage and the main rf voltage. We find the area factors that can be used to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 99% slip stacking efficiency. We measure the longitudinal distribution of the Booster beam and use it to generate a realistic beam model for slip stacking simulation. We demonstrate that the harmonic rf cavity can not only reduce particle loss during slip stacking, but also reduce the final longitudinal emittance.

  1. Dynamic Stabilization of Atmospheric Single Column Models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, John W.; Sardeshmukh, Prashant D.

    2004-03-01

    Tropics.When implemented in the NCAR SCM, the dynamically coupled SCM shows a clear improvement over its uncoupled counterpart for tropical conditions observed during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Coupling effectively stabilizes the SCM. As a result, short-term prediction errors are substantially reduced, the ensemble spread is reduced in ensemble runs, and the SCM is able to maintain realistic thermodynamic structures in extended runs. Such a dynamically coupled SCM should therefore be more useful not only for isolating physical parameterization errors in weather and climate models, but also for economical simulations of regional climate variability.

  2. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  3. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  4. 14 CFR 29.181 - Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. 29.181 Section 29.181 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....181 Dynamic stability: Category A rotorcraft. Any short-period oscillation occurring at any speed...

  5. Enhanced leaf nitrogen status stabilizes omnivore population density.

    PubMed

    Liman, Anna-Sara; Dalin, Peter; Björkman, Christer

    2017-01-01

    Plant traits can mediate the strength of interactions between omnivorous predators and their prey through density effects and changes in the omnivores' trophic behavior. In this study, we explored the established assumption that enhanced nutrient status in host plants strengthens the buffering effect of plant feeding for omnivorous predators, i.e., prevents rapid negative population growth during prey density decline and thereby increases and stabilizes omnivore population density. We analyzed 13 years of field data on population densities of a heteropteran omnivore on Salix cinerea stands, arranged along a measured leaf nitrogen gradient and found a 195 % increase in omnivore population density and a 63 % decrease in population variability with an increase in leaf nitrogen status from 26 to 40 mgN × g(-1). We recreated the leaf nitrogen gradient in a greenhouse experiment and found, as expected, that increasing leaf nitrogen status enhanced omnivore performance but reduced per capita prey consumption. Feeding on high nitrogen status host plants can potentially decouple omnivore-prey population dynamics and allow omnivores to persist and function effectively at low prey densities to provide "background level" control of insect herbivores. This long-term effect is expected to outweigh the short-term effect on per capita prey consumption-resulting in a net increase in population predation rates with increasing leaf nitrogen status. Conservation biological control of insect pests that makes use of omnivore background control could, as a result, be manipulated via management of crop nitrogen status.

  6. Resonance enhanced dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Plum, Markus A; Menges, Bernhard; Fytas, George; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Steffen, Werner

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel light scattering setup that enables probing of dynamics near solid surfaces. An evanescent wave generated by a surface plasmon resonance in a metal layer is the incident light field in the dynamic light scattering experiment. The combination of surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering leads to a spatiotemporal resolution extending a few hundred nanometers from the surface and from microseconds to seconds. The comparison with evanescent wave dynamic light scattering identifies the advantages of the presented technique, e.g., surface monitoring, use of metal surfaces, and biorelevant systems. For both evanescent wave geometries, we define the scattering wave vector necessary for the analysis of the experimental relaxation functions.

  7. Lift enhancement by bats' dynamically changing wingspan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu

    2015-01-01

    This paper elucidates the aerodynamic role of the dynamically changing wingspan in bat flight. Based on direct numerical simulations of the flow over a slow-flying bat, it is found that the dynamically changing wingspan can significantly enhance the lift. Further, an analysis of flow structures and lift decomposition reveal that the elevated vortex lift associated with the leading-edge vortices intensified by the dynamically changing wingspan considerably contributed to enhancement of the time-averaged lift. The nonlinear interaction between the dynamically changing wing and the vortical structures plays an important role in the lift enhancement of a flying bat in addition to the geometrical effect of changing the lifting-surface area in a flapping cycle. In addition, the dynamically changing wingspan leads to the higher efficiency in terms of generating lift for a given amount of the mechanical energy consumed in flight. PMID:26701882

  8. Temporal stability in forest productivity increases with tree diversity due to asynchrony in species dynamics.

    PubMed

    Morin, Xavier; Fahse, Lorenz; de Mazancourt, Claire; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Bugmann, Harald

    2014-12-01

    Theory predicts a positive relationship between biodiversity and stability in ecosystem properties, while diversity is expected to have a negative impact on stability at the species level. We used virtual experiments based on a dynamic simulation model to test for the diversity-stability relationship and its underlying mechanisms in Central European forests. First our results show that variability in productivity between stands differing in species composition decreases as species richness and functional diversity increase. Second we show temporal stability increases with increasing diversity due to compensatory dynamics across species, supporting the biodiversity insurance hypothesis. We demonstrate that this pattern is mainly driven by the asynchrony of species responses to small disturbances rather than to environmental fluctuations, and is only weakly affected by the net biodiversity effect on productivity. Furthermore, our results suggest that compensatory dynamics between species may enhance ecosystem stability through an optimisation of canopy occupancy by coexisting species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  9. Enhancing protein stability with extended disulfide bonds

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Yan; Luo, Xiaozhou; ...

    2016-05-09

    Disulfide bonds play an important role in protein folding and stability. However, the cross-linking of sites within proteins by cysteine disulfides has significant distance and dihedral angle constraints. In this paper, we report the genetic encoding of noncanonical amino acids containing long side-chain thiols that are readily incorporated into both bacterial and mammalian proteins in good yields and with excellent fidelity. These amino acids can pair with cysteines to afford extended disulfide bonds and allow cross-linking of more distant sites and distinct domains of proteins. To demonstrate this notion, we preformed growth-based selection experiments at nonpermissive temperatures using a librarymore » of random β-lactamase mutants containing these noncanonical amino acids. A mutant enzyme that is cross-linked by one such extended disulfide bond and is stabilized by ~9 °C was identified. Finally, this result indicates that an expanded set of building blocks beyond the canonical 20 amino acids can lead to proteins with improved properties by unique mechanisms, distinct from those possible through conventional mutagenesis schemes.« less

  10. Hamular frenum modification: a removable denture prosthesis retention and stability enhancement.

    PubMed

    Massad, J J; Anderson, J F

    2001-04-01

    A removable denture prosthesis, whether partial or complete, often requires preprosthetic surgery to achieve optimum stabilization and retention. While the hamular frenum may produce significant dynamic dislodging forces, a literature review did not reveal any reports dealing with this problem. A hamular frenum reduction surgical procedure using the free autogenous gingival graft procedure is described. Prosthetic function may be enhanced by eliminating the dynamic disrupting force of the hamular frenum along with improving posterior maxillary tuberosity contour and, as necessary, premaxillary form, allowing these contours to work in concert to develop a "cupping" stabilizing and retentive complex.

  11. Double polymer sheathed carbon nanotube supercapacitors show enhanced cycling stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenqi; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Chunhui; Wu, Shiting; Xu, Wenjing; Zou, Mingchu; Ouyang, An; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Yibin

    2015-12-01

    Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices.Pseudo-materials are effective in boosting the specific capacitance of supercapacitors, but during service their degradation may also be very strong, causing reduced cycling stability. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube sponge grafted by two conventional pseudo-polymer layers in sequence can serve as a porous supercapacitor electrode with significantly enhanced cycling stability compared with single polymer grafting. Creating conformal polymer coatings on the nanotube surface and the resulting double-sheath configuration are important structural factors leading to the enhanced performance. Combining different polymers as double sheaths as reported here might be a potential route to circumvent the dilemma of pseudo-materials, and to simultaneously improve the capacitance and stability for various energy storage devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05978j

  12. Enhanced Hydrate Nucleation Near the Limit of Stability.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Angeles, Felipe; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2015-03-30

    Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures composed of small guest molecules trapped into cages formed by hydrogen-bonded water molecules. In hydrate nucleation, water and the guest molecules may stay in a metastable fluid mixture for a long period. Metastability is broken if the concentration of the guest is above certain limit. We perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of supersaturated water-propane solutions close to the limit of stability. We show that hydrate nucleation can be very fast in a very narrow range of composition at moderate temperatures. Propane density fluctuations near the fluid-fluid demixing are coupled with crystallization producing en- hanced nucleation rates. This is the first report of propane-hydrate nucleation by MD simulations. We observe motifs of the crystalline structure II in line with experiments and new hydrate cages not reported in the literature. Our study relates nucleation to the fluid-fluid spinodal decomposition and demonstration that the enhanced nucleation phenomenon is more general than short range attractive interactions as suggested in nucleation of proteins.

  13. 14 CFR 23.181 - Dynamic stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (“Dutch roll”) occurring between the stalling speed and the maximum allowable speed appropriate to the... stability. (b) Any combined lateral-directional oscillations (Dutch roll) occurring between the stalling...

  14. Synchronization and stability in noisy population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Sabrina B L; de Aguiar, M A M

    2008-02-01

    We study the stability and synchronization of predator-prey populations subjected to noise. The system is described by patches of local populations coupled by migration and predation over a neighborhood. When a single patch is considered, random perturbations tend to destabilize the populations, leading to extinction. If the number of patches is small, stabilization in the presence of noise is maintained at the expense of synchronization. As the number of patches increases, both the stability and the synchrony among patches increase. However, a residual asynchrony, large compared with the noise amplitude, seems to persist even in the limit of an infinite number of patches. Therefore, the mechanism of stabilization by asynchrony recently proposed by Abta [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 098104 (2007)], combining noise, diffusion, and nonlinearities, seems to be more general than first proposed.

  15. Logic Dynamics for Deductive Inference -- Its Stability and Neural Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Ichiro

    2014-12-01

    We propose a dynamical model that represents a process of deductive inference. We discuss the stability of logic dynamics and a neural basis for the dynamics. We propose a new concept of descriptive stability, thereby enabling a structure of stable descriptions of mathematical models concerning dynamic phenomena to be clarified. The present theory is based on the wider and deeper thoughts of John S. Nicolis. In particular, it is based on our joint paper on the chaos theory of human short-term memories with a magic number of seven plus or minus two.

  16. Dynamic Colloidal Stabilization by Nanoparticle Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanikas, S.; Louis, A. A.

    2004-12-01

    We explore the conditions under which colloids can be stabilized by the addition of smaller particles. The largest repulsive barriers between colloids occur when the added particles repel each other with soft interactions, leading to an accumulation near the colloid surfaces. At lower densities these layers of mobile particles (nanoparticle halos) result in stabilization, but when too many are added, the interactions become attractive again. We systematically study these effects—accumulation repulsion, reentrant attraction, and bridging—by accurate integral equation techniques.

  17. On the dynamic stability of multilayer sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.; Chen, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the dynamic stability of plates which are constructed of several alternating soft and hard layers and are subjected to time-dependent periodic in-plane loads. A theory that accounts for all of these effects is presented for multilayer sandwich plates. The plate thickness consists of (k - 1) orthotropic soft core layers sandwiched between k hard isotropic membrane layers, each of which may have a different thickness and elastic properties. It is assumed that the core layers carry only the transverse shear stresses, while the hard membrane layers carry the in-plane normal and shear stresses. The complementary variational principle for dynamics is used to derive the governing differential equations and the necessary boundary conditions for the dynamic stability of the sandwich plate. The equations governing the vibration of the plate and those governing its static stability are deduced from the more general equations for dynamic stability.

  18. A Quasi-Steady Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady CFD with Unsteady Aerodynamic Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin is caused by an undamping of the aerodynamics in one of the lower frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic lineloads derived from steady rigid computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic (CAE) analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping. This paper will present a method of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics. The enhanced formulation uses unsteady CFD to compute the response of selected lower frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle lineloads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic lineload response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping and mass matrices. The results of the enhanced quasi-static aeroelastic stability analysis are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady CAE analysis and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady CAE analysis.

  19. Enhanced thermal stability of Ag nanorods through capping

    SciTech Connect

    Bachenheimer, Lou; Elliott, Paul; Stagon, Stephen; Huang, Hanchen

    2014-11-24

    Ag nanorods may serve as sensors in the detection of trace amounts of chemical agents, even single molecules, through surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). However, thermal coarsening of Ag nanorods near room temperature limits their applications. This letter proposes the use of a thin oxide capping layer to enhance the thermal stability of Ag nanorods beyond 100 °C. Using electron microscopy characterization and SERS tests, the authors show that the proposed method is effective in stabilizing both morphology and sensitivity of Ag nanorods. The results of this work extend the applicability of Ag nanorods as chemical sensors to higher temperatures.

  20. Stabilizing feedback control for dynamical systems with bounded uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutman, S.; Leitmann, G.

    1976-01-01

    The theories of differential games and generalized dynamic systems are used to deduce stabilizing controllers for quasi-linear systems. Attention is given to a class of dynamic systems subject to parameter and input uncertainty whose values range in a given compact set. Using a worst case design philosophy, a feedback control is derived that assures uniform asymptotic (Liapunov) stability of the origin under all admissible uncertainties.

  1. Indicators of dynamic stability in transtibial prosthesis users.

    PubMed

    Kendell, C; Lemaire, E D; Dudek, N L; Kofman, J

    2010-03-01

    An improved understanding of factors related to dynamic stability in lower-limb prosthesis users is important, given the high occurrence of falls in this population. Current methods of assessing stability are unable to adequately characterize dynamic stability over a variety of walking conditions. F-Scan Mobile has been used to collect plantar pressure data and six extracted parameters were useful measures of dynamic stability. The aim of this study was to investigate dynamic stability in individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation based on these six parameters. Twenty community ambulators with a unilateral transtibial amputation walked over level ground, uneven ground, stairs, and a ramp while plantar pressure data were collected. For each limb (intact and prosthetic) and condition, six stability parameters related to plantar center-of-pressure perturbations and gait temporal parameters, were computed from the plantar pressure data. Parameter values were compared between limbs, walking condition, and groups (unilateral transtibial prosthesis users and able-bodied subjects). Differences in parameters were found between limbs and conditions, and between prosthesis users and able-bodied individuals. Further research could investigate optimizing parameter calculations for unilateral transtibial prosthesis users and define relationships between potential for falls and the dynamic stability measures.

  2. Parametrics of submarine dynamic stability in the vertical plane

    SciTech Connect

    Papoulias, F.A.; Papanikolaou, S.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of dynamic stability of submersible vehicles in the dive plane is examined utilizing bifurcation techniques. The primary mechanism of loss of stability is identified in the form of generic Hopf bifurcations to periodic solutions. Stability of the resulting limit cycles is established using center manifold approximations and integral averaging. Parametric studies are performed with varying vehicle geometric properties. The methods described in this work could lead to techniques resulting in enlargement of the submerged operational envelope of a vehicle.

  3. Enhancing Biopolymer Dynamics through Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal filaments that organize intracellular space structurally and through active transport along their lengths. They need to be organized and remodeled quickly during development of differentiated cells or in mitosis. Much work has focused on remodeling from the ends because these long polymers can stochastically disassemble through dynamic instability or be actively disassembled. Microtubule-severing enzymes are a novel class of microtubule regulators that create new ends by cutting the filament. Thus, these proteins add a new dimension to microtubule regulation by their ability to create new microtubule ends. Interestingly, despite their destructive capabilities, severing has the ability to create new microtubule networks in cells. We are interested in the inherent biophysical activities of these proteins and their ability to remodel cellular microtubule networks. Interestingly, despite their destructive capabilities, severing has the ability to create new microtubule networks in cells. We use two-color single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence imaging to visualize purified severing enzymes and microtubules in vitro. We have examined two families of severing enzymes to find that their biophysical activities are distinct giving them different network-regulating abilities.

  4. Noise-induced stabilization of collective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clusella, Pau; Politi, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    We illustrate a counterintuitive effect of an additive stochastic force, which acts independently on each element of an ensemble of globally coupled oscillators. We show that a very small white noise not only broadens the clusters, wherever they are induced by the deterministic forces, but can also stabilize a linearly unstable collective periodic regime: self-consistent partial synchrony. With the help of microscopic simulations we are able to identify two noise-induced bifurcations. A macroscopic analysis, based on a perturbative solution of the associated nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation, confirms the numerical studies and allows determining the eigenvalues of the stability problem. We finally argue about the generality of the phenomenon.

  5. Missile Motion Sensitivity to Dynamic Stability Derivatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    to Lifting-Surface/Body Interference." AFFDL- TR-71-5, April 1972. 5. Williams, John E. and Vukelich, Steven R. "The USAF Stability and Control...and Laberge , J. G. "Direct and Cross-Coupling Subsonic Moment Derivatives Due to Oscillatory Pitching and Yawing of an Aircraft- Like Model of

  6. Dynamics and stability of wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.; Nolan, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous and induction generators are considered. A comparison is made between wind turbines, steam, and hydro units. The unusual phenomena associated with wind turbines are emphasized. The general control requirements are discussed, as well as various schemes for torsional damping such as speed sensitive stabilizer and blade pitch control. Integration between adjacent wind turbines in a wind farm is also considered.

  7. Dynamic stability differences in fall-prone and healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; Lockhart, Thurmon E.

    2010-01-01

    Typical stability assessments characterize performance in standing balance despite the fact that most falls occur during dynamic activities such as walking. The objective of this study was to identify dynamic stability differences between fall-prone elderly individuals, healthy age-matched adults, and young adults. Three-dimensional video-motion analysis kinematic data were recorded for 35 contiguous steps while subjects walked on a treadmill at three speeds. From this data, we estimated the vector from the center-of-mass to the center of pressure at each foot-strike. Dynamic stability of walking was computed by methods of Poincare analyses of these vectors. Results revealed that the fall-prone group demonstrated poorer dynamic stability than the healthy elderly and young adult groups. Stability was not influenced by walking velocity, indicating that group differences in walking speed could not fully explain the differences in stability. This pilot study supports the need for future investigations using larger population samples to study fall-prone individuals using nonlinear dynamic analyses of movement kinematics. PMID:17686633

  8. Animal flight dynamics II. Longitudinal stability in flapping flight.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G K; Thomas, A L R

    2002-02-07

    Stability is essential to flying and is usually assumed to be especially problematic in flapping flight. If so, problems of stability may have presented a particular hurdle to the evolution of flapping flight. In spite of this, the stability of flapping flight has never been properly analysed. Here we use quasi-static and blade element approaches to analyse the stability provided by a flapping wing. By using reduced order approximations to the natural modes of motion, we show that wing beat frequencies are generally high enough compared to the natural frequencies of motion for a quasi-static approach to be valid as a first approximation. Contrary to expectations, we find that there is noting inherently destabilizing about flapping: beating the wings faster simply amplifies any existing stability or instability, and flapping can even enhance stability compared to gliding at the same air speed. This suggests that aerodynamic stability may not have been a particular hurdle in the evolution of flapping flight. Hovering animals, like hovering helicopters, are predicted to possess neutral static stability. Flapping animals, like fixed wing aircraft, are predicted to be stable in forward flight if the mean flight force acts above and/or behind the centre of gravity. In this case, the downstroke will always be stabilizing. The stabilizing contribution may be diminished by an active upstroke with a low advance ratio and more horizontal stroke plane; other forms of the upstroke may make a small positive contribution to stability. An active upstroke could, therefore, be used to lower stability and enhance manoeuvrability. Translatory mechanisms of unsteady lift production are predicted to amplify the stability predicted by a quasi-static analysis. Non-translatory mechanisms will make little or no contribution to stability. This may be one reason why flies, and other animals which rely upon non-translatory aerodynamic mechanisms, often appear inherently unstable. Copyright

  9. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Jianping; Yu, Liang; Liu, Qingfei; Ning, Yanxiao; Zhou, Zhiwen; Chen, Hao; Huang, Wugen; Liu, Ping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSs with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs.

  10. Dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.; Mulcahy, T.M.; Wang, Z.

    1996-11-01

    This report summarizes the research performed on maglev vehicle dynamic stability at Argonne National Laboratory during the past few years. It also documents both measured and calculated magnetic-force data. Because dynamic instability is not acceptable for any commercial maglev system, it is important to consider this phenomenon in the development of all maglev systems. This report presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares the results with predictions calculated by a nonlinear-dynamics computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic-suspension system type vehicle model were obtained by experimental observation and computer simulation of a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway that consists of a pair of L-shaped aluminum conductors attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

  11. Dynamic stabilization of rapid hexapedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    Jindrich, Devin L; Full, Robert J

    2002-09-01

    To stabilize locomotion, animals must generate forces appropriate to overcome the effects of perturbations and to maintain a desired speed or direction of movement. We studied the stabilizing mechanism employed by rapidly running insects by using a novel apparatus to perturb running cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis). The apparatus used chemical propellants to accelerate a small projectile, generating reaction force impulses of less than 10 ms duration. The apparatus was mounted onto the thorax of the insect, oriented to propel the projectile laterally and loaded with propellant sufficient to cause a nearly tenfold increase in lateral velocity relative to maxima observed during unperturbed locomotion. Cockroaches were able to recover from these perturbations in 27+/-12 ms (mean +/- S.D., N=9) when running on a high-friction substratum. Lateral velocity began to decrease 13+/-5 ms (mean +/- S.D., N=11) following the start of a perturbation, a time comparable with the fastest reflexes measured in cockroaches. Cockroaches did not require step transitions to recover from lateral perturbations. Instead, they exhibited viscoelastic behavior in the lateral direction, with spring constants similar to those observed during unperturbed locomotion. The rapid onset of recovery from lateral perturbations supports the possibility that, during fast locomotion, intrinsic properties of the musculoskeletal system augment neural stabilization by reflexes.

  12. Nucleosomal stability and dynamics vary significantly when viewed by internal versus terminal labels.

    PubMed

    Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Sun, Jenny; Woodbury, Neal; Lohr, D

    2008-09-09

    Nucleosomes are a major impediment to regulatory factor activities and therefore to the operation of genomic processes in eukaryotes. One suggested mechanism for overcoming in vivo nucleosomal repression is factor-mediated removal of H2A/H2B from nucleosomes. Using nucleosomes labeled internally with FRET fluorophores, we previously observed significant, DNA sequence-dependent variation in stability and dynamics under conditions (subnanomolar concentrations) reported to produce H2A/H2B release from nucleosomes. Here, the same analytical approaches are repeated using 5S and MMTV-B nucleosomes containing FRET labels that monitor the terminal regions. The results show that stability and dynamics vary significantly within the nucleosome; terminally labeled constructs report significantly reduced stability and enhanced DNA dynamics compared to internally labeled constructs. The data also strongly support previous suggestions (1) that subnanomolar concentrations cause H2A/H2B release from nucleosomes, including the 5S, and (2) that stabilities in the internal regions of 5S and two promoter-derived nucleosomes (MMTV-B, GAL10) differ. Sequence-dependent nucleosome stability/dynamics differences could produce inherent variations in the accessibility of histone-associated DNA in vivo. Such intrinsic variation could also provide a mechanism for producing enhanced effects on specific nucleosomes by processes affecting large chromatin regions, thus facilitating the localized targeting of alterations to nucleosomes on crucial regulatory sequences. The results demonstrate clearly the importance of studying physiologically relevant nucleosomes.

  13. Constrained basin stability for studying transient phenomena in dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    van Kan, Adrian; Jegminat, Jannes; Donges, Jonathan F; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Transient dynamics are of large interest in many areas of science. Here, a generalization of basin stability (BS) is presented: constrained basin stability (CBS) that is sensitive to various different types of transients arising from finite size perturbations. CBS is applied to the paradigmatic Lorenz system for uncovering nonlinear precursory phenomena of a boundary crisis bifurcation. Further, CBS is used in a model of the Earth's carbon cycle as a return time-dependent stability measure of the system's global attractor. Both case studies illustrate how CBS's sensitivity to transients complements BS in its function as an early warning signal and as a stability measure. CBS is broadly applicable in systems where transients matter, from physics and engineering to sustainability science. Thus CBS complements stability analysis with BS as well as classical linear stability analysis and will be a useful tool for many applications.

  14. New Insight into Cataract Formation: Enhanced Stability through Mutual Attraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stradner, A.; Schurtenberger, P.; Foffi, G.; Dorsaz, N.; Thurston, G.

    2007-11-09

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations combined with an application of concepts from soft matter physics to complex protein mixtures provide new insight into the stability of eye lens protein mixtures. Exploring this colloid-protein analogy we demonstrate that weak attractions between unlike proteins help to maintain lens transparency in an extremely sensitive and nonmonotonic manner. These results not only represent an important step towards a better understanding of protein condensation diseases such as cataract formation, but provide general guidelines for tuning the stability of colloid mixtures, a topic relevant for soft matter physics and industrial applications.

  15. Summary of methods for calculating dynamic lateral stability and response and for estimating aerodynamic stability derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1952-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Detailed estimation methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic and supersonic speed conditions.

  16. Active Dendrites Enhance Neuronal Dynamic Range

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Kinouchi, Osame; Copelli, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB). Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range. PMID:19521531

  17. Subsonic Dynamic Stability Tests of a Sample Return Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael; Johnson, R. Keith

    2006-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to determine the subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of a proposed atmospheric entry vehicle for sample return missions. In particular, the effects of changes in aft-body geometry on stability were examined. Freeflying tests of a dynamically scaled model with various geometric features were conducted, including cases in which the model was perturbed to measure dynamic response. Both perturbed and non-perturbed runs were recorded as motion time histories using the VST optical data acquisition system and reduced for post-test analysis. In addition, preliminary results from a static force and moment test of a similar model in the Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel are presented. Results indicate that the configuration is dynamically stable for the baseline geometry, but exhibits degraded dynamic behavior for the geometry modifications tested.

  18. Effect of stabilizer on dynamic thermal transport property of ZnO nanofluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of adding a stabilizer on the dynamic thermal properties of ZnO nanofluid (containing 5 to 10 nm diameter of ZnO nanocrystals) measured using a 3ω method. Addition of the stabilizer leads to the stabilization of the nanofluid and also substantial reduction of the enhancement of thermal transport compared to that seen in the bare ZnO nanofluid. This also alters the frequency dependence of the thermal transport and the characteristic time scale associated with it. It is suggested that the addition of the stabilizer inhibits the thermodiffusion-assisted local aggregation thus leading to substantial reduction of the enhancement of thermal transport properties of the bare nanofluid as proposed in some recent models, and this also alters the characteristic time scales by altering the scale of aggregation. PMID:23497347

  19. Effect of stabilizer on dynamic thermal transport property of ZnO nanofluid.

    PubMed

    Neogy, Rajesh Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Arup Kumar

    2013-03-14

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of adding a stabilizer on the dynamic thermal properties of ZnO nanofluid (containing 5 to 10 nm diameter of ZnO nanocrystals) measured using a 3ω method. Addition of the stabilizer leads to the stabilization of the nanofluid and also substantial reduction of the enhancement of thermal transport compared to that seen in the bare ZnO nanofluid. This also alters the frequency dependence of the thermal transport and the characteristic time scale associated with it. It is suggested that the addition of the stabilizer inhibits the thermodiffusion-assisted local aggregation thus leading to substantial reduction of the enhancement of thermal transport properties of the bare nanofluid as proposed in some recent models, and this also alters the characteristic time scales by altering the scale of aggregation.

  20. Stability of dynamic response of suspension bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capsoni, Antonio; Ardito, Raffaele; Guerrieri, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The potential occurrence of internal parametric resonance phenomena has been recently indicated as a potential contributory cause of the appearance of critical dynamic states in long-span suspension bridges. At the same time, suspension bridges, in view of their flexibility, are prone to aeroelastic response, such as vortex shedding, torsional divergence and flutter. In this paper, a non-linear dynamic model of a suspension bridge is devised, with the purpose of providing a first attempt toward a unified framework for the study of aeroelastic and internal resonance instabilities. Inspired by the pioneering work of Herrmann and Hauger, the analyses have been based on a linearized formulation that is able to represent the main structural non-linear effects and the coupling given by aerodynamic forces. The results confirm that the interaction between aeroelastic effects and non-linear internal resonance leads to unstable conditions for wind speeds which can be lower than the critical threshold for standard aeroelastic predictions.

  1. Effects of asymmetry on the dynamic stability of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fantino, R. E.; Parsons, E. K.; Powell, J. D.; Shevell, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The oblique wing concept for transonic aircraft was proposed to reduce drag. The dynamic stability of the aircraft was investigated by analytically determining the stability derivatives at angles of skew ranging from 0 and 45 deg and using these stability derivatives in a linear analysis of the coupled aircraft behavior. The stability derivatives were obtained using a lifting line aerodynamic theory and found to give reasonable agreement with derivatives developed in a previous study for the same aircraft. In the dynamic analysis, no instability or large changes occurred in the root locations for skew angles varying from 0 to 45 deg with the exception of roll convergence. The damping in roll, however, decreased by an order of magnitude. Rolling was a prominent feature of all the oscillatory mode shapes at high skew angles.

  2. Dynamic stabilization of a coupled ultracold atom-molecule system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng-Chang; Ye, Chong

    2015-12-01

    We numerically demonstrate the dynamic stabilization of a strongly interacting many-body bosonic system which can be realized by coupled ultracold atom-molecule gases. The system is initialized to an unstable equilibrium state corresponding to a saddle point in the classical phase space, where subsequent free evolution gives rise to atom-molecule conversion. To control and stabilize the system, periodic modulation is applied that suddenly shifts the relative phase between the atomic and the molecular modes and limits their further interconversion. The stability diagram for the range of modulation amplitudes and periods that stabilize the dynamics is given. The validity of the phase diagram obtained from the time-average calculation is discussed by using the orbit tracking method, and the difference in contrast with the maximum absolute deviation analysis is shown as well. A brief quantum analysis shows that quantum fluctuations can put serious limitations on the applicability of the mean-field results.

  3. Assessment of stability during gait in patients with spinal deformity-A preliminary analysis using the dynamic stability margin.

    PubMed

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Lugade, Vipul; Bernhardt, Kathie; Larson, A Noelle; Kaufman, Kenton

    2017-06-01

    Daily living activities are dynamic, requiring spinal motion through space. Current assessment of spinal deformities is based on static measurements from full-spine standing radiographs. Tools to assess dynamic stability during gait might be useful to enhance the standard evaluation. The aim of this study was to evaluate gait dynamic imbalance in patients with spinal deformity using the dynamic stability margin (DSM). Twelve normal subjects and 17 patients with spinal deformity were prospectively recruited. A kinematic 3D gait analysis was performed for the control group (CG) and the spinal deformity group (SDG). The DSM (distance between the extrapolated center of mass and the base of support) and time-distance parameters were calculated for the right and left side during gait. The relationship between DSM and step length was assessed using three variables: gait stability, symmetry, and consistency. Variables' accuracy was validated by a discriminant analysis. Patients with spinal deformity exhibited gait instability according to the DSM (0.25m versus 0.31m) with decreased velocity (1.1ms(-1) versus 1.3ms(-1)) and decreased step length (0.32m versus 0.38m). According to the discriminant analysis, gait stability was the more accurate variable (area under the curve AUC=0.98) followed by gait symmetry and consistency. However, gait consistency showed 100% of specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy of precision. The DSM showed that patients with spinal malalignment exhibit decreased gait stability, symmetry, and consistency besides gait time-distance parameter changes. Additional work is required to determine how to apply the DSM for preoperative and postoperative spinal deformity management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Polarization-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for laser stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Paul D; Heavner, Thomas P; Jefferts, Steven R

    2013-11-20

    We demonstrate a variation of pump-probe spectroscopy that is particularly useful for laser frequency stabilization. The polarization-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (POLEAS) signal provides a significant improvement in signal-to-noise ratio over saturated absorption spectroscopy (SAS) for the important and commonly used atomic cycling transitions. The improvements can directly increase the short-term stability of a laser frequency lock, given sufficient servo loop bandwidth. The long-term stability of the POLEAS method, which is limited by environmental sensitivities, is comparable to that of SAS. The POLEAS signal is automatically Doppler-free, without requiring a separate Doppler subtraction beam, and lends itself to straightforward compact packaging. Finally, by increasing the amplitude of the desired (cycling) peak, while reducing the amplitude of all other peaks in the manifold, the POLEAS method eases the implementation of laser auto-locking schemes.

  5. Enhancing stability of industrial turbines using adjustable partial arc bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasalevris, Athanasios; Dohnal, Fadi

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the principal of operation, the simulation and the characteristics of two partial-arc journal bearings of variable geometry and adjustable/controllable stiffness and damping properties. The proposed journals are supposed to consist of a scheme that enables the periodical variation of bearing properties. Recent achievements of suppressing rotor vibrations using plain circular journal bearings of variable geometry motivate the further extension of the principle to bearings of applicable geometry for industrial turbines. The paper describes the application of a partial-arc journal bearing to enhance stability of high speed industrial turbines. The proposed partial-arc bearings with adjustable/controllable properties enhance stability and they introduce stable margins in speeds much higher than the 1st critical.

  6. Deciphering the imprint of topology on nonlinear dynamical network stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzbon, J.; Schultz, P.; Heitzig, J.; Kurths, J.; Hellmann, F.

    2017-03-01

    Coupled oscillator networks show complex interrelations between topological characteristics of the network and the nonlinear stability of single nodes with respect to large but realistic perturbations. We extend previous results on these relations by incorporating sampling-based measures of the transient behaviour of the system, its survivability, as well as its asymptotic behaviour, its basin stability. By combining basin stability and survivability we uncover novel, previously unknown asymptotic states with solitary, desynchronized oscillators which are rotating with a frequency different from their natural one. They occur almost exclusively after perturbations at nodes with specific topological properties. More generally we confirm and significantly refine the results on the distinguished role tree-shaped appendices play for nonlinear stability. We find a topological classification scheme for nodes located in such appendices, that exactly separates them according to their stability properties, thus establishing a strong link between topology and dynamics. Hence, the results can be used for the identification of vulnerable nodes in power grids or other coupled oscillator networks. From this classification we can derive general design principles for resilient power grids. We find that striving for homogeneous network topologies facilitates a better performance in terms of nonlinear dynamical network stability. While the employed second-order Kuramoto-like model is parametrised to be representative for power grids, we expect these insights to transfer to other critical infrastructure systems or complex network dynamics appearing in various other fields.

  7. Dynamic Margins of Stability During Human Walking in Destabilizing Environments☆

    PubMed Central

    McAndrew Young, Patricia M.; Wilken, Jason M.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how humans maintain stability when walking, particularly when exposed to perturbations, is key to preventing falls. Here, we quantified how imposing continuous, pseudorandom anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) oscillations affected the control of dynamic walking stability. Twelve subjects completed five 3-minute walking trials in the Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment (CAREN) system under each of 5 conditions: no perturbation (NOP), AP platform (APP) or visual (APV) or ML platform (MLP) or visual (MLV) oscillations. We computed AP and ML margins of stability (MOS) for each trial. Mean MOSml were consistently slightly larger than NOP during all perturbation conditions (p ≤ 0.038). Mean MOSap for the APP, MLP and MLV oscillations were significantly smaller than during NOP (p < 0.0005). Variability of both MOSap and MOSml was significantly greater during the MLP and MLV oscillations than during NOP (p < 0.0005). We also directly quantified how the MOS on any given step affected the MOS on the following step using first-return plots. There were significant changes in step-to-step MOSml dynamics between experimental conditions (p < 0.0005). These changes suggested that subjects may have been trying to control foot placement, and consequently stability, during the perturbation conditions. Quantifying step-to-step changes in margins of dynamic stability may be more useful than mean MOS in assessing how individuals control walking stability. PMID:22326059

  8. Dynamic margins of stability during human walking in destabilizing environments.

    PubMed

    McAndrew Young, Patricia M; Wilken, Jason M; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2012-04-05

    Understanding how humans maintain stability when walking, particularly when exposed to perturbations, is key to preventing falls. Here, we quantified how imposing continuous, pseudorandom anterior-posterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) oscillations affected the control of dynamic walking stability. Twelve subjects completed five 3-minute walking trials in the Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment (CAREN) system under each of 5 conditions: no perturbation (NOP), AP platform (APP) or visual (APV) or ML platform (MLP) or visual (MLV) oscillations. We computed AP and ML margins of stability (MOS) for each trial. Mean MOS(ml) were consistently slightly larger during all perturbation conditions than during NOP (p≤0.038). Mean MOS(ap) for the APP, MLP and MLV oscillations were significantly smaller than during NOP (p<0.0005). Variability of both MOS(ap) and MOS(ml) was significantly greater during the MLP and MLV oscillations than during NOP (p<0.0005). We also directly quantified how the MOS on any given step affected the MOS on the following step using first-return plots. There were significant changes in step-to-step MOS(ml) dynamics between experimental conditions (p<0.0005). These changes suggested that subjects may have been trying to control foot placement, and consequently stability, during the perturbation conditions. Quantifying step-to-step changes in margins of dynamic stability may be more useful than mean MOS in assessing how individuals control walking stability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  10. Stability limits and dynamics of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Resnik, Andy; Kaukler, William F.

    1993-01-01

    This program of theoretical and experimental ground-based and low gravity research is focussed on the understanding of the dynamics and stability limits of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges. There are three basic objectives to the proposed work: (1) to determine the stability limits of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges held between non-coaxially aligned disks; (2) to examine the dynamics of nonaxisymmetric bridges and nonaxisymmetric oscillations of initially axisymmetric bridges (some of these experiments require a low gravity environment and the ground-based research will culminate in a definitive flight experiment); and (3) to experimentally investigate the vibration sensitivity of liquid bridges under terrestrial and low gravity conditions.

  11. Enhanced catalyst stability for cyclic co methanation operations

    DOEpatents

    Risch, Alan P.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1983-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are passed over a catalyst to deposit a surface layer of active surface carbon thereon essentially without the formation of inactive coke. The active carbon is thereafter reacted with steam or hydrogen to form methane. Enhanced catalyst stability for long term, cyclic operation is obtained by the incorporation of an alkali or alkaline earth dopant in a silica binding agent added to the catalyst-support additive composition.

  12. Stationary stability for evolutionary dynamics in finite populations

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, Marc; Fryer, Dashiell

    2016-08-25

    Here, we demonstrate a vast expansion of the theory of evolutionary stability to finite populations with mutation, connecting the theory of the stationary distribution of the Moran process with the Lyapunov theory of evolutionary stability. We define the notion of stationary stability for the Moran process with mutation and generalizations, as well as a generalized notion of evolutionary stability that includes mutation called an incentive stable state (ISS) candidate. For sufficiently large populations, extrema of the stationary distribution are ISS candidates and we give a family of Lyapunov quantities that are locally minimized at the stationary extrema and at ISS candidates. In various examples, including for the Moran andWright–Fisher processes, we show that the local maxima of the stationary distribution capture the traditionally-defined evolutionarily stable states. The classical stability theory of the replicator dynamic is recovered in the large population limit. Finally we include descriptions of possible extensions to populations of variable size and populations evolving on graphs.

  13. Stability of focal adhesion enhanced by its inner force fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhi-Xiu; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Chen, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Cells actively sense and respond to mechanical signals from the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions. By representing a single focal adhesion as a cluster of slip bonds, it has been demonstrated that the cluster often became unstable under fluctuated forces. However, an unusual case was also reported, where the stability of the cluster might be substantially enhanced by a fluctuated force with a relatively low fluctuation frequency and high fluctuation amplitude. Such an observation cannot be explained by the conventional fracture theory of fatigue. Here, we intensively investigate this intriguing observation by carrying out systematic parametric studies. Our intensive simulation results indicate that stability enhancement of this kind is in fact quite robust, which can be affected by the stochastic features of a single bond and the profile of the fluctuated forces such as the average value of bond force. We then suggest that the fluctuation of traction force within a focal adhesion might enhance its stability in a certain way. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.*11372279).

  14. Dispersive Elements for Enhanced Laser Gyroscopy and Cavity Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok; Diels, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the effect of a highly dispersive element placed inside a modulated optical cavity on the frequency and amplitude of the modulation to determine the conditions for cavity self-stabilization and enhanced gyroscopic sensitivity. We find an enhancement in the sensitivity of a laser gyroscope to rotation for normal dispersion, while anomalous dispersion can be used to self-stabilize an optical cavity. Our results indicate that atomic media, even coherent superpositions in multilevel atoms, are of limited use for these applications, because the amplitude and phase filters work against one another, i.e., decreasing the modulation frequency increases its amplitude and vice-versa. On the other hand, for optical resonators the dispersion reversal associated with critical coupling enables the amplitude and phase filters to work together. We find that for over-coupled resonators, the absorption and normal dispersion on-resonance increase the contrast and frequency of the beat-note, respectively, resulting in a substantial enhancement of the gyroscopic response. Under-coupled resonators can be used to stabilize the frequency of a laser cavity, but result in a concomitant increase in amplitude fluctuations. As a more ideal solution we propose the use of a variety of coupled-resonator-induced transparency that is accompanied by anomalous dispersion.

  15. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2004-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  16. Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2003-01-01

    Force and moment measurements from an F-16XL during forced pitch oscillation tests result in dynamic stability derivatives, which are measured in combinations. Initial computational simulations of the motions and combined derivatives are attempted via a low-order, time-dependent panel method computational fluid dynamics code. The code dynamics are shown to be highly questionable for this application and the chosen configuration. However, three methods to computationally separate such combined dynamic stability derivatives are proposed. One of the separation techniques is demonstrated on the measured forced pitch oscillation data. Extensions of the separation techniques to yawing and rolling motions are discussed. In addition, the possibility of considering the angles of attack and sideslip state vector elements as distributed quantities, rather than point quantities, is introduced.

  17. Feedline dynamic effects on shuttle POGO stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimaggio, O. D.; Nishimoto, T.

    1972-01-01

    The transmission parameters for the dynamic characteristics of a feedline were approximated using both power and product series expansions. The feedline transfer functions of a shuttle orbiter feedline configuration were obtained using power and product series approximations of 60th, 120th, 180th, and 240th, order. Bode plots using the above polynomial approximations were obtained and the results compared with the exact solution. The exact solution to the feedline transfer function was obtained by using the transcendental terms appearing in the transmission parameters. The results show that the shuttle orbiter feedline may be modeled adequately by using polynomial approximations for the transcendental functions appearing in the transmission parameters. The power series approach was shown to be preferable to the product series method.

  18. Memory, sleep, and dynamic stabilization of neural circuitry: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kavanau, J L

    1996-01-01

    Some aspects of the evolution of mechanisms for enhancement and maintenance of synaptic efficacy are treated. After the origin of use-dependent synaptic plasticity, frequent synaptic activation (dynamic stabilization, DS) probably prolonged transient efficacy enhancements induced by single activations. In many "primitive" invertebrates inhabiting essentially unvarying aqueous environments, DS of synapses occurs primarily in the course of frequent functional use. In advanced locomoting ectotherms encountering highly varied environments, DS is thought to occur both through frequent functional use and by spontaneous "non-utilitarian" activations that occur primarily during rest. Non-utilitarian activations are induced by endogenous oscillatory neuronal activity, the need for which might have been one of the sources of selective pressure for the evolution of neurons with oscillatory firing capacities. As non-sleeping animals evolved increasingly complex brains, ever greater amounts of circuitry encoding inherited and experiential information (memories) required maintenance. The selective pressure for the evolution of sleep may have been the need to depress perception and processing of sensory inputs to minimize interference with DS of this circuitry. As the higher body temperatures and metabolic rates of endothermy evolved, mere skeletal muscle hypotonia evidently did not suffice to prevent sleep-disrupting skeletal muscle contractions during DS of motor circuitry. Selection against sleep disruption may have led to the evolution of further decreases in muscle tone, paralleling the increase in metabolic rate, and culminating in the postural atonia of REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. Phasic variations in heart and respiratory rates during REM sleep may result from superposition of activations accomplishing non-utilitarian DS of redundant and modulatory motor circuitry on the rhythmic autonomic control mechanisms. Accompanying non-utilitarian DS of circuitry during sleep

  19. Advanced anaerobic processes to enhance waste activated sludge stabilization.

    PubMed

    Braguglia, C M; Carozza, N; Gagliano, M C; Gallipoli, A; Gianico, A; Rossetti, S; Suschka, J; Tomei, M C; Mininni, G

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for enhanced stabilization processes to obtain a more stable, pathogen-free sludge for agricultural use is an increasing challenge to comply with in the waste hierarchy. With this in mind, the Routes European project ('Novel processing routes for effective sewage sludge management') is addressed to assess innovative solutions with the aim of maximizing sludge quality and biological stability. In order to increase anaerobic stabilization performances, the sequential anerobic/aerobic process and the thermophilic digestion process, with or without integration of the thermal hydrolysis pre-treatment, were investigated as regards the effect on sludge stabilization, dewaterability and digestion performances. Thermal pre-treatment improved anaerobic digestion in terms of volatile solids reduction and biogas production, but digestate dewaterability worsened. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) quantification showed an increase of methanogens consistent with the increase of biogas produced. The aerobic post-treatment after mesophilic digestion had a beneficial effect on dewaterability and stability of the digested sludge even if was with a reduction of the potential energy recovery.

  20. Classification of Intact Stability Standards for Dynamically Supported Craft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    ships and craft at sea are based upon displacement mode operation and cannot adequately be applied to high-speed craft when operating with their dynamic...See USCG Standards for example) (b) Criteria based on GM and the statical and dynamical righting levers as used by IMCO for example. (c) Criteria which...d) Newly developing criteria which are based on the theory of stability of ship motion. (See Odabasi 1976, and USCG sponsored work by Bovet 1973 and

  1. Elementary Applications of a Rotorcraft Dynamic Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1976-01-01

    A number of applications of a rotorcraft aeroelastic analysis are presented to verify that the analysis encompasses the classical solutions of rotor dynamics, and to examine the influence of certain features of the model. Results are given for the following topics: flapping frequency response to pitch control; forward flight flapping stability; pitch/flap flutter and divergence; ground resonance instability; and the flight dynamics of several representative helicopters.

  2. Role of reflex dynamics in spinal stability: intrinsic muscle stiffness alone is insufficient for stability.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Kevin M; Granata, Kevin P

    2007-01-01

    Spinal stability is related to both the intrinsic stiffness of active muscle as well as neuromuscular reflex response. However, existing analyses of spinal stability ignore the role of the reflex response, focusing solely on the intrinsic muscle stiffness associated with voluntary activation patterns in the torso musculature. The goal of this study was to empirically characterize the role of reflex components of spinal stability during voluntary trunk extension exertions. Pseudorandom position perturbations of the torso and associated driving forces were recorded in 11 healthy adults. Nonlinear systems-identification analyses of the measured data provided an estimate of total systems dynamics that explained 81% of the movement variability. Proportional intrinsic response was less than zero in more than 60% of the trials, e.g. mean value of P(INT) during the 20% maximum voluntary exertion trunk extension exertions -415+/-354N/m. The negative value indicated that the intrinsic muscle stiffness was not sufficient to stabilize the spine without reflex response. Reflexes accounted for 42% of the total stabilizing trunk stiffness. Both intrinsic and reflex components of stiffness increased significantly with trunk extension effort. Results reveal that reflex dynamics are a necessary component in the stabilizing control of spinal stability.

  3. Role of Reflex Dynamics in Spinal Stability: Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Alone is Insufficient for Stability

    PubMed Central

    Moorhouse, Kevin M.; Granata, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    Spinal stability is related to both the intrinsic stiffness of active muscle as well as neuromuscular reflex response. However, existing analyses of spinal stability ignore the role of the reflex response, focusing solely on the intrinsic muscle stiffness associated with voluntary activation patterns in the torso musculature. The goal of this study was to empirically characterize the role of reflex components of spinal stability during voluntary trunk extension exertions. Pseudorandom position perturbations of the torso and associated driving forces were recorded in 11 healthy adults. Nonlinear systems-identification analyses of the measured data provided an estimate of total systems dynamics that explained 81% of the movement variability. Proportional intrinsic response was less than zero in more than 60% of the trials, e.g. mean value of PINT during the 20% maximum voluntary exertion trunk extension exertions 415±354 N/m. The negative value indicated that the intrinsic muscle stiffness was not sufficient to stabilize the spine without reflex response. Reflexes accounted for 42% of the total stabilizing trunk stiffness. Both intrinsic and reflex components of stiffness increased significantly with trunk extension effort. Results reveal that reflex dynamics are a necessary component in the stabilizing control of spinal stability. PMID:16782106

  4. Enhanced structural stability of nanoporous zirconia under irradiation of He

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tengfei; Huang, Xuejun; Wang, Chenxu; Zhang, Yanwen; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    This work reports a greatly enhanced tolerance for He irradiation-induced swelling in nanocrystalline zirconia film with interconnected nanoporous structure (hereinafter referred as to NC-C). Compared to bulk yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and another nanocrystalline zirconia film only with discrete nano voids (hereinafter referred as to NC-V), the NC-C film reveals good tolerance for irradiation of high-fluence He. No appreciable surface blistering can be found even at the highest fluence of 6 1017 cm2 in NCC film. From TEM analysis of as-irradiated samples, the enhanced tolerance for volume swelling in NCC film is attributed to the enhanced diffusion mechanism of deposited He via widely distributed nano channels. Furthermore, the growth of grain size is quite small for both nanocrystalline zirconia films after irradiation, which is ascribed to the decreasing of area of grain boundary due to loose structure and low energy of primary knock-on atoms for He ions.

  5. Dynamic flight stability of a hovering model dragonfly.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Sun, Mao

    2014-05-07

    The longitudinal dynamic flight stability of a model dragonfly at hovering flight is studied, using the method of computational fluid dynamics to compute the stability derivatives and the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis for solving the equations of motion. Three natural modes of motion are identified for the hovering flight: one unstable oscillatory mode, one stable fast subsidence mode and one stable slow subsidence mode. The flight is dynamically unstable owing to the unstable oscillatory mode. The instability is caused by a pitch-moment derivative with respect to horizontal velocity. The damping force and moment derivatives (with respect to horizontal and vertical velocities and pitch-rotational velocity, respectively) weaken the instability considerably. The aerodynamic interaction between the forewing and the hindwing does not have significant effect on the stability properties. The dragonfly has similar stability derivatives, hence stability properties, to that of a one-wing-pair insect at normal hovering, but there are differences in how the derivatives are produced because of the highly inclined stroke plane of the dragonfly.

  6. Constraints on dynamic stability during forward, backward and lateral locomotion in skilled football players.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of speed and plane of motion on stability during locomotion in skilled football players. Ten male national-level football players participated in this study to run forward, backward and in lateral directions on a treadmill at 80%, 100% and 120% of their preferred running speeds. The coordinate data of passive reflective markers attached to body segments were recorded using motion capture systems. Time series data obtained from the ankle marker were used for further analyses. The largest finite-time Lyapunov exponent and maximum Floquet multiplier were adopted to quantify local and orbital dynamic stabilities, respectively. Results showed that speed did not significantly change local and orbital dynamic stabilities in any of running patterns. However, both local and orbital dynamic stability were significantly higher in the secondary plane of progression. Data revealed that in running, unlike walking, stability in the direction perpendicular to the direction of running is significantly higher, implying that less active control is required in the secondary plane of progression. The results of this study could be useful in sports training and rehabilitation programmes where development of fundamental exercise programmes that challenge both speed and the ability to maintain stability might produce a tangible enhancement of athletic skill level.

  7. Morphological stability and fluid dynamics of vapor crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, F. E.

    1984-01-01

    Research on morphological stability and fluid dynamics of crystal growth is discussed. Interfacial heat and mass transfer research is discussed. The finding of surface roughening is a precursor to a solid-solid phase transition was further quantified. Progress was obtained with the mass spectroscopic characterization of GeSe-Ge I sub 4.

  8. Vesicle Stability and Dynamics: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Bianco, Cristina; Torino, Domenica; Mansy, Sheref S.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory exercise is described that helps students learn about lipid self-assembly by making vesicles under different solution conditions. Concepts covering the chemical properties of different lipids, the dynamics of lipids, and vesicle stability are explored. Further, the described protocol is easy and cheap to implement. One to two…

  9. Vesicle Stability and Dynamics: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Bianco, Cristina; Torino, Domenica; Mansy, Sheref S.

    2014-01-01

    A laboratory exercise is described that helps students learn about lipid self-assembly by making vesicles under different solution conditions. Concepts covering the chemical properties of different lipids, the dynamics of lipids, and vesicle stability are explored. Further, the described protocol is easy and cheap to implement. One to two…

  10. Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System (DSIS). Volume 3; User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Boyden, Richmond P.; Dress, David A.; Jordan, Thomas L.

    1996-01-01

    The paper is an operating manual for the Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System in specific NASA Langley wind tunnels. The instrumentation system performs either a synchronous demodulation or a Fast Fourier Transform on dynamic balance strain gage signals, and ultimately computes aerodynamic coefficients. The dynamic balance converts sting motor rotation into pitch or yaw plane or roll axis oscillation, with timing information provided by a shaft encoder. Additional instruments control model attitude and balance temperature and monitor sting vibrations. Other instruments perform self-calibration and diagnostics. Procedures for conducting calibrations and wind-off and wind-on tests are listed.

  11. Adaptive steady-state stabilization for nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David J.

    2008-07-01

    By means of LaSalle’s invariance principle, we propose an adaptive controller with the aim of stabilizing an unstable steady state for a wide class of nonlinear dynamical systems. The control technique does not require analytical knowledge of the system dynamics and operates without any explicit knowledge of the desired steady-state position. The control input is achieved using only system states with no computer analysis of the dynamics. The proposed strategy is tested on Lorentz, van der Pol, and pendulum equations.

  12. The Relationship Between Dynamic Stability and Multidirectional Speed.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Schultz, Adrian B; Callaghan, Samuel J; Jeffriess, Matthew D

    2016-11-01

    Lockie, RG, Schultz, AB, Callaghan, SJ, and Jeffriess, MD. The relationship between dynamic stability and multidirectional speed. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3033-3043, 2016-Dynamic stability is said to contribute to multidirectional (linear and change-of-direction) speed, although little research confirms this. This study analyzed the relationship between dynamic stability as measured by lower-limb functional reaching in 6 directions (anterolateral, lateral, posterolateral, posteromedial, medial, and anteromedial) within a modified star excursion balance test and multidirectional speed (40-m sprint: 0-10, 0-20, and 0-40 m intervals; T-test; change-of-direction and acceleration test [CODAT]). Sixteen male field sport athletes (age, 23.31 ± 5.34 years; height, 1.78 ± 0.07 m; mass, 80.60 ± 9.89 kg) completed testing. A 1-way analysis of variance determined significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences in excursions between faster and slower subjects. All data were pooled for a Spearman's correlation analysis (p ≤ 0.05). Faster subjects had greater left leg medial reach (76.24 ± 5.33 vs. 65.94 ± 10.75%), right leg posteromedial reach (85.20 ± 8.07 vs. 73.59 ± 12.64%), and a smaller between-leg difference in lateral reach (2.26 ± 1.85 vs. 6.46 ± 4.29%). Longer reach distances (greater dynamic stability) correlated with faster speed test times (ρ = -0.499 to 0.664). Dynamic stability relationships were pronounced for the change-of-direction speed tests. For example, smaller between-leg excursion differences in anterolateral, lateral, posterolateral, and posteromedial reaches related to faster T-test and CODAT times (ρ = 0.502-0.804). There is a relationship between dynamic stability as measured by functional reaching and multidirectional speed in field sport athletes, possibly because of similarities in movement demands and muscle recruitment. Dynamic stability training could strengthen muscles for multidirectional sprinting and develop functional joint motion.

  13. Multiple-node basin stability in complex dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Chiranjit; Choudhary, Anshul; Sinha, Sudeshna; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-03-01

    Dynamical entities interacting with each other on complex networks often exhibit multistability. The stability of a desired steady regime (e.g., a synchronized state) to large perturbations is critical in the operation of many real-world networked dynamical systems such as ecosystems, power grids, the human brain, etc. This necessitates the development of appropriate quantifiers of stability of multiple stable states of such systems. Motivated by the concept of basin stability (BS) [P. J. Menck et al., Nat. Phys. 9, 89 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2516], we propose here the general framework of multiple-node basin stability for gauging the global stability and robustness of networked dynamical systems in response to nonlocal perturbations simultaneously affecting multiple nodes of a system. The framework of multiple-node BS provides an estimate of the critical number of nodes that, when simultaneously perturbed, significantly reduce the capacity of the system to return to the desired stable state. Further, this methodology can be applied to estimate the minimum number of nodes of the network to be controlled or safeguarded from external perturbations to ensure proper operation of the system. Multiple-node BS can also be utilized for probing the influence of spatially localized perturbations or targeted attacks to specific parts of a network. We demonstrate the potential of multiple-node BS in assessing the stability of the synchronized state in a deterministic scale-free network of Rössler oscillators and a conceptual model of the power grid of the United Kingdom with second-order Kuramoto-type nodal dynamics.

  14. Nonlinear Slewing Spacecraft Control Based on Exergy, Power Flow, and Static and Dynamic Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinett, Rush D.; Wilson, David G.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a new nonlinear control methodology for slewing spacecraft, which provides both necessary and sufficient conditions for stability by identifying the stability boundaries, rigid body modes, and limit cycles. Conservative Hamiltonian system concepts, which are equivalent to static stability of airplanes, are used to find and deal with the static stability boundaries: rigid body modes. The application of exergy and entropy thermodynamic concepts to the work-rate principle provides a natural partitioning through the second law of thermodynamics of power flows into exergy generator, dissipator, and storage for Hamiltonian systems that is employed to find the dynamic stability boundaries: limit cycles. This partitioning process enables the control system designer to directly evaluate and enhance the stability and performance of the system by balancing the power flowing into versus the power dissipated within the system subject to the Hamiltonian surface (power storage). Relationships are developed between exergy, power flow, static and dynamic stability, and Lyapunov analysis. The methodology is demonstrated with two illustrative examples: (1) a nonlinear oscillator with sinusoidal damping and (2) a multi-input-multi-output three-axis slewing spacecraft that employs proportional-integral-derivative tracking control with numerical simulation results.

  15. Dynamic Stability of Uncertain Laminated Beams Under Subtangential Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyal, Vijay K.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Adelman, Howard (Technical Monitor); Horta, Lucas (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of the inherent complexity of fiber-reinforced laminated composites, it can be challenging to manufacture composite structures according to their exact design specifications, resulting in unwanted material and geometric uncertainties. In this research, we focus on the deterministic and probabilistic stability analysis of laminated structures subject to subtangential loading, a combination of conservative and nonconservative tangential loads, using the dynamic criterion. Thus a shear-deformable laminated beam element, including warping effects, is derived to study the deterministic and probabilistic response of laminated beams. This twenty-one degrees of freedom element can be used for solving both static and dynamic problems. In the first-order shear deformable model used here we have employed a more accurate method to obtain the transverse shear correction factor. The dynamic version of the principle of virtual work for laminated composites is expressed in its nondimensional form and the element tangent stiffness and mass matrices are obtained using analytical integration The stability is studied by giving the structure a small disturbance about an equilibrium configuration, and observing if the resulting response remains small. In order to study the dynamic behavior by including uncertainties into the problem, three models were developed: Exact Monte Carlo Simulation, Sensitivity Based Monte Carlo Simulation, and Probabilistic FEA. These methods were integrated into the developed finite element analysis. Also, perturbation and sensitivity analysis have been used to study nonconservative problems, as well as to study the stability analysis, using the dynamic criterion.

  16. Dynamic stability of unidirectional fiber-reinforced viscoelastic composite plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandiramani, N. K.; Librescu, L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper deals with a dynamic stability analysis of unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite viscoelastic plates subjected to compressive edge loads. The integrodifferential equations governing the stability problem are obtained by using, in conjunction with a Boltzmann hereditary constitutive law for a three-dimensional viscoelastic medium, a higher-order shear deformation theory of orthotropic plates. Such a theory incorporates transverse shear deformation, transverse normal stress, and rotatory inertia effects. The solution of the stability problem as considered within this paper concerns the determination of the critical in-plane edge loads yielding the asymptotic instability. Numerical applications, based on material properties derived within the framework of Aboudi's micromechanical model, are presented and pertinent conclusions concerning the nature of the loss of stability and the influence of various parameters are outlined.

  17. Enhanced stability of catalase covalently immobilized on functionalized titania submicrospheres.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Liang, Yanpeng; Shi, Jiafu; Wang, Xiaoli; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Zhongyi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a novel approach combing the chelation and covalent binding was explored for facile and efficient enzyme immobilization. The unique capability of titania to chelate with catecholic derivatives at ambient conditions was utilized for titania surface functionalization. The functionalized titania was then used for enzyme immobilization. Titania submicrospheres (500-600 nm) were synthesized by a modified sol-gel method and functionalized with carboxylic acid groups through a facile chelation method by using 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) propionic acid as the chelating agent. Then, catalase (CAT) was covalently immobilized on these functionalized titania submicrospheres through 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. The immobilized CAT retained 65% of its free form activity with a loading capacity of 100-150 mg/g titania. The pH stability, thermostability, recycling stability and storage stability of the immobilized CAT were evaluated. A remarkable enhancement in enzyme stability was achieved. The immobilized CAT retained 90% and 76% of its initial activity after 10 and 16 successive cycles of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. Both the Km and the Vmax values of the immobilized CAT (27.4 mM, 13.36 mM/min) were close to those of the free CAT (25.7 mM, 13.46 mM/min).

  18. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-14

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  19. The validity and reliability of a dynamic neuromuscular stabilization-heel sliding test for core stability.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young Joo; Lee, Jae Jin; Kim, Do Hyun; You, Joshua Sung H

    2017-07-21

    Core stabilization plays an important role in the regulation of postural stability. To overcome shortcomings associated with pain and severe core instability during conventional core stabilization tests, we recently developed the dynamic neuromuscular stabilization-based heel sliding (DNS-HS) test. The purpose of this study was to establish the criterion validity and test-retest reliability of the novel DNS-HS test. Twenty young adults with core instability completed both the bilateral straight leg lowering test (BSLLT) and DNS-HS test for the criterion validity study and repeated the DNS-HS test for the test-retest reliability study. Criterion validity was determined by comparing hip joint angle data that were obtained from BSLLT and DNS-HS measures. The test-retest reliability was determined by comparing hip joint angle data. Criterion validity was (ICC2,3) = 0.700 (p< 0.05), suggesting a good relationship between the two core stability measures. Test-retest reliability was (ICC3,3) = 0.953 (p< 0.05), indicating excellent consistency between the repeated DNS-HS measurements. Criterion validity data demonstrated a good relationship between the gold standard BSLLT and DNS-HS core stability measures. Test-retest reliability data suggests that DNS-HS core stability was a reliable test for core stability. Clinically, the DNS-HS test is useful to objectively quantify core instability and allow early detection and evaluation.

  20. PEGylation enhancement of pH stability of uricase via inhibitive tetramer dissociation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong; Guo, Yuan; Gao, Xiangdong; Yao, Wenbing

    2013-01-01

    Previously, PEGylated uricase was demonstrated to maintain catalytic activity at pH 5.8, the isoelectric point of uricase, where native uricase ceases to function. To find out whether PEGylation could enhance pH stability of uricase, the enzyme activity to pH curve was completely characterized. Complete characterization of the enzyme activity to pH curve, indicating an inverted bell-shaped relationship not previously documented, is presented. PEGylation enhancement of uricase stability at a pH lower than that commonly found in the liver, can be explored by dynamic dissociation of uricase using ultrafiltration and size-exclusion chromatography. The results suggest the role of PEGylation in enhanced pH stability is via inhibition of subunit disintegration. The mechanism of this effect is characterized by the wrapping of PEG chains around uricase, providing a flexible shell preventing subunit disintegration. The presence of notable PEGylation-induced changes in uricase supports this mechanism and include improved enzyme-substrate affinity and elevated thermal stability. Characterization of PEGylated uricase provides a basis for the rational design of therapeutic PEGylated proteins. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  1. Enhanced mobility of fullerene (C60) nanoparticles in the presence of stabilizing agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yonggang; Li, Yusong; Costanza, Jed; Abriola, Linda M; Pennell, Kurt D

    2012-11-06

    Experimental and mathematical modeling studies were performed to examine the effects of stabilizing agents on the transport and retention of fullerene nanoparticles (nC(60)) in water-saturated quartz sand. Three stabilizing systems were considered: naturally occurring compounds known to stabilize nanoparticles (Suwannee river humic acid (SRHA) and fulvic acid (SRFA)), synthetic additives used to enhance nanoparticle stability (Tween 80, a nonionic surfactant), and residual contaminants resulting from the manufacturing process (tetrahydrofuran (THF)). The results of column experiments demonstrated that the presence of THF, at concentrations up to 44.5 mg/L, did not alter nC(60) transport and retention behavior, whereas addition of SRHA (20 mg C/L), SRFA (20 mg C/L), or Tween 80 (1000 mg/L) to the influent nC(60) suspensions dramatically increased the mobility of nC(60), as demonstrated by coincidental nanoparticle and nonreactive tracer effluent breakthrough curves (BTCs) and minimal nC(60) retention. When columns were preflushed with surfactant, nC(60) transport was significantly enhanced compared to that in the absence of a stabilizing agent. The presence of adsorbed Tween 80 resulted in nC(60) BTCs characterized by a declining plateau and retention profiles that exhibited hyperexponential decay. The observed nC(60) transport and retention behavior was accurately captured by a mathematical model that accounted for coupled surfactant adsorption-desorption dynamics, surfactant-nanoparticle interactions, and particle attachment kinetics.

  2. Multijoint dynamics and postural stability of the human arm.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Eric J; Kirsch, Robert F; Crago, Patrick E

    2004-08-01

    The goal of this study was to examine how the mechanical properties of the human arm are modulated during isometric force regulation tasks. Specifically, we examined whether the dynamic stability of the limb remained nearly invariant across a range of voluntarily generated endpoint forces and limb postures. Previous single joint studies have demonstrated that dynamic joint stability, as quantified via estimates of the joint damping ratio, is nearly invariant during isometric torque regulation tasks. However, the relevance of these findings to the control of multijoint posture has not been investigated previously. A similar degree of invariance at the multijoint level could suggest a fundamental property of the motor system that could be incorporated into the planning and execution of multijoint tasks. In this work, limb mechanics were quantified using estimates of dynamic endpoint stiffness, which characterizes the relationship between imposed displacements of limb posture and the forces opposing those displacements. Endpoint stiffness was estimated using a two-link robot operating in the horizontal plane at the height of each subject's glenohumeral joint. The robot was used to apply stochastic position perturbations to the arm and to measure the resulting forces. Endpoint stiffness dynamics were estimated nonparametrically and subsequently summarized using inertial, viscous and elastic parameters. We found that in the tasks studied, there was a differential modulation of endpoint elasticity and endpoint viscosity. Elasticity increased nearly linearly with increases in voluntary force generation while viscosity increased nonlinearly. This differential regulation resulted in limb dynamics that had a remarkably consistent damping ratio across all subjects and all tested conditions. These results emphasize the importance of considering the full dynamic response of a limb when investigating multijoint stability, and suggest that a minimal degree of limb stability is

  3. Dynamic postural stability in blind athletes using the biodex stability system.

    PubMed

    Aydoğ, E; Aydoğ, S T; Cakci, A; Doral, M N

    2006-05-01

    Three systems affect the upright standing posture in humans - visual, vestibular, and somatosensory. It is well known that the visually impaired individuals have bad postural balance. On the other hand, it is a well documented fact that some sports can improve postural balance. Therefore, it is aimed in this study to evaluate the dynamic postural stability in goal-ball athletes. Twenty blind goal-ball players, 20 sighted and 20 sedentary blind controls were evaluated using the Biodex Stability System. Three adaptation trials and three test evaluations (a 20-second balance test at a platform stability of 8) were applied to the blind people, and to the sighted with eyes open and closed. Dynamic postural stability was measured on the basis of three indices: overall, anteroposterior, and mediolateral. Means of each test score were calculated. The tests results were compared for the blind athletes, sighted (with eyes open and closed) subjects, and sedentary blind people. There were significant differences between the results of the blind people and the sighted subjects with regards to all of the three indices. Although the stability of goal-ball players was better than sedentary blinds', only ML index values were statistically different (4.47 +/- 1.24 in the goal-ball players; 6.46 +/- 3.42 in the sedentary blind, p = 0.04). Dynamic postural stability was demonstrated to be affected by vision; and it was found that blind people playing goal-ball 1 - 2 days per week have higher ML stability than the sedentary sighted people.

  4. Dynamical behavior and Jacobi stability analysis of wound strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lake, Matthew J.; Harko, Tiberiu

    2016-06-01

    We numerically solve the equations of motion (EOM) for two models of circular cosmic string loops with windings in a simply connected internal space. Since the windings cannot be topologically stabilized, stability must be achieved (if at all) dynamically. As toy models for realistic compactifications, we consider windings on a small section of mathbb {R}^2, which is valid as an approximation to any simply connected internal manifold if the winding radius is sufficiently small, and windings on an S^2 of constant radius mathcal {R}. We then use Kosambi-Cartan-Chern (KCC) theory to analyze the Jacobi stability of the string equations and determine bounds on the physical parameters that ensure dynamical stability of the windings. We find that, for the same initial conditions, the curvature and topology of the internal space have nontrivial effects on the microscopic behavior of the string in the higher dimensions, but that the macroscopic behavior is remarkably insensitive to the details of the motion in the compact space. This suggests that higher-dimensional signatures may be extremely difficult to detect in the effective (3+1)-dimensional dynamics of strings compactified on an internal space, even if configurations with nontrivial windings persist over long time periods.

  5. Summary of Methods for Calculating Dynamic Lateral Stability and Response and for Estimating Lateral Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, John P; Mckinney, Marion O

    1951-01-01

    A summary of methods for making dynamic lateral stability and response calculations and for estimating the aerodynamic stability derivatives required for use in these calculations is presented. The processes of performing calculations of the time histories of lateral motions, of the period and damping of these motions, and of the lateral stability boundaries are presented as a series of simple straightforward steps. Existing methods for estimating the stability derivatives are summarized and, in some cases, simple new empirical formulas are presented. Reference is also made to reports presenting experimental data that should be useful in making estimates of the derivatives. Detailed estimating methods are presented for low-subsonic-speed conditions but only a brief discussion and a list of references are given for transonic- and supersonic-speed conditions.

  6. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1998-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigation of the stability of nonaxisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric bridges contained between equal and unequal radii disks as a function of Bond and Weber number with emphasis on the transition from unstable axisymmetric to stable nonaxisymmetric shapes. Numerical analysis of the stability of nonaxisymmetric bridges for various orientations of the gravity vector for equal and unequal disks. Experimental and theoretical investigation of large (nonaxisymmetric) oscillations and breaking of liquid bridges. This project involves both experimental and theoretical work. Static and dynamic experiments are conducted in a Plateau tank which makes a range of static Bond numbers accessible.

  7. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Piriz, A R; Rodriguez Prieto, G; Muñoz Díaz, I; López Cela, J J; Tahir, N A

    2010-08-01

    Dynamic stabilization of incompressible and immiscible newtonian fluids is studied by means of an approximate analytical model that considers the vertical vibration of the interface between the fluids. The force driving the vibration is modeled by periodic sequences of Dirac deltas. The model shows the roles played by surface tension and viscosity in determining the stability boundaries and the relevant similarity parameters are found. The results are compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies that used a sinusoidal vibration and they are found to present the same qualitative features provided a symmetric sequence of Dirac deltas is considered. Instead, important differences are observed when an asymmetric driving is used.

  8. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Newtonian fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R.; Rodriguez Prieto, G.; Munoz Diaz, I.; Lopez Cela, J. J.; Tahir, N. A.

    2010-08-15

    Dynamic stabilization of incompressible and immiscible Newtonian fluids is studied by means of an approximate analytical model that considers the vertical vibration of the interface between the fluids. The force driving the vibration is modeled by periodic sequences of Dirac deltas. The model shows the roles played by surface tension and viscosity in determining the stability boundaries and the relevant similarity parameters are found. The results are compared with previous theoretical and experimental studies that used a sinusoidal vibration and they are found to present the same qualitative features provided a symmetric sequence of Dirac deltas is considered. Instead, important differences are observed when an asymmetric driving is used.

  9. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  10. Dynamic stabilization of classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Piriz, A. R.; Piriz, S. A.; Tahir, N. A.

    2011-09-15

    Dynamic stabilization of classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied by modeling the interface vibration with the simplest possible wave form, namely, a sequence of Dirac deltas. As expected, stabilization results to be impossible. However, in contradiction to previously reported results obtained with a sinusoidal driving, it is found that in general the perturbation amplitude is larger than in the classical case. Therefore, no beneficial effect can be obtained from the vertical vibration of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface between two ideal fluids.

  11. Dynamics and Adaptive Control for Stability Recovery of Damaged Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Kaneshige, John; Nespeca, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a recent study of a damaged generic transport model as part of a NASA research project to investigate adaptive control methods for stability recovery of damaged aircraft operating in off-nominal flight conditions under damage and or failures. Aerodynamic modeling of damage effects is performed using an aerodynamic code to assess changes in the stability and control derivatives of a generic transport aircraft. Certain types of damage such as damage to one of the wings or horizontal stabilizers can cause the aircraft to become asymmetric, thus resulting in a coupling between the longitudinal and lateral motions. Flight dynamics for a general asymmetric aircraft is derived to account for changes in the center of gravity that can compromise the stability of the damaged aircraft. An iterative trim analysis for the translational motion is developed to refine the trim procedure by accounting for the effects of the control surface deflection. A hybrid direct-indirect neural network, adaptive flight control is proposed as an adaptive law for stabilizing the rotational motion of the damaged aircraft. The indirect adaptation is designed to estimate the plant dynamics of the damaged aircraft in conjunction with the direct adaptation that computes the control augmentation. Two approaches are presented 1) an adaptive law derived from the Lyapunov stability theory to ensure that the signals are bounded, and 2) a recursive least-square method for parameter identification. A hardware-in-the-loop simulation is conducted and demonstrates the effectiveness of the direct neural network adaptive flight control in the stability recovery of the damaged aircraft. A preliminary simulation of the hybrid adaptive flight control has been performed and initial data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid approach. Future work will include further investigations and high-fidelity simulations of the proposed hybrid adaptive Bight control approach.

  12. Rational design of rabies vaccine formulation for enhanced stability.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Veysel; Françon, Alain; Pinton, Hervé; Saluzzo, Jean-François; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2017-06-12

    Vaccines are often lyophilized in order to retain their stability and efficacy for a longer period of time. However, the same lyophilization process may also cause a major degradation of the vaccine, especially during early phases of manufacturing, leading to a loss of potency of the product. Many viral diseases, such as rabies, are acute and fatal unless the vaccine is administered prior to exposure or the onset of symptoms in the case of postexposure treatment. We investigated the effect of lyophilization on the stability of the virus structure during rabies vaccine manufacturing using dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Our results indicate that some viruses lose their stability and efficacy in the course of lyophilization if the pH of the cell culture medium is controlled by solvated CO2 because the structure of the rabies virus is very sensitive to the solution pH: the virus either aggregates or its shape is deformed at low solution pH, whereas at high pH empty capsid shells are formed. Based on our findings, we developed a new formulation for the rabies vaccine that is stable in different buffers owing to the prevention of pH upshift upon lyophilization.

  13. Dramatic pressure-driven enhancement of bulk skyrmion stability

    PubMed Central

    Levatić, I.; Popčević, P.; Šurija, V.; Kruchkov, A.; Berger, H.; Magrez, A.; White, J. S.; Rønnow, H. M.; Živković, I.

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of magnetic skyrmion lattices initiated a surge of interest in the scientific community. Several novel phenomena have been shown to emerge from the interaction of conducting electrons with the skyrmion lattice, such as a topological Hall-effect and a spin-transfer torque at ultra-low current densities. In the insulating compound Cu2OSeO3, magneto-electric coupling enables control of the skyrmion lattice via electric fields, promising a dissipation-less route towards novel spintronic devices. One of the outstanding fundamental issues is related to the thermodynamic stability of the skyrmion lattice. To date, the skyrmion lattice in bulk materials has been found only in a narrow temperature region just below the order-disorder transition. If this narrow stability is unavoidable, it would severely limit applications. Here we present the discovery that applying just moderate pressure on Cu2OSeO3 substantially increases the absolute size of the skyrmion pocket. This insight demonstrates directly that tuning the electronic structure can lead to a significant enhancement of the skyrmion lattice stability. We interpret the discovery by extending the previously employed Ginzburg-Landau approach and conclude that change in the anisotropy is the main driver for control of the size of the skyrmion pocket. PMID:26892190

  14. Method for enhancing stability in multi-beam microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yujia; Wang, Yifan; Kuang, Cuifang; Liu, Xu

    2016-10-01

    A method based on close loop control of four degrees of freedom (4DF) is proposed to enhance angular and translational stability of beams in multi-beam microscopy including STED, RESOLFT and CARS, etc. Deviations of multi-beams can be measured and corrected by our module, which is composed of four degrees of freedom position sensitive detectors (4DF PSD) and two actuator mirrors (AM) with motor and piezo servos. An output crosslink matrix obtained by a self-learning process is used to control four actuators to compensate for 4DF independently in beam deviations. We realize a standard deviation within about 2 µm at the entrance pupil plane (a spatial optical path of 180 cm for the whole system) using a compact stabilization system, which is equivalent to around 3 nm at the sample plane under the 100×  objective lens with a focal length of 2 mm, corresponding to an improvement of stability by an order of magnitude. Our method can react fast in real time and compensate for large disturbances caused by air agitation or temperature variation.

  15. Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System (DSIS). Volume 1: Hardware description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. L.; Daniels, T. S.; Hare, D. A.; Boyden, R. P.; Dress, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a hardware description manual for the Dynamic Stability Instrumentation System that is used in specific NASA Langley wind tunnels. The instrumentation system performs either a synchronous demodulation or a fast Fourier transform on dynamic balance strain gage signals, and ultimately computes aerodynamic coefficients. The DSIS consists of a double rack of instruments, a remote motor-generator set, two special stings each with motor driven shafts, and specially designed balances. The major components in the instrumentation rack include a personal computer, digital signal processor microcomputers, computer-controlled signal conditioners, function generator, digital multimeter, and an optional fast Fourier transform analyzer.

  16. Development of a transfer function method for dynamic stability measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1977-01-01

    Flutter testing method based on transfer function measurements is developed. The error statistics of several dynamic stability measurement methods are reviewed. It is shown that the transfer function measurement controls the error level by averaging the data and correlating the input and output. The method also gives a direct estimate of the error in the response measurement. An algorithm is developed for obtaining the natural frequency and damping ratio of low damped modes of the system, using integrals of the transfer function in the vicinity of a resonant peak. Guidelines are given for selecting the parameters in the transfer function measurement. Finally, the dynamic stability measurement technique is applied to data from a wind tunnel test of a proprotor and wing model.

  17. Conditional random matrix ensembles and the stability of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Paul; Rolando, Delphine M. Y.; MacLean, Adam L.; Stumpf, Michael P. H.

    2015-08-01

    Random matrix theory (RMT) has found applications throughout physics and applied mathematics, in subject areas as diverse as communications networks, population dynamics, neuroscience, and models of the banking system. Many of these analyses exploit elegant analytical results, particularly the circular law and its extensions. In order to apply these results, assumptions must be made about the distribution of matrix elements. Here we demonstrate that the choice of matrix distribution is crucial. In particular, adopting an unrealistic matrix distribution for the sake of analytical tractability is liable to lead to misleading conclusions. We focus on the application of RMT to the long-standing, and at times fractious, ‘diversity-stability debate’, which is concerned with establishing whether large complex systems are likely to be stable. Early work (and subsequent elaborations) brought RMT to bear on the debate by modelling the entries of a system’s Jacobian matrix as independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. These analyses were successful in yielding general results that were not tied to any specific system, but relied upon a restrictive i.i.d. assumption. Other studies took an opposing approach, seeking to elucidate general principles of stability through the analysis of specific systems. Here we develop a statistical framework that reconciles these two contrasting approaches. We use a range of illustrative dynamical systems examples to demonstrate that: (i) stability probability cannot be summarily deduced from any single property of the system (e.g. its diversity); and (ii) our assessment of stability depends on adequately capturing the details of the systems analysed. Failing to condition on the structure of dynamical systems will skew our analysis and can, even for very small systems, result in an unnecessarily pessimistic diagnosis of their stability.

  18. Intraspecific functional diversity of common species enhances community stability.

    PubMed

    Wood, Connor M; McKinney, Shawn T; Loftin, Cynthia S

    2017-03-01

    Common species are fundamental to the structure and function of their communities and may enhance community stability through intraspecific functional diversity (iFD). We measured among-habitat and within-habitat iFD (i.e., among- and within-plant community types) of two common small mammal species using stable isotopes and functional trait dendrograms, determined whether iFD was related to short-term population stability and small mammal community stability, and tested whether spatially explicit trait filters helped explain observed patterns of iFD. Southern red-backed voles (Myodes gapperi) had greater iFD than deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), both among habitats, and within the plant community in which they were most abundant (their "primary habitat"). Peromyscus maniculatus populations across habitats differed significantly between years and declined 78% in deciduous forests, their primary habitat, as did the overall deciduous forest small mammal community. Myodes gapperi populations were stable across habitats and within coniferous forest, their primary habitat, as was the coniferous forest small mammal community. Generalized linear models representing internal trait filters (e.g., competition), which increase within-habitat type iFD, best explained variation in M. gapperi diet, while models representing internal filters and external filters (e.g., climate), which suppress within-habitat iFD, best explained P. maniculatus diet. This supports the finding that M. gapperi had higher iFD than P. maniculatus and is consistent with the theory that internal trait filters are associated with higher iFD than external filters. Common species with high iFD can impart a stabilizing influence on their communities, information that can be important for conserving biodiversity under environmental change.

  19. Estimation of dynamic stability parameters from drop model flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Iliff, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    The overall remotely piloted drop model operation, descriptions, instrumentation, launch and recovery operations, piloting concept, and parameter identification methods are discussed. Static and dynamic stability derivatives were obtained for an angle attack range from -20 deg to 53 deg. It is indicated that the variations of the estimates with angle of attack are consistent for most of the static derivatives, and the effects of configuration modifications to the model were apparent in the static derivative estimates.

  20. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincaré maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed.

  1. Dynamic remedial action scheme using online transient stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Arun

    Economic pressure and environmental factors have forced the modern power systems to operate closer to their stability limits. However, maintaining transient stability is a fundamental requirement for the operation of interconnected power systems. In North America, power systems are planned and operated to withstand the loss of any single or multiple elements without violating North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) system performance criteria. For a contingency resulting in the loss of multiple elements (Category C), emergency transient stability controls may be necessary to stabilize the power system. Emergency control is designed to sense abnormal conditions and subsequently take pre-determined remedial actions to prevent instability. Commonly known as either Remedial Action Schemes (RAS) or as Special/System Protection Schemes (SPS), these emergency control approaches have been extensively adopted by utilities. RAS are designed to address specific problems, e.g. to increase power transfer, to provide reactive support, to address generator instability, to limit thermal overloads, etc. Possible remedial actions include generator tripping, load shedding, capacitor and reactor switching, static VAR control, etc. Among various RAS types, generation shedding is the most effective and widely used emergency control means for maintaining system stability. In this dissertation, an optimal power flow (OPF)-based generation-shedding RAS is proposed. This scheme uses online transient stability calculation and generator cost function to determine appropriate remedial actions. For transient stability calculation, SIngle Machine Equivalent (SIME) technique is used, which reduces the multimachine power system model to a One-Machine Infinite Bus (OMIB) equivalent and identifies critical machines. Unlike conventional RAS, which are designed using offline simulations, online stability calculations make the proposed RAS dynamic and adapting to any power system

  2. Dynamical behaviour of multiplanet systems close to their stability limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, F.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of systems of two and three planets, initially placed on circular and nearly coplanar orbits, is explored in the proximity of their stability limit. The evolution of a large number of systems is numerically computed and their dynamical behaviour is investigated with the frequency map analysis as chaos indicator. Following the guidance of this analysis, it is found that for two-planet systems the dependence of the Hill limit on the planet mass, usually made explicit through Hill's radius parametrization, does not appear to be fully adequate. In addition, frequent cases of stable chaos are found in the proximity of the Hill limit. For three-planet systems, the usual approach adopted in numerical explorations of their stability, where the planets are initially separated by multiples of the mutual Hill radius, appears too reducing. A detailed sampling of the parameter space reveals that systems with more packed inner planets are stable well within previous estimates of the stability limit. This suggests that a two-dimensional approach is needed to outline when three-planet systems are dynamically stable.

  3. Dynamics, stability, and statistics on lattices and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livi, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    These lectures aim at surveying some dynamical models that have been widely explored in the recent scientific literature as case studies of complex dynamical evolution, emerging from the spatio-temporal organization of several coupled dynamical variables. The first message is that a suitable mathematical description of such models needs tools and concepts borrowed from the general theory of dynamical systems and from out-of-equilibrium statistical mechanics. The second message is that the overall scenario is definitely reacher than the standard problems in these fields. For instance, systems exhibiting complex unpredictable evolution do not necessarily exhibit deterministic chaotic behavior (i.e., Lyapunov chaos) as it happens for dynamical models made of a few degrees of freedom. In fact, a very large number of spatially organized dynamical variables may yield unpredictable evolution even in the absence of Lyapunov instability. Such a mechanism may emerge from the combination of spatial extension and nonlinearity. Moreover, spatial extension allows one to introduce naturally disorder, or heterogeneity of the interactions as important ingredients for complex evolution. It is worth to point out that the models discussed in these lectures share such features, despite they have been inspired by quite different physical and biological problems. Along these lectures we describe also some of the technical tools employed for the study of such models, e.g., Lyapunov stability analysis, unpredictability indicators for "stable chaos," hydrodynamic description of transport in low spatial dimension, spectral decomposition of stochastic dynamics on directed networks, etc.

  4. Dynamics, stability, and statistics on lattices and networks

    SciTech Connect

    Livi, Roberto

    2014-07-15

    These lectures aim at surveying some dynamical models that have been widely explored in the recent scientific literature as case studies of complex dynamical evolution, emerging from the spatio-temporal organization of several coupled dynamical variables. The first message is that a suitable mathematical description of such models needs tools and concepts borrowed from the general theory of dynamical systems and from out-of-equilibrium statistical mechanics. The second message is that the overall scenario is definitely reacher than the standard problems in these fields. For instance, systems exhibiting complex unpredictable evolution do not necessarily exhibit deterministic chaotic behavior (i.e., Lyapunov chaos) as it happens for dynamical models made of a few degrees of freedom. In fact, a very large number of spatially organized dynamical variables may yield unpredictable evolution even in the absence of Lyapunov instability. Such a mechanism may emerge from the combination of spatial extension and nonlinearity. Moreover, spatial extension allows one to introduce naturally disorder, or heterogeneity of the interactions as important ingredients for complex evolution. It is worth to point out that the models discussed in these lectures share such features, despite they have been inspired by quite different physical and biological problems. Along these lectures we describe also some of the technical tools employed for the study of such models, e.g., Lyapunov stability analysis, unpredictability indicators for “stable chaos,” hydrodynamic description of transport in low spatial dimension, spectral decomposition of stochastic dynamics on directed networks, etc.

  5. Distributed Multi-Agent-Based Protection Scheme for Transient Stability Enhancement in Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. S.; Mahmud, M. A.; Pota, H. R.; Hossain, M. J.; Orchi, T. F.

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a new distributed agent-based scheme to enhance the transient stability of power systems by maintaining phase angle cohesiveness of interconnected generators through proper relay coordination with critical clearing time (CCT) information. In this distributed multi-agent infrastructure, intelligent agents represent various physical device models to provide dynamic information and energy flow among different physical processes of power systems. The agents can communicate with each other in a distributed manner with a final aim to control circuit breakers (CBs) with CCT information as this is the key issue for maintaining and enhancing the transient stability of power systems. The performance of the proposed scheme is evaluated on a standard IEEE 39-bus New England benchmark system under different large disturbances such as three-phase short-circuit faults and changes in loads within the systems. From the simulation results, it is found that the proposed scheme significantly enhances the transient stability of power systems as compared to a conventional scheme of static CB operation.

  6. Stability Enhancement of Polymeric Sensing Films Using Fillers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Brian; Shevade, Abhijit; Ryan, Margaret Amy; Kisor, Adam; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Manatt, Kenneth; Homer, Margie; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Experiments have shown the stability enhancement of polymeric sensing films on mixing the polymer with colloidal filler particles (submicron-sized) of carbon black, silver, titanium dioxide, and fumed silicon dioxide. The polymer films are candidates for potential use as sensing media in micro/nano chemical sensor devices. The need for stability enhancement of polymer sensing films arises because such films have been found to exhibit unpredictable changes in sensing activity over time, which could result in a possible failure of the sensor device. The changes in the physical properties of a polymer sensing film caused by the sorption of a target molecule can be measured by any of several established transduction techniques: electrochemical, optical, calorimetric, or piezoelectric, for example. The transduction technique used in the current polymer stability experiments is based on piezoelectric principles using a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). The surface of the QCM is coated with the polymer, and the mass uptake by the polymer film causes a change in the oscillating frequency of the quartz crystal. The polymer used for the current study is ethyl cellulose. The polymer/ polymer composite solutions were prepared in 1,3 dioxolane solvent. The filler concentration was fixed at 10 weight percent for the composites. The polymer or polymer composite solutions were cast on the quartz crystal having a fundamental frequency of about 6 MHz. The coated crystal was subjected to a multistage drying process to remove all measurable traces of the solvent. In each experiment, the frequency of oscillation was measured while the QCM was exposed to clean, dry, flowing air for about 30 minutes, then to air containing a known concentration of isopropanol for about 30 minutes, then again to clean dry air for about 30 minutes, and so forth. This cycle of measurements for varying isopropanol concentrations was repeated at intervals for several months. The figure depicts some of the

  7. Stationary stability for evolutionary dynamics in finite populations

    DOE PAGES

    Harper, Marc; Fryer, Dashiell

    2016-08-25

    Here, we demonstrate a vast expansion of the theory of evolutionary stability to finite populations with mutation, connecting the theory of the stationary distribution of the Moran process with the Lyapunov theory of evolutionary stability. We define the notion of stationary stability for the Moran process with mutation and generalizations, as well as a generalized notion of evolutionary stability that includes mutation called an incentive stable state (ISS) candidate. For sufficiently large populations, extrema of the stationary distribution are ISS candidates and we give a family of Lyapunov quantities that are locally minimized at the stationary extrema and at ISSmore » candidates. In various examples, including for the Moran andWright–Fisher processes, we show that the local maxima of the stationary distribution capture the traditionally-defined evolutionarily stable states. The classical stability theory of the replicator dynamic is recovered in the large population limit. Finally we include descriptions of possible extensions to populations of variable size and populations evolving on graphs.« less

  8. On D-brane dynamics and moduli stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki

    2017-09-01

    We discuss the effect of the dynamics of D-branes on moduli stabilization in type IIB string theory compactifications, with reference to a concrete toy model of T6/Z 3 orientifold compactification with fractional D3-branes and anti-D3-branes at orbifold fixed points. The resulting attractive forces between anti-D3-branes and D3-branes, together with the repulsive forces between anti-D3-branes and O3-planes, can affect the stability of the compact space. There are no complex structure moduli in T6/Z 3 orientifold, which should thus capture some generic features of more general settings where all complex structure moduli are stabilized by three-form fluxes. The simultaneous presence of branes and anti-branes brings along the breaking of supersymmetry. Non-BPS combinations of this type are typical of “brane supersymmetry breaking” and are a necessary ingredient in the KKLT scenario for stabilizing the remaining Kähler moduli. The conclusion of our analysis is that, while mutual D-brane interactions sometimes help Kähler moduli stabilization, this is not always the case.

  9. Apparent Tradeoff of Higher Activity in MMP-12 for Enhanced Stability and Flexibility in MMP-3

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangyang; Arunima, A.; Zhao, Yingchu; Bhaskaran, Rajagopalan; Shende, Anuradha; Byrne, Todd S.; Fleeks, Jeremy; Palmier, Mark O.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The greater activity of MMP-12 than MMP-3 toward substrates from protein fibrils has been quantified. Why is MMP-12 the more active protease? We looked for behaviors associated with the higher activity of MMP-12 than MMP-3, using nuclear magnetic resonance to monitor backbone dynamics and residue-specific stabilities of their catalytic domain. The proteolytic activities are likely to play important roles in inflammatory diseases of arteries, lungs, joints, and intestines. Nuclear magnetic resonance line broadening indicates that regions surrounding the active sites of both proteases sample conformational substates within milliseconds. The more extensive line broadening in MMP-3 suggests greater sampling of conformational substates, affecting the full length of helix B and β-strand IV forming the active site, and more remote sites. This could suggest more excursions to functionally incompetent substates. MMP-3 also has enhanced subnanosecond fluctuations in helix A, in the β-hairpin of strands IV and V, and before and including helix C. Hydrogen exchange protection in the EX2 regime suggests that MMP-3 possesses 2.8 kcal/mol higher folding stability than MMP-12(E219A). The β-sheet of MMP-3 appears to be stabilized still more. The higher stability of MMP-3 relative to MMP-12 coincides with the former's considerably lower proteolytic activity. This relationship is consistent with the hypothesis that enzymes often trade stability for higher activity. PMID:20655856

  10. Dynamic Stability Testing of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroenenberger, Mark; Yates, Leslie; Hathaway, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    Results from a 26 shot ballistic range test of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry capsule are presented. The supersonic pitch damping properties of the MSL capsule were characterized between Mach 1.35 and Mach 3.5 and total angles-of-attack from 0 to 30 degrees. In flight, the MSL entry capsule will utilize a radial center-of-gravity offset to produce a non-zero trim angle-of-attack. This offset trim angle will produce lift, enabling the capsule to fly a guided entry and reducing the landing footprint dimensions to within 10 km of the desired landing site. A lifting configuration could not be tested at the ballistic range used for this test as the models would swerve into the range walls, possibly damaging cameras, the coordinate reference system or other facility assets. Ballistic (non-lifting) data was extracted and will be implemented in a conservative fashion to ensure that the dynamic stability characteristics of the flight vehicle are bounded. A comparison between the MSL pitch damping results and the dynamic model of the Mars Exploration Rover capsule shows generally close agreement with no significant differences in damping characteristics due to the change in backshell geometry. Dynamic moments are also compared to the MSL reaction control system (RCS) control authority to show the controller has sufficient margin to easily damp any dynamic stability effects.

  11. Dynamic plate osteosynthesis for fracture stabilization: how to do it

    PubMed Central

    Sonderegger, Juerg; Grob, Karl R.; Kuster, Markus S.

    2010-01-01

    Plate osteosynthesis is one treatment option for the stabilization of long bones. It is widely accepted to achieve bone healing with a dynamic and biological fixation where the perfusion of the bone is left intact and micromotion at the fracture gap is allowed. The indications for a dynamic plate osteosynthesis include distal tibial and femoral fractures, some midshaft fractures, and adolescent tibial and femoral fractures with not fully closed growth plates. Although many lower limb shaft fractures are managed successfully with intramedullary nails, there are some important advantages of open-reduction-and-plate fixation: the risk of malalignment, anterior knee pain, or nonunion seems to be lower. The surgeon performing a plate osteosynthesis has the possibility to influence fixation strength and micromotion at the fracture gap. Long plates and oblique screws at the plate ends increase fixation strength. However, the number of screws does influence stiffness and stability. Lag screws and screws close to the fracture site reduce micromotion dramatically. Dynamic plate osteosynthesis can be achieved by applying some simple rules: long plates with only a few screws should be used. Oblique screws at the plate ends increase the pullout strength. Two or three holes at the fracture site should be omitted. Lag screws, especially through the plate, must be avoided whenever possible. Compression is not required. Locking plates are recommended only in fractures close to the joint. When respecting these basic concepts, dynamic plate osteosynthesis is a safe procedure with a high healing and a low complication rate. PMID:21808699

  12. Computer simulation and image guidance for individualised dynamic spinal stabilization.

    PubMed

    Kantelhardt, S R; Hausen, U; Kosterhon, M; Amr, A N; Gruber, K; Giese, A

    2015-08-01

    Dynamic implants for the human spine are used to re-establish regular segmental motion. However, the results have often been unsatisfactory and complications such as screw loosening are common. Individualisation of appliances and precision implantation are needed to improve the outcome of this procedure. Computer simulation, virtual implant optimisation and image guidance were used to improve the technique. A human lumbar spine computer model was developed using multi-body simulation software. The model simulates spinal motion under load and degenerative changes. After virtual degeneration of a L4/5 segment, virtual pedicle screw-based implants were introduced. The implants' positions and properties were iteratively optimised. The resulting implant positions were used as operative plan for image guidance and finally implemented in a physical spine model. In the simulation, the introduction and optimisation of virtually designed dynamic implants could partly compensate for the effects of virtual lumbar segment degeneration. The optimised operative plan was exported to two different image-guidance systems for transfer to a physical spine model. Three-dimensional computer graphic simulation is a feasible means to develop operative plans for dynamic spinal stabilization. These operative plans can be transferred to commercially available image-guidance systems for use in implantation of physical implants in a spine model. This concept has important potential in the design of operative plans and implants for individualised dynamic spine stabilization surgery.

  13. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Jianping; Yu, Liang; Liu, Qingfei; Ning, Yanxiao; Zhou, Zhiwen; Chen, Hao; Huang, Wugen; Liu, Ping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSs with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs. PMID:28223687

  14. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; ...

    2017-02-22

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSsmore » with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs.« less

  15. Enhanced dynamic range x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Haidekker, Mark A; Morrison, Logan Dain-Kelley; Sharma, Ajay; Burke, Emily

    2017-03-01

    X-ray images can suffer from excess contrast. Often, image exposure is chosen to visually optimize the region of interest, but at the expense of over- and underexposed regions elsewhere in the image. When image values are interpreted quantitatively as projected absorption, both over- and underexposure leads to the loss of quantitative information. We propose to combine multiple exposures into a composite that uses only pixels from those exposures in which they are neither under- nor overexposed. The composite image is created in analogy to visible-light high dynamic range photography. We present the mathematical framework for the recovery of absorbance from such composite images and demonstrate the method with biological and non-biological samples. We also show with an aluminum step-wedge that accurate recovery of step thickness from the absorbance values is possible, thereby highlighting the quantitative nature of the presented method. Due to the higher amount of detail encoded in an enhanced dynamic range x-ray image, we expect that the number of retaken images can be reduced, and patient exposure overall reduced. We also envision that the method can improve dual energy absorptiometry and even computed tomography by reducing the number of low-exposure ("photon-starved") projections.

  16. The stabilizing effects of genetic diversity on predator-prey dynamics.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Christopher F; Masse, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity among prey in their susceptibility to predation is a potentially important stabilizer of predator-prey interactions, reducing the magnitude of population oscillations and enhancing total prey population abundance. When microevolutionary responses of prey populations occur at time scales comparable to population dynamics, adaptive responses in prey defense can, in theory, stabilize predator-prey dynamics and reduce top-down effects on prey abundance. While experiments have tested these predictions, less explored are the consequences of the evolution of prey phenotypes that can persist in both vulnerable and invulnerable classes. We tested this experimentally using a laboratory aquatic system composed of the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus as a predator and the prey Synura petersenii, a colony-forming alga that exhibits genetic variation in its propensity to form colonies and colony size (larger colonies are a defense against predators). Prey populations of either low initial genetic diversity and low adaptive capacity or high initial genetic diversity and high adaptive capacity were crossed with predator presence and absence. Dynamics measured over the last 127 days of the 167-day experiment revealed no effects of initial prey genetic diversity on the average abundance or temporal variability of predator populations. However, genetic diversity and predator presence/absence interactively affected prey population abundance and stability; diversity of prey had no effects in the absence of predators but stabilized dynamics and increased total prey abundance in the presence of predators. The size structure of the genetically diverse prey populations diverged from single strain populations in the presence of predators, showing increases in colony size and in the relative abundance of cells found in colonies. Our work sheds light on the adaptive value of colony formation and supports the general view that genetic diversity and intraspecific trait variation of

  17. Dynamical systems techniques for enhancing microfluidic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-01

    Achieving rapid mixing is often desirable in microfluidic devices, for example in improving reation rates in biotechnological assays. Enhancing mixing within a particular context is often achieved by introducing problem-specific strategies such as grooved or twisted channels, ac electromagnetic fields or oscillatory microsyringe flows. Evaluating the efficiency of these methods is challenging since either experimental fabrication and sensing, or computationally expensive direct numerical simulations with complicated boundary conditions, are required. A review of how mixing can be quantified when velocity fields have been obtained from such situations is presented. A less-known alternative to these methods is offered by dynamical systems, which characterizes the motion of collective fluid parcel trajectories by studying crucial interior flow barriers which move unsteadily, but nevertheless strongly govern mixing possibilities. The methodology behind defining these barriers and quantifying the fluid transport influenced by them is explained. Their application towards several microfluidic situations (e.g. best cross-flow positioning in cross-channel micromixers, usage of channel curvature to enhance mixing within microdroplets traveling in a channel, optimum frequencies of velocity agitations to use) is discussed.

  18. Noisy vestibular stimulation improves dynamic walking stability in bilateral vestibulopathy.

    PubMed

    Wuehr, Max; Nusser, Eva; Decker, Julian; Krafczyk, Siegbert; Straube, Andreas; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus; Schniepp, Roman

    2016-06-07

    To examine the effects of imperceptible levels of white noise galvanic vestibular stimulation (nGVS) on dynamic walking stability in patients with bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP). Walking performance of 13 patients with confirmed BVP (mean age 50.1 ± 5.5 years) at slow, preferred, and fast speeds was examined during walking with zero-amplitude nGVS (sham trial) and nonzero-amplitude nGVS set to 80% of the individual cutaneous threshold for GVS (nGVS trial). Eight standard gait measures were analyzed: stride time, stride length, base of support, double support time percentage as well as the bilateral phase coordination index, and the coefficient of variation (CV) of stride time, stride length, and base of support. Compared to the sham trial, nGVS improved stride time CV by 26.0% ± 8.4% (p < 0.041), stride length CV by 26.0% ± 7.7% (p < 0.029), base of support CV by 27.8% ± 2.9% (p < 0.037), and phase coordination index by 8.4% ± 8.8% (p < 0.013). The nGVS effects on walking performance were correlated with subjective ratings of walking balance (ρ = 0.79, p < 0.001). Effect of nGVS on walking stability was most pronounced during slow walking. In patients with BVP, nGVS is effective in improving impaired gait performance, predominantly during slower walking speeds. It primarily targets the variability and bilateral coordination characteristics of the walking pattern, which are linked to dynamic walking stability. nGVS might present an effective treatment option to immediately improve walking performance and reduce the incidence of falls in patients with BVP. This study provides Class IV evidence that in patients with BVP, an imperceptible level of nGVS improves dynamic walking stability. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Dynamic flight stability in the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2003-08-01

    Here we provide the first formal quantitative analysis of dynamic stability in a flying animal. By measuring the longitudinal static stability derivatives and mass distribution of desert locusts Schistocerca gregaria, we find that their static stability and static control responses are insufficient to provide asymptotic longitudinal dynamic stability unless they are sensitive to pitch attitude (measured with respect to an inertial or earth-fixed frame) as well as aerodynamic incidence (measured relative to the direction of flight). We find no evidence for a 'constant-lift reaction', previously supposed to keep lift production constant over a range of body angles, and show that such a reaction would be inconsequential because locusts can potentially correct for pitch disturbances within a single wingbeat. The static stability derivatives identify three natural longitudinal modes of motion: one stable subsidence mode, one unstable divergence mode, and one stable oscillatory mode (which is present with or without pitch attitude control). The latter is identified with the short period mode of aircraft, and shown to consist of rapid pitch oscillations with negligible changes in forward speed. The frequency of the short period mode (approx. 10 Hz) is only half the wingbeat frequency (approx. 22 Hz), so the mode would become coupled with the flapping cycle without adequate damping. Pitch rate damping is shown to be highly effective for this purpose - especially at the small scales associated with insect flight - and may be essential in stabilising locust flight. Although having a short period mode frequency close to the wingbeat frequency risks coupling, it is essential for control inputs made at the level of a single wingbeat to be effective. This is identified as a general constraint on flight control in flying animals.

  20. Enhanced structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures by graphene encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matković, Aleksandar; Vasić, Borislav; Pešić, Jelena; Prinz, Julia; Bald, Ilko; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Gajić, Radoš

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that a single-layer graphene replicates the shape of DNA origami nanostructures very well. It can be employed as a protective layer for the enhancement of structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures. Using the AFM based manipulation, we show that the normal force required to damage graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures is over an order of magnitude greater than for the unprotected ones. In addition, we show that graphene encapsulation offers protection to the DNA origami nanostructures against prolonged exposure to deionized water, and multiple immersions. Through these results we demonstrate that graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures are strong enough to sustain various solution phase processing, lithography and transfer steps, thus extending the limits of DNA-mediated bottom-up fabrication.

  1. Nonspherical dynamics and shape mode stability of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are shell encapsulated microbubbles developed originally for ultrasound imaging enhancement. UCAs are more recently being exploited for therapeutic applications, such as for drug delivery, gene therapy, and tissue ablation. Ultrasound transducer pulses can induce spherical (radial) UCA oscillations, translation, and nonspherical shape oscillations, the dynamics of which are highly coupled. If driven sufficiently strongly, the ultrasound can induce breakup of UCAs, which can facilitate drug or gene delivery but should be minimized for imaging purposes to increase residence time and maximize diagnostic effect. Therefore, an understanding of the interplay between the acoustic driving and nonspherical shape mode stability of UCAs is essential for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we use both analytical and numerical methods to analyze shape mode stability for cases of small and large nonspherical oscillations, respectively. To analyze shape mode stability in the limit of small nonspherical perturbations, we couple a radial model of a lipid-coated microbubble with a model for bubble translation and nonspherical shape oscillation. This hybrid model is used to predict shape mode stability for ultrasound driving frequencies and pressure amplitudes of clinical interest. In addition, calculations of the stability of individual shape modes, residence time, maximum radius, and translation are provided with respect to acoustic driving parameters and compared to an unshelled bubble. The effects of shell elasticity, shell viscosity, and initial radius on stability are investigated. Furthermore, the well-established boundary element method (BEM) is used to investigate the dynamics and shape stability of large amplitude nonspherical oscillations of an ultrasonically-forced, polymer-coated microbubble near a rigid boundary. Different instability modes are identified based on the degree of jetting and proximity to the

  2. Dynamic stability of spine using stability-based optimization and muscle spindle reflex.

    PubMed

    Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Hemami, Hooshang; Barin, Kamran; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2008-02-01

    A computational method for simulation of 3-D movement of the trunk under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was developed. Neural excitation of muscles was set based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. The method was used to simulate the trunk movement from the upright standing to 60 degrees of flexion. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization resulted in an increase in antagonistic activities demonstrating that the antagonistic co-activation acts to increase the trunk stability in response to self-induced postural internal perturbation. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, muscle spindles decreased the induced deviation of the position and velocity profiles from the desired ones. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that the rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  3. Flexible Launch Vehicle Stability Analysis Using Steady and Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Launch vehicles frequently experience a reduced stability margin through the transonic Mach number range. This reduced stability margin can be caused by the aerodynamic undamping one of the lower-frequency flexible or rigid body modes. Analysis of the behavior of a flexible vehicle is routinely performed with quasi-steady aerodynamic line loads derived from steady rigid aerodynamics. However, a quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis can be unconservative at the critical Mach numbers, where experiment or unsteady computational aeroelastic analysis show a reduced or even negative aerodynamic damping.Amethod of enhancing the quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis of a launch vehicle with unsteady aerodynamics is developed that uses unsteady computational fluid dynamics to compute the response of selected lower-frequency modes. The response is contained in a time history of the vehicle line loads. A proper orthogonal decomposition of the unsteady aerodynamic line-load response is used to reduce the scale of data volume and system identification is used to derive the aerodynamic stiffness, damping, and mass matrices. The results are compared with the damping and frequency computed from unsteady computational aeroelasticity and from a quasi-steady analysis. The results show that incorporating unsteady aerodynamics in this way brings the enhanced quasi-steady aeroelastic stability analysis into close agreement with the unsteady computational aeroelastic results.

  4. Assessment of current criteria for dynamic stability of container vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanca, C.; Ancuta, C.; Acomi, N.; Andrei, C.

    2016-08-01

    Container vessels sailing through heavy weather are exposed to a significant variation of stability due to specific shape of the hull combined with the action of the waves. Even if the weather forecast is transmitted to vessels, the way of acting it is a matter of officers’ experience. The Maritime Safety Committee, under the International Maritime Organization, has approved the Guidance to the master for avoiding dangerous situations in adverse weather and sea conditions. Adverse weather conditions include wind induced waves or heavy swell. The development of dangerous phenomena such as surf-riding and broaching to, syncronious and parametric rollings is a result of a these adverse conditions which has to be encountered by the vessels. Understanding the dynamic stability of the vessel in the waves and ship's behaviour based on mathematical and physical rules is a difficult task, any effort in order to assess these components are salutary. To avoid excessive acceleration and forces which can damage the hull of the vessel, lashing and integrity of containers, course and speed may need to be changed for the vessel's motion in heavy seas. Specific software have been developed as aids for evaluating the response of the vessel in heavy seas according to parameters variations. The paper aims at assessing of current criteria for dynamic stability of a container vessel model ship in order to determine the ways for avoiding dangerous conditions. The results should be regarded as a supporting tool during the decision making process.

  5. Reexamination of dynamical stabilization of matter-wave solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Itin, Alexander; Morishita, Toru; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2006-09-15

    We consider dynamical stabilization of Bose-Einstein condensates by time-dependent modulation of the scattering length. The problem has been studied before by several methods: Gaussian variational approximation, the method of moments, the method of modulated Townes soliton, and the direct averaging of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We summarize these methods and find that the numerically obtained stabilized solution has a different configuration than that assumed by the theoretical methods (in particular a phase of the wave function is not quadratic with r). We show that there is presently no clear evidence for stabilization in a strict sense, because in the numerical experiments only metastable (slowly decaying) solutions have been obtained. In other words, neither numerical nor mathematical evidence for a new kind of soliton solutions has been revealed so far. The existence of the metastable solutions is nevertheless an interesting and complicated phenomenon on its own. We try some non-Gaussian variational trial functions to obtain better predictions for the critical nonlinearity g{sub cr} for metastabilization but other dynamical properties of the solutions remain difficult to predict.

  6. Transmission stability and Raman-induced amplitude dynamics in multichannel soliton-based optical waveguide systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Avner; Nguyen, Quan M.; Tran, Thinh P.

    2016-12-01

    We study transmission stability and dynamics of pulse amplitudes in N-channel soliton-based optical waveguide systems, taking into account second-order dispersion, Kerr nonlinearity, delayed Raman response, and frequency dependent linear gain-loss. We carry out numerical simulations with systems of N coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equations and compare the results with the predictions of a simplified predator-prey model for Raman-induced amplitude dynamics. Coupled-NLS simulations for single-fiber transmission with 2 ≤ N ≤ 4 frequency channels show stable oscillatory dynamics of soliton amplitudes at short-to-intermediate distances, in excellent agreement with the predator-prey model's predictions. However, at larger distances, we observe transmission destabilization due to resonant formation of radiative sidebands, which is caused by Kerr nonlinearity. The presence of linear gain-loss in a single fiber leads to a limited increase in transmission stability. Significantly stronger enhancement of transmission stability is achieved in a nonlinear N-waveguide coupler due to efficient suppression of radiative sideband generation by the linear gain-loss. As a result, the distances along which stable Raman-induced dynamics of soliton amplitudes is observed are significantly larger in the waveguide coupler system compared with the single-fiber system.

  7. A study of helicopter stability and control including blade dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Xin; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A linearized model of rotorcraft dynamics has been developed through the use of symbolic automatic equation generating techniques. The dynamic model has been formulated in a unique way such that it can be used to analyze a variety of rotor/body coupling problems including a rotor mounted on a flexible shaft with a number of modes as well as free-flight stability and control characteristics. Direct comparison of the time response to longitudinal, lateral and directional control inputs at various trim conditions shows that the linear model yields good to very good correlation with flight test. In particular it is shown that a dynamic inflow model is essential to obtain good time response correlation, especially for the hover trim condition. It also is shown that the main rotor wake interaction with the tail rotor and fixed tail surfaces is a significant contributor to the response at translational flight trim conditions. A relatively simple model for the downwash and sidewash at the tail surfaces based on flat vortex wake theory is shown to produce good agreement. Then, the influence of rotor flap and lag dynamics on automatic control systems feedback gain limitations is investigated with the model. It is shown that the blade dynamics, especially lagging dynamics, can severly limit the useable values of the feedback gain for simple feedback control and that multivariable optimal control theory is a powerful tool to design high gain augmentation control system. The frequency-shaped optimal control design can offer much better flight dynamic characteristics and a stable margin for the feedback system without need to model the lagging dynamics.

  8. Fractional Stability of Trunk Acceleration Dynamics of Daily-Life Walking: Toward a Unified Concept of Gait Stability

    PubMed Central

    Ihlen, Espen A. F.; van Schooten, Kimberley S.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Pijnappels, Mirjam; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decades, various measures have been introduced to assess stability during walking. All of these measures assume that gait stability may be equated with exponential stability, where dynamic stability is quantified by a Floquet multiplier or Lyapunov exponent. These specific constructs of dynamic stability assume that the gait dynamics are time independent and without phase transitions. In this case the temporal change in distance, d(t), between neighboring trajectories in state space is assumed to be an exponential function of time. However, results from walking models and empirical studies show that the assumptions of exponential stability break down in the vicinity of phase transitions that are present in each step cycle. Here we apply a general non-exponential construct of gait stability, called fractional stability, which can define dynamic stability in the presence of phase transitions. Fractional stability employs the fractional indices, α and β, of differential operator which allow modeling of singularities in d(t) that cannot be captured by exponential stability. The fractional stability provided an improved fit of d(t) compared to exponential stability when applied to trunk accelerations during daily-life walking in community-dwelling older adults. Moreover, using multivariate empirical mode decomposition surrogates, we found that the singularities in d(t), which were well modeled by fractional stability, are created by phase-dependent modulation of gait. The new construct of fractional stability may represent a physiologically more valid concept of stability in vicinity of phase transitions and may thus pave the way for a more unified concept of gait stability. PMID:28900400

  9. Strategy Switching in the Stabilization of Unstable Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zenzeri, Jacopo; De Santis, Dalia; Morasso, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms of strategy switching in the stabilization of unstable dynamics, this work investigates how human subjects learn to become skilled users of an underactuated bimanual tool in an unstable environment. The tool, which consists of a mass and two hand-held non-linear springs, is affected by a saddle-like force-field. The non-linearity of the springs allows the users to determine size and orientation of the tool stiffness ellipse, by using different patterns of bimanual coordination: minimal stiffness occurs when the two spring terminals are aligned and stiffness size grows by stretching them apart. Tool parameters were set such that minimal stiffness is insufficient to provide stable equilibrium whereas asymptotic stability can be achieved with sufficient stretching, although at the expense of greater effort. As a consequence, tool users have two possible strategies for stabilizing the mass in different regions of the workspace: 1) high stiffness feedforward strategy, aiming at asymptotic stability and 2) low stiffness positional feedback strategy aiming at bounded stability. The tool was simulated by a bimanual haptic robot with direct torque control of the motors. In a previous study we analyzed the behavior of naïve users and we found that they spontaneously clustered into two groups of approximately equal size. In this study we trained subjects to become expert users of both strategies in a discrete reaching task. Then we tested generalization capabilities and mechanism of strategy-switching by means of stabilization tasks which consist of tracking moving targets in the workspace. The uniqueness of the experimental setup is that it addresses the general problem of strategy-switching in an unstable environment, suggesting that complex behaviors cannot be explained in terms of a global optimization criterion but rather require the ability to switch between different sub-optimal mechanisms. PMID:24921254

  10. Kinematic variability, fractal dynamics and local dynamic stability of treadmill walking

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Motorized treadmills are widely used in research or in clinical therapy. Small kinematics, kinetics and energetics changes induced by Treadmill Walking (TW) as compared to Overground Walking (OW) have been reported in literature. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the differences between OW and TW in terms of stride-to-stride variability. Classical (Standard Deviation, SD) and non-linear (fractal dynamics, local dynamic stability) methods were used. In addition, the correlations between the different variability indexes were analyzed. Methods Twenty healthy subjects performed 10 min TW and OW in a random sequence. A triaxial accelerometer recorded trunk accelerations. Kinematic variability was computed as the average SD (MeanSD) of acceleration patterns among standardized strides. Fractal dynamics (scaling exponent α) was assessed by Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) of stride intervals. Short-term and long-term dynamic stability were estimated by computing the maximal Lyapunov exponents of acceleration signals. Results TW did not modify kinematic gait variability as compared to OW (multivariate T2, p = 0.87). Conversely, TW significantly modified fractal dynamics (t-test, p = 0.01), and both short and long term local dynamic stability (T2 p = 0.0002). No relationship was observed between variability indexes with the exception of significant negative correlation between MeanSD and dynamic stability in TW (3 × 6 canonical correlation, r = 0.94). Conclusions Treadmill induced a less correlated pattern in the stride intervals and increased gait stability, but did not modify kinematic variability in healthy subjects. This could be due to changes in perceptual information induced by treadmill walking that would affect locomotor control of the gait and hence specifically alter non-linear dependencies among consecutive strides. Consequently, the type of walking (i.e. treadmill or overground) is important to consider in each protocol

  11. Kinematic variability, fractal dynamics and local dynamic stability of treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Terrier, Philippe; Dériaz, Olivier

    2011-02-24

    Motorized treadmills are widely used in research or in clinical therapy. Small kinematics, kinetics and energetics changes induced by Treadmill Walking (TW) as compared to Overground Walking (OW) have been reported in literature. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the differences between OW and TW in terms of stride-to-stride variability. Classical (Standard Deviation, SD) and non-linear (fractal dynamics, local dynamic stability) methods were used. In addition, the correlations between the different variability indexes were analyzed. Twenty healthy subjects performed 10 min TW and OW in a random sequence. A triaxial accelerometer recorded trunk accelerations. Kinematic variability was computed as the average SD (MeanSD) of acceleration patterns among standardized strides. Fractal dynamics (scaling exponent α) was assessed by Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) of stride intervals. Short-term and long-term dynamic stability were estimated by computing the maximal Lyapunov exponents of acceleration signals. TW did not modify kinematic gait variability as compared to OW (multivariate T(2), p=0.87). Conversely, TW significantly modified fractal dynamics (t-test, p=0.01), and both short and long term local dynamic stability (T(2) p=0.0002). No relationship was observed between variability indexes with the exception of significant negative correlation between MeanSD and dynamic stability in TW (3 × 6 canonical correlation, r=0.94). Treadmill induced a less correlated pattern in the stride intervals and increased gait stability, but did not modify kinematic variability in healthy subjects. This could be due to changes in perceptual information induced by treadmill walking that would affect locomotor control of the gait and hence specifically alter non-linear dependencies among consecutive strides. Consequently, the type of walking (i.e. treadmill or overground) is important to consider in each protocol design. © 2011 Terrier and Dériaz; licensee

  12. Non-linear dynamics of human locomotion: effects of rhythmic auditory cueing on local dynamic stability

    PubMed Central

    Terrier, Philippe; Dériaz, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    It has been observed that times series of gait parameters [stride length (SL), stride time (ST), and stride speed (SS)], exhibit long-term persistence and fractal-like properties. Synchronizing steps with rhythmic auditory stimuli modifies the persistent fluctuation pattern to anti-persistence. Another non-linear method estimates the degree of resilience of gait control to small perturbations, i.e., the local dynamic stability (LDS). The method makes use of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, which estimates how fast a non-linear system embedded in a reconstructed state space (attractor) diverges after an infinitesimal perturbation. We propose to use an instrumented treadmill to simultaneously measure basic gait parameters (time series of SL, ST, and SS from which the statistical persistence among consecutive strides can be assessed), and the trajectory of the center of pressure (from which the LDS can be estimated). In 20 healthy participants, the response to rhythmic auditory cueing (RAC) of LDS and of statistical persistence [assessed with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)] was compared. By analyzing the divergence curves, we observed that long-term LDS (computed as the reverse of the average logarithmic rate of divergence between the 4th and the 10th strides downstream from nearest neighbors in the reconstructed attractor) was strongly enhanced (relative change +73%). That is likely the indication of a more dampened dynamics. The change in short-term LDS (divergence over one step) was smaller (+3%). DFA results (scaling exponents) confirmed an anti-persistent pattern in ST, SL, and SS. Long-term LDS (but not short-term LDS) and scaling exponents exhibited a significant correlation between them (r = 0.7). Both phenomena probably result from the more conscious/voluntary gait control that is required by RAC. We suggest that LDS and statistical persistence should be used to evaluate the efficiency of cueing therapy in patients with neurological gait disorders. PMID

  13. Local dynamic stability of the lifting kinematic chain.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ryan B; Costigan, Patrick A; Sadler, Erin M; Stevenson, Joan M

    2011-10-01

    While a stable trunk and centre of mass (CoM) trajectory are required during lifting, it is unclear how stability is controlled. Thirty healthy participants (15M, 15F) performed repetitive, symmetric lifting at 10 cycles per minute for 3 min with a load-in-hands equivalent to 10% of their maximum back strength. Short- and long-term maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents (λ(max-s) and λ(max-l)), describing responses to small (local) perturbations, estimated the local dynamic stability of the foot, shank, thigh, pelvis, lower back, and upper back segments. Instability (λ(max-s)) significantly increased when moving up the kinematic chain (p<0.001). Therefore, to maintain trunk equilibrium and accurately regulate CoM trajectory during lifting, stability of the distal (fixed) lower limb segments is prioritized. This is contrary to previous results observed during gait, indicating that trunk control via kinematic chain stability is accomplished differently for walking and lifting.

  14. Influence of screw augmentation in posterior dynamic and rigid stabilization systems in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae: a biomechanical cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Sven; Sven, Hoppe; Loosli, Yannick; Yannick, Loosli; Baumgartner, Daniel; Daniel, Baumgartner; Heini, Paul; Paul, Heini; Benneker, Lorin; Lorin, Benneker

    2014-03-15

    Biomechanical cadaveric study. To determine whether augmentation positively influence screw stability or not. Implantation of pedicle screws is a common procedure in spine surgery to provide an anchorage of posterior internal fixation into vertebrae. Screw performance is highly correlated to bone quality. Therefore, polymeric cement is often injected through specifically designed perforated pedicle screws into osteoporotic bone to potentially enhance screw stability. Caudocephalic dynamic loading was applied as quasi-physiological alternative to classical pull-out tests on 16 screws implanted in osteoporotic lumbar vertebrae and 20 screws in nonosteoporotic specimen. Load was applied using 2 different configurations simulating standard and dynamic posterior stabilization devices. Screw performance was quantified by measurement of screwhead displacement during the loading cycles. To reduce the impact of bone quality and morphology, screw performance was compared for each vertebra and averaged afterward. All screws (with or without cement) implanted in osteoporotic vertebrae showed lower performances than the ones implanted into nonosteoporotic specimen. Augmentation was negligible for screws implanted into nonosteoporotic specimen, whereas in osteoporotic vertebrae pedicle screw stability was significantly increased. For dynamic posterior stabilization system an increase of screwhead displacement was observed in comparison with standard fixation devices in both setups. Augmentation enhances screw performance in patients with poor bone stock, whereas no difference is observed for patients without osteoporosis. Furthermore, dynamic stabilization systems have the possibility to fail when implanted in osteoporotic bone.

  15. Dynamic Stability of Crack Fronts: Out-Of-Plane Corrugations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Arias, Rodrigo E.; Bouchbinder, Eran; Katzav, Eytan

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics and stability of brittle cracks are not yet fully understood. Here we use the Willis-Movchan 3D linear perturbation formalism [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 45, 591 (1997)] to study the out-of-plane stability of planar crack fronts in the framework of linear elastic fracture mechanics. We discuss a minimal scenario in which linearly unstable crack front corrugations might emerge above a critical front propagation speed. We calculate this speed as a function of Poisson’s ratio and show that corrugations propagate along the crack front at nearly the Rayleigh wave speed. Finally, we hypothesize about a possible relation between such corrugations and the long-standing problem of crack branching.

  16. Cognitive demand and predictive adaptational responses in dynamic stability control.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Sebastian; Mersmann, Falk; Bierbaum, Stefanie; Dietrich, Ralf; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2012-09-21

    We studied the effects of a concurrent cognitive task on predictive motor control, a feedforward mechanism of dynamic stability control, during disturbed gait in young and old adults. Thirty-two young and 27 elderly male healthy subjects participated and were randomly assigned to either control or dual task groups. By means of a covered exchangeable element the surface condition on a gangway could be altered to induce gait perturbations. The experimental protocol included a baseline on hard surface and an adaptation phase with twelve trials on soft surface. After the first, sixth and last soft surface trial, the surface condition was changed to hard (H1-3), to examine after-effects and, thus, to quantify predictive motor control. Dynamic stability was assessed using the 'margin of stability (MoS)' as a criterion for the stability state of the human body (extrapolated center of mass concept). In H1-3 the young participants significantly increased the MoS at touchdown of the disturbed leg compared to baseline. The magnitude and the rate of these after-effects were unaffected by the dual task condition. The old participants presented a trend to after-effects (i.e., increase of MoS) in H3 but only under the dual task condition.In conclusion, the additional cognitive demand did not compromise predictive motor control during disturbed walking in the young and old participants. In contrast to the control group, the old dual task group featured a trend to predictive motor adjustments, which may be a result of a higher state of attention or arousal due to the dual task paradigm.

  17. The addition of body armor diminishes dynamic postural stability in military soldiers.

    PubMed

    Sell, Timothy C; Pederson, Jonathan J; Abt, John P; Nagai, Takashi; Deluzio, Jennifer; Wirt, Michael D; McCord, Larry J; Lephart, Scott M

    2013-01-01

    Poor postural stability has been identified as a risk factor for lower extremity musculoskeletal injury. The additional weight of body armor carried by Soldiers alters static postural stability and may predispose Soldiers to lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries. However, static postural stability tasks poorly replicate the dynamic military environment, which places considerable stress on the postural control system during tactical training and combat. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of body armor on dynamic postural stability during single-leg jump landings. Thirty-six 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) Soldiers performed single-leg jump landings in the anterior direction with and without wearing body armor. The dynamic postural stability index and the individual stability indices (medial-lateral stability index, anterior-posterior stability index, and vertical stability index) were calculated for each condition. Paired sample t-tests were performed to determine differences between conditions. Significant differences existed for the medial-lateral stability index, anterior-posterior stability index, vertical stability index, and dynamic postural stability index (p < 0.05). The addition of body armor resulted in diminished dynamic postural stability, which may result in increased lower extremity injuries. Training programs should address the altered dynamic postural stability while wearing body armor in attempts to promote adaptations that will result in safer performance during dynamic tasks.

  18. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability. PMID:27271435

  19. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Chen, S. H.; Lu, Y. M.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. L.; Yang, Y.; Chan, K. C.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  20. Origin of Shear Stability and Compressive Ductility Enhancement of Metallic Glasses by Metal Coating.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Chen, S H; Lu, Y M; Zhu, Z G; Zhao, Y L; Yang, Y; Chan, K C; Liu, C T

    2016-06-08

    Metallic glasses (MGs) are notorious for the poor macroscopic ductility and to overcome the weakness various intrinsic and extrinsic strategies have been proposed in past decades. Among them, the metal coating is regarded as a flexible and facile approach, yet the physical origin is poorly understood due to the complex nature of shear banding process. Here, we studied the origin of ductile enhancement in the Cu-coating both experimentally and theoretically. By examining serrated shear events and their stability of MGs, we revealed that the thin coating layer plays a key role in stopping the final catastrophic failure of MGs by slowing down shear band dynamics and thus retarding its attainment to a critical instable state. The mechanical analysis on interplay between the coating layer and shear banding process showed the enhanced shear stability mainly comes from the lateral tension of coating layer induced by the surface shear step and the bonding between the coating layer and MGs rather than the layer thickness is found to play a key role in contributing to the shear stability.

  1. Thermal stability of marks gold nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yanlin; Li, Siqi; Qi, Weihong; Wang, Mingpu; Li, Zhou; Wang, Zhixing

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations were used to explore the thermal stability of Au nanoparticles (NPs) with decahedral, cuboctahedral, icosahedral and Marks NPs. According to the calculated cohesive energy and melting temperature, the Marks NPs have a higher cohesive energy and melting temperature compared to these other shapes. The Lindemann index, radial distribution function, deformation parameters, mean square displacement and self-diffusivity have been used to characterize the structure variation during heating. This work may inspire researchers to prepare Marks NPs and apply them in different fields.

  2. Enhanced stability and activity of an antimicrobial peptide in conjugation with silver nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Pal, Indrani; Brahmkhatri, Varsha P; Bera, Swapna; Bhattacharyya, Dipita; Quirishi, Yasrib; Bhunia, Anirban; Atreya, Hanudatta S

    2016-12-01

    The conjugation of nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides (AMP) is emerging as a promising route to achieve superior antimicrobial activity. However, the nature of peptide-nanoparticle interactions in these systems remains unclear. This study describes a system consisting of a cysteine containing antimicrobial peptide conjugated with silver nanoparticles, in which the two components exhibit a dynamic interaction resulting in a significantly enhanced stability and biological activity compared to that of the individual components. This was investigated using NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other biophysical techniques. Using fluorescence assisted cell sorting and membrane mimics we carried out a quantitative comparison of the activity of the AMP-nanoparticle system and the free peptide. Taken together, the study provides new insights into nanoparticle-AMP interactions at a molecular level and brings out the factors that will be useful for consideration while designing new conjugates with enhanced functionality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Symmetry-enhanced performance of dynamical decoupling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasini, S.; Uhrig, G. S.

    2011-10-15

    We consider a system with general decoherence and a quadratic dynamical decoupling sequence (QDD) for the coherence control of a qubit coupled to a bath of spins. We investigate the influence of the geometry and of the initial conditions of the bath on the performance of the sequence. The overall performance is quantified by a distance norm d. It is expected that d scales with {tau}, the total duration of the sequence, as {tau}{sup min{l_brace}N{sub x},N{sub z}{r_brace}+1}, where N{sub x} and N{sub z} are the number of pulses of the outer and of the inner sequence, respectively. We show both numerically and analytically that the state of the bath can boost the performance of QDD under certain conditions: The scaling of QDD for a given number of pulses can be enhanced by a factor of 2 if the bath is prepared in a highly symmetric state and if the system Hamiltonian is SU(2) invariant.

  4. Stability and dynamics of membrane-spanning DNA nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maingi, Vishal; Burns, Jonathan R.; Uusitalo, Jaakko J.; Howorka, Stefan; Marrink, Siewert J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2017-03-01

    Recently developed DNA-based analogues of membrane proteins have advanced synthetic biology. A fundamental question is how hydrophilic nanostructures reside in the hydrophobic environment of the membrane. Here, we use multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the structure, stability and dynamics of an archetypical DNA nanotube inserted via a ring of membrane anchors into a phospholipid bilayer. Coarse-grained MD reveals that the lipids reorganize locally to interact closely with the membrane-spanning section of the DNA tube. Steered simulations along the bilayer normal establish the metastable nature of the inserted pore, yielding a force profile with barriers for membrane exit due to the membrane anchors. Atomistic, equilibrium simulations at two salt concentrations confirm the close packing of lipid around of the stably inserted DNA pore and its cation selectivity, while revealing localized structural fluctuations. The wide-ranging and detailed insight informs the design of next-generation DNA pores for synthetic biology or biomedicine.

  5. Estimation of dynamic stability parameters from drop model flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, J. R.; Iliff, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    A recent NASA application of a remotely-piloted drop model to studies of the high angle-of-attack and spinning characteristics of a fighter configuration has provided an opportunity to evaluate and develop parameter estimation methods for the complex aerodynamic environment associated with high angles of attack. The paper discusses the overall drop model operation including descriptions of the model, instrumentation, launch and recovery operations, piloting concept, and parameter identification methods used. Static and dynamic stability derivatives were obtained for an angle-of-attack range from -20 deg to 53 deg. The results of the study indicated that the variations of the estimates with angle of attack were consistent for most of the static derivatives, and the effects of configuration modifications to the model (such as nose strakes) were apparent in the static derivative estimates. The dynamic derivatives exhibited greater uncertainty levels than the static derivatives, possibly due to nonlinear aerodynamics, model response characteristics, or additional derivatives.

  6. Nonlinear flight dynamics and stability of hovering model insects

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bin; Sun, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Current analyses on insect dynamic flight stability are based on linear theory and limited to small disturbance motions. However, insects' aerial environment is filled with swirling eddies and wind gusts, and large disturbances are common. Here, we numerically solve the equations of motion coupled with the Navier–Stokes equations to simulate the large disturbance motions and analyse the nonlinear flight dynamics of hovering model insects. We consider two representative model insects, a model hawkmoth (large size, low wingbeat frequency) and a model dronefly (small size, high wingbeat frequency). For small and large initial disturbances, the disturbance motion grows with time, and the insects tumble and never return to the equilibrium state; the hovering flight is inherently (passively) unstable. The instability is caused by a pitch moment produced by forward/backward motion and/or a roll moment produced by side motion of the insect. PMID:23697714

  7. Stability and dynamics of membrane-spanning DNA nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Maingi, Vishal; Burns, Jonathan R.; Uusitalo, Jaakko J.; Howorka, Stefan; Marrink, Siewert J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Recently developed DNA-based analogues of membrane proteins have advanced synthetic biology. A fundamental question is how hydrophilic nanostructures reside in the hydrophobic environment of the membrane. Here, we use multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the structure, stability and dynamics of an archetypical DNA nanotube inserted via a ring of membrane anchors into a phospholipid bilayer. Coarse-grained MD reveals that the lipids reorganize locally to interact closely with the membrane-spanning section of the DNA tube. Steered simulations along the bilayer normal establish the metastable nature of the inserted pore, yielding a force profile with barriers for membrane exit due to the membrane anchors. Atomistic, equilibrium simulations at two salt concentrations confirm the close packing of lipid around of the stably inserted DNA pore and its cation selectivity, while revealing localized structural fluctuations. The wide-ranging and detailed insight informs the design of next-generation DNA pores for synthetic biology or biomedicine. PMID:28317903

  8. Enhancement of stability of aqueous suspension of alumina nanoparticles by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngsang; Ha, Jeonghong; Kim, Dongsik; Choi, Tae-Youl; Jeong, Dae-Yong; Lee, Seung Yong

    2015-09-21

    In this work, we report substantially enhanced colloidal stability of aqueous nanoparticle suspensions by ultrashort laser pulse irradiation. A Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser (wavelength: 800 nm; pulse duration: 50 fs at full width at half maximum) was used to modify the electrochemical properties of nanoparticle suspensions at laser fluences below the particle ablation threshold. The colloidal stability of the suspension was evaluated by zeta potential and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The DLS results along with the images from transmission electron microscopy revealed that the laser irradiation caused no distinct morphological change to the individual alumina particles, but a substantial portion of the clustered particles was fragmented by the laser pulses, decreasing the apparent size of the suspended particles. Also, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicates that the laser irradiation modified the surface chemistry of the alumina particles. The stabilizing capability of the proposed technique was turned out to be better than that of conventional ultrasonic treatments. The stability of the laser-treated sample with no added surfactant was maintained for up to 30 days, without requiring an additional homogenizing process such as magnetic stirring.

  9. A Dynamic Stability Criterion for Ice Shelves and Tidewater Glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassis, J. N.; Fricker, H. A.; Minster, J.

    2006-12-01

    The collapse of the Antarctic ice shelves could have dramatic consequences for the mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet and, as a result, sea level rise. It is therefore imperative to improve our knowledge of the mechanisms that lead to ice shelf retreat. The mechanism that has the potential to remove the largest amounts of mass rapidly is iceberg calving. However, the processes and mechanisms that lead to iceberg calving are still poorly understood. Motivated by the complexity of the short-time scale behavior of ice fracture we seek a dynamic stability criterion that predicts the onset of ice shelf retreat based on dimensional analysis. In our approach, rather than attempt to model the initiation and propagation of individual fractures, we look for a non-dimensional number that describes the overall ice shelf stability. We also make the assumption that the same criterion, valid for ice shelves, also applies to tidewater glaciers. This enables us to test our criterion against a larger set of ice shelves and calving glaciers. Our analysis predicts that retreat will occur when a non-dimensional number that we call the "terminus stability number", decreases below a critical value. We show that this criterion is valid for calving glaciers in Alaska, for several glaciers around Greenland as well as for three Antarctic ice shelves. This stability analysis has much in common with classic hydrodynamic stability theory, where the onset of instability is related to non-dimensional numbers that are largely independent of geometry or other situation specific variables.

  10. Non-Linear Dynamics and Stability of Circular Cylindrical Shells Containing Flowing Fluid. Part i: Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.; PELLICANO, F.; PAÏDOUSSIS, M. P.

    1999-08-01

    The study presented is an investigation of the non-linear dynamics and stability of simply supported, circular cylindrical shells containing inviscid incompressible fluid flow. Non-linearities due to large-amplitude shell motion are considered by using the non-linear Donnell's shallow shell theory, with account taken of the effect of viscous structural damping. Linear potential flow theory is applied to describe the fluid-structure interaction. The system is discretiszd by Galerkin's method, and is investigated by using a model involving seven degrees of freedom, allowing for travelling wave response of the shell and shell axisymmetric contraction. Two different boundary conditions are applied to the fluid flow beyond the shell, corresponding to: (i) infinite baffles (rigid extensions of the shell), and (ii) connection with a flexible wall of infinite extent in the longitudinal direction, permitting solution by separation of variables; they give two different kinds of dynamical behaviour of the system, as a consequence of the fact that axisymmetric contraction, responsible for the softening non-linear dynamical behaviour of shells, is not allowed if the fluid flow beyond the shell is constrained by rigid baffles. Results show that the system loses stability by divergence.

  11. Dynamic Stability Testing of the Genesis Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. McNeil; Winchenbach, Gerald L.; Hathaway, Wayne; Chapman, Gary

    2000-01-01

    This paper documents a series of free flight tests of a scale model of the Genesis Sample Return Capsule. These tests were conducted in the Aeroballistic Research Facility (ARF), located at Eglin AFB, FL, during April 1999 and were sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center. Because these blunt atmospheric entry shapes tend to experience small angle of attack dynamic instabilities (frequently leading to limit cycle motions), the primary purpose of the present tests was to determine the dynamic stability characteristics of the Genesis configuration. The tests were conducted over a Mach number range of 1.0 to 4.5. The results for this configuration indicate that the models were dynamically unstable at low angles of attack for all Mach numbers tested. At Mach numbers below 2.5, the models were also unstable at the higher angles of attack (above 15 deg), and motion amplitudes of up to 40 deg were experienced. Above Mach 2.5, the models were dynamically stable at the higher angles of attack.

  12. Stability and dynamics of stretched fluid shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlay, Michael Jason

    1999-11-01

    The transition to turbulence of shear layers is one of the most fundamental and oldest problems of fluid dynamics. The process is roughly understood in terms of a series of conceptually discrete stages (although in reality the stages overlap). The first stage is the mostly two-dimensional roll-up of the shear layer into a streamwise array of billows. The second is the initiation and growth of three-dimensional disturbances on or near those billows. The third stage is considered to be a much more rapid and continuous process which is far more difficult to understand. It is this third stage which is the motivation for this thesis. A careful look at recent high resolution computational fluid dynamics simulations of shear layers becoming turbulent reveals that the streamwise vortices stretch nearby smaller remnant shear layers which in turn roll up. These remnant shear layers are the ``braid'' portion of the original shear layer, i.e. the shear regions between billows. The generic process of tubes stretching shear layers and triggering rollup is the one thought to be responsible for the incremental cascade from larger to smaller scales in 3D turbulence. It is therefore crucial to have a broad and detailed understanding of that process in order to understand turbulent dynamics. To begin to understand this process, a series of simulations is performed which model simplified stretched shear layers. Two subsets of simulations are performed. One has streamwise vortices stretching shear layers. The other poses a shear layer with initial spanwise variation. These cases are analyzed in detail using the paradigm of vortex dynamics. The stability properties of the shear layer, of the stretched shear layer dynamics and of the deformations of the billows are studied and quantified using software written for the analysis of fluid dynamics, and using sophisticated flow visualization techniques.

  13. Fast Dynamic Simulation-Based Small Signal Stability Assessment and Control

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, Naresh; Baone, Chaitanya; Veda, Santosh; Dai, Jing; Chaudhuri, Nilanjan; Leonardi, Bruno; Sanches-Gasca, Juan; Diao, Ruisheng; Wu, Di; Huang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Yu; Jin, Shuangshuang; Zheng, Bin; Chen, Yousu

    2014-12-31

    Power grid planning and operation decisions are made based on simulation of the dynamic behavior of the system. Enabling substantial energy savings while increasing the reliability of the aging North American power grid through improved utilization of existing transmission assets hinges on the adoption of wide-area measurement systems (WAMS) for power system stabilization. However, adoption of WAMS alone will not suffice if the power system is to reach its full entitlement in stability and reliability. It is necessary to enhance predictability with "faster than real-time" dynamic simulations that will enable the dynamic stability margins, proactive real-time control, and improve grid resiliency to fast time-scale phenomena such as cascading network failures. Present-day dynamic simulations are performed only during offline planning studies, considering only worst case conditions such as summer peak, winter peak days, etc. With widespread deployment of renewable generation, controllable loads, energy storage devices and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles expected in the near future and greater integration of cyber infrastructure (communications, computation and control), monitoring and controlling the dynamic performance of the grid in real-time would become increasingly important. The state-of-the-art dynamic simulation tools have limited computational speed and are not suitable for real-time applications, given the large set of contingency conditions to be evaluated. These tools are optimized for best performance of single-processor computers, but the simulation is still several times slower than real-time due to its computational complexity. With recent significant advances in numerical methods and computational hardware, the expectations have been rising towards more efficient and faster techniques to be implemented in power system simulators. This is a natural expectation, given that the core solution algorithms of most commercial simulators were developed

  14. Global asymptotic stability of dynamic dissipative compensators for multibody flexible space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Joshi, Suresh M.; Alberts, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    The stability characteristics of dynamic dissipative compensators are investigated for multibody flexible space structures having nonlinear dynamics. The problem addressed is that of proving asymptotic stability of dynamic dissipative compensators. The stability proof uses the Liapunov approach and exploits the inherent passivity of such systems. For such systems these compensators are shown to be robust to parametric uncertainties and unmodeled dynamics. The results are applicable to a large class of structures such as flexible space structures with articulated flexible appendages.

  15. Dynamic stability of a human standing on a balance board.

    PubMed

    Chagdes, James R; Rietdyk, Shirley; Jeffrey, M Haddad; Howard, N Zelaznik; Raman, Arvind

    2013-10-18

    The neuromuscular system used to stabilize upright posture in humans is a nonlinear dynamical system with time delays. The analysis of this system is important for improving balance and for early diagnosis of neuromuscular disease. In this work, we study the dynamic coupling between the neuromuscular system and a balance board-an unstable platform often used to improve balance in young athletes, and older or neurologically impaired patients. Using a simple inverted pendulum model of human posture on a balance board, we describe a surprisingly broad range of divergent and oscillatory CoP/CoM responses associated with instabilities of the upright equilibrium. The analysis predicts that a variety of sudden changes in the stability of upright postural equilibrium occurs with slow continuous deterioration in balance board stiffness, neuromuscular gain, and time delay associated with the changes in proprioceptive/vestibular/visual-neuromuscular feedback. The analysis also provides deeper insight into changes in the control of posture that enable stable upright posture on otherwise unstable platforms. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Slobozhanin, Lev A.; Resnick, Andrew H.; Ramus, Jean-Francois; Delafontaine, Sylvie

    1999-01-01

    Liquid bridges have been the focus of numerous theoretical and experimental investigations since the early work by Plateau more than a century ago. More recently, motivated by interest in their physical behavior and their occurrence in a variety of technological situations, there has been a resurgence of interest in the static and dynamic behavior of liquid bridges. Furthermore, opportunities to carry out experiments in the near weightless environment of a low-Earth-orbit spacecraft have also led to a number of low-gravity experiments involving large liquid bridges. In this paper, we present selected results from our work concerning the stability of nonaxisymmetric liquid bridges, the bifurcation of weightless bridges in the neighborhood of the maximum volume stability limit, isorotating axisymmetric bridges contained between equidimensional disks, and bridges contained between unequal disks. For the latter, we discuss both theoretical and experimental results. Finally, we present results concerning the stability of axisymmetric equilibrium configurations for a capillary liquid partly contained in a closed circular cylinder.

  17. Enhanced photoacoustic stability of gold nanorods by silica matrix confinement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leng-Chun; Wei, Chen-Wei; Souris, Jeffrey S; Cheng, Shih-Hsun; Chen, Chin-Tu; Yang, Chung-Shi; Li, Pai-Chi; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has garnered much attention for its high contrast and excellent spatial resolution of perfused tissues. Gold nanorods (GNRs) have been employed to further enhance the imaging contrast of PAT. However, the photon fluences typically needed for PA wave induction often also result in GNR shape changes that significantly reduce the efficiency of acoustic wave generation. In this work, we propose, synthesize, and evaluate amorphous silica-coated gold nanorods (GNR-Si) in an effort to improve contrast agent stability and ameliorate efficiency loss during photoacoustic (PA) wave induction. TEM and optical absorption spectra measurements of GNR and GNR-Si show that encasing GNRs within amorphous silica provides substantial protection of nanorod conformation from thermal deformation. PA signals generated by GNR-Si demonstrate considerably greater resistance to degradation of signal intensity with repetitive pulsing than do uncoated GNRs, thereby enabling much longer, high-contrast imaging sessions than previously possible. The prolongation of high-contrast imaging, and biocompatibility and easy surface functionalization for targeting ligands afforded by amorphous silica, suggest GNR-Si to be potentially significant for the clinical translation of PAT.

  18. Birefringence and Enhanced Stability in Stable Organic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianyi; Exarhos, Annemarie; Cheng, Kevin; Jia, Tiezheng; Walsh, Patrick; Kikkawa, Jay; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Stable glasses can be prepared by physical vapor depositing organic molecules onto a cold substrate at slow rates. These glasses have many exceptional properties such as high thermal stability, high density, and birefringence. Regardless of the molecular shape or intermolecular interactions, birefringence has been observed in various stable glasses produced at low temperatures (below 80% of the molecule's glass transition temperature, Tg) . Here we prepare stable glasses of an organic molecule, 9-(3,5-di(naphthalen-1-yl)phenyl)anthracene, that possesses a nearly isotropic shape and intrinsic fluorescence. Ellipsometry is used to show that all stable glasses prepared in the temperature range from 73% Tg to 97% Tgshow positive birefringence. Angle- and polarization- dependent photoluminescence measurements show isotropic molecular orientation in these optically birefringent glasses. Furthermore, the values of birefringence are strongly correlated with the enhanced density, implying a general origin of the observed anisotropy in stable glasses. This correlation can elucidate the role of packing in the formation of such high-density glasses. The authors would like to acknowledge Ethan Alguire and Joe Subotnik for simulation. Z.F. acknowledges funding from NSF CAREER (DMR-1350044). P.J.W. acknowledges funding from NSF (CHE-1152488). J.M.K acknowledges funding from NSF (DMR-1206270).

  19. Encapsulation enhancement and stabilization of insulin in cationic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Jin; Choi, Soon Gil; Davaa, Enkhzaya; Park, Jeong-Sook

    2011-08-30

    The purpose of this study was to enhance encapsulation efficiency and sustained-release delivery for parenteral administration of a protein drug. To reduce the administration frequency of protein drugs, it is necessary to develop sustained delivery systems. In this study, protein drug-loaded cationic liposomes were formulated with dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), and cholesterol (CH) at a molar ratio of DOPE/DOTAP/CH of 2/1.5/2. Five mol% of distearoylphosphatidyl ethanolamine polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG) was added prior to encapsulation of the drug into liposomes. Insulin was chosen as a model protein drug and encapsulation efficiency was evaluated in various liposomes with and without DSPE-PEG. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the insulin-loaded cationic liposomes. Structural analysis was performed using spectropolarimetry. Additionally, the stability and cytotoxicity of insulin-loaded cationic liposomes were evaluated. Liposomes coated with DSPE-PEG showed higher insulin encapsulation efficiency than did those without DSPE-PEG, but not significantly. Moreover, among the liposomes coated with DSPE-PEG, those hydrated with 10% sucrose showed higher encapsulation efficiency than did liposomes hydrated in either phosphate-buffered saline or 5% dextrose. In vitro release of insulin was prolonged by cationic liposomes. Our findings suggest that cationic liposomes may be a potential sustained-release delivery system for parenteral administration of protein and peptide drugs to prolong efficacy and improve bioavailability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Solar enhanced wastewater treatment in waste stabilization ponds.

    PubMed

    Agunwamba, J C; Utsev, J T; Okonkwo, W I

    2009-05-01

    One of the most popular off-site wastewater treatment plants used in the tropics is the waste stabilization pond (WSP). Although it has several advantages, its use in urban areas is limited because of its large land area requirement. Hence, this research is aimed at investigating if a solar-enhanced WSP (SEWSP) can increase treatment efficiency and consequently reduce the land area requirement. The SEWSPs of varying sizes, made of a metallic tank with inlet and outlet valves and a solar reflector, were constructed to increase the incident sunlight intensity. Wastewater samples collected from the inlet and outlet of the SEWSPs were examined for physio-chemical and biological characteristics for a period of 2 months. The parameters examined were total suspended solids, dissolved oxygen, 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), chemical oxygen demand (COD), coliform, and Escherichia coli. The efficiencies of the SEWSPs, with respect to these parameters, fluctuated with temperature variation, with the shallowest SEWSP giving the highest treatment efficiency. The research revealed that the cost of treating wastewater using SEWSPs was approximately 2 times lower than the conventional WSP for the same treatment efficiencies.

  1. Dynamics and stability of divacancy defects in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngkuk; Ihm, Jisoon; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do

    2011-08-01

    A divacancy (DV) is one of the most abundant and most important defects in irradiated graphene, which modifies electronic and chemical properties of graphene. In this paper, we present ab initio calculations to study the dynamics and stability of DVs in graphene. Divacancies in graphene have various reconstructed structures, such as triple pentagon-triple heptagon (555-777) and pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) patterns. A direct observation of the structural transformations between these reconstructions was recorded in transmission electron microscope images reported by Girit in ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1166999 323, 1705 (2009). We clarify the atomic structures of DVs observed in the experiment and investigate the atomic processes and energetics for the observed dynamical motions in great detail. It is found that a series of Stone-Wales-type transformations are responsible for the migration and structural transformations of DVs and that a pentagon-heptagon-heptagon-pentagon (5-7-7-5) defect appearing as an intermediate structure during the dynamical process plays an important role in the transformations of DVs.

  2. Dynamic stability of rolling particles between elastic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzev, Mikhail; Dmitriev, Aleksandr; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2017-04-01

    of the oscillator normalised by the spring's effective energy. We found that the system has symmetrical and asymmetrical equilibrium solutions. In the dynamical case, the asymmetric solutions ensue when the system is deviated from its symmetrical equilibrium. We point out a few features of the global dynamics of the system: 1) at the symmetric equilibrium, the stability region of the sympathetic oscillators does not intersect the stability region of the modified oscillator system below the horizontal suspension line; 2) at the asymmetric equilibrium, the stability region of the sympathetic oscillators intersect the stability region of the modified oscillator system below the suspension line. References [1] Kun, F., I. Varga, S. Lennartz-Sassinek & I.G. Main, 2014. Rupture cascades in a discrete element model of a porous sedimentary rock. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 065501. [2] Dyskin, A.V. & E. Pasternak, 2012. Mechanical effect of rotating non-spherical particles on failure in compression. Phil. Mag. 92, 3451-3473. [3] A. Sommerfeld, Vorlesungen uber Theoretische Physik, Band 1: Mechanik, Verlag Harri Deutsch, Thun, 1994. [4] P. Ramachandran, S. G. Krishna, Y. M. Ram, Instability of a constrained pendulum system, Am. J. Phys. 79 (4) (2011) 395-400.

  3. Sharp transitions in nuclear dynamics: Limits to collectivity and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonna, M.; Di Toro, M.; Latora, V.; Smerzi, A.

    Two limiting cases of nuclear dynamics are analysed in details: the disappearing of giant collective motions in hot nuclei and the nuclear disassembly in violent heavy ion collisions. It is shown that sharp transitions occur in the dynamical behaviour of finite nuclei. For collective vibration built on excited states we get a dramatic increase of the widths due to the enhancement of two body collisions with increasing temperature. The case of hot Giant Dipole Resonances (GDR) is discussed. As a consequence of the competition with neutron evaporation we get a sharp quenching of giant photon emission. Pre-equilibrium effects on the GDR formation are also accounted for. Limiting temperatures for the observation of GDR γ-decays are deduced for various nuclei, ranging from 6.0 to 3.5 MeV with increasing mass number. A detailed study of the onset of a new multifragmentation mechanism in violent heavy ion collisions around 50 MeV/u beam energy for symmetric partners is performed. It is shown that the nuclear system enters a dynamical instability region and fragments are directly produced from the growing of fluctuations. An hybrid model is developped just coupling average informations on the system entering the critical region to a statistical multifragmentration decay picture. Some hints towards a fully dynamical description of fragment production are finally discussed.

  4. Stability of power systems coupled with market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jianping

    This Ph.D. thesis presented here spans two relatively independent topics. The first part, Chapter 2 is self-contained, and is dedicated to studies of new algorithms for power system state estimation. The second part, encompassing the remaining chapters, is dedicated to stability analysis of power system coupled with market dynamics. The first part of this thesis presents improved Newton's methods employing efficient vectorized calculations of higher order derivatives in power system state estimation problems. The improved algorithms are proposed based on an exact Newton's method using the second order terms. By efficiently computing an exact gain matrix, combined with a special optimal multiplier method, the new algorithms show more reliable convergence compared with the existing methods of normal equations, orthogonal decomposition, and Hachtel's sparse tableau. Our methods are able to handle ill-conditioned problems, yet show minimal penalty in computational cost for well-conditioned cases. These claims are illustrated through the standard IEEE 118 and 300 bus test examples. The second part of the thesis focuses on stability analysis of market/power systems. The work presented is motivated by an emerging problem. As the frequency of market based dispatch updates increases, there will inevitably be interaction between the dynamics of markets determining the generator dispatch commands, and the physical response of generators and network interconnections, necessitating the development of stability analysis for such coupled systems. We begin with numeric tests using different market models, with detailed machine/exciter/turbine/governor dynamics, in the New England 39 bus test system. A progression of modeling refinements are introduced, including such non-ideal effects as time delays. Electricity market parameter identification algorithms are also studied based on real time data from the PJM electricity market. Finally our power market model is augmented by optimal

  5. Effect of Footwear on Dynamic Stability during Single-leg Jump Landings.

    PubMed

    Bowser, Bradley J; Rose, William C; McGrath, Robert; Salerno, Jilian; Wallace, Joshua; Davis, Irene S

    2017-06-01

    Barefoot and minimal footwear running has led to greater interest in the biomechanical effects of different types of footwear. The effect of running footwear on dynamic stability is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to compare dynamic stability and impact loading across 3 footwear conditions; barefoot, minimal footwear and standard running shoes. 25 injury free runners (21 male, 4 female) completed 5 single-leg jump landings in each footwear condition. Dynamic stability was assessed using the dynamic postural stability index and its directional components (mediolateral, anteroposterior, vertical). Peak vertical ground reaction force and vertical loadrates were also compared across footwear conditions. Dynamic stability was dependent on footwear type for all stability indices (ANOVA, p<0.05). Post-hoc tests showed dynamic stability was greater when barefoot than in running shoes for each stability index (p<0.02) and greater than minimal footwear for the anteroposterior stability index (p<0.01). Peak vertical force and average loadrates were both dependent on footwear (p≤0.05). Dynamic stability, peak vertical force, and average loadrates during single-leg jump landings appear to be affected by footwear type. The results suggest greater dynamic stability and lower impact loading when landing barefoot or in minimal footwear. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Enhanced stability and antibacterial efficacy of a traditional Chinese medicine-mediated silver nanoparticle delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjie; Qu, Ding; Ma, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Congyan; Zhou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used as antibacterial products in various fields. Recent studies have suggested that AgNPs need an appropriate stabilizer to improve their stability. Some antibacterial traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) contain various reductive components, which can not only stabilize AgNPs but also enhance their antimicrobial activity. In this study, we developed a series of novel AgNPs using a TCM extract as a stabilizer, reducing agent, and antimicrobial agent (TCM-AgNPs). A storage stability investigation of the TCM-AgNPs suggested a significant improvement when compared with bare AgNPs. Further, conjugation of TCMs onto the AgNP surface resulted in stronger antimicrobial potency on antibacterial evaluation using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration 50% (MIC50) ratios (and minimum bactericidal concentration 90% [MBC90] ratios) of AgNPs to respective TCM-AgNPs as assessment indices. Among these, P. cuspidatum Sieb. et-conjugated AgNPs (P.C.-AgNPs) had the advantage of a combination of TCMs and AgNPs and was studied in detail with regard to its synthesis and characterization. The extraction time, reaction temperature, and concentrations of AgNO3 and Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et extract were critical factors in the preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. Further, the results of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated successful preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. In representative studies, P.C.-AgNPs showed a well-defined spherical shape, a homogeneous small particle size (36.78 nm), a narrow polydispersity index (0.105), and a highly negative zeta potential (−23.6 mV) on transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. These results indicate that TCM-AgNPs have a potential role as antibacterial agents in the clinic setting. PMID:25473286

  7. Enhanced stability and antibacterial efficacy of a traditional Chinese medicine-mediated silver nanoparticle delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjie; Qu, Ding; Ma, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Liu, Congyan; Zhou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used as antibacterial products in various fields. Recent studies have suggested that AgNPs need an appropriate stabilizer to improve their stability. Some antibacterial traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) contain various reductive components, which can not only stabilize AgNPs but also enhance their antimicrobial activity. In this study, we developed a series of novel AgNPs using a TCM extract as a stabilizer, reducing agent, and antimicrobial agent (TCM-AgNPs). A storage stability investigation of the TCM-AgNPs suggested a significant improvement when compared with bare AgNPs. Further, conjugation of TCMs onto the AgNP surface resulted in stronger antimicrobial potency on antibacterial evaluation using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration 50% (MIC50) ratios (and minimum bactericidal concentration 90% [MBC90] ratios) of AgNPs to respective TCM-AgNPs as assessment indices. Among these, P. cuspidatum Sieb. et-conjugated AgNPs (P.C.-AgNPs) had the advantage of a combination of TCMs and AgNPs and was studied in detail with regard to its synthesis and characterization. The extraction time, reaction temperature, and concentrations of AgNO3 and Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb. et extract were critical factors in the preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. Further, the results of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicated successful preparation of P.C.-AgNPs. In representative studies, P.C.-AgNPs showed a well-defined spherical shape, a homogeneous small particle size (36.78 nm), a narrow polydispersity index (0.105), and a highly negative zeta potential (-23.6 mV) on transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. These results indicate that TCM-AgNPs have a potential role as antibacterial agents in the clinic setting.

  8. Enhanced thermal stability of RuO2/polyimide interface for flexible device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Schmidt, Paul; Chang, Keke

    2017-09-01

    We have studied the thermal stability of RuO2/polyimide (Kapton) interface using experimental and theoretical methods. Based on calorimetric and spectroscopic analyses, this inorganic–organic system does not exhibit any enthalpic peaks as well as all bonds in RuO2 and Kapton are preserved up to 500 °C. In addition, large-scale density functional theory based molecular dynamics, carried out in the same temperature range, validates the electronic structure and points out that numerous Ru–C and a few Ru–O covalent/ionic bonds form across the RuO2/Kapton interface. This indicates strong adhesion, but there is no evidence of Kapton degradation upon thermal excitation. Furthermore, RuO2 does not exhibit any interfacial bonds with N and H in Kapton, providing additional evidence for the thermal stability notion. It is suggested that the RuO2/Kapton interface is stable due to aromatic architecture of Kapton. This enhanced thermal stability renders Kapton an appropriate polymeric substrate for RuO2 containing systems in various applications, especially for flexible microelectronic and energy devices.

  9. Dynamical stability of a many-body Kapitza pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Citro, Roberta; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.; D’Alessio, Luca; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Babadi, Mehrtash; Oka, Takashi; Demler, Eugene

    2015-09-15

    We consider a many-body generalization of the Kapitza pendulum: the periodically-driven sine–Gordon model. We show that this interacting system is dynamically stable to periodic drives with finite frequency and amplitude. This finding is in contrast to the common belief that periodically-driven unbounded interacting systems should always tend to an absorbing infinite-temperature state. The transition to an unstable absorbing state is described by a change in the sign of the kinetic term in the Floquet Hamiltonian and controlled by the short-wavelength degrees of freedom. We investigate the stability phase diagram through an analytic high-frequency expansion, a self-consistent variational approach, and a numeric semiclassical calculation. Classical and quantum experiments are proposed to verify the validity of our results.

  10. Carotenoid incorporation into microsomes: yields, stability and membrane dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socaciu, Carmen; Jessel, Robert; Diehl, Horst A.

    2000-12-01

    The carotenoids β-carotene (BC), lycopene (LYC), lutein (LUT), zeaxanthin (ZEA), canthaxanthin (CTX) and astaxanthin (ASTA) have been incorporated into pig liver microsomes. Effective incorporation concentrations in the range of about 1-6 nmol/mg microsomal protein were obtained. A stability test at room temperature revealed that after 3 h BC and LYC had decayed totally whereas, gradually, CTX (46%), LUT (21%), ASTA (17%) and ZEA (5%) decayed. Biophysical parameters of the microsomal membrane were changed hardly by the incorporation of carotenoids. A small rigidification may occur. Membrane anisotropy seems to offer only a small tolerance for incorporation of carotenoids and seems to limit the achievable incorporation concentrations of the carotenoids into microsomes. Microsomes instead of liposomes should be preferred as a membrane model to study mutual effects of carotenoids and membrane dynamics.

  11. Dynamical Stabilization of Large Pores in Bilayer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Philip

    1997-03-01

    I will review two recent results involving large stable pores in lipid bilayer membranes. Needham and Zhelev have created long-lived, dynamically stabilized pores in vesicles using micropipette suction. We explain the long lifetime of these pores, and their very sudden closure. (2) Bar-Ziv, Frisch, and Moses have induced vesicles to expel interior objects after irradiation with laser light. This process also involves the formation of a long-lived exit pore in the outer vesicle. We report new experimental results and sketch a theory to explain them. The main hypothesis is that the laser trap pulls in lipid and ejects it in the form of submicron objects, whose osmotic activity then drives the expulsion.

  12. Dynamics and Stability and Control Characteristics of the X-37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Ashwani; Nguyen, Viet; Tran, Hoi; Poladian, David; Falangas, Eric; Turner, Susan G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the stability and control analysis and the control design results for the Boeing/NASA/AFRL X-37. The X-37 is a flight demonstrator vehicle that will go into space and after its mission, autonomously reenter and land on a conventional runway. This paper studies the dynamics and control of the X-37 from atmospheric reentry through landing. A nominal trajectory that lands on the Edwards Air Force Base Lakebed is considered for all the analysis and design. The X-37's longitudinal and lateral/directional bare-airframe characteristics are presented. The level of maneuvering control power is assessed. Vehicle trim with multiple surfaces is discussed. Special challenges where the wings loose roll effectiveness are discussed and solutions are presented. Aerodynamic uncertainties and flexibility modeling issues are presented. Control design results and robustness analysis methods are presented. Results are provided for the Entry, Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM), and Approach and Land phases.

  13. U32: Vehicle Stability and Dynamics: Longer Combination Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Petrolino, Joseph; Spezia, Tony; Arant, Michael; Broshears, Eric; Chitwood, Caleb; Colbert, Jameson; Hathaway, Richard; Keil, Mitch; LaClair, Tim J; Pape, Doug; Patterson, Jim; Pittro, Collin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the safety and stability of longer combination vehicles (LCVs), in particular a triple trailer combination behind a commercial tractor, which has more complicated dynamics than the more common tractor in combination with a single semitrailer. The goal was to measure and model the behavior of LCVs in simple maneuvers. Example maneuvers tested and modeled were single and double lane changes, a gradual lane change, and a constant radius curve. In addition to test track data collection and a brief highway test, two computer models of LCVs were developed. One model is based on TruckSim , a lumped parameter model widely used for single semitrailer combinations. The other model was built in Adams software, which more explicitly models the geometry of the components of the vehicle, in terms of compliant structural members. Among other results, the models were able to duplicate the experimentally measured rearward amplification behavior that is characteristic of multi-unit combination vehicles.

  14. Movement stability under uncertain internal models of dynamics.

    PubMed

    Crevecoeur, F; McIntyre, J; Thonnard, J-L; Lefèvre, P

    2010-09-01

    Sensory noise and feedback delay are potential sources of instability and variability for the on-line control of movement. It is commonly assumed that predictions based on internal models allow the CNS to anticipate the consequences of motor actions and protect the movements from uncertainty and instability. However, during motor learning and exposure to unknown dynamics, these predictions can be inaccurate. Therefore a distinct strategy is necessary to preserve movement stability. This study tests the hypothesis that in such situations, subjects adapt the speed and accuracy constraints on the movement, yielding a control policy that is less prone to undesirable variability in the outcome. This hypothesis was tested by asking subjects to hold a manipulandum in precision grip and to perform single-joint, discrete arm rotations during short-term exposure to weightlessness (0 g), where the internal models of the limb dynamics must be updated. Measurements of grip force adjustments indicated that the internal predictions were altered during early exposure to the 0 g condition. Indeed, the grip force/load force coupling reflected that the grip force was less finely tuned to the load-force variations at the beginning of the exposure to the novel gravitational condition. During this learning period, movements were slower with asymmetric velocity profiles and target undershooting. This effect was compared with theoretical results obtained in the context of optimal feedback control, where changing the movement objective can be directly tested by adjusting the cost parameters. The effect on the simulated movements quantitatively supported the hypothesis of a change in cost function during early exposure to a novel environment. The modified optimization criterion reduces the trial-to-trial variability in spite of the fact that noise affects the internal prediction. These observations support the idea that the CNS adjusts the movement objective to stabilize the movement when

  15. Obesity dynamics and cardiovascular risk factor stability in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Ram; Shaw, Melissa; Savoye, Mary; Caprio, Sonia

    2009-09-01

    Cross-sectional studies showed worsening of cardiovascular risk factors with increasing severity of childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of obesity dynamics on cardiovascular risk factors and on the stability of the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome (MS) in obese youth. A longitudinal assessment of components of the MS using two definitions was performed in 186 obese adolescents (106 females/80 males, age 13.1 +/- 2.5 yr). Components of the MS were assessed at baseline and after 19 +/- 7 months. We stratified the cohort into three categories based on the 25th and 75th percentile of body mass index (BMI) z-score change: category 1 reduced BMI z-score by 0.09 or more, category 2 had a BMI z-score change of between -0.09 and 0.12, and category 3 increased BMI z-score by >0.12. Subjects who reduced their BMI z-score significantly decreased their fasting and 2-h glucose levels and triglyceride levels and increased their high density lipoprotein cholesterol in comparison to subjects who increased their BMI z-score. BMI z-score changes negatively correlated with changes in insulin sensitivity (r = -0.36, p < 0.001). Among those with no MS at baseline (n = 119), 10 (8%), most of whom significantly increased their BMI z-score, developed MS. Of 67 who had MS at baseline, 33 (50%), most of whom decreased their BMI z-score, lost the diagnosis. Obesity dynamics, tightly linked to changes in insulin sensitivity, have an impact on each individual component of the MS and on the stability of the diagnosis of MS in obese youth.

  16. Static and dynamic postural stability in veterans with combat-related mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tao; Liao, Ke; Roenigk, Kristen; Daly, Janis J; Walker, Mark F

    2015-10-01

    Persistent post-concussive symptoms are reported by 10-15% of individuals who suffer mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), but their basis is often uncertain. One such symptom is disequilibrium, a sensation of impaired balance during standing and walking. The hypothesis for this study was that this subjective symptom is associated with objective and measurable deficits in static and dynamic postural stability. An infrared motion tracking system was used to record body motion during quiet standing and in response to waist perturbations in fourteen veterans (age 22-40 years, 13 male) of the Operations Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Iraqi Freedom (OIF), who had a history of mTBI that occurred 7 months to 7 years prior to testing. We compared body sway between veterans with mTBI reporting persistent disequilibrium (TD, n=8) and those with no vestibular symptoms (n=6), as well as to a group of non-veterans with no balance symptoms (n=10). Static postural stability was reduced in TD veterans in comparison to each of the other two groups (p<0.0002), most notably on a compliant surface with eyes closed. The TD group also had decreased dynamic stability of the upper trunk (p<0.05) and enhanced postural oscillations (p<0.02) following waist perturbations. Our findings support a physiological basis for persistent disequilibrium after mTBI and are consistent with impaired vestibular processing. Disruption of semicircular canal inputs is unlikely to be the cause, as head impulse responses were normal in all groups. The unexpected finding of dynamic postural oscillations requires further study but may indicate enhanced instability in sensorimotor networks responsible for postural control.

  17. Dynamic stability of elastically supported pipes conveying pulsating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, S. T.; Hopkins, G. R.

    1980-07-01

    The effect of support flexibility on the dynamic behaviour of pipes conveying fluid is investigated for both steady and pulsatile flows. The pipes are built-in at the upstream end and supported at the other by both a translational and a rotational spring. For the steady flow condition, the critical flow velocities, the frequencies and flow induced damping patterns that are associated with the different vibration modes of selected pipe systems are determined as functions of the flow velocity. The results from steady flow cases show that the pipes may first lose stability by either buckling or flutter, depending on the values of the rotational and translational spring constants and their relative magnitudes. In the case of pulsatile flow, the Floquet theory is utilized for the stability analysis of the selected pipe-fluid systems. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the effects of the amount of translational and rotational resiliences at the elastic support on the regions of parametric and combination resonances of the pipes. The results more of the interesting aspects of the behaviour of non-conservative systems.

  18. Dynamical Stability of the F Ring Core and Moonlet Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whizin, A.; Colwell, J.; Cuzzi, J. N.

    2011-12-01

    The stability of the F ring core has yet to be adequately established. We further work similar to Scargle, J. & Cuzzi, J., et al. (1993, Dynamical Evolution of Saturn's Rings, BAAS 25, 1103) through the orbital evolution of test particles in the F ring region in order to explore how Prometheus and Pandora control the position and perhaps even the fate of this unique ring. The F ring was once thought to be shepherded (Goldreich & Tremaine ARAA 1982, 20:249-83) but now it is clearer that it exhibits signs of chaos (Scargle et al., 1993, Winter, O. C., et al., 2007, MNRAS, 380, L54, and Winter, O.C., et al., 2010, A&A, 523, A67). Our work also sheds light on the evolution of the ~1km sized embedded moonlets ('clumps') which wreak havoc on the ring through encounters with Prometheus, creating gaps in the ring ('streaks')(Murray, C. D., et al., 2008, Nature, 453, 7196, 739-744). We present results pertaining to the stability of the F ring core, using a three-pronged approach consisting of N-body numerical simulations, analytical modeling, and detection and analysis of chaotic orbits with Lyapunov Residuals. Our results find narrow regions that are substantially more stable near the Bosh et al. (2002, Icarus 157, 57-75) core location, which we argue may explain the current location of the F ring.

  19. Does visual augmented feedback reduce local dynamic stability while walking?

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Daniel; Hamacher, Dennis; Schega, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Augmented feedback is frequently used in gait training to efficiently correct specific gait patterns in patients with different disorders. The patients use this external augmented feedback to align actual movements in a way that predefined gait characteristics can be achieved. Voluntary changes of gait characteristics are reported to reduce local dynamic stability (LDS) which in turn is associated with increased risk of falling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of visual feedback, provided to help patients to correct frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements, on the LDS of pelvis and trunk. Kinematic gait data was captured in ten women with gait disorders. The effect of visual feedback on LDS, quantified with the largest Lyapunov exponent, of walking was examined. We found a significant decreased LDS (e.g. pelvis: p=.009) in our subjects when they were using visual augmented feedback. Our data suggest that the use of visual augmented feedback causes less stable gait patterns indicating a reduced ability to respond to small perturbations which might increase risk of falling. Therefore, researchers or clinicians who aim to correct gait patterns through real time based external augmented feedback should consider the potential negative effect on gait stability. It should be evaluated if the possible increased fall risk provoked by visual feedback exceeds possible increases in fall risk induced by conventional gait-retraining interventions. The external validity of the study is limited because of the low sample size and inhomogeneous group characteristics. Thus, further studies including homogeneous cohorts are required.

  20. Blowoff dynamics of bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Kostka, Stanislav; Renfro, Michael W.; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2010-04-15

    This article concerns the flame dynamics of a bluff body stabilized turbulent premixed flame as it approaches lean blowoff. Time resolved chemiluminescence imaging along with simultaneous particle image velocimetry and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence were utilized in an axisymmetric bluff body stabilized, propane-air flame to determine the sequence of events leading to blowoff and provide a quantitative analysis of the experimental results. It was found that as lean blowoff is approached by reduction of equivalence ratio, flame speed decreases and the flame shape progressively changes from a conical to a columnar shape. For a stably burning conical flame away from blowoff, the flame front envelopes the shear layer vortices. Near blowoff, the columnar flame front and shear layer vortices overlap to induce high local stretch rates that exceed the extinction stretch rates instantaneously and in the mean, resulting in local flame extinction along the shear layers. Following shear layer extinction, fresh reactants can pass through the shear layers to react within the recirculation zone with all other parts of the flame extinguished. This flame kernel within the recirculation zone may survive for a few milliseconds and can reignite the shear layers such that the entire flame is reestablished for a short period. This extinction and reignition event can happen several times before final blowoff which occurs when the flame kernel fails to reignite the shear layers and ultimately leads to total flame extinguishment. (author)

  1. Stability properties of elementary dynamic models of membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Julio A

    2003-01-01

    Living cells are characterized by their capacity to maintain a stable steady state. For instance, cells are able to conserve their volume, internal ionic composition and electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane within values compatible with the overall cell functions. The dynamics of these cellular variables is described by complex integrated models of membrane transport. Some clues for the understanding of the processes involved in global cellular homeostasis may be obtained by the study of the local stability properties of some partial cellular processes. As an example of this approach, I perform, in this study, the neighborhood stability analysis of some elementary integrated models of membrane transport. In essence, the models describe the rate of change of the intracellular concentration of a ligand subject to active and passive transport across the plasma membrane of an ideal cell. The ligand can be ionic or nonionic, and it can affect the cell volume or the plasma membrane potential. The fundamental finding of this study is that, within the physiological range, the steady states are asymptotically stable. This basic property is a necessary consequence of the general forms of the expressions employed to describe the active and passive fluxes of the transported ligand.

  2. Dynamic Stability of Trains Moving Over Bridges Shaken by Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YANG, Y.-B.; WU, Y.-S.

    2002-11-01

    The dynamic stability of trains moving over bridges shaken by earthquakes is studied. Unlike the seismic analysis of structures containing a single subsystem, the seismic analysis of a bridge sustaining a passing train requires not only information on acceleration, but also on velocity and displacement of the ground motion. Four typical earthquakes, including the 1999 Chi-Chi Earthquake, were adopted as the input excitations, each of which was normalized to have a moderate intensity. The results indicate that a train initially resting on the bridge can stay safely under the ground motions considered, if the bridge and track structures do not exhibit inelastic deformations during the earthquake. The type of the vertical component of ground motions can affect significantly the stability of the train-rail- bridge system. As a preliminary attempt, safety, possible instability and instability regions were established in a three-phase plot for the train running over the bridge for each of the earthquakes considered, from which the maximum allowable speed for the train to run safely under the specified ground acceleration can be obtained.

  3. The dynamics of CRM attitude change: Attitude stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorich, Steven E.

    1993-01-01

    Special training seminars in cockpit resource management (CRM) are designed to enhance crew effectiveness in multicrew air-transport cockpits. In terms of CRM, crew effectiveness is defined by teamwork rather than technical proficiency. These seminars are designed to promote factual learning, alter aviator attitudes, and motivate aviators to make use of what they have learned. However, measures of attitude change resulting from CRM seminars have been the most common seminar evaluation technique. The current investigation explores a broader range of attitude change parameters with specific emphasis on the stability of change between recurrent visits to the training center. This allows for a comparison of training program strengths in terms of seminar ability to effect lasting change.

  4. The dynamics of CRM attitude change: Attitude stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregorich, Steven E.

    1993-01-01

    Special training seminars in cockpit resource management (CRM) are designed to enhance crew effectiveness in multicrew air-transport cockpits. In terms of CRM, crew effectiveness is defined by teamwork rather than technical proficiency. These seminars are designed to promote factual learning, alter aviator attitudes, and motivate aviators to make use of what they have learned. However, measures of attitude change resulting from CRM seminars have been the most common seminar evaluation technique. The current investigation explores a broader range of attitude change parameters with specific emphasis on the stability of change between recurrent visits to the training center. This allows for a comparison of training program strengths in terms of seminar ability to effect lasting change.

  5. Geometrical analysis of the LiCN vibrational dynamics: a stability geometrical indicator.

    PubMed

    Vergel, A; Benito, R M; Losada, J C; Borondo, F

    2014-02-01

    The vibrational dynamics of the LiNC/LiCN molecular system is examined making use of the Riemannian geometry. Stability and chaoticity are analyzed, in this context, by means of the Jacobi-Levi-Civita equations, derived from the Jacobi metric, and its solutions. A dynamical indicator, called stability geometrical indicator, is introduced in order to ascertain the dynamical characteristics of stability and chaos in the molecule under study.

  6. A consensus dynamics with delay-induced instability can self-regulate for stability via agent regrouping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyong Koh, M.; Sipahi, Rifat

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of many multi-agent systems is influenced by communication/activation delays τ. In the presence of delays, there exists a certain margin called the delay margin τ* , less than which system stability holds. This margin depends strongly on agents' dynamics and the agent network. In this article, three key elements, namely, the delay margin, network graph, and a distance threshold conditioning two agents' connectivity are considered in a multi-agent consensus dynamics under delay τ. We report that when the dynamics is unstable under this delay, its states can be naturally bounded, even for arbitrarily large threshold values, preventing agents to disperse indefinitely. This mechanism can also make the system recover stability in a self-regulating manner, mainly induced by network separation and enhanced delay margin. Under certain conditions, unstable consensus dynamics can keep separating into smaller stable subnetwork dynamics until all agents stabilize in their respective subnetworks. Results are then demonstrated on a previously validated robot coordination model, where specifically robustness of τ* is studied against the delay τinh inherently present in the orientation measurements of the robots. To this end, a mathematical framework to compute τ* with respect to τinh in quasi-state is developed, demonstrating that τ* can be sensitive to τinh, yet robot regrouping and stabilization of subnetworks is still possible.

  7. A consensus dynamics with delay-induced instability can self-regulate for stability via agent regrouping.

    PubMed

    Hyong Koh, M; Sipahi, Rifat

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of many multi-agent systems is influenced by communication/activation delays τ. In the presence of delays, there exists a certain margin called the delay margin τ(*), less than which system stability holds. This margin depends strongly on agents' dynamics and the agent network. In this article, three key elements, namely, the delay margin, network graph, and a distance threshold conditioning two agents' connectivity are considered in a multi-agent consensus dynamics under delay τ. We report that when the dynamics is unstable under this delay, its states can be naturally bounded, even for arbitrarily large threshold values, preventing agents to disperse indefinitely. This mechanism can also make the system recover stability in a self-regulating manner, mainly induced by network separation and enhanced delay margin. Under certain conditions, unstable consensus dynamics can keep separating into smaller stable subnetwork dynamics until all agents stabilize in their respective subnetworks. Results are then demonstrated on a previously validated robot coordination model, where specifically robustness of τ(*) is studied against the delay τinh inherently present in the orientation measurements of the robots. To this end, a mathematical framework to compute τ(*) with respect to τinh in quasi-state is developed, demonstrating that τ(*) can be sensitive to τinh, yet robot regrouping and stabilization of subnetworks is still possible.

  8. The Role of Magnetosonic Shocks in the Dynamics and Stability of the Staged Z-pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Hafiz U.; Wessel, F. J.; Ruskov, E.; Ney, P.; Narkis, J.; Valenzuela, J.; Conti, F.; Beg, F.

    2016-10-01

    A Staged Z-pinch is comprised of a magnetized, high-Z liner compressing a low-Z target and is predicted to achieve high, final-energy-density through enhanced stability, shock heating, and flux compression. Magnetosonic waves propagate radially in the system producing a stable, current carrying shock front that heats the target plasma during run-in, prior to inertial-adiabatic compression by the liner. The propagation of nonlinear-magnetosonic waves is described analytically by the KdV-Burger's Equation, providing stable-stationary solutions. We include a finite resistivity in the energy equation and generalized Ohm's law. A radiation-hydrodynamic code is used to evaluate the dynamic shock behavior, energy coupling, and the stability of the pinch. During implosion the axial-magnetic field provides enhanced stability and thermal insulation between the liner and the target plasmas. At peak compression the large amplitude Bz traps the fusion products leading to ignition in a deuterium-tritium target mixture. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  9. Applications of Computational Methods for Dynamic Stability and Control Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Spence, Angela M.

    2004-01-01

    Initial steps in the application o f a low-order panel method computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code to the calculation of aircraft dynamic stability and control (S&C) derivatives are documented. Several capabilities, unique to CFD but not unique to this particular demonstration, are identified and demonstrated in this paper. These unique capabilities complement conventional S&C techniques and they include the ability to: 1) perform maneuvers without the flow-kinematic restrictions and support interference commonly associated with experimental S&C facilities, 2) easily simulate advanced S&C testing techniques, 3) compute exact S&C derivatives with uncertainty propagation bounds, and 4) alter the flow physics associated with a particular testing technique from those observed in a wind or water tunnel test in order to isolate effects. Also presented are discussions about some computational issues associated with the simulation of S&C tests and selected results from numerous surface grid resolution studies performed during the course of the study.

  10. Dynamics of microresonator frequency comb generation: models and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Microresonator frequency combs hold promise for enabling a new class of light sources that are simultaneously both broadband and coherent, and that could allow for a profusion of potential applications. In this article, we review various theoretical models for describing the temporal dynamics and formation of optical frequency combs. These models form the basis for performing numerical simulations that can be used in order to better understand the comb generation process, for example helping to identify the universal combcharacteristics and their different associated physical phenomena. Moreover, models allow for the study, design and optimization of comb properties prior to the fabrication of actual devices. We consider and derive theoretical formalisms based on the Ikeda map, the modal expansion approach, and the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We further discuss the generation of frequency combs in silicon resonators featuring multiphoton absorption and free-carrier effects. Additionally, we review comb stability properties and consider the role of modulational instability as well as of parametric instabilities due to the boundary conditions of the cavity. These instability mechanisms are the basis for comprehending the process of frequency comb formation, for identifying the different dynamical regimes and the associated dependence on the comb parameters. Finally, we also discuss the phenomena of continuous wave bi- and multistability and its relation to the observation of mode-locked cavity solitons.

  11. Enhanced Power Stability for Proton Conducting Solid Oxides Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boris Merinov; William A. Goddard III; Sossina Haile; Adri van Duin; Peter Babilo; Sang Soo Han

    2005-12-29

    In order to provide the basis for a rational approach to improving the performance of Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} electrolytes for proton conducting ceramic fuel cells, we carried out a series of coupled computational and experimental studies to arrive at a consensus view of the characteristics affecting the proton conductivity of these systems. The computational part of the project developed a practical first principles approach to predicting the proton mobility as a function of temperature and doping for polycrystalline systems. This is a significant breakthrough representing the first time that first principles methods have been used to study diffusion across grain boundaries in such systems. The basis for this breakthrough was the development of the ReaxFF reactive force field that accurately describes the structure and energetics of Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} as the proton hops from site to site. The ReaxFF parameters are all derived from an extensive set of quantum mechanics calculations on various clusters, two dimensionally infinite slabs, and three dimensionally infinite periodic systems for combinations of metals, metal alloys, metal oxides, pure and Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3}, including chemical reaction pathways and proton transport pathways, structures. The ReaxFF force field enables molecular dynamics simulations to be carried out quickly for systems with {approx} 10,000 atoms rather than the {approx}100 or so practical for QM. The first 2.5 years were spent on developing and validating the ReaxFF and we have only had an opportunity to apply these methods to only a few test cases. However these simulations lead to transport properties (diffusion coefficients and activation energy) for multi-granular systems in good agreement with current experimental results. Now that we have validated the ReaxFF for diffusion across grain boundaries, we are in the position of being able to use computation to explore strategies to improve the diffusion of protons across grain boundaries

  12. Insights into thermal stability of thermophilic nitrile hydratases by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Yu, Huimin; Shen, Zhongyao

    2008-11-01

    Thermal stability is of great importance for industrial enzymes. Here we explored the thermal-stable mechanism of thermophilic nitrile hydratases (NHases) utilizing a molecular dynamic simulation. At a nanosecond timescale, profiles of root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) of two thermophilic NHases, 1UGQ and 1V29, under enhancing thermal stress were carried out at 300 K, 320 K, 350 K and 370 K, respectively. Results showed that the region A1 (211-231 aa) and A2 (305-316 aa) in 1UGQ, region B1 (186-192 aa) in 1V29, and most of terminal ends in both enzymes are hyper-sensitive. Salt-bridge analyses revealed that in one hand, salt-bridges contributed to maintaining the rigid structure and stable performance of the thermophilic 1UGQ and 1V29; in the other hand, salt-bridges involved in thermal sensitive regions are relatively weak and prone to be broken at elevated temperature, thereby cannot hold the stable conformation of the spatial neighborhood. In 1V29, region A1 was stabilized by a well-organized hook-hook like cluster with multiple salt-bridge interactions, region A2 was stabilized by two strong salt-bridge interactions of GLU52-ARG332 and GLU334-ARG332. In 1UGQ, the absence of a charged residue decreased its thermal sensitivity of region B1, and the formation of a small beta-sheet containing a stable salt-bridge in C-beta-terminal significantly enhanced its thermal stability. By radius of gyration calculation containing or eliminating the thermal sensitive regions, we quantified the contribution of thermal sensitive regions for thermal sensitivity of 1UGQ and 1V29. Consequently, we presented strategies to improve thermal stability of the industrialized mesophilic NHase by introducing stable salt-bridge interactions into its thermal sensitive regions.

  13. DNA sequence-dependent variation in nucleosome structure, stability, and dynamics detected by a FRET-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Kelbauskas, L; Woodbury, N; Lohr, D

    2009-02-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques provide powerful and sensitive methods for the study of conformational features in biomolecules. Here, we review FRET-based studies of nucleosomes, focusing particularly on our work comparing the widely used nucleosome standard, 5S rDNA, and 2 promoter-derived regulatory element-containing nucleosomes, mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-B and GAL10. Using several FRET approaches, we detected significant DNA sequence-dependent structure, stability, and dynamics differences among the three. In particular, 5S nucleosomes and 5S H2A/H2B-depleted nucleosomal particles have enhanced stability and diminished DNA dynamics, compared with MMTV-B and GAL10 nucleosomes and particles. H2A/H2B-depleted nucleosomes are of interest because they are produced by the activities of many transcription-associated complexes. Significant location-dependent (intranucleosomal) stability and dynamics variations were also observed. These also vary among nucleosome types. Nucleosomes restrict regulatory factor access to DNA, thereby impeding genetic processes. Eukaryotic cells possess mechanisms to alter nucleosome structure, to generate DNA access, but alterations often must be targeted to specific nucleosomes on critical regulatory DNA elements. By endowing specific nucleosomes with intrinsically higher DNA accessibility and (or) enhanced facility for conformational transitions, DNA sequence-dependent nucleosome dynamics and stability variations have the potential to facilitate nucleosome recognition and, thus, aid in the crucial targeting process. This and other nucleosome structure and function conclusions from FRET analyses are discussed.

  14. Dynamic stability of sequential stimulus representations in adapting neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Renato C. F.; Morrison, Abigail

    2014-01-01

    The ability to acquire and maintain appropriate representations of time-varying, sequential stimulus events is a fundamental feature of neocortical circuits and a necessary first step toward more specialized information processing. The dynamical properties of such representations depend on the current state of the circuit, which is determined primarily by the ongoing, internally generated activity, setting the ground state from which input-specific transformations emerge. Here, we begin by demonstrating that timing-dependent synaptic plasticity mechanisms have an important role to play in the active maintenance of an ongoing dynamics characterized by asynchronous and irregular firing, closely resembling cortical activity in vivo. Incoming stimuli, acting as perturbations of the local balance of excitation and inhibition, require fast adaptive responses to prevent the development of unstable activity regimes, such as those characterized by a high degree of population-wide synchrony. We establish a link between such pathological network activity, which is circumvented by the action of plasticity, and a reduced computational capacity. Additionally, we demonstrate that the action of plasticity shapes and stabilizes the transient network states exhibited in the presence of sequentially presented stimulus events, allowing the development of adequate and discernible stimulus representations. The main feature responsible for the increased discriminability of stimulus-driven population responses in plastic networks is shown to be the decorrelating action of inhibitory plasticity and the consequent maintenance of the asynchronous irregular dynamic regime both for ongoing activity and stimulus-driven responses, whereas excitatory plasticity is shown to play only a marginal role. PMID:25374534

  15. Bats dynamically change wingspan to enhance lift and efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu; Turbulence Team

    2016-11-01

    Bats can dynamically change the wingspan by controlling the joints on the wings. This work focuses on the effect of dynamically changing wingspan on the lift and efficiency in slow-flying bats. The geometry and kinematics of the bat model is constructed based on the experimental measurements of Wolf et al.. The Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flows are solved numerically to investigate the 3D unsteady flows around the bat model. It is found that the dynamically changing wingspan can significantly enhance the lift and efficiency. The lift enhancement is contributed by both lifting surface area extended during the downstroke and the vortex force associated with the leading-edge vortices intensified by the dynamically changing wingspan. The nonlinear interaction between the dynamically changing wing and the vortex structures plays an important role in the lift enhancement of a slow-flying bat in addition to the geometrical effect of changing the lifting-surface area in a flapping cycle.

  16. Probing dynamics at interfaces: resonance enhanced dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Plum, Markus A; Steffen, Werner; Fytas, George; Knoll, Wolfgang; Menges, Bernhard

    2009-06-08

    Experiments addressing supramolecular dynamics at interfaces are of paramount importance for the understanding of the dynamic behaviour of polymers, particles, or cells at interfaces, transport phenomena to and from surfaces, thin films or membranes. However, there are only few reports in the literature due to the paucity of experimental methods that offer the required spatial and time resolution. Evanescent wave dynamic light scattering originally developed to meet these needs has limited sensitivity and is restricted to glass substrates. Here we report the first experimental realization of a dynamic light scattering experiment close to an interface using surface plasmon polaritons as light source offering a strong increase in the signal to noise ratio and allowing for the use of metallic interfaces. As a proof of concept, we consider the diffusion of particles with radii down to 10nm in dilute dispersions close to a gold surface.

  17. Mechanism study on stability enhancement of adefovir dipivoxil by cocrystallization: Degradation kinetics and structure-stability correlation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rui-Zhen; Sun, Peng-Jie; Tao, Qian; Yao, Jia; Chen, Jia-Mei; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2016-03-31

    The purpose of this study is to determine the mechanism by which cocrystallization can enhance the stability of adefovir dipivoxil (AD), a diester prodrug of adefovir with known chemical stability problem. Three multi-component crystals of AD with biologically safe coformers, including gallic acid cocrystal hydrate (1:1:1), salicylate salt (1:1), and maleate salt (1:1) were prepared and characterized by thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. DVS measurements and stability tests were applied to evaluate the stability. The new crystalline phases exhibit improved stability compared to pure drug in the order AD gallic acid cocrystal>AD maleate>AD salicylate>AD form I. Degradation kinetics and structure-stability correlation studies demonstrate that the stability enhancement mechanism by cocrystallization involves (1) inhibition of hydrolysis of AD by replacement of drug-drug homosynthons by stronger drug-coformer heterosynthons at adenine fragments; (2) suppression of dimerization of AD by separation of adenine fragments by inserting coformers in crystal lattices; (3) further reducing rates of hydrolysis by forming hydrogen bonds with hydrate water at phosphoryl fragments. This study has important implications for use of cocrystallization approach to some easily degradable drugs in pharmaceutical.

  18. Robust transmission stabilization and dynamic switching in broadband hybrid waveguide systems with nonlinear gain and loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quan M.; Peleg, Avner; Tran, Thinh P.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a method for transmission stabilization and robust dynamic switching for colliding optical soliton sequences in broadband waveguide systems with nonlinear gain and loss. The method is based on employing hybrid waveguides, consisting of spans with linear gain and cubic loss, and spans with linear loss, cubic gain, and quintic loss. We show that the amplitude dynamics is described by a hybrid Lotka-Volterra (LV) model, and use the model to determine the physical parameter values required for enhanced transmission stabilization and switching. Numerical simulations with coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations confirm the predictions of the LV model, and show complete suppression of radiative instability and pulse distortion. This enables stable transmission over distances larger by an order of magnitude compared with uniform waveguides with linear gain and cubic loss. Moreover, multiple on-off and off-on dynamic switching events are demonstrated over a wide range of soliton amplitudes, showing the superiority of hybrid waveguides compared with static switching in uniform waveguides.

  19. Enhancing the stability of the synchronization of multivariable coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; Gutiérrez, R.; Huerta-Cuellar, G.; Boccaletti, S.; Gómez-Gardeñes, J.; Arenas, A.; Buldú, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    Synchronization processes in populations of identical networked oscillators are the focus of intense studies in physical, biological, technological, and social systems. Here we analyze the stability of the synchronization of a network of oscillators coupled through different variables. Under the assumption of an equal topology of connections for all variables, the master stability function formalism allows assessing and quantifying the stability properties of the synchronization manifold when the coupling is transferred from one variable to another. We report on the existence of an optimal coupling transference that maximizes the stability of the synchronous state in a network of Rössler-like oscillators. Finally, we design an experimental implementation (using nonlinear electronic circuits) which grounds the robustness of the theoretical predictions against parameter mismatches, as well as against intrinsic noise of the system.

  20. Transient Dynamics of Electric Power Systems: Direct Stability Assessment and Chaotic Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Chi

    A power system is continuously experiencing disturbances. Analyzing, predicting, and controlling transient dynamics, which describe transient behaviors of the power system following disturbances, is a major concern in the planning and operation of a power utility. Important conclusions and decisions are made based on the result of system transient behaviors. As today's power network becomes highly interconnected and much more complex, it has become essential to enhance the fundamental understanding of transient dynamics, and to develop fast and reliable computational algorithms. In this thesis, we emphasize mathematical rigor rather than physical insight. Nonlinear dynamical system theory is applied to study two fundamental topics: direct stability assessment and chaotic motions. Conventionally, power system stability is determined by calculating the time-domain transient behaviors for a given disturbance. In contrast, direct methods identify whether or not the system will remain stable once the disturbance is removed by comparing the corresponding energy value of the post-fault system to a calculated threshold value. Direct methods not only avoid the time-consuming numerical integration of the time domain approach, but also provide a quantitative measure of the degree of system stability. We present a general framework for the theoretical foundations of direct methods. Canonical representations of network-reduction models as well as network-preserving models are proposed to facilitate the analysis and the construction of energy functions of various power system models. An advanced and practical method, called the boundary of stability region based controlling unstable equilibrium point method (BCU method), of computing the controlling unstable equilibrium point is proposed along with its theoretical foundation. Numerical solution algorithms capable of supporting on-line applications of direct methods are provided. Further possible improvements and enhancements are

  1. Ethanol enhances collective dynamics of lipid membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, Martin D.; Schmalzl, Karin; Conti Nibali, Valeria; Tarek, Mounir; Rheinstaedter, Maikel C.

    2011-05-15

    From inelastic neutron-scattering experiments and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we present evidence for a low-energy dynamical mode in the fluid phase of a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phoshatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer immersed in a 5% water/ethanol solution. In addition to the well-known phonon that shows a liquidlike dispersion with energies up to 4.5 meV, we observe an additional mode at smaller energies of 0.8 meV, which shows little or no dispersion. Both modes show transverse properties and might be related to molecular motion perpendicular to the bilayer.

  2. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems. PMID:27225708

  3. Enhancing recombinant protein quality and yield by protein stability profiling.

    PubMed

    Mezzasalma, Tara M; Kranz, James K; Chan, Winnie; Struble, Geoffrey T; Schalk-Hihi, Céline; Deckman, Ingrid C; Springer, Barry A; Todd, Matthew J

    2007-04-01

    The reliable production of large amounts of stable, high-quality proteins is a major challenge facing pharmaceutical protein biochemists, necessary for fulfilling demands from structural biology, for high-throughput screening, and for assay purposes throughout early discovery. One strategy for bypassing purification challenges in problematic systems is to engineer multiple forms of a particular protein to optimize expression, purification, and stability, often resulting in a nonphysiological sub-domain. An alternative strategy is to alter process conditions to maximize wild-type construct stability, based on a specific protein stability profile (PSP). ThermoFluor, a miniaturized 384-well thermal stability assay, has been implemented as a means of monitoring solution-dependent changes in protein stability, complementing the protein engineering and purification processes. A systematic analysis of pH, buffer or salt identity and concentration, biological metals, surfactants, and common excipients in terms of an effect on protein stability rapidly identifies conditions that might be used (or avoided) during protein production. Two PSPs are presented for the kinase catalytic domains of Akt-3 and cFMS, in which information derived from a ThermoFluor PSP led to an altered purification strategy, improving the yield and quality of the protein using the primary sequences of the catalytic domains.

  4. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems.

  5. Enhancing synchronization stability in a multi-area power grid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-05-26

    Maintaining a synchronous state of generators is of central importance to the normal operation of power grids, in which many networks are generally interconnected. In order to understand the condition under which the stability can be optimized, it is important to relate network stability with feedback control strategies as well as network structure. Here, we present a stability analysis on a multi-area power grid by relating it with several control strategies and topological design of network structure. We clarify the minimal feedback gain in the self-feedback control, and build the optimal communication network for the local and global control strategies. Finally, we consider relationship between the interconnection pattern and the synchronization stability; by optimizing the network interlinks, the obtained network shows better synchronization stability than the original network does, in particular, at a high power demand. Our analysis shows that interlinks between spatially distant nodes will improve the synchronization stability. The results seem unfeasible to be implemented in real systems but provide a potential guide for the design of stable power systems.

  6. Determining basin geometry, stability, and flow dynamics of valley glaciers with ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Seth William

    Mountain glaciers and ice caps (GICs) currently contribute ~0% to annual sea level rise. Most are temperate, therefore having the potential for rapid retreat from rising atmospheric temperatures. This climate sensitivity makes GIC stability and their impact on sea level rise a scientific problem with societal implications. To accurately predict impacts from GIC changes, knowledge of glacier components (e.g., basin geometry, mass balance, and dynamics) is needed. The goal of my dissertation research is to determine information about glacier geometry, snow-fire, and englacial stratigraphy using ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to enhance our understanding of valley glacier mass balance, dynamics, and stability. I first examine glacier basin geometry and ice volume of two temperate glaciers (Jarvis Glacier, Alaska and Nisqually Glacier, Washington) and demonstrate that significant errors (≥30-50%) can arise when using empirically-based volume estimates without geophysical constraints. I next determine spatial variability of accumulation across the temperate Juneau Icefield in Alaska usina GPR to interpolate between snowpits. To accomplish this, the dependence of radar velocity on snow density (~.3-0.7 g cm -3) and water content (0-9% by volume) needs to be addressed. Results show that on average, 2.1+/-0.5 m (water equivalent) of winter snow accumulates across the icefield with accumulation patterns depending on elevation, aspect, and proximity to moisture source. The third component of my dissertation combines locally measured accumulation rates, ice flow velocities, and englacial structures imaged with GPR to calculate that a negative mass balance (-0.25 cm a -1) has existed in valley glaciers of the Pensacola Mountains, West Antarctica over the past 1200 years. Finally, 1 use a 3-dimensional finite element non-Newtonian model to characterize the stress fields and current dynamics of a small ice divide. GPR-derived basin geometry is used for model boundary

  7. Stability Mechanisms of a Thermophilic Laccase Probed by Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Niels J.; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2013-01-01

    Laccases are highly stable, industrially important enzymes capable of oxidizing a large range of substrates. Causes for their stability are, as for other proteins, poorly understood. In this work, multiple-seed molecular dynamics (MD) was applied to a Trametes versicolor laccase in response to variable ionic strengths, temperatures, and glycosylation status. Near-physiological conditions provided excellent agreement with the crystal structure (average RMSD ∼0.92 Å) and residual agreement with experimental B-factors. The persistence of backbone hydrogen bonds was identified as a key descriptor of structural response to environment, whereas solvent-accessibility, radius of gyration, and fluctuations were only locally relevant. Backbone hydrogen bonds decreased systematically with temperature in all simulations (∼9 per 50 K), probing structural changes associated with enthalpy-entropy compensation. Approaching Topt (∼350 K) from 300 K, this change correlated with a beginning “unzipping” of critical β-sheets. 0 M ionic strength triggered partial denucleation of the C-terminal (known experimentally to be sensitive) at 400 K, suggesting a general salt stabilization effect. In contrast, F− (but not Cl−) specifically impaired secondary structure by formation of strong hydrogen bonds with backbone NH, providing a mechanism for experimentally observed small anion destabilization, potentially remedied by site-directed mutagenesis at critical intrusion sites. N-glycosylation was found to support structural integrity by increasing persistent backbone hydrogen bonds by ∼4 across simulations, mainly via prevention of F− intrusion. Hydrogen-bond loss in distinct loop regions and ends of critical β-sheets suggest potential strategies for laboratory optimization of these industrially important enzymes. PMID:23658618

  8. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in chronic Achilles tendinosis.

    PubMed

    Gärdin, Anna; Brismar, Torkel B; Movin, Tomas; Shalabi, Adel

    2013-11-22

    Chronic Achilles tendinosis is a common problem. When evaluating and comparing different therapies there is a need for reliable imaging methods. Our aim was to evaluate if chronic Achilles tendinosis affects the dynamic contrast-enhancement in the tendon and its surroundings and if short-term eccentric calf-muscle training normalizes the dynamic contrast-enhancement. 20 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were included. Median duration of symptoms was 31 months (range 6 to 120 months). Both Achilles tendons were examined with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI before and after a 12- week exercise programme of eccentric calf-muscle training. The dynamic MRI was evaluated in tendon, vessel and in fat ventrally of tendon. Area under the curve (AUC), time to peak of signal, signal increase per second (SI/s) and increase in signal between start and peak as a percentage (SI%) was calculated. Pain and performance were evaluated using a questionnaire. In the fat ventrally of the tendon, dynamic contrast enhancement was significantly higher in the symptomatic leg compared to the contralateral non-symptomatic leg before but not after treatment. Despite decreased pain and improved performance there was no significant change of dynamic contrast enhancement in symptomatic tendons after treatment. In Achilles tendinosis there is an increased contrast enhancement in the fat ventrally of the tendon. The lack of correlation with symptoms and the lack of significant changes in tendon contrast enhancement parameters do however indicate that dynamic enhanced MRI is currently not a useful method to evaluate chronic Achilles tendinosis.

  9. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in chronic Achilles tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic Achilles tendinosis is a common problem. When evaluating and comparing different therapies there is a need for reliable imaging methods. Our aim was to evaluate if chronic Achilles tendinosis affects the dynamic contrast-enhancement in the tendon and its surroundings and if short-term eccentric calf-muscle training normalizes the dynamic contrast-enhancement. Methods 20 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were included. Median duration of symptoms was 31 months (range 6 to 120 months). Both Achilles tendons were examined with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI before and after a 12- week exercise programme of eccentric calf-muscle training. The dynamic MRI was evaluated in tendon, vessel and in fat ventrally of tendon. Area under the curve (AUC), time to peak of signal, signal increase per second (SI/s) and increase in signal between start and peak as a percentage (SI%) was calculated. Pain and performance were evaluated using a questionnaire. Results In the fat ventrally of the tendon, dynamic contrast enhancement was significantly higher in the symptomatic leg compared to the contralateral non-symptomatic leg before but not after treatment. Despite decreased pain and improved performance there was no significant change of dynamic contrast enhancement in symptomatic tendons after treatment. Conclusion In Achilles tendinosis there is an increased contrast enhancement in the fat ventrally of the tendon. The lack of correlation with symptoms and the lack of significant changes in tendon contrast enhancement parameters do however indicate that dynamic enhanced MRI is currently not a useful method to evaluate chronic Achilles tendinosis. PMID:24261480

  10. Intrarater test-retest reliability of static and dynamic stability indexes measurement using the Biodex Stability System during unilateral stance.

    PubMed

    Arifin, Nooranida; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar

    2014-04-01

    The measurements of postural balance often involve measurement error, which affects the analysis and interpretation of the outcomes. In most of the existing clinical rehabilitation research, the ability to produce reliable measures is a prerequisite for an accurate assessment of an intervention after a period of time. Although clinical balance assessment has been performed in previous study, none has determined the intrarater test-retest reliability of static and dynamic stability indexes during dominant single stance. In this study, one rater examined 20 healthy university students (female=12, male=8) in two sessions separated by 7 day intervals. Three stability indexes--the overall stability index (OSI), anterior/posterior stability index (APSI), and medial/ lateral stability index (MLSI) in static and dynamic conditions--were measured during single dominant stance. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), standard error measurement (SEM) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated. Test-retest ICCs for OSI, APSI, and MLSI were 0.85, 0.78, and 0.84 during static condition and were 0.77, 0.77, and 0.65 during dynamic condition, respectively. We concluded that the postural stability assessment using Biodex stability system demonstrates good-to-excellent test-retest reliability over a 1 week time interval.

  11. Dynamic Stability and Gravitational Balancing of Multiple Extended Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Feasibility of a non-invasive compensation scheme was analyzed for precise positioning of a massive extended body in free fall using gravitational forces influenced by surrounding source masses in close proximity. The N-body problem of classical mechanics is a paradigm used to gain insight into the physics of the equivalent N-body problem subject to control forces. The analysis addressed how a number of control masses move around the proof mass so that the proof mass position can be accurately and remotely compensated when exogenous disturbances are acting on it, while its sensitivity to gravitational waves remains unaffected. Past methods to correct the dynamics of the proof mass have considered active electrostatic or capacitive methods, but the possibility of stray capacitances on the surfaces of the proof mass have prompted the investigation of other alternatives, such as the method presented in this paper. While more rigorous analyses of the problem should be carried out, the data show that, by means of a combined feedback and feed-forward control approach, the control masses succeeded in driving the proof mass along the specified trajectory, which implies that the proof mass can, in principle, be balanced via gravitational forces only while external perturbations are acting on it. This concept involves the dynamic stability of a group of massive objects interacting gravitationally under active control, and can apply to drag-free control of spacecraft during missions, to successor gravitational wave space borne sensors, or to any application requiring flying objects to be precisely controlled in position and attitude relative to another body via gravitational interactions only.

  12. Enhanced dissolution of particle-stabilized bubbles by cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulichet, Vincent; Garbin, Valeria

    2015-11-01

    Foams and emulsions that are durable and stable under varying environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, humidity) are central in the food and personal care industry. Small bubbles (< 100 μ m) need to be stabilized against dissolution even in a gas-saturated liquid, because the Laplace pressure drives diffusion across the curved gas-liquid interface. Solid particles adsorbed at the interface of microbubbles have been shown to prevent coalescence and also arrest bubble dissolution. We studied the effect of changes in temperature on the lifetime of particle-stabilized microbubbles. We report a mechanism of destabilization beyond dissolution arrest, driven by the cooling of the external liquid. We show that the dominant mechanism of destabilization is the increase in solubility of the gas in the liquid, leading to a condition of undersaturation, which drives gas diffusion. Control experiments show that indeed, at constant temperature and pressure, undersaturation alone is sufficient to cause particle-stabilized bubbles to dissolve.

  13. Image segmentation and edge enhancement with stabilized inverse diffusion equations.

    PubMed

    Pollak, I; Willsky, A S; Krim, H

    2000-01-01

    We introduce a family of first-order multidimensional ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with discontinuous right-hand sides and demonstrate their applicability in image processing. An equation belonging to this family is an inverse diffusion everywhere except at local extrema, where some stabilization is introduced. For this reason, we call these equations "stabilized inverse diffusion equations" (SIDEs). Existence and uniqueness of solutions, as well as stability, are proven for SIDEs. A SIDE in one spatial dimension may be interpreted as a limiting case of a semi-discretized Perona-Malik equation. In an experiment, SIDE's are shown to suppress noise while sharpening edges present in the input signal. Their application to image segmentation is also demonstrated.

  14. Enhanced stability of hillslopes and channel beds to mass failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prancevic, Jeff; Lamb, Michael; Palucis, Marisa; Venditti, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    The stability of inclined, unconsolidated sediments subjected to groundwater flow on hillslopes and steep channel beds is important for both landscape evolution and natural hazards. Force-balance models have been used for seven decades to predict the stability of slopes, but they generally underpredict the degree of saturation required to destabilize the sediment. Researchers often appeal to heightened stabilizing forces from root and mineral cohesion, and friction acting on the margins of the failure to explain this underprediction. Surprisingly, infinite-slope stability models in their simplest form have never been tested under controlled laboratory conditions. To address this gap in data, we perform a set of controlled laboratory experiments with slope-parallel seepage in the simplest possible configuration. We performed 47 experiments in a 5 m laboratory flume with 4 grain sizes (D50 = 0.7, 2, 5, and 15 mm) and a wide range in bed angles (20° to 43°), spanning both Darcian and turbulent subsurface flow regimes. Our experiments show that granular slopes were more stable than predicted by simple force balance models in experiments that lack root or mineral cohesion. Despite the smooth plastic walls and the long aspect ratio of our flume, we calculate wall and toe friction to be important. Including these additional resistance terms in the model reduces the model misfit with our experimental results. However, there is considerable remaining misfit (up to 50% underestimation of the saturation level required for failure). We investigate two explanations of this heightened stability: 1) standard frictional resistance terms are underestimated, and 2) seepage stresses are overestimated. Both explanations require that we modify the models used to predict slope stability.

  15. Dynamical Formation and Stability of Helical Prominence Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVore, C. Richard; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2000-08-01

    We numerically simulated an initially bipolar magnetic field subjected to shear motions concentrated near and parallel to the photospheric polarity inversion line. The simulations yield three principal results: (1) For footpoint displacements comparable to the bipole's depth, the sheared core field acquires a dipped geometry that can support cool prominence material against gravity. This confirms previous force-free equilibrium models for forming dipped prominence fields by differential shear and extends them to much larger applied shears and time-dependent dynamics with dissipation. (2) At larger shears, we discover a new mechanism for forming the helical magnetic fields of prominences. It entails a two-step process of magnetic reconnection in the corona. First, flux in the sheared core reconnects with flux in the unsheared, restraining arcade, producing new pairs of interlinked field lines. Second, as these interlinked fields continue to be sheared, they are brought together and reconnect again, producing helical field threading and enveloping the body of the prominence. This mechanism can account for the twist that is often observed in both quiescent and erupting prominences. (3) Even for very large shears, the dipped, helical structure settles into an apparently stable equilibrium, despite the substantial amount of reconnection and twist in the magnetic field. We conclude that neither a kink instability of the helical core field, nor a tether-cutting instability of the restraining arcade, is operating in our low-lying model prominence. This concurs with both observations and a theoretical model for prominence stability.

  16. Late-quaternary vegetational dynamics and community stability reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcourt, Paul A.; Delcourt, Hazel R.

    1983-03-01

    Defining the spatial and temporal limits of vegetational processes such as migration and invasion of established communities is a prerequisite to evaluating the degree of stability in plant communities through the late Quaternary. The interpretation of changes in boundaries of major vegetation types over the past 20,000 yr offers a complementary view to that provided by migration maps for particular plant taxa. North of approximately 43°N in eastern North America, continual vegetational disequilibrium has resulted from climatic change, soil development, and species migrations during postglacial times. Between 33° and 39°N, stable full-glacial vegetation was replaced by a relatively unstable vegetation during late-glacial climatic amelioration; stable interglacial vegetation developed there after about 9000 yr B.P. Late-Quaternary vegetation has been in dynamic equilibrium, with a relatively constant flora, south of 33°N on upland interfluves along the northern Gulf Coastal Plain, peninsular Florida, and west-central Mexico.

  17. Enhancement of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) thermal and processing stability using a bio-waste derived additive.

    PubMed

    Persico, Paola; Ambrogi, Veronica; Baroni, Antonio; Santagata, Gabriella; Carfagna, Cosimo; Malinconico, Mario; Cerruti, Pierfrancesco

    2012-12-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a biodegradable polymer, whose applicability is limited by its brittleness and narrow processing window. In this study a pomace extract (EP), from the bio-waste of winery industry, was used as thermal and processing stabilizer for PHB, aimed to engineer a totally bio-based system. The results showed that EP enhanced the thermal stability of PHB, which maintained high molecular weights after processing. This evidence was in agreement with the slower decrease in viscosity over time observed by rheological tests. EP also affected the melt crystallization kinetics and the overall crystallinity extent. Finally, dynamic mechanical and tensile tests showed that EP slightly improved the polymer ductility. The results are intriguing, in view of the development of sustainable alternatives to synthetic polymer additives, thus increasing the applicability of bio-based materials. Moreover, the reported results demonstrated the feasibility of the conversion of an agro-food by-product into a bio-resource in an environmentally friendly and cost-effective way.

  18. Enhanced stability of polyacrylate-coated magnetite nanoparticles in biorelevant media.

    PubMed

    Hajdú, Angéla; Szekeres, Márta; Tóth, Ildikó Y; Bauer, Rita A; Mihály, Judith; Zupkó, István; Tombácz, Etelka

    2012-06-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides. Adsorption of polyacrylic acid (PAA) on MNPs was measured at pH=6.5±0.3 and I=0.01 M (NaCl) to find the optimal PAA amount for MNP stabilization under physiological conditions. We detected an H-bond formation between magnetite surface groups and PAA by ATR-FTIR measurements, but bonds of metal ion-carboxylate complexes, generally cited in literature, were not identified at the given pH and ionic strength. The dependence of the electrokinetic potential and the aggregation state on the amount of added PAA at various pHs was measured by electrophoretic mobility and dynamic light-scattering methods. The electrokinetic potential of the naked MNPs was low at near physiological pH, but PAA adsorption overcharged the particles. Highly negatively charged, well-stabilized carboxylated MNPs formed via adsorption of PAA in an amount of approximately ten times of that necessary to compensate the original positive charge of the magnetite. Coagulation kinetics experiments revealed gradual enhancement of salt tolerance at physiological pH from ~0.001 M at no added PAA up to ~0.5 M at 1.12 mmol/g PAA. The PAA-coated MNPs exert no substantial effect on the proliferation of malignant (HeLa) or non-cancerous fibroblast cells (MRC-5) as determined by means of MTT assays.

  19. Dynamic enhancement of the exchange bias training effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, S.; Polisetty, S.; Binek, Ch.; Berger, A.

    2007-03-01

    Exchange bias in coupled magnetic thin films and its accompanying training effect are fundamental interface phenomena with significant impact in spintronic applications. Both effects are well known in heterosystems of ferro- and antiferromagnetic thin films. Here, we report on the dynamic enhancement of the training effect in an exchange coupled bilayer of soft and hard ferromagnetic materials. Training is referred to as a gradual change of the bias field, which evolves upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. Its dynamic enhancement is observed with increasing sweep rate of the applied magnetic field from quasistatic to the fully dynamic range. A dynamically generalized theory based on triggered relaxation is in excellent agreement with the training data. Additionally, we evidence the remarkable universality of our theoretical approach when applying it to the dynamically altered training effect of a conventional exchange bias system involving an antiferromagnetic pinning layer.

  20. Dynamic stability of functionally graded nanobeam based on nonlocal Timoshenko theory considering surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saffari, Shahab; Hashemian, Mohammad; Toghraie, Davood

    2017-09-01

    Based on nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory, dynamic stability of functionally graded (FG) nanobeam under axial and thermal loading was investigated. Surface stress effects were implemented according to Gurtin-Murdoch continuum theory. Using power law distribution for FGM and von Karman geometric nonlinearity, governing equations were derived based on Hamilton's principle. The developed nonlocal models have the capability of interpreting small scale effects. Pasternak elastic medium was employed to represent the interaction of the FG nanobeam and the surrounding elastic medium. A parametric study was conducted to focus influences of the static load factor, temperature change, gradient index, nonlocal parameter, slenderness ratio, surface effect and springs constants of the elastic medium on the dynamic instability region (DIR) of the FG beam with simply-supported boundary conditions. It was found that differences between DIRs predicted by local and nonlocal beam theories are significant for beams with lower aspect ratio. Moreover, it was observed that in contrast to high temperature environments, at low temperatures, increasing the temperature change moves the origin of the DIR to higher excitation frequency zone and leads to further stability. Considering surface stress effects shifts the DIR of FG beam to higher frequency zone, also increasing the gradient index enhances the frequency of DIR.

  1. Transient Stability Enhancement of Power Systems by Lyapunov-Based Recurrent Neural Networks UPFC Controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Chi; Tsai, Hung-Chi; Chang, Wei-Neng

    A Lyapunov-based recurrent neural networks unified power flow controller (UPFC) is developed for improving transient stability of power systems. First, a simple UPFC dynamical model, composed of a controllable shunt susceptance on the shunt side and an ideal complex transformer on the series side, is utilized to analyze UPFC dynamical characteristics. Secondly, we study the control configuration of the UPFC with two major blocks: the primary control, and the supplementary control. The primary control is implemented by standard PI techniques when the power system is operated in a normal condition. The supplementary control will be effective only when the power system is subjected by large disturbances. We propose a new Lyapunov-based UPFC controller of the classical single-machine-infinite-bus system for damping enhancement. In order to consider more complicated detailed generator models, we also propose a Lyapunov-based adaptive recurrent neural network controller to deal with such model uncertainties. This controller can be treated as neural network approximations of Lyapunov control actions. In addition, this controller also provides online learning ability to adjust the corresponding weights with the back propagation algorithm built in the hidden layer. The proposed control scheme has been tested on two simple power systems. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed control strategy is very effective for suppressing power swing even under severe system conditions.

  2. Electrified film on a porous inclined plane: dynamics and stability.

    PubMed

    Uma, B; Usha, R

    2010-07-01

    The time evolution of a thin conducting liquid film flowing down a porous inclined substrate is investigated when an electric field acts normal to the substrate. It is assumed that the flow through the porous medium is governed by Darcy's law together with Beavers-Joseph condition. Under the assumption of small permeability relative to the thickness of the overlying fluid layer, the flow is decoupled from the filtration flow through the porous medium. A slip condition at the bottom is used to incorporate the effects of the permeability of the substrate. From the set of exact averaged equations derived using integral boundary method for the film thickness and for the flow rate, a nonlinear evolution equation for the film thickness is derived through a long-wave approximation. A linear stability analysis of the base flow is performed and the critical Reynolds number is obtained. The results reveal that the substrate porosity in general destabilizes the liquid film flow and the presence of the electric field enhances this destabilizing effect. A weakly nonlinear stability analysis divulges the existence of supercritical stable and subcritical unstable zones in the wave number/Reynolds number parameter space and the results demonstrate how the neutral curves change as the intensity of the electric filed or the permeability of the porous medium is varied. The numerical solution of the nonlinear evolution equation in a periodic domain reveals that the base flow yields to surface structures that are either time independent waves of permanent form that propagate or time-dependent modes that oscillate slightly in the amplitude. Further, it is observed that the shape and amplitude of long-time waveforms are influenced by the permeability of the porous medium as well as by the applied electric field. The results reveal that the destabilization induced by the electric field in an otherwise stable film over a porous medium is exhibited in the form of traveling waves of finite

  3. Electrified film on a porous inclined plane: Dynamics and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uma, B.; Usha, R.

    2010-07-01

    The time evolution of a thin conducting liquid film flowing down a porous inclined substrate is investigated when an electric field acts normal to the substrate. It is assumed that the flow through the porous medium is governed by Darcy’s law together with Beavers-Joseph condition. Under the assumption of small permeability relative to the thickness of the overlying fluid layer, the flow is decoupled from the filtration flow through the porous medium. A slip condition at the bottom is used to incorporate the effects of the permeability of the substrate. From the set of exact averaged equations derived using integral boundary method for the film thickness and for the flow rate, a nonlinear evolution equation for the film thickness is derived through a long-wave approximation. A linear stability analysis of the base flow is performed and the critical Reynolds number is obtained. The results reveal that the substrate porosity in general destabilizes the liquid film flow and the presence of the electric field enhances this destabilizing effect. A weakly nonlinear stability analysis divulges the existence of supercritical stable and subcritical unstable zones in the wave number/Reynolds number parameter space and the results demonstrate how the neutral curves change as the intensity of the electric filed or the permeability of the porous medium is varied. The numerical solution of the nonlinear evolution equation in a periodic domain reveals that the base flow yields to surface structures that are either time independent waves of permanent form that propagate or time-dependent modes that oscillate slightly in the amplitude. Further, it is observed that the shape and amplitude of long-time waveforms are influenced by the permeability of the porous medium as well as by the applied electric field. The results reveal that the destabilization induced by the electric field in an otherwise stable film over a porous medium is exhibited in the form of traveling waves of finite

  4. Optimal mistuning for enhanced aeroelastic stability of transonic fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, K. C.; Crawley, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    An inverse design procedure was developed for the design of a mistuned rotor. The design requirements are that the stability margin of the eigenvalues of the aeroelastic system be greater than or equal to some minimum stability margin, and that the mass added to each blade be positive. The objective was to achieve these requirements with a minimal amount of mistuning. Hence, the problem was posed as a constrained optimization problem. The constrained minimization problem was solved by the technique of mathematical programming via augmented Lagrangians. The unconstrained minimization phase of this technique was solved by the variable metric method. The bladed disk was modelled as being composed of a rigid disk mounted on a rigid shaft. Each of the blades were modelled with a single tosional degree of freedom.

  5. Stabilities and Dynamics of Protein Folding Nuclei by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Shun; Zhou, Xin; Zheng, Wei-Mou; Wang, Yan-Ting

    2017-07-01

    To understand how the stabilities of key nuclei fragments affect protein folding dynamics, we simulate by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation in aqueous solution four fragments cut out of a protein G, including one α-helix (seqB: KVFKQYAN), two β-turns (seqA: LNGKTLKG and seqC: YDDATKTF), and one β-strand (seqD: DGEWTYDD). The Markov State Model clustering method combined with the coarse-grained conformation letters method are employed to analyze the data sampled from 2-μs equilibrium MD simulation trajectories. We find that seqA and seqB have more stable structures than their native structures which become metastable when cut out of the protein structure. As expected, seqD alone is flexible and does not have a stable structure. Throughout our simulations, the native structure of seqC is stable but cannot be reached if starting from a structure other than the native one, implying a funnel-shape free energy landscape of seqC in aqueous solution. All the above results suggest that different nuclei have different formation dynamics during protein folding, which may have a major contribution to the hierarchy of protein folding dynamics. Supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant No. 2013CB932804, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11421063, and the CAS Biophysics Interdisciplinary Innovation Team Project

  6. Method for enhancing stability of high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, and the stabilized high explosives

    DOEpatents

    Nutt, Gerald L.

    1991-01-01

    The stability of porous solid high explosives, for purposes of transport or storage, is enhanced by reducing the sensitivity to shock initiation of a reaction that leads to detonation. The pores of the explosive down to a certain size are filled under pressure with a stable, low melt temperature material in liquid form, and the combined material is cooled so the pore filling material solidifies. The stability can be increased to progressively higher levels by filling smaller pores. The pore filling material can be removed, at least partially, by reheating above its melt temperature and drained off so that the explosive is once more suitable for detonation.

  7. Designing an extracellular matrix protein with enhanced mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sean P.; Billings, Kate S.; Ohashi, Tomoo; Allen, Mark D.; Best, Robert B.; Randles, Lucy G.; Erickson, Harold P.; Clarke, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix proteins tenascin and fibronectin experience significant mechanical forces in vivo. Both contain a number of tandem repeating homologous fibronectin type III (fnIII) domains, and atomic force microscopy experiments have demonstrated that the mechanical strength of these domains can vary significantly. Previous work has shown that mutations in the core of an fnIII domain from human tenascin (TNfn3) reduce the unfolding force of that domain significantly: The composition of the core is apparently crucial to the mechanical stability of these proteins. Based on these results, we have used rational redesign to increase the mechanical stability of the 10th fnIII domain of human fibronectin, FNfn10, which is directly involved in integrin binding. The hydrophobic core of FNfn10 was replaced with that of the homologous, mechanically stronger TNfn3 domain. Despite the extensive substitution, FNoTNc retains both the three-dimensional structure and the cell adhesion activity of FNfn10. Atomic force microscopy experiments reveal that the unfolding forces of the engineered protein FNoTNc increase by ≈20% to match those of TNfn3. Thus, we have specifically designed a protein with increased mechanical stability. Our results demonstrate that core engineering can be used to change the mechanical strength of proteins while retaining functional surface interactions. PMID:17535921

  8. Enhancement of Edge Stability with Lithium Wall Coatings in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maingi, R.; Bell, R. E.; Leblanc, B. P.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S. M.; Kugel, H. W.; Mansfield, D. K.; Osborne, T. H.

    2008-11-01

    ELM reduction or elimination while maintaining high confinement is essential for ITER, which has been designed for H-mode operation. Large ELMs are thought to be triggered by exceeding either edge current density and/or pressure gradient limits (peeling, ballooning modes). Stability calculations show that spherical tori should have access to higher pressure gradients and pedestal heights than higher R/a tokamaks, owing to access to second stability regimes[...1]. An ELM-free regime was recently observed in the NSTX following the application of lithium onto the graphite plasma facing components[......2]. ELMs were eliminated in phases[.....3], with the resulting pressure gradients and pedestal widths increasing substantially. Calculations with TRANSP have shown that the edge bootstrap current increased substantially, consistent with second stability access. These ELM-free discharges have a substantial improvement in energy confinement, up to the global βN˜ 5.5 limit. * Supported by US DOE DE-FG02-04ER54520, DE-AC-76CH03073, and DE-FC02-04ER54698. [.1] P. B. Snyder, et. al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 46 (2004) A131. [2] H. W. Kugel, et. al., Phys. Plasma 15 (2008) #056118. [3] D. M. Mansfield, et. al., J. Nucl. Materials (2009) submitted.

  9. Enhanced stability and mechanical strength of sodium alginate composite films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sijun; Li, Yong; Li, Lin

    2017-03-15

    This work aims to study how three kinds of nanofillers: graphene oxide (GO), ammonia functionalized graphene oxide (AGO), and triethoxylpropylaminosilane functionalized silica, can affect stability and mechanical strength of sodium alginate (SA) composite films. The filler/sodium alginate (SA) solutions were first studied by rheology to reveal effects of various fillers on zero shear viscosity η0. SA composite films were then prepared by a solution mixing-evaporation method. The structure, morphology and properties of SA composite films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), contact angle and mechanical testing. Compared to GO and silica, the presence of AGO significantly improved the interaction between AGO and SA, which led to the increase in stability and mechanical strength of the resulting SA composite films. The tensile strength and elongation at break of AGO/SA composite film at 3wt% AGO loading were increased by 114.9% and 194.4%, respectively, in contrast to pure SA film. Furthermore, the stability of AGO/SA composite films at high temperatures and in a wet environment were better than that of silica/SA and GO/SA composite films.

  10. Atmospheric accelerations and the stability of dynamic supergiant atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, H.; de Jager, C.

    1995-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to study instability regions in the HR diagram, through a calculation of the atmospheric accelerations for spherically symmetric stars, in dynamic equilibrium, without using detailed atmospheric models. The input data are five primary data, viz.: the stellar luminosity L, the effective temperature T_eff_, the mass M, the rate of mass loss ˙(M), and the microturbulent velocity component ζmu_, while we assume the temperature for a reference atmospheric layer, an assumption that appears not to be critical. An iterative solution of the momentum equation, simultaneous with some other equations, yields values for the various accelerations acting on a stellar atmosphere and their algebraic sum g_eff_', the predicted effective acceleration. In the first part of the paper we compare this latter quantity with the g_eff_-value derived observationally from spectral studies of nine program stars and we find overall fair agreement. This supports the method as well as the values of the five input data. In part 2 we determine g'_eff_ in same way for the whole upper part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram by using statistical primary data on the mass (based on evolutionary calculations), on mass-loss and on microturbulence (shock-strengths). We find as a fairly general rule that, as stars move along their evolutionary track, and for time scales longer than the dynamic time scale of the atmosphere, the atmosphere continuously adapts to the new (L,T_eff_)-values and essentially remains stable. Current practice of determining the stability limit of stellar atmospheres by extrapolating hydrostatic models to the Eddington limit is not justified by this study. There is one exception: we find a small area around T_eff_=8300K and log(L/Lsun_)=5.7, where no solution is possible for evolved stars on their blueward evolutionary track; the stars in this area have in any case effective accelerations <1mm/s^2^: the "Yellow Evolutionary Void". In the third part we

  11. Stability and dynamics of polycomb target sites in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Camilla; Adryan, Boris; Bell, Ian; Meadows, Lisa; Russell, Steven; Manak, J Robert; White, Robert

    2008-09-05

    Polycomb-group (PcG) and Trithorax-group proteins together form a maintenance machinery that is responsible for stable heritable states of gene activity. While the best-studied target genes are the Hox genes of the Antennapedia and Bithorax complexes, a large number of key developmental genes are also Polycomb (Pc) targets, indicating a widespread role for this maintenance machinery in cell fate determination. We have studied the linkage between the binding of PcG proteins and the developmental regulation of gene expression using whole-genome mapping to identify sites bound by the PcG proteins, Pc and Pleiohomeotic (Pho), in the Drosophila embryo and in a more restricted tissue, the imaginal discs of the third thoracic segment. Our data provide support for the idea that Pho is a general component of the maintenance machinery, since the majority of Pc targets are also associated with Pho binding. We find, in general, considerable developmental stability of Pc and Pho binding at target genes and observe that Pc/Pho binding can be associated with both expressed and inactive genes. In particular, at the Hox complexes, both active and inactive genes have significant Pc and Pho binding. However, in comparison to inactive genes, the active Hox genes show reduced and altered binding profiles. During development, Pc target genes are not simply constantly associated with Pc/Pho binding, and we identify sets of genes with clear differential binding between embryo and imaginal disc. Using existing datasets, we show that for specific fate-determining genes of the haemocyte lineage, the active state is characterised by lack of Pc binding. Overall, our analysis suggests a dynamic relationship between Pc/Pho binding and gene transcription. Pc/Pho binding does not preclude transcription, but levels of Pc/Pho binding change during development, and loss of Pc/Pho binding can be associated with both stable gene activity and inactivity.

  12. Adaptations and pathologies linked to dynamic stabilization of neural circuitry.

    PubMed

    Kavanau, J L

    1999-05-01

    Brain circuits for infrequently employed memories are reinforced largely during sleep by self-induced, electrical slow-waves, a process referred to as "dynamic stabilization" (DS). The essence of waking brain function in the absence of volitional activity is sensory input processing, an enormous amount of which is visual. These two functions: circuit reinforcement by DS and sensory information processing come into conflict when both occur at a high level, a conflict that may have been the selective pressure for sleep's origin. As brain waves are absent at the low temperatures of deep torpor, essential circuitry of hibernating small mammals would lose its competence if the animals did not warm up periodically to temperatures allowing sleep and circuit reinforcement. Blind, cave-dwelling vertebrates require no sleep because their sensory processing does not interfere with DS. Nor does such interference arise in continuously-swimming fishes, whose need to process visual information is reduced greatly by life in visually relatively featureless, pelagic habitats, and by schooling. Dreams are believed to have their origin in DS of memory circuits. They are thought to have illusory content when the circuits are partially degraded (incompetent), with synaptic efficacies weakened through infrequent use. Partially degraded circuits arise normally in the course of synaptic efficacy decay, or pathologically through abnormal regimens of DS. Organic delirium may result from breakdown of normal regimens of DS of circuitry during sleep, leaving many circuits incompetent. Activation of incompetent circuits during wakefulness apparently produces delirium and hallucinations. Some epileptic seizures may be induced by abnormal regimens of DS of motor circuitry. Regimens of remedial DS during seizures induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) apparently produce temporary remission of delirium by restoring functional or 'dedicated' synaptic efficacies in incompetent circuitry. Sparing

  13. Lift enhancement by dynamically changing wingspan in forward flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei; Liu, Tianshu

    2014-06-01

    Dynamically stretching and retracting wingspan has been widely observed in the flight of birds and bats, and its effects on the aerodynamic performance particularly lift generation are intriguing. The rectangular flat-plate flapping wing with a sinusoidally stretching and retracting wingspan is proposed as a simple model for biologically inspired dynamic morphing wings. Numerical simulations of the low-Reynolds-number flows around the flapping morphing wing are conducted in a parametric space by using the immersed boundary method. It is found that the instantaneous and time-averaged lift coefficients of the wing can be significantly enhanced by dynamically changing wingspan in a flapping cycle. The lift enhancement is caused by both changing the lifting surface area and manipulating the flow structures responsible to the vortex lift generation. The physical mechanisms behind the lift enhancement are explored by examining the three-dimensional flow structures around the flapping wing.

  14. Examining the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic postural stability measures in differentiating among ankle instability status.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kathy; Glutting, Joseph; Wikstrom, Erik; Gustavsen, Geoff; Royer, Todd; Kaminski, Thomas W

    2013-02-01

    Dynamic postural stability is defined as the ability to transition from a dynamic movement to a stable condition over one's base of support. Measures of dynamic stability have been used extensively to classify ankle instability status and assist clinicians with ankle injury interventions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if current methods of quantifying dynamic stability are accurate in differentiating among healthy, coper, and unstable ankles. One hundred ninety four Division-I collegiate athletes (football, volleyball, field hockey, men's/women's soccer, men's/women's lacrosse, men's/women's basketball) volunteered for this study. Participants were categorized into healthy, coper, and stable groups by a self-reported questionnaire and previous history of ankle injuries. Dynamic postural stability was assessed using the Multi-Directional Dynamic Stability Protocol by jumping and landing single-legged onto a force platform from four different directions. Receiver operator curves were used to analyze the accuracy of current techniques of calculating dynamic stability among groups. None of the existing methods were found to be accurate in differentiating ankle instability status in any of the jump landings. Researchers have commonly used these existing methods to quantify dynamic postural stability. None of the current calculation techniques worked with our jump landing protocol. Researchers need to pay attention to the protocol and calculation technique pairings in that using inaccurate measures of dynamic postural stability makes any findings of that research ineffective. Therefore, this challenges researchers to develop a more accurate calculation to quantify dynamic postural stability, or develop a jump landing protocol that exposes sensorimotor deficits in the more able-bodied population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipid cross-linking of nanolipoprotein particles substantially enhances serum stability and cellular uptake [Lipid crosslinking enhances the stability of nanolipoprotein particles in serum by multiple orders of magnitude

    DOE PAGES

    Gilmore, Sean F.; Blanchette, Craig D.; Scharadin, Tiffany M.; ...

    2016-07-13

    Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) consist of a discoidal phospholipid lipid bilayer confined by an apolipoprotein belt. NLPs are a promising platform for a variety of biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, size, definable composition, and amphipathic characteristics. However, poor serum stability hampers the use of NLPs for in vivo applications such as drug formulation. In this study, NLP stability was enhanced upon the incorporation and subsequent UV-mediated intermolecular cross-linking of photoactive DiynePC phospholipids in the lipid bilayer, forming cross-linked nanoparticles (X-NLPs). Both the concentration of DiynePC in the bilayer and UV exposure time significantly affected the resulting X-NLP stability in 100%more » serum, as assessed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of fluorescently labeled particles. Cross-linking did not significantly impact the size of X-NLPs as determined by dynamic light scattering and SEC. X-NLPs had essentially no degradation over 48 h in 100% serum, which is a drastic improvement compared to non-cross-linked NLPs (50% degradation by ~10 min). X-NLPs had greater uptake into the human ATCC 5637 bladder cancer cell line compared to non-cross-linked particles, indicating their potential utility for targeted drug delivery. X-NLPs also exhibited enhanced stability following intravenous administration in mice. Lastly, these results collectively support the potential utility of X-NLPs for a variety of in vivo applications.« less

  16. Lipid cross-linking of nanolipoprotein particles substantially enhances serum stability and cellular uptake [Lipid crosslinking enhances the stability of nanolipoprotein particles in serum by multiple orders of magnitude

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Sean F.; Blanchette, Craig D.; Scharadin, Tiffany M.; Hura, Greg L.; Rasley, Amy; Corzett, Michele; Pan, Chong-xian; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Henderson, Paul T.

    2016-07-13

    Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) consist of a discoidal phospholipid lipid bilayer confined by an apolipoprotein belt. NLPs are a promising platform for a variety of biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, size, definable composition, and amphipathic characteristics. However, poor serum stability hampers the use of NLPs for in vivo applications such as drug formulation. In this study, NLP stability was enhanced upon the incorporation and subsequent UV-mediated intermolecular cross-linking of photoactive DiynePC phospholipids in the lipid bilayer, forming cross-linked nanoparticles (X-NLPs). Both the concentration of DiynePC in the bilayer and UV exposure time significantly affected the resulting X-NLP stability in 100% serum, as assessed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of fluorescently labeled particles. Cross-linking did not significantly impact the size of X-NLPs as determined by dynamic light scattering and SEC. X-NLPs had essentially no degradation over 48 h in 100% serum, which is a drastic improvement compared to non-cross-linked NLPs (50% degradation by ~10 min). X-NLPs had greater uptake into the human ATCC 5637 bladder cancer cell line compared to non-cross-linked particles, indicating their potential utility for targeted drug delivery. X-NLPs also exhibited enhanced stability following intravenous administration in mice. Lastly, these results collectively support the potential utility of X-NLPs for a variety of in vivo applications.

  17. Lipid cross-linking of nanolipoprotein particles substantially enhances serum stability and cellular uptake [Lipid crosslinking enhances the stability of nanolipoprotein particles in serum by multiple orders of magnitude

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Sean F.; Blanchette, Craig D.; Scharadin, Tiffany M.; Hura, Greg L.; Rasley, Amy; Corzett, Michele; Pan, Chong-xian; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Henderson, Paul T.

    2016-07-13

    Nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) consist of a discoidal phospholipid lipid bilayer confined by an apolipoprotein belt. NLPs are a promising platform for a variety of biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, size, definable composition, and amphipathic characteristics. However, poor serum stability hampers the use of NLPs for in vivo applications such as drug formulation. In this study, NLP stability was enhanced upon the incorporation and subsequent UV-mediated intermolecular cross-linking of photoactive DiynePC phospholipids in the lipid bilayer, forming cross-linked nanoparticles (X-NLPs). Both the concentration of DiynePC in the bilayer and UV exposure time significantly affected the resulting X-NLP stability in 100% serum, as assessed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of fluorescently labeled particles. Cross-linking did not significantly impact the size of X-NLPs as determined by dynamic light scattering and SEC. X-NLPs had essentially no degradation over 48 h in 100% serum, which is a drastic improvement compared to non-cross-linked NLPs (50% degradation by ~10 min). X-NLPs had greater uptake into the human ATCC 5637 bladder cancer cell line compared to non-cross-linked particles, indicating their potential utility for targeted drug delivery. X-NLPs also exhibited enhanced stability following intravenous administration in mice. Lastly, these results collectively support the potential utility of X-NLPs for a variety of in vivo applications.

  18. Nonlinear Dynamic Stability of the Viscoelastic Plate Considering Higher Order Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuanxiang; Wang, Cheng

    2016-11-01

    -The dynamic stability of viscoelastic plates is investigated in this paper by using chaotic and fractal theory. The nonlinear integro-differential dynamic equation is changed into an autonomic 4-dimensional dynamical system. The numerical time integrations of equations are obtained by using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method. And the Lyapunov exponent spectrum, the fractal dimension of strange attractors and the time evolution of deflection are obtained. The influence of viscoelastic parameter on dynamic buckling of viscoelastic plates is discussed. The effect of higher order modes on dynamic stability of viscoelastic plate is obtained, the necessity of considering higher order modes is discussed.

  19. The importance of steady and dynamic inflow on the stability of rotor-body systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The induced flow field of a rotor responds in a dynamic fashion to oscillations in rotor lift. This was long known to affect the stability and control derivatives of the rotor. More recently, however, it was also shown that this dynamic inflow also affects rotor and rotor-body aeroelastic stability. Thus, both the steady and unsteady inflow have pronounced effects on air resonance. Recent theoretical developments were made in the modeling of dynamic inflow, and these were verified experimentally. Thus, there is now a simple, verified dynamic inflow model for use in dynamic analyses.

  20. Microstructure-dependent dynamic stability analysis of torsional NEMS scanner in van der Waals regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Javad; Keivani, Maryam; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-06-01

    The physico-mechanical behavior of nanoscale devices might be microstructure dependent. However, the classical continuum theory cannot correctly predict the microstructure dependency. In this paper, the strain gradient theory is employed to examine the instability characteristics of a nanoscanner with circular geometry. The governing equation of the scanner is derived incorporating the Coulomb and van der Waals (vdW) forces. The influences of applied voltage, squeeze damping and microstructure parameters on the dynamic instability of equilibrium points are studied by plotting the phase portrait and bifurcation diagrams. In the presence of the applied voltage, the phase portrait shows the saddle-node bifurcation while for freestanding scanner a subcritical pitchfork bifurcation is observed. It is concluded that the microstructure parameter enhances the torsional stability.

  1. Stability Limits and Dynamics of Nonaxisymmetric Liquid Bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigation of the stability of nonaxisymmetric and axisymmetric bridges contained between equal and unequal radii disks as a function of Bond and Weber number with emphasis on the transition from unstable axisymmetric to stable nonaxisymmetric shapes. Numerical analysis of the stability of nonaxisymmetric bridges between unequal disks for various orientations of the gravity vector Experimental and numerical investigation of bridge stability (nonaxisymmetric and axisymmetric), large amplitude (nonaxisymmetric) oscillations and breaking.

  2. Dynamics of single-species population growth: stability or chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, L.D.; Ayala, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    We have examined stability at the carrying capacity for 25 genetically different populations of Drosophila melanogaster. In spite of their genetic heterogeneity, 20 of the populations yield stable equilibria and none have eigenvalues significantly greater than one. Computer simulations demonstrate how selection at the individual level may account for population stability (and, hence, that group selection is not necessary for the evolution of stability). Recent theoretical studies on density-dependent selection in random environments provide predictions consistent with our empirical findings.

  3. Dynamics and stability of mechanical systems with follower forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, G.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph on problems of stability of equilibrium of mechanical systems with follower forces is presented. Concepts of stability and criteria of stability are reviewed briefly, together with means of analytical specification of follower forces. Nondissipative systems with two degrees of freedom are discussed, and destabilizing effects due to various types of dissipative forces both in discrete and continuous systems, are treated. The analyses are accompanied by some quantative experiments and observations on demonstrational laboratory models.

  4. Microwave axial free-electron laser with enhanced phase stability

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.; Fazio, M.; Haynes, W.

    1995-12-31

    Free-electron laser (FEL) amplifiers have demonstrated high efficiencies and high output power at microwave wavelengths. However, measurements and simulations have indicated that the present level of phase stability for these devices is not sufficient for driving linear accelerators. Fluctuations in the diode voltage, which is needed to accelerate the electron beam, are the largest cause of the shifts in the phase of the output power. Pulse-power technology cannot keep the voltage fluctuations less than 1/4%. However, we have found a scheme that will make the output phase much less sensitive to these fluctuations by exploiting the traveling wave nature of the FEL interaction. In this paper we study the phase stability issue by analyzing the dispersion relation for an axial FEL, in which the rf field is transversely wiggled and the electron trajectories are purely longitudinal. The advantage of using the axial FEL interaction instead of the common transverse FEL interaction is that (1) the dispersion relation is not additionally complicated by how the transverse electron motion depends on the diode voltage and (2) such a device is simpler and less expensive to construct than a transverse-coupling FEL because there is no wiggler. The axial FEL interaction is with a fast wave and does involve axial bunching of the electron beam, so the results found for this device also apply to transverse-coupling FELs. By examination of the dispersion relation it is found that the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s velocity can be cancelled by the effect of the phase dependency on the beam`s plasma wave, for an annular electron beam. By changing the annulus radius, exact cancellation can be found for a variety of beam voltages and currents in the ranges of 0.5-1.0 MV and 1-5 kA. This cancellation leads to first-order phase stability, which is not possible for standing-wave devices, such as klystrons.

  5. Obesity May Not Induce Dynamic Stability Disadvantage during Overground Walking among Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Qi; Yang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has been related to postural instability during static standing. It remains unknown how obesity influences stability during dynamic movements like gait. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of obesity on dynamic gait stability control in young adults during gait. Forty-four young adults (21 normal-weight and 23 obese) participated in this study. Participants walked five times at their self-selected gait speeds on a linear walkway. Their full-body kinematics were gathered by a motion capture system. Compared with normal-weight group, individuals with obesity walked more slowly with a shorter but wider step. People with obesity also spent an elongated double stance phase than those with normal weight. A reduced gait speed decreases the body center of mass's velocity relative to the base of support, leading to a reduction in dynamic stability. On the other hand, a shortened step in accompanying with a less backward-leaning trunk has the potential to bring the center of mass closer to the base of support, resulting in an increase in dynamic stability. As the result of these adaptive changes to the gait pattern, dynamic gait stability among people with obesity did not significantly differ from the one among people with normal weight. Obesity seems to not be inducing dynamic stability disadvantage in young adults during level overground walking. These findings could provide insight into the mechanisms of stability control among people affected by obesity during dynamic locomotion.

  6. Obesity May Not Induce Dynamic Stability Disadvantage during Overground Walking among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Qi; Yang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Obesity has been related to postural instability during static standing. It remains unknown how obesity influences stability during dynamic movements like gait. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effects of obesity on dynamic gait stability control in young adults during gait. Forty-four young adults (21 normal-weight and 23 obese) participated in this study. Participants walked five times at their self-selected gait speeds on a linear walkway. Their full-body kinematics were gathered by a motion capture system. Compared with normal-weight group, individuals with obesity walked more slowly with a shorter but wider step. People with obesity also spent an elongated double stance phase than those with normal weight. A reduced gait speed decreases the body center of mass’s velocity relative to the base of support, leading to a reduction in dynamic stability. On the other hand, a shortened step in accompanying with a less backward-leaning trunk has the potential to bring the center of mass closer to the base of support, resulting in an increase in dynamic stability. As the result of these adaptive changes to the gait pattern, dynamic gait stability among people with obesity did not significantly differ from the one among people with normal weight. Obesity seems to not be inducing dynamic stability disadvantage in young adults during level overground walking. These findings could provide insight into the mechanisms of stability control among people affected by obesity during dynamic locomotion. PMID:28085914

  7. Enhanced Lamb dip for absolute laser frequency stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegman, A. E.; Byer, R. L.; Wang, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    Enhanced Lamb dip width is 5 MHz and total depth is 10 percent of peak power. Present configuration is useful as frequency standard in near infrared. Technique extends to other lasers, for which low pressure narrow linewidth gain tubes can be constructed.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Processable Polyimides with Enhanced Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    1999-01-01

    The following is a summary report of the research carried out under NASA Grant NAG-1-448. The work was divided into four major areas: 1) Enhanced polyimide processing through the use of reactive plasticizers 2) Development of processable polyhenylquinoxalines 3) Synthesis and characterization of perfluorovinylether-terminated imide oligomers and 4) Fluorosilicones containing perfuorocyclobutane rings.

  9. Enhancing the stability of silicon nanosheets electrodes by fluoroethylene carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Min; Kim, Sujin; Ha, Jung Hoon; Kim, Sung Wook; Lee, Jaejun; Park, Sangwon; Cho, Byung-Won; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2017-09-01

    Stabilization of the SEI layer that is formed by consuming active lithium in electrolytes is a critical issue for improving the cyclability of lithium ion batteries. We used SiNSs as anodes and investigated the effect of fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additives on the SEI layer. Our XPS, EIS and TEM analysis of Csbnd O and Cdbnd O bonds, interfacial resistance and thickness of SEl layer, respectively, shows that the FEC produces electrochemically and mechanically stable SEI layer. The SiNSs with FEC showed the capacity of over 1500 mA h g-1 with 95% efficiency after 200 cycles.

  10. Tuneable enhancement of the salt and thermal stability of polymeric micelles by cyclized amphiphiles

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Tezuka, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic molecules provide better stability for their aggregates. Typically in nature, the unique cyclic cell membrane lipids allow thermophilic archaea to inhabit extreme conditions. By mimicking the biological design, the robustness of self-assembled synthetic nanostructures is expected to be improved. Here we report topology effects by cyclized polymeric amphiphiles against their linear counterparts, demonstrating a drastic enhancement in the thermal, as well as salt stability of self-assembled micelles. Furthermore, through coassembly of the linear and cyclic amphiphiles, the stability was successfully tuned for a wide range of temperatures and salt concentrations. The enhanced thermal/salt stability was exploited in a halogen exchange reaction to stimulate the catalytic activity. The mechanism for the enhancement was also investigated. These topology effects by the cyclic amphiphiles offer unprecedented opportunities in polymer materials design unattainable by traditional means. PMID:23481382

  11. ATC Enhancement Considering Transient Stability by Optimal Power Flow Control Using UPFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuta, Taisuke; Motoki, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    With recent development of power electronics technology, power system stability enhancement and optimal power flow control by using Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS) devices have so far been studied. The FACTS devices to relieve multiple constraints can also make it possible to enhance Available Transfer Capability (ATC) without construction of new transmission lines. In this paper, a new method for improving transient stability by Unified Power Flow Controller (UPFC) is proposed. Then the proposed method is applied to an OPF control method by using UPFC for relieving multiple constraints. The new OPF method is used for enhancement of ATC taking into account Transient stability constraints as well as overload and steady-state stability constraints. The OPF problem is formulated to minimize total capacity of inverters of UPFC. Effectiveness of the proposed method is shown by numerical examples for IEEJ East-10-machine test system.

  12. Both solubility and chemical stability of curcumin are enhanced by solid dispersion in cellulose derivative matrices.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Konecke, Stephanie; Wegiel, Lindsay A; Taylor, Lynne S; Edgar, Kevin J

    2013-10-15

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) of curcumin (Cur) in cellulose derivative matrices, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS), carboxymethylcellulose acetate butyrate (CMCAB), and cellulose acetate adipate propionate (CAAdP) were prepared in order to investigate the structure-property relationship and identify polymer properties necessary to effectively increase Cur aqueous solution concentration. XRD results indicated that all investigated solid dispersions were amorphous, even at a 9:1 Cur:polymer ratio. Both stability against crystallization and Cur solution concentration from these ASDs were significantly higher than those from physical mixtures and crystalline Cur. Remarkably, curcumin was also stabilized against chemical degradation in solution. Chemical stabilization was polymer-dependent, with stabilization in CAAdP>CMCAB>HPMCAS>PVP, while matrices enhanced solution concentration as PVP>HPMCAS>CMCAB≈CAAdP. HPMCAS/Cur dispersions have useful combinations of pH-triggered release profile, chemical stabilization, and strong enhancement of Cur solution concentration.

  13. Enhanced Thermal Stability of Polylactide by Terminal Conjugation Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Hang Thi; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru; Vu, Ngo Dinh

    2016-05-01

    Various acids such as aliphatic or carbocyclic fatty or aromatic acids were successfully conjugated into the ending hydroxyl group of poly( l-lactide) (PLLA). The chemical structures of various acid-PLLAs were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared and proton nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The crystallinity and solubility of the original PLLA were maintained after the terminal conjugation of various acids. The thermal properties were significantly improved, especially the 10% weight-loss temperature that showed an increase of over 80°C for conjugation of aliphatic or aromatic acids as compared to that of the corresponding original PLLA. In addition, more than 60 wt.% of the aliphatic acid-PLLAs was pyrolyzed, and aromatic acid-PLLAs degraded only about 10 wt.% for 150 min, although the original PLLA was pyrolyzed completely at 250°C for 7 min. The thermal stability of PLLA was controlled by the conjugation of aliphatic or aromatic acids into a chain end. These acid-PLLAs may be useful as materials with high thermal stability for various application fields.

  14. Optimal placement of unified power flow controllers to improve dynamic voltage stability using power system variable based voltage stability indices.

    PubMed

    Albatsh, Fadi M; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches.

  15. Optimal Placement of Unified Power Flow Controllers to Improve Dynamic Voltage Stability Using Power System Variable Based Voltage Stability Indices

    PubMed Central

    Albatsh, Fadi M.; Ahmad, Shameem; Mekhilef, Saad; Mokhlis, Hazlie; Hassan, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines a new approach to selecting the locations of unified power flow controllers (UPFCs) in power system networks based on a dynamic analysis of voltage stability. Power system voltage stability indices (VSIs) including the line stability index (LQP), the voltage collapse proximity indicator (VCPI), and the line stability index (Lmn) are employed to identify the most suitable locations in the system for UPFCs. In this study, the locations of the UPFCs are identified by dynamically varying the loads across all of the load buses to represent actual power system conditions. Simulations were conducted in a power system computer-aided design (PSCAD) software using the IEEE 14-bus and 39- bus benchmark power system models. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. When the UPFCs are placed in the locations obtained with the new approach, the voltage stability improves. A comparison of the steady-state VSIs resulting from the UPFCs placed in the locations obtained with the new approach and with particle swarm optimization (PSO) and differential evolution (DE), which are static methods, is presented. In all cases, the UPFC locations given by the proposed approach result in better voltage stability than those obtained with the other approaches. PMID:25874560

  16. Enhanced stability of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of subsurface solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Richard J.; Finn, Dennis D.; Cutler, Lynn M.; Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Teel, Amy L.

    2007-05-01

    The stabilization of hydrogen peroxide was investigated as a basis for enhancing its downgradient transport and contact with contaminants during catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations (CHP) in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Stabilization of hydrogen peroxide was investigated in slurries containing four characterized subsurface solids using phytate, citrate, and malonate as stabilizing agents after screening ten potential stabilizers. The extent of hydrogen peroxide stabilization and the most effective stabilizer were solid-specific; however, phytate was usually the most effective stabilizer, increasing the hydrogen peroxide half-life to as much as 50 times. The degree of stabilization was nearly as effective at 10 mM concentrations as at 250 mM or 1 M concentrations. The effect of stabilization on relative rates of hydroxyl radical activity varied between the subsurface solids, but citrate and malonate generally had a greater positive effect than phytate. The effect of phytate, citrate, and malonate on the relative rates of superoxide generation was minimal to somewhat negative, depending on the solid. The results of this research demonstrate that the stabilizers phytate, citrate, and malonate can significantly increase the half-life of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of subsurface solids during CHP reactions while maintaining a significant portion of the reactive oxygen species activity. Use of these stabilizers in the field will likely improve the delivery of hydrogen peroxide and downgradient treatment during CHP ISCO.

  17. Enhancing screw stability in osteosynthesis with hydroxyapatite granules.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, K; Yamamura, S; Dohmae, Y

    1998-01-01

    We employed hydroxyapatite (HA) granules to enhance screw fixation in revision surgery of failed osteosynthesis with a compression hip screw system in an 83-year-old woman. After reduction of the fracture, the fracture site with a large bone defect was filled with HA granules, and osteosynthesis was accomplished with a double cannulated lag screw and plate system. We feel that this HA granule augmentation method may also be suitable for osteosynthesis in other osteoporotic fractures.

  18. Transient stability enhancement of modern power grid using predictive Wide-Area Monitoring and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefian, Reza

    This dissertation presents a real-time Wide-Area Control (WAC) designed based on artificial intelligence for large scale modern power systems transient stability enhancement. The WAC using the measurements available from Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) at generator buses, monitors the global oscillations in the system and optimally augments the local excitation system of the synchronous generators. The complexity of the power system stability problem along with uncertainties and nonlinearities makes the conventional modeling non-practical or inaccurate. In this work Reinforcement Learning (RL) algorithm on the benchmark of Neural Networks (NNs) is used to map the nonlinearities of the system in real-time. This method different from both the centralized and the decentralized control schemes, employs a number of semi-autonomous agents to collaborate with each other to perform optimal control theory well-suited for WAC applications. Also, to handle the delays in Wide-Area Monitoring (WAM) and adapt the RL toward the robust control design, Temporal Difference (TD) is proposed as a solver for RL problem or optimal cost function. However, the main drawback of such WAC design is that it is challenging to determine if an offline trained network is valid to assess the stability of the power system once the system is evolved to a different operating state or network topology. In order to address the generality issue of NNs, a value priority scheme is proposed in this work to design a hybrid linear and nonlinear controllers. The algorithm so-called supervised RL is based on mixture of experts, where it is initialized by linear controller and as the performance and identification of the RL controller improves in real-time switches to the other controller. This work also focuses on transient stability and develops Lyapunov energy functions for synchronous generators to monitor the stability stress of the system. Using such energies as a cost function guarantees the convergence

  19. Dynamic enhancement of the exchange bias training effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Sarbeswar; Berger, Andreas; Polisetty, Srinivas; Binek, Christian

    2007-03-01

    Exchange bias in coupled magnetic films and its accompanying training effect are fundamental interface phenomena which impact spintronic applications. Training is referred to as a gradual change of the bias field, which evolves upon cycling the soft layer through consecutive hysteresis loops. We report on its dynamic enhancement in exchange coupled bilayers of soft and hard ferromagnetic materials. Dynamic effects are induced with increasing sweep rate of the applied magnetic field from quasi-static to the fully dynamic range. A dynamically generalized theory based on triggered and partially truncated relaxation is in excellent agreement with the data. Remarkable universality of our theoretical approach is evidenced when applying the approach to the dynamic training effect of a conventional exchange bias system involving an antiferromagnetic pinning layer.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of processable polyimides with enhanced thermal stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the emerging applications of polymers on space vehicles require materials with outstanding thermal stability. These polymers must also be readily processable in order to facilitate their use. The syntheses and polymerization of a cardo dianhydride were investigated. This monomer was prepared via the reaction of N-methyl 4-nitrophthalimide with a cardo diol. Polyimides containing oxyalkylene linkages were studied. The effects of two additional structural modifications on the polymers' properties were investigated. The effects of carrying out the preparation of poly(amic acid)s under non-equilibrium conditions were examined. Approaches that were investigated included the in-situ neutralization of the generated amic acid and its in-situ esterification.

  1. Enhancing Cycling Stability of Aqueous Polyaniline Electrochemical Capacitors.

    PubMed

    Santino, Luciano M; Lu, Yang; Acharya, Shinjita; Bloom, Liana; Cotton, Daniel; Wayne, Aly; D'Arcy, Julio M

    2016-11-02

    Electrochemical capacitors fabricated with polyaniline nanofibers are cycled 150 000 times with 98% capacitance retention. These devices maintain an energy density of 11.41 Wh/kg at a power density of 4000 W/kg, 64 times greater than that of an identically fabricated device based on activated carbon (0.177 Wh/kg at 4600 W/kg). For applications requiring a higher specific energy, 33.39 Wh/kg at a specific power of 600 W/kg is obtained by widening the voltage window; this device retains 93% capacitance after 10 000 cycles. We achieve a high cycling stability through careful device engineering paired with a renewed focus on the electrochemical processes occurring at the positive and negative electrodes during cycling.

  2. Soy protein polymers: Enhancing the water stability property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gowrishankar

    Soy protein based plastics have been processed in the past by researchers for various short-term applications; however a common issue is the high water sensitivity of these plastics. This work concentrates on resolving this water sensitivity issue of soy protein polymers by employing chemical and mechanical interaction at the molecular level during extrusion. The primary chemical interactions employed were anhydride chemistries such as maleic anhydride (MA), phthalic anhydride (PTA), and butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA). These were respectively used in conjunction with glycerol as a plasticizer to produce relatively water stable soy protein based plastics. Formulations with varying additive levels of the chemistries were extruded and injection molded to form the samples for characterization. The additive levels of anhydrides were varied between 3-10% tw/tw (total mass). Results indicated that phthalic anhydride formulations resulted in highest water stability. Plastic formulations with concentration up to 10% phthalic anhydride were observed to have water absorption as low as 21.5% after 24 hrs of exposure to water with respect to 250% for the control formulation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized to characterize and confirm the fundamental mechanisms of water stability achieved by phthalic and maleic anhydride chemistries. In addition, the anhydride formulations were modified by inclusion of cotton fibers and pretreated cotton powder in order to improve mechanical properties. The incorporation of cotton fibers improved the dry strength by 18%, but did not significantly improve the wet state strength of the plastics. It was also observed that the butylated-hydroxy anisole (BHA) formulation exhibited high extension values in the dry state and had inferior water absorption properties in comparison with anhydride formulations.

  3. Kinetic analysis of enhanced thermal stability of an alkaline protease with engineered twin disulfide bridges and calcium-dependent stability.

    PubMed

    Ikegaya, Kazuo; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Murakami, Kohji; Yamanouchi, Kouichi

    2003-01-20

    The thermal stability of a cysteine-free alkaline protease (Alp) secreted by the eukaryote Aspergillus oryzae was improved both by the introduction of engineered twin disulfide bridges (Cys-69/Cys-101 and Cys-169/Cys-200), newly constructed as part of this study, and by the addition of calcium ions. We performed an extensive kinetic analysis of the increased thermal stability of the mutants as well as the role of calcium dependence. The thermodynamic activation parameters for irreversible thermal inactivation, the activation free energy (deltaG), the activation enthalpy (deltaH), and the activation entropy (deltaS) were determined from absolute reaction rate theory. The values of deltaH and deltaS were significantly and concomitantly increased as a result of introducing the twin disulfide bridges, for which the increase in the value of deltaH outweighed that of deltaS, resulting in significant increases in the value of deltaG. The enhancement of the thermal stability obtained by introducing the twin disulfide bridges is an example of the so-called low-temperature stabilization of enzymes. The stabilizing effect of calcium ions on wild-type Alp is similar to the results we obtained by introducing the engineered twin disulfide bridges.

  4. Animal flight dynamics I. Stability in gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A L; Taylor, G K

    2001-10-07

    Stability is as essential to flying as lift itself, but previous discussions of how flying animals maintain stability have been limited in both number and scope. By developing the pitching moment equations for gliding animals and by discussing potential sources of roll and yaw stability, we consider the various sources of static stability used by gliding animals. We find that gliding animals differ markedly from aircraft in how they maintain stability. In particular, the pendulum stability provided when the centre of gravity lies below the wings is a much more important source of stability in flying animals than in most conventional aircraft. Drag-based stability also appears to be important for many gliding animals, whereas in aircraft, drag is usually kept to a minimum. One unexpected consequence of these differences is that the golden measure of static pitching stability in aircraft--the static margin--can only strictly be applied to flying animals if the equilibrium angle of attack is specified. We also derive several rules of thumb by which stable fliers can be identified. Stable fliers are expected to exhibit one or more of the following features: (1) Wings that are swept forward in slow flight. (2) Wings that are twisted down at the tips when swept back (wash-out) and twisted up at the tips when swept forwards (wash-in). (3) Additional lifting surfaces (canard, hindwings or a tail) inclined nose-up to the main wing if they lie forward of it, and nose-down if they lie behind it (longitudinal dihedral). Each of these predictions is directional--the opposite is expected to apply in unstable animals. In addition, animals with reduced stability are expected to display direct flight patterns in turbulent conditions, in contrast to the erratic flight patterns predicted for stable animals, in which large restoring forces are generated. Using these predictions, we find that flying animals possess a far higher degree of inherent stability than has generally been

  5. Overview of Orion Crew Module and Launch Abort Vehicle Dynamic Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Donald B.; Aibicjpm. Vamessa V.

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle, NASA is designing a new spacecraft, called Orion, to fly astronauts to low earth orbit and beyond. Characterization of the dynamic stability of the Orion spacecraft is important for the design of the spacecraft and trajectory construction. Dynamic stability affects the stability and control of the Orion Crew Module during re-entry, especially below Mach = 2.0 and including flight under the drogues. The Launch Abort Vehicle is affected by dynamic stability as well, especially during the re-orientation and heatshield forward segments of the flight. The dynamic stability was assessed using the forced oscillation technique, free-to-oscillate, ballistic range, and sub-scale free-flight tests. All of the test techniques demonstrated that in heatshield-forward flight the Crew Module and Launch Abort Vehicle are dynamically unstable in a significant portion of their flight trajectory. This paper will provide a brief overview of the Orion dynamic aero program and a high-level summary of the dynamic stability characteristics of the Orion spacecraft.

  6. Enhancement of stability following anterior cervical corpectomy: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kern; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Kim, Jesse; Lorenz, Eric P; Lim, Tae-Hong; An, Howard S

    2004-04-15

    An in vitro biomechanical study of various reconstructive techniques following decompression of the spondylotic cervical spine. OBJECTIVE.: To evaluate the biomechanical stability of anterior cervical plate fixation following three strategies of decompression for multilevel cervical spondylosis (three levels) of the cervical spine: three level discectomy, single corpectomy and discectomy, and a two-level corpectomy. The main goals of surgical treatment for cervical myelopathy include adequate decompression and stabilization while maintaining or restoring cervical lordosis. Cervical decompression is often performed through a corpectomy followed by strut-graft reconstruction. An anterior cervical plate with end-fixation (two points of fixation) is then used to span the construct. The authors propose an alternative to multilevel corpectomy and long-segment end construct plate fixation. Often times, the cervical stenosis is confined to the area of the degenerative discs. As a result, the authors feel that either multilevel discectomy or a corpectomy combined with discectomy followed by segmental plate fixation may provide adequate decompression with increased biomechanical rigidity as compared to cervical plate-constructs with end-fixation only. Seven human cadaveric fresh-frozen cervical spines from C1-T1 were utilized. Three-dimensional motion analysis with an optical tracking device was used to determine motion following various reconstruction methods. All seven cervical spines underwent testing in a randomized order. The end construct model consisted of a corpectomy at C4 and C5 with a polymethyl methacrylate strut graft and an anterior cervical PEAK (DePuy-AcroMed) plate. The two segmental constructs also utilized the PEAK plate with one construct undergoing discectomies at C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 with polymethyl methacrylate interbody grafts and the other segmental construct undergoing a discectomy at C3-C4 and a corpectomy of C5. All specimens underwent a pure

  7. Fundamentals of tracer kinetics for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Koh, Tong San; Bisdas, Sotirios; Koh, Dow Mu; Thng, Choon Hua

    2011-12-01

    Tracer kinetic methods employed for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) share common roots with earlier tracer studies involving arterial-venous sampling and other dynamic imaging modalities. This article reviews the essential foundation concepts and principles in tracer kinetics that are relevant to DCE MRI, including the notions of impulse response and convolution, which are central to the analysis of DCE MRI data. We further examine the formulation and solutions of various compartmental models frequently used in the literature. Topics of recent interest in the processing of DCE MRI data, such as the account of water exchange and the use of reference tissue methods to obviate the measurement of an arterial input, are also discussed. Although the primary focus of this review is on the tracer models and methods for T(1) -weighted DCE MRI, some of these concepts and methods are also applicable for analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI data.

  8. Enhanced Weathering Strategies for Stabilizing Climate and Averting Ocean Acidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M. S.; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliorate ocean acidification by 2100. Global carbon cycle modelling driven by ensemble Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5, business-as-usual; RCP4.5, medium-level mitigation) indicates that enhanced weathering could lower atmospheric CO2 by 30-300 ppm by 2100, depending mainly on silicate rock application rate (1 kg or 5 kg m(exp -2) yr (exp -1)) and composition. At the higher application rate, end-of-century ocean acidification is reversed under RCP4.5 and reduced by about two-thirds under RCP8.5. Additionally, surface ocean aragonite saturation state, a key control on coral calcification rates, is maintained above 3.5 throughout the low latitudes, thereby helping maintain the viability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, we highlight major issues of cost, social acceptability, and potential unanticipated consequences that will limit utilization and emphasize the need for urgent efforts to phase down fossil fuel emissions.

  9. Enhanced weathering strategies for stabilizing climate and averting ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M. S.; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2016-04-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliorate ocean acidification by 2100. Global carbon cycle modelling driven by ensemble Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5, business-as-usual; RCP4.5, medium-level mitigation) indicates that enhanced weathering could lower atmospheric CO2 by 30-300 ppm by 2100, depending mainly on silicate rock application rate (1 kg or 5 kg m-2 yr-1) and composition. At the higher application rate, end-of-century ocean acidification is reversed under RCP4.5 and reduced by about two-thirds under RCP8.5. Additionally, surface ocean aragonite saturation state, a key control on coral calcification rates, is maintained above 3.5 throughout the low latitudes, thereby helping maintain the viability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, we highlight major issues of cost, social acceptability, and potential unanticipated consequences that will limit utilization and emphasize the need for urgent efforts to phase down fossil fuel emissions.

  10. Enhanced Weathering Strategies for Stabilizing Climate and Averting Ocean Acidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lyla L.; Quirk, Joe; Thorley, Rachel M. S.; Kharecha, Pushker A.; Hansen, James; Ridgwell, Andy; Lomas, Mark R.; Banwart, Steve A.; Beerling, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical breakdown of rocks, weathering, is an important but very slow part of the carbon cycle that ultimately leads to CO2 being locked up in carbonates on the ocean floor. Artificial acceleration of this carbon sink via distribution of pulverized silicate rocks across terrestrial landscapes may help offset anthropogenic CO2 emissions. We show that idealized enhanced weathering scenarios over less than a third of tropical land could cause significant drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and ameliorate ocean acidification by 2100. Global carbon cycle modelling driven by ensemble Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) projections of twenty-first-century climate change (RCP8.5, business-as-usual; RCP4.5, medium-level mitigation) indicates that enhanced weathering could lower atmospheric CO2 by 30-300 ppm by 2100, depending mainly on silicate rock application rate (1 kg or 5 kg m(exp -2) yr (exp -1)) and composition. At the higher application rate, end-of-century ocean acidification is reversed under RCP4.5 and reduced by about two-thirds under RCP8.5. Additionally, surface ocean aragonite saturation state, a key control on coral calcification rates, is maintained above 3.5 throughout the low latitudes, thereby helping maintain the viability of tropical coral reef ecosystems. However, we highlight major issues of cost, social acceptability, and potential unanticipated consequences that will limit utilization and emphasize the need for urgent efforts to phase down fossil fuel emissions.

  11. Glycosylation of the enhanced aromatic sequon is similarly stabilizing in three distinct reverse turn contexts.

    PubMed

    Price, Joshua L; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2011-08-23

    Cotranslational N-glycosylation can accelerate protein folding, slow protein unfolding, and increase protein stability, but the molecular basis for these energetic effects is incompletely understood. N-glycosylation of proteins at naïve sites could be a useful strategy for stabilizing proteins in therapeutic and research applications, but without engineering guidelines, often results in unpredictable changes to protein energetics. We recently introduced the enhanced aromatic sequon as a family of portable structural motifs that are stabilized upon glycosylation in specific reverse turn contexts: a five-residue type I β-turn harboring a G1 β-bulge (using a Phe-Yyy-Asn-Xxx-Thr sequon) and a type II β-turn within a six-residue loop (using a Phe-Yyy-Zzz-Asn-Xxx-Thr sequon) [Culyba EK, et al. (2011) Science 331:571-575]. Here we show that glycosylating a new enhanced aromatic sequon, Phe-Asn-Xxx-Thr, in a type I' β-turn stabilizes the Pin 1 WW domain. Comparing the energetic effects of glycosylating these three enhanced aromatic sequons in the same host WW domain revealed that the glycosylation-mediated stabilization is greatest for the enhanced aromatic sequon complementary to the type I β-turn with a G1 β-bulge. However, the portion of the stabilization from the tripartite interaction between Phe, Asn(GlcNAc), and Thr is similar for each enhanced aromatic sequon in its respective reverse turn context. Adding the Phe-Asn-Xxx-Thr motif (in a type I' β-turn) to the enhanced aromatic sequon family doubles the number of proteins that can be stabilized by glycosylation without having to alter the native reverse turn type.

  12. Enhancement of stability of various nZVI suspensions used in groundwater remediation with environmentally friendly organic stabilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Doris; Wagner, Stephan; Velimirović, Milica; Laumann, Susanne; Micić, Vesna; Hofmann, Thilo

    2014-05-01

    The use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) particles for in situ remediation of polluted soil and groundwater has been shown as one of the most promising techniques [1]. The success of this technology depends on the mobility, reactivity, and longevity of nZVI particles. The mobility of nZVI particles depends on the properties of the single particles, stability of the particle suspension, and the aquifer material [1,2]. In order to enhance the mobility of nZVI, the mobility-decisive properties of the nZVI particles in suspension such as concentration, size distribution, surface charge, and sedimentation rate have to be investigated and optimized. Previous studies showed that pristine nZVI particles aggregate rapidly in water, reducing the particles radius of influence after injection [3]. In order to prevent aggregation and sedimentation of the nZVI particles, and consequently improve the stability of nZVI suspension and therefore the mobility of the nZVI particles, surface stabilizers can be used to provide electrostatic repulsion and steric or electrosteric stabilization [3,4]. The objective of this lab-scale study is to investigate the potential for enhancing the stability of different nZVI suspensions by means of environmentally friendly organic stabilizers, including carboxymethyl cellulose, pectin, alginate, xanthan, and guar gum. The different nZVI particles used included pristine and polyacrylic acid-coated nZVI particles provided in suspension (Nanofer 25 and Nanofer 25S, respectively, NANOIRON s.r.o., Czech Republic), air-stable nZVI particles (Nanofer Star, (NANOIRON s.r.o., Czech Republic), and milled iron flakes (UVR-FIA, Germany). In order to study the enhancement of nZVI stability (1 g L-1 total iron) different concentrations of organic stabilizers (1-20 wt.%) were applied in these nZVI suspensions. Each nZVI suspension was freshly prepared and treated for 10 minutes with Ultra-Turrax (15 000 rpm) and 10 minutes ultrasonic bath prior to

  13. Enhancement of the vibration stability of a microdiffraction goniometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. H.; Preissner, C.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Shu, D.

    2002-07-02

    High-precision instrumentation, such as that for x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, and other optical micropositioning systems, requires the stability that comes from vibration-isolated support structures. Structure-born vibrations impede the acquisition of accurate experimental data through such high-precision instruments. At the Advanced Photon Source, a multiaxis goniometer is installed in the 2-ID-D station for synchrotron microdiffraction investigations. However, ground vibration can excite the kinematic movements of the goniometer linkages, resulting in critically contaminated experimental data. In this paper, the vibration behavior of the goniometer has been considered. Experimental vibration measurements were conducted to define the present vibration levels and determine the threshold sensitivity of the equipment. In addition, experimental modal tests were conducted and used to guide an analytical finite element analysis. Both results were used for finding the best way to reduce the vibration levels and to develop a vibration damping/isolation structure for the 2-ID-D goniometer. The device that was designed and tested could be used to reduce local vibration levels for the vibration isolation of similar high-precision instruments.

  14. Zirconia coating for enhanced thermal stability of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastre, A.; Cristini-Robbe, O.; Bois, L.; Chassagneux, F.; Branzea, D.; Boé, A.; Kinowski, C.; Raulin, K.; Rolland, N.; Bernard, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, simple and one-step method for the preparation of 2-4 nm diameter zirconia-coated gold nanoparticles at room temperature. These nanoparticles were synthesized by two simultaneous processes: the chemical reduction of tetrachloroauric acid with sodium borohydride and the formation of zirconia sol-gel matrices. All the gold nanoparticle sols were characterized by UV-visible absorption and transmission electron microscopy to determine the nanoparticle size and shape. The synthesis method is a combination of a polymeric structure of the amorphous zirconia and the use of a strong reducing agent, and it yields to very small quasi-spherical gold nanoparticles at room temperature. The thermal stability up to 1200 °C of the coated nanoparticles was studied by x-ray diffraction. The metastable tetragonal phase of the zirconia coating was obtained at 400 °C, and a progressive transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic phases of the zirconia coating was observed up to 1100 °C. After the heat treatment at 400 °C, the crystallite size of the gold nanoparticles was about 29 nm, and it remained unchanged from 400 °C to 1200 °C. These results are promising for the development of such materials as doping elements for optical fiber applications.

  15. n-body dynamics of stabilized vector solitons.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, Gaspar D; Rodas-Verde, María I; Pérez-García, Víctor M; Michinel, Humberto

    2005-09-01

    In this work we study the interactions between stabilized Townes solitons. By means of effective Lagrangian methods, we have found that the interactions between these solitons are governed by central forces, in a first approximation. In our numerical simulations we describe different types of orbits, deflections, trapping, and soliton splitting. Splitting phenomena are also described by finite-dimensional reduced models. All these effects could be used for potential applications of stabilized solitons.

  16. Attitude dynamic of spin-stabilized satellites with flexible appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renard, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Equations of motion and computer programs have been developed for analyzing the motion of a spin-stabilized spacecraft having long, flexible appendages. Stability charts were derived, or can be redrawn with the desired accuracy for any particular set of design parameters. Simulation graphs of variables of interest are readily obtainable on line using program FLEXAT. Finally, applications to actual satellites, such as UK-4 and IMP-1 have been considered.

  17. Asymptotic stability of distributed order nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Anaya, G.; Nava-Antonio, G.; Jamous-Galante, J.; Muñoz-Vega, R.; Hernández-Martínez, E. G.

    2017-07-01

    In this article we present a generalization of the Lyapunov direct method for distributed order nonlinear time-varying systems. By extending recently introduced properties of the Caputo fractional derivative to the distributed order case, we provide various ways to determine the stability or asymptotic stability of certain systems. The fractional results that inspired this work are recovered if an appropriate distribution function is chosen. Some examples are given to validate the obtained results.

  18. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Experiments with Newtonian fluids as surrogates for ablation fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Prieto, G.; Piriz, A. R.; Lopez Cela, J. J.; Tahir, N. A.

    2013-01-15

    A previous theory on dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at interfaces between Newtonian fluids is reformulated in order to make evident the analogy of this problem with the related one on dynamic stabilization of ablation fronts in the framework of inertial confinement fusion. Explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the boundaries of the dynamically stable region which turns out to be completely analogue to the stability charts obtained for the case of ablation fronts. These results allow proposing experiments with Newtonian fluids as surrogates for studying the case of ablation fronts. Experiments with Newtonian fluids are presented which demonstrate the validity of the theoretical approach and encourage to pursue experimental research on ablation fronts to settle the feasibility of dynamic stabilization in the inertial confinement fusion scenario.

  19. Enhanced sampling techniques in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Rafael C; Melo, Marcelo C R; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Recent developments of molecular dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An Action Dependent Heuristic Dynamic Programming-controlled Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage for Transient Stability Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinpu; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaodong; Yu, Xiaopeng

    To enhance the stability of power system, the active power and reactive power can be absorbed from or released to Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) unit according to system power requirements. This paper proposes a control strategy based on action dependent heuristic dynamic programing (ADHDP) which can control SMES to improve the stability of electric power system with on-line learning ability. Based on back propagation (BP) neural network, ADHDP approximates the optimal control solution of nonlinear system through iteration step by step. This on-line learning ability improves its performance by learning from its own mistakes through reinforcement signal from external environment, so that it can adjust the neural network weights according to the back propagation error to achieve optimal control performance. To investigate the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, simulation tests are carried out in Matlab/Simulink. And a conventional Proportional-Integral (PI) controlled method is used to compare the performance of ADHDP. Simulation results show that the proposed controller demonstrates superior damping performance on power system oscillation caused by three-phase fault and wind power fluctuation over the PI controller.

  1. Dynamic stability margin using a marker based system and Tekscan: a comparison of four gait conditions.

    PubMed

    Lugade, Vipul; Kaufman, Kenton

    2014-01-01

    Stability during gait is maintained through control of the center of mass (CoM) position and velocity in relation to the base of support (BoS). The dynamic stability margin, or the interaction of the extrapolated center of mass with the closest boundary of the BoS, can reveal possible control errors during gait. The purpose of this study was to investigate a marker based method for defining the BoS, and compare the dynamic stability margin throughout gait in comparison to a BoS defined from foot pressure sensors. The root mean squared difference between these two methodologies ranged from 0.9 cm to 3.5 cm, when walking under four conditions: plantigrade, equinus, everted, and inverted. As the stability margin approaches -35 cm prior to contralateral heel strike, there was approximately 90% agreement between the two systems at this time point. Underestimation of the marker based dynamic stability margin or overestimation of the pressure based dynamic stability margin was due to inaccuracies in defining the medial boundary of the BoS. Overall, care must be taken to ensure similar definitions of the BoS are utilized when comparing the dynamic stability margin between participants and gait conditions.

  2. Dynamic Stability Optimization of Laminated Composite Plates under Combined Boundary Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafei, Erfan; Kabir, Mohammad Zaman

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stability and design optimization of laminated simply supported plates under planar conservative boundary loads are investigated in current study. Examples can be found in internal connecting elements of spacecraft and aerospace structures subjected to edge axial and shear loads. Designation of such elements is function of layup configuration, plate aspect ratio, loading combinations, and layup thickness. An optimum design aims maximum stability load satisfying a predefined stable vibration frequency. The interaction between compound loading and layup angle parameter affects the order of merging vibration modes and may stabilize the dynamic response. Laminated plates are assumed to be angle-plies symmetric to mid-plane surface. Dynamic equilibrium PDE has been solved using kernel integral transformation for modal frequency values and eigenvalue-based orthogonal functions for critical stability loads. The dictating dynamic stability mode is shown to be controlled by geometric stiffness distributions of composite plates. Solution of presented design optimization problem has been done using analytical approach combined with interior penalty multiplier algorithm. The results are verified by FEA approach and stability zones of original and optimized plates are stated as final data. Presented method can help designers to stabilize the dynamic response of composite plates by selecting an optimized layup orientation and thickness for prescribed design circumstances.

  3. Difference in static and dynamic stability between flexible flatfeet and neutral feet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lim, One-Bin; Yi, Chung-Hwi

    2015-02-01

    Different postural stability may be a contributor to secondary injuries in individuals with flexible flatfeet (FF) compared to those with neutral feet (NF). However, the differences between static and dynamic stability of FF and NF have not been examined. This study compared the static and dynamic stability of subjects with FF and NF and investigated the relationship between static and dynamic stability. Twenty-eight subjects (14 each in the FF and NF groups) performed three tasks (single leg standing with eyes open, with eyes closed, and the Y balance test). We quantified the center of pressure (COP) speed and Y balance test score (Y score) within the tasks. COP speed was significantly greater in the FF group than in the NF group under both conditions (eyes open and closed) and directions (anteroposterior and mediolateral). Y scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. No significant relationship was observed between the COP speed and Y score in either group. These results show that individuals with FF have different static stabilities, but not dynamic stabilities, compared with those with NF. This might indicate the absence of a relationship between static and dynamic stabilities.

  4. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    PubMed

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  5. Investigation of biomechanical behavior of lumbar vertebral segments with dynamic stabilization device using finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deoghare, Ashish B.; Kashyap, Siddharth; Padole, Pramod M.

    2013-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease is a major source of lower back pain and significantly alters the biomechanics of the lumbar spine. Dynamic stabilization device is a remedial technique which uses flexible materials to stabilize the affected lumbar region while preserving the natural anatomy of the spine. The main objective of this research work is to investigate the stiffness variation of dynamic stabilization device under various loading conditions under compression, axial rotation and flexion. Three dimensional model of the two segment lumbar spine is developed using computed tomography (CT) scan images. The lumbar structure developed is analyzed in ANSYS workbench. Two types of dynamic stabilization are considered: one with stabilizing device as pedicle instrumentation and second with stabilization device inserted around the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis suggests that proper positioning of the dynamic stabilization device is of paramount significance prior to the surgery. Inserting the device in the posterior region indicates the adverse effects as it shows increase in the deformation of the inter-vertebral disc. Analysis executed by positioning stabilizing device around the inter-vertebral disc yields better result for various stiffness values under compression and other loadings. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Wataru; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1) and 30 (Experiment 2) ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing.

  7. Vastly enhancing the chemical stability of phosphorene by employing an electric field.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junfeng; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2017-03-23

    Currently, a major hurdle preventing phosphorene from various electronic applications is its rapid oxidation under ambient conditions. Thus how to enhance its chemical stability by suppressing oxidation becomes an urgent task. Here, we reveal a highly effective procedure to suppress the oxidation of phosphorene by employing a suitable van der Waals (vdW) substrate and a vertical electric field. Our first-principles study shows that the phosphorene-MoSe2 vdW heterostructure is able to reverse the stability of physisorption and chemisorption of molecular O2 on phosphorene. With further application of a vertical electric field of -0.6 V Å(-1), the energy barrier for oxidation is able to further increase to 0.91 eV, leading to a 10(5) times enhancement in its lifetime compared with that without using the procedure at room temperature. Our work presents a viable strategy to vastly enhance the chemical stability of phosphorene in air.

  8. Fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer coating for the stability enhancement of electroactive and photoactive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Luping; Neoh, K. G.; Zhang, Yan; Kang, E. T.

    2003-11-01

    The effectiveness of radio frequency sputtered fluorinated ethylene propylene copolymer (FEP) for the stability enhancement of electroactive and photoactive systems was investigated. Two kinds of electroactive polymer systems, polyaniline (PANI) coated low density polyethylene (LDPE) film and PANI-viologen assembly, were tested. In both cases, a sputtered FEP coating of <10 nm in thickness significantly enhanced the electrical stability of the films in water. The enhancement of the electrical stability of the PANI-LDPE film was also achieved in basic aqueous solution of pH up to 12 with a FEP coating of 40-50 nm in thickness. The deposition of a FEP coating on the photoactive viologen system (viologen grafted on LDPE film) prolonged its photochromic effect by inhibiting the diffusion of oxygen, and hence the reoxidation of the highly colored viologen radical cations to the dication state.

  9. Dynamic knee stability estimated by finite helical axis methods during functional performance approximately twenty years after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Grip, Helena; Tengman, Eva; Häger, Charlotte K

    2015-07-16

    Finite helical axis (FHA) measures of the knee joint during weight-bearing tasks may capture dynamic knee stability following Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury. The aim was to investigate dynamic knee stability during two-leg squat (TLS) and one-leg side hop (SH) in a long-term follow-up of ACL injury, and to examine correlations with knee laxity (KT-1000), osteoarthritis (OA, Kellgren-Lawrence) and knee function (Lysholm score). Participants were injured 17-28 years ago and then treated with surgery (n=33, ACLR) or physiotherapy only (n=37, ACLPT) and healthy-knee controls (n=33) were tested. Movements were registered with an optical motion capture system. We computed three FHA inclination angles, its' Anterior-Posterior (A-P) position, and an index quantifying directional changes (DI), during stepwise knee flexion intervals of ∼15°. Injured knees were less stable compared to healthy controls' and to contralateral non-injured knees, regardless of treatment: the A-P intersection was more anterior (indicating a more anterior positioning of tibia relative to femur) positively correlating with high laxity/low knee function, and during SH, the FHA was more inclined relative to the flexion-extension axis, possibly due to reduced rotational stability. During the TLS, A-P intersection was more anterior in the non-injured knee than the injured, and DI was higher, probably related to higher load on the non-injured knee. ACLR had less anterior A-P intersection than ACLPT, suggesting that surgery enhanced stability, although rotational stability may remain reduced. More anterior A-P intersection and greater inclination between the FHA and the knee flexion-extension axis best revealed reduced dynamic stability ∼23 years post-injury.

  10. Motivational Dynamics in Language Learning: Change, Stability, and Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waninge, Freerkien; Dörnyei, Zoltán; De Bot, Kees

    2014-01-01

    Motivation as a variable in L2 development is no longer seen as the stable individual difference factor it was once believed to be: Influenced by process-oriented models and principles, and especially by the growing understanding of how complex dynamic systems work, researchers have been focusing increasingly on the dynamic and changeable nature…

  11. Motivational Dynamics in Language Learning: Change, Stability, and Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waninge, Freerkien; Dörnyei, Zoltán; De Bot, Kees

    2014-01-01

    Motivation as a variable in L2 development is no longer seen as the stable individual difference factor it was once believed to be: Influenced by process-oriented models and principles, and especially by the growing understanding of how complex dynamic systems work, researchers have been focusing increasingly on the dynamic and changeable nature…

  12. Dynamic head-neck stabilization in cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; de Bruijn, Edo; Nijmeijer, Sebastiaan W R; Koelman, Johannes H T M; van der Helm, Frans C T; Schouten, Alfred C; Tijssen, Marina A J; Happee, Riender

    2017-02-01

    Effective sensorimotor integration is essential to modulate (adapt) neck stabilization strategies in response to varying tasks and disturbances. This study evaluates the hypothesis that relative to healthy controls cervical dystonia patients have an impaired ability to modulate afferent feedback for neck stabilization with changes in the frequency content of mechanical perturbations. We applied anterior-posterior displacement perturbations (110s) on the torso of seated subjects, while recording head-neck kinematics and muscular activity. We compared low bandwidth (0.2-1.2Hz) and high bandwidth (0.2-8Hz) perturbations where our previous research showed a profound modulation of stabilization strategies in healthy subjects. Cervical dystonia patients and age matched controls performed two tasks: (1) maintain head forward posture and (2) allow dystonia to dictate head posture. Patients and controls demonstrated similar kinematic and muscular responses. Patient modulation was similar to that of healthy controls (P>0.05); neck stiffness and afferent feedback decreased with high bandwidth perturbations. During the head forward task patients had an increased neck stiffness relative to controls (P<0.05), due to increased afferent feedback. The unaffected modulation of head-neck stabilization (both kinematic and muscular) in patients with cervical dystonia does not support the hypothesis of impaired afferent feedback modulation for neck stabilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stability and dynamical properties of Cooper-Shepard-Sodano compactons.

    PubMed

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Cardenas, Andres; Cooper, Fred; Saxena, Avadh

    2010-12-01

    Extending a Padé approximant method used for studying compactons in the Rosenau-Hyman (RH) equation, we study the numerical stability of single compactons of the Cooper-Shepard-Sodano (CSS) equation and their pairwise interactions. The CSS equation has a conserved Hamiltonian which has allowed various approaches for studying analytically the nonlinear stability of the solutions. We study three different compacton solutions and find they are numerically stable. Similar to the collisions between RH compactons, the CSS compactons re-emerge with same coherent shape when scattered. The time evolution of the small-amplitude ripple resulting after scattering depends on the values of the parameters l and p characterizing the corresponding CSS equation. The simulation of the CSS compacton scattering requires a much smaller artificial viscosity to obtain numerical stability than in the case of RH compacton propagation.

  14. Dynamic stability as affected by the longitudinal moment of inertia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edwin B

    1924-01-01

    In a recent Technical Note (NACA-TN-115, October, 1922), Norton and Carrol have reported experiments showing that a relatively large (15 per cent) increase in longitudinal moment of inertia made no noticeable difference in the stability of a standard SE-5A airplane. They point out that G. P. Thomson, "Applied Aeronautics," page 208, stated that an increase in longitudinal moment of inertia would decrease the stability. Neither he nor they make any theoretical forecast of the amount of decrease. Although it is difficult, on account of the complications of the theory of stability of the airplane, to make any accurate forecast, it is the purpose of this report to attempt a discussion of the matter theoretically with reference to finding a rough quantitative estimate.

  15. Walking in simulated Martian gravity: influence of the portable life support system's design on dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M; O'Connor, Daniel P; Layne, Charles S; Josić, Kresimir; Kurz, Max J

    2009-09-01

    With human exploration of the moon and Mars on the horizon, research considerations for space suit redesign have surfaced. The portable life support system (PLSS) used in conjunction with the space suit during the Apollo missions may have influenced the dynamic balance of the gait pattern. This investigation explored potential issues with the PLSS design that may arise during the Mars exploration. A better understanding of how the location of the PLSS load influences the dynamic stability of the gait pattern may provide insight, such that space missions may have more productive missions with a smaller risk of injury and damaging equipment while falling. We explored the influence the PLSS load position had on the dynamic stability of the walking pattern. While walking, participants wore a device built to simulate possible PLSS load configurations. Floquet and Lyapunov analysis techniques were used to quantify the dynamic stability of the gait pattern. The dynamic stability of the gait pattern was influenced by the position of load. PLSS loads that are placed high and forward on the torso resulted in less dynamically stable walking patterns than loads placed evenly and low on the torso. Furthermore, the kinematic results demonstrated that all joints of the lower extremity may be important for adjusting to different load placements and maintaining dynamic stability. Space scientists and engineers may want to consider PLSS designs that distribute loads evenly and low, and space suit designs that will not limit the sagittal plane range of motion at the lower extremity joints.

  16. Biopolyester-based systems containing naturally occurring compounds with enhanced thermo-oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Rossella; Morici, Elisabetta; Dintcheva, Nadka Tzankova

    2016-11-02

    This work presents a sustainable approach for the stabilization of polylactic acid (PLA) against thermo-oxidative aging. Naturally occurring phenolic and polyphenolic compounds, such as ferulic acid (FerAc), vanillic acid (VanAc), quercetin (Querc) and vitamin E (VitE), were introduced into PLA. The preliminary characterization of the systems formulated containing different amounts of natural stabilizers showed that all compounds used acted as plasticizers, leading to a decrease in rheological functions with respect to neat PLA, without significantly modifying the crystallinity of the raw material. The study of the thermo-oxidative behavior of neat PLA and PLA/natural compound systems, performed by spectrometric and thermal analyses, indicated that all stabilizers considered were able to exert a remarkable antioxidant action against thermo-oxidative phenomena. All natural compounds considered are thus proposed as ecofriendly stabilizers, to get fully bio-based polymer systems with enhanced thermo-oxidative stability, suitable for biomedical applications.

  17. Dynamic Stability of Generalized Beck-Reut's Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánási, Tibor

    2016-12-01

    The classical non-conservative Beck's beam, loaded by follower compressive force, is generalized by allowing an arbitrary angle of action of the follower force as well as allowing for excentric positioning of the applied force. For the corresponding boundary eigenvalue problem, the frequency equation is derived. Results of parametric studies are presented with an emphasis laid on the lowest eigenfrequencies. The characteristic shape of the computed curves indicates whether stability loss by divergence or by flutter occurs. A map of stability is presented in terms of parameters describing the excentricity and the angle under which the follower force acts on the beam.

  18. Studies of the Stability and Dynamics of Levitated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikumar, A.; Lee, Chun Ping; Wang, T. G.

    1996-01-01

    This is a review of our experimental and theoretical studies relating to equilibrium and stability of liquid drops, typically of low viscosity, levitated in air by a sound field. The major emphasis here is on the physical principles and understanding behind the stability of levitated drops. A comparison with experimental data is also given, along with some fascinating pictures from high-speed photography. One of the aspects we shall deal with is how a drop can suddenly burst in an intense sound field; a phenomenon which can find applications in atomization technology. Also, we are currently investigating the phenomenon of suppression of coalescence between drops levitated in intense acoustic fields.

  19. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  20. Bulky Dehydroamino Acids Enhance Proteolytic Stability and Folding in β-Hairpin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Ankur; Kastner, David W; Webber, Kei G I; Smith, Mason S; Price, Joshua L; Castle, Steven L

    2017-10-06

    The bulky dehydroamino acids dehydrovaline (ΔVal) and dehydroethylnorvaline (ΔEnv) can be inserted into the turn regions of β-hairpin peptides without altering their secondary structures. These residues increase proteolytic stability, with ΔVal at the (i + 1) position having the most substantial impact. Additionally, a bulky dehydroamino acid can be paired with a d-amino acid (i.e., d-Pro) to synergistically enhance resistance to proteolysis. A link between proteolytic stability and peptide structure is established by the finding that a stabilized ΔVal-containing β-hairpin is more highly folded than its Asn-containing congener.

  1. Resistance Training and Head-Neck Segment Dynamic Stabilization in Male and Female Collegiate Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Mansell, Jamie; Tierney, Ryan T; Sitler, Michael R; Swanik, Kathleen A; Stearne, David

    2005-01-01

    Context: Cervical resistance training has been purported to aid in reducing the severity of brain injuries in athletes. Objective: To determine the effect of an 8-week resistance-training program on head-neck segment dynamic stabilization in male and female collegiate soccer players. Design: Pretest and posttest control group design. Setting: University research laboratory and fitness center. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-six National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate soccer players (17 men, 19 women). Intervention(s): The resistance training group underwent an 8-week cervical resistance training program that consisted of 3 sets of 10 repetitions of neck flexion and extension at 55% to 70% of their 10-repetition maximum 2 times a week. Participants in the control group performed no cervical resistance exercises. Main Outcome Measure(s): Head-neck segment kinematics and stiffness, electromyographic activity of the upper trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles during force application to the head, and neck flexor and extensor isometric strength. Results: No kinematic, electromyographic, or stiffness training effects were seen. The posttest resistance training group isometric neck flexor strength was 15% greater than the pretest measurement. Isometric neck extensor strength in the female resistance training group was 22.5% greater at the posttest than at the pretest. Women's neck girth increased 3.4% over time regardless of training group level. Women exhibited 7% less head-neck segment length and 26% less head-neck segment mass than men. Conclusions: Despite increases in isometric strength and girth, the 8-week isotonic cervical resistance training did not enhance head-neck segment dynamic stabilization during force application in collegiate soccer players. Future researchers should examine the effect of head-neck segment training protocols that include traditional and neuromuscular activities (eg, plyometrics) with the focus of

  2. Dynamical weights and enhanced synchronization in adaptive complex networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Changsong; Kurths, Jürgen

    2006-04-28

    Dynamical organization of connection weights is studied in scale-free networks of chaotic oscillators, where the coupling strength of a node from its neighbors develops adaptively according to the local synchronization property between the node and its neighbors. We find that when complete synchronization is achieved, the coupling strength becomes weighted and correlated with the topology due to a hierarchical transition to synchronization in heterogeneous networks. Importantly, such an adaptive process enhances significantly the synchronizability of the networks, which could have meaningful implications in the manipulation of dynamical networks.

  3. The shape, stability and dynamics of elastic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.

    2008-03-01

    Bending a thin sheet is easier than stretching it, an observation which has its roots in geometry. We will use this fact to explain some unusual problems in biology, physics and geology. At the everyday scale, I will discuss the morphology of avascular algal blades, the dynamics of defects in an elastic ribbon, and the dynamics of prey capture by certain carnivorous plants. At the geological scale, I will try to explain the shape of island arcs on our planet. Finally, time permitting, I will discuss how we might extend these ideas to the macromolecular scale, to derive a mechanical model for the dynamic instability of a growing microtubule.

  4. Binding of protofibrillar Aβ trimers to lipid bilayer surface enhances Aβ structural stability and causes membrane thinning.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuewei; Sun, Yunxiang; Wei, Guanghong; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2017-10-05

    Alzheimer's disease, a common neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by the aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides. The interactions of Aβ with membranes cause changes in membrane morphology and ion permeation, which are responsible for its neurotoxicity and can accelerate fibril growth. However, the Aβ-lipid interactions and how these induce membrane perturbation and disruption at the atomic level and the consequences for the Aβ organization are not entirely understood. Here, we perform multiple atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on three protofibrillar Aβ9-40 trimers. Our simulations show that, regardless of the morphologies and the initial orientations of the three different protofibrillar Aβ9-40 trimers, the N-terminal β-sheet of all trimers preferentially binds to the membrane surface. The POPG lipid bilayers enhance the structural stability of protofibrillar Aβ trimers by stabilizing inter-peptide β-sheets and D23-K28 salt-bridges. The interaction causes local membrane thinning. We found that the trimer structure related to Alzheimer's disease brain tissue () is the most stable both in water solution and at membrane surface, and displays slightly stronger membrane perturbation capability. These results provide mechanistic insights into the membrane-enhanced structural stability of protofibrillar Aβ oligomers and the first step of Aβ-induced membrane disruption at the atomic level.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound: A quantification method

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Dong, Yi; Froehlich, Eckhart; Hocke, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) has been recently standardized by guidelines and recommendations. The European Federation of Societies for US in Medicine and Biology position paper describes the use for DCE-US. Comparatively, little is known about the use of contrast-enhanced endoscopic US (CE-EUS). This current paper reviews and discusses the clinical use of CE-EUS and DCE-US. The most important clinical use of DCE-US is the prediction of tumor response to new drugs against vascular angioneogenesis. PMID:28218195

  6. Stability properties of nonlinear dynamical systems and evolutionary stable states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleria, Iram; Brenig, Leon; Rocha Filho, Tarcísio M.; Figueiredo, Annibal

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we address the problem of stability in a general class of non-linear systems. We establish a link between the concepts of asymptotic stable interior fixed points of square Quasi-Polynomial systems and evolutionary stable states, a property of some payoff matrices arising from evolutionary games.

  7. The Effects on Dynamic Lateral Stability and Control of Large Artificial Variations in the Rotary Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schade, Robert O; Hassell, James L , Jr

    1953-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation conducted in the Langley free-flight tunnel to determine the effects of large artificial variations of several rotary lateral-stability derivatives on the dynamic lateral stability and control characteristics of a 45 degree sweptback-wing airplane model. Calculations of the period and damping of the lateral motions and of the response to roll and yaw disturbances were made for correlation with the experimental results. The calculated results were in qualitative agreement with the experimental results in predicting the general trends in flight characteristics produced by large changes in the stability derivatives, but in some cases the theory with the assumption of zero lag was not in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Robust adaptive dynamic programming and feedback stabilization of nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the robust optimal control design for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems from a perspective of robust adaptive dynamic programming (RADP). The objective is to fill up a gap in the past literature of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) where dynamic uncertainties or unmodeled dynamics are not addressed. A key strategy is to integrate tools from modern nonlinear control theory, such as the robust redesign and the backstepping techniques as well as the nonlinear small-gain theorem, with the theory of ADP. The proposed RADP methodology can be viewed as an extension of ADP to uncertain nonlinear systems. Practical learning algorithms are developed in this paper, and have been applied to the controller design problems for a jet engine and a one-machine power system.

  9. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  10. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  11. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-10

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  12. Dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in persons with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rijken, N H M; van Engelen, B G M; Geurts, A C H; Weerdesteyn, V

    2015-09-01

    Patients with FSHD suffer from progressive skeletal muscle weakness, which is associated with an elevated fall risk. To obtain insight into fall mechanisms in this patient group, we aimed to assess dynamic stability during level walking and obstacle crossing in patients at different disease stages. Ten patients with at least some lower extremity weakness were included, of whom six were classified as moderately affected and four as mildly affected. Ten healthy controls were also included. Level walking at comfortable speed was assessed, as well as crossing a 10 cm high wooden obstacle. We assessed forward and lateral dynamic stability, as well as spatiotemporal and kinematics variables. During level walking, the moderately affected group demonstrated a lower walking speed, which was accompanied by longer step times and smaller step lengths, yet dynamic stability was unaffected. When crossing the obstacle, however, the moderately affected patients demonstrated reduced forward stability margins during the trailing step, which was accompanied by an increased toe clearance and greater trunk and hip flexion. This suggests that during level walking, the patients effectively utilized compensatory strategies for maintaining dynamic stability, but that the moderately affected group lacked the capacity to fully compensate for the greater stability demands imposed by obstacle crossing, rendering them unable to maintain optimal stability levels. The present results highlight the difficulties that FSHD patients experience in performing this common activity of daily living and may help explain their propensity to fall in the forward direction.

  13. Stability in flux: community structure in dynamic networks.

    PubMed

    Bryden, John; Funk, Sebastian; Geard, Nicholas; Bullock, Seth; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2011-07-06

    The structure of many biological, social and technological systems can usefully be described in terms of complex networks. Although often portrayed as fixed in time, such networks are inherently dynamic, as the edges that join nodes are cut and rewired, and nodes themselves update their states. Understanding the structure of these networks requires us to understand the dynamic processes that create, maintain and modify them. Here, we build upon existing models of coevolving networks to characterize how dynamic behaviour at the level of individual nodes generates stable aggregate behaviours. We focus particularly on the dynamics of groups of nodes formed endogenously by nodes that share similar properties (represented as node state) and demonstrate that, under certain conditions, network modularity based on state compares well with network modularity based on topology. We show that if nodes rewire their edges based on fixed node states, the network modularity reaches a stable equilibrium which we quantify analytically. Furthermore, if node state is not fixed, but can be adopted from neighbouring nodes, the distribution of group sizes reaches a dynamic equilibrium, which remains stable even as the composition and identity of the groups change. These results show that dynamic networks can maintain the stable community structure that has been observed in many social and biological systems.

  14. A review of dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Rote, D.M.

    1998-07-01

    Vehicle dynamics and the need to satisfy ride quality requirements have long been recognized as crucial to the commercial success of passenger-carrying transportation systems. Design concepts for maglev systems are no exception. Early maglev investigators and designers were well aware of the importance of ride quality and took care to ensure that their designs would meet acceptable ride quality standards. In contrast, the dynamic stability of electrodynamic suspension (EDS) systems, which has obvious implications for system safety and cost as well as for ride quality, has not received nearly as much attention. Because of the well-known under-damped nature of EDS suspension systems and the observation of instabilities in laboratory-scale model systems, it is prudent to develop a better understanding of vehicle stability characteristics. The work reported in this was undertaken with the intention of summarizing information that has been accumulated worldwide and that is relevant to dynamic stability of repulsive-force maglev suspension systems, assimilating that information, and gaining an understanding of the factors that influence that stability. Included in the paper is a discussion and comparison of results acquired from some representative tests of large-scale vehicles on linear test tracks, together with analytical and laboratory-scale investigations of stability and dynamics of EDS systems. This paper will also summarize the R and D activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) since 1991 to study the nature of the forces that are operative in an EDS system and the dynamic stability of such systems.

  15. Filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization in Drosophila visual circuit development.

    PubMed

    Özel, Mehmet Neset; Langen, Marion; Hassan, Bassem A; Hiesinger, P Robin

    2015-10-29

    Filopodial dynamics are thought to control growth cone guidance, but the types and roles of growth cone dynamics underlying neural circuit assembly in a living brain are largely unknown. To address this issue, we have developed long-term, continuous, fast and high-resolution imaging of growth cone dynamics from axon growth to synapse formation in cultured Drosophila brains. Using R7 photoreceptor neurons as a model we show that >90% of the growth cone filopodia exhibit fast, stochastic dynamics that persist despite ongoing stepwise layer formation. Correspondingly, R7 growth cones stabilize early and change their final position by passive dislocation. N-Cadherin controls both fast filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization. Surprisingly, loss of N-Cadherin causes no primary targeting defects, but destabilizes R7 growth cones to jump between correct and incorrect layers. Hence, growth cone dynamics can influence wiring specificity without a direct role in target recognition and implement simple rules during circuit assembly.

  16. The Fatal Five? Five Factors That Enhance Effectiveness of Stability Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited THE FATAL FIVE? FIVE FACTORS THAT ENHANCE EFFECTIVENESS OF STABILITY OPERATIONS A...2014 2. REPORT TYPE SAMS Monograph 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2013 – May 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Fatal Five? Five Factors That...Z39.18 ii MONOGRAPH APPROVAL Name of Candidate: Major Ralph D. Heaton Monograph Title: The Fatal Five? Five Factors That Enhance Effectiveness of

  17. STABILITY AND DYNAMICS OF A FLUX ROPE FORMED VIA FLUX EMERGENCE INTO THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    An, J. M.; Magara, T. E-mail: magara@khu.ac.kr

    2013-08-10

    We study the stability and dynamics of a flux rope formed through the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube into the solar atmosphere. A three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation has been performed to investigate several key factors affecting the dynamics of the flux rope. The stability of the flux rope is examined by deriving the decay index of the coronal magnetic field surrounding the flux rope. We investigate a transition between the quasi-static and dynamic states of the flux rope through an analysis of the curvature and scale height of emerging magnetic field. A practical application of this analysis for global eruptions is also considered.

  18. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant's functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies.

  19. Deciphering the Dynamics of Non-Covalent Interactions Affecting Thermal Stability of a Protein: Molecular Dynamics Study on Point Mutant of Thermus thermophilus Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reetu; Sastry, G. Narahari

    2015-01-01

    Thermus thermophilius isopropylmalate dehydrogenase catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation and dehydrogenation of isopropylmalate. Substitution of leucine to alanine at position 172 enhances the thermal stability among the known point mutants. Exploring the dynamic properties of non-covalent interactions such as saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions to explain thermal stability of a protein is interesting in its own right. In this study dynamic changes in the non-covalent interactions are studied to decipher the deterministic features of thermal stability of a protein considering a case study of a point mutant in Thermus thermophilus isopropylmalate dehydrogenase. A total of four molecular dynamic simulations of 0.2 μs were carried out on wild type and mutant’s functional dimers at 300 K and 337 K. Higher thermal stability of the mutant as compared to wild type is revealed by root mean square deviation, root mean square fluctuations and Cα-Cα distance with an increase in temperature from 300 K to 337 K. Most of the regions of wild type fluctuate higher than the corresponding regions of mutant with an increase in temperature. Cα-Cα distance analysis suggests that long distance networks are significantly affected in wild type as compared to the mutant. Short lived contacts are higher in wild type, while long lived contacts are lost at 337 K. The mutant forms less hydrogen bonds with water as compared to wild type at 337 K. In contrast to wild type, the mutant shows significant increase in unique saltbridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts at 337 K. The current study indicates that there is a strong inter-dependence of thermal stability on the way in which non-covalent interactions reorganize, and it is rewarding to explore this connection in single mutant studies. PMID:26657745

  20. Enhanced thermal stability of the thylakoid membranes from spruce. A comparison with selected angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Karlický, Václav; Kurasová, Irena; Ptáčková, Božena; Večeřová, Kristýna; Urban, Otmar; Špunda, Vladimír

    2016-12-01

    Recently, we have found that thermal stability of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in spruce needles is higher than in other plants (barley, beech) cultivated under the same temperatures. In this work, temperature dependences of various characteristics of PSII organization were studied in order to obtain complex information on the thermal stability of PSII function and organization in spruce. Temperature dependency of circular dichroism spectra revealed by about 6 °C higher thermal stability of macrodomain organization in spruce thylakoid membranes in comparison with Arabidopsis and barley ones; however, thermal disintegration of light-harvesting complex of PSII did not significantly differ among the species studied. These results thus indicate that thermal stability of PSII macro-organization in spruce thylakoid membranes is enhanced to a similar extent as thermal stability of PSII photochemistry. Clear-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of preheated thylakoids demonstrated that among the separated pigment-protein complexes, only PSII supercomplexes (SCs) revealed considerably higher thermal stability in spruce thylakoids as compared to Arabidopsis and barley ones. Hence we suggest that higher thermal stability of PSII macro-organization of spruce is influenced by the maintenance of PSII SCs in the thylakoid membrane. In addition, we discuss possible effects of different PSII organizations and lipid compositions on the thermal stability of spruce thylakoid membranes.

  1. The effect of walking speed on local dynamic stability is sensitive to calculation methods.

    PubMed

    Stenum, Jan; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Jensen, Bente R

    2014-11-28

    Local dynamic stability has been assessed by the short-term local divergence exponent (λS), which quantifies the average rate of logarithmic divergence of infinitesimally close trajectories in state space. Both increased and decreased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds have been reported. This might pertain to methodological differences in calculating λS. Therefore, the aim was to test if different calculation methods would induce different effects of walking speed on local dynamic stability. Ten young healthy participants walked on a treadmill at five speeds (60%, 80%, 100%, 120% and 140% of preferred walking speed) for 3min each, while upper body accelerations in three directions were sampled. From these time-series, λS was calculated by three different methods using: (a) a fixed time interval and expressed as logarithmic divergence per stride-time (λS-a), (b) a fixed number of strides and expressed as logarithmic divergence per time (λS-b) and (c) a fixed number of strides and expressed as logarithmic divergence per stride-time (λS-c). Mean preferred walking speed was 1.16±0.09m/s. There was only a minor effect of walking speed on λS-a. λS-b increased with increasing walking speed indicating decreased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds, whereas λS-c decreased with increasing walking speed indicating increased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds. Thus, the effect of walking speed on calculated local dynamic stability was significantly different between methods used to calculate local dynamic stability. Therefore, inferences and comparisons of studies employing λS should be made with careful consideration of the calculation method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Global stability and periodic solution of the viral dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinyu; Neumann, Avidan U.

    2007-05-01

    It is well known that the mathematical models provide very important information for the research of human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the infection rate of almost all mathematical models is linear. The linearity shows the simple interaction between the T cells and the viral particles. In this paper, we consider the classical mathematical model with saturation response of the infection rate. By stability analysis we obtain sufficient conditions on the parameters for the global stability of the infected steady state and the infection-free steady state. We also obtain the conditions for the existence of an orbitally asymptotically stable periodic solution. Numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the results.

  3. Fundamental analysis of dynamic stability in superconductive power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitani, Y.; Tsuji, K.; Murakami, Y. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on applications of superconductivity to power systems which have possible advantages in economy, reliability and stability. On the other side, superconductive power systems have risks of including insufficient damping due to the effect of inductance-capacitance (LC) resonance. This may cause subsynchronous resonance oscillations (SSR) represented by self-excited oscillation and torsional oscillation of rotor-turbine shafts. The main subject of this paper is to analyze numerically SSR and electro-mechanical power swing in a model power system with superconductive power apparatus. A stabilizing control scheme which uses the stored energy in the field winding circuit of superconductive generator, is applied to some instabilities and its effectiveness is confirmed in a digital simulation study.

  4. Evolving enhanced topologies for the synchronization of dynamical complex networks.

    PubMed

    Gorochowski, Thomas E; di Bernardo, Mario; Grierson, Claire S

    2010-05-01

    Enhancing the synchronization of dynamical networks is of great interest to those designing and analyzing many man-made and natural systems. In this work, we investigate how network topology can be evolved to improve this property through the rewiring of edges. A computational tool called NETEVO performs this task using a simulated annealing metaheuristic. In contrast to other work which considers topological attributes when assessing current performance, we instead take a dynamical approach using simulated output from the system to direct the evolution of the network. Resultant topologies are analyzed using standard network measures, B matrices, and motif distributions. These uncover the convergence of many similar features for all our networks, highlighting also significant differences between those evolved using topological rather than dynamical performance measures.

  5. Motion and Stability of Saturated Soil Systems under Dynamic Loading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-04

    A 174 902 RF Project 763420/716894 Approvpn f or" ipilic release -, Report dL~rbutIonunlimited. MOTION AND STABILITY OF SATURATED SOIL SYSTEMS UNDER...no relative motion between the constituents . Liquefaction of soil is primarily associated with relative motion of soil and water. The so-called...was that the notion of the mixture as a continuum in motion is inadmissible except in the case of no relative motion between the constituents

  6. Interfacial Polymerization on Dynamic Complex Colloids: Creating Stabilized Janus Droplets.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Savagatrup, Suchol; Zarzar, Lauren D; Swager, Timothy M

    2017-03-01

    Complex emulsions, including Janus droplets, are becoming increasingly important in pharmaceuticals and medical diagnostics, the fabrication of microcapsules for drug delivery, chemical sensing, E-paper display technologies, and optics. Because fluid Janus droplets are often sensitive to external perturbation, such as unexpected changes in the concentration of the surfactants or surface-active biomolecules in the environment, stabilizing their morphology is critical for many real-world applications. To endow Janus droplets with resistance to external chemical perturbations, we demonstrate a general and robust method of creating polymeric hemispherical shells via interfacial free-radical polymerization on the Janus droplets. The polymeric hemispherical shells were characterized by optical and fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. By comparing phase diagrams of a regular Janus droplet and a Janus droplet with the hemispherical shell, we show that the formation of the hemispherical shell nearly doubles the range of the Janus morphology and maintains the Janus morphology upon a certain degree of external perturbation (e.g., adding hydrocarbon-water or fluorocarbon-water surfactants). We attribute the increased stability of the Janus droplets to (1) the surfactant nature of polymeric shell formed and (2) increase in interfacial tension between hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon due to polymer shell formation. This finding opens the door of utilizing these stabilized Janus droplets in a demanding environment.

  7. Phase stability and dynamics of entangled polymer-nanoparticle composites.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden A

    2015-06-05

    Nanoparticle-polymer composites, or polymer-nanoparticle composites (PNCs), exhibit unusual mechanical and dynamical features when the particle size approaches the random coil dimensions of the host polymer. Here, we harness favourable enthalpic interactions between particle-tethered and free, host polymer chains to create model PNCs, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in high molecular weight entangled polymers. Investigation of the mechanical properties of these model PNCs reveals that the nanoparticles have profound effects on the host polymer motions on all timescales. On short timescales, nanoparticles slow-down local dynamics of the host polymer segments and lower the glass transition temperature. On intermediate timescales, where polymer chain motion is typically constrained by entanglements with surrounding molecules, nanoparticles provide additional constraints, which lead to an early onset of entangled polymer dynamics. Finally, on long timescales, nanoparticles produce an apparent speeding up of relaxation of their polymer host.

  8. Phase stability and dynamics of entangled polymer–nanoparticle composites

    PubMed Central

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle–polymer composites, or polymer–nanoparticle composites (PNCs), exhibit unusual mechanical and dynamical features when the particle size approaches the random coil dimensions of the host polymer. Here, we harness favourable enthalpic interactions between particle-tethered and free, host polymer chains to create model PNCs, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in high molecular weight entangled polymers. Investigation of the mechanical properties of these model PNCs reveals that the nanoparticles have profound effects on the host polymer motions on all timescales. On short timescales, nanoparticles slow-down local dynamics of the host polymer segments and lower the glass transition temperature. On intermediate timescales, where polymer chain motion is typically constrained by entanglements with surrounding molecules, nanoparticles provide additional constraints, which lead to an early onset of entangled polymer dynamics. Finally, on long timescales, nanoparticles produce an apparent speeding up of relaxation of their polymer host. PMID:26044723

  9. Phase stability and dynamics of entangled polymer-nanoparticle composites

    SciTech Connect

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden A.

    2015-06-10

    Nanoparticle–polymer composites, or polymer–nanoparticle composites (PNCs), exhibit unusual mechanical and dynamical features when the particle size approaches the random coil dimensions of the host polymer. Here, we harness favourable enthalpic interactions between particle-tethered and free, host polymer chains to create model PNCs, in which spherical nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed in high molecular weight entangled polymers. Investigation of the mechanical properties of these model PNCs reveals that the nanoparticles have profound effects on the host polymer motions on all timescales. On short timescales, nanoparticles slow-down local dynamics of the host polymer segments and lower the glass transition temperature. On intermediate timescales, where polymer chain motion is typically constrained by entanglements with surrounding molecules, nanoparticles provide additional constraints, which lead to an early onset of entangled polymer dynamics. Finally, on long timescales, nanoparticles produce an apparent speeding up of relaxation of their polymer host.

  10. Successful stabilization of graphene oxide in electrolyte solutions: enhancement of biofunctionalization and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bong Jin; Compton, Owen C; An, Zhi; Eryazici, Ibrahim; Nguyen, SonBinh T

    2012-01-24

    Aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide are inherently unstable in the presence of electrolytes, which screen the electrostatic surface charge on these nanosheets and induce irreversible aggregation. Two complementary strategies, utilizing either electrostatic or steric stabilization, have been developed to enhance the stability of graphene oxide in electrolyte solutions, allowing it to stay dispersed in cell culture media and serum. The electrostatic stabilization approach entails further oxidation of graphene oxide to low C/O ratio (~1.1) and increases ionic tolerance of these nanosheets. The steric stabilization technique employs an amphiphilic block copolymer that serves as a noncovalently bound surfactant to minimize the aggregate-inducing nanosheet-nanosheet interactions. Both strategies can stabilize graphene oxide nanosheets with large dimensions (>300 nm) in biological media, allowing for an enhancement of >250% in the bioconjugation efficiency of streptavidin in comparison to untreated nanosheets. Notably, both strategies allow the stabilized nanosheets to be readily taken up by cells, demonstrating their excellent performance as potential drug-delivery vehicles.

  11. Successful Stabilization of Graphene Oxide in Electrolyte Solutions: Enhancement of Bio-functionalization and Cellular Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bong Jin; Compton, Owen C.; An, Zhi; Eryzazici, Ibrahim; Nguyen, SonBinh T.

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide are inherently unstable in the presence of electrolytes, which screen the electrostatic surface charge on these nanosheets and induce irreversible aggregation. Two complementary strategies, utilizing either electrostatic or steric stabilization, have been developed to enhance the stability of graphene oxide in electrolyte solutions, allowing it to stay dispersed in cell culture media and serum. The electrostatic stabilization approach entails further oxidation of graphene oxide to low C/O ratio (~1.03) and increases ionic tolerance of these nanosheets. The steric stabilization technique employs an amphiphilic block copolymer that serves as a non-covalently bound surfactant to minimize the aggregate-induced nanosheets-nanosheet interactions. Both strategies can stabilize graphene oxide nanosheets with large dimensions (>300 nm) in biological media, allowing for an enhancement of >250% in the bioconjugation efficiency of streptavidin in comparison to untreated nanosheets. Notably, both strategies allow the stabilized nanosheets to be readily uptake by cells, demonstrating their excellent performance as potential drug delivery vehicles. PMID:22017285

  12. Surface effects on dynamic stability and loading during outdoor running using wireless trunk accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Schütte, Kurt H; Aeles, Jeroen; De Beéck, Tim Op; van der Zwaard, Babette C; Venter, Rachel; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2016-07-01

    Despite frequently declared benefits of using wireless accelerometers to assess running gait in real-world settings, available research is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate outdoor surface effects on dynamic stability and dynamic loading during running using tri-axial trunk accelerometry. Twenty eight runners (11 highly-trained, 17 recreational) performed outdoor running on three outdoor training surfaces (concrete road, synthetic track and woodchip trail) at self-selected comfortable running speeds. Dynamic postural stability (tri-axial acceleration root mean square (RMS) ratio, step and stride regularity, sample entropy), dynamic loading (impact and breaking peak amplitudes and median frequencies), as well as spatio-temporal running gait measures (step frequency, stance time) were derived from trunk accelerations sampled at 1024Hz. Results from generalized estimating equations (GEE) analysis showed that compared to concrete road, woodchip trail had several significant effects on dynamic stability (higher AP ratio of acceleration RMS, lower ML inter-step and inter-stride regularity), on dynamic loading (downward shift in vertical and AP median frequency), and reduced step frequency (p<0.05). Surface effects were unaffected when both running level and running speed were added as potential confounders. Results suggest that woodchip trails disrupt aspects of dynamic stability and loading that are detectable using a single trunk accelerometer. These results provide further insight into how runners adapt their locomotor biomechanics on outdoor surfaces in situ.

  13. Enhancing Economic Stability Utilizing the High Technologies in Community Colleges: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehnert, Barbara H.; Kurki, Allan W.

    Strategies to enhance the economic stability of community colleges through high technology approaches are discussed in this paper. First, general economic problems facing higher education are identified, and the ways in which they influence community colleges are described. Next, 10 strategies to aid in the economic recovery of community colleges…

  14. Hybrid ultramicroporous materials (HUMs) with enhanced stability and trace carbon capture performance.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amrit; Hua, Carol; Madden, David G; O'Nolan, Daniel; Chen, Kai-Jie; Keane, Lee-Ann J; Perry, John J; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2017-05-30

    Fine-tuning of HUMs through pillar substitution can significantly enhance trace CO2 sorption performance and stability. The resulting materials, exemplified by the new material TIFSIX-3-Ni, [Ni(pyrazine)2(TiF6)]n, are shown through temperature programmed desorption experiments to remove trace quantities of CO2 from moist gas mixtures.

  15. Origin of Activity and Stability Enhancement for Ag3PO4 Photocatalyst after Calcination

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Pengyu; Hou, Guihua; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Xinjiang; Tian, Hao; Xu, Fenghua; Xi, Xinguo; Shao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Pristine Ag3PO4 microspheres were synthesized by a co-precipitation method, followed by being calcined at different temperatures to obtain a series of calcined Ag3PO4 photocatalysts. This work aims to investigate the origin of activity and stability enhancement for Ag3PO4 photocatalyst after calcination based on the systematical analyses of the structures, morphologies, chemical states of elements, oxygen defects, optical absorption properties, separation and transfer of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, and active species. The results indicate that oxygen vacancies (VO˙˙) are created and metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are formed by the reaction of partial Ag+ in Ag3PO4 semiconductor with the thermally excited electrons from Ag3PO4 and then deposited on the surface of Ag3PO4 microspheres during the calcination process. Among the calcined Ag3PO4 samples, the Ag3PO4-200 sample exhibits the best photocatalytic activity and greatly enhanced photocatalytic stability for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) solution under visible light irradiation. Oxygen vacancies play a significantly positive role in the enhancement of photocatalytic activity, while metallic Ag has a very important effect on improving the photocatalytic stability. Overall, the present work provides some powerful evidences and a deep understanding on the origin of activity and stability enhancement for the Ag3PO4 photocatalyst after calcination. PMID:28774088

  16. Enhancing Economic Stability Utilizing the High Technologies in Community Colleges: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehnert, Barbara H.; Kurki, Allan W.

    Strategies to enhance the economic stability of community colleges through high technology approaches are discussed in this paper. First, general economic problems facing higher education are identified, and the ways in which they influence community colleges are described. Next, 10 strategies to aid in the economic recovery of community colleges…

  17. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide binding enhances virion stability and promotes environmental fitness of an enteric virus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Christopher M; Jesudhasan, Palmy R; Pfeiffer, Julie K

    2014-01-15

    Enteric viruses, including poliovirus and reovirus, encounter a vast microbial community in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, which has been shown to promote virus replication and pathogenesis. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we find that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, which enhances virion stability and cell attachment by increasing binding to the viral receptor. Additionally, we identified a poliovirus mutant, VP1-T99K, with reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding. Although T99K and WT poliovirus cell attachment, replication, and pathogenesis in mice are equivalent, VP1-T99K poliovirus was unstable in feces following peroral inoculation of mice. Consequently, the ratio of mutant virus in feces is reduced following additional cycles of infection in mice. Thus, the mutant virus incurs a fitness cost when environmental stability is a factor. These data suggest that poliovirus binds bacterial surface polysaccharides, enhancing cell attachment and environmental stability, potentially promoting transmission to a new host.

  18. Deformation-enhanced thermal stability of an amorphous Fe80B20 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, G. J.; Quan, M. X.; Hu, Z. Q.

    1996-11-01

    By means of differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) measurements, the thermal stability of an amorphous Fe80B20 alloy after various periods of low-energy ball milling has been studied. The results indicate that the thermal stability of the amorphous Fe80B20 ribbons can be enhanced upon mechanical deformation with a low milling intensity. The crystallization temperature Tp, the crystallization enthalpy ΔH, and the crystallization activation energy Ex increase with milling time. The above observations will be compared with our previous findings that extensive mechanical deformation with a high milling intensity can otherwise induce a structural relaxation in an amorphous Fe80B20 alloy. Based on conventional thermodynamic and kinetic arguments, a reasonable interpretation will be made to explain the enhanced thermal stability of the amorphous Fe80B20 alloy after mechanical deformation.

  19. Salts Enhance Both Protein Stability and Amyloid Formation of an Immunoglobulin Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Sikkink, Laura A.; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with sulfated glycosaminoglycans in the extracellular matrix. The presence of sulfated glycosaminoglycans is known to promote amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, with the sulfate groups playing a role in this process. In order to understand the role that sulfate plays in amyloid formation, we have studied the effect of salts from the Hofmeister series on the protein structure, stability and amyloid formation of an amyloidogenic light chain protein, AL-12. We have been able to show for the first time a direct correlation between protein stability and amyloid formation enhancement by salts from the Hofmeister series, where SO42−conferred the most protein stability and enhancement of amyloid formation. Our study emphasizes the importance of the effect of ions in the protein bound water properties and downplays the role of specific interactions between the protein and ions. PMID:18395318

  20. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  1. Dynamic stabilization methods for bilateral control of remote manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handlykken, M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper discusses and analyses several control strategies for generalized, bilateral master/slave manipulator systems. In these manipulators the two arms have different dynamic/kinematic properties which implies a more difficult control problem. Attention is focused on torque/force driven arms. Required performance for the necessary control computer(s) is discussed.

  2. Effect of speed on local dynamic stability of locomotion under different task constraints in running.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated effects of speed on local dynamic stability of walking, although this relationship has been rarely investigated under changing task constraints, such as during forward and backward running. To rectify this gap in the literature, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of running speed on local dynamic stability of forward and backward running on a treadmill. Fifteen healthy male participants took part in this study. Participants ran in forward and backward directions at speeds of 80%, 100% and 120% of their preferred running speed. The three-dimensional motion of a C7 marker was recorded using a motion capture system. Local dynamic stability of the marker was quantified using short- and long-term largest finite-time Lyapunov exponents (LyE). Results showed that short-term largest finite-time LyE values increased with participant speed meaning that local dynamic stability decreased with increasing speed. Long-term largest finite-time LyEs, however, remained unaffected as speed increased. Results of this study indicated that, as in walking, slow running is more stable than fast running. These findings improve understanding of how stability is regulated when constraints on the speed of movements is altered. Implications for the design of rehabilitation or sport practice programmes suggest how task constraints could be manipulated to facilitate adaptations in locomotion stability during athletic training.

  3. Enhancement of Frequency Stability Using Synchronization of a Cantilever Array for MEMS-Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Torres, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Riverola, Martí; Sobreviela, Guillermo; Barniol, Núria

    2016-10-13

    Micro and nano electromechanical resonators have been widely used as single or multiple-mass detection sensors. Smaller devices with higher resonance frequencies and lower masses offer higher mass responsivities but suffer from lower frequency stability. Synchronization phenomena in multiple MEMS resonators have become an important issue because they allow frequency stability improvement, thereby preserving mass responsivity. The authors present an array of five cantilevers (CMOS-MEMS system) that are forced to vibrate synchronously to enhance their frequency stability. The frequency stability has been determined in closed-loop configuration for long periods of time by calculating the Allan deviation. An Allan deviation of 0.013 ppm (@ 1 s averaging time) for a 1 MHz cantilever array MEMS system was obtained at the synchronized mode, which represents a 23-fold improvement in comparison with the non-synchronized operation mode (0.3 ppm).

  4. Enhanced toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with increased plasma density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shikui; Zhu, Ping; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-01

    Toroidal flow alone is generally thought to have an important influence on tokamak edge pedestal stability, even though theoretical analysis often predicts merely a weak stabilizing effect of toroidal flow on the edge localized modes (ELMs) in experimental parameter regimes. For the first time, we find from two-fluid MHD calculations that such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced by increasing the edge plasma density. Our finding resolves a long-standing mystery whether or how toroidal rotation can indeed have an effective influence on ELMs, and explains why the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation are more favorably achieved in higher collisionality regime in recent experiments. The finding suggests a new control scheme on modulating toroidal flow stabilization of ELMs with plasma density, along with a new additional constraint on the optimal level of plasma density for the desired edge plasma conditions.

  5. A Nonlinear Excitation Controller Design Method for Terminal Voltage Regulation and Transient Stability Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chongxin; Zhang, Kaifeng; Dai, Xianzhong; Zang, Qiang

    2014-06-01

    This paper proposes a cascade control method to design a nonlinear excitation controller to guarantee the terminal voltage regulation and the transient stability. Firstly, a nonlinear automatic voltage regulator (NAVR) in the inner loop is designed to control the terminal voltage exactly. Secondly, the generator model including the NAVR is transformed to be a reduced one. Subsequently, based on the reduced generator model, the nonlinear power system stabilizer in the external loop is designed to enhance the transient stability of the power systems. Furthermore, a coordination strategy is presented to improve the performances of the terminal voltage regulation in the steady state and the stability in the transient state. Finally, the proposed method is verified by numerous simulation results.

  6. Enhancement of Frequency Stability Using Synchronization of a Cantilever Array for MEMS-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Riverola, Martí; Sobreviela, Guillermo; Barniol, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Micro and nano electromechanical resonators have been widely used as single or multiple-mass detection sensors. Smaller devices with higher resonance frequencies and lower masses offer higher mass responsivities but suffer from lower frequency stability. Synchronization phenomena in multiple MEMS resonators have become an important issue because they allow frequency stability improvement, thereby preserving mass responsivity. The authors present an array of five cantilevers (CMOS-MEMS system) that are forced to vibrate synchronously to enhance their frequency stability. The frequency stability has been determined in closed-loop configuration for long periods of time by calculating the Allan deviation. An Allan deviation of 0.013 ppm (@ 1 s averaging time) for a 1 MHz cantilever array MEMS system was obtained at the synchronized mode, which represents a 23-fold improvement in comparison with the non-synchronized operation mode (0.3 ppm). PMID:27754377

  7. Nyquist and Bode stability criteria to assess changes in dynamic knee stability in healthy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed individuals during walking.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kristin D; Zheng, Yanbing; Bush, Heather; Noehren, Brian

    2016-06-14

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are one of the most frequently injured knee ligaments. Despite reconstruction, many individuals report difficulty returning to high level activities that require greater dynamic stability. Since few methods have been tested to assess dynamic stability post ACL reconstruction (ACLR), the purpose of this study was to evaluate between and within dynamic knee stability in control and ACLR individuals using Nyquist and Bode stability criteria. Sixteen control and sixteen post ACLR individuals performed a walking protocol. Nyquist and Bode stability criteria were implemented to classify and quantify individual step-to-step sagittal plane dynamic knee stability from the gait waveforms at initial contact, 15% and 30% of stance based on the resulting gain and phase margins. An ANOVA compared differences in phase margins between the control and ACLR limbs and found that the ACLR limbs were overall significantly more unstable than the non-reconstructed and control limbs (p=0.001). The results indicated that the ACLR individuals who exhibited stable steps adopted a more compensatory strategy aimed to stabilize the knee. These methods of evaluating dynamic knee stability may help clinicians to assess dynamic knee stability progression throughout rehabilitation and help assess return-to-sport with minimal risk to the individual. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Effects of Balance Training on Static and Dynamic Postural Stability Indices After Acute ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Asghar; Ghiasi, Fateme; Mir, Mohsen; Hosseinifar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proprioception and postural stability play an important role in knee movements. However, there are controversies about the overall recovery time of proprioception following knee surgery and onset of balance and neuromuscular training after ACL reconstruction. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the effect of balance training in early stage of knee rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of balance exercises on postural stability indices in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Methods: The study was a controlled randomized trial study. Twenty four patients who had ACL reconstructed (balance training group) and twenty four healthy adults without any knee injury (control group) were recruited in the study. The balance exercises group performed balance exercises for 2 weeks. Before and after the interventions, overall, anteroposterior, and mediolateral stability indices were measured with a Biodex Balance System in bilateral and unilateral stance positions with the eyes open and closed. T-tests were used for statistical analysis (p<0.05). Results: Results showed that amount of static stability indices did not change after training and there were not significant differences in static stability indices before and after balance training (p>0.05). Although amount of dynamic stability indices decreased, there were not significant differences in dynamic stability indices before and after balance training (p>0.05). Amount of dynamic stability indices were decreased in balance training group, however, there were not significant differences between groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: These results support that balance exercise could partially improved dynamic stability indices in early stage of ACL reconstruction rehabilitation. The results of this study suggest that balance exercises should be part of the rehabilitation program following ACL reconstruction. PMID

  9. Steady-State Computation of Constant Rotational Rate Dynamic Stability Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Green, Lawrence L.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic stability derivatives are essential to predicting the open and closed loop performance, stability, and controllability of aircraft. Computational determination of constant-rate dynamic stability derivatives (derivatives of aircraft forces and moments with respect to constant rotational rates) is currently performed indirectly with finite differencing of multiple time-accurate computational fluid dynamics solutions. Typical time-accurate solutions require excessive amounts of computational time to complete. Formulating Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations in a rotating noninertial reference frame and applying an automatic differentiation tool to the modified code has the potential for directly computing these derivatives with a single, much faster steady-state calculation. The ability to rapidly determine static and dynamic stability derivatives by computational methods can benefit multidisciplinary design methodologies and reduce dependency on wind tunnel measurements. The CFL3D thin-layer N-S computational fluid dynamics code was modified for this study to allow calculations on complex three-dimensional configurations with constant rotation rate components in all three axes. These CFL3D modifications also have direct application to rotorcraft and turbomachinery analyses. The modified CFL3D steady-state calculation is a new capability that showed excellent agreement with results calculated by a similar formulation. The application of automatic differentiation to CFL3D allows the static stability and body-axis rate derivatives to be calculated quickly and exactly.

  10. Arms Transfers: A System Dynamics Analysis Focusing on Regional Stability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    73 IS OSOLET E . .. JILASSIIE]L.. SECURITY C14 A :PIrATInN (.S TWIM 04rc.- .- l° AFIT/GOR/OS/83D-8 ARMS TRANSFERS: A SYSTEM DYNA’ICS ALYSIS FOCUSING...regional stability. 5. Provide guidance and instructions on how to use and alter the model for specific policy analysis. Scot e This research is...a system, and that not all societal groups are the same. Durkheim insisted that his theory of anowia must be interpreted frorr a contingency point of

  11. Stability of numerical integration techniques for transient rotor dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    A finite element model of a rotor bearing system was analyzed to determine the stability limits of the forward, backward, and centered Euler; Runge-Kutta; Milne; and Adams numerical integration techniques. The analysis concludes that the highest frequency mode determines the maximum time step for a stable solution. Thus, the number of mass elements should be minimized. Increasing the damping can sometimes cause numerical instability. For a uniform shaft, with 10 mass elements, operating at approximately the first critical speed, the maximum time step for the Runge-Kutta, Milne, and Adams methods is that which corresponds to approximately 1 degree of shaft movement. This is independent of rotor dimensions.

  12. Criterion for stability of a special relativistically covariant dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Zucker, D.

    2017-03-01

    We study classically the problem of two relativistic particles with an invariant Duffing-like potential which reduces to the usual Duffing form in the nonrelativistic limit. We use a special relativistic generalization (RGEM) of the geometric method (GEM) developed for the analysis of nonrelativistic Hamiltonian systems to study the local stability of a relativistic Duffing oscillator. Poincaré plots of the simulated motion are consistent with the RGEM. We find a threshold for the external driving force required for chaotic behavior in the Minkowski spacetime.

  13. Enhanced dynamic range in a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shun; He, Jun; Jin, Honglin; Yang, Fei; Lu, Jinling; Yang, Jie

    2011-08-19

    Genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) indicators are powerful tools for real-time detection of second messenger molecules and activation of signal proteins. However, these fluorescent protein-based sensors typically display marginal FRET efficiency. To improve their FRET efficiency for optical imaging and screening, we developed a number of fluorescent protein mutants based on cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). To improve FRET ratios, which were initially within a narrow dynamic range, we used DNA shuffling to develop a new FRET pair called 3xCFP/Venus. The optimized 3xCFP/Venus pair exhibited higher FRET ratios than CyPet/YPet, which has one of the greatest dynamic ranges of protein-based FRET pairs. We converted this FRET pair to a Ca(2+) FRET indicators using circular permutation Venus (cpVenus) linked with 3xCFP to form 3xCFP/cpVenus, which displayed an ∼11-fold change in dynamic range in response to Ca(2+) binding. The enhanced dynamic range for Ca(2+) concentration detection using 3xCFP/cpVenus was confirmed in PC12 cells using previously established indicators (TN-XXL, ECFP/cpCitrine). To our knowledge, this FRET pair displays the largest dynamic range so far among genetically-encoded sensors, and can be used for sensitive FRET detection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Balancing the stability and the catalytic specificities of OP hydrolases with enhanced V-agent activities.

    PubMed

    Reeves, T E; Wales, M E; Grimsley, J K; Li, P; Cerasoli, D M; Wild, J R

    2008-06-01

    Rational site-directed mutagenesis and biophysical analyses have been used to explore the thermodynamic stability and catalytic capabilities of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and its genetically modified variants. There are clear trade-offs in the stability of modifications that enhance catalytic activities. For example, the H254R/H257L variant has higher turnover numbers for the chemical warfare agents VX (144 versus 14 s(-1) for the native enzyme (wild type) and VR (Russian VX, 465 versus 12 s(-1) for wild type). These increases are accompanied by a loss in stability in which the total Gibb's free energy for unfolding is 19.6 kcal/mol, which is 5.7 kcal/mol less than that of the wild-type enzyme. X-ray crystallographic studies support biophysical data that suggest amino acid residues near the active site contribute to the chemical and thermal stability through hydrophobic and cation-pi interactions. The cation-pi interactions appear to contribute an additional 7 kcal/mol to the overall global stability of the enzyme. Using rational design, it has been possible to make amino acid changes in this region that restored the stability, yet maintained effective V-agent activities, with turnover numbers of 68 and 36 s(-1) for VX and VR, respectively. This study describes the first rationally designed, stability/activity balance for an OPH enzyme with a legitimate V-agent activity, and its crystal structure.

  15. Concert halls with strong lateral reflections enhance musical dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pätynen, Jukka; Tervo, Sakari; Robinson, Philip W.; Lokki, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    One of the most thrilling cultural experiences is to hear live symphony-orchestra music build up from a whispering passage to a monumental fortissimo. The impact of such a crescendo has been thought to depend only on the musicians’ skill, but here we show that interactions between the concert-hall acoustics and listeners’ hearing also play a major role in musical dynamics. These interactions contribute to the shoebox-type concert hall’s established success, but little prior research has been devoted to dynamic expression in this three-part transmission chain as a complete system. More forceful orchestral playing disproportionately excites high frequency harmonics more than those near the note’s fundamental. This effect results in not only more sound energy, but also a different tone color. The concert hall transmits this sound, and the room geometry defines from which directions acoustic reflections arrive at the listener. Binaural directional hearing emphasizes high frequencies more when sound arrives from the sides of the head rather than from the median plane. Simultaneously, these same frequencies are emphasized by higher orchestral-playing dynamics. When the room geometry provides reflections from these directions, the perceived dynamic range is enhanced. Current room-acoustic evaluation methods assume linear behavior and thus neglect this effect. The hypothesis presented here is that the auditory excitation by reflections is emphasized with an orchestra forte most in concert halls with strong lateral reflections. The enhanced dynamic range provides an explanation for the success of rectangularly shaped concert-hall geometry. PMID:24591584

  16. The effects of sensory loss and walking speed on the orbital dynamic stability of human walking.

    PubMed

    Dingwell, Jonathan B; Kang, Hyun Gu; Marin, Laura C

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral sensory feedback is believed to contribute significantly to maintaining walking stability. Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy have a greatly increased risk of falling. Previously, we demonstrated that slower walking speeds in neuropathic patients lead to improved local dynamic stability. However, all subjects exhibited significant local instability during walking, even though no subject fell or stumbled during testing. The present study was conducted to determine if and how significant changes in peripheral sensation and walking speed affect orbital stability during walking. Trunk and lower extremity kinematics were examined from two prior experiments that compared patients with significant neuropathy to healthy controls and walking at multiple different speeds in young healthy subjects. Maximum Floquet multipliers were computed for each time series to quantify the orbital stability of these movements. All subjects exhibited orbitally stable walking kinematics, even though these same kinematics were previously shown to be locally unstable. Differences in orbital stability between neuropathic and control subjects were small and, with the exception of knee joint movements (p=0.001), not statistically significant (0.380p0.946). Differences in knee orbital stability were not mediated by differences in walking speed. This was supported by our finding that although orbital stability improved slightly with slower walking speeds, the correlations between walking speed and orbital stability were generally weak (r(2)16.7%). Thus, neuropathic patients do not gain improved orbital stability as a result of slowing down and do not experience any loss of orbital stability because of their sensory deficits.

  17. Allosteric Regulation of the Hsp90 Dynamics and Stability by Client Recruiter Cochaperones: Protein Structure Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Kristin; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental role of the Hsp90 chaperone in supporting functional activity of diverse protein clients is anchored by specific cochaperones. A family of immune sensing client proteins is delivered to the Hsp90 system with the aid of cochaperones Sgt1 and Rar1 that act cooperatively with Hsp90 to form allosterically regulated dynamic complexes. In this work, functional dynamics and protein structure network modeling are combined to dissect molecular mechanisms of Hsp90 regulation by the client recruiter cochaperones. Dynamic signatures of the Hsp90-cochaperone complexes are manifested in differential modulation of the conformational mobility in the Hsp90 lid motif. Consistent with the experiments, we have determined that targeted reorganization of the lid dynamics is a unifying characteristic of the client recruiter cochaperones. Protein network analysis of the essential conformational space of the Hsp90-cochaperone motions has identified structurally stable interaction communities, interfacial hubs and key mediating residues of allosteric communication pathways that act concertedly with the shifts in conformational equilibrium. The results have shown that client recruiter cochaperones can orchestrate global changes in the dynamics and stability of the interaction networks that could enhance the ATPase activity and assist in the client recruitment. The network analysis has recapitulated a broad range of structural and mutagenesis experiments, particularly clarifying the elusive role of Rar1 as a regulator of the Hsp90 interactions and a stability enhancer of the Hsp90-cochaperone complexes. Small-world organization of the interaction networks in the Hsp90 regulatory complexes gives rise to a strong correspondence between highly connected local interfacial hubs, global mediator residues of allosteric interactions and key functional hot spots of the Hsp90 activity. We have found that cochaperone-induced conformational changes in Hsp90 may be determined by specific

  18. A Robust Stability and Control Theory for Hybrid Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    in hybrid systems via detectability and an invariance principle ", Sanfelice, R.G.; Goebel, R.; Teel, A.R., Proceedings of the 2005 American Control...34, submitted to ESAIM:COCV (Control, Optimisation, and Calculus of Variations), 2006. R.G. Sanfelice, R. Goebel, and A.R. Teel, " Invariance principles for...developed the most general version of LaSalle’s invariance principle that is available for hybrid dynamical systems. In our result, uniqueness of

  19. Combined analytical and numerical approaches in Dynamic Stability analyses of engineering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Náprstek, Jiří

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic Stability is a widely studied area that has attracted many researchers from various disciplines. Although Dynamic Stability is usually associated with mechanics, theoretical physics or other natural and technical disciplines, it is also relevant to social, economic, and philosophical areas of our lives. Therefore, it is useful to occasionally highlight the general aspects of this amazing area, to present some relevant examples and to evaluate its position among the various branches of Rational Mechanics. From this perspective, the aim of this study is to present a brief review concerning the Dynamic Stability problem, its basic definitions and principles, important phenomena, research motivations and applications in engineering. The relationships with relevant systems that are prone to stability loss (encountered in other areas such as physics, other natural sciences and engineering) are also noted. The theoretical background, which is applicable to many disciplines, is presented. In this paper, the most frequently used Dynamic Stability analysis methods are presented in relation to individual dynamic systems that are widely discussed in various engineering branches. In particular, the Lyapunov function and exponent procedures, Routh-Hurwitz, Liénard, and other theorems are outlined together with demonstrations. The possibilities for analytical and numerical procedures are mentioned together with possible feedback from experimental research and testing. The strengths and shortcomings of these approaches are evaluated together with examples of their effective complementing of each other. The systems that are widely encountered in engineering are presented in the form of mathematical models. The analyses of their Dynamic Stability and post-critical behaviour are also presented. The stability limits, bifurcation points, quasi-periodic response processes and chaotic regimes are discussed. The limit cycle existence and stability are examined together with their

  20. Phase Stability and Dynamics of nanoparticles in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangal, Rahul; Srivastava, Samanvaya; Archer, Lynden

    In polymer nanocomposites, polymer grafted nanoparticles, where the tethered polymer chains are chemically identical to the host chains, have been reported to irreversibly aggregate if the length of host chains (P) become 5 or more times larger than the length tethered chains (N) due to the autophobic dewetting of the polymer brush. Utilizing Small Angle X-ray scattering as a tool, here we show that by choosing appropriate chemistry one can utilize the enthalpic attractions between the tethered chains and host chains to facilitate uniform nanoparticle dispersion in very large Mw hosts (P/N ~140). A generic phase diagram has also been proposed. Xray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) is employed as a sensitive probe of nanoparticle relaxation dynamics to investigate particle dynamics in these model PNCs. Remarkably, we find that for nanoparticle size D , slightly larger than the tube diameter of the host polymer (a) , particles undergo a transition from normal diffusion to hyperdiffusive relaxation dynamics,. In contrast, for unentangled hosts, diffusive particle relaxation are observed. Our experimental observations are rationalized by finding that nanoparticle motion in entangled melts only disturb sub-chain entangled segments of size comparable to the particle diameter.

  1. Dynamic Flux Tubes Form Reservoirs of Stability in Neuronal Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteforte, Michael; Wolf, Fred

    2012-10-01

    Neurons in cerebral cortical circuits interact by sending and receiving electrical impulses called spikes. The ongoing spiking activity of cortical circuits is fundamental to many cognitive functions including sensory processing, working memory, and decision making. London et al. [Sensitivity to Perturbations In Vivo Implies High Noise and Suggests Rate Coding in Cortex, Nature (London)NATUAS0028-0836 466, 123 (2010).10.1038/nature09086] recently argued that even a single additional spike can cause a cascade of extra spikes that rapidly decorrelate the microstate of the network. Here, we show theoretically in a minimal model of cortical neuronal circuits that single-spike perturbations trigger only a very weak rate response. Nevertheless, single-spike perturbations are found to rapidly decorrelate the microstate of the network, although the dynamics is stable with respect to small perturbations. The coexistence of stable and unstable dynamics results from a system of exponentially separating dynamic flux tubes around stable trajectories in the network’s phase space. The radius of these flux tubes appears to decrease algebraically with neuron number N and connectivity K, which implies that the entropy of the circuit’s repertoire of state sequences scales as Nln⁡(KN).

  2. CTCF and cohesin regulate chromatin loop stability with distinct dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anders S; Pustova, Iryna; Cattoglio, Claudia; Tjian, Robert; Darzacq, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Folding of mammalian genomes into spatial domains is critical for gene regulation. The insulator protein CTCF and cohesin control domain location by folding domains into loop structures, which are widely thought to be stable. Combining genomic and biochemical approaches we show that CTCF and cohesin co-occupy the same sites and physically interact as a biochemically stable complex. However, using single-molecule imaging we find that CTCF binds chromatin much more dynamically than cohesin (~1–2 min vs. ~22 min residence time). Moreover, after unbinding, CTCF quickly rebinds another cognate site unlike cohesin for which the search process is long (~1 min vs. ~33 min). Thus, CTCF and cohesin form a rapidly exchanging 'dynamic complex' rather than a typical stable complex. Since CTCF and cohesin are required for loop domain formation, our results suggest that chromatin loops are dynamic and frequently break and reform throughout the cell cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25776.001 PMID:28467304

  3. Flexible body dynamic stability for high performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, E. A.; Youssef, H. M.; Apelian, C. V.; Schroeder, S. C.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic equations which include the effects of unsteady aerodynamic forces and a flexible body structure were developed for a free flying high performance fighter aircraft. The linear and angular deformations are assumed to be small in the body reference frame, allowing the equations to be linearized in the deformation variables. Equations for total body dynamics and flexible body dynamics are formulated using the hybrid coordinate method and integrated in a state space format. A detailed finite element model of a generic high performance fighter aircraft is used to generate the mass and stiffness matrices. Unsteady aerodynamics are represented by a rational function approximation of the doublet lattice matrices. The equations simplify for the case of constant angular rate of the body reference frame, allowing the effect of roll rate to be studied by computing the eigenvalues of the system. It is found that the rigid body modes of the aircraft are greatly affected by introducing a constant roll rate, while the effect on the flexible modes is minimal for this configuration.

  4. Characterization of Enhancing MS Lesions by Dynamic Texture Parameter Analysis of Dynamic Susceptibility Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev K.; Slotboom, Johannes; Locher, Cäcilia; Heldner, Mirjam R.; Weisstanner, Christian; Abela, Eugenio; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; Zbinden, Martin; Kamm, Christian P.; Wiest, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate statistical differences with MR perfusion imaging features that reflect the dynamics of Gadolinium-uptake in MS lesions using dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA). Methods. We investigated 51 MS lesions (25 enhancing, 26 nonenhancing lesions) of 12 patients. Enhancing lesions (n = 25) were prestratified into enhancing lesions with increased permeability (EL+; n = 11) and enhancing lesions with subtle permeability (EL−; n = 14). Histogram-based feature maps were computed from the raw DSC-image time series and the corresponding texture parameters were analyzed during the inflow, outflow, and reperfusion time intervals. Results. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between EL+ and EL− and between EL+ and nonenhancing inactive lesions (NEL). Main effects between EL+ versus EL− and EL+ versus NEL were observed during reperfusion (mainly in mean and standard deviation (SD): EL+ versus EL− and EL+ versus NEL), while EL− and NEL differed only in their SD during outflow. Conclusion. DTPA allows grading enhancing MS lesions according to their perfusion characteristics. Texture parameters of EL− were similar to NEL, while EL+ differed significantly from EL− and NEL. Dynamic texture analysis may thus be further investigated as noninvasive endogenous marker of lesion formation and restoration. PMID:26885524

  5. Influence of point defects and impurities on the dynamical stability of δ-plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorado, B.; Bieder, J.; Torrent, M.

    2017-06-01

    We use first-principles calculations to provide direct evidence of the effect of aluminum, gallium, iron and uranium on the dynamical stability of δ-plutonium. We first show that the δ phase is dynamically unstable at low temperature, as seen in experiments, and that this stability directly depends on the plutonium 5f orbital occupancies. Then, we demonstrate that both aluminum and gallium stabilize the δ phase, contrary to iron. As for uranium, which is created during self-irradiation and whose effect on plutonium has yet to be understood, we show that it leaves a few unstable vibrational modes and that higher concentrations lead to an almost complete stabilization. Finally, we provide an attempt at a consistent analysis of the experimental Pu-Ga phonon density of states. We show that the presence of gallium can reproduce only partially the experimental measurements, and we investigate how point defects, such as interstitials and vacancies, affect the calculated phonon density of states.

  6. Stability of linear dynamic systems over the packet erasure channel: a co-design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Alireza

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the stability of linear time-invariant dynamic systems over the packet erasure channel subject to minimum bit rate constraint when an encoder and a decoder are unaware of the control signal. This assumption results in co-designing the encoder, decoder and controller. The encoder, decoder, controller and conditions relating transmission rate to packet erasure probability and eigenvalues of the system matrix A are presented for almost sure asymptotic stability of linear time-invariant dynamic systems over the packet erasure channel with feedback acknowledgment. When the eigenvalues of the system matrix A are real valued, it is shown that the obtained condition for stability is tight. Simulation result illustrates the satisfactory performance of the proposed encoder, decoder and controller for almost sure asymptotic stability.

  7. Quantum dynamical simulations of local field enhancement in metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Negre, Christian F A; Perassi, Eduardo M; Coronado, Eduardo A; Sánchez, Cristián G

    2013-03-27

    Field enhancements (Γ) around small Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are calculated using a quantum dynamical simulation formalism and the results are compared with electrodynamic simulations using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) in order to address the important issue of the intrinsic atomistic structure of NPs. Quite remarkably, in both quantum and classical approaches the highest values of Γ are located in the same regions around single NPs. However, by introducing a complete atomistic description of the metallic NPs in optical simulations, a different pattern of the Γ distribution is obtained. Knowing the correct pattern of the Γ distribution around NPs is crucial for understanding the spectroscopic features of molecules inside hot spots. The enhancement produced by surface plasmon coupling is studied by using both approaches in NP dimers for different inter-particle distances. The results show that the trend of the variation of Γ versus inter-particle distance is different for classical and quantum simulations. This difference is explained in terms of a charge transfer mechanism that cannot be obtained with classical electrodynamics. Finally, time dependent distribution of the enhancement factor is simulated by introducing a time dependent field perturbation into the Hamiltonian, allowing an assessment of the localized surface plasmon resonance quantum dynamics.

  8. Enhancement of colour stability of anthocyanins in model beverages by gum arabic addition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2016-06-15

    This study investigated the potential of gum arabic to improve the stability of anthocyanins that are used in commercial beverages as natural colourants. The degradation of purple carrot anthocyanin in model beverage systems (pH 3.0) containing L-ascorbic acid proceeded with a first-order reaction rate during storage (40 °C for 5 days in light). The addition of gum arabic (0.05-5.0%) significantly enhanced the colour stability of anthocyanin, with the most stable systems observed at intermediate levels (1.5%). A further increase in concentration (>1.5%) reduced its efficacy due to a change in the conformation of the gum arabic molecules that hindered their exposure to the anthocyanins. Fluorescence quenching measurements showed that the anthocyanin could have interacted with the glycoprotein fractions of the gum arabic through hydrogen bonding, resulting in enhanced stability. Overall, this study provides valuable information about enhancing the stability of anthocyanins in beverage systems using natural ingredients.

  9. Enhancing Intrinsic Stability of Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cell by Strong, yet Balanced, Electronic Coupling

    PubMed Central

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Bentria, El Tayeb; Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the meteoric development of hybrid organic–inorganic perovskite solar cells (PSC) astonished the community. The efficiency has already reached the level needed for commercialization; however, the instability hinders its deployment on the market. Here, we report a mechanism to chemically stabilize PSC absorbers. We propose to replace the widely used methylammonium cation (CH3NH3+) by alternative molecular cations allowing an enhanced electronic coupling between the cation and the PbI6 octahedra while maintaining the band gap energy within the suitable range for solar cells. The mechanism exploits establishing a balance between the electronegativity of the materials’ constituents and the resulting ionic electrostatic interactions. The calculations demonstrate the concept of enhancing the electronic coupling, and hence the stability, by exploring the stabilizing features of CH3PH3+, CH3SH2+, and SH3+ cations, among several other possible candidates. Chemical stability enhancement hence results from a strong, yet balanced, electronic coupling between the cation and the halides in the octahedron. This shall unlock the hindering instability problem for PSCs and allow them to hit the market as a serious low-cost competitor to silicon based solar cell technologies. PMID:27457130

  10. Enhancing Intrinsic Stability of Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cell by Strong, yet Balanced, Electronic Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Bentria, El Tayeb; Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H.

    2016-07-01

    In the past few years, the meteoric development of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells (PSC) astonished the community. The efficiency has already reached the level needed for commercialization; however, the instability hinders its deployment on the market. Here, we report a mechanism to chemically stabilize PSC absorbers. We propose to replace the widely used methylammonium cation (CH3NH3+) by alternative molecular cations allowing an enhanced electronic coupling between the cation and the PbI6 octahedra while maintaining the band gap energy within the suitable range for solar cells. The mechanism exploits establishing a balance between the electronegativity of the materials’ constituents and the resulting ionic electrostatic interactions. The calculations demonstrate the concept of enhancing the electronic coupling, and hence the stability, by exploring the stabilizing features of CH3PH3+, CH3SH2+, and SH3+ cations, among several other possible candidates. Chemical stability enhancement hence results from a strong, yet balanced, electronic coupling between the cation and the halides in the octahedron. This shall unlock the hindering instability problem for PSCs and allow them to hit the market as a serious low-cost competitor to silicon based solar cell technologies.

  11. VMCast: A VM-Assisted Stability Enhancing Solution for Tree-Based Overlay Multicast

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weidong; Zhang, Xinchang; Gong, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Tree-based overlay multicast is an effective group communication method for media streaming applications. However, a group member’s departure causes all of its descendants to be disconnected from the multicast tree for some time, which results in poor performance. The above problem is difficult to be addressed because overlay multicast tree is intrinsically instable. In this paper, we proposed a novel stability enhancing solution, VMCast, for tree-based overlay multicast. This solution uses two types of on-demand cloud virtual machines (VMs), i.e., multicast VMs (MVMs) and compensation VMs (CVMs). MVMs are used to disseminate the multicast data, whereas CVMs are used to offer streaming compensation. The used VMs in the same cloud datacenter constitute a VM cluster. Each VM cluster is responsible for a service domain (VMSD), and each group member belongs to a specific VMSD. The data source delivers the multicast data to MVMs through a reliable path, and MVMs further disseminate the data to group members along domain overlay multicast trees. The above approach structurally improves the stability of the overlay multicast tree. We further utilized CVM-based streaming compensation to enhance the stability of the data distribution in the VMSDs. VMCast can be used as an extension to existing tree-based overlay multicast solutions, to provide better services for media streaming applications. We applied VMCast to two application instances (i.e., HMTP and HCcast). The results show that it can obviously enhance the stability of the data distribution. PMID:26562152

  12. Enhancing Intrinsic Stability of Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cell by Strong, yet Balanced, Electronic Coupling.

    PubMed

    El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Bentria, El Tayeb; Rashkeev, Sergey N; Kais, Sabre; Alharbi, Fahhad H

    2016-07-26

    In the past few years, the meteoric development of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells (PSC) astonished the community. The efficiency has already reached the level needed for commercialization; however, the instability hinders its deployment on the market. Here, we report a mechanism to chemically stabilize PSC absorbers. We propose to replace the widely used methylammonium cation (CH3NH3(+)) by alternative molecular cations allowing an enhanced electronic coupling between the cation and the PbI6 octahedra while maintaining the band gap energy within the suitable range for solar cells. The mechanism exploits establishing a balance between the electronegativity of the materials' constituents and the resulting ionic electrostatic interactions. The calculations demonstrate the concept of enhancing the electronic coupling, and hence the stability, by exploring the stabilizing features of CH3PH3(+), CH3SH2(+), and SH3(+) cations, among several other possible candidates. Chemical stability enhancement hence results from a strong, yet balanced, electronic coupling between the cation and the halides in the octahedron. This shall unlock the hindering instability problem for PSCs and allow them to hit the market as a serious low-cost competitor to silicon based solar cell technologies.

  13. Enhanced stability of anthocyanin-based color in model beverage systems through whey protein isolate complexation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2015-10-01

    Anthocyanins are often used in functional foods and beverages as colorants and nutraceuticals. However, these natural compounds may undergo chemical degradation during storage leading to color fading and loss of bioactivity. In particular, vitamin C (l-ascorbic acid) is known to accelerate anthocyanin degradation. In this study, the influence of various food-grade biopolymers on the physical and chemical stability of model beverages containing anthocyanin (0.025%), ascorbic acid (0 or 0.05%), and calcium salt (0 or 0.01%) was examined under accelerated conditions (40°C for 7days). Four biopolymers (1%) were examined for their potential to inhibit anthocyanin degradation: native whey protein; denatured whey protein; citrus pectin; and beet pectin. The physical stability was determined by measuring changes in absorbance, color, and visual appearance. Solutions containing anthocyanin and calcium salt (0 or 0.01%) were stable throughout storage, while those with added ascorbic acid were the least stable. The addition of biopolymers, particularly heat denatured whey protein, significantly enhanced the stability of the anthocyanin during storage. Fluorescence quenching studies showed that the anthocyanin may have formed complexes with the whey protein through hydrogen bonding that resulted in their enhanced stability in the presence of ascorbic acid. This study provides information that may improve the stability of anthocyanins in food and beverage systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interplay Between Energy-Market Dynamics and Physical Stability of a Smart Power Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Sergio; Mammoli, Andrea; Sorrentino, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    A smart power grid is being envisioned for the future which, among other features, should enable users to play the dual role of consumers as well as producers and traders of energy, thanks to emerging renewable energy production and energy storage technologies. As a complex dynamical system, any power grid is subject to physical instabilities. With existing grids, such instabilities tend to be caused by natural disasters, human errors, or weather-related peaks in demand. In this work we analyze the impact, upon the stability of a smart grid, of the energy-market dynamics arising from users' ability to buy from and sell energy to other users. The stability analysis of the resulting dynamical system is performed assuming different proposed models for this market of the future, and the corresponding stability regions in parameter space are identified. We test our theoretical findings by comparing them with data collected from some existing prototype systems.

  15. Effect of dual task type on gait and dynamic stability during stair negotiation at different inclinations.

    PubMed

    Madehkhaksar, Forough; Egges, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Stair gait is a common daily activity with great potential risk for falls. Stairs have varying inclinations and people may perform other tasks concurrently with stair gait. This study investigated dual-task interference in the context of complex gait tasks, such as stair gait at different inclinations, a topic about which little is understood. We examined how secondary cognitive and manual tasks interfere with stair gait when a person concurrently performed tasks at different levels of complexity. Gait kinematic data and secondary task performance measures were obtained from fifteen healthy young males while ascending and descending a four-step staircase at three inclinations (17.7°, 29.4°, and 41.5°) as well as level walking. They performed a cognitive task, 'backward digit recall', a manual task, 'carrying a cup of water' and a combination of the two tasks. Gait performance and dynamic stability were assessed by gait speed and whole body center of mass (COM) range of motion in the medial-lateral direction, respectively. No significant effect of the gait task on the cognitive task performance was observed. In contrast, stair walking adversely affected the performance of the manual task compared to level walking. Overall, more difficult postural and secondary tasks resulted in a decrease in gait speed and variation in COM displacement within normal range. Results suggest that COM displacement and gait alterations might be adopted to enhance the stability, and optimize the secondary task performance while walking under challenging circumstances. Our findings are useful for balance and gait evaluation, and for future falls prediction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamical observations of self-stabilizing stationary light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, J. L.; Campbell, G. T.; Cho, Y.-W.; Vernaz-Gris, P.; Higginbottom, D. B.; Pinel, O.; Robins, N. P.; Lam, P. K.; Buchler, B. C.

    2017-01-01

    The precise control of atom-light interactions is vital to many quantum technologies. For instance, atomic systems can be used to slow and store light, acting as a quantum memory. Optical storage can be achieved via stopped light, where no optical energy continues to exist in the atomic system, or as stationary light, where some optical energy remains present during storage. Here, we demonstrate a form of self-stabilizing stationary light. From any initial state, our atom-light system evolves to a stable configuration that may contain bright optical excitations trapped within the atomic ensemble. This phenomenon is verified experimentally in a cloud of cold Rb87 atoms. The spinwave in our atomic cloud is imaged from the side, allowing direct comparison with theoretical predictions.

  17. Orbiting pairs of walking droplets: Dynamics and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Anand U.; Siéfert, Emmanuel; Harris, Daniel M.; Moláček, Jan; Bush, John W. M.

    2017-05-01

    A decade ago, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.154101 discovered that a millimetric droplet sustained on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath may self-propel through a resonant interaction with its own wave field. We here present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the interactions of such walking droplets. Specifically, we delimit experimentally the different regimes for an orbiting pair of identical walkers and extend the theoretical model of Oza et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 737, 552 (2013)], 10.1017/jfm.2013.581 in order to rationalize our observations. A quantitative comparison between experiment and theory highlights the importance of spatial damping of the wave field. Our results also indicate that walkers adapt their impact phase according to the local wave height, an effect that stabilizes orbiting bound states.

  18. The dynamical stability of differentially rotating discs. III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaloizou, J. C. B.; Pringle, J. E.

    1987-03-01

    The numerical calculations of Papaloizou and Pringle (1984) are extended to tori with nonconstant angular momentum, extending the range of differentially rotating tori known to be unstable. Two independent numerical methods agree on the stability borderline around q = 3 exp 1/2 previously derived for low-m modes and slender tori, and indicate its validity for large tori. A Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation is used to investigate modes of high azimuthal wavenumber in an infinite cylindrical torus, confirming the finding of Broadbent and Moore (1979) that radiation losses always act to destabilize modes, though it is noted that the effects rising from the corotation resonance are more important in most cases.

  19. Dynamics of a rolling and sliding disk in a plane. Asymptotic solutions, stability and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylska, Maria; Rauch-Wojciechowski, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We present a qualitative analysis of the dynamics of a rolling and sliding disk in a horizontal plane. It is based on using three classes of asymptotic solutions: straight-line rolling, spinning about a vertical diameter and tumbling solutions. Their linear stability analysis is given and it is complemented with computer simulations of solutions starting in the vicinity of the asymptotic solutions. The results on asymptotic solutions and their linear stability apply also to an annulus and to a hoop.

  20. Investigation of effects of terpene skin penetration enhancers on stability and biological activity of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Varman, Rahul M; Singh, Somnath

    2012-12-01

    The transport of proteins through skin can be facilitated potentially by using terpenes as chemical enhancers. However, we do not know about the effects of these enhancers on the stability and biological activity of proteins which is crucial for the development of safe and efficient formulations. Therefore, this project investigated the effects of terpene-based skin penetration enhancers which are reported as nontoxic to the skin (e.g., limonene, p-cymene, geraniol, farnesol, eugenol, menthol, terpineol, carveol, carvone, fenchone, and verbenone), on the conformational stability and biological activity of a model protein lysozyme. Terpene (5% v/v) was added to lysozyme solution and kept for 24 h (the time normally a transdermal patch remains) for investigating conformational stability profiles and biological activity. Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer was used to analyze different secondary structures, e.g., α-helix, β-sheet, β-turn, and random coil. Conformational changes were also monitored by differential scanning calorimeter by determining midpoint transition temperature (Tm) and calorimetric enthalpy (ΔH). Biological activity of lysozyme was determined by measuring decrease in A (450) when it was added to a suspension of Micrococcus lysodeikticus. The results of this study indicate that terpenes 9, 10, and 11 (carvone, L-fenchone, and L-verbenone) decreased conformational stability and biological activity of lysozyme significantly (p < 0.05) less than other terpenes used in this study. It is concluded that smaller terpenes containing ketones with low lipophilicity (log K (ow) ∼2.00) would be optimal for preserving conformational stability and biological activity of lysozyme in a transdermal formulation containing terpene as permeation enhancer.

  1. Avalanche Dynamics and Stability in Wet Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, Peter; Tegzes, Pal; Vicsek, Tamas

    2002-11-01

    In our previous work, we identified three fundamental regimes for the repose angle of wet granular materials as a function of the liquid content. The granular regime at very low liquid contents is dominated by the motion of individual grains; in the correlated regime corresponding to intermediate liquid contents, a rough surface is formed by the flow of separated clumps; and the repose angle of very wet samples results from cohesive flow with viscoplastic properties. Here we report investigations of the avalanche dynamics and flow properties of wet granular materials, employing a rotating drum apparatus (a cylindrical chamber partly filled with a granular medium and rotated around a horizontal axis). At low rotation rates, the medium remains at rest relative to the drum while its surface angle is slowly increased by rotation, up to a critical angle thetamax where an avalanche occurs, thus decreasing the surface angle to the repose angle thetar The flow becomes continuous at high rotation rates, but the transition between avalanching and continuous flow is hysteretic in rotation rate in dry media. Previous studies of cohesive granular media in a rotating drum have focused on the surface angles of the medium before and after avalanches. In our measurements, we focus instead on characterizing the dynamics of cohesive flow. We quantitatively investigate the flow dynamics during avalanches at different liquid contents by analyzing the time evolution of the averaged surface profile obtained from hundreds of avalanche events, and we also measure surface velocities during continuous flow. In particular, we explore the nature of the viscoplastic flow, (observed at the highest liquid contents) in which there are lasting contacts during flow, leading to coherence across the entire sample. This coherence leads to a velocity independent flow depth at high rotation rates and novel robust pattern formation in the granular surface. Additional information is included in the

  2. Population dynamics and the ecological stability of obligate pollination mutualisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    Mutualistic interactions almost always produce both costs and benefits for each of the interacting species. It is the difference between gross benefits and costs that determines the net benefit and the per-capita effect on each of the interacting populations. For example, the net benefit of obligate pollinators, such as yucca and senita moths, to plants is determined by the difference between the number of ovules fertilized from moth pollination and the number of ovules eaten by the pollinator's larvae. It is clear that if pollinator populations are large, then, because many eggs are laid, costs to plants are large, whereas, if pollinator populations are small, gross benefits are low due to lack of pollination. Even though the size and dynamics of the pollinator population are likely to be crucial, their importance has been neglected in the investigation of mechanisms, such as selective fruit abortion, that can limit costs and increase net benefits. Here, we suggest that both the population size and dynamics of pollinators are important in determining the net benefits to plants, and that fruit abortion can significantly affect these. We develop a model of mutualism between populations of plants and their pollinating seed-predators to explore the ecological consequences of fruit abortion on pollinator population dynamics and the net effect on plants. We demonstrate that the benefit to a plant population is unimodal as a function of pollinator abundance, relative to the abundance of flowers. Both selective abortion of fruit with eggs and random abortion of fruit, without reference to whether they have eggs or not, can limit pollinator population size. This can increase the net benefits to the plant population by limiting the number of eggs laid, if the pollination rate remains high. However, fruit abortion can possibly destabilize the pollinator population, with negative consequences for the plant population.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of a driven mode near marginal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Pekker, M.

    1995-09-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a linearly unstable mode in a driven kinetic system is investigated to determine scaling of the saturated fields near the instability threshold. To leading order, this problem reduces to solving an integral equation with a temporally nonlocal cubic term. This equation can exhibit a self-similar solution that blows up in a finite time. When the blow-up occurs, higher nonlinearities become important and the mode saturates due to plateau formation arising from particle trapping in the wave. Otherwise, the simplified equation gives a regular solution that leads to a different saturation scaling reflecting the closeness to the instability threshold.

  4. Dynamics of column stability with partial end restraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of columns with partial end restraints and loads consisting of a dead load and a pulsating load are investigated. The differential equation is solved using a lumped impulse recurrence formula relative to time coupled with a finite difference discretization along the member length. A computer program is written from which the first critical frequencies are found as a function of end stiffness. The case of a pinned ended column compares very well with the exact solution. Also, the natural frequency and buckling load formulas are derived for equal and unequal end restraints.

  5. Textured (100) yttria-stabilized zirconia thin films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzschuh, H.; Suhr, H.

    1991-07-01

    Thin films of yttria-stabilized zirconia were deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on quartz Si(100), Si(111), Ni, and the steels V2A and Hastelloy at substrate temperatures (Ts): 673-873 K. The metal beta-diketonates Y (thd)3 and Zr(thd)4 were used as precursors. The fully stabilized fluorite-type cubic structure was obtained over a wide range of yttria contents from 3.5 to 80 mol pct (Ts = 773 K). The quality of the films depended on the match of the thermal expansion coefficients of substrate and deposit.

  6. Thiols as interfacial modifiers to enhance the performance and stability of perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jing; Yin, Jun; Yuan, Shangfu; Zhao, Yun; Li, Jing; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-06-07

    Modifying the interfaces of CH3NH3PbI3 with TiO2 and hole transport layers using two different types of thiols leads to enhanced performance and stability of perovskite solar cells. The incorporation of HOOC-Ph-SH at the TiO2/perovskite interface facilitates electron transfer from perovskite to TiO2 and also alters the morphology of perovskite crystal growth to increase the power conversion efficiency. The modification of pentafluorobenzenethiol at the perovskite/hole transport layer interface improves the stability.

  7. Dynamic stability of deformable elements of one class of aeroelastic constructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velmisov, Petr A.; Ankilov, Andrey V.; Semenova, Elizaveta P.

    2016-12-01

    At designing of the constructions and the devices interacting with the flow of gas or liquid, it is necessary to solve the problems associated with the investigation of the stability required for their functioning and operational reliability. The definition of stability of an elastic body corresponds to the Lyapunov's concept of stability of dynamical system. A mathematical model of the device relating to the vibration technique, which is intended for intensification of technological processes, for example, the process of mixing, is considered. The action of these devices is based on the oscillations of elastic elements at the flowing around gas or liquid flow. The dynamic stability of the elastic element, located inside of the flow channel with the subsonic flow of gas or liquid (in an ideal model of a compressible environment) is investigated. The model is described by coupled system of partial differential equations for the unknown functions - the potential of the gas velocity and deformation of the elastic element. On the basis of the construction of functional, the sufficient conditions of the dynamical stability, imposing restrictions on the free-stream velocity of the gas, the flexural stiffness of the elastic element, and other parameters of the mechanical system are obtained. The examples of construction of the stability regions for particular parameters of the mechanical system are presented.

  8. Dynamics, stability, and control analyses of flapping wing micro-air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlowski, Christopher T.; Girard, Anouck R.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents an overview of the various analyses of flight dynamics, stability, and control of flapping wing micro-air vehicles available in the literature. The potential benefits of flapping wing micro-air vehicles for civil, military, and search and rescue operations are numerous. The majority of the flight dynamics research involves the standard aircraft (6DOF) equations of motion, although a growth is evident in examining the multibody flight dynamics models of flapping wing micro-air vehicles. The stability of flapping wing micro-air vehicles is largely studied in the vicinity of hover and forward flight. The majority of stability studies focus on linear, time-invariant stability in the vicinity of reference flight conditions, such as hover or forward flight. The consistent result is that flapping wing micro-air vehicles are unstable in an open loop setting. The unstable result is based on linear and nonlinear stability analyses. Control has been demonstrated for hovering and forward flight through various methods, both linear and nonlinear in nature. The entirety of reported research into the stability and control of flapping wing micro-air vehicles has neglected the mass effects of the wings on the position and orientation of the central body. Successful control of a flapping wing micro-air vehicle, with the wings' mass effects included, is still an open research area.

  9. Dynamic stabilization of the Rayleigh-Benard instability in rectangular enclosures: A computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbo, Randy M.

    The dynamic stabilization of the Rayleigh-Bénard instability by vertical vibrations in rectangular enclosures is computationally investigated. Analogous dynamic stability phenomenon are treated to provide physical intuition into the problem. Linear stability analysis is used to determine the stability boundaries. The Galerkin method is used to solve the spatial portion of the differential equations, and Floquet analysis is used to solve the temporal portion. Both the synchronous and the subharmonic regions of instability are recovered. Two drive types (sinusoidal and rectangular) and two types of thermal boundary conditions (insulating and conducting) are considered. The conditions necessary for dynamic stability are reported for Rayleigh numbers from critical to 106 and for Prandtl numbers in the range of 0.1-7. Plots of two nondimensional groups, Ravib, and Pvib, are provided to summarize the conditions for the two stability boundaries. The linear model is compared to a published data set where the performance of an inverted pulse tube is measured; the predicted asymptotic scaling is confirmed.

  10. Dynamic Stabilization of Simple Fractures With Active Plates Delivers Stronger Healing Than Conventional Compression Plating

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Stanley; Bliven, Emily K.; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kindt, Philipp; Augat, Peter; Henschel, Julia; Fitzpatrick, Daniel C.; Madey, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Active plates dynamize a fracture by elastic suspension of screw holes within the plate. We hypothesized that dynamic stabilization with active plates delivers stronger healing relative to standard compression plating. Methods: Twelve sheep were randomized to receive either a standard compression plate (CP) or an active plate (ACTIVE) for stabilization of an anatomically reduced tibial osteotomy. In the CP group, absolute stabilization was pursued by interfragmentary compression with 6 cortical screws. In the ACTIVE group, dynamic stabilization after bony apposition was achieved with 6 elastically suspended locking screws. Fracture healing was analyzed weekly on radiographs. After sacrifice 9 weeks postsurgery, the torsional strength of healed tibiae and contralateral tibiae was measured. Finally, computed tomography was used to assess fracture patterns and healing modes. Results: Healing in both groups included periosteal callus formation. ACTIVE specimens had almost 6 times more callus area by week 9 (P < 0.001) than CP specimens. ACTIVE specimens recovered on average 64% of their native strength by week 9, and were over twice as strong as CP specimens, which recovered 24% of their native strength (P = 0.008). Microcomputed tomography demonstrated that compression plating induced a combination of primary bone healing and gap healing. Active plating consistently stimulated biological bone healing by periosteal callus formation. Conclusions: Compared with compression plating, dynamic stabilization of simple fractures with active plates delivers significantly stronger healing. PMID:27861456

  11. Adaptive Delta-Sigma Modulation for Enhanced Input Dynamic Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zierhofer, Clemens M.

    2006-12-01

    An adaptive delta-sigma modulator of 1st order with one-bit quantization is presented. Adaptation is instantaneous and based on an exponential law. The feedback signal is a multibit discrete-level signal generated by a digital-to-analog converter (DAC). Compared to a nonadaptive delta-sigma modulator of 1st order, the input dynamic range is significantly enhanced. The gain in dynamic range is 6 dB per bit defining the feedback amplitude. The influence of nonideal DAC performance is discussed. It is demonstrated that an implementation of the system is realistic with standard CMOS technology. To relax the requirements to the one-bit quantizer, the quantizer input signal is amplified adaptively (Q-Switching).

  12. Development of a Stirling System Dynamic Model With Enhanced Thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regan, Timothy F.; Lewandowski, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    The Stirling Convertor System Dynamic Model developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is a software model developed from first principles that includes the mechanical and mounting dynamics, the thermodynamics, the linear alternator, and the controller of a free-piston Stirling power convertor, along with the end user load. As such it represents the first detailed modeling tool for fully integrated Stirling convertor-based power systems. The thermodynamics of the model were originally a form of the isothermal Stirling cycle. In some situations it may be desirable to improve the accuracy of the Stirling cycle portion of the model. An option under consideration is to enhance the SDM thermodynamics by coupling the model with Gedeon Associates Sage simulation code. The result will be a model that gives a more accurate prediction of the performance and dynamics of the free-piston Stirling convertor. A method of integrating the Sage simulation code with the System Dynamic Model is described. Results of SDM and Sage simulation are compared to test data. Model parameter estimation and model validation are discussed.

  13. Dynamic perspective cues enhance depth perception from motion parallax.

    PubMed

    Buckthought, Athena; Yoonessi, Ahmad; Baker, Curtis L

    2017-01-01

    Motion parallax, the perception of depth resulting from an observer's self-movement, has almost always been studied with random dot textures in simplified orthographic rendering. Here we examine depth from motion parallax in more naturalistic conditions using textures with an overall 1/f spectrum and dynamic perspective rendering. We compared depth perception for orthographic and perspective rendering, using textures composed of two types of elements: random dots and Gabor micropatterns. Relative texture motion (shearing) with square wave corrugation patterns was synchronized to horizontal head movement. Four observers performed a two-alternative forced choice depth ordering task with monocular viewing, in which they reported which part of the texture appeared in front of the other. For both textures, depth perception was better with dynamic perspective than with orthographic rendering, particularly at larger depths. Depth ordering performance with naturalistic 1/f textures was slightly lower than with the random dots; however, with depth-related size scaling of the micropatterns, performance was comparable to that with random dots. We also examined the effects of removing each of the three cues that distinguish dynamic perspective from orthographic rendering: (a) small vertical displacements, (b) lateral gradients of speed across the corrugations, and (c) speed differences in rendered near versus far surfaces. Removal of any of the three cues impaired performance. In conclusion, depth ordering performance is enhanced by all of the dynamic perspective cues but not by using more naturalistic 1/f textures.

  14. Bluff-body stabilized flame dynamics of lean premixed syngas combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hong G.; Kim, Yu Jeong; Lee, Bok Jik; Kaust Team

    2015-11-01

    Recently, syngas combustion has been actively investigated for the potential application to integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems. While lean premixed combustion is attractive for both reduced emission and enhanced efficiency, flame instability becomes often an issue. Bluff-bodies have been adopted as effective flame holders for practical application of premixed flames. In the present study, high-fidelity direct numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the dynamics of lean premixed syngas flames stabilized on a bluff-body, in particular at the near blow-off regime of the flame. A two-dimensional domain of 4 mm height and 20 mm length with a flame holder of a 1 mm-by-1 mm square geometry is used. For a syngas mixture with the equivalence ratio of 0.5 and the CO:H2 ratio of 1, several distinct flame modes are identified as the inflow velocity approaches to the blowoff limit. The sequences of extinction pathway and combustion characteristics are discussed.

  15. Biodiversity simultaneously enhances the production and stability of community biomass, but the effects are independent.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, Bradley J; Gross, Kevin; Fritschie, Keith; Flombaum, Pedro; Fox, Jeremy W; Rixen, Christian; van Ruijven, Jasper; Reich, Peter B; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Wilsey, Brian J

    2013-08-01

    To predict the ecological consequences of biodiversity loss, researchers have spent much time and effort quantifying how biological variation affects the magnitude and stability of ecological processes that underlie the functioning of ecosystems. Here we add to this work by looking at how biodiversity jointly impacts two aspects of ecosystem functioning at once: (1) the production of biomass at any single point in time (biomass/area or biomass/ volume), and (2) the stability of biomass production through time (the CV of changes in total community biomass through time). While it is often assumed that biodiversity simultaneously enhances both of these aspects of ecosystem functioning, the joint distribution of data describing how species richness regulates productivity and stability has yet to be quantified. Furthermore, analyses have yet to examine how diversity effects on production covary with diversity effects on stability. To overcome these two gaps, we reanalyzed the data from 34 experiments that have manipulated the richness of terrestrial plants or aquatic algae and measured how this aspect of biodiversity affects community biomass at multiple time points. Our reanalysis confirms that biodiversity does indeed simultaneously enhance both the production and stability of biomass in experimental systems, and this is broadly true for terrestrial and aquatic primary producers. However, the strength of diversity effects on biomass production is independent of diversity effects on temporal stability. The independence of effect sizes leads to two important conclusions. First, while it may be generally true that biodiversity enhances both productivity and stability, it is also true that the highest levels of productivity in a diverse community are not associated with the highest levels of stability. Thus, on average, diversity does not maximize the various aspects of ecosystem functioning we might wish to achieve in conservation and management. Second, knowing how

  16. Anharmonic effects in atomic hydrogen: Superconductivity and lattice dynamical stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinaga, Miguel; Errea, Ion; Calandra, Matteo; Mauri, Francesco; Bergara, Aitor

    2016-05-01

    We present first-principles calculations of metallic atomic hydrogen in the 400-600 GPa pressure range in a tetragonal structure with space group I 41/a m d , which is predicted to be its first atomic phase. Our calculations show a band structure close to the free-electron-like limit due to the high electronic kinetic energy induced by pressure. Bands are properly described even in the independent electron approximation fully neglecting the electron-electron interaction. Linear-response harmonic calculations show a dynamically stable phonon spectrum with marked Kohn anomalies. Even if the electron-electron interaction has a minor role in the electronic bands, the inclusion of electronic exchange and correlation in the density response is essential to obtain a dynamically stable structure. Anharmonic effects, which are calculated within the stochastic self-consistent harmonic approximation, harden high-energy optical modes and soften transverse acoustic modes up to a 20% in energy. Despite a large impact of anharmonicity has been predicted in several high-pressure hydrides, here the superconducting critical temperature is barely affected by anharmonicity, as it is lowered from its harmonic 318 K value only to 300 K at 500 GPa. We attribute the small impact of anharmonicity on superconductivity to the absence of softened optical modes and the fairly uniform distribution of the electron-phonon coupling among the vibrational modes.

  17. Dynamic characteristics and seismic stability of expanded polystyrene geofoam embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Zahra A.

    Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) geofoam has become a preferred material in various construction applications due to its light weight. Application of EPS accelerates the projects particularly on soft soils. The focus of this research is on the application of the EPS in embankments and its behavior mainly under harmonic vibration. The goal of this study was to investigate dynamic characteristics of freestanding vertical EPS geofoam embankment and address potential seismic issues that result from the distinguished dynamic behavior of such systems due to the layered and discrete block structure. A series of experimental studies on EPS 19 and a commercially available adhesive was conducted. Two-dimensional numerical analyses were performed to replicate the response of EPS geofoam embankment to horizontal and vertical harmonic motions. The results of the analyses have shown that for some acceleration amplitude levels interlayer sliding is expected to occur in EPS geofoam embankments almost immediately after the start of the base excitation; however, as a highly efficient energy dissipation mechanism sliding ceases rapidly. Shear keys and adhesive may be used to prevent interlayer sliding if they cover the proper extent of area of the embankment. EPS blocks placed in the corners of the embankment and at the edges of the segment prohibited from sliding may experience high stress concentrations. The embankment may show horizontal sway and rocking once sliding is prevented.

  18. Bacterial dynamics in steady-state biofilters: beyond functional stability.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The spatial and temporal dynamics of microbial community structure and function were surveyed in duplicated woodchip-biofilters operated under constant conditions for 231 days. The contaminated gaseous stream for treatment was representative of composting emissions, included ammonia, dimethyl disulfide and a mixture of five oxygenated volatile organic compounds. The community structure and diversity were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis on 16S rRNA gene fragments. During the first 42 days, microbial acclimatization revealed the influence of operating conditions and contaminant loading on the biofiltration community structure and diversity, as well as the limited impact of inoculum compared to the greater persistence of the endogenous woodchip community. During long-term operation, a high and stable removal efficiency was maintained despite a highly dynamic microbial community, suggesting the probable functional redundancy of the community. Most of the contaminant removal occurred in the first compartment, near the gas inlet, where the microbial diversity was the highest. The stratification of the microbial structures along the filter bed was statistically correlated to the longitudinal distribution of environmental conditions (selective pressure imposed by contaminant concentrations) and function (contaminant elimination capacity), highlighting the central role of the bacterial community. The reproducibility of microbial succession in replicates suggests that the community changes were presumably driven by a deterministic process.

  19. Guidelines for Computing Longitudinal Dynamic Stability Characteristics of a Subsonic Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Joseph R.; Frank, Neal