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Sample records for dynamic tensile tests

  1. Tensile testing apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R.

    1985-08-01

    An improved mechanical extensometer is described for use with a constant load creep test machine. The dead weight of the extensometer is counterbalanced by two pairs of weights connected through a pulley system and to rod extension and leading into the furnace where the test sample is undergoing elevated temperature (above 500 F.) tensile testing. Novel gripper surfaces, conical tip and flat surface are provided in each sampling engaging platens to reduce the grip pressure normally required for attachment of the extensometer to the specimen and reduce initial specimen bending normally associated with foil-gage metal testing.

  2. Tensile testing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved mechanical extensometer is described for use with a constant load creep test machine. The dead weight of the extensometer is counterbalanced by two pairs of weights connected through a pulley system and to rod extension and leading into the furnace where the test sample is undergoing elevated temperature (above 500 F.) tensile testing. Novel gripper surfaces, conical tip and flat surface are provided in each sampling engaging platens to reduce the grip pressure normally required for attachment of the extensometer to the specimen and reduce initial specimen bending normally associated with foil-gage metal testing.

  3. Validating Material Modelling of OFHC Copper Using Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) Test at Different Impact Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Nicola; Testa, Gabriel; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using phenomenological and physically based models (Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong and Rusinek-Klepaczko), are presented. Preliminary simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using crystal plasticity package CPFEM, providing, as input, the strain history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the extruded fragments. Results were compared with EBSD investigation.

  4. Constitutive Modeling of the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion Test of PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnyansky, Anatoly; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl; Gray, George

    2015-06-01

    Use of polymers in the defence, aerospace and industrial application at extreme conditions makes prediction of behaviour of these materials very important. Crucial to this is knowledge of the physical damage response in association with the phase transformations during the loading and the ability to predict this via multi-phase simulation taking the thermodynamical non-equilibrium and strain rate sensitivity into account. The current work analyses Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (DTE) experiments on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). In particular, the phase transition during the loading with subsequent tension are analysed using a two-phase rate sensitive material model implemented in the CTH hydrocode and the calculations are compared with experimental high-speed photography. The damage patterns and their link with the change of loading modes are analysed numerically and are correlated to the test observations.

  5. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-07-17

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  6. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-08-21

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  7. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2006-01-10

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  8. Determination of Dynamic Compressive and Tensile Behavior of Rocks from Numerical Tests of Split Hopkinson Pressure and Tension Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z. Y.; Zhu, J. B.; Xia, K. W.; Tang, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    FEM-based numerical testing systems of the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) and the split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) are established to study the characteristics of rock materials under dynamic compressive and tensile loadings. First of all, the accuracy and applicability of the numerical testing system are validated and calibrated through comparison between the laboratory measurements and the simulation results. Subsequently, the dynamic behavior of rock is analyzed in detail with the numerical testing system followed by the underlying physical mechanism. For the SHPB tests, the simulation results demonstrate that the incident waveform is determined by the striker length, the striker shape and the pulse shaper. The dynamic increase factor (DIF) of the rock specimen varies with different impact velocities, which is attributed to the strain rate effect. The rock specimen size and bar size also have effects on the DIF. In addition, the interfacial friction between the rock specimen and the bars cannot be ignored. For the SHTB tests, it is found that the incident waveform is dependent on the striker tube length and the striker tube thickness. In addition, similar to the SHPB tests, the impact velocity, rock specimen size and bar size all have strong effects on the rock dynamic tensile strength.

  9. On loading velocity oscillations during dynamic tensile testing with flying wheel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erice, Borja; Roth, Christian; Gary, Gerard; Mohr, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Flying Wheels (FW) provide a space-saving alternative to Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) systems for generating the loading pulse for intermediate and high strain rate material testing. This is particularly attractive in view of performing ductile fracture experiments at intermediate strain rates that require a several milliseconds long loading pulse. More than 50 m long Hopkinson bars are required in that case, whereas the same kinetic energy (for a given loading velocity) can be stored in rather compact flying wheels (e.g. diameter of less than 1.5 m). To gain more insight into the loading capabilities of FW tensile testing systems, a simple analytical model is presented to analyze the loading history applied by a FW system. It is found that due to the presence of a puller bar that transmits the tensile load from the rotating wheel to the specimen, the loading velocity applied onto the specimen oscillates between about zero and twice the tangential loading speed applied by the FW. The theoretical and numerical evaluation for a specific 1.1 m diameter FW system revealed that these oscillations occur at a frequency in the kHz range, thereby questioning the approximate engineering assumption of a constant strain rate in FW tensile experiments at strain rates of the order of 100/s.

  10. Development of a miniature tensile Kolsky bar for dynamic testing of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jastin V.

    Mechanical properties such as yield stress and ultimate strength are most commonly obtained under quasi-static (strain rate of 10--4 s--1) loading conditions Materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers may exhibit significant changes in mechanical response when subjected to high strain rate (102 --105 per second) conditions. The loading rate or strain rate can affect the material properties such as elastic modulus, yield strength, work hardening, and ductility. To ensure product quality and reliability under impact conditions, the mechanical responses of materials under dynamic loading conditions must be characterized. A Kolsky bar is a tool that can be used to study the uniaxial compressive constitutive behavior of materials under high strain rates. The goal of this thesis is to develop a miniature Tensile Kolsky bar that can be used to test materials with thickness on the order of 200 micrometers (thin foils). The system consists of a cylindrical launch tube with an internal striker, a rectangular incident bar and a transmitted bar. The specimen is held in pockets that were milled directly into the incident and transmitted bar. The rectangular incident and transmitted bars facilitate specimen and strain gage mounting. The rectangular section also provides a reduced cross sectional bar area compared to a bar of circular cross section with diameter equivalent to the width of the rectangular bar, which increases the system sensitivity. This thesis presents the detailed description of the miniature Kolsky bar device, specimen geometry, diagnostic techniques and different calibration and validation techniques used for developing the system. The Kolsky bar setup was used to test 99.9 percent pure magnesium at two different strain rates (5000 and 10000 per second). Specimens were cut from billets processed via the 4Bc equal channel angular extrusion route and were tested in three different directions: extrusion, longitudinal and transverse. The results from the

  11. Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  12. Tensile testing: a simple introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  13. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  14. Tensile testing of Fe and FeCr nanowires using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Byggmästar, J. Granberg, F.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.; Henriksson, K. O. E.

    2015-01-07

    Using molecular dynamics, we have studied the behaviour of cylindrical [001]-oriented Fe and FeCr nanowires under uniaxial tensile strain with both an embedded atom method (EAM) and a Tersoff-like bond order potential. The mechanical properties were analysed and the deformation mechanism was studied and compared between the potentials. The effects of chromium content and size of the wire were studied. Both potentials show elongation by deformation twinning in the 〈111〉/(211) system resulting in a significantly stiffer and stronger [110]-axial nanowire. The pure iron nanowires are elastically softer than bulk iron and an addition of chromium has both a softening and weakening effect. The bond order potential shows a strong dependence on chromium concentration, while the dependence is considerably weaker for the EAM potential.

  15. Dual phase versus TRIP strip steels: Microstructural changes as a consequence of quasi-static and dynamic tensile testing

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, S.; Jones, T.B.; Fourlaris, G. . E-mail: g.fourlaris@swan.ac.uk

    2007-04-15

    The development of present day and future vehicles is being driven by the need to simultaneously reduce mass and increase passenger and pedestrian safety. For this reason, the steel industry has developed strip steel grades with suitable properties, as required for meeting the demands placed on the automotive manufacturers. Two of these strip steel grades are the Dual Phase (DP) and the Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, which are thought to offer solutions for critical crash component criteria. Limited published information is available on the changes in microstructure of these novel strip steel grades at different rates of deformation. This paper examines the change in microstructure of a range of both commercial and experimental DP and TRIP strip steel grades, which were tensile tested at low (0.001 s{sup -1}) and very high strain rates (200 s{sup -1}). The DP and TRIP microstructures were characterised in terms of ferrite grain size, ferrite grain elongation and volume fraction of constituent phases. The specimens were examined following deformation and compared to the as-received condition to assess microstructural changes. This paper concentrates only on microstructural changes through dynamic tensile testing of DP and TRIP grades at low and high strain rates. The full crash performance data from the dynamic tensile tests and crushing of box sections is presented in a separate publication. [S. Oliver, G. Fourlaris and T.B. Jones, 'Dual Phase versus TRIP strip steels: a comparison of dynamic properties for automotive crash performance', Materials Science and Technology, 2006 (submitted for publication)].

  16. Tensile Test For Arboform Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavanescu (Mazurchevici), Simona; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Petroleum-based plastic materials constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is received particular attention. Our studied material, "Liquid wood" produced from lignin, natural fibres and natural additives, is completely biodegradable in natural environment, in normal conditions. This paper presents the behaviour of Arboform and Arboform reinforced with Aramidic Fibers tensile test analysis. Experimental data show that the tensile strength reached an average value of 15.8 MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3513.3MPA for Arboform and for the reinforcement the tensile strength is 23.625MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3411.5MPA, the materials present a brittle behaviour. The high mechanical properties of newly developed material, better than of other ordinary plastics, recommend it as a potential environment-friendly substituent for synthetic plastics, which are present in all fields of activity.

  17. Manual for LDEF tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    One of the experiments aboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) consists of a tray of approximately one hundred tensile specimens of several candidate space structure composite materials. During the LDEF flight the materials will be subjected to the space environment and to possible contamination during launch and recovery. Tensile tests of representative samples were made before the LDEF flight to obtain baseline data. Similar tests will be made on control specimens stored on earth for the length of the LDEF flight and on recovered flight specimens. This manual codifies the details of testing, data acquisition, and handling used in obtaining the baseline data so that the same procedures and equipment will be used on the subsequent tests.

  18. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  19. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  20. Approaches for Tensile Testing of Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Martin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    For angleply composites, lamina tension and compression strengths are commonly determined by applying classical lamination theory to test data obtained from testing of angleply composite specimens. For textile composites such as 2D triaxial braids, analysis is more complex and standard test methods do not always yield reliable strength measurements. This paper describes recent research focused on development of more reliable tensile test methods for braided composites and presents preliminary data for various approaches. The materials investigated in this work have 0deg+/-60 2D triaxial braid architecture with nearly equal fiber volume fraction in each of the three fiber directions. Flat composite panels are fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) using six layers of the braided preform aligned along the 0deg fiber direction. Various epoxy resins are used as matrix materials. Single layer panels are also fabricated in order to examine local variations in deformation related to the braid architecture. Specimens are cut from these panels in the shape of standard straight-sided coupons, an alternative bowtie geometry, and an alternative notched geometry. Axial tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded along the 0deg fiber direction. Transverse tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded perpendicular to the 0deg fibers. Composite tubes are also fabricated by RTM. These tubes are tested by internal pressurization using a soft rubbery material sealed between the inside diameter of the tube and the load fixtures. The ends of the tube are unconstrained, so the primary load is in the hoop direction. Tubes are fabricated with the 0deg fibers aligned along the tube axis by overbraiding the preform on a mandrel. Since the loading is in the hoop direction, testing of the overbraided tube provides a measure of transverse tensile strength. Previous work has indicated that straight-sided coupons yield a transverse tensile strength that is much lower

  1. Furnace for Tensile Testing of Flexible Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.; Estrella, C. A.; Katvala, V. W.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic cloth and thread tested quickly at temperatures up to 1,250 degree C. Tensile strengths of ceramic cloths and threads measured conveniently in new furnace at specified temperatures up to 1,250 degree C, using ordinary mechanical tester. Samples heated along part of their lengths in furnace slots. Interchangeable furnace chambers and matching heating elements sized to match size of tested ceramic material.

  2. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion of polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmanski, Jevan; Cady, Carl; Rae, Philip; Trujillo, Carl P.; Gray, George Thompson, III; Brown, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Polyurea was investigated under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) loading where spherical projectiles were propelled at 440 to 509 ms-1 through a conical extrusion die with an area reduction of 87%. Momentum of the leading edge imposes a rapid tensile deformation on the extruded jet of material. Polyurea is an elastomer with outstanding high-rate tensile performance of interest in the shock regime. Previous Dyn-Ten-Ext work on semi-crystalline fluoropolymers (PTFE, PCTFE) elucidated irregular deformation and profuse stochastic-based damage and failure mechanisms, but with limited insight into damage inception or progression in those polymers. The polyurea behaved very differently; the polymer first extruded a jet of apparently intact material, which then broke down via void coalescence, followed by fibrillation and tearing of the material. Most of the material in the jet elastically retracted back into the die, and only a few unique fragments were formed. The surface texture of all failed surfaces was found to be tortuous and covered with drawn hair-like filaments, implying a considerable amount of energy was absorbed during damage progression.

  3. Effects of chemical composition and test conditions on the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Laws, K. J.; Trujillo, C. P.; Brown, A. D.; Cerreta, E. K.; Hazell, P. J.; Quadir, M. Z.; Ferry, M.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of impact velocity and temperature on the dynamic mechanical behavior of two bulk metallic glasses (BMG) with slightly different elemental compositions (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38) have been investigated. Bullet-shaped samples were accelerated by a gas gun to speeds in the 400 ~ 600m/s range and tested at room temperature and 250 °C. The specimens impacted a steel extrusion die which subjected them to high strains at high strain-rates. The extruded samples were subsequently soft recovered by using low density foams. The deformed specimens were examined by optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and hardness measurements. The characterization results aided to assess the effect of chemical composition on the microstructural evolution, i.e. phase changes or crystallization, which might influence the ductility on the nominally brittle amorphous BMGs. The most significant results from this study will be presented. School of Engineering and Information Technology, UNSW Canberra.

  4. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  5. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Kenneth C.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens having dogbone- or T-shaped end sections without introducing bending stresses in the specimens during the application of a dynamic tensile loading on the specimens is described. A pair of elongated pull rods disposed in a side-by-side relationship are used to grip the shoulders on each T-shaped end section. The pull rods are pivotally attached to a piston-displaceable, disk-shaped member so as to be longitudinally movable with respect to one another effecting the self-alignment thereof with the shoulders on the T-shaped end sections of the specimen to compensate for shoulders being located in different longitudinal positions.

  6. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

  7. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  8. The Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Railway Wheel Steel at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Lin; Han, Liangliang; Zhao, Longmao; Zhang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic tensile tests on D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates were conducted using a split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus, compared to quasi-static tests. Three different types of specimens, which were machined from three different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub) of a railway wheel, were prepared and examined. The rim specimens were checked to have a higher yield stress and ultimate tensile strength than those web and hub specimens under both quasi-static and dynamic loadings, and the railway wheel steel was demonstrated to be strain rate dependent in dynamic tension. The dynamic tensile fracture surfaces of all the wheel steel specimens are cup-cone-shaped morphology on a macroscopic scale and with the quasi-ductile fracture features on the microscopic scale.

  9. Polystyrene cryostat facilitates testing tensile specimens under liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogan, R. P.; Skalka, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    Lightweight cryostat made of expanded polystyrene reduces eccentricity in a tensile system being tested under liquid nitrogen. The cryostat is attached directly to the tensile system by a special seal, reducing misalignment effects due to cryostat weight, and facilitates viewing and loading of the specimens.

  10. Determination of Dynamic Flexural Tensile Strength of Thermally Treated Laurentian Granite Using Semi-Circular Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tubing; Wang, Pin; Li, Xibing; Wu, Bangbiao; Tao, Ming; Shu, Ronghua

    2016-10-01

    To understand the effects of increasing temperature and loading rate on the flexural tensile strength of Laurentian granite, dynamic flexural tensile strength experiments were carried out by means of a semi-circular bend specimen with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system. The tests were performed at different loading rates, specimens were treated from room temperature up to 850 °C, and a high-speed camera was utilized to monitor the failure process of the specimen. For samples in the same temperature group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength was observed; it increased consistently with the increase of loading rate. Temperature effects on rock mechanical properties were investigated from the microscopic viewpoint, and the dynamic flexural tensile strength decreased with the treatment temperature. A formula relating dynamic flexural tensile strength to loading rate and temperature is presented to quantify the results. It was found that the change regulation of the dynamic flexural tensile strength of rock is very similar to that of its crack growth along with the increase of loading rate, which indicates that the essence of rock failure is the initiation and propagation of the internal cracks. Compared with our earlier work on dynamic tensile tests using the Brazilian test, it was observed that the flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength. Non-local failure theory can be adopted to explain this discrepancy at low temperature conditions, but it is no longer effective at high temperatures. Under high loading rates, rock failure is initiated at the centre of the half circular disc, and finally it is separated completely into two equal parts.

  11. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  12. An Experimental Study of Dynamic Tensile Failure of Rocks Subjected to Hydrostatic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bangbiao; Yao, Wei; Xia, Kaiwen

    2016-10-01

    It is critical to understand the dynamic tensile failure of confined rocks in many rock engineering applications, such as underground blasting in mining projects. To simulate the in situ stress state of underground rocks, a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system is utilized to load Brazilian disc (BD) samples hydrostatically, and then exert dynamic load to the sample by impacting the striker on the incident bar. The pulse shaper technique is used to generate a slowly rising stress wave to facilitate the dynamic force balance in the tests. Five groups of Laurentian granite BD samples (with static BD tensile strength of 12.8 MPa) under the hydrostatic confinement of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 MPa were tested with different loading rates. The result shows that the dynamic tensile strength increases with the hydrostatic confining pressure. It is also observed that under the same hydrostatic pressure, the dynamic tensile strength increases with the loading rate, revealing the so-called rate dependency for engineering materials. Furthermore, the increment of the tensile strength decreases with the hydrostatic confinement, which resembles the static tensile behavior of rock under confining pressure, as reported in the literature. The recovered samples are examined using X-ray micro-computed tomography method and the observed crack pattern is consistent with the experimental result.

  13. Dynamic tensile strength of glass fiber reinforced pultruded composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Kumar, M.M.; Hui, D.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the stress-strain behavior, fracture strength, influence of low temperature, and energy absorption in the diametral tensile splitting fracturing of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite. Experiments were conducted at low-temperature in a thermal chamber installed on a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. The tensile strength was determined by diametral compression of disc samples at 24, {minus}5 and {minus}40 C.

  14. Dynamic tensile failure mechanics of the musculoskeletal neck using a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Yliniemi, Eno M; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Doczy, Erica J; Nuckley, David J; Perry, Chris E; Ching, Randal P

    2009-05-01

    Although the catapult phase of pilot ejections has been well characterized in terms of human response to compressive forces, the effect of the forces on the human body during the ensuing ejection phases (including windblast and parachute opening shock) has not been thoroughly investigated. Both windblast and parachute opening shock have been shown to induce dynamic tensile forces in the human cervical spine. However, the human tolerance to such loading is not well known. Therefore, the main objective of this research project was to measure human tensile neck failure mechanics to provide data for computational modeling, anthropometric test device development, and improved tensile injury criteria. Twelve human cadaver specimens, including four females and eight males with a mean age of 50.1+/-9 years, were subjected to dynamic tensile loading through the musculoskeletal neck until failure occurred. Failure load, failure strain, and tensile stiffness were measured and correlated with injury type and location. The mean failure load for the 12 specimens was 3100+/-645 N, mean failure strain was 16.7+/-5.4%, and mean tensile stiffness was 172+/-54.5 N/mm. The majority of injuries (8) occurred in the upper cervical spine (Oc-C3), and none took place in the midcervical region (C3-C5). The results of this study assist in filling the existing void in dynamic tensile injury data and will aid in developing improved neck injury prevention strategies. PMID:19388771

  15. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber; Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber; and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 C to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  16. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber, Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) Nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber, and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  17. Method and apparatus for tensile testing of metal foil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, O. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method for obtaining accurate and reproducible results in the tensile testing of metal foils in tensile testing machines is described. Before the test specimen are placed in the machine, foil side edges are worked until they are parallel and flaw free. The specimen are also aligned between and secured to grip end members. An aligning apparatus employed in the method is comprised of an alignment box with a longitudinal bottom wall and two upright side walls, first and second removable grip end members at each end of the box, and a means for securing the grip end members within the box.

  18. Environmental control system for cryogenic testing of tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandergrift, E. F.; Yatsko, G. O.

    1967-01-01

    Environmental control system uses a special coil to permit the tensile testing of specimens which may be subjected to temperatures anywhere between liquid nitrogen and room temperature. The test specimen zone is surrounded by the coil which permits the selective flooding of the specimen with warm or cold gas.

  19. The role of shear and tensile failure in dynamically triggered landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipprich, T.L.; Snieder, R.K.; Jibson, R.W.; Kimman, W.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic stresses generated by earthquakes can trigger landslides. Current methods of landslide analysis such as pseudo-static analysis and Newmark's method focus on the effects of earthquake accelerations on the landslide mass to characterize dynamic landslide behaviour. One limitation of these methods is their use Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria, which only accounts for shear failure, but the role of tensile failure is not accounted for. We develop a limit-equilibrium model to investigate the dynamic stresses generated by a given ground motion due to a plane wave and use this model to assess the role of shear and tensile failure in the initiation of slope instability. We do so by incorporating a modified Griffith failure envelope, which combines shear and tensile failure into a single criterion. Tests of dynamic stresses in both homogeneous and layered slopes demonstrate that two modes of failure exist, tensile failure in the uppermost meters of a slope and shear failure at greater depth. Further, we derive equations that express the dynamic stress in the near-surface in the acceleration measured at the surface. These equations are used to approximately define the depth range for each mechanism of failure. The depths at which these failure mechanisms occur suggest that shear and tensile failure might collaborate in generating slope failure. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  20. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  1. Tensile testing grips are easily assembled under liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalka, R. J.; Vandergrift, E. F.

    1967-01-01

    Split-screw grips for tensile testing provide uniform loading on the specimen shoulders. Holes in the heads enable the screws and specimen to be threaded as an assembly into a grip body, closely controlled guides and seats afford positive seating, and precision machining of mating surfaces minimizes misalignment effects.

  2. Effects of Thermal Treatment on Tensile Strength of Laurentian Granite Using Brazilian Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Tubing; Li, Xibing; Cao, Wenzhuo; Xia, Kaiwen

    2015-11-01

    The effect of thermal treatment on several physical properties and the tensile strength of Laurentian granite (LG) are measured in this study. Brazilian disc LG specimens are treated at temperatures of up to 850 °C. The physical properties such as grain density, relative volume change per degree, and P-wave velocity are investigated under the effect of heat treatment. The results indicate that both the density and the P-wave velocity decrease with the increase in heating temperature. However, the relative volume change per degree is not sensitive below 450 °C, while a remarkable increase appears from 450 to 850 °C. All cases are explained by the increase in both number and width of the thermally induced microcracks with the heating temperature. Brazilian tests are carried out statically with an MTS hydraulic servo-control testing system and dynamically with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system to measure both static and dynamic tensile strength of LG. The relationship between the tensile strength and treatment temperatures shows that static tensile strength decreases with temperature while the dynamic tensile strength first increases and then decreases with a linear increase in the loading rate. However, the increase in dynamic tensile strength with treatment temperatures from 25 to 100 °C is due to slight dilation of the grain boundaries as the initial thermal action, which leads to compaction of rock. When the treatment temperature rises above 450 °C, the quartz phase transition results in increased size of microcracks due to the differential expansion between the quartz grains and other minerals, which is the main cause of the sharp reduction in tensile strength.

  3. Advanced tensile testing methods for bulk superconductors at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaba, K.; Teshima, H.; Hokari, T.; Sato, T.; Katagiri, K.; Shoji, Y.; Murakami, A.; Hirano, H.

    2006-10-01

    Tensile tests of bulk high Tc superconductors at room temperature have been generally performed by gluing the bulk specimens to Al-alloy rods. Because of the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal stresses were induced at cryogenic temperatures especially near the interface between the specimen and the rods. In this study, tensile testing methods with minimized effect of the thermal stress were tried by using specimens cut from Dy-Ba-Cu-O superconductors. These were: (1) The rod material of Al-alloy was replaced with Ti-alloy, which has the coefficient close to the bulk. (2) The interlayer made of the identical bulk superconductor was inserted between the specimen and the Ti-alloy rod. The nominal tensile strength at the liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT) of the specimen glued to the Ti-alloy rods was significantly higher than that glued to the Al-alloy rods. The application of the interlayers increased the strength significantly. The FEM analysis showed that the thermal tensile stress component in the direction of loading axis within the specimen at LNT is markedly reduced by the method (1) and substantially eliminated in the method (2).

  4. Tensile testing of rodlike trabeculae excised from bovine femoral bone.

    PubMed

    Ryan, S D; Williams, J L

    1989-01-01

    Individual trabeculae, rodlike in form, were excised from bovine femora and tested in tension to obtain stress-strain plots. Tensile grips were constructed to permit such small specimens to be tested and to avoid slippage during the test. Data were collected for 38 specimens. The results of these tests show that rodlike trabeculae obtained from the femora of young bovine animals have an average Young's modulus in tension of approximately 1 GPa. This value is an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding value for cortical bone in the diaphysis of the femur.

  5. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  6. On the off-axis tensile test for unidirectional composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, M. P.; Herakovich, C. T.; Post, D.

    1982-01-01

    The off axis tensile test was examined experimentally to obtain actual displacement fields over the surface of graphite polyimide coupon specimens. The experimental results were compared with approximate analytical solutions and generated finite element results. An optical method of high sensitivity moire interferometry was used to determine the actual displacements to high precision. The approximate analytical solution and the finite element results compare very favorably with the measured centerline displacements in the test section, and the finite element displacement fields provide excellent agreement with the moire displacements throughout the specimen. A 15 degree fiber orientation and coupon aspect ratios of 5 and 15 are presented.

  7. Compressive tensile and shear testing of melt-foamed aluminium

    SciTech Connect

    Von Hagen, H.; Bleck, W.

    1998-12-31

    For construction purposes it is utterly important to get detailed information on the possible influence of the foam thickness on the mechanical properties and on the deformation behavior of metallic foams. The effect of compressive, tensile and shear loads on aluminium foam samples has been examined with the testing methods for sandwich material as described in German and ASTM-standards. The aim is to provide more data on these mechanical properties varying the sample density and thickness. Regarding the results the most reliable material parameters as well as steps towards a relationship between the different strength parameters can be obtained.

  8. Tensile testing of ultra-thin films on water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Han; Nizami, Adeel; Hwangbo, Yun; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Woo, Chang-Su; Hyun, Seungmin; Kim, Taek-Soo

    2013-10-01

    The surface of water provides an excellent environment for gliding movement, in both nature and modern technology, from surface living animals such as the water strider, to Langmuir-Blodgett films. The high surface tension of water keeps the contacting objects afloat, and its low viscosity enables almost frictionless sliding on the surface. Here we utilize the water surface as a nearly ideal underlying support for free-standing ultra-thin films and develop a novel tensile testing method for the precise measurement of mechanical properties of the films. In this method, namely, the pseudo free-standing tensile test, all specimen preparation and testing procedures are performed on the water surface, resulting in easy handling and almost frictionless sliding without specimen damage or substrate effects. We further utilize van der Waals adhesion for the damage-free gripping of an ultra-thin film specimen. Our approach can potentially be used to explore the mechanical properties of emerging two-dimensional materials.

  9. Method and device for tensile testing of cable bundles

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Lawrence M; Ardelean, Emil V; Goodding, James C; Babuska, Vit

    2012-10-16

    A standard tensile test device is improved to accurately measure the mechanical properties of stranded cables, ropes, and other composite structures wherein a witness is attached to the top and bottom mounting blocks holding the cable under test. The witness is comprised of two parts: a top and a bottom rod of similar diameter with the bottom rod having a smaller diameter stem on its upper end and the top rod having a hollow opening in its lower end into which the stem fits forming a witness joint. A small gap is present between the top rod and the larger diameter portion of the bottom rod. A standard extensometer is attached to the top and bottom rods of the witness spanning this small witness gap. When a force is applied to separate the mounting blocks, the gap in the witness expands the same length that the entire test specimen is stretched.

  10. ROLE OF SCALE FACTOR DURING TENSILE TESTING OF SMALL SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T; Field, Kevin G; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Gray, Mr. Sean

    2014-01-01

    The influence of scale factor (tensile specimen geometry and dimensions) on mechanical test results was investigated for different widely used types of small specimens (SS-1, SS-2, SS-3, and SS-J3) and a set of materials. It was found that the effect of scale factor on the accurate determination of yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and uniform elongation values was weak; however, clear systematic differences were observed and should be accounted for during interpretation of results. In contrast, total elongation values were strongly sensitive to variations in specimen geometry. Modern experimental methods like digital image correlation allow the impact of scale factor to be reduced. Using these techniques, it was shown that true stress true strain curves describing strain-hardening behavior were very close for different specimen types. The limits of miniaturization are discussed, and an ultra-miniature specimen concept was suggested and evaluated. This type of specimen, as expected, may be suitable for SEM and TEM in situ testing.

  11. In situ tensile and creep testing of lithiated silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, Steven T.; Kraft, Oliver; Thompson, Carl V.; Mönig, Reiner

    2013-12-23

    We present experimental results for uniaxial tensile and creep testing of fully lithiated silicon nanowires. A reduction in the elastic modulus is observed when silicon nanowires are alloyed with lithium and plastic deformation becomes possible when the wires are saturated with lithium. Creep testing was performed at fixed force levels above and below the tensile strength of the material. A linear dependence of the strain-rate on the applied stress was evident below the yield stress of the alloy, indicating viscous deformation behavior. The observed inverse exponential relationship between wire radius and strain rate below the yield stress indicates that material transport was controlled by diffusion. At stress levels approaching the yield strength of fully lithiated silicon, power-law creep appears to govern the strain-rate dependence on stress. These results have direct implications on the cycling conditions, rate-capabilities, and charge capacity of silicon and should prove useful for the design and construction of future silicon-based electrodes.

  12. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  13. A microdynamic version of the tensile test machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Very large space structures require structural reactions to control forces associated with nanometer-level displacements; JPL has accordingly built a tensile test machine capable of mN-level force measurements and nm-level displacement measurements, with a view to the study of structural linear joining technology at the lower limit of its resolution. The tester is composed of a moving table that is supported by six flexured legs and a test specimen cantilevered off the table to ground. Three vertical legs contain piezoactuators allowing changes in length up to 200 microns while generating axial load and bending moments. Displacements between ground and table are measured by means of three laser-interferometric channels.

  14. Novel approach to tensile testing of micro- and nanoscale fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E. P. S.; Lim, C. T.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the strength and size of the micro- and nanoscale fibers, larger conventional universal testing machines are not suitable in performing stretch test of such fibers. Existing microtensile testing machines are custom-made and are complex and expensive to construct. Here, a novel method of using an existing atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindenation system for the tensile testing of microscale or bundled nanoscale fibers is proposed. The microscale poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber (˜25 μm diameter) was used as an example to illustrate this technique. The microfiber was first attached to a nanoindenter tip and the base via a custom-made holder to ensure that the microfiber was taut and vertically aligned. The force transducer of the nanoindenter was used to measure the tensile force required to stretch the microfiber. The microfiber was stretched using the stepper motor of the AFM system. The elongation of the microfiber was measured by subtracting the elongation of the transducer spring from the total elongation of the microfiber and transducer spring. A plot of the load against elongation of the microfiber was then obtained. The stress and strain of the microfiber was measured by subtracting the elongation of the transducer spring from the total elongation of the microfiber was then obtained. The stress and strain of the microfiber was obtained by dividing the load and elongation by cross-sectional area and gauge length, respectively. With this data, the mechanical behavior of the sample at small strains can be studied. This system is able to provide a high load resolution of 80 nN and displacement resolution of 0.5 nm. However, maximum load and sample elongation is limited and handling of the sample still remains a challenge.

  15. Modified ring stretch tensile testing of Zr-1Nb cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.B.; Majumdar, S.; Ruther, W.E.; Billone, M.C.; Chung, H.M.; Neimark, L.A.

    1998-03-01

    In a round robin effort between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire in France, and the Russian Research Centre-Kurchatov Institute, Argonne National Laboratory conducted 16 modified ring stretch tensile tests on unirradiated samples of zr-1Nb cladding, which is used in Russian VVER reactors. Test were conducted at two temperatures (25 and 400 C) and two strain rates (0.001 and 1 s{sup {minus}1}). At 25 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE), and total elongation (TE) were 201 MPa, 331 MPa, 18.2%, and 57.6%, respectively. At 400 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 109 MPa, 185 MPa, 15.4%, and 67.7%, respectively. Finally, at 400 C and 1 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 134 MPa, 189 MPa, 18.9%, and 53.4%, respectively. The high strain rate tests at room temperature were not successful. Test results proved to be very sensitive to the amount of lubrication used on the inserts; because of the large contact area between the inserts and specimen, too little lubrication leads to significantly higher strengths and lower elongations being reported. It is also important to note that only 70 to 80% of the elongation takes place in the gauge section, depending on specimen geometry. The appropriate percentage can be estimated from a simple model or can be calculated from finite-element analysis.

  16. Investigation of the dynamic mechanical behavior of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) in the high stress tensile regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berer, M.; Major, Z.; Pinter, G.; Constantinescu, D. M.; Marsavina, L.

    2014-11-01

    Due to its outstanding mechanical performance both in static and dynamic loading and its resistance up to very high temperatures, Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted many practical applications. The loaded contact state for the application of PEEK rolls as bearing elements was recently analyzed by the corresponding author. High irreversible deformations on the mantle side were caused by the rolling contact and thus the rolling performance is supposed to be strongly affected by the dynamic mechanical properties of this irreversibly deformed material. Tensile fatigue tests at various stress levels up to the thermally dominated fatigue regime were conducted in order to get information regarding the dynamic mechanical material behavior at high stress regimes. Two types of PEEK (annealed and untreated) were investigated and two load ratios, R, were used (0.1 and 0.5). During the fatigue tests extensometer strain, load and surface temperature were recorded and a quantitative hysteresis loop analysis with calculated secant modulus and dynamic modulus was performed. Furthermore, the concept of isocyclic stress-strain diagrams was applied to enlarge and confirm the results obtained from the hysteresis loop analysis. A sharp transition between thermally dominated and mechanically dominated fatigue regimes was found for both PEEK types (annealed and untreated) and for both load ratios. Moreover, the annealed PEEK was stiffer in the tensile fatigue tests than the untreated material. Both examined PEEK types showed distinct hardening throughout the fatigue tests which made them "more elastic" (higher stiffness and less damping).

  17. Tensile tests of ITER TF conductors jacket materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anashkin, O. P.; Kеilin, V. E.; Krivykh, A. V.; Diev, D. N.; Dinisilov, A. S.; Shcherbakov, V. I.; Tronza, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    The set of very tough requirements has been formulated for TF jacket materials with extremely high plasticity at liquid helium temperature. The stainless steel 316LN-IG is recommended to be used for TF jacket tubes. Samples of 316LN-IG tubes (whole tubes and sub-size samples) made of the material from the same electro slag remelt have been tested in different conditions - as received tubes and tubes after prescribed compaction, 2.5% deformation at room temperature and heat treatment at 650 0C, 200 hours. The tensile tests were carried out at room, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures down to 4.2 K, meeting corresponding ASME and ASTM requirements. The low temperature testing devices are described. The tests results for sub-size samples and whole tubes show that the latter tests are considerably more representative and important for butt weld qualification at LHe temperature. It was observed that the ferromagnetic properties of all samples and especially of butt welds increase with lowering the temperature and increasing the degree of deformation. At LHe temperature a non-uniform and highly localized serrated deformations were observed.

  18. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert; George, Easo P

    2007-11-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

  19. TENSILE TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A; Thad Adams, T; Ps Lam, P

    2007-05-02

    An infrastructure of new and existing pipelines and systems will be required to carry and to deliver hydrogen as an alternative energy source under the hydrogen economy. Carbon and low alloy steels of moderate strength are currently used in hydrogen delivery systems as well as in the existing natural gas systems. It is critical to understand the material response of these standard pipeline materials when they are subjected to pressurized hydrogen environments. The methods and results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (10.34 MPa or 1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels.

  20. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  1. Calibration of DEM simulation: Unconfined Compressive Test and Brazilian Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yucang; Alonso-Marroquín, Fernando

    2009-06-01

    We simulate rock fracture using ESyS_Particle, which is a 3-D Discrete Element Model developed for modeling geological materials. Two types of simulations are carried out: Unconfined Compressive Test (UCT) and Brazilian Tensile Test (BTT). The results are compared to laboratory tests. Model parameters are determined on the basis of theoretical studies on the elastic properties of regular lattices and dimensionless analysis. The fracture patterns and realistic macroscopic strength are well reproduced. Also the ratio of the macroscopic strength of compression to the tensile strength is obtained numerically.

  2. Stiffness reductions during tensile fatigue testing of graphite/epoxy angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, E. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Tensile fatigue data was generated under carefully controlled test conditions. A computerized data acquisition system was used to permit the measurement of dynamic modulus without interrupting the fatigue cycling. Two different 8-ply laminate configurations, viz, + or - 45 (2s) and + or - 67.5 (2s), of a T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite were tested. The + or - 45 (2s) laminate did exhibit some modulus decay, although there was no well-defined correlation with applied stress level or number of cycles. The + or - 67.5 (2s) laminate did not exhibit any measurable modulus decay. Secondary effects observed included a small but distinct difference between modulus as measured statically and dynamically, a slight recovery of the modulus decay after a test interruption, and a significant viscoelastic (creep) response of the + or - 45 (2s) laminate during fatigue testing.

  3. An interrupted tensile testing at high strain rates for pure copper bars

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Dongfang; Chen Danian; Wu Shanxing; Wang Huanran; Hou Yanjun; Cai Canyuan

    2010-12-01

    A high-speed tensile facility (HSTF) invented by us was applied to interrupting the tests for pure copper specimen bars controlled locally at different levels of elongation. It was realized to isolate and identify the different stages of the dynamic fracture process of the pure copper specimen bar under impact tension. The results of scanning electron microscopical (SEM) investigation of the recovered pure copper specimens show that the void evolution near the surface of the minimum cross-section of the necking area is more severe than that at the middle of the necking area, which may be connected with the findings discussed by Alves and Jones [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 47, 643 (1999)]. The constitutive models in a certain range of strain determined from the tensile split Hopkinson bar optimized by us were employed and adjusted in numerically simulating the large deformation of the pure copper specimen in the interrupted tensile tests on HSTF. The dependence of the instability strain of thermoviscoplastic materials in simple tension on material parameters delineated by Batra and Wei [Int. J. Impact Eng. 34, 448 (2007)] was inspected in predicting the diffuse necking of the specimen bar. The axisymmetric necking rod model with a central void under static tension presented by Ragab [Eng. Fract. Mech. 71, 1515 (2004)] was extended to predicting the local necking and fracture of the specimen bar under impact tension.

  4. Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Botner, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    A small 10-ft x 12-ft temperature and relative humidity controlled room for tensile testing of parachute materials is presented. Tensile tests of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials indicate there is a negligible change in break strength of test samples soaked in the controlled environment vs samples soaked in ambient conditions.

  5. Micro/nano-mechanical test system employing tensile test holder with push-to-pull transformer

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Yunje; Cyrankowski, Edward; Shan, Zhiwei; Syed Asif, Syed Amanula

    2014-07-29

    A micromachined or microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based push-to-pull mechanical transformer for tensile testing of micro-to-nanometer scale material samples including a first structure and a second structure. The second structure is coupled to the first structure by at least one flexible element that enables the second structure to be moveable relative to the first structure, wherein the second structure is disposed relative to the first structure so as to form a pulling gap between the first and second structures such that when an external pushing force is applied to and pushes the second structure in a tensile extension direction a width of the pulling gap increases so as to apply a tensile force to a test sample mounted across the pulling gap between a first sample mounting area on the first structure and a second sample mounting area on the second structure.

  6. Micro/nano-mechanical test system employing tensile test holder with push-to-pull transformer

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Yunje; Cyrankowski, Edward; Shan, Zhiwei; Asif, Syed Amanula Syed

    2013-05-07

    A micromachined or microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based push-to-pull mechanical transformer for tensile testing of micro-to-nanometer scale material samples including a first structure and a second structure. The second structure is coupled to the first structure by at least one flexible element that enables the second structure to be moveable relative to the first structure, wherein the second structure is disposed relative to the first structure so as to form a pulling gap between the first and second structures such that when an external pushing force is applied to and pushes the second structure in a tensile extension direction a width of the pulling gap increases so as to apply a tensile force to a test sample mounted across the pulling gap between a first sample mounting area on the first structure and a second sample mounting area on the second structure.

  7. Stiffness reductions during tensile fatigue testing of graphite/epoxy angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, E. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    The monitoring of modulus decay during fatigue testing as an indicator of damage accumulation and incipient failure has frequently been postulated. The present study was designed to generate tensile fatigue data under carefully controlled test conditions. A computerized data acquisition system was used to permit the measurement of dynamic modulus without interrupting the fatigue cycling. Two different 8-ply laminate configurations, viz, (+ or - 45)2s and (+ or - 67.5)2s, of a T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite were tested. The (+ or 45)2s laminate did exhibit some modulus decay, although there was no well-defined correlation with applied stress level or number of cycles. The (+ or - 67.5)2s laminate did not exhibit any measurable modulus decay. Secondary effects observed included a slight recovery of the modulus decay after a test interruption, and a significant viscoelastic (creep) response of the (+ or - 45)2s laminate during fatigue testing.

  8. Dynamic Tensile Failure of the Rock Interface Between Tuff and Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Feng, Xia-Ting; Chen, Rong; Xia, Kaiwen; Jin, Changyu

    2012-05-01

    The dynamic tensile strength properties of the rock interface and its host rocks sampled from the Baihetan Hydropower Station from Western China were measured using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). The results were compared with those for its two host rocks. The dynamic tensile strengths of the two host rocks, tuff and basalt have typical loading rate dependence. However, the dynamic response of the rock interface is much more complicated and at a given loading rate, varies between those of tuff and basalt. To explain the observation, numerical simulation using the discrete element method (DEM) was conducted to determine the detailed tensile failure process of the rock interface. The numerical simulation verifies that the variation of the dynamic tensile strength of the rock interface is a result of the variation of the interface geometry.

  9. Eulerian hydrocode modeling of a dynamic tensile extrusion experiment (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, Michael W; Clancy, Sean P

    2009-01-01

    Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model were performed to provide insight into a dynamic extrusion experiment. The dynamic extrusion response of copper (three different grain sizes) and tantalum spheres were simulated with MESA, an explicit, 2-D Eulerian continuum mechanics hydrocode and compared with experimental data. The experimental data consisted of high-speed images of the extrusion process, recovered extruded samples, and post test metallography. The hydrocode was developed to predict large-strain and high-strain-rate loading problems. Some of the features of the features of MESA include a high-order advection algorithm, a material interface tracking scheme and a van Leer monotonic advection-limiting. The Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model was utilized to evolve the flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate and temperature for copper and tantalum. Plastic strains exceeding 300% were predicted in the extrusion of copper at 400 m/s, while plastic strains exceeding 800% were predicted for Ta. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rate were made. Additionally, predictions of the texture evolution (based upon the deformation rate history and the rigid body rotations experienced by the copper during the extrusion process) were compared with the orientation imaging microscopy measurements. Finally, comparisons between the calculated and measured influence of the initial texture on the dynamic extrusion response of tantalum was performed.

  10. A cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by miniature pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. B.; Liu, S. X.; Gu, K. X.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by a miniature pulse tube cryocooler. At present, tensile tests are widely applied to measure the mechanical properties of materials; most of the cryogenic tensile testing apparatus are designed for samples with standard sizes, while for non-standard size samples, especially for microsamples, the tensile testing cannot be conducted. The general approach to cool down the specimens for tensile testing is by using of liquid nitrogen or liquid helium, which is not convenient: it is difficult to keep the temperature of the specimens at an arbitrary set point precisely, besides, in some occasions, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome these limitations, a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus cooled by a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler has been designed, built and tested. The operating temperatures of the developed tensile testing apparatus cover from 20 K to room temperature with a controlling precision of ±10 mK. The apparatus configurations, the methods of operation and some cooling performance will be described in this paper.

  11. Influence of necking propensity on the dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Gray Ill, George T; Trujillo, Carl P

    2009-01-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic responses of two fluoropolymers - polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) - have been extensively characterized. Here we investigate the influence of the propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their responses under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-TenExt). The Dyn-Ten-Ext technique was originally developed for metals and applied to copper and tantalum spheres by Gray, et al. as a tensile corollary to compressive Taylor Cylinder Impact Testing. Under Taylor Cylinder loading both PTFE and PCTFE exhibit a classic three-diameter ductile deformation pattern. The ductile-to-brittle transition in PTFE occurs at 131 m s{sup -1} with a very tight transition range in impact stress of less than 4 m s{sup -1}. Conversely, the ductile-to-brittle transition in PCTFE occurs between 165 and 200 m s{sup -1} with a gradual transition to stochastic crack formation and ultimately failure. Under Dyn-Ten-Ext loading the onset of extrusion occurs above 164 and 259 m s{sup -1} for PTFE and PCTFE respectively.

  12. Experimental determination of the dynamic tensile strength of liquid Sn, Pb, and Zn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaretsky, E. B.

    2016-07-01

    An experimental technique capable of determining the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of metals in the liquid state is described. Relying on this technique, spall data on samples of tin, lead, and zinc pre-heated to 20 K above their melting points were obtained. It is found that the spall strength of the metals is low, 40-100 MPa, but not zero and is, seemingly, affected by material purity and by the rate of tensile deformation preceding sample spallation.

  13. On the dynamic stability of shear deformable beams under a tensile load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddemi, S.; Caliò, I.; Cannizzaro, F.

    2016-07-01

    Loss of stability of beams in a linear static context due to the action of tensile loads has been disclosed only recently in the scientific literature. However, tensile instability in the dynamic regime has been only marginally covered. Several aspects concerning the role of shear deformation on the tensile dynamic instability on continuous and discontinuous beams are still to be addressed. It may appear as a paradox, but also for the case of the universally studied Timoshenko beam model, despite its old origin, frequency-axial load diagrams in the range of negative values of the load (i.e. tensile load) has never been brought to light. In this paper, for the first time, the influence of a conservative tensile axial loads on the dynamic behaviour of the Timoshenko model, according to the Haringx theory, is assessed. It is shown that, under increasing tensile loads, regions of positive/negative fundamental frequency variations can be distinguished. In addition, the beam undergoes eigen-mode changes, from symmetric to anti-symmetric shapes, until tensile instability of divergence type is reached. As a further original contribution on the subject, taking advantage of a new closed form solution, it is shown that the same peculiarities are recovered for an axially loaded Euler-Bernoulli vibrating beam with multiple elastic sliders. This latter model can be considered as the discrete counterpart of the Timoshenko beam-column in which the internal sliders concentrate the shear deformation that in the Timoshenko model is continuously distributed. Original aspects regarding the evolution of the vibration frequencies and the relevant mode shapes with the tensile load value are highlighted.

  14. Effect of dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degree}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE).

  15. Dynamic tensile material properties of human pelvic cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Andrew R; McNally, Craig; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-01-01

    IIn order for finite element models of the human body to predict pelvic injuries accurately, the appropriate material properties must be applied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the dynamic material properties of human pelvic cortical bone in tension. In order to accomplish this, a total of 20 tension coupon specimens were obtained from four regions of four human cadaver pelves: anterior ilium wing, posterior ilium wing, superior pubic ramus, and ischium body. For the anterior and posterior regions of the ilium wing, samples were taken in two orientations to investigate any direction dependence. A high-rate servo-hydraulic Material Testing System (MTS) with a custom slack adaptor was used to apply tension loads to failure at a constant loading rate of 0.5 strains/s. The horizontally oriented anterior ilium specimens were found to have a significantly larger ultimate stress (p=0.02), ultimate strain (p>0.01), and modulus (p=0.02) than the vertically oriented anterior ilium specimens. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.27), ultimate strain (p=0.85), or modulus (p=0.87) found between horizontally oriented and vertically oriented posterior ilium specimens. However, additional testing should be conducted at specimen orientation 45 degree from the orientations used in the current study to further investigate the effect of specimen orientation on the posterior portion of the ilium wing. There were no significant differences in ultimate stress (p=0.79), ultimate strain (p=0.31), or modulus (p=0.15) found between the superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens. However, the statistical comparison between superior pubic ramus and ischium body specimens was considered weak due to the limited samples and large variation between subjects. PMID:19141951

  16. In situ TEM tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a MEMS device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changhong; Howe, Jane Y; Perovic, Doug; Filleter, Tobin; Sun, Yu

    2016-07-15

    This paper reports in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a monolithic TEM compatible microelectromechanical system device. The set-up allows direct on-chip nanosheet thickness mapping, high resolution electron beam linking of a pre-fractured nanosheet, and mechanical tensile testing of the nanosheet. This technique enables simultaneous mechanical and high energy electron beam characterization of 2D nanomaterials. PMID:27256541

  17. In situ TEM tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a MEMS device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changhong; Howe, Jane Y.; Perovic, Doug; Filleter, Tobin; Sun, Yu

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a monolithic TEM compatible microelectromechanical system device. The set-up allows direct on-chip nanosheet thickness mapping, high resolution electron beam linking of a pre-fractured nanosheet, and mechanical tensile testing of the nanosheet. This technique enables simultaneous mechanical and high energy electron beam characterization of 2D nanomaterials.

  18. In situ TEM tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a MEMS device.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changhong; Howe, Jane Y; Perovic, Doug; Filleter, Tobin; Sun, Yu

    2016-07-15

    This paper reports in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tensile testing of carbon-linked graphene oxide nanosheets using a monolithic TEM compatible microelectromechanical system device. The set-up allows direct on-chip nanosheet thickness mapping, high resolution electron beam linking of a pre-fractured nanosheet, and mechanical tensile testing of the nanosheet. This technique enables simultaneous mechanical and high energy electron beam characterization of 2D nanomaterials.

  19. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  20. Intrinsic tensile properties of cocoon silk fibres can be estimated by removing flaws through repeated tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Kaur, Jasjeet; Wang, Xungai; Batchelor, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibres from silkworm cocoons have lower strength than spider silk and have received less attention as a source of high-performance fibres. In this work, we have used an innovative procedure to eliminate the flaws gradually of a single fibre specimen by retesting the unbroken portion of the fibre, after each fracture test. This was done multiple times so that the final test may provide the intrinsic fibre strength. During each retest, the fibre specimen began to yield once the failure load of the preceding test was exceeded. For each fibre specimen, a composite curve was constructed from multiple tests. The composite curves and analysis show that strengths of mass-produced Muga and Eri cocoon silk fibres increased from 446 to 618 MPa and from 337 to 452 MPa, respectively. Similarly, their toughness increased from 84 to 136 MJ m−3 and from 61 to 104 MJ m−3, respectively. Composite plots produced significantly less inter-specimen variations compared to values from single tests. The fibres with reduced flaws as a result of retests in the tested section have a tensile strength and toughness comparable to naturally spun dragline spider silk with a reported strength of 574 MPa and toughness of 91–158 MJ m−3, which is used as a benchmark for developing high-performance fibres. This retesting approach is likely to provide useful insights into discrete flaw distributions and intrinsic mechanical properties of other fatigue-resistant materials. PMID:25948613

  1. Anisotropic behavior of deep-drawn al 1017 alloy using Macroscopic tensile and cupping tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balogun, S. A.; Esezobor, D. E.; Adeosun, S. O.

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a macromechanical approach for the determination of microstructural integrity of aluminum 1017 alloy (vis-à-vis recrystallization, recovery, and grain growth). Tensile and cupping tests were carried out on cold-rolled 1.2 mm and 1.6 mm samples. The paper examines the variation of the plastic strain ratio, dislocation density, degree of deformation, and ultimate tensile strength of this alloy in relation to the orientation of rolling using macromechanically based stress and strain models.

  2. Subtask 12G2: Effects of dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use as fusion reactor structural materials is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage under conditions relevant to fusion reactor operation. In the present Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates of {approx}0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Li-filled DHCE capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified as the most promising vanadium-base alloy for fusion reactors on the basis of its superior baseline and irradiation properties. Effects of helium on tensile strength and ductility were insignificant after irradiation and testing at >420{degrees}C. Contrary to initial expectation, room-temperature ductilities of DHCE specimens were higher than those of non-DHCE specimens (in which there was negligible helium generation), whereas strengths were lower, indicating that different types of hardening centers are produced during DHCE and non-DHCE irradiation. In strong contrast to tritium-trick experiments in which dense coalescence of helium bubbles is produced on grain boundaries in the absence of displacement damage, no intergranular fracture was observed in any tensile specimens irradiated in the DHCE. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A.; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Raston, Colin L.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes. PMID:26965728

  4. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J; Atwood, Jerry L; Lawrance, Warren D; Raston, Colin L

    2016-01-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes. PMID:26965728

  5. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A.; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Raston, Colin L.

    2016-03-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes.

  6. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J; Atwood, Jerry L; Lawrance, Warren D; Raston, Colin L

    2016-01-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes.

  7. Dependence of Dynamic Tensile Strength of Longyou Sandstone on Heat-Treatment Temperature and Loading Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Kanopolous, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    As a material for famous historical underground rock caverns, Longyou sandstone (LS) may fail under the combination of high loading rate and high temperature. The thermal damage induced by various heat-treatment temperatures (150, 250, 350, 450, 600 and 850 °C) is first characterized by X-ray Micro-computed tomography (CT) method. The damage variable derived from the average CT value for heat-treated LS specimen and reference specimen without heat treatment was used to quantify the thermal damage. The dynamic tensile strengths of these LS samples under different dynamic loading rates (ranging from 24 to 540 GPa/s) were then obtained using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The dynamic tensile strength of LS increases with the loading rate at a given heat-treatment temperature, and the tensile strength at the same loading rate decreases with the heat-treatment temperature except for 450 °C. Based on the experimental data, an empirical equation was established to relate the dynamic tensile strength of LS to the loading rate and the heat-treatment temperature.

  8. Annealing and Test Temperature Dependence of Tensile Properties of UNS N04400 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Naveed; Ahmad, R.; Akhtar, Tanveer; Ayub, R.; Ghauri, I. M.

    2013-07-01

    Effects of annealing and test temperatures on the tensile behavior of UNS N04400 alloy have been examined. The specimens were annealed at 800, 1000, and 1200 °C for 4 h under vacuum in a muffle furnace. Stress-strain curves of the specimens were obtained in the temperature range 25-300 °C using a universal testing machine fitted with a thermostatic chamber. The results indicate that the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and percentage elongation of the specimens decrease with increase of annealing temperature. By increasing the test temperature, the YS and UTS decrease, whereas the percentage elongation initially decreases with increase of test temperature from 25 to 100 °C and then increases with further increasing the temperature up to 300 °C. The changes in the tensile properties of the alloy are associated with the post-annealing microstructure and modes of fracture.

  9. Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

  10. Mechanical tensile testing of titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Martinez, R. M.; Shirron, P.; Tuttle, J.; Galassi, N. M.; McGuinness, D. S.; Puckett, D.; Francis, J. J.; Flom, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 are highly desired materials for structural components in cryogenic applications due to their low thermal conductivity at low temperatures. Previous tests have indicated that titanium 15-3-3-3 becomes increasingly brittle as the temperature decreases. Furthermore, little is known regarding the mechanical properties of Kevlar 49 at low temperatures, most specifically its Young's modulus. This testing investigates the mechanical properties of both materials at cryogenic temperatures through cryogenic mechanical tensile testing to failure. The elongation, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and break strength of both materials are provided and analyzed here.

  11. Numerical and experimental study of cruciform specimens subjected to biaxial tensile test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrusca, L.; Goanta, V.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Steigmann, R.

    2016-08-01

    Multiaxial stress states are very common in engineering applications. To obtain a plane stress state in a material are used different experimental procedures. Biaxial tensile tests of cruciform specimens represent one of the most versatile techniques with accurate results for a wide range of materials. Specimen geometry and size must be adapted to biaxial experiments that use devices attached to universal testing machine. Biaxial tensile tests are performed using cruciform specimens optimized by a numerical study through finite element analysis and a custom built attachable device developed. The results obtained show that the method proposed in this paper can be used with good results to characterize the behaviour of ductile materials.

  12. Carbon Fiber Strand Tensile Failure Dynamic Event Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; Reeder, James

    2016-01-01

    There are few if any clear, visual, and detailed images of carbon fiber strand failures under tension useful for determining mechanisms, sequences of events, different types of failure modes, etc. available to researchers. This makes discussion of physics of failure difficult. It was also desired to find out whether the test article-to-test rig interface (grip) played a part in some failures. These failures have nothing to do with stress rupture failure, thus representing a source of waste for the larger 13-00912 investigation into that specific failure type. Being able to identify or mitigate any competing failure modes would improve the value of the 13-00912 test data. The beginnings of the solution to these problems lay in obtaining images of strand failures useful for understanding physics of failure and the events leading up to failure. Necessary steps include identifying imaging techniques that result in useful data, using those techniques to home in on where in a strand and when in the sequence of events one should obtain imaging data.

  13. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of conditioned foamed asphalt mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) Test for samples prepared with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Samples were conditioned in water at 25°C for 24 hours prior to testing. Results show that recycled aggregate from reclaimed asphalt pavement performs as well as virgin aggregate.

  14. Development on the Tensile Fatigue Test Apparatus and Strength Evaluation of Thin Metal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushi, Miyuki; Miyata, Hiroshi; Murakami, Akira

    Recently, development of medical devices such as catheter and stent are advanced in the low invasion medical field. Considering the functions of human body are affected severely by the medical devices, the high strength reliability of devices must be secured. In these circumstances, the thin metal film, which has high reliability of strength, is useful structural material for further development of low invasion medical device. As the strength characteristics of a thin film depend on thickness and formation process of itself, there is little strength database concerning a thin metal film. In this study, a tensile fatigue testing apparatus with cyclic loading frequency up to 30Hz and maximum loading 8 N for the thin metal film has been developed, and thin rolled films Ti and SUS304 were evaluated on tensile and load-controlled fatigue strength. The static tensile tests give that both are also over the twice of the bulk material on the tensile strength, and the proof stress is high-strength with over 90% of tensile strength respectively. The fatigue test shows that Ti thin film has long life in comparison with the bulk material, however, the fatigue characteristic itself is similar like that of bulk material.

  15. Microstructural evolutions and stability of gradient nano-grained copper under tensile tests and subsequent storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; You, Z. S.; Tao, N. R.; Lu, L.

    2015-08-01

    A gradient nano-grained (GNG) surface layer is produced on a bulk coarse-grained Cu by means of a surface mechanical grinding treatment. Homogeneous grain coarsening induced by mechanical deformation is observed in the GNG Cu layer under tensile tests at both 300 K and 123 K. The concurrent grain coarsening during tensile deformation is proven to be also thermally activated, because the extent of grain coarsening of the GNG Cu layer is less significant at 123 K than at 300 K, although a higher flow stress is achieved at 123 K. During the subsequent storage at 258 K after tensile tests, no obvious change can be found for the grain size in the GNG Cu layer deformed at 300 K. In contrast, widespread abnormal grain coarsening is frequently observed in the GNG Cu layer deformed at 123 K and stored for 100 days, which may be caused by the higher stored energy in the non-equilibrium grain boundary structures.

  16. Mechanical Properties of AN ER Fluid in Tensile, Compression and Oscillatory Squeeze Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, S. L.; Nakano, M.; Oke, R.; Nagata, T.

    In this work, the mechanical properties of an anhydrous electrorheological fluid made of carbonaceous particles dispersed in silicone oil were determined in tensile, compression and oscillatory squeeze tests. The mechanical tests were carried out on a Mechanical Testling Machine and the device developed for measuring the ER properties was composed of two parallel steel electrodes between which the ER fluid was placed. The mechanical properties were measured for different DC electric field strengths, velocity and initial gap between the electrodes, and the ERF was tested in two different ways: (a) the fluid was placed between the electrodes (configuration 1) and (b) the electrodes were immersed inside the ERF (configuration 2). The results showed that the ER fluid is more resistant to compression than to tensile, and that the shape of the tensile stress-strain curve and the tensile strength varies with the electric field strength and the initial gap between the electrodes. The compressive stress increased with the increase of the electric field strength and with the decrease of the gap size and upper electrode velocity. In oscillatory test, for both configurations 1 and 2, increasing the oscillation frequency f and the number of cycles N produced a decrease of the damping performance of the ER fluid. Besides this, the damping force of each cycle in oscillatory tests increased with N. The electric field also played an important role on the shape of the hysteresis loop (stress as a function of fluid strain) for both configurations.

  17. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  18. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2009-03-10

    TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

  19. Evaluation of Tensile Strength of Partial Penetration Butt Welded Joints by Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hiroshi; Kaji, Atsushi

    Partial penetration butt welded joints are widely used because they require relatively less weld metal for fabrication. However, incomplete penetration acts as a crack-like flaw. When the size of flaw in a material is known, the tensile strength of the material can be evaluated using fracture mechanics. This paper deals with a practical method of estimating the size of flaw (the incomplete penetration of a partial penetration butt welded joint) by ultrasonic testing (UT). The refraction angle of the probe and the method of UT are discussed. In addition, tensile strengths of welded joints are evaluated using fracture mechanics, and are found to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Metamodel based optimization of material parameters in a finite element simulation of tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Justin; McKay, Cavendish

    2010-04-01

    We determine the optimum set of parameters for simulating a tensile test of a sample of Zytelnylon resin in a finite element model. Using manufacturer supplied data and initial tensile measurements as starting data, we use a metamodel based optimization scheme to iteratively improve the choice of parameters. The commercial finite element solver LS-DYNA and optimization package LS-Opt are used to assess the quality of the material parameter choice. A map of the response surface is presented to illustrate some challenges with the metamodel based approach.

  1. Finite Element Simulation of Tensile Tests for α-Iron in the Presence of Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premono, Agung; Liu, Lijun; Miresmaeili, Reza; Kanayama, Hiroshi

    In ductile fracture, the cup and cone fracture that occurs at the neck of a specimen is produced by the coalescence of internal voids which in turn grow by plastic deformation under the influence of a prevailing stress triaxiality. In this work, our concern is with regard to hydrogen embrittlement phenomena, where the presence of hydrogen influences the ductile fracture. We correlate the micro-scale void growth to the macro-scale deformation at the center part of the tensile test model of α-Iron to simulate the hydrogen effects on macro- and micro-scale model simultaneously. The tensile test model is used to determine the hydrogen effects at the macro-scale while the internal void model is used to determine the influence of hydrogen on the void growth. Loads in micro-scale are imported from the displacement results at the center part of the macro-scale tensile model. Our findings show that the proposed approach is feasible and can be implemented to correlate the micro-scale void growth to the macro-scale deformation at the center part of the tensile test model of α-Iron in the presence of hydrogen. Due to limitations of experimental data for hydrogen-material interaction, only α-Iron is considered in this study.

  2. Analysis of Factors Influencing Measurement Accuracy of Al Alloy Tensile Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornik, Bojan; Žužek, Borut; Sedlaček, Marko; Kevorkijan, Varužan; Hostej, Boris

    2016-02-01

    In order to properly use materials in design, a complete understanding of and information on their mechanical properties, such as yield and ultimate tensile strength must be obtained. Furthermore, as the design of automotive parts is constantly pushed toward higher limits, excessive measuring uncertainty can lead to unexpected premature failure of the component, thus requiring reliable determination of material properties with low uncertainty. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of different metrology factors, including the number of tested samples, specimens machining and surface quality, specimens input diameter, type of testing and human error on the tensile test results and measurement uncertainty when performed on 2xxx series Al alloy. Results show that the most significant contribution to measurement uncertainty comes from the number of samples tested, which can even exceed 1 %. Furthermore, moving from experimental laboratory conditions to very intense industrial environment further amplifies measurement uncertainty, where even if using automated systems human error cannot be neglected.

  3. Influence of uniaxial, biaxial and plane strain pre-straining on the dynamic tensile properties of high strength sheet steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larour, P.; Verleysen, P.; Bleck, W.

    2006-08-01

    The influence of pre-straining and microstructure on the dynamic properties of car body high strength steels has been investigated at room temperature. The mechanical properties of a dual phase steel DP600, a TRIP steel TRIP700 and an austenitic steel AISI 301LN2B (1.4318) have been determined performing high speed servohydraulic and split-Hopkinson bar tensile tests in the strain rate range from 0.005s-1 up to 950s-1. The pre-straining modes and levels, respectively 10% uniaxial, 10% plane strain and 5% biaxial pre-straining, have been chosen in this investigation according to industrial use. 10% plane strain pre-straining brings the highest increase of yield and tensile strength values. 5% biaxial and 10% uniaxial pre-straining have similar effect on strength properties. The austenitic steel presents a pronounced minimum for tensile strength values at around 1/s. A combination of adiabatic heating and exothermic γ to α' transformation produces some significant softening effects in the austenitic steel grade.

  4. Ten deg off-axis tensile test for intralaminar shear characterization of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen for the intralaminar shear characterization of unidirectional composites. Composite mechanics, a combined-stress failure criterion, and a finite element analysis were used to determine theoretically the stress-strain variation across the specimen width and the relative stress and strain magnitudes at the 10 deg plane. Strain gages were used to measure the strain variation across the specimen width at specimen midlength and near the end tabs. Specimens from Mod-I/epoxy, T-300/epoxy, and S-glass/epoxy were used in the experimental program. It was found that the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen is suitable for intralaminar shear characterization and it is recommended that it should be considered as a possible standard test specimen for such a characterization.

  5. Tensile test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Fujisawa, Y.; Takahara, K.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile strength tests of pressureless sintered silicon nitride were carried out in air at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to 1600 C. Silicon nitrides containing Y2O3, Al2O3, Al2O3-MgO, or MgO-CeO2 additives were tested. The results show that the composition of the additive used influences the strength characteristics of the silicon nitride. The tensile strength rapidly decreased at temperatures above 1000 C for the materials containing MgO as the additive and above 1000 C for the material with Y2O3. When the temperature increased to as high as 1300 C, the strength decreased to about 10 percent of the room temperature strength in each case. Observations of the fracture origin and of the crack propagation on the fracture surfaces are discussed.

  6. Microstructure and fracture behavior of F82H steel under different irradiation and tensile test conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of martensitic steel F82H were irradiated to doses ranging from 10.7 dpa/850 appm He to 19.6 dpa/1740 appm He at temperatures between 165 and 305 °C in the second experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-II). Tensile tests were conducted at different temperatures and various fracture modes were observed. Microstructural changes including irradiation-induced defect clusters, dislocation loops and helium bubbles under different irradiation conditions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deformation microstructures of tensile tested specimens were carefully examined to understand the underlying deformation mechanisms. Deformation twinning was for the first time observed in irradiated martensitic steels. A change of deformation mechanism from dislocation channeling to deformation twinning was observed when the fracture mode changed from rather ductile (quasi-cleavage) to brittle (intergranular or cleavage and intergranular mixed).

  7. Ethylene propylene cable degradation during LOCA research tests: tensile properties at the completion of accelerated aging

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1982-05-01

    Six ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) insulation materials were aged at elevated temperature and radiation stress exposures common in cable LOCA qualification tests. Material samples were subjected to various simultaneous and sequential aging simulations in preparation for accident environmental exposures. Tensile properties subsequent to the aging exposure sequences are reported. The tensile properties of some, but not all, specimens were sensitive to the order of radiation and elevated temperature stress exposure. Other specimens showed more severe degradation when simultaneously exposed to radiation and elevated temperature as opposed to the sequential exposure to the same stresses. Results illustrate the difficulty in defining a single test procedure for nuclear safety-related qualification of EPR elastomers. A common worst-case sequential aging sequence could not be identified.

  8. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  9. A Constitutive Model of 6111-T4 Aluminum Alloy Sheet Based on the Warm Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Lin; Meng, Fanzhi; Song, Yanli; Liu, Jianing; Qin, Xunpeng; Suo, Lianbing

    2014-03-01

    As main light-weight material, aluminum alloy sheets have been widely applied to produce auto body panels. In order to predict the formability and springback of aluminum alloy sheets, a precise constitutive model is a necessity. In this article, a series of warm tensile tests were conducted on Gleeble-1500D thermal mechanical simulator for 6111-T4 aluminum alloy sheets. The corresponding strain rate ranged from 0.015 to 1.5 s-1, and the temperature ranged from 25 to 350 °C. The relationship between the temperature, the strain rate, and the flow stress were discussed. A constitutive model based on the updated Fields-Backofen equation was established to describe the flow behavior of 6111-T4 aluminum alloy during the warm tensile tests. Subsequently, the average absolute relative error (AARE) was introduced to verify the predictability of the constitutive model. The value of AARE at the uniform plastic deformation stage was calculated to be 1.677%, which demonstrates that the predicted flow stress values were in accordance with the experimental ones. The constitutive model was validated by the fact that the simulated results of the warm tensile tests coincided with the experimental ones.

  10. Computer-assisted recording of tensile tests for the evaluation of serrated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhandl, H.; Mitter, F.; Bernt, W.; Kumar, S.; Pink, E. . Erich-Schmid-Inst. fuer Festkoerperphysik)

    1994-12-01

    In a previous paper the authors pointed out the difficulties which arise in the evaluation of serrated flow curves when the applied tensile strain rates are just above normal''. The recording system of tensile testing machines which were built, say, twenty years ago, are not capable of recording the full size of the load drops due to the inertia of the recording pen. This handicap was then overcome by establishing correction factors which were determined from recording a small number of load drops with an oscilloscope. Modern testing machines are equipped with digital recording. The disadvantage of the common system is, however, their limited capacity, so that not enough space for data points is available. Consequently, the time intervals between data points are of the order of tenths of seconds. It will become obvious from the present results that such a time interval is too large for recording a correct serration size. This report is concerned with the recording of complete load-extension relations during tensile tests using a computer which is capable of storing the data at sufficiently small time intervals.

  11. Tensile-shear correlations obtained from shear punch test technique using a modified experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, V.; Visweswaran, P.; Vijayraghavan, A.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Raj, Baldev

    2009-09-01

    Shear punch testing has been a very useful technique for evaluating mechanical properties of irradiated alloys using a very small volume of material. The load-displacement data is influenced by the compliance of the fixture components. This paper describes a modified experimental approach where the compliances of the punch and die components are eliminated. The analysis of the load-displacement data using the modified setup for various alloys like low carbon steel, SS316, modified 9Cr-1Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo indicate that the shear yield strength evaluated at 0.2% offset of normalized displacement relates to the tensile YS as per the Von Mises yield relation ( σys = 1.73 τys). A universal correlation of type UTS = mτmax where m is a function of strain hardening exponent, is seen to be obeyed for all the materials in this study. The use of analytical models developed for blanking process are explored for evaluating strain hardening exponent from the load-displacement data. This study is directed towards rationalizing the tensile-shear empirical correlations for a more reliable prediction of tensile properties from shear punch tests.

  12. Strength, Hardening, and Failure Observed by In Situ TEM Tensile Testing.

    PubMed

    Kiener, Daniel; Kaufmann, Petra; Minor, Andrew M

    2012-11-01

    We present in situ transmission electron microscope tensile tests on focused ion beam fabricated single and multiple slip oriented Cu tensile samples with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm. Both crystal orientations fail by localized shear. While failure occurs after a few percent plastic strain and limited hardening in the single slip case, the multiple slip samples exhibit extended homogenous deformation and necking due to the activation of multiple dislocation sources in conjunction with significant hardening. The hardening behavior at 1% plastic strain is even more pronounced compared to compression samples of the same orientation due to the absence of sample taper and the interface to the compression platen. Moreover, we show for the first time that the strain rate sensitivity of such FIB prepared samples is an order of magnitude higher than that of bulk Cu.

  13. Application of a tensile-strength test method to the evaluation of hydrating hair products.

    PubMed

    Mercelot, V

    1998-08-01

    The usual methods applied to studying the hydration state of hair (e.g. gravimetry, microscopy, evaporimetry) are mostly concerned with a limited area of the fibre. Consequently, the results obtained do not reflect the variability of the physicochemical properties of the whole fibre. Moreover, there are not many experimental methods to evaluate the hydrating power of hair care products in the literature. This study proposes a new method to measure the hydration state of treated or untreated hair by using a tensile strength test. A graphic analysis of tensile strength variation as a function of relative humidity after hair treatment allows the calculation of three hydration indexes: protection index, instant hydration index and permanent hydration index. This technique can give useful information on the behaviour of hair versus relative humidity and on the different hydrating mechanisms exhibited by hair care products.

  14. Investigation on thermoformability of PLA by rheological and hot tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, Emilia; Iannaccone, Giovanni; Scarfato, Paola; Di Maio, Luciano; Incarnato, Loredana

    2012-07-01

    In this work the correlation between the thermoformability of different grades of polylactide acid (PLA 4032D, PLA 4042D and PLA 2003D) and their mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties was explored. In particular, hot tensile tests, at different stretching temperatures and crosshead speeds, were performed in order to identify an optimum windows of temperature and strain rate for improved thermoforming performance. The properties measured from the creep experiments were correlated with the propensity of PLA sheet to sag, while the unrecovered strains by the creep recovery tests were associated to mold replication attitude of the materials investigated.

  15. Self-Healing Nanofiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites. 1. Tensile Testing and Recovery of Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; An, Seongpil; Jo, Hong Seok; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2015-09-01

    The present work aims at development of self-healing materials capable of partially restoring their mechanical properties under the conditions of prolonged periodic loading and unloading, which is characteristic, for example, of aerospace applications. Composite materials used in these and many other applications frequently reveal multiple defects stemming from their original inhomogeneity, which facilitates microcracking and delamination at ply interfaces. Self-healing nanofiber mats may effectively prevent such damage without compromising material integrity. Two types of core-shell nanofibers were simultaneously electrospun onto the same substrate in order to form a mutually entangled mat. The first type of core-shell fibers consisted of resin monomer (dimethylsiloxane) within the core and polyacrylonitrile within the shell. The second type of core-shell nanofibers consisted of cure (dimethyl-methyl hydrogen-siloxane) within the core and polyacrylonitrile within the shell. These mutually entangled nanofiber mats were used for tensile testing, and they were also encased in polydimethylsiloxane to form composites that were also subsequently subjected to tensile testing. During tensile tests, the nanofibers can be damaged in stretching up to the plastic regime of deformation. Then, the resin monomer and cure was released from the cores and the polydimethylsiloxane resin was polymerized, which might be expected to result in the self-healing properties of these materials. To reveal and evaluate the self-healing properties of the polyacrylonitrile-resin-cure nanofiber mats and their composites, the results were compared to the tensile test results of the monolithic polyacrylonitrile nanofiber mats or composites formed by encasing polyacrylonitrile nanofibers in a polydimethylsiloxane matrix. The latter do not possess self-healing properties, and indeed, do not recover their mechanical characteristics, in contrast to the polyacrylonitrile-resin-cure nanofiber mats and

  16. Infarcted rat myocardium: Data from biaxial tensile and uniaxial compressive testing and analysis of collagen fibre orientation.

    PubMed

    Sirry, Mazin S; Butler, J Ryan; Patnaik, Sourav S; Brazile, Bryn; Bertucci, Robbin; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ron; Davies, Neil H; Liao, Jun; Franz, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Myocardial infarction was experimentally induced in rat hearts and harvested immediately, 7, 14 and 28 days after the infarction induction. Anterior wall infarct samples underwent biaxial tensile and uniaxial compressive testing. Orientation of collagen fibres was analysed following mechanical testing. In this paper, we present the tensile and compressive stress-strain raw data, the calculated tensile and compressive moduli and the measured angles of collagen orientation. The presented data is associated with the research article titled "Characterisation of the mechanical properties of infarcted myocardium in the rat under biaxial tension and uniaxial compression" (Sirry et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27579338

  17. Lamb wave ultrasonic evaluation of welded AA2024 specimens at tensile static and fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, M. V.; Byakov, A. V.; Shah, R. T.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of Lamb waves ultrasonic testing technique applied for evaluation of different stress-strain and damaged state of aluminum specimens at static and fatigue loading in order to develop a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) approach. The experimental results of tensile testing of AA2024T3 specimens with welded joints are presented. Piezoelectric transducers used as actuators and sensors were adhesively bonded to the specimen's surface using two component epoxy. The set of static and cyclic tensile tests with two frequencies of acoustic testing (50 kHz and 335 kHz) were performed. The recorded signals were processed to calculate the maximum envelope in order to evaluate the changes of the stress-strain state of the specimen and its microstructure during static tension. The registered data are analyzed and discussed in terms of signal attenuation due to the formation of fatigue defects during cyclic loading. Understanding the relations between acoustic signal features and fatigue damages will provide us the ability to determine the damage state of the structure and its residual lifetime in order to design a robust SHM system.

  18. An investigation of the dynamic separation of spot welds under plane tensile pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Bohan; Fan, Chunlei; Chen, Danian Wang, Huanran; Zhou, Fenghua

    2014-08-07

    We performed ultra-high-speed tests for purely opening spot welds using plane tensile pulses. A gun system generated a parallel impact of a projectile plate onto a welded plate. Induced by the interactions of the release waves, the welded plate opened purely under the plane tensile pulses. We used the laser velocity interferometer system for any reflector to measure the velocity histories of the free surfaces of the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate. We then used a scanning electron microscope to investigate the recovered welded plates. We found that the interfacial failure mode was mainly a brittle fracture and the cracks propagated through the spot nugget, while the partial interfacial failure mode was a mixed fracture comprised ductile fracture and brittle fracture. We used the measured velocity histories to evaluate the tension stresses in the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate by applying the characteristic theory. We also discussed the different constitutive behaviors of the metals under plane shock loading and under uniaxial split Hopkinson pressure bar tests. We then compared the numerically simulated velocity histories of the free surfaces of the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate with the measured results. The numerical simulations made use of the fracture stress criteria, and then the computed fracture modes of the tests were compared with the recovered results.

  19. A comparative study on the restrictions of dynamic test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoobi, GH.; Lahmi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic behavior of materials is investigated using different devices. Each of the devices has some restrictions. For instance, the stress-strain curve of the materials can be captured at high strain rates only with Hopkinson bar. However, by using a new approach some of the other techniques could be used to obtain the constants of material models such as Johnson-Cook model too. In this work, the restrictions of some devices such as drop hammer, Taylor test, Flying wedge, Shot impact test, dynamic tensile extrusion and Hopkinson bars which are used to characterize the material properties at high strain rates are described. The level of strain and strain rate and their restrictions are very important in examining the efficiency of each of the devices. For instance, necking or bulging in tensile and compressive Hopkinson bars, fragmentation in dynamic tensile extrusion and petaling in Taylor test are restricting issues in the level of strain rate attainable in the devices.

  20. Design and construction of a tensile tester for the testing of simple composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borst, Mark A.; Spiegel, F. Xavier

    1994-01-01

    The following is a design for a tensile tester which will be used to test the tensile strength and anisotropic properties of simple composites. These simple composites are suspected to be anisotropic primarily in a single plane. When the composites undergo a tensile force, they will undergo deformation, causing movement either to the left or right. The composites are suspect due to their method of construction. Each sample has a single layer of unidirectional continuous fibers embedded in a rubbery resin. It has been well established that a serious limitation of unidirectional fiber composites is the very large in-plane anisotropy. The design presented here incorporates a single degree of freedom such that distortion (to the left or right) due to anisotropic tendencies may be measured. The device will spend the vast majority of its time in an undergraduate materials lab. As a result, ease of use and durability are valued more highly than research grade accuracy. Additional concerns focus on the fact that this machine will be built as a student project. Issues which are dealt with during this design include: specimen configuration or shape; a method of applying consistent, linear tension force; a method of gripping specimen without affecting its overall properties; a method of collecting data; repeatability of data; ease of use; ease of construction; and cost. After the device has been constructed, it will be used to test the simple composites which were fabricated in house. A comparison will be made between composites manufactured using aluminum screening as the strengthening fibers and those manufactured using fiberglass screening.

  1. Dynamic behavior of nano-voids in magnesium under hydrostatic tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponga, Mauricio; Ramabathiran, Amuthan A.; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the mechanisms responsible for nano-void growth in single crystal magnesium under dynamic hydrostatic tensile stress. A key conclusion derived from our study is that there is no secondary strain hardening near the nano-void. This behavior, which is in remarkable contrast to face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic materials, greatly limits the peak stress and explains the relatively lower spall strength of magnesium. The lack of secondary strain hardening is due to the fact that pyramidal dislocations do not interact with basal or prismatic dislocations. Our analysis also shows that for loads applied at moderate strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ε} ≤slant {{10}6} s‑1) the peak stress, dislocation velocity and temperature distribution converge asymptotically. However at very high strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ε} ≥slant {{10}8} s‑1), there is a sharp transition in these quantities.

  2. Change in dynamic young's modulus of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite during tensile and compressive stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.; Oku, T.

    1983-12-01

    The effect of mechanical stresses on the dynamic Young's modulus measured by the ultrasonic wave method was examined for an isotropic graphite. Young's modulus of the graphite decreased with increasing applied stress, though the amount of its decrease was different between tensile and compressive stresses. The change in Young's modulus under mechanical stresses clearly corresponded to the stress-strain behavior of the graphite. Change in pore volume caused by mechanical stressing plays an important role in the decrease in Young's modulus under tension and compression. The change in Young's modulus was well represented by the formula E/E 0 = exp(- Aɛ + B) within a limited strain. A and B in the equation appeared to differ between tension and compression. The strain above which the formula showed deviation would be associated with the formation of cracks as observed in previous work.

  3. Dynamic behavior of nano-voids in magnesium under hydrostatic tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponga, Mauricio; Ramabathiran, Amuthan A.; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the mechanisms responsible for nano-void growth in single crystal magnesium under dynamic hydrostatic tensile stress. A key conclusion derived from our study is that there is no secondary strain hardening near the nano-void. This behavior, which is in remarkable contrast to face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic materials, greatly limits the peak stress and explains the relatively lower spall strength of magnesium. The lack of secondary strain hardening is due to the fact that pyramidal dislocations do not interact with basal or prismatic dislocations. Our analysis also shows that for loads applied at moderate strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ɛ} ≤slant {{10}6} s-1) the peak stress, dislocation velocity and temperature distribution converge asymptotically. However at very high strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ɛ} ≥slant {{10}8} s-1), there is a sharp transition in these quantities.

  4. Dynamic tensile forces drive collective cell migration through three-dimensional extracellular matrices

    PubMed Central

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; S. Piotrowski, Alexandra; Varner, Victor D.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collective cell migration drives tissue remodeling during development, wound repair, and metastatic invasion. The physical mechanisms by which cells move cohesively through dense three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) remain incompletely understood. Here, we show directly that migration of multicellular cohorts through collagenous matrices occurs via a dynamic pulling mechanism, the nature of which had only been inferred previously in 3D. Tensile forces increase at the invasive front of cohorts, serving a physical, propelling role as well as a regulatory one by conditioning the cells and matrix for further extension. These forces elicit mechanosensitive signaling within the leading edge and align the ECM, creating microtracks conducive to further migration. Moreover, cell movements are highly correlated and in phase with ECM deformations. Migrating cohorts use spatially localized, long-range forces and consequent matrix alignment to navigate through the ECM. These results suggest biophysical forces are critical for 3D collective migration. PMID:26165921

  5. Tensile and fatigue qualification testing of ITER-CS conduit alloy JK2LB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; McRae, D. M.; Han, K.; Martovetsky, N. N.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) coils utilize cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) and the conduit alloy is JK2LB. The production grade conduit alloy (and it's welds) must meet strict requirements for strength, toughness, fatigue crack resistance, and fabricability. The conduit alloy must retain good mechanical properties after additional fabrication steps such as welding, coil winding strain and exposure to the Nb3Sn superconductor's reaction heat treatment. Here we present data from cryogenic tensile, fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth rate, and axial fatigue tests of JK2LB alloy and conduit butt welds, before and after the exposure to the reaction heat treatment. The tests of specimens removed directly from the conduit provide confirmation of the materials properties and the effect of the cold work and aging. The 4 K fatigue performance is extremely important to the reliability of the CS and is covered both by axial cyclic fatigue tests and the fatigue crack growth rate measurements.

  6. Effects of oxidation on tensile deformation of iron nanowires: Insights from reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aral, Gurcan; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Ogata, Shigenobu; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of oxidation on the mechanical properties of nanostructured metals is rarely explored and remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, in this work, we systematically investigate the mechanical properties and changes in the metallic iron (Fe) nanowires (NWs) under various atmospheric conditions of ambient dry O2 and in a vacuum. More specifically, we focus on the effect of oxide shell layer thickness over Fe NW surfaces at room temperature. We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the variable charge ReaxFF force field potential model that dynamically handles charge variation among atoms as well as breaking and forming of the chemical bonds associated with the oxidation reaction. The ReaxFF potential model allows us to study large length scale mechanical atomistic deformation processes under the tensile strain deformation process, coupled with quantum mechanically accurate descriptions of chemical reactions. To study the influence of an oxide layer, three oxide shell layer thicknesses of ˜4.81 Å, ˜5.33 Å, and ˜6.57 Å are formed on the pure Fe NW free surfaces. It is observed that the increase in the oxide layer thickness on the Fe NW surface reduces both the yield stress and the critical strain. We further note that the tensile mechanical deformation behaviors of Fe NWs are dependent on the presence of surface oxidation, which lowers the onset of plastic deformation. Our MD simulations show that twinning is of significant importance in the mechanical behavior of the pure and oxide-coated Fe NWs; however, twin nucleation occurs at a lower strain level when Fe NWs are coated with thicker oxide layers. The increase in the oxide shell layer thickness also reduces the external stress required to initiate plastic deformation.

  7. Baseline tensile tests of composite materials for LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Tensile specimens of five graphite fiber reinforced composite materials were tested at room temperature to provide baseline data for similar specimens exposed to the space environment in low-Earth orbit on the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility. All specimens were 4-ply (+ or - 45 deg)s layups; at least five replicate specimens were tested for each parameter evaluated. Three epoxy-matrix materials and two polysulfone-matrix materials, several fiber volume fractions, and two sizes of specimen were evaluated. Stress-strain and Poisson's ratio-stress curves, ultimate stress, strain at failure, secant modulus at 0.004 strain, inplane shear stress-strain curves, and unidirectional shear modulus at .004 shear strain are presented.

  8. Multiscale stochastic simulations for tensile testing of nanotube-based macroscopic cables.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M; Bosia, Federico; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2008-08-01

    Thousands of multiscale stochastic simulations are carried out in order to perform the first in-silico tensile tests of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based macroscopic cables with varying length. The longest treated cable is the space-elevator megacable but more realistic shorter cables are also considered in this bottom-up investigation. Different sizes, shapes, and concentrations of defects are simulated, resulting in cable macrostrengths not larger than approximately 10 GPa, which is much smaller than the theoretical nanotube strength (approximately 100 GPa). No best-fit parameters are present in the multiscale simulations: the input at level 1 is directly estimated from nanotensile tests of CNTs, whereas its output is considered as the input for the level 2, and so on up to level 5, corresponding to the megacable. Thus, five hierarchical levels are used to span lengths from that of a single nanotube (approximately 100 nm) to that of the space-elevator megacable (approximately 100 Mm). PMID:18666164

  9. Multiscale stochastic simulations for tensile testing of nanotube-based macroscopic cables.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M; Bosia, Federico; Carpinteri, Alberto

    2008-08-01

    Thousands of multiscale stochastic simulations are carried out in order to perform the first in-silico tensile tests of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based macroscopic cables with varying length. The longest treated cable is the space-elevator megacable but more realistic shorter cables are also considered in this bottom-up investigation. Different sizes, shapes, and concentrations of defects are simulated, resulting in cable macrostrengths not larger than approximately 10 GPa, which is much smaller than the theoretical nanotube strength (approximately 100 GPa). No best-fit parameters are present in the multiscale simulations: the input at level 1 is directly estimated from nanotensile tests of CNTs, whereas its output is considered as the input for the level 2, and so on up to level 5, corresponding to the megacable. Thus, five hierarchical levels are used to span lengths from that of a single nanotube (approximately 100 nm) to that of the space-elevator megacable (approximately 100 Mm).

  10. Tensile and burst tests in support of the cadmium safety rod failure evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-02-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. This report discusses confirmatory separate effects tests conducted to support the evaluation of failures observed in the safety rod thermal tests. As part of the failure evaluation, the potential for liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of the safety rod cladding by cadmium (Cd) -- aluminum (Al) solutions was examined. Based on the test conditions, literature data, and U-Bend tests, its was concluded that the SS304 safety rod cladding would not be subject to LME by liquid Cd-Al solutions under conditions relevant to the safety rod thermal tests or gamma heating accident. To confirm this conclusion, tensile tests on SS304 specimens were performed in both air and liquid Cd-Al solutions with the range of strain rates, temperatures, and loading conditions spanning the range relevant to the safety rod thermal tests and gamma heating accident.

  11. Inflation and Bi-Axial Tensile Testing of Healthy Porcine Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Boekhoven, Renate W; Peters, Mathijs F J; Rutten, Marcel C M; van Sambeek, Marc R; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the intrinsic material properties of healthy and diseased arterial tissue components is of great importance in diagnostics. This study describes an in vitro comparison of 13 porcine carotid arteries using inflation testing combined with functional ultrasound and bi-axial tensile testing. The measured tissue behavior was described using both a linear, but geometrically non-linear, one-parameter (neo-Hookean) model and a two-parameter non-linear (Demiray) model. The shear modulus estimated using the linear model resulted in good agreement between the ultrasound and tensile testing methods, GUS = 25 ± 5.7 kPa and GTT = 23 ± 5.4 kPa. No significant correspondence was observed for the non-linear model aUS = 1.0 ± 2.7 kPa vs. aTT = 17 ± 8.8 kPa, p ∼ 0); however, the exponential parameters were in correspondence (bUS = 12 ± 4.2 vs. bTT = 10 ± 1.7, p > 0.05). Estimation of more complex models in vivo is cumbersome considering the sensitivity of the model parameters to small changes in measurement data and the absence of intraluminal pressure data, endorsing the use of a simple, linear model in vivo.

  12. Directionally solidified lamellar eutectic superalloys by edge-defined, film-fed growth. [including tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was performed to scale up the edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) method for the gamma/gamma prime-beta eutectic alloy of the nominal composition Ni-19.7 Cb - 6 Cr-2.5 Al. Procedures and problem areas are described. Flat bars approximately 12 x 1.7 x 200 mm were grown, mostly at speeds of 38 mm/hr, and tensile tests on these bars at 25 and 1000 C showed lower strength than expected. The feasibility of growing hollow airfoils was also demonstrated by growing bars over 200 mm long with a teardrop shaped cross-section, having a major dimension of 12 mm and a maximum width of 5 mm.

  13. Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires studied by tensile tests

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.; Wei, X. L. E-mail: qingchen@pku.edu.cn; Xu, T. T.; Ning, Z. Y.; Shu, J. P.; Chen, Q. E-mail: qingchen@pku.edu.cn; Wang, X. Y.; Pan, D.; Zhao, J. H.; Yang, T.

    2014-03-10

    Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires (NWs) synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods are studied by in-situ tensile tests in a scanning electron microscope and their fracture strength and Young's modulus are obtained. The two types of NWs both exhibit brittle fracture with a maximum elastic strain up to ∼10%. Their fracture strength distributes in a similar range of ∼2–5 GPa with a general trend of increasing with NW volume decrease, which is well described by Weibull statistic with a smaller Weibull modulus and a higher characteristic strength for MOCVD NWs. Young's modulus is determined to be 16–78 GPa with an average value of 45 GPa and no dependence on NW diameter for MOCVD NWs and 34–79 GPa with an average value of 58 GPa for MBE NWs.

  14. Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires studied by tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Wei, X. L.; Xu, T. T.; Ning, Z. Y.; Shu, J. P.; Wang, X. Y.; Pan, D.; Zhao, J. H.; Yang, T.; Chen, Q.

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical properties of individual InAs nanowires (NWs) synthesized by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods are studied by in-situ tensile tests in a scanning electron microscope and their fracture strength and Young's modulus are obtained. The two types of NWs both exhibit brittle fracture with a maximum elastic strain up to ˜10%. Their fracture strength distributes in a similar range of ˜2-5 GPa with a general trend of increasing with NW volume decrease, which is well described by Weibull statistic with a smaller Weibull modulus and a higher characteristic strength for MOCVD NWs. Young's modulus is determined to be 16-78 GPa with an average value of 45 GPa and no dependence on NW diameter for MOCVD NWs and 34-79 GPa with an average value of 58 GPa for MBE NWs.

  15. An In-situ Tensile Test Apparatus for Polymers in High Pressure Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Pitman, Stan G.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Tucker, Joseph C.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2014-10-10

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex-situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in-situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials like Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in-situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 5,000 psi. Modulus data from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  16. An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, K. J. Kafentzis, T. A.; Pitman, S. G.; Johnson, K. I.; Skorski, D.; Tucker, J. C.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Dahl, M. E.

    2014-10-15

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  17. An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Alvine, K J; Kafentzis, T A; Pitman, S G; Johnson, K I; Skorski, D; Tucker, J C; Roosendaal, T J; Dahl, M E

    2014-10-01

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  18. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  19. Tensile toughness test and high temperature fracture analysis of thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, G.; Nakamura, T.; Berndt, C.C.; Leigh, S.H.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, an effective fracture toughness test which uses interface fracture mechanics theory is introduced. This method is ideally suited for determining fracture resistance of multilayered thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) consisting of ceramic and bond layers and, unlike other fracture experiments, requires minimal set-up over a simple tensile adhesion test. Furthermore, while other test methods usually use edge cracked specimens, the present test models a crack embedded within the coatings, which is more consistent with actual TBCs where failure initiates from internal voids or defects. The results of combined computational and experimental analysis show that any defects located within the ceramic coating can significantly weaken a TBC, whereas the debonding resistances of the bond coating and its interfaces are found to be much higher. In a separate analysis, the authors have studied fracture behavior of TBCs subjected to thermal loading in a high temperature environment. The computed fracture parameters reveal that when the embedded crack size is on order of the coating thickness, the fracture driving force is comparable to the fracture resistance of the coating found in the toughness test. In addition, the major driving force for fracture derives from the thermal insulating effect across the crack faces rather than the mismatch in the coefficients of thermal expansion. The authors have also investigated the effects of functionally graded material (FGM) within TBCs and found its influences on the fracture parameters to be small. This result implies that the FGM may not contribute toward enhancing the fracture toughness of the TBCs considered here.

  20. Effect of native oxide layers on copper thin-film tensile properties: A reactive molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlinski, Michael D.; Quesnel, David J.

    2015-12-01

    Metal-oxide layers are likely to be present on metallic nano-structures due to either environmental exposure during use, or high temperature processing techniques such as annealing. It is well known that nano-structured metals have vastly different mechanical properties from bulk metals; however, difficulties in modeling the transition between metallic and ionic bonding have prevented the computational investigation of the effects of oxide surface layers. Newly developed charge-optimized many body [Liang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., R 74, 255 (2013)] potentials are used to perform fully reactive molecular dynamics simulations which elucidate the effects that metal-oxide layers have on the mechanical properties of a copper thin-film. Simulated tensile tests are performed on thin-films while using different strain-rates, temperatures, and oxide thicknesses to evaluate changes in yield stress, modulus, and failure mechanisms. Findings indicate that copper-thin film mechanical properties are strongly affected by native oxide layers. The formed oxide layers have an amorphous structure with lower Cu-O bond-densities than bulk CuO, and a mixture of Cu2O and CuO charge character. It is found that oxidation will cause modifications to the strain response of the elastic modulii, producing a stiffened modulii at low temperatures (<75 K) and low strain values (<5%), and a softened modulii at higher temperatures. While under strain, structural reorganization within the oxide layers facilitates brittle yielding through nucleation of defects across the oxide/metal interface. The oxide-free copper thin-film yielding mechanism is found to be a tensile-axis reorientation and grain creation. The oxide layers change the observed yielding mechanism, allowing for the inner copper thin-film to sustain an FCC-to-BCC transition during yielding. The mechanical properties are fit to a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory. The fit implies that the oxidation of the films

  1. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the tensile behavior of a thermosetting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaorui; Qu, Jianmin

    2014-07-01

    Using a previously developed coarse-grained model, we conducted large-scale (˜85×85×85nm3) molecular dynamics simulations of uniaxial-strain deformation to study the tensile behavior of an epoxy molding compound, epoxy phenol novolacs (EPN) bisphenol A (BPA). Under the uniaxial-strain deformation, the material is found to exhibit cavity nucleation and growth, followed by stretching of the ligaments separated by the cavities, until the ultimate failure through ligament scissions. The nucleation sites of cavities are rather random and the subsequent cavity growth accounts for much (87%) of the volumetric change during the uniaxial-strain deformation. Ultimate failure of the materials occurs when the cavity volume fraction reaches ˜60%. During the entire deformation process, polymer strands in the network are continuously extended to their linear states and broken in the postyielding strain hardening stage. When most of the strands are stretched to their taut configurations, rapid scission of a large number of strands occurs within a small strain increment, which eventually leads to fracture. Finally, through extensive numerical simulations of various loading conditions in addition to uniaxial strain, we find that yielding of the EPN-BPA can be described by the pressure-modified von Mises yield criterion.

  2. DYNAMIC DUCTILE EVOLUTION AND TENSILE FRACTURE: NEW EXPERIMENTAL INSIGHTS FOR MODELS EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    A. ZUREK

    2000-08-01

    Under dynamic loading conditions, the rapid nature of the fracture process may simultaneously activate a considerable number of nucleation sites for void formation at the region of the tensile stress field. The growth and coalescence of these voids forms the deformation plane and eventually the fracture surface. Attempts to quantify damage evolution during fracture using microstructural observations, specifically for spallation, were pioneered by Seaman and his coworkers. They performed incipient spallation experiments in which they imposed a peak stress below the spall strength of the material, thereby developing an incipient spallation zone rather than complete separation. When this experimental methodology is applied, recovery techniques are utilized to recover the deformed samples without introducing any additional damage. Seaman and his coworkers, and later Lacomme, et al., developed damage quantification techniques based on area measurements of incipient fracture. However, measuring the area of a fracture opening with a certain degree of precision from a two dimensional image can be extremely inaccurate due to the irregular shape of the image. In recent years several techniques have been developed, or improved, that may allow a better and more accurate quantification of image features observed in metallographic analyses in incipient damage of fracture surfaces. Many of these measured quantities are essential towards developing a solid, robust understanding necessary for a good constitutive model.

  3. Influence of Shock Prestraining and Grain Size on the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion Response of Copper: Experiments and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G. T. III; Cerreta, E.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Addessio, L. B.; Henrie, B. L.; Sencer, B. H.; Maloy, S. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Lopez, M. F.; Burkett, M.; Maudlin, P. J.

    2006-07-28

    The mechanical behavior of, and damage evolution in high-purity Cu is influenced by strain rate, temperature, stress state, grain size, and shock prestraining. The effects of grain size on the tensile mechanical response of high-purity Cu have been probed and are correlated with the evolution of the substructure. The dynamic extrusion response of shock prestrained Cu demonstrates the significant influence of grain size on the large-strain dynamic tensile ductility of high-purity copper. Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress constitutive model were performed to provide insight into the dynamic extrusion process. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rates are presented.

  4. Influence of Shock Prestraining and Grain Size on the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion Response of Copper: Experiments and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, G. T.; Cerreta, E.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Addessio, L. B.; Henrie, B. L.; Sencer, B. H.; Burkett, M.; Maudlin, P. J.; Maloy, S. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Lopez, M. F.

    2006-07-01

    The mechanical behavior of, and damage evolution in high-purity Cu is influenced by strain rate, temperature, stress state, grain size, and shock prestraining. The effects of grain size on the tensile mechanical response of high-purity Cu have been probed and are correlated with the evolution of the substructure. The dynamic extrusion response of shock prestrained Cu demonstrates the significant influence of grain size on the large-strain dynamic tensile ductility of high-purity copper. Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress constitutive model were performed to provide insight into the dynamic extrusion process. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rates are presented.

  5. Effect of dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-5Ti, V-4Cr-4Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    In the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates of {approx}0.4 to 4.2 appm He/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 424-600{degrees}C in the lithium-filled DHCE capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of V-5Ti, V-4Cr-4Ti, V-3Ti-1Si. The effect of helium on tensile strength and ductility was insignificant after irradiation and testing at >420{degrees}C. Contrary to initial expectation, room temperature ductility of DHCE specimens was higher than that on non-DHCE specimens, whereas strength was lower, indicating that different types of hardening centers are produced during DHCE and non-DHCE irradiation. In strong contrast to results of tritium-trick experiments, in which dense coalescence of helium bubbles is produced on grain boundaries in the absence of displacement damage, no intergranular fracture was observed in any tensile specimens irradiated in the DHCE.

  6. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  7. Tensile Tests of NACA and Conventional Machine-countersunk Flush Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartone, Leonard M.; Mandel, Merven W.

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine and compare the tensile strength of NACA and conventional machine-countersunk flush rivets of several rivet-head angles and varying countersunk depth. The results of the investigation are presented in the form of curves that show the variation of the tensile strength of the rivet with the ratio of the sheet thickness to the rivet diameter. For the same rivet-head angle and for a given angle of c/d, the NACA rivets developed higher tensile strength than the conventional rivets.

  8. Comparison of Constitutive Relationships of Tubes Established Using Uniaxial Tensile Tests and Tube Hydroforming Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Yang, Lianfa

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present paper is to evaluate existing constitutive models and to fitting hardening laws of SS304 tubes for the accurate prediction of the deformation behaviors of the tubes in hydroforming. Uniaxial tensile test (UTT) and free hydro-bugling (FHB) experiments were conducted on SS304 tubes, and a hi-speed three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) system was applied to obtain the deformation data of the samples. Eight constitutive relationships of the tubes were then established by fitting the equivalent stress and strain data with the four existing constitutive models of Hollomon, Ghosh, Voce and Ghosh/Voce, and the fitting accuracy of the obtained constitutive relationships were analyzed and compared. The results show that Ghosh/Voce model holds the highest accuracy in describing the deformation behaviors of the tubes in UTT and FHB, followed by the Ghosh model and then the Hollomon model. The Voce model holds the lowest accuracy. A distinct discrepancy between the constitutive relationships obtained using UTT and FHB experiments are observed in present research conditions.

  9. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  10. Cubical Mass-Spring Model design based on a tensile deformation test and nonlinear material model.

    PubMed

    San-Vicente, Gaizka; Aguinaga, Iker; Tomás Celigüeta, Juan

    2012-02-01

    Mass-Spring Models (MSMs) are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of deformable bodies such as soft tissues in medical applications. Although they are fast to compute, they lack accuracy and their design remains still a great challenge. The major difficulties in building realistic MSMs lie on the spring stiffness estimation and the topology identification. In this work, the mechanical behavior of MSMs under tensile loads is analyzed before studying the spring stiffness estimation. In particular, the performed qualitative and quantitative analysis of the behavior of cubical MSMs shows that they have a nonlinear response similar to hyperelastic material models. According to this behavior, a new method for spring stiffness estimation valid for linear and nonlinear material models is proposed. This method adjusts the stress-strain and compressibility curves to a given reference behavior. The accuracy of the MSMs designed with this method is tested taking as reference some soft-tissue simulations based on nonlinear Finite Element Method (FEM). The obtained results show that MSMs can be designed to realistically model the behavior of hyperelastic materials such as soft tissues and can become an interesting alternative to other approaches such as nonlinear FEM. PMID:22156291

  11. Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin

    PubMed Central

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Fricke, Heiko; Knoche, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The skin of developing soft and fleshy fruit is subjected to considerable growth stress, and failure of the skin is associated with impaired barrier properties in water transport and pathogen defence. The objectives were to establish a standardized, biaxial tensile test of the skin of soft and fleshy fruit and to use it to characterize and quantify mechanical properties of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit skin as a model. A segment of the exocarp (ES) comprising cuticle, epidermis, hypodermis and adhering flesh was mounted in the elastometer such that the in vivo strain was maintained. The ES was pressurized from the inner surface and the pressure and extent of associated bulging were recorded. Pressure : strain responses were almost linear up to the point of fracture, indicating that the modulus of elasticity was nearly constant. Abrading the cuticle decreased the fracture strain but had no effect on the fracture pressure. When pressure was held constant, bulging of the ES continued to increase. Strain relaxation upon releasing the pressure was complete and depended on time. Strains in longitudinal and latitudinal directions on the bulging ES did not differ significantly. Exocarp segments that released their in vivo strain before the test had higher fracture strains and lower moduli of elasticity. The results demonstrate that the cherry skin is isotropic in the tangential plane and exhibits elastic and viscoelastic behaviour. The epidermis and hypodermis, but not the cuticle, represent the structural ‘backbone’ in a cherry skin. This test is useful in quantifying the mechanical properties of soft and fleshy fruit of a range of species under standardized conditions. PMID:24876301

  12. Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin.

    PubMed

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Fricke, Heiko; Knoche, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The skin of developing soft and fleshy fruit is subjected to considerable growth stress, and failure of the skin is associated with impaired barrier properties in water transport and pathogen defence. The objectives were to establish a standardized, biaxial tensile test of the skin of soft and fleshy fruit and to use it to characterize and quantify mechanical properties of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit skin as a model. A segment of the exocarp (ES) comprising cuticle, epidermis, hypodermis and adhering flesh was mounted in the elastometer such that the in vivo strain was maintained. The ES was pressurized from the inner surface and the pressure and extent of associated bulging were recorded. Pressure : strain responses were almost linear up to the point of fracture, indicating that the modulus of elasticity was nearly constant. Abrading the cuticle decreased the fracture strain but had no effect on the fracture pressure. When pressure was held constant, bulging of the ES continued to increase. Strain relaxation upon releasing the pressure was complete and depended on time. Strains in longitudinal and latitudinal directions on the bulging ES did not differ significantly. Exocarp segments that released their in vivo strain before the test had higher fracture strains and lower moduli of elasticity. The results demonstrate that the cherry skin is isotropic in the tangential plane and exhibits elastic and viscoelastic behaviour. The epidermis and hypodermis, but not the cuticle, represent the structural 'backbone' in a cherry skin. This test is useful in quantifying the mechanical properties of soft and fleshy fruit of a range of species under standardized conditions. PMID:24876301

  13. Development of a technique for testing of tensile properties with miniature size specimens for metal additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongare, Sujitkumar

    The study of mechanical properties of metals provides a basis to decide on the capability of a particular metal for a task and also to make predictions about its life. The concepts of stress, strain and strength of materials are employed in practically every engineering discipline. Mechanical properties such as stiffness, yield strength, tensile strength, ductility, toughness, impact resistance, creep resistance, fatigue resistance and others, influence the design, fabrication and service life of equipment. Therefore, more than one property is considered for the material selection process for an application. For complete understanding of any material and its feasibility for a particular application, inter-related mechanical properties have to be measured. Unfortunately, these properties cannot be measured in any single test. However, the tensile test can be used to measure a number of the most commonly used mechanical properties. Extensive research has already been performed in this area. Standards have been developed and established regarding the size of test specimens, testing procedures and process parameters. This thesis discusses the development of a testing procedure for non-standard tensile tests for evaluation of material properties. Miniature test specimens similar to the standard ASTM E8 were designed and used for testing. The tests were mainly conducted on the baseline material for aerospace industry i.e. Ti-6Al-4V.

  14. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  15. Simulating plastic surgery: from human skin tensile tests, through hyperelastic finite element models to real-time haptics.

    PubMed

    Lapeer, R J; Gasson, P D; Karri, V

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we provide a summary of a number of experiments we conducted to arrive at a prototype real-time simulator for plastic surgical interventions such as skin flap repair and inguinal herniotomy. We started our research with a series of in-vitro tensile stress tests on human skin, harvested from female patients undergoing plastic reconstructive surgery. We then used the acquired stress-strain data to fit hyperelastic models. Three models were considered: General Polynomial, Reduced Polynomial and Ogden. Only Reduced Polynomial models were found to be stable, hence they progressed to the next stage to be used in an explicit finite element model aimed at real-time performance in conjunction with a haptic feedback device. A total Lagrangian formulation with the half-step central difference method was employed to integrate the dynamic equation of motion of the mesh. The mesh was integrated into two versions of a real-time skin simulator: a single-threaded version running on a computer's main central processing unit and a multi-threaded version running on the computer's graphics card. The latter was achieved by exploiting recent advances in programmable graphics technology.

  16. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in shear and tensile bond strength tests.

    PubMed

    Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Magnani, Maria Beatriz Borges de Araújo; Nouer, Darcy Flávio

    2005-09-01

    The coefficient of variation is a dispersion measurement that does not depend on the unit scales, thus allowing the comparison of experimental results involving different variables. Its calculation is crucial for the adhesive experiments performed in laboratories because both precision and reliability can be verified. The aim of this study was to evaluate and to suggest a classification of the coefficient variation (CV) for in vitro experiments on shear and tensile strengths. The experiments were performed in laboratory by fifty international and national studies on adhesion materials. Statistical data allowing the estimation of the coefficient of variation was gathered from each scientific article since none of them had such a measurement previously calculated. Excel worksheet was used for organizing the data while the sample normality was tested by using Shapiro Wilk tests (alpha = 0.05) and the Statistical Analysis System software (SAS). A mean value of 6.11 (SD = 1.83) for the coefficient of variation was found by the data analysis and the data had a normal distribution (p>0.05). A range classification was proposed for the coefficient of variation from such data, that is, it should be considered low for a value lesser than 2.44; intermediate for a value between 2.44 and 7.94, high for a value between 7.94 and 9.78, and finally, very high for a value greater than 9.78. Such classification can be used as a guide for experiments on adhesion materials, thus making the planning easier as well as revealing precision and validity concerning the data.

  17. Effect of Test Specimen Shape and Size on Interlaminar Tensile Properties of Advanced Carbon-Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2015-01-01

    The interlaminar tensile strength of 1000-tow T-300 fiber ACC-6 carbon-carbon composites was measured using the method of bonding the coupons to adherends at room temperature. The size, 0.70 to 1.963 inches maximum width or radius, and shape, round or square, of the test coupons were varied to determine if the test method was sensitive to these variables. Sixteen total variations were investigated and the results modeled.

  18. Effect of native oxide layers on copper thin-film tensile properties: A reactive molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Skarlinski, Michael D.; Quesnel, David J.

    2015-12-21

    Metal-oxide layers are likely to be present on metallic nano-structures due to either environmental exposure during use, or high temperature processing techniques such as annealing. It is well known that nano-structured metals have vastly different mechanical properties from bulk metals; however, difficulties in modeling the transition between metallic and ionic bonding have prevented the computational investigation of the effects of oxide surface layers. Newly developed charge-optimized many body [Liang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., R 74, 255 (2013)] potentials are used to perform fully reactive molecular dynamics simulations which elucidate the effects that metal-oxide layers have on the mechanical properties of a copper thin-film. Simulated tensile tests are performed on thin-films while using different strain-rates, temperatures, and oxide thicknesses to evaluate changes in yield stress, modulus, and failure mechanisms. Findings indicate that copper-thin film mechanical properties are strongly affected by native oxide layers. The formed oxide layers have an amorphous structure with lower Cu-O bond-densities than bulk CuO, and a mixture of Cu{sub 2}O and CuO charge character. It is found that oxidation will cause modifications to the strain response of the elastic modulii, producing a stiffened modulii at low temperatures (<75 K) and low strain values (<5%), and a softened modulii at higher temperatures. While under strain, structural reorganization within the oxide layers facilitates brittle yielding through nucleation of defects across the oxide/metal interface. The oxide-free copper thin-film yielding mechanism is found to be a tensile-axis reorientation and grain creation. The oxide layers change the observed yielding mechanism, allowing for the inner copper thin-film to sustain an FCC-to-BCC transition during yielding. The mechanical properties are fit to a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory. The fit implies that the oxidation of the

  19. Effect of grain size on deformation stability of copper under quasi- static and dynamic tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D.H.; Gourdin, W.H.

    1991-10-31

    The effects of grain size on the deformation stability of copper deformed in tension under quasi-static and dynamic conditions have been studied experimentally and analytically. Oxygen Free Electronic (OFE) copper samples with grain sizes of 15 {mu} and 120 {mu}m were tested. Results of the tests indicated that an increase in grain size resulted in greater extents of elongation prior to deformation instability and eventual failure under both quasi-static and dynamic loading. We have applied the deformation stability condition of Considere to both a simple power law modified to include a Hall-Petch grain size dependence and the more descriptive mechanical threshold stress (MTS) model. Calculations of the stress-strain behavior in uniaxial tension and the instability strain under quasi-static loading are compared with experiment. Both models predict an increase in the instability strain with increasing grain size, but the power law, included as a heuristic, yields a poor overall fit to both the stress-strain and the instability strains. Under dynamic loading comparison of the experimental results with analytical predictions were difficult due to inherent inaccuracy in the dynamic stress-strain data.

  20. Dynamic tensile characterization of Vascomax® maraging C250 and C300 alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Bo; Wakeland, Peter Eric; Furnish, Michael D.

    2015-04-14

    Vascomax® maraging C250 and C300 alloys were dynamically characterized in tension with Kolsky tension bar techniques. Compared with conventional Kolsky tension bar experiments, a pair of lock nuts was used to minimize the pseudo stress peak and a laser system was applied to directly measure the specimen displacement. Dynamic engineering stress–strain curves of the C250 and C300 alloys were obtained in tension at 1000 and 3000 s–1. The dynamic yield strengths for both alloys were similar, but significantly higher than those obtained from quasi-static indentation tests. Both alloys exhibited insignificant strain-rate effect on dynamic yield strength. The C300 alloy showedmore » approximately 10 % higher in yield strength than the C250 alloy at the same strain rates. Necking was observed in both alloys right after yield. The Bridgman correction was applied to calculate the true stress and strain at failure for both alloys. The true failure stress showed a modest strain rate effect for both alloys but no significant difference between the two alloys at the same strain rate. As a result, the C250 alloy was more ductile than the C300 alloy under dynamic loading.« less

  1. Dynamic tensile characterization of Vascomax® maraging C250 and C300 alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Wakeland, Peter Eric; Furnish, Michael D.

    2015-04-14

    Vascomax® maraging C250 and C300 alloys were dynamically characterized in tension with Kolsky tension bar techniques. Compared with conventional Kolsky tension bar experiments, a pair of lock nuts was used to minimize the pseudo stress peak and a laser system was applied to directly measure the specimen displacement. Dynamic engineering stress–strain curves of the C250 and C300 alloys were obtained in tension at 1000 and 3000 s–1. The dynamic yield strengths for both alloys were similar, but significantly higher than those obtained from quasi-static indentation tests. Both alloys exhibited insignificant strain-rate effect on dynamic yield strength. The C300 alloy showed approximately 10 % higher in yield strength than the C250 alloy at the same strain rates. Necking was observed in both alloys right after yield. The Bridgman correction was applied to calculate the true stress and strain at failure for both alloys. The true failure stress showed a modest strain rate effect for both alloys but no significant difference between the two alloys at the same strain rate. As a result, the C250 alloy was more ductile than the C300 alloy under dynamic loading.

  2. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  3. Revision of the tensile database for V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys tested at ANL.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M. C.

    1998-01-13

    The published database for the tensile properties of unirradiated and irradiated vanadium-based alloys tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been reviewed. The alloys tested are in the ranges of V-(0-18)wt.%Ti and V-(4-15)wt.%Cr-(3-15)wt.%Ti. A consistent methodology, based on ASTM terminology and standards, has been used to re-analyze the unpublished load vs. displacement curves for 162 unirradiated samples and 91 irradiated samples to determine revised values for yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE) and total elongation (TE). The revised data set contains lower values for UE ({minus}5{+-}2% strain) and TE ({minus}4{+-}2% strain) than previously reported. Revised values for YS and UTS are consistent with the previously-published values in that they are within the scatter usually associated with these properties.

  4. Specimen alignment in an axial tensile test of thin films using direct imaging and its influence on the mechanical properties of BeCu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Joong; Park, Jun-Hyub; Shin, Myung-Soo; Ha, Jong-Eun; Lee, Hak-Joo

    2010-08-01

    This paper proposes a new system for verification of the alignment of loading fixtures and test specimens during tensile testing of thin film with a micrometer size through direct imaging. The novel and reliable image recognition system to evaluate the misalignment between the load train and the specimen axes during tensile test of thin film was developed using digital image processing technology with CCD. The decision of whether alignment of the tensile specimen is acceptable or not is based on a probabilistic analysis through the edge feature extraction of digital imaging. In order to verify the performance of the proposed system and investigate the effect of the misalignment of the specimen on tensile properties, the tensile tests were performed as displacement control in air and at room temperature for metal thin film, the beryllium copper (BeCu) alloys. In the case of the metal thin films, bending stresses caused by misalignment are insignificant because the films are easily bent during tensile tests to eliminate the bending stresses. And it was observed that little effects and scatters on tensile properties occur by stress gradient caused by twisting at in-plane misalignment, and the effects and scatters on tensile properties are insignificant at out-of-plane misalignment, in the case of the BeCu thin film.

  5. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  6. Deformation of Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy for tensile followed by compressive and compressive followed by tensile loading: A molecular dynamics simulation based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meraj, Md; Pal, S.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based study on deformation behavior during uniaxial tension followed by compression and compression followed by tension after 0.6 pre-strain for Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy (20 at. % each element) single crystals has been reported. This MD simulation is carried out at strain rate of 108 s-1 and at the temperature of -10°C. The influence of observed nano twin on deformation behaviour for such two types of loading process (i.e. tensile followed by compressive and compressive followed by tensile) has been investigated thoroughly. It is found that the dominant deformation mechanism is twin for tensile forward loading in Ni20W20Cu20Fe20Mo20 high entropy alloy single crystal, whereas atomic diffusion is the dominating factor for deformation behaviour in compressive reverse loading direction of high entropy alloy.

  7. Influence of Shock Prestraining and Grain Size on the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion Response of Copper: Experiments, Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, George, III

    2005-07-01

    The mechanical behavior and damage evolution response of high-purity Cu are influenced by strain rate, temperature, stress state, grain size, and shock prestraining. The effects of grain size on the mechanical response of high-purity Cu have been probed and are correlated with the substructural evolution during deformation. The dynamic extrusion response of shock prestrained Cu demonstrates the significant influence of grain size on the large-strain dynamic tensile ductility of high-purity copper. Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model were performed to provide insight into the dynamic extrusion process. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rate will be presented. Predictions of the texture evolution (based upon the deformation rate history and the rigid body rotations experienced by the Cu during the extrusion process) are compared with texture measurements.

  8. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensil specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen irregardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis.

  9. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1987-08-18

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensile specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen regardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis. 4 figs.

  10. High-speed imaging on static tensile test for unidirectional CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Hideaki; Aoki, Yuichiro; Hirano, Yoshiyasu; Kondo, Yasushi; Nagao, Yosuke

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) under static tensile loading. The advantages of CFRP are higher specific stiffness and strength than the metal material. The use of CFRP is increasing in not only the aerospace and rapid transit railway industries but also the sports, leisure and automotive industries. The tensile fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP has not been experimentally made clear because the fracture speed of unidirectional CFRP is quite high. We selected the intermediate modulus and high strength unidirectional CFRP laminate which is a typical material used in the aerospace field. The fracture process under static tensile loading was captured by a conventional high-speed camera and a new type High-Speed Video Camera HPV-1. It was found that the duration of fracture is 200 microseconds or less, then images taken by a conventional camera doesn't have enough temporal-resolution. On the other hand, results obtained by HPV-1 have higher quality where the fracture process can be clearly observed.

  11. Dynamic testing of regional viscoelastic behavior of canine sclera

    PubMed Central

    Palko, Joel R.; Pan, Xueliang; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuations have gained recent clinical interest and thus warrant an understanding of how the sclera responds to dynamic mechanical insults. The objective of this study was to characterize the regional dynamic viscoelastic properties of canine sclera under physiological cyclic loadings. Scleral strips were excised from the anterior, equatorial, and posterior sclera in ten canine eyes. The dimensions of each strip were measured using a high resolution ultrasound imaging system. The strips were tested in a humidity chamber at approximately 37°C using a Rheometrics Systems Analyzer. A cyclic strain input (0.25%, 1 Hz) was applied to the strips, superimposed upon pre-stresses corresponding to an IOP of 15, 25, and 45 mmHg. The cyclic stress output was recorded and the dynamic properties were calculated based on linear viscoelasticity. Uniaxial tensile tests were also performed on the same samples and the results were compared to those reported for human eyes. The results showed that the sclera’s resistance to dynamic loading increased significantly while the damping capability decreased significantly with increasing pre-stresses for all regions of sclera (P<0.001). Anterior sclera appeared to have a significantly higher damping capability than equatorial and posterior sclera (P=0.003 and 0.018, respectively). The secant modulus from uniaxial tensile tests showed a decreasing trend from anterior to posterior sclera, displaying a similar pattern as in the human eye. In conclusion, all scleral regions in the canine eyes exhibited an increased ability to resist and a decreased ability to dampen cyclic stress insults at increasing prestress (i.e., increasing steady-state IOP). The regional variation of the dynamic properties differed from those of uniaxial tensile tests. Dynamic testing may provide useful information to better understand the mechanical behavior of the sclera in response to dynamic IOP. PMID:21983041

  12. Fluid dynamics test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayman, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Test method and apparatus determine fluid effective mass and damping in frequency range where effective mass may be considered as total mass less sum of slosh masses. Apparatus is designed so test tank and its mounting yoke are supported from structural test wall by series of flexures.

  13. Rapid heating tensile tests of hydrogen-charged high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1989-05-19

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. Proper design of the equipment will require an understanding of how tritium and its decay product helium affect mechanical properties. This memorandum describes results of rapid heating tensile testing of hydrogen-charged specimens of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) 316L stainless steel. These results provide a data base for comparison with uncharged and tritium-charged-and-aged specimens to distinguish the effects of hydrogen and helium. Details of the experimental equipment and procedures and results for uncharged specimens were reported previously. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  15. Advantages of a 3-parameter reduced constitutive model for the measurement of polymers elastic modulus using tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, A.; André, S.; Delobelle, P.; Meshaka, Y.; Cunat, C.

    2016-04-01

    Exact measurements of the rheological parameters of time-dependent materials are crucial to improve our understanding of their intimate relation to the internal bulk microstructure. Concerning solid polymers and the apparently simple determination of Young's modulus in tensile tests, international standards rely on basic protocols that are known to lead to erroneous values. This paper describes an approach allowing a correct measurement of the instantaneous elastic modulus of polymers by a tensile test. It is based on the use of an appropriate reduced model to describe the behavior of the material up to great strains, together with well-established principles of parameter estimation in engineering science. These principles are objective tools that are used to determine which parameters of a model can be correctly identified according to the informational content of a given data set. The assessment of the methodology and of the measurements is accomplished by comparing the results with those obtained from two other physical experiments, probing the material response at small temporal and length scales, namely, ultrasound measurements with excitation at 5 MHz and modulated nanoindentation tests over a few nanometers of amplitude.

  16. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  17. Hydrogen-induced crack nucleation in tensile testing of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitckii, Evgenii; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Hänninen, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of continuous hydrogen charging on tensile properties of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels was studied at room and elevated temperatures of 100 °C and 300 °C. The hydrogen effect decreases with increase of the temperature for ODS-EUROFER steel, while susceptibility to hydrogen of EUROFER 97 steel remains approximately the same at all testing temperatures. Continuous hydrogen charging results in a reduction of the grain boundary cohesion of the EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels tested at RT. With increase of the testing temperature up to 300 °C EUROFER 97 steel exhibits relatively high amount of micro-cracks which agglomerate in sub-micrometer size cracks, while the hydrogen-induced intergranular crack nucleation in ODS-EUROFER steel is effectively suppressed. Possible mechanism of the hydrogen-induced crack nucleation and propagation under applied external stress is discussed.

  18. Reduced gravity multibody dynamics testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sillanpaa, Meija

    1993-01-01

    The Final Report on reduced gravity multibody dynamics testing is presented. Tests were conducted on board the NASA KC-135 RGA in Houston, Texas. The objective was to analyze the effects of large angle rotations on flexible, multi-segmented structures. The flight experiment was conducted to provide data which will be compared to the data gathered from ground tests of the same configurations. The flight and ground tested data will be used to validate the TREETOPS software, software which models dynamic multibody systems, and other multibody codes. The flight experiment consisted of seven complete flights on board the KC-135 RGA during two one-week periods. The first period of testing was 4-9 Apr. 1993. The second period of testing was 13-18 Jun. 1993.

  19. Advances in experimental assessment of dynamic tensile strength of concrete by the spalling technique. …in tribute to Janusz Roman Klepaczko, Emeritus Professor at the Université Paul Verlaine in Metz, passed away on August 15, 2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brara, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    An experimental method to test concrete in dynamic tension by spalling with a Hopkinson bar as loading and measuring tool was developed in 1999. The dynamic strength of concrete specimen and strain rate were indirectly derived from an accurate data processing of the signals measured on the Hopkinson bar surface. This method suggested by late Prof. Klepaczko, allowed for reaching the highest strain rate reported in literature for which an intriguing tensile strength increase was highlighted. This simple and efficient technique has been adopted by many researchers around the world. Some significant improvements in terms of definition and reproducibility of the incident loading pulse travelling along the bar and direct and/or contactless measurements on concrete specimens have been introduced. The very high rate sensitivity of concrete tensile strength was corroborated by the additional experimental data obtained with this experimental technique during the last fifteen years.

  20. Dynamic Brazilian Test of Rock Under Intermediate Strain Rate: Pendulum Hammer-Driven SHPB Test and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W. C.; Niu, L. L.; Li, S. H.; Xu, Z. H.

    2015-09-01

    The tensile strength of rock subjected to dynamic loading constitutes many engineering applications such as rock drilling and blasting. The dynamic Brazilian test of rock specimens was conducted with the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) driven by pendulum hammer, in order to determine the indirect tensile strength of rock under an intermediate strain rate ranging from 5.2 to 12.9 s-1, which is achieved when the incident bar is impacted by pendulum hammer with different velocities. The incident wave excited by pendulum hammer is triangular in shape, featuring a long rising time, and it is considered to be helpful for achieving a constant strain rate in the rock specimen. The dynamic indirect tensile strength of rock increases with strain rate. Then, the numerical simulator RFPA-Dynamics, a well-recognized software for simulating the rock failure under dynamic loading, is validated by reproducing the Brazilian test of rock when the incident stress wave retrieved at the incident bar is input as the boundary condition, and then it is employed to study the Brazilian test of rock under the higher strain rate. Based on the numerical simulation, the strain-rate dependency of tensile strength and failure pattern of the Brazilian disc specimen under the intermediate strain rate are numerically simulated, and the associated failure mechanism is clarified. It is deemed that the material heterogeneity should be a reason for the strain-rate dependency of rock.

  1. Dynamic impact testing with servohydraulic testing machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenheier, R.; Rogers, G.

    2006-08-01

    The design concept of “Crashworthiness” requires the information on material behaviour under dynamic impact loading in order to describe and predict the crash behaviour of structures. Especially the transport related industries, like car, railway or aircraft industry, pursue the concept of lightweight design for a while now. The materials' maximum constraint during loading is pushed to permanently increasing figures. This means in terms of crashworthiness that the process of energy absorption in structures and the mechanical behaviour of materials must well understood and can be described appropriately by material models. In close cooperation with experts from various industries and research institutes Instron has developed throughout the past years a new family of servohydraulic testing machines specifically designed to cope with the dynamics of high rate testing. Main development steps are reflected versus their experimental necessities.

  2. Comparison of Superelasticity of Nickel Titanium Orthodontic Arch wires using Mechanical Tensile Testing and Correlating with Electrical Resistivity

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraj, Aravind

    2013-01-01

    Background: Application of light and continuous forces for optimum physiological response and least damage to the tooth supporting structures should be the primary aim of the orthodontist. Nickel titanium alloys with the properties of excellent spring back, super elasticity and wide range of action is one of the natural choices for the clinicians to achieve this goal. In recent periods, various wire manufacturers have come with a variety of wires exhibiting different properties. It is the duty of the clinician to select appropriate wires during various stages of treatment for excellent results. For achieving this evaluation of the properties of these wires is essential. Materials & Methods: This study is focussed on evaluating the super elastic property of eight groups of austenite active nickel titanium wires. Eight groups of archwires bought from eight different manufacturers were studied. These wires were tested through mechanical tensile testing and electrical resistivity methods. Results: Unloading curves were carefully assessed for superelastic behaviour on deactivation. Rankings of the wires tested were based primarily upon the unloading curve’s slope Conclusion: Ortho organisers wires ranked first and superior, followed by American Orthodontics and Ormco A wires. Morelli and GAClowland NiTi wires were ranked last. It can be concluded that the performance of these wires based on rankings should be further evaluated by clinical studies. How to cite this article: Sivaraj A. Comparison of Superelasticity of Nickel Titanium Orthodontic Arch wires using Mechanical Tensile Testing and Correlating with Electrical Resistivity. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):1-12. PMID:24155596

  3. Semi-analytical and Numerical Studies on the Flattened Brazilian Splitting Test Used for Measuring the Indirect Tensile Strength of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. G.; Wang, L. G.; Lu, Y. L.; Chen, J. R.; Zhang, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    Based on the two-dimensional elasticity theory, this study established a mechanical model under chordally opposing distributed compressive loads, in order to perfect the theoretical foundation of the flattened Brazilian splitting test used for measuring the indirect tensile strength of rocks. The stress superposition method was used to obtain the approximate analytic solutions of stress components inside the flattened Brazilian disk. These analytic solutions were then verified through a comparison with the numerical results of the finite element method (FEM). Based on the theoretical derivation, this research carried out a contrastive study on the effect of the flattened loading angles on the stress value and stress concentration degree inside the disk. The results showed that the stress concentration degree near the loading point and the ratio of compressive/tensile stress inside the disk dramatically decreased as the flattened loading angle increased, avoiding the crushing failure near-loading point of Brazilian disk specimens. However, only the tensile stress value and the tensile region were slightly reduced with the increase of the flattened loading angle. Furthermore, this study found that the optimal flattened loading angle was 20°-30°; flattened load angles that were too large or too small made it difficult to guarantee the central tensile splitting failure principle of the Brazilian splitting test. According to the Griffith strength failure criterion, the calculative formula of the indirect tensile strength of rocks was derived theoretically. This study obtained a theoretical indirect tensile strength that closely coincided with existing and experimental results. Finally, this paper simulated the fracture evolution process of rocks under different loading angles through the use of the finite element numerical software ANSYS. The modeling results showed that the Flattened Brazilian Splitting Test using the optimal loading angle could guarantee the tensile

  4. Reliability design and assessment of a micro-probe using the results of a tensile test of a beryllium-copper alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Hyub; Shin, Myung-Soo

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the results of tensile tests for a beryllium-copper (BeCu) alloy thin film and the application of the results to the design of a probe. The copper alloy films were fabricated by electroplating. To obtain the tensile characteristics of the film, the dog-bone type specimen was fabricated by the etching method. The tensile tests were performed with the specimen using a test machine developed by the authors. The BeCu alloy has an elastic modulus of 119 GPa and the 0.2% offset yield and ultimate tensile strengths of 1078 MPa and 1108 MPa, respectively. The design and manufacture of a smaller probe require higher pad density and smaller pad-pitch chips. It should be effective in high-frequency testing. For the design of a new micro-probe, we investigated several design parameters that may cause problems, such as the contact force and life, using the tensile properties and the design of experiment method in conjunction with finite element analysis. The optimal dimensions of the probe were found using the response surface method. The probe with optimal dimensions was manufactured by a precision press process. It was verified that the manufactured probe satisfied the life, the contact force and the over drive through the compression tests and the life tests of the probes.

  5. Determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of the smooth adhesive organs of Carausius morosus using tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, Michael; Backhaus, Stefan; Scholz, Ingo; Park, Daesung; Mayer, Joachim; Baumgartner, Werner

    2014-10-15

    Adhesive organs like arolia of insects allow these animals to climb on different substrates by creating high adhesion forces. According to the Dahlquist criterion, adhesive organs must be very soft, exhibiting an effective Young's modulus of below 100 kPa to adhere well to substrates. Such a low effective Young's modulus allows the adhesive organs to make almost direct contact with the substrate and results in van der Waals forces along with capillary forces. In previous studies, the effective Young's moduli of adhesive organs were determined using indentation tests, revealing their structure to be very soft. However, adhesive organs show a layered structure, thus the measured values comprise the effective Young's moduli of several layers of the adhesive organs. In this study, a new approach is illustrated to measure the Young's modulus of the outermost layer of the arolium, i.e. of the epicuticle, of the stick insect Carausius morosus. As a result of the epicuticle being supported by upright fibres, tensile tests allow the determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle with hardly influence from subjacent layers. In our tensile tests, arolia of stick insects adhering on a latex membrane were stretched by stretching the membrane while the elongation of the contact area between an arolium and the membrane was recorded. For analysis, mathematical models of the mechanical system were developed. When fed with the observed elongations, these models yield estimates for the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of approximately 100 MPa. Thus, in arolia, a very thin layer (~225 nm) of a rather stiff material, which is less susceptible to abrasion, makes contact with the substrates, whereas the inner fibrous structure of arolia is responsible for their softness.

  6. Determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of the smooth adhesive organs of Carausius morosus using tensile testing

    PubMed Central

    Bennemann, Michael; Backhaus, Stefan; Scholz, Ingo; Park, Daesung; Mayer, Joachim; Baumgartner, Werner

    2014-01-01

    Adhesive organs like arolia of insects allow these animals to climb on different substrates by creating high adhesion forces. According to the Dahlquist criterion, adhesive organs must be very soft, exhibiting an effective Young's modulus of below 100 kPa to adhere well to substrates. Such a low effective Young's modulus allows the adhesive organs to make almost direct contact with the substrate and results in van der Waals forces along with capillary forces. In previous studies, the effective Young's moduli of adhesive organs were determined using indentation tests, revealing their structure to be very soft. However, adhesive organs show a layered structure, thus the measured values comprise the effective Young's moduli of several layers of the adhesive organs. In this study, a new approach is illustrated to measure the Young's modulus of the outermost layer of the arolium, i.e. of the epicuticle, of the stick insect Carausius morosus. As a result of the epicuticle being supported by upright fibres, tensile tests allow the determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle with hardly influence from subjacent layers. In our tensile tests, arolia of stick insects adhering on a latex membrane were stretched by stretching the membrane while the elongation of the contact area between an arolium and the membrane was recorded. For analysis, mathematical models of the mechanical system were developed. When fed with the observed elongations, these models yield estimates for the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of approximately 100 MPa. Thus, in arolia, a very thin layer (~225 nm) of a rather stiff material, which is less susceptible to abrasion, makes contact with the substrates, whereas the inner fibrous structure of arolia is responsible for their softness. PMID:25214493

  7. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY (SATURN V IN BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  8. High temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Stevens, C.O.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests have been performed on V-4Cr-4Ti at 750 and 800 C in order to extend the data base beyond the current limit of 700 C. From comparison with previous measurements, the yield strength is nearly constant and tensile elongations decrease slightly with increasing temperature between 300 and 800 C. The ultimate strength exhibits an apparent maximum near 600 C (attributable to dynamic strain aging) but adequate strength is maintained up to 800 C. The reduction in area measured on tensile specimens remained high ({approximately}80%) for test temperatures up to 800 C, in contrast to previous reported results.

  9. Nucleation and growth of damage in polycrystalline aluminum under dynamic tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, M. L.; Yao, Y.; Ran, X. X.; Ye, W.; Bie, B. X.; Fan, D.; Li, P.

    2015-03-15

    Plate-impact experiments were conducted to study the features and mechanisms of void nucleation and growth in the polycrystalline of pure aluminum under dynamic loading. Soft-recovered samples have been analyzed by metallographic microscopy, electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD), and synchrotron radiation x-ray tomography technology. It was found that most of the void nucleation in grains neared the boundaries of “weak-orientation” grains and grew toward the grain boundaries with fractured small grains around the boundaries. This was mainly caused by the accumulation and interaction of slip systems in the “weak-orientation” grains. In addition, the micro voids were nearly octahedron because the octahedral slip systems were formed by 8 slip planes in the polycrystalline of pure aluminum. The EBSD results are consistent with the three-dimensional structure observed by synchrotron radiation x-ray.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-06-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  11. Relating tensile, bending, and shear test data of asphalt binders to pavement performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.S.; Tsai, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Eight different asphalt binders representing a wide range of applications for pavement construction were tested in uniaxial tension, bending, and shear stresses. Theoretical analyses were performed in this study to covert the data from the three engineering tests to stiffness moduli for predicting pavement performance. At low temperatures, high asphalt stiffness may induce pavement thermal cracking; thus, the allowable maximum stiffness was set at 1,000 MPa. At high temperatures, low asphalt stiffness may lead to pavement rutting (ruts in the road); master curves were constructed to rank the potential for rutting in the asphalts. All three viscoelastic functions were shown to be interchangeable within the linear viscoelastic region. When subjected to large deformation in the direct tension test, asphalt binders behaved nonlinear viscoelastic in which the data under bending, shear and tension modes were not comparable. The asphalts were, however, found toe exhibit linear viscoelasticity up to the failure point in the steady-state strain region.

  12. Effect of Heat Treatment and Layer Orientation on the Tensile Strength of a Crystalline Rock Under Brazilian Test Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha Roy, Debanjan; Singh, T. N.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of heat treatment and the layer orientation on the tensile properties of granitic gneiss were studied under the unconfined stress condition. The tensile strength of the samples was studied using a Brazilian configuration, and the geochemical and microstructural properties were studied using the X-ray diffraction technique as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The fracture pattern and the geometrical analyses were performed using the digital photographs. The results show that both the heat treatment and layer orientation have strong control on the tensile strength, force-parallel and layer-parallel strains, and on the tensile fracture geometry. A general decrease in the tensile strength of the rock was documented with the increasing heat treatment. Although, in the heat-treated samples, X-ray diffraction study do not reveal any major change in the mineral composition, but the SEM shows the development of several micro-cracks in the grains. In the samples with different layer orientation, along with the changes in the tensile strength and layer-parallel to force-parallel strain ratio, the layer activation under shear stress is also noticed. Here, the ratio between the tensile to shear stress, acting along the layers is thought to be the major controlling factor of the tensile properties of rocks, which has many applications in mining, civil constructions, and waste disposal work.

  13. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Mann; Devdutt Shukla; Xi Hong; John P. Hurley

    2004-09-27

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) is being utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. Shakedown testing of the CADCAF has been completed. Samples of slag and refractory from the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station have been obtained for testing in the CADCAF. The slag has been dried and sieved to the size needed for our flowing slag corrosion tests. Screening tests are in currently in progress. Detailed analysis of corrosion rates from the first tests is in progress.

  14. An open-end burst test method to obtain uniaxial hoop tensile properties of fuel cladding in a hot cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Aita, Makoto; Sakamoto, Kan; Higuchi, Toru

    2013-03-01

    The hoop stress-hoop strain relationship of fuel cladding is one of the essential input parameters for safety analysis of fuel rods. The three objectives of this paper were: to propose a burst test method for open-end tube specimens with the uniaxial hoop stress condition; to develop the necessary in-cell high temperature open-end burst (OEB) techniques to implement the method; and to determine the optimum specimen length for the proposed OEB test method. Silicone oil was selected as the pressurization medium, and it was sealed inside the specimens not by welding but by O-rings so that no axial tensile stress was induced in the specimens. The specimens with combined end plugs and O-rings were successfully assembled by manipulators in a hot cell, and a high temperature (⩽350 °C), high pressure (⩽100 MPa) seal was achieved. The optimum specimen length was determined by using ductile and embrittled tubes with various lengths of 30-60 mm and was found to be around 45 mm for typical BWR fuel rods. During the OEB test, internal pressure and diametral expansion were monitored to obtain the basic mechanical performance properties of the fuel cladding such as yield stress, ultimate strength, as well as the true hoop stress-hoop strain curve.

  15. Residual stress analysis on tensile MMC specimens after loading/unloading tests in several conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Alessandra; Albertini, Gianni; Manescu, Adrian

    2004-07-01

    Residual stresses have been investigated in samples made of AA6061+22% Al2O3 in order to correlate microstructural characteristics with mechanical performances. In particular, the possible occurrence of a brittle fracture induced by an excessive load transfer from the matrix to the reinforcement was investigated. To this end, macrostresses and microstresses were analysed. A neutron diffraction test on 12 specimens submitted to several loading/unloading conditions at different temperatures was performed. These measurements aimed to establish the optimal temperature for the initial extruded billet in pre-heating stage, before forging the final wheel hub.

  16. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Mann; Devdutt Shukla; John P. Hurley

    2003-09-27

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) is being utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. Shakedown testing of the CADCAF is in progress. Samples of slag and refractory from the Tampa Electric Polk Power Station have been obtained for testing in the CADCAF. The slag has been dried and sieved to the size needed for our flowing slag corrosion tests. Testing is expected to begin in October.

  17. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Mann; Wayne S. Seames; Devdutt Shukla; Xi Hong; John P. Hurley

    2005-12-01

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by refractory materials under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) was utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. High-alumina and high-chromia refractory bricks were tested using slags obtained from two solid fuel gasifiers. Testing was performed at 1475 C in a reducing atmosphere (2% H{sub 2} in N{sub 2}) The CADCAF tests show that high-chrome refractories have greater corrosion resistance than high-aluminum refractories; coal slag readily diffuses into the refractory through its grain boundaries; the refractory grains are more stable than the matrix in the tests, and the grains are the first line of defense against corrosion; calcium and alkali in the slag are more corrosive than iron; and silicon and calcium penetrate the deepest into the refractory. The results obtained from this study are preliminary and should be combined with result from other research programs. In particular, the refractory corrosion results from this study should be compared with refractories removed from commercial gasifiers.

  18. Tensile strength of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Zidan, O; Asmussen, E; Jørgensen, K D

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the present work was to measure the tensile strength of restorative resins and to study the effect of the method of measurement on the recorded results. A direct pull method using dumb-bell shaped specimens was used. The tensile strength of the resins was also tested using the diametral compression method suggested by the A.D.A. It was found that the method of testing affects the results. Although the diametral compression method is a simple method, it cannot be considered reliable for all types of material. The tensile strength of the conventional composites was significantly higher than the tensile strength of the microfilled composites.

  19. Determination of the elastic properties of rabbit vocal fold tissue using uniaxial tensile testing and a tailored finite element model.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Neda; Miri, Amir K; Mongeau, Luc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the effects of the specimen shape on the accuracy of mechanical properties determined from a shape-specific model generation strategy. Digital images of five rabbit vocal folds (VFs) in their initial undeformed conditions were used to build corresponding specific solid models. The displacement field of the VFs under uniaxial tensile test was then measured over the visible portion of the surface using digital image correlation. A three-dimensional finite element model was built, using ABAQUS, for each solid model, while imposing measured boundary conditions. An inverse-problem method was used, assuming a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic constitutive model. Unknown elastic properties were identified iteratively through an error minimization technique between simulated and measured force-time data. The longitudinal elastic moduli of the five rabbit VFs were calculated and compared to values from a simple analytical method and those obtained by approximating the cross-section as elliptical. The use of shape-specific models significantly reduced the standard deviation of the Young׳s moduli of the tested specimens. However, a non-parametric statistical analysis test, i.e., the Friedman test, yielded no statistically significant differences between the shape-specific method and the elliptic cylindrical finite element model. Considering the required procedures to reconstruct the shape-specific finite element model for each tissue specimen, it might be expedient to use the simpler method when large numbers of tissue specimens are to be compared regarding their Young׳s moduli. PMID:25173237

  20. Test methods for the dynamic mechanical properties of polymeric materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.K.

    1980-06-01

    Various test geometries and procedures for the dynamic mechanical analysis of polymers employing a mechanical spectrometer have been evaluated. The methods and materials included in this work are forced torsional pendulum testing of Kevlar/epoxy laminates and rigid urethane foams, oscillatory parallel plate testing to determine the kinetics of the cure of VCE with Hylene MP, oscillatory compressive testing of B-3223 cellular silicone, and oscillatory tensile testing of Silastic E and single Kevlar filaments. Fundamental dynamic mechanical properties, including the storage and loss moduli and loss tangent of the materials tested, were determined as a function of temperature and sometimes of frequency.

  1. The effect of spherical inclusions in metallic glass nanowires under tensile test and its relation to atomic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, Matias; Gutierrez, Gonzalo; Amigo, Nicolas

    The plastic behavior of crystalline metals is well understood. It is know that this regime is mainly mediated by nucleation and propagation of dislocations as well as by grain boundary sliding. In metallic glasses (MGs) the plastic behavior is quite different from their crystalline counterparts and a relationship between atomic-micro structure and properties remains one of the barriers that has hampered the progress to wide applications of MGs. In particular it would be desirable to have studies which directly relate the evolution of the shear bands (SBs) and glass matrix structure to each step of the applied strain, which would allow us to easily connect the evolution of the atomic structure to the stress-strain curve. Here we present a computational tensile test which shows the evolution of the atomic structure according to the strain is applied for a Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowire at 300 K with a Cu-Zr b2 inclusion in the center of the system with three different radius from 20 to 60 Å. The system consists of a million atoms and the local structure is analyzed by means of the Voronoi polyhedral technique and the nucleation and propagation of SBs by monitoring the local atomic shear strain. CONICyT PhD Fellowship No. 21140904.

  2. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  3. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  4. Ex-situ tensile fatigue-creep testing: A powerful tool to simulate in-situ mechanical degradation in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, A.; Venkatesan, S. V.; Khorasany, R. M. H.; Kim, W. H. J.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-04-01

    An ex-situ tensile fatigue and creep based accelerated stress test (TFC-AST) is proposed to evaluate the mechanical stability of catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) used in fuel cells. The fatigue-creep action of the TFC test is analyzed by tensile and hygrothermal expansion measurements on partially degraded specimens supplemented by microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy, revealing significant decay in mechanical properties as well as morphological rearrangement due to the combined fatigue and creep loading. Through comparison with in-situ hygrothermally degraded CCMs, the TFC-AST protocol is demonstrated to be an economical alternative to the costly in-situ mechanical accelerated stress tests that can reduce the test duration by more than 99%.

  5. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Mann; John P. Hurley

    2002-09-27

    As DOE continues to advance new power systems, materials issues are often pivotal in determining the ultimate efficiency that can be reached in the system. Refractory performance in slagging gasification represents one of these issues. The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to thoroughly examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by a variety of refractory materials during both normal operation and thermal cycling under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The focus of the proposed work is to test the corrosion resistance of commercially available refractories to flowing coal slag, and propose the mechanisms of corrosion for the conditions studied. Corrosion is the degradation of material surfaces or grain boundaries by chemical reactions with melts, liquids, or gases, causing loss of material and consequently a decrease in strength of the structure. In order to develop methods of reducing corrosion, the microstructure that is attacked must be identified along with the mechanism and rates of attack. Once these are identified, methods for reducing corrosion rates can be developed. The work will take advantage of equipment and experimental techniques developed at the EERC under funding from several DOE programs. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) will be utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. To date, efforts have focused on final shakedown of the CADCAF and obtaining representative samples of slag and refractory for testing.

  6. Development of high-throughput perfusion-based microbioreactor platform capable of providing tunable dynamic tensile loading to cells and its application for the study of bovine articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Hsin-Yao; Liu, Heng-Liang; Wang, Shih-Siou; Liu, Yen-Ting; Chen, Yan-Ming; Tsai, Shiao-Wen; Lin, Chun-Li

    2011-08-01

    Mammalian cells are sensitive to extracellular microenvironments. In order to precisely explore the physiological responses of cells to tensile loading, a stable and well-defined culture condition is required. In this study, a high-throughput perfusion-based microbioreactor platform capable of providing dynamic equibiaxial tensile loading to the cultured cells under a steady culture condition was proposed. The mechanism of generating tensile stimulation to cells is based on the pneumatically-driven deformation of an elastic polydimethylsiloxan (PDMS) membrane which exerts tensile loading to the attached cells. By modulating the magnitude and frequency of the applied pneumatic pressure, various tensile loading can be generated in a controllable manner. In this study, the microbioreactor platform was designed with the aid of the experimentally-validated finite element (FE) analysis to ensure the loading of tensile strain to cells is uniform and definable. Based on this design, the quantitative relationship between the applied pneumatic pressure and the generated tensile strain on the PDMS membrane was established via FE analysis. Results demonstrated that the proposed device was able to generate the tensile strain range (0~0.12), which covers the physiological condition that articular chondrocytes experience tensile strain under human walking condition. In this study, moreover, the effect of tensile loading on the metabolic, biosynthetic and proliferation activities of articular chondrocytes was investigated. Results disclosed that the dynamic tensile loading of 0.12 strain at 1 Hz might significantly up-regulate the synthesis of glycosaminoglycans while such stimulation was found no significant influence on the metabolic activity, the synthesis of collagen, and the proliferation of chondrocytes. Overall, this study has presented a high throughput perfusion micro cell culture device that is suitable for precisely exploring the effect of tensile loading on cell

  7. A dynamic ball compression test for understanding rock crushing.

    PubMed

    Huang, S; Liu, H; Xia, K

    2014-12-01

    During crushing, rock particles are subjected to complicated loading. It is desired to establish the relation between the loading and the fragmentation parameters for better understanding rock crushing mechanism. In this work, a split Hopkinson pressure bar system in combination with high speed cameras is utilized in the dynamic ball compression test, in which the spherical rock sample is adopted to avoid the shape effect. Using elasticity theory, the loading rate and the dynamic indirect tensile strength are first calculated. With the aid of the moment-trap technique and high speed cameras, the surface energy is determined for each sample. The relations between the loading rate and the fragmentation parameters, i.e., the number of fragments and the surface energy are established. The application of this method to a granitic rock shows that it is flexible and can be applied to the crushing study of generic brittle solids.

  8. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, A.; Seidt, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen's stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s-1 to 200 s-1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing).

  9. An evaluation of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, S.; Morton, J.; Jackson, K. E.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of advanced composite laminates is studied. The assumptions used for the development of the shear strength formulas were examined, and factors such as the specimen geometry and stacking sequence were assessed experimentally. It was found that the strength of symmetric and balanced +/-45 deg laminates depends primarily upon the specimen thickness rather than the specimen width. These findings have important implications for the +/-45 deg tensile test which is recommended by several organizations for the determination of the in-plane shear stress/strain response and the shear strength of continuous fiber reinforced composites. Modifications to the recommended practices for specimen selection and shear strength determination are suggested.

  10. Unveil the Size-Dependent Mechanical Behaviors of Individual CNT/SiC Composite Nanofibers by In Situ Tensile Tests in SEM.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingchao; Chen, Weibing; Hacopian, Emily; Dong, Pei; Sun, Anqi; Ci, Lijie; Lou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    In situ quantitative tensile tests of individual carbon nanotube (CNT)/SiC core-shell nanofibers are carried out in both a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The incorporation of CNTs into a SiC matrix led to improved elastic modulus and fracture strength of the CNT/SiC nanofibers as compared to SiC alone. PMID:27400777

  11. Numerical biaxial tensile test for sheet metal forming simulation of aluminium alloy sheets based on the homogenized crystal plasticity finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, A.; Ishii, Y.; Hakoyama, T.; Eyckens, P.; Kuwabara, T.

    2016-08-01

    The simulation of the stretch forming of A5182-O aluminum alloy sheet with a spherical punch is performed using the crystal plasticity (CP) finite element method based on the mathematical homogenization theory. In the simulation, the CP constitutive equations and their parameters calibrated by the numerical and experimental biaxial tensile tests with a cruciform specimen are used. The results demonstrate that the variation of the sheet thickness distribution simulated show a relatively good agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Morphology study of peroxide-induced dynamically vulcanized polypropylene/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer/zinc dimethacrylate blends during tensile deformation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Liming; Wang, Yanpeng; Fang, Liming

    2013-06-27

    Polypropylene (PP)/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)/zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) blend (EPDM/PP ratio of 30/70) with remarkable extensibility was successfully prepared via peroxide dynamic vulcanization. The uniaxial tensile properties, crystallization behavior, structure, and morphology during stretching were investigated. The tensile process study showed that the PP/EPDM/ZDMA blend exhibited the rubbery-like behavior with an elongation beyond 600%. The ZDMA graft-product domain increased the compatibility and interfacial adhesion between rubber and PP phases, while it reduced the crystallinity of the PP phase. On the basis of TEM and SEM analyses, we found that the cross-linked rubber particles could be elongated and oriented along the tensile direction, whereas the ZDMA graft-product domain "encapsulated" rubber phase together, acting as a "bridge" between elongated rubber phases and the PP phase during uniaxial stretching. The stress could be effectively transferred from the PP phase to the numerous elongated rubber phases due to the excellent compatibility and interfacial adhesion between rubber and PP phases, resulting in the rubbery-like behavior. PMID:23742700

  13. A practical test for noisy chaotic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenSaïda, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    This code computes the largest Lyapunov exponent and tests for the presence of a chaotic dynamics, as opposed to stochastic dynamics, in a noisy scalar series. The program runs under MATLAB​® programming language.

  14. Comparison of the direct burst pressure and the ring tensile test methods for mechanical characterization of tissue-engineered vascular substitutes.

    PubMed

    Laterreur, Véronique; Ruel, Jean; Auger, François A; Vallières, Karine; Tremblay, Catherine; Lacroix, Dan; Tondreau, Maxime; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Germain, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative for small diameter vascular grafts, especially with the self-assembly method. It is crucial that these grafts possess mechanical properties that allow them to withstand physiological flow and pressure without being damaged. Therefore, an accurate assessment of their mechanical properties, especially the burst pressure, is essential prior to clinical release. In this study, the burst pressure of self-assembled tissue-engineered vascular substitutes was first measured by the direct method, which consists in pressurizing the construct with fluid until tissue failure. It was then compared to the burst pressure estimated by Laplace׳s law using data from a ring tensile test. The major advantage of this last method is that it requires a significantly smaller tissue sample. However, it has been reported as overestimating the burst pressure compared to a direct measurement. In the present report, it was found that an accurate estimation of the burst pressure may be obtained from a ring tensile test when failure internal diameter is used as the diameter parameter in Laplace׳s law. Overestimation occurs with the method previously reported, i.e. when the unloaded internal diameter is used for calculations. The estimation of other mechanical properties was also investigated. It was demonstrated that data from a ring tensile test provide an accurate estimate of the failure strain and the stiffness of the constructs when compared to measurements with the direct method.

  15. Dynamic testing of docking system hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorland, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    Extensive dynamic testing was conducted to verify the flight readiness of the Apollo docking hardware. Testing was performed on a unique six degree-of-freedom motion simulator controlled by a computer that calculated the associated spacecraft motions. The test system and the results obtained by subjecting flight-type docking hardware to actual impact loads and resultant spacecraft dynamics are described.

  16. Stress-induced martensitic transformation during tensile test of full-size TF conductor jacket tube at 4.2 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H. H.; Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J.; Huang, R. J.; Li, S. P.; Li, L. F.

    2014-01-01

    The toroidal-field (TF) conductor jacket of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is made of modified 316LN stainless steel, which is influenced by heat treatment at approximately 650 °C for 200 h to produce Nb3Sn superconducting materials at the final stage. Due to the high electromagnetic forces arising during magnet operation, higher mechanical properties of the jacket materials at cryogenic temperatures are required. In our work, mechanical properties of the full-size TF conductor jacket tube were investigated, which satisfied the ITER requirements. Stress-induced martensitic transformation mechanism during tensile test of the conductor jacket material at 4.2 K was characterized by means of in-situ temperature dependent XRD, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile behavior related to the amount of stress-induced phase transformation at cryogenic temperature was also discussed.

  17. Stress-induced martensitic transformation during tensile test of full-size TF conductor jacket tube at 4.2 K

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. H.; Li, S. P.; Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J.; Huang, R. J.; Li, L. F.

    2014-01-27

    The toroidal-field (TF) conductor jacket of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is made of modified 316LN stainless steel, which is influenced by heat treatment at approximately 650 °C for 200 h to produce Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting materials at the final stage. Due to the high electromagnetic forces arising during magnet operation, higher mechanical properties of the jacket materials at cryogenic temperatures are required. In our work, mechanical properties of the full-size TF conductor jacket tube were investigated, which satisfied the ITER requirements. Stress-induced martensitic transformation mechanism during tensile test of the conductor jacket material at 4.2 K was characterized by means of in-situ temperature dependent XRD, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile behavior related to the amount of stress-induced phase transformation at cryogenic temperature was also discussed.

  18. NASA-VCOSS dynamic test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waites, H. B.; Seltzer, S. M.; Doane, G. B., III

    1985-01-01

    The Large Space Structure Ground Test Facility under development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama is described. The Ground Test Facility was established initially to test experimentally the control system to be used on the Solar Array flight Experiment. The structural dynamics of the selected test article were investigated, including the fidelity of the associated mathematical model. The facility must permit the investigation of structural dynamics phenomena and be able to evaluate candidate attitude control and vibration suppression techniques.

  19. Viking 1975 orbiter development test model/Lander dynamic test model, dynamic environmental testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milder, G.

    1975-01-01

    A series of dynamic environmental tests on the Viking 1975 Orbiter/Lander model provided information regarding damping and linearity. The quality of mode isolation was made with orthogonality checks. A pretest criterion established for orthogonality provided good correlation with test results. Part of the post-test analysis was dedicated to a review of instrumentation selection for control and/or response limiting. Limited load values were also examined.

  20. Considerable different frequency dependence of dynamic tensile modulus between self-heating (Joule heat) and external heating for polymer--nickel-coated carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Bin, Yuezhen; Dong, Enyuan; Matsuo, Masaru

    2014-06-26

    Dynamic tensile moduli of polyethylene--nickel-coated carbon fiber (NiCF) composites with 10 and 4 vol % NiCF contents under electrical field were measured by a homemade instrument in the frequency range of 100--0.01 Hz. The drastic descent of the storage modulus of the composite with 10 vol % was verified in lower frequency range with elevating surface temperature (T(s)) by self-heating (Joule heat). The composite was cut when T(s) was beyond 108 °C. On the other hand, the measurement of the composite with 4 vol % beyond 88 °C was impossible, since T(s) did not elevate because of the disruption of current networks. Incidentally, the dynamic tensile moduli by external heating could be measured up to 130 and 115 °C for 10 and 4 vol %, respectively, but the two composites could be elongated beyond the above temperatures. Such different properties were analyzed in terms of crystal dispersions, electrical treeing, and thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling effect. PMID:24893179

  1. Considerable different frequency dependence of dynamic tensile modulus between self-heating (Joule heat) and external heating for polymer--nickel-coated carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Bin, Yuezhen; Dong, Enyuan; Matsuo, Masaru

    2014-06-26

    Dynamic tensile moduli of polyethylene--nickel-coated carbon fiber (NiCF) composites with 10 and 4 vol % NiCF contents under electrical field were measured by a homemade instrument in the frequency range of 100--0.01 Hz. The drastic descent of the storage modulus of the composite with 10 vol % was verified in lower frequency range with elevating surface temperature (T(s)) by self-heating (Joule heat). The composite was cut when T(s) was beyond 108 °C. On the other hand, the measurement of the composite with 4 vol % beyond 88 °C was impossible, since T(s) did not elevate because of the disruption of current networks. Incidentally, the dynamic tensile moduli by external heating could be measured up to 130 and 115 °C for 10 and 4 vol %, respectively, but the two composites could be elongated beyond the above temperatures. Such different properties were analyzed in terms of crystal dispersions, electrical treeing, and thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling effect.

  2. Tensile and pack compressive tests of some sheets of aluminum alloy, 1025 carbon steel, and chromium-nickel steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atchison, C S; Miller, James A

    1942-01-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain curves, stress-deviation curves, and secant modulus-stress curves are given for longitudinal and transverse specimens of 17S-T, 24S-T, and 24S-RT aluminum-alloy sheet in thicknesses from 0.032 to 0.081 inch, 1025 carbon steel sheet in thicknesses of 0.054 and 0.120 inch, and chromium-nickel steel sheet in thicknesses form 0.020 to 0.0275 inch. Significant differences were found between the tensile and the compressive stress-strain curves, and also the corresponding corollary curves; similarly, differences were found between the curves for the longitudinal and transverse directions. These differences are of particular importance in considering the compressive strength of aircraft structures made of thin sheet. They are explored further for the case of compression by giving tangent modulus-stress curves in longitudinal and transverse compression and dimensionless curves of the ratio of tangent modulus to Young's modulus and of the ratio of reduced modulus for a rectangular section to Young's modulus, both plotted against the ratio of stress to secant yield strength.

  3. An in-plane tensile test for rheological and formability identification: comparison between experimental and numerical FLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leotoing, L.; Guines, D.; Ragneau, E.

    2011-05-01

    Both accurate constitutive laws and formability limits of materials are essential for a numerical optimization of sheet forming processes. To identify these behaviors, experimental databases are needed. In this work, experiments are performed from a biaxial device able to give for a unique in-plane specimen a good prediction of rheological parameters and formability. The proposed device is a servo-hydraulic testing machine provided with four independent dynamic actuators. By localizing necking in the central zone of the specimen, the strain path in this zone is controlled by the speed ratio between the two axes and the whole forming limit diagram can be covered. The experimental forming limit curve for the aluminium alloy AA5086 is determined thanks to a rigorous procedure for detecting the onset of necking in the specimen. Material parameters (constants of both hardening law and anisotropic yield criterion) are identified from the global measurement of force versus displacement curves by means of an inverse analysis procedure. Comparison between experimental and numerical forming limit curves are presented. For the numerical FLCs, two sets of material parameters are compared, the former is identified through the classical uniaxial test and the latter thanks to the dedicated cruciform specimen.

  4. An in-plane tensile test for rheological and formability identification: comparison between experimental and numerical FLC

    SciTech Connect

    Leotoing, L.; Guines, D.; Ragneau, E.

    2011-05-04

    Both accurate constitutive laws and formability limits of materials are essential for a numerical optimization of sheet forming processes. To identify these behaviors, experimental databases are needed. In this work, experiments are performed from a biaxial device able to give for a unique in-plane specimen a good prediction of rheological parameters and formability. The proposed device is a servo-hydraulic testing machine provided with four independent dynamic actuators. By localizing necking in the central zone of the specimen, the strain path in this zone is controlled by the speed ratio between the two axes and the whole forming limit diagram can be covered. The experimental forming limit curve for the aluminium alloy AA5086 is determined thanks to a rigorous procedure for detecting the onset of necking in the specimen. Material parameters (constants of both hardening law and anisotropic yield criterion) are identified from the global measurement of force versus displacement curves by means of an inverse analysis procedure. Comparison between experimental and numerical forming limit curves are presented. For the numerical FLCs, two sets of material parameters are compared, the former is identified through the classical uniaxial test and the latter thanks to the dedicated cruciform specimen.

  5. Space station structures and dynamics test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Frank M.; Ivey, E. W.; Moore, C. J.; Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    The design, construction, and operation of a low-Earth orbit space station poses challenges for development and implementation of technology. One specific challenge is the development of a dynamics test program for defining the space station design requirements, and identifying and characterizing phenomena affecting the space station's design and development. The test proposal, as outlined, is a comprehensive structural dynamics program to be launched in support of the space station (SS). Development of a parametric data base and verification of the mathematical models and analytical analysis tools necessary for engineering support of the station's design, construction, and operation provide the impetus for the dynamics test program. The four test phases planned are discussed: testing of SS applicable structural concepts; testing of SS prototypes; testing of actual SS structural hardware; and on-orbit testing of SS construction.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  7. Space station structures and dynamics test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.; Townsend, John S.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    The design, construction, and operation of a low-Earth orbit space station poses unique challenges for development and implementation of new technology. The technology arises from the special requirement that the station be built and constructed to function in a weightless environment, where static loads are minimal and secondary to system dynamics and control problems. One specific challenge confronting NASA is the development of a dynamics test program for: (1) defining space station design requirements, and (2) identifying the characterizing phenomena affecting the station's design and development. A general definition of the space station dynamic test program, as proposed by MSFC, forms the subject of this report. The test proposal is a comprehensive structural dynamics program to be launched in support of the space station. The test program will help to define the key issues and/or problems inherent to large space structure analysis, design, and testing. Development of a parametric data base and verification of the math models and analytical analysis tools necessary for engineering support of the station's design, construction, and operation provide the impetus for the dynamics test program. The philosophy is to integrate dynamics into the design phase through extensive ground testing and analytical ground simulations of generic systems, prototype elements, and subassemblies. On-orbit testing of the station will also be used to define its capability.

  8. The dynamic sphere test problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chabaud, Brandon M.; Brock, Jerry S.; Smith, Brandon M.

    2012-05-16

    In this manuscript we define the dynamic sphere problem as a spherical shell composed of a homogeneous, linearly elastic material. The material exhibits either isotropic or transverse isotropic symmetry. When the problem is formulated in material coordinates, the balance of mass equation is satisfied automatically. Also, the material is assumed to be kept at constant temperature, so the only relevant equation is the equation of motion. The shell has inner radius r{sub i} and outer radius r{sub o}. Initially, the shell is at rest. We assume that the interior of the shell is a void and we apply a time-varying radial stress on the outer surface.

  9. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  10. Comparison of the slow strain rate technique and the NACE TM0177/sup (1)/ tensile test for determining sulfide stress cracking resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoey, G.R.; Revie, R.W.; Ramsingh, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    Samples of a commercial sour service API C-90 (modified AISI 4130 steel) oil country seamless casing in the asquenched state were tempered at six temperatures in the range of 610 to 780 C. The sulfide stress cracking (SSC) resistance of the tempered steels was investigated by the NACE Standard TMO177 tensile bar test and the slow strain rate technique (SSRT). By the NACE TMO177 test, a maximum SSC threshold stress of 662 MPa (96 ksi) was obtained for a steel with a yield strength of 690 MPa (100 ksi), which has been tempered at 715 C. Data on time to failure, percent reduction of area, and percent elongation by the SSRT correlated well with the threshold stresses of the six tempered steels. Compared with the NACE TMO177 test, the SSRT saved considerable time in determining SSC resistance.

  11. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1]. PMID:27660812

  12. Use of micro-tomography for validation of method to identify interfacial shear strength from tensile tests of short regenerated cellulose fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajlane, A.; Miettinen, A.; Madsen, B.; Beauson, J.; Joffe, R.

    2016-07-01

    The interfacial shear strength of short regenerated cellulose fibre/polylactide composites was characterized by means of an industry-friendly adhesion test method. The interfacial shear strength was back-calculated from the experimental tensile stress-strain curves of composites by using a micro-mechanical model. The parameters characterizing the microstructure of the composites, e.g. fibre length and orientation distributions, used as input in the model were obtained by micro-tomography. The investigation was carried out on composites with untreated and surface treated fibres with various fibre weight contents (5wt%, 10wt%, and 15wt% for untreated fibres, and 15wt% for treated fibres). The properties of fibres were measured by an automated single fibre tensile test method. Based on these results, the efficiency of the fibre treatment to improve fibre/matrix adhesion is evaluated, and the applicability of the method to measure the interfacial shear strength is discussed. The results are compared with data from previous work, and with other results from the literature.

  13. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; Nasiatka, James R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2014-08-15

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C.

  14. Dynamic assertion testing of flight control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.; Mahmood, A.; Mccluskey, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Assertions are used to dynamically test fault tolerant flight software. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters.

  15. Dynamic assertion testing of flight control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.; Mahmood, A.; Mccluskey, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment in using assertions to dynamically test fault tolerant flight software is described. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters.

  16. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  17. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG

  18. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  20. Continuous waves probing in dynamic acoustoelastic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Ait Ouarabi, M.; Boubenider, F.

    2016-05-01

    Consolidated granular media display a peculiar nonlinear elastic behavior, which is normally analysed with dynamic ultrasonic testing exploiting the dependence on amplitude of different measurable quantities, such as the resonance frequency shift, the amount of harmonics generation, or the break of the superposition principle. However, dynamic testing allows measuring effects which are averaged over one (or more) cycles of the exciting perturbation. Dynamic acoustoelastic testing has been proposed to overcome this limitation and allow the determination of the real amplitude dependence of the modulus of the material. Here, we propose an implementation of the approach, in which the pulse probing waves are substituted by continuous waves. As a result, instead of measuring a time-of-flight as a function of the pump strain, we study the dependence of the resonance frequency on the strain amplitude, allowing to derive the same conclusions but with an easier to implement procedure.

  1. Dynamic Breaking Tests of Airplane Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertel, Heinrich

    1933-01-01

    The static stresses of airplane parts, the magnitude of which can be determined with the aid of static load assumptions, are mostly superposed by dynamic stresses, the magnitude of which has been but little explored. The object of the present investigation is to show how the strength of airplane parts can best be tested with respect to dynamic stresses with and without superposed static loading, and to what extent the dynamic strength of the parts depends on their structural design. Experimental apparatus and evaluation methods were developed and tried for the execution of vibration-strength tests with entire structural parts both with and without superposed static loading. Altogether ten metal spars and spar pieces and two wooden spars were subjected to vibration breaking tests.

  2. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  3. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  4. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui Ren, Luquan; Liang, Yunhong; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  5. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument. PMID:24985848

  6. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  7. NASA Handbook for Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Dennis L.; Scharton, Terry D.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in the area of structural dynamics and vibrations, in both methodology and capability, have the potential to make spacecraft system testing more effective from technical, cost, schedule, and hardware safety points of view. However, application of these advanced test methods varies widely among the NASA Centers and their contractors. Identification and refinement of the best of these test methodologies and implementation approaches has been an objective of efforts by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on behalf of the NASA Office of the Chief Engineer. But to develop the most appropriate overall test program for a flight project from the selection of advanced methodologies, as well as conventional test methods, spacecraft project managers and their technical staffs will need overall guidance and technical rationale. Thus, the Chief Engineer's Office has recently tasked JPL to prepare a NASA Handbook for Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Testing. An outline of the proposed handbook, with a synopsis of each section, has been developed and is presented herein. Comments on the proposed handbook is solicited from the spacecraft structural dynamics testing community.

  8. NASA Handbook for Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Dennis L.; Scharton, Terry D.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the area of structural dynamics and vibrations, in both methodology and capability, have the potential to make spacecraft system testing more effective from technical, cost, schedule, and hardware safety points of view. However, application of these advanced test methods varies widely among the NASA Centers and their contractors. Identification and refinement of the best of these test methodologies and implementation approaches has been an objective of efforts by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on behalf of the NASA Office of the Chief Engineer. But to develop the most appropriate overall test program for a flight project from the selection of advanced methodologies, as well as conventional test methods, spacecraft project managers and their technical staffs will need overall guidance and technical rationale. Thus, the Chief Engineer's Office has recently tasked JPL to prepare a NASA Handbook for Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Testing. An outline of the proposed handbook, with a synopsis of each section, has been developed and is presented herein. Comments on the proposed handbook are solicited from the spacecraft structural dynamics testing community.

  9. Effect of sample test volume and geometry on the tensile mechanical behavior of SiC/SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Neogi, J.

    1998-09-01

    The development of a silicon carbide-type fiber from an organometallic precursor has led to a major resurgence of interest in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites. By combining this high strength fiber with a variety of ceramic matrices it has been possible to achieve tough composites offering significant potential advantages over monolithic ceramics and carbon-carbon for high temperature applications. A continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composite (CFCC) typical of materials proposed for such industrial applications as power generation, heat recovery and chemical production as well as biomedical and environmental applications was tested in uniaxial tension using a universal test machine. Test parameters investigated included: test mode (load versus displacement), test rate (0.003 mm/s, 0.03 mm/s, 50 N/s and 500 N/s), specimen geometry (straight-sided versus reduced-gauge section) and type of specimen volume (long/thin versus short/fat). Typical properties include an average elastic modulus 130 {+-} 10 Gpa, an average proportional limit stress of 45 {+-} 20 Mpa, an average ultimate tensile strength of 180 {+-} 20 MPa and an average modulus of toughness of 8.4 {+-} 2 (x10{sup 5})J/m{sup 3}.

  10. Tensile creep of dental amalgam.

    PubMed

    Greener, E H; Szurgot, K; Lautenschlager, E P

    1982-04-01

    Rather than the usual compressive dental creep, various types of one week old dental amalgams were continuously monitored in tensile creep. Testing was done at 37, 45 and 50 degrees C, in a specially designed apparatus capable of 0 to 60 degrees C while maintaining a constant true tensile stress of 17 MPa. For the first time, the classical four stages of creep were observed at elevated temperatures in the low Cu amalgams, including creep rupture. The high Cu systems displayed only transient creep up to 50 degrees C and no rupture. Approximately one half the stress was needed in tension to provide the equivalent creep in compression. PMID:7082735

  11. Stability precision dynamic testing system on artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Li, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic feature of Weapon equipments is one of important performance index for evaluating the performance of the whole weapon system. The construction of target range in our country in fire control dynamic testing is relatively backward; therefore, it has greatly influenced the evaluation on the fire control system. In order to solve this problem, it's urgent to develop a new testing instrument so as to adjust to the armament research process and promote weapon system working more efficiently and thereby meeting the needs of modernization in national defense. This paper proposes a new measure which is used to test the stability precision of the fire control system, and it is installed on the moving base. Using the method, we develop a testing system which can test the stability precision of the fire control system and achieve a high precision results after testing. The innovation of the system is we can receive the image not only by CCD, but our eyes. It also adopts digital image-forming and image processing technique for real-time measurement and storing of the target information; it simultaneously adopts the method adjusting the platform and the corresponding fixture mounted on a sample to measure the stable precision and the precision of corner of stabilizator. In this paper, we make a description on the construction of the system and the idea of the designing of the optical system. Finally, we introduce the actual application of the system and testing results.

  12. Anti-buckling fatigue test assembly. [for subjecting metal specimen to tensile and compressive loads at constant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Imig, L. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An antibuckling fatigue test assembly is described for holding a metal specimen which is subjected to compression and to rapid cyclical heating and cooling while permitting visual observation. In an illustrative embodiment of this invention, the anti-buckling fatigue test apparatus includes first and second guide members between which the metal specimen is disposed and held, a heating assembly comprising a suitable heating source such as a quartz lamp and a reflecting assembly directing the heat onto the specimen, and a cooling assembly for directing a suitable cooling fluid such as air onto the specimen. The guide members each have a passage to permit the heat to be directed onto the specimen. An opening is provided in the reflecting assembly to permit visual inspection of that region of the specimen adjacent to the opening onto which the heat is directed.

  13. Improvement in Mechanical Properties of A356 Tensile Test Bars Cast in a Permanent Mold by Application of a Knife Ingate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaou; Schwam, David; Neff, David V.; Chen, Chai-Jung; Zhu, Xuejun

    2012-03-01

    As a standard test-bar permanent mold, the "Stahl" Mold has been widely used in foundries to assess the properties of cast alloys. However, inferior mechanical properties are often obtained with this mold due to shrinkage-induced microporosity in the gage section. In order to improve the mechanical properties, a design modification comprising a thin knife ingate between the feeder and test-bar cavity was evaluated in this work. The new design was studied by computer-aided simulation. Simulations predicted that the knife ingate improved the metal feeding capability and reduced the shrinkage microporosity at the gage section from 3 to 1 pct. Experimental verification work has been undertaken with aluminum alloy A356, and the results were analyzed by a statistics theory-based factorial analysis method. The new design resulted in main effects with ultimate tensile strength (UTS) improvement of 20 MPa (relative 12 pct) and elongation increment of 2 pct (relative 45 pct) for the as-cast test bars.

  14. Dynamic tests of cracked pipe components

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, D.A.; Heald, J.D.; Sharma, S.R.

    1984-02-01

    Dynamic tests were conducted involving notched sections of 4-in. (10-cm) stainless steel and Inconel-600 pipe. The specimen was a four-point bending beam with end masses sized to give an elastic first-mode frequency near that of typical field installed piping systems (15 Hz). Specimens were loaded using sinewave excitation at this first mode natural frequency. Specimen response was compared to predictions from an elastic-plastic dynamic analysis previously developed on this program. In addition, specimen loads at failure were compared to those predicted from a net section collapse failure criterion. The results confirmed that the elasticplastic dynamic analysis adequately predicted the dynamic response of flawed pipes under seismic-type excitation. Furthermore, net section collapse does not occur under dynamic loading conditions which simulate natural frequencies of asinstalled light water reactor piping systems. Finally, a net section collapse criterion yields conservative estimates of the load capacity of flawed pipe sections provided crack growth is properly accounted for.

  15. Dynamic (Vibration) Testing: Design-Certification of Aerospace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin K.

    2010-01-01

    Various types of dynamic testing of structures for certification purposes are described, including vibration, shock and acoustic testing. Modal testing is discussed as it frequently complements dynamic testing and is part of the structural verification/validation process leading up to design certification. Examples of dynamic and modal testing are presented as well as the common practices, procedures and standards employed.

  16. Dynamic Docking Test System (DDTS) active table frequency response test results. [Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of the frequency response test performed on the dynamic docking test system (DDTS) active table. Sinusoidal displacement commands were applied to the table and the dynamic response determined from measured actuator responses and accelerometers mounted to the table and one actuator.

  17. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  18. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, Joe L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  19. Dynamic test techniques - Concepts and practices. [flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlings, K., III; Cooper, J. M.; Hughes, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    An initial investigation of dynamic flight test analysis techniques indicated that a strict, comprehensive force-moment accounting system would be necessary. An implementation of the longitudinal force-moment accounting system provided excellent results in accounting for small lift/drag and tail deflection changes. Attention is given to gross thrust calculation, instrumentation, maneuvers, and aspects of data correlation. The results of the studies demonstrate that it is possible to generate a lift/drag model which is capable of predicting performance from nearly any maneuver.

  20. Preparation of dynamic gravity testing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, Carl

    Bowin's interest at WHOI is to obtain the most accurate gravity and gravity gradient measurements possible. The Navy's interest is to have the most accurate navigation possible. Neither can have one without the other. Through Zarak Corporation, Bowin has proposed to the Navy Air System Command to develop a dynamic navigational gravity/gravity gradient (NAV/GRAV) system utilizing superconducting squid gravity and tensor gravity gradient sensors for high precision performance. The proposed system development incorporates that inter-dependency, not only to provide the best estimates of both, but also to provide estimates of the quality of the results obtained. Zarak is pursuing funds for the development of superconducting gravity and gravity gradient sensors. Such sensors, when available, will then be utilized in this palletized system for higher accuracy navigation, gravity and gravity gradient determination. It is desired that initial testing utilize Vibrating String Accelerometers (VSA) gravity sensors and readout systems available at WHOI. This way the development and testing of the NAV/GRAV system can proceed using the VSA sensors while the superconducting gravity sensors are being fabricated. Initial dynamic systems tests will be in a van vehicle for convenience and practicality. The system units will be palletized, and therefore they shall be easily transferable, and thus also be usable in aircraft and ships. It is planned that WHOI will have loan of prototype systems for about two months each year for earth research use.

  1. Testing relativity with solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A major breakthrough is described in the accuracy of Solar System dynamical tests of relativistic gravity. The breakthrough was achieved by factoring in ranging data from Viking Landers 1 and 2 from the surface of Mars. Other key data sources included optical transit circle observations, lunar laser ranging, planetary radar, and spacecraft (Mariner 9 to Mars and Mariner 10 to Mercury). The Solar System model which is used to fit the data and the process by which such fits are performed are explained and results are discussed. The results are fully consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  2. A Method for Selecting Software for Dynamic Event Analysis II: the Taylor Anvil and Dynamic Brazilian Tests

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Richins; J. M. Lacy; T. K. Larson; S. R. Novascone

    2008-05-01

    New nuclear power reactor designs will require resistance to a variety of possible malevolent attacks as well as traditional dynamic accident scenarios. The design/analysis team may be faced with a broad range of phenomena including air and ground blasts, high-velocity penetrators or shaped charges, and vehicle or aircraft impacts. With a host of software tools available to address these high-energy events, the analysis team must evaluate and select the software most appropriate for their particular set of problems. The accuracy of the selected software should then be validated with respect to the phenomena governing the interaction of the threat and structure. Several software codes are available for the study of blast, impact, and other shock phenomena. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a study is underway to investigate the comparative characteristics of a group of shock and high-strain rate physics codes including ABAQUS, LS-DYNA, CTH, ALEGRA, and ALE-3D. In part I of this report, a series of five benchmark problems to exercise some important capabilities of the subject software was identified. The benchmark problems selected are a Taylor cylinder test, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test, a free air blast, the dynamic splitting tension (Brazilian) test, and projectile penetration of a concrete slab. Part II-- this paper-- reports the results of two of the benchmark problems: the Taylor cylinder and the dynamic Brazilian test. The Taylor cylinder test is a method to determine the dynamic yield properties of materials. The test specimen is a right circular cylinder which is impacted against a theoretically rigid target. The cylinder deforms upon impact, with the final shape depending upon the dynamic yield stress, in turn a function of strain and strain rate. The splitting tension test, or Brazilian test, is a method to measure the tensile strength of concrete using a cylindrical specimen. The specimen is loaded diametrically in compression, producing a

  3. Low-temperature mechanical properties of Fe 0.06C 18Cr 10Ni 0.4Ti austenitic steel determined using ring-pull tensile tests and microhardness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neustroev, V. S.; Boev, E. V.; Garner, F. A.

    2007-08-01

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels removed from Russian water-cooled VVERs experience irradiation temperatures and He/dpa conditions that are very similar to steels to be used in ITER. Data are presented on the radiation hardening of the Russian analog of AISI 321 at 0.2-15 dpa in the range of 285-320 °C. The Russian variant of the ring-pull tensile test was used to obtain mechanical property data. Microhardness tests on the ring specimens provide useful information throughout the deformed regions, but at high hardening levels caution must be exercised before application of a widely accepted hardness-yield stress correlation to prediction of tensile properties. Low-nickel austenitic steels are very prone to form deformation martensite, a phase that increases strongly with the larger deformation levels characteristic of microhardness tests, especially when compared to the 0.2% deformation used to define yield stress.

  4. Low-temperature Mechanical Properties of Fe-0.06C-18Cr-10Ni-0.4Ti Austenitic Steel Determined Using Ring-Pull Tensile Tests and Microhardness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neustroev, V. S.; Boev, E. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-08-01

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels removed from Russian water-cooled VVERs experience irradiation temperatures and He/dpa conditions that are very similar to steels to be used in ITER. Data are presented on the radiation hardening of the Russian analog of AISI 321 at 0.2 to 15 dpa in the range of 285 to 320оС. The Russian variant of the ring-pull tensile test was used to obtain mechanical prop-erty data. Microhardness tests on the ring specimens provide useful information throughout the deformed regions, but at high hardening levels caution must be exercised before application of a widely accepted hardness-yield stress correla-tion to prediction of tensile properties. Low-nickel austenitic steels are very prone to form deformation martensite, a phase that increases strongly with the larger deformation levels characteristic of microhardness tests, especially when compared to the 0.2% deformation used to define yield stress.

  5. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  6. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains. PMID:19616380

  7. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  8. Novel in situ device for investigating the tensile and fatigue behaviors of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qinchao; Wang, Kaiting; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Hongbing; Lu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    For investigating the static tensile and dynamic fatigue behaviors of bulk materials, a miniaturized device with separate modular tensile and fatigue actuators was developed. The fatigue actuator presented good compatibility with the tensile actuator and mainly consisted of a special flexure hinge and piezoelectric stack. In situ fatigue tests under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. A displacement correction method of tensile actuator based on load sensor compliance was investigated, and the feasibility of the method was verified by the comparison tests with a commercial tensile instrument. The application of testing the storage and loss modulus as a function of frequency was explained, and the temperature rises of both the piezoelectric stack and specimen were obtained as a function of frequency. Output characteristics of the fatigue actuator were also investigated. Additionally, the discharge performance of piezoelectric stack based on various initial voltages and fatigue tests on C11000 copper was carried out. This paper shows a modularized example that combines a servo motor with a piezoelectric actuator attached to the specimen grip to realize the in situ fatigue tests.

  9. Novel in situ device for investigating the tensile and fatigue behaviors of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qinchao; Wang, Kaiting; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Hongbing; Lu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    For investigating the static tensile and dynamic fatigue behaviors of bulk materials, a miniaturized device with separate modular tensile and fatigue actuators was developed. The fatigue actuator presented good compatibility with the tensile actuator and mainly consisted of a special flexure hinge and piezoelectric stack. In situ fatigue tests under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. A displacement correction method of tensile actuator based on load sensor compliance was investigated, and the feasibility of the method was verified by the comparison tests with a commercial tensile instrument. The application of testing the storage and loss modulus as a function of frequency was explained, and the temperature rises of both the piezoelectric stack and specimen were obtained as a function of frequency. Output characteristics of the fatigue actuator were also investigated. Additionally, the discharge performance of piezoelectric stack based on various initial voltages and fatigue tests on C11000 copper was carried out. This paper shows a modularized example that combines a servo motor with a piezoelectric actuator attached to the specimen grip to realize the in situ fatigue tests.

  10. Experimental Testing of Dynamically Optimized Photoelectron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; Dunning, M.; England, R. J.; Musumeci, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Fillipetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.; Vicario, C.; Jones, S.

    2006-11-01

    We discuss the design of and initial results from an experiment in space-charge dominated beam dynamics which explores a new regime of high-brightness electron beam generation at the SPARC photoinjector. The scheme under study employs the tendency of intense electron beams to rearrange to produce uniform density, giving a nearly ideal beam from the viewpoint of space charge-induced emittance. The experiments are aimed at testing the marriage of this idea with a related concept, emittance compensation. We show that this new regime of operating photoinjector may be the preferred method of obtaining highest brightness beams with lower energy spread. We discuss the design of the experiment, including developing of a novel time-dependent, aerogel-based imaging system. This system has been installed at SPARC, and first evidence for nearly uniformly filled ellipsoidal charge distributions recorded.

  11. Experimental Testing of Dynamically Optimized Photoelectron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; Dunning, M.; England, R. J.; Musumeci, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Fillipetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Palumbo, L.; Vicario, C.; Serafini, L.; Jones, S.

    2006-11-27

    We discuss the design of and initial results from an experiment in space-charge dominated beam dynamics which explores a new regime of high-brightness electron beam generation at the SPARC photoinjector. The scheme under study employs the tendency of intense electron beams to rearrange to produce uniform density, giving a nearly ideal beam from the viewpoint of space charge-induced emittance. The experiments are aimed at testing the marriage of this idea with a related concept, emittance compensation. We show that this new regime of operating photoinjector may be the preferred method of obtaining highest brightness beams with lower energy spread. We discuss the design of the experiment, including developing of a novel time-dependent, aerogel-based imaging system. This system has been installed at SPARC, and first evidence for nearly uniformly filled ellipsoidal charge distributions recorded.

  12. Testing particle filters on convective scale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslehner, Mylene; Craig, George. C.; Janjic, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    Particle filters have been developed in recent years to deal with highly nonlinear dynamics and non Gaussian error statistics that also characterize data assimilation on convective scales. In this work we explore the use of the efficient particle filter (P.v. Leeuwen, 2011) for convective scale data assimilation application. The method is tested in idealized setting, on two stochastic models. The models were designed to reproduce some of the properties of convection, for example the rapid development and decay of convective clouds. The first model is a simple one-dimensional, discrete state birth-death model of clouds (Craig and Würsch, 2012). For this model, the efficient particle filter that includes nudging the variables shows significant improvement compared to Ensemble Kalman Filter and Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) particle filter. The success of the combination of nudging and resampling, measured as RMS error with respect to the 'true state', is proportional to the nudging intensity. Significantly, even a very weak nudging intensity brings notable improvement over SIR. The second model is a modified version of a stochastic shallow water model (Würsch and Craig 2013), which contains more realistic dynamical characteristics of convective scale phenomena. Using the efficient particle filter and different combination of observations of the three field variables (wind, water 'height' and rain) allows the particle filter to be evaluated in comparison to a regime where only nudging is used. Sensitivity to the properties of the model error covariance is also considered. Finally, criteria are identified under which the efficient particle filter outperforms nudging alone. References: Craig, G. C. and M. Würsch, 2012: The impact of localization and observation averaging for convective-scale data assimilation in a simple stochastic model. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.,139, 515-523. Van Leeuwen, P. J., 2011: Efficient non-linear data assimilation in geophysical

  13. Viking Mars lander 1975 dynamic test model/orbiter developmental test model forced vibration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, J.; Brownlee, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Viking Mars Lander 1975 dynamic test model and orbiter developmental test model were subjected to forced vibration sine tests. Flight acceptance (FA) and type approval (TA) test levels were applied to the spacecraft structure in a longitudinal test configuration using a 133,440-N (30,000-lb) force shaker. Testing in the two lateral axes (X, Y) was performed at lower levels using four 667-N (150-lb) force shakers. Forced vibration qualification (TA) test levels were successfully imposed on the spacecraft at frequencies down to 10 Hz. Measured responses showed the same character as analytical predictions, and correlation was reasonably good. Because of control system test tolerances, orbiter primary structure generally did not reach the design load limits attained in earlier static testing. A post-test examination of critical orbiter structure disclosed no apparent damage to the structure as a result of the test environment.

  14. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  15. Mechanical properties of proton-conducting sulfonated aromatic polymer membranes: Stress-strain tests and dynamical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgreccia, E.; Chailan, J.-F.; Khadhraoui, M.; Di Vona, M. L.; Knauth, P.

    The mechanical properties of sulfonated aromatic polymers (SAPs: SPEEK and SPPSU) are studied by tensile stress-strain tests and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The elastic moduli are generally above 1 GPa with tensile strength between 25 and 80 MPa and elongation at rupture between 7 and 50%. These properties are consistent with polymers below their glass transition temperature. The glass transition and elastic moduli are strongly increased by thermal treatments of the SAP membranes, due to formation of cross-links between macromolecules. The cross-linking is observed "in situ" during DMA experiments on thermally untreated SPPSU. These data show that previously neglected SAPs might become very interesting PEM fuel cell membranes, if previously thermally treated.

  16. The dynamic modelling of a slotted test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumas, G.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model of the wind tunnel dynamics was developed. The modelling techniques were restricted to the use of one dimensional unsteady flow. The dynamic characteristics of slotted test section incorporated into the model are presented.

  17. Industry review: Locomotive dynamic characterization test-analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Data are given relative to tests performed on locomotive components. Dynamic characteristics related to safety are described. Suspension systems, shock absorbers, data processing, bearings, and damping are discussed.

  18. Re-examination of the Present Stress State of the Atera Fault, Central Japan, Based on the Calibrated Crustal Stress Data of Hydraulic Fracturing Test by Measuring the Tensile Strength of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Fukuyama, E.; Omura, K.

    2008-12-01

    To infer the activity and physical state of intraplate faults in Japan, we re-examined the crustal stress with the hydraulic fracturing test by measuring the tensile strength of rocks. The tensile strength was measured by fracturing hollow cylindrical rock samples (inner and outer radius are 25.0-25.2 mm and 55.1-101.5 mm, respectively, length is 137.0-140.1 mm) which were obtained close to the in situ stress measurement locations by pressurizing the inner hole of the sample. Confining pressure is not applied to the samples in this test. To check the reliability and accuracy of this test, we conducted similar experiments with the standard rock sample (Inada granite) whose physical property is well known. Then, we measured the tensile strength of all available core samples including the Atera fault (at Ueno, Fukuoka, and Hatajiri), the Atotsugawa fault, and the Nojima fault (at Hirabayashi, Iwaya and Kabutoyama), in central Japan, which had been obtained by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) by the stress measurement with the hydraulic fracturing method. The measured tensile strength data reveals that the in situ re- opening pressure, which is one of the parameters needed for the determination of the maximum in situ horizontal stress, was obviously biased. We re-estimated the re-opening pressure using the measured tensile strength and the in situ breakdown pressure, and re-calculated the in situ stress around the Atera fault. Although the past dislocation of the Atera fault has been considered to be left lateral from the geographical features around the fault, the re-estimated stress suggests that the present dislocation of the Atera fault is right lateral. And the shear stress decreases from the fault. The right lateral dislocation is also supported by the present-day horizontal crustal deformation observed by the triangular and GPS surveys by Geographical Survey Institute in Japan. Therefore, the dislocation direction

  19. Tensile deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of Ni-based superalloy 617

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaoumi, D.; Hrutkay, K.

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms of deformation were investigated in a nickel-based alloy (Inconel 617) of interest for the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Tensile tests at 25 °C, 600 °C, 800 °C, and 950 °C were conducted in air at different strain rates. The tests were followed by electron microscopy analysis (including FE-SEM, TEM, EDX). The tensile property measurements and the metallographic examination of tested specimens allowed relating the deformation behavior with the microstructural changes in the material. The temperature and strain rate impact on the properties was assessed. The results and microstructure observations were discussed in terms of serrated flow associated with dynamic strain ageing, precipitate evolution, and softening processes due to dynamic recrystallization.

  20. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  1. Need for Instruction: Dynamic Testing in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosma, Tirza; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of dynamic testing in the measuring of children's need for instruction and to explore responses of special education teachers to dynamic testing results. Thirty-six 10-12-year-old children with a moderate to mild intellectual disability and their teachers participated. Children in the…

  2. Tensile properties of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Lyon, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    The importance of textile composite materials in aerospace structural applications has been gaining momentum in recent years. With a view to better understand the suitability of these materials in aerospace applications, an experimental program was undertaken to assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Specifically, the braided textile preforms were infiltrated with suitable polymeric matrices leading to the fabrication of composite test coupons. Evaluation of the tensile properties and the analyses of the results in the form of strength moduli, Poisson's ratio, etc., for the braided composites are presented. Based on our past experience with the textile coupons, the fabrication techniques have been modified (by incorporating glass microballoons in the matrix and/or by stabilizing the braid angle along the length of the specimen with axial fibers) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of the textile composites. This paper outlines the preliminary experimental results obtained from testing these composites.

  3. Tensile behavior of nanocrystalline copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R.; Eastman, J.A. |

    1995-11-01

    High density nanocrystalline copper produced by inert gas condensation was tested in tension. Displacements were measured using foil strain gauges, which greatly improved the accuracy of the strain data. The Young`s modulus of nanocrystalline copper was found to be consistent with that of coarse-grained copper. Total elongations of {approx} 1% were observed in samples with grain sizes less than 50 nm, while a sample with a grain size of 110 nm exhibited more than 10% elongation, perhaps signifying a change to a dislocation-based deformation mechanism in the larger-grained material. In addition, tensile tests were performed as a function of strain rate, with a possible trend of decreased strength and increased elongation as the strain rate was decreased.

  4. An experimental evaluation of the tensile strength of impact ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xian, X.; Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1989-01-01

    The evaluation of the tensile strength of impact built-up ice on structural components has been prompted by such problems as electrical transmission line losses and catastrophic failures in Arctic regions, deicing problems with fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, etc. It is demonstrated that the conventional tensile-testing technique furnishes adequate data on artificially refrigerated ice, and helps establish the influence of extrinsic factors on ice tensile strength.

  5. Dynamic materials testing and constitutive modeling of structural sheet steel for automotive applications. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, C.M.; Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III

    1996-08-23

    The objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic mechanical properties of four different structural sheet steels used in automobile manufacture. The analysis of a drawing quality, special killed (DQSK) mild steel; high strength, low alloy (HSLA) steel; interstitial free (IF); and a high strength steel (M-190) have been completed. In addition to the true stress-true strain data, coefficients for the Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong, and Mechanical Threshold Stress constitutive models have been determined from the mechanical test results at various strain rates and temperatures and are summarized. Compression, tensile, and biaxial bulge tests and low (below 0.1/s) strain rate tests were completed for all four steels. From these test results it was determined to proceed with the material modeling optimization using the through thickness compression results. Compression tests at higher strain rates and temperatures were also conducted and analyzed for all the steels. Constitutive model fits were generated from the experimental data. This report provides a compilation of information generated from mechanical tests, the fitting parameters for each of the constitutive models, and an index and description of data files.

  6. Dynamics Explorer twin spacecraft under evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, C.

    1981-01-01

    The Dynamics Explorer A and B satellites designed to explore the interactive processes occuring between the magnetosphere and Earth's ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and plasmasphere are described. Effects of these interactions, satellite orbits, data collecting antennas, solar power systems, axes, configurations, and Earth based command, control and data display systems are mentioned.

  7. Subsonic Dynamic Stability Tests of a Sample Return Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael; Johnson, R. Keith

    2006-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to determine the subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of a proposed atmospheric entry vehicle for sample return missions. In particular, the effects of changes in aft-body geometry on stability were examined. Freeflying tests of a dynamically scaled model with various geometric features were conducted, including cases in which the model was perturbed to measure dynamic response. Both perturbed and non-perturbed runs were recorded as motion time histories using the VST optical data acquisition system and reduced for post-test analysis. In addition, preliminary results from a static force and moment test of a similar model in the Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel are presented. Results indicate that the configuration is dynamically stable for the baseline geometry, but exhibits degraded dynamic behavior for the geometry modifications tested.

  8. Low-Temperature Mechanical Properties Of Fe-0.06c-18cr-10ni-0.4ti Austenitic Steel Determined Using Ring-Pull Tensile Tests And Microhardness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neustroev, V. S.; Boev, E. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-03-01

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels removed from Russian water-cooled VVERs experience irradia-tion temperatures and He/dpa conditions that are very similar to steels to be used in ITER. Data are presented on the radiation hardening of the Russian analog of AISI 321 at 0.2 to 15 dpa in the range of 285 to 320оС. The Russian variant of the ring-pull tensile test was used to obtain mechanical prop-erty data. Microhardness tests on the ring specimens provide useful information throughout the de-formed regions, but at high hardening levels caution must be exercised before application of a widely accepted hardness-yield stress correlation to prediction of tensile properties. Low-nickel austenitic steels are very prone to form deformation martensite, a phase that increases strongly with the larger deformation levels characteristic of microhardness tests, especially when compared to the 0.2% de-formation used to define yield stress.

  9. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  10. Overview of Dynamic Test Techniques for Flight Dynamics Research at NASA LaRC (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, D. Bruce; Brandon, Jay M.; Croom, Mark A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Heim, Eugene H.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of dynamic test techniques used at NASA Langley Research Center on scale models to obtain a comprehensive flight dynamics characterization of aerospace vehicles is presented. Dynamic test techniques have been used at Langley Research Center since the 1920s. This paper will provide a partial overview of the current techniques available at Langley Research Center. The paper will discuss the dynamic scaling necessary to address the often hard-to-achieve similitude requirements for these techniques. Dynamic test techniques are categorized as captive, wind tunnel single degree-of-freedom and free-flying, and outside free-flying. The test facilities, technique specifications, data reduction, issues and future work are presented for each technique. The battery of tests conducted using the Blended Wing Body aircraft serves to illustrate how the techniques, when used together, are capable of characterizing the flight dynamics of a vehicle over a large range of critical flight conditions.

  11. Analyses of the dynamic docking test system for advanced mission docking system test programs. [Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.; Williams, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Results are given of analytical studies performed in support of the design, implementation, checkout and use of NASA's dynamic docking test system (DDTS). Included are analyses of simulator components, a list of detailed operational test procedures, a summary of simulator performance, and an analysis and comparison of docking dynamics and loads obtained by test and analysis.

  12. Mechanical shear and tensile characteristics of selected biomass stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical characteristics (stress and energy of tensile and shear modes) of selected biomass stems, such as big bluestem, bromegrass, and Barlow wheat were determined. A high capacity MTI-100K universal testing machine attached with standard tensile clamps and designed fabricated double-shear devic...

  13. Dynamic tests of composite panels of an aircraft wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splichal, Jan; Pistek, Antonin; Hlinka, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes the analysis of aerospace composite structures under dynamic loading. Today, it is common to use design procedures based on assumption of static loading only, and dynamic loading is rarely assumed and applied in design and certification of aerospace structures. The paper describes the application of dynamic loading for the design of aircraft structures, and the validation of the procedure on a selected structure. The goal is to verify the possibility of reducing the weight through improved design/modelling processes using dynamic loading instead of static loading. The research activity focuses on the modelling and testing of a composite panel representing a local segment of an aircraft wing section, investigating in particular the buckling behavior under dynamic loading. Finite Elements simulation tools are discussed, as well as the advantages of using a digital optical measurement system for the evaluation of the tests. The comparison of the finite element simulations with the results of the tests is presented.

  14. Testing Lorentz symmetry with planetary orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, A.; Bailey, Q. G.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Bourgoin, A.; Rivoldini, A.; Lamine, B.; Meynadier, F.; Guerlin, C.; Wolf, P.

    2015-09-01

    Planetary ephemerides are a very powerful tool to constrain deviations from the theory of general relativity (GR) using orbital dynamics. The effective field theory framework called the Standard-Model Extension (SME) has been developed in order to systematically parametrize hypothetical violations of Lorentz symmetry (in the Standard Model and in the gravitational sector). In this communication, we use the latest determinations of the supplementary advances of the perihelia and of the nodes obtained by planetary ephemerides analysis to constrain SME coefficients from the pure gravity sector and also from gravity-matter couplings. Our results do not show any deviation from GR and they improve current constraints. Moreover, combinations with existing constraints from Lunar Laser Ranging and from atom interferometry gravimetry allow us to disentangle contributions from the pure gravity sector from the gravity-matter couplings.

  15. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  16. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  17. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  18. X-ray Laue micro diffraction and neutron diffraction analysis of residual elastic strains and plastic deformation in a 1% uniaxial tensile tested nickel alloy 600 sample

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Jing; Mark, Alison; Fuller, Marina; Barabash, Rozaliya; McIntyre, Stewart; Holt, Richard A.; Klassen, Robert; Liu, W.

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of elastic strain for a nickel alloy 600 (A600) sample that had been subjected to uniaxial tensile stress were measured by micro Laue diffraction (MLD) and neutron diffraction techniques. For a sample that had been dimensionally strained by 1%, both MLD and neutron diffraction data indicated that the global residual elastic strain was on the order of 10{sup -4}, however the micro-diffraction data indicated considerable grain-to-grain variability amongst individual components of the residual strain tensor. A more precise comparison was done by finding those grains in the MLD map that had appropriate oriented in the specific directions matching those used in the neutron measurements and the strains were found to agree within the uncertainty. Large variations in strain values across the grains were noted during the MLD measurements which are reflected in the uncertainties. This is a possible explanation for the large uncertainty in the average strains measured from multiple grains during neutron diffraction.

  19. Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl P.; Martinez, Daniel Tito; Gray, George T. III

    2012-06-07

    The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

  20. Cost effective dynamic design and test requirements for Shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloff, H. R.; Bangs, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study examining current spacecraft dynamic design and test requirements for the cost effective design and development of Shuttle payloads are presented. Dynamic environments, payload configurations, design/test requirements, test levels, assembly level of testing, simulation methods, prototype role, load limiting, test facilities, and flight measurements are discussed as they relate to the development of a cost effective design and test philosophy for Shuttle Spacelab payloads. It is concluded that changes to current design/test practices will minimize long range payload costs. However, changes to current practices need be quantitatively evaluated before an orderly progression to more cost effective methods can be achieved without undue risk of mission failures. Of major importance is optimization of test levels and plans for payloads and payload subsystems which will result in minimum project costs.

  1. Dynamic analysis of vehicle with laser testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qingzu

    1996-08-01

    In this paper the laser-Doppler-velocimeter is used to measure the responsive velocity of car body and cylinder of engine. It is made of the cylindrical beam as emissive light, avalan-che pipe as receiver and wide-band monitor as signal processor. The frequency response function can be easily obtained from the output signal of laser-Doppler- velocimeter after A/D converting and FFT transforming. The modal parameters data of modal shape may be gotten with test modal software.

  2. Discriminating chaotic and stochastic dynamics through the permutation spectrum test.

    PubMed

    Kulp, C W; Zunino, L

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new heuristic symbolic tool for unveiling chaotic and stochastic dynamics: the permutation spectrum test. Several numerical examples allow us to confirm the usefulness of the introduced methodology. Indeed, we show that it is robust in situations in which other techniques fail (intermittent chaos, hyperchaotic dynamics, stochastic linear and nonlinear correlated dynamics, and deterministic non-chaotic noise-driven dynamics). We illustrate the applicability and reliability of this pragmatic method by examining real complex time series from diverse scientific fields. Taking into account that the proposed test has the advantages of being conceptually simple and computationally fast, we think that it can be of practical utility as an alternative test for determinism.

  3. Discriminating chaotic and stochastic dynamics through the permutation spectrum test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, C. W.; Zunino, L.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new heuristic symbolic tool for unveiling chaotic and stochastic dynamics: the permutation spectrum test. Several numerical examples allow us to confirm the usefulness of the introduced methodology. Indeed, we show that it is robust in situations in which other techniques fail (intermittent chaos, hyperchaotic dynamics, stochastic linear and nonlinear correlated dynamics, and deterministic non-chaotic noise-driven dynamics). We illustrate the applicability and reliability of this pragmatic method by examining real complex time series from diverse scientific fields. Taking into account that the proposed test has the advantages of being conceptually simple and computationally fast, we think that it can be of practical utility as an alternative test for determinism.

  4. Orbiting dynamic compression laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Kasiraj, P.; Frisch, B.

    1984-01-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of carrying out dynamic compression experiments on a space station, the possibility of using explosive gun launchers is studied. The question of whether powders of a refractory metal (molybdenum) and a metallic glass could be well considered by dynamic compression is examined. In both cases extremely good bonds are obtained between grains of metal and metallic glass at 180 and 80 kb, respectively. When the oxide surface is reduced and the dynamic consolidation is carried out in vacuum, in the case of molybdenum, tensile tests of the recovered samples demonstrated beneficial ultimate tensile strengths.

  5. Dynamic testing in schizophrenia: does training change the construct validity of a test?

    PubMed

    Wiedl, Karl H; Schöttke, Henning; Green, Michael F; Nuechterlein, Keith H

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic testing typically involves specific interventions for a test to assess the extent to which test performance can be modified, beyond level of baseline (static) performance. This study used a dynamic version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) that is based on cognitive remediation techniques within a test-training-test procedure. From results of previous studies with schizophrenia patients, we concluded that the dynamic and static versions of the WCST should have different construct validity. This hypothesis was tested by examining the patterns of correlations with measures of executive functioning, secondary verbal memory, and verbal intelligence. Results demonstrated a specific construct validity of WCST dynamic (i.e., posttest) scores as an index of problem solving (Tower of Hanoi) and secondary verbal memory and learning (Auditory Verbal Learning Test), whereas the impact of general verbal capacity and selective attention (Verbal IQ, Stroop Test) was reduced. It is concluded that the construct validity of the test changes with dynamic administration and that this difference helps to explain why the dynamic version of the WCST predicts functional outcome better than the static version. PMID:15954185

  6. Dynamic Particle Growth Testing - Phase I Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z-C.

    2001-05-17

    There is clearly a great need to understand the processes of crystallization and solid scale formation that led to the shutdown of 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and could possibly cause similar problems in the future in other evaporators. Waste streams from SRS operations that enter the evaporators generally contain alkaline, sodium nitrate/nitrite-based solutions with various changing concentrations of silicates and aluminates. It has been determined. that the silicates and aluminates served as precursor reactants for forming unwanted minerals during solution evaporation, upon transport, or upon storage. Mineral forms of the Zeolite Linde A group--sodalites and cancrinite--along with gibbsite, have often been identified as contributing to deposit (scale) formation on surfaces of the 2H evaporator as well as to the formation of solid plugs in the gravity drain line and lift line. Meanwhile, solids (amorphous or crystalline minerals) are believed, without direct evidence, to form in the bulk solutions in the evaporator. In addition, the position of deposits in the 2H evaporator suggests that scale formation depends on the interplay of heat and mass transfer, hydrodynamics, and reaction mechanisms and kinetics. The origin of solid scale formation on walls could be due to heterogeneous nucleation and/or to homogeneous nucleation followed by cluster/particle deposition. Preliminary laboratory tests at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with standing metal coupons seem to support the latter mechanism for initial deposition; that is, the solid particles form in the bulk solution first and then deposit on the metal surfaces. Further buildup of deposits may involve both mechanisms: deposition and crystal growth. Therefore, there may be a direct linkage between the solid particle growth in bulk solution and the scale buildup on the wall surfaces. On the other hand, even if scale formation is due solely to a heterogeneous mechanism

  7. Early Results from Solar Dynamic Space Power System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Mason, Lee S.

    1996-01-01

    A government/industry team designed, built and tested a 2-kWe solar dynamic space power system in a large thermal vacuum facility with a simulated Sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum and solar flux as encountered in low-Earth orbit. The solar dynamic system includes a Brayton power conversion unit integrated with a solar receiver which is designed to store energy for continuous power operation during the eclipse phase of the orbit. This paper reviews the goals and status of the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration project and describes the initial testing, including both operational and performance data. System testing to date has accumulated over 365 hours of power operation (ranging from 400 watts to 2.0-W(sub e)), including 187 simulated orbits, 16 ambient starts and 2 hot restarts. Data are shown for an orbital startup, transient and steady-state orbital operation and shutdown. System testing with varying insolation levels and operating speeds is discussed. The solar dynamic ground test demonstration is providing the experience and confidence toward a successful flight demonstration of the solar dynamic technologies on the Space Station Mir in 1997.

  8. Ergodicity convergence test suggests telomere motion obeys fractional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepten, E.; Bronshtein, I.; Garini, Y.

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous diffusion, observed in many biological processes, is a generalized description of a wide variety of processes, all obeying the same law of mean-square displacement. Identifying the basic mechanisms of these observations is important for deducing the nature of the biophysical systems measured. We implement a previously suggested method for distinguishing between fractional Langevin dynamics, fractional Brownian motion, and continuous time random walk based on the ergodic nature of the data. We apply the method together with the recently suggested P-variation test and the displacement correlation to the lately measured dynamics of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells and find strong evidence that the telomeres motion obeys fractional dynamics. The ergodic dynamics are observed experimentally to fit fractional Brownian or Langevin dynamics.

  9. Indirect and direct tensile behavior of Devonian oil shales

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, K.P.; Chen, J.L.; Dana, G.F.; Weber, J.A.

    1984-03-01

    Ultimate indirect tensile strengths of Devonian oil shales across the bedding planes is a mechanical property parameter important to predicting how oil shale will break. This is particularly important to in-situ fragmentation. The Split Cylinder Test was used to determine the indirect tensile strengths between the bedding planes. Test specimens, cored perpendicular to the bedding planes, representing oil shales of different oil yields taken from Silver Point Quad in DeKalb County, Tennessee and Friendship in Scioto County, Ohio, were subjected to the Split Cylinder Test. Linear regression equations relating ultimate tensile strength across the bedding planes to volume percent of organic matter in the rock were developed from the test data. In addition, direct tensile strengths were obtained between the bedding planes for the Tennessee oil shales. This property is important for the design of horizontal fractures in oil shales. Typical results were presented.

  10. Verification Challenges of Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Six Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a test facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas for performing dynamic verification of space structures and hardware. Some examples of past and current tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility is able to integrate a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or demating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is utilized for input to the simulation during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents many unique challenges, one particular area of interest is with respect to the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. There are many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) measurement systems available on the market, and the test facility measurement systems have evolved over time to include two separate COTS systems. The first system incorporates infra-red sensing cameras, while the second system employs a laser interferometer to determine position and orientation data. The specific technical challenges with the measurement systems in a large dynamic environment include changing thermal and humidity levels, operational area and measurement volume, dynamic tracking, and data synchronization. The facility is located in an expansive high-bay area that is occasionally exposed to outside temperature when large retractable doors at each end of the building are opened. The laser interferometer system, in particular, is vulnerable to the environmental changes in the building. The operational area of the test facility itself is sizeable, ranging from seven meters wide and five meters deep to as much as seven meters high. Both facility measurement systems have desirable measurement volumes and the accuracies vary

  11. Tensile strength of dried gelcast green bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, S.D.; Omatete, O.O.; Walls, C.A.; Barker, D.L.

    1994-04-01

    Ceramic green bodies were prepared by three different techniques, dry pressing, slip casting, and gelcasting. The tensile strength of the green bodies was measured using a diametral compression test. It was found that the gelcast samples were from 2 to 20 times stronger than the conventionally formed green bodies. SEM examination of the gelcast samples revealed a homogeneous, brittle fracture surface indicating a very uniform distribution of the binder and excellent dispersion of the ceramic powder.

  12. Time-Reversal Test for Stochastic Quantum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowling, Mark R.; Drummond, Peter D.; Davis, Matthew J.; Deuar, Piotr

    2005-04-01

    The calculation of quantum dynamics is currently a central issue in theoretical physics, with diverse applications ranging from ultracold atomic Bose-Einstein condensates to condensed matter, biology, and even astrophysics. Here we demonstrate a conceptually simple method of determining the regime of validity of stochastic simulations of unitary quantum dynamics by employing a time-reversal test. We apply this test to a simulation of the evolution of a quantum anharmonic oscillator with up to 6.022×1023 (Avogadro’s number) of particles. This system is realizable as a Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice, for which the time-reversal procedure could be implemented experimentally.

  13. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  14. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian T; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Cohen, Helen S; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients' scores were significantly worse than normals' scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients.

  15. Dynamic visual acuity testing for screening patients with vestibular impairments.

    PubMed

    Peters, Brian T; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Cohen, Helen S; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic visual acuity (DVA) may be a useful indicator of the function of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) but most DVA tests involve active head motion in the yaw plane. During gait the passive, vertical VOR may be more relevant and passive testing would be less likely to elicit compensatory strategies. The goal of this study was to determine if testing dynamic visual acuity during passive vertical motion of the subject would differentiate normal subjects from patients with known vestibular disorders. Subjects, normals and patients who had been diagnosed with either unilateral vestibular weaknesses or were post-acoustic neuroma resections, sat in a chair that could oscillate vertically with the head either free or constrained with a cervical orthosis. They viewed a computer screen 2 m away that showed Landholt C optotypes in one of 8 spatial configurations and which ranged in size from 0.4 to 1.0 logMAR. They were tested while the chair was stationary and while it was moving. Scores were worse for both groups during the dynamic condition compared to the static condition. In the dynamic condition patients' scores were significantly worse than normals' scores. Younger and older age groups differed slightly but significantly; the sample size was too small to examine age differences by decade. The data suggest that many well-compensated patients have dynamic visual acuity that is as good as age-matched normals. Results of ROC analyses were only moderate, indicating that the differences between patients and normals were not strong enough, under the conditions tested, for this test to be useful for screening people to determine if they have vestibular disorders. Modifications of the test paradigm may make it more useful for screening potential patients. PMID:23000614

  16. Cumulative Measurement Errors for Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Located at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, the Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a real-time, six degree-of-freedom, short range motion base simulator originally designed to simulate the relative dynamics of two bodies in space mating together (i.e., docking or berthing). The SDTS has the capability to test full scale docking and berthing systems utilizing a two body dynamic docking simulation for docking operations and a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) simulation for berthing operations. The SDTS can also be used for nonmating applications such as sensors and instruments evaluations requiring proximity or short range motion operations. The motion base is a hydraulic powered Stewart platform, capable of supporting a 3,500 lb payload with a positional accuracy of 0.03 inches. The SDTS is currently being used for the NASA Docking System testing and has been also used by other government agencies. The SDTS is also under consideration for use by commercial companies. Examples of tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility integrates a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or de-mating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is used for input during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents unique challenges, one particular area of interest involves the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. The measurement systems for the test facility have two separate functions. The first is to take static measurements of facility and test hardware to determine both the static and moving frames used in the simulation and control system. The test hardware must be measured after each configuration change to determine both sets of reference frames. The second function is to take dynamic

  17. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  18. Contributions of Transonic Dynamics Tunnel Testing to Airplane Flutter Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Jose A.; Florance, James R.

    2000-01-01

    The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) became in operational in 1960, and since that time has achieved the status of the world's premier wind tunnel for testing large in aeroelastically scaled models at transonic speeds. The facility has many features that contribute to its uniqueness for aeroelastic testing. This paper will briefly describe these capabilities and features, and their relevance to aeroelastic testing. Contributions to specific airplane configurations and highlights from the flutter tests performed in the TDT aimed at investigating the aeroelastic characteristics of these configurations are presented.

  19. Mechanical properties of gold twinned nanocubes under different triaxial tensile rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zailin; Zhang, Guowei; Luo, Gang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Zhao, Jianwei

    2016-08-01

    The gold twinned nanocubes under different triaxial tensile rates are explored by molecular dynamics simulation. Hydrostatic stress and Mises stress are defined in order to understand triaxial stresses. Twin boundaries prevent dislocations between twin boundaries from developing and dislocation angles are inconspicuous, which causes little difference between triaxial stresses. The mechanical properties of the nanocubes under low and high tensile rates are different. The curves of nanocubes under high tensile rates are more abrupt than those under low tensile rates. When the tensile rate is extremely big, the loadings are out of the nanocubes and there are not deformation and fracture in the internal nanocubes.

  20. Dynamic Investigation of Static Divergence: Analysis and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    The phenomenon known as aeroelastic divergence is the focus of this work. The analyses and experiment presented here show that divergence can occur without a structural dynamic mode losing its oscillatory nature. Aeroelastic divergence occurs when the structural restorative capability or stiffness of a structure is overwhelmed by the static aerodynamic moment. This static aeroelastic coupling does not require the structural dynamic system behavior to cease, however. Aeroelastic changes in the dynamic mode behavior are governed not only by the stiffness, but by damping and inertial properties. The work presented here supports these fundamental assertions by examining a simple system: a typical section airfoil with only a rotational structural degree of freedom. Analytical results identified configurations that exhibit different types of dynamic mode behavior as the system encounters divergence. A wind tunnel model was designed and tested to examine divergence experimentally. The experimental results validate the analytical calculations and explicitly examine the divergence phenomenon where the dynamic mode persists. Three configurations of the wind tunnel model were tested. The experimental results agree very well with the analytical predictions of subcritical characteristics, divergence velocity, and behavior of the noncritical dynamic mode at divergence.

  1. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  2. Dynamics of test bodies with spin in de Sitter spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Obukhov, Yuri N.; Puetzfeld, Dirk

    2011-02-15

    We study the motion of spinning test bodies in the de Sitter spacetime of constant positive curvature. With the help of the 10 Killing vectors, we derive the 4-momentum and the tensor of spin explicitly in terms of the spacetime coordinates. However, in order to find the actual trajectories, one needs to impose the so-called supplementary condition. We discuss the dynamics of spinning test bodies for the cases of the Frenkel and Tulczyjew conditions.

  3. Equivalence Principle tests as probes of Modified Newtonian Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyneer, Alex; Pereira, Jonas; Krause, Thomas; Overduin, James

    Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) has been proposed as a way to reconcile gravitational theory and observational cosmology without the need for large amounts of unseen dark matter. Instead, a change is postulated to the Newtonian limit of standard theory in the regime of very small accelerations. We consider whether it might be possible to constrain this idea using proposed space tests of the Equivalence Principle (EP). Such tests could be sensitive to accelerations as small as 10- 18 g over 20 orbits.

  4. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Ground load dynamic tests. 23.726 Section 23.726 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 23.725 except that the drop height must be— (1) 2.25 times the drop height prescribed in §...

  5. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Ground load dynamic tests. 23.726 Section 23.726 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load...

  6. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types. PMID:25940499

  7. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types.

  8. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  9. 2 kWe Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration Project. Volume 3; Fabrication and Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration (SDGTD) project has successfully designed and fabricated a complete solar-powered closed Brayton electrical power generation system and tested it in a relevant thermal vacuum facility at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). In addition to completing technical objectives, the project was completed 3-l/2 months early, and under budget.

  10. Dynamic testing of MFTF containment-vessel structural system

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.J.; McCallen, D.B.; Eli, M.W.

    1982-04-01

    Dynamic (modal) testing was performed on the Magnetic Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) containment vessel. The seismic design of this vessel was heavily dependent upon the value of structural damping used in the analysis. Typically for welded steel vessels, a value of 2 to 3% of critical is used. However, due to the large mass of the vessel and magnet supported inside, we felt that the interaction between the structure and its foundation would be enhanced. This would result in a larger value of damping because vibrational energy in the structure would be transferred through the foundation into the surrounding soil. The dynamic test performed on this structure (with the magnet in place) confirmed this later theory and resulted in damping values of approximately 4 to 5% for the whole body modes. This report presents a brief description of dynamic testing emphasizing the specific test procedure used on the MFTF-A system. It also presents an interpretation of the damping mechanisms observed (material and geometric) based upon the spatial characteristics of the modal parameters (mode shapes).

  11. Dynamic stereoacuity: a test for hitting a baseball?

    PubMed

    Solomon, H; Zinn, W J; Vacroux, A

    1988-07-01

    Vision is a critical ingredient in professional sports such as baseball. It would, therefore, be logical to assume that vision testing should be able to discriminate between good and bad performance. Past attempts to establish this vision/performance relationship have not been successful. We believe the fault is anchored in the fact that all routine vision testing is static and unable to measure motion parameters. Using an instrument of our design to test dynamic stereoacuity, we have been able to detect subtle differences among individuals. The data show a segregation between major league hitters and pitchers. Such information could be used as one clue to predict hitting performance. PMID:3403900

  12. Dynamic stereoacuity: a test for hitting a baseball?

    PubMed

    Solomon, H; Zinn, W J; Vacroux, A

    1988-07-01

    Vision is a critical ingredient in professional sports such as baseball. It would, therefore, be logical to assume that vision testing should be able to discriminate between good and bad performance. Past attempts to establish this vision/performance relationship have not been successful. We believe the fault is anchored in the fact that all routine vision testing is static and unable to measure motion parameters. Using an instrument of our design to test dynamic stereoacuity, we have been able to detect subtle differences among individuals. The data show a segregation between major league hitters and pitchers. Such information could be used as one clue to predict hitting performance.

  13. The relationship between parameters of static and dynamic stability tests

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mohammad Taghi; Solomonidis, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stability is often described to be static (quiet standing) and dynamic (maintaining a stable position while undertake a prescribed movement). Many researchers have used only static tests to evaluate the stability of normal and handicapped subjects. However, it is important to evaluate the stability of subjects while undertaking various tasks (dynamic stability). It is not currently clear whether static balance can predict dynamic balance or not. Therefore, the aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between parameters of static and dynamic stability tests. METHODS: The current clinical trial study was carried out in the Bioengineering Unit of Strathclyde University during 2008 and 2009. The normal subjects with no history of musculoskeletal disorders from staff and students of the Unit were selected in this study. Twenty-five normal subjects were recruited to participate in this research project. They were asked to stand on a force plate in quiet standing and while undertaking various hand tasks. The functional stability of the subjects was measured while transverse and vertical reaching tasks were undertaken. The correlation between various parameters of stability in quiet standing and functional hand tasks was evaluated using Pearson correlation. RESULTS: There was no significant correlation between static and dynamic stability parameters. The Pearson correlation coefficients for all parameters regarding the static and dynamic tests were less than 0.46. CONCLUSIONS: As there was no correlation between stability parameters in quiet standing and while performing various hand tasks, it is not practical to discuss ability of the subjects to control their balance while undertaking various hand tasks based on static balance ability. PMID:22091270

  14. Two-Speed Gearbox Dynamic Simulation Predictions and Test Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; DeSmidt, Hans; Smith, Edward C.; Bauman, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic simulations and experimental validation tests were performed on a two-stage, two-speed gearbox as part of the drive system research activities of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Rotary Wing Project. The gearbox was driven by two electromagnetic motors and had two electromagnetic, multi-disk clutches to control output speed. A dynamic model of the system was created which included a direct current electric motor with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) speed control, a two-speed gearbox with dual electromagnetically actuated clutches, and an eddy current dynamometer. A six degree-of-freedom model of the gearbox accounted for the system torsional dynamics and included gear, clutch, shaft, and load inertias as well as shaft flexibilities and a dry clutch stick-slip friction model. Experimental validation tests were performed on the gearbox in the NASA Glenn gear noise test facility. Gearbox output speed and torque as well as drive motor speed and current were compared to those from the analytical predictions. The experiments correlate very well with the predictions, thus validating the dynamic simulation methodologies.

  15. Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test: Trajectory, Atmosphere, and Aerodynamics Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutty, Prasad; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Blood, Eric M.; O'Farrell, Clara; Ginn, Jason M.; Shoenenberger, Mark; Dutta, Soumyo

    2015-01-01

    The Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test is a full-scale flight test of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator, which is part of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator technology development project. The purpose of the project is to develop and mature aerodynamic decelerator technologies for landing large mass payloads on the surface of Mars. The technologies include a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator and Supersonic Parachutes. The first Supersonic Flight Dynamics Test occurred on June 28th, 2014 at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. This test was used to validate the test architecture for future missions. The flight was a success and, in addition, was able to acquire data on the aerodynamic performance of the supersonic inflatable decelerator. This paper describes the instrumentation, analysis techniques, and acquired flight test data utilized to reconstruct the vehicle trajectory, atmosphere, and aerodynamics. The results of the reconstruction show significantly higher lofting of the trajectory, which can partially be explained by off-nominal booster motor performance. The reconstructed vehicle force and moment coefficients fall well within pre-flight predictions. A parameter identification analysis indicates that the vehicle displayed greater aerodynamic static stability than seen in pre-flight computational predictions and ballistic range tests.

  16. Dynamic interpretation of slug tests in highly permeable aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zurbuchen, B.R.; Zlotnik, V.A.; Butler, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in developing a theoretical framework for modeling slug test responses in formations with high hydraulic conductivity K. However, several questions of practical significance remain unresolved. Given the rapid and often oscillatory nature of test responses, the traditional hydrostatic relationship between the water level and the transducer-measured head in the water column may not be appropriate. A general dynamic interpretation is proposed that describes the relationship between water level response and transducer-measured head. This theory is utilized to develop a procedure for transforming model-generated water level responses to transducer readings. The magnitude of the difference between the actual water level position and the apparent position based on the transducer measurement is a function of the acceleration and velocity of the water column, test geometry, and depth of the transducer. The dynamic approach explains the entire slug test response, including the often-noted discrepancy between the actual initial water level displacement and that measured by a transducer in the water column. Failure to use this approach can lead to a significant underestimation of K when the transducer is a considerable distance below the static water level. Previous investigators have noted a dependence of test responses on the magnitude of the initial water level displacement and have developed various approximate methods for analyzing such data. These methods are re-examined and their limitations clarified. Practical field guidelines are proposed on the basis of findings of this work. The soundness of the dynamic approach is demonstrated through a comparison of K profiles from a series of multilevel slug tests with those from dipole-flow tests performed in the same wells.

  17. Tests for robustness of dynamical models of arms races

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer-Kress, G.

    1997-05-01

    The theory of dynamical systems-especially in the form of discrete maps and automata-makes it very easy to convert conceptual ideas of arms races or other forms of social interactions into formal, dynamical models. Modern interfaces and interpreters also allow a quick, interactive parameter search and display of attractors or other long term behavior. This situation makes it also easy to forgetthat the qualitative behavior of non-linear dynamical systems with a high-dimensional parameter (control) space can change dramatically with a change of parameters that often is well within the resolution accuracy of the model. In order to obtain trustworthy interpretations of numerical simulations, it is essential that multiple tests of robustness are performed. We discuss stochastic methods based on Chapman-Kolmogorov equations, search methods based on neural nets and genetic algorithms, geometrical methods based on multi-dimensional tableau-representations bifurcation diagrams and other methods whose application often depends on the context.

  18. A Spectrum of Dynamic Insulin Sensitivity Test Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Docherty, Paul D; Chase, J Geoffrey; Morenga, Lisa Te; Lotz, Thomas F; Berkeley, Juliet E; Shaw, Geoffrey M; McAuley, Kirsten A; Mann, Jim I

    2011-01-01

    Background Numerous tests have been developed to estimate insulin sensitivity (SI). However, most of the established tests are either too expensive for widespread application or do not yield reliable results. The dynamic insulin sensitivity and secretion test (DISST) uses assays of glucose, insulin, and C-peptide from nine samples to quantify SI and endogenous insulin secretion (UN) at a comparatively low cost. The quick dynamic insulin sensitivity test has shown that the DISST SI values are robust to significant assay omissions. Methods Eight DISST-based variations of the nine-sample assay regimen are proposed to investigate the effects of assay omission within the DISST-based framework. SI and UN were identified using the fully-sampled DISST and data from 218 nine-sample tests undertaken in 74 female individuals with elevated diabetes risk. This same data was then used with appropriate assay omissions to identify SI and UN with the eight DISST-based assay variations. Results Median intraprocedure proportional difference between SI values from fully-sampled DISST and the DISST-based variants was in the range of -17.9 to 7.8%. Correlations were in the range of r = 0.71 to 0.92 with the highest correlations between variants with the greatest commonality with the nine-sample DISST. Metrics of UN correlated relatively well between tests when C-peptide was assayed (r = 0.72 to 1) but were sometimes not well estimated when samples were not assayed for C-peptide (r = -0.14 to 0.75). Conclusions The DISST-based spectrum offers a series of tests with very distinct compromises of information yield, accuracy, assay cost, and clinical intensity. Thus, the spectrum of tests has the potential to enable researchers to better allocate funds by selecting an optimal test configuration for their particular application. PMID:22226272

  19. A comparison of static and dynamic hazard perception tests.

    PubMed

    Scialfa, Charles T; Borkenhagen, David; Lyon, John; Deschênes, Micheline

    2013-03-01

    Hazard perception is a vital component to safe driving and hazard perception tests (HPTs) are being used with greater frequency for driver training, assessment and licensure. In this study, we compared a dynamic HPT (Scialfa et al., 2011), which presents short video scenes to observers and a static HPT (Scialfa et al., 2012), which uses still images. Both tests require the observer to indicate the presence of a traffic conflict that would lead to a collision between the "camera" vehicle and another road user or fixed object. Young adult drivers (n=56) completed both forms of the HPT, along with a modified version of the Driver Behavior Questionnaire (Reason et al., 1990) and a measure of simple reaction time. Self-reported collision and moving violation data were also collected. As in previous work, both static and dynamic HPTs had good reliability. The correlation between composite static and dynamic scores was approximately .40, but was reduced to approximately .25 when simple reaction time was controlled. Both HPTs predicted lapses and errors on the Driver Behavior Questionnaire, but neither predicted self-reported collisions or moving violations. Discussion focuses on the differences in visual cues available in dynamic and static scenes and how these differences could influence decisions about potential hazards.

  20. Transient rotor dynamic rub phenomena - Theory and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, A. F.; Montaque, G.; Palazzolo, A. B.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops an implicit integration scheme for transient rotor dynamic rub prediction and includes a correlation study with actual test results. A Nordsieck-like numerical integration scheme is applied directly to the second-order equations of motion. The assumption that forces and torques on the rotor are functions of the position and velocity at the point of application and its nearest neighbor is made in order to make the computational time proportional to the number of elements in the rotor dynamics model rather than the cube of the number. The test rig consists of a turbine driven, flexible shaft supported by squeeze film dampers. The blade loss event occurs due to collision of a balance bolt on one of the disks with a high speed plunger. The rotor is seen to spiral outward and contact against a stationary assemblage of seal shoes.

  1. Dynamic testing in the evaluation of male gonadal function.

    PubMed

    De Martino, M U; Pastore, R; Caprio, M; Frajese, G; Fabbri, A

    2003-01-01

    The maturation and physiologic functions of male sexual apparatus are under the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The determination of gonadotropins and testosterone as secretory products of pituitary and gonads, respectively, represents the first step in the evaluation of male sexual function and the diagnosis of disorders in male reproductive axis. However, there are several clinical situations that require a dynamic evaluation of this system and the measurement of basal gonadotropins and testosterone must be combined with specific dynamic tests. These mainly consist in GnRH stimulation, which evaluates the endocrine reserve capacity of the pituitary, and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) stimulation, which is used in the assessment of Leydig cells activity. The paper illustrates the technical aspects, the normal/pathological responses and the role of these two tests in assessing the male HPG axis in respect to different clinical diagnostic queries.

  2. A method for dynamic fracture initiation testing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.; Suresh, S.; Cho, K.; Bopp, E.R.

    1988-10-01

    An experimental method is described whereby the dynamic fracture initiation toughness of ceramics and ceramic composites can be measured in pure tension or pure torsion at stress intensity factor rates of 10/sup 5/ to 10/sup 6/ MPa/Lambda/m/s. In this procedure, circumferentially notched cylindrical rods are subjected to uniaxial cyclic compression at room temperature to introduce a self-arresting, concentric Mode I fatigue pre-crack, following the technique presented. Subsequently, dynamic fracture initiation is effected by stress wave loading with a sharp-fronted pulse which subjects the specimen to a dynamic load inducing either Mode I or Mode III fracture. Instrumentation appropriate to the loading mode provides a record of average stress at the fracture site as a function of time. The capability of this method to yield highly reproducible dynamic fracture initiation toughness values for ceramics is demonstrated with the aid of experiments conducted on a polycrystalline aluminum oxide. Guidelines for the dynamic fracture initiation testing of ceramics and ceramic composites are discussed.

  3. Test and validation for robot arm control dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yae, K. Harold; Kim, Sung-Soo; Haug, Edward J.; Seering, Warren; Sundaram, Kamala; Thompson, Bruce; Turner, James; Chun, Hon; Frisch, Harold P.; Schnurr, Richard

    1989-01-01

    The Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) program will require an ability to develop, in a cost effective manner, many simulation models for design, analysis, performance evaluation, and crew training. Computational speed and the degree of modeling fidelity associated with each simulation must be commensurate with problem objectives. To demonstrate evolving state-of-the-art general purpose multibody modeling capabilities, to validate these by laboratory testing, and to expose their modeling shortcomings, two focus problems at the opposite ends of the simulation spectrum are defined: (1) Coarse Acquisition Control Dynamics. Create a real time man-in-the-control-loop simulator. Provide animated graphical display of robot arm dynamics and tactile feedback sufficient for cueing the operator. Interface simulator software with human operated tactile feedback controller; i.e., the Kraft mini-master. (2) Fine, Precision Mode Control Dynamics. Create a high speed, high fidelity simulation model for the design, analysis, and performance evaluation of autonomous 7 degree-of-freedom (DOF) trajectory control algorithms. This model must contain detail dynamic models for all significant dynamics elements within the robot arm, such as joint drive mechanisms.

  4. Overview of the solar dynamic ground test demonstration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Boyle, Robert V.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) program demonstrates the availability of SD technologies in a simulated space environment at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) vacuum facility. An aerospace industry/ government team is working together to design, fabricate, build, and test a complete SD system. This paper reviews the goals and status of the SD GTD program. A description of the SD system includes key design features of the system, subsystems, and components as reported at the Critical Design Review (CDR).

  5. Analysis and test for space shuttle propellant dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. L.; Demchak, L. J.; Tegart, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to develop an analytical model capable of predicting the dynamic interaction forces on the Shuttle External Tank, due to large amplitude propellant slosh during RTLS separation. The report details low-g drop tower and KC-135 test programs that were conducted to investigate propellant reorientation during RTLS. In addition, the development of a nonlinear finite element slosh model (LAMPS2, two dimensional, and one LAMPS3, three dimensional) is presented. Correlation between the model and test data is presented as a verification of the modeling approach.

  6. Novel test of modified Newtonian dynamics with gas rich galaxies.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Stacy S

    2011-03-25

    The current cosmological paradigm, the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, requires that the mass-energy of the Universe be dominated by invisible components: dark matter and dark energy. An alternative to these dark components is that the law of gravity be modified on the relevant scales. A test of these ideas is provided by the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR), an empirical relation between the observed mass of a galaxy and its rotation velocity. Here, I report a test using gas rich galaxies for which both axes of the BTFR can be measured independently of the theories being tested and without the systematic uncertainty in stellar mass that affects the same test with star dominated spirals. The data fall precisely where predicted a priori by the modified Newtonian dynamics. The scatter in the BTFR is attributable entirely to observational uncertainty, consistent with a single effective force law.

  7. Testing and Validation of the Dynamic Inertia Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander W.; Herrera, Claudia Y.; Spivey, Natalie D.; Fladung, William A.; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    The Dynamic Inertia Measurement (DIM) method uses a ground vibration test setup to determine the mass properties of an object using information from frequency response functions. Most conventional mass properties testing involves using spin tables or pendulum-based swing tests, which for large aerospace vehicles becomes increasingly difficult and time-consuming, and therefore expensive, to perform. The DIM method has been validated on small test articles but has not been successfully proven on large aerospace vehicles. In response, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) conducted mass properties testing on an "iron bird" test article that is comparable in mass and scale to a fighter-type aircraft. The simple two-I-beam design of the "iron bird" was selected to ensure accurate analytical mass properties. Traditional swing testing was also performed to compare the level of effort, amount of resources, and quality of data with the DIM method. The DIM test showed favorable results for the center of gravity and moments of inertia; however, the products of inertia showed disagreement with analytical predictions.

  8. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  9. Effects of anisotropy on dynamic tensile behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Schifert, S.K.; Davidson, R.F.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    A stability analysis for an anisotropic stretching rod is presented. We consider the particular case of a rapidly stretching titanium jet using a continuum code to examine anisotropic plastic response in the finite-neck regime. It was found that the classical analysis (yield strength is inversely proportional to stability) is insufficient; anisotropic jets can be more or less stable than their maximum or minimum yield strengths, depending on initial perturbations and the orientation of the anisotropy. One particular anisotropy -- with the weak direction along the jet axis -- appears to be generally stabilizing. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Using Spare Logic Resources To Create Dynamic Test Points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2011-01-01

    A technique has been devised to enable creation of a dynamic set of test points in an embedded digital electronic system. As a result, electronics contained in an application specific circuit [e.g., gate array, field programmable gate array (FPGA)] can be internally probed, even when contained in a closed housing during all phases of test. In the present technique, the test points are not fixed and limited to a small number; the number of test points can vastly exceed the number of buffers or pins, resulting in a compact footprint. Test points are selected by means of spare logic resources within the ASIC(s) and/or FPGA(s). A register is programmed with a command, which is used to select the signals that are sent off-chip and out of the housing for monitoring by test engineers and external test equipment. The register can be commanded by any suitable means: for example, it could be commanded through a command port that would normally be used in the operation of the system. In the original application of the technique, commanding of the register is performed via a MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem.

  11. Hot tensile tests of Inconel 718

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The physical metallurgy of near-solidus integranular cracking in Inconel 718 welds was investigated. The data, although inconclusive, suggest at least two mechanisms which might explain intergranular cracking (microfissuring) in the heat-affected zone of several high temperature alloys. One theory is based on the separation of intergranular liquid while the other involves mechanical failure of solid ligaments surrounded by intergranular liquid. Both mechanisms concentrate strain in the grain boundaries resulting in low strain (1%) intergranular brittleness. The mechanisms reported might also pertain to the physical metallurgy of casting, powder metallurgy sintering and hot isostatic pressing.

  12. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamics in dynamical spacetimes: Numerical methods and tests

    SciTech Connect

    Duez, Matthew D.; Liu, Yuk Tung; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Stephens, Branson C.

    2005-07-15

    Many problems at the forefront of theoretical astrophysics require the treatment of magnetized fluids in dynamical, strongly curved spacetimes. Such problems include the origin of gamma-ray bursts, magnetic braking of differential rotation in nascent neutron stars arising from stellar core collapse or binary neutron star merger, the formation of jets and magnetized disks around newborn black holes, etc. To model these phenomena, all of which involve both general relativity (GR) and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), we have developed a GRMHD code capable of evolving MHD fluids in dynamical spacetimes. Our code solves the Einstein-Maxwell-MHD system of coupled equations in axisymmetry and in full 3+1 dimensions. We evolve the metric by integrating the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura equations, and use a conservative, shock-capturing scheme to evolve the MHD equations. Our code gives accurate results in standard MHD code-test problems, including magnetized shocks and magnetized Bondi flow. To test our code's ability to evolve the MHD equations in a dynamical spacetime, we study the perturbations of a homogeneous, magnetized fluid excited by a gravitational plane wave, and we find good agreement between the analytic and numerical solutions.

  13. Dynamically Substructured System Testing for Railway Vehicle Pantographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoten, D. P.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    2016-09-01

    ]The overall objective of this paper is to establish a dynamically substructured system (DSS) testing approach for railway vehicle pantographs. In this approach a pilot study quasi-pantograph (QP) is tested within a laboratory environment, where the catenary wire, contact wire and catenary support (abbreviated as ‘catenary’ in this paper) are modelled as a numerical substructure. This is simulated in real time and in parallel with the operation of the physical substructure, i.e. the QP rig itself. The entire DSS is driven by parametric excitation within the catenary model, whilst the numerical and physical substructures are synchronised at their interface via the DSS control technique of [1]. Simulation and physical experimental investigations of the pilot QP rig, constructed within the Advanced Control and Test Laboratory at the University of Bristol, UK, demonstrate the efficacy of the method when subjected to parametric variations, unknown parameter values and parametric excitation.

  14. An automated dynamic water vapor permeation test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Phillip; Kendrick, Cyrus; Rivin, Donald; Charmchii, Majid; Sicuranza, Linda

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an automated apparatus developed to measure the transport of water vapor through materials under a variety of conditions. The apparatus is more convenient to use than the traditional test methods for textiles and clothing materials, and allows one to use a wider variety of test conditions to investigate the concentration-dependent and nonlinear transport behavior of many of the semipermeable membrane laminates which are now available. The dynamic moisture permeation cell (DMPC) has been automated to permit multiple setpoint testing under computer control, and to facilitate investigation of transient phenomena. Results generated with the DMPC are in agreement with and of comparable accuracy to those from the ISO 11092 (sweating guarded hot plate) method of measuring water vapor permeability.

  15. Dynamic Investigation Test-rig on hAptics (DITA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannella, F.; Scalise, L.; Olivieri, E.; Memeo, M.; Caldwell, D. G.

    2013-09-01

    Research on tactile sensitivity has been conducted since the last century and many devices have been proposed to study in detail this sense through experimental tests. The sense of touch is essential in every-day life of human beings, but it can also play a fundamental role for the assessment of some neurological disabilities and pathologies. In fact, the level of tactile perception can provide information on the health state of the nervous system. In this paper, authors propose the design and development of a novel test apparatus, named DITA (Dynamic Investigation Test-rig on hAptics), aiming to provide the measurement of the tactile sensitivity trough the determination of the Just Noticeable Difference (JND) curve of a subject. The paper reports the solution adopted for the system design and the results obtained on the set of experiments carried out on volunteers.

  16. Dynamic testing and characterization of pre-fractured ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Hunter, D.A.

    1993-07-01

    Nearly all of the mechanical behavior studies of armor ceramics, to date, havc involved the characterization and testing of pristine ceramic material. However, balhstic impact causes a strong shock front to propagate rapidly through the ceramic before much penetration can occur. A strong shock wave can result in localized compressive failure and fragmentation of the ceramic before its amplitude is amnuated below the compressive strength of the ceramic. Goals of this effort were to creatc shock-fractured ceramic using test assemblies which maintain the intergranular coupling and high density of the ceramic, characterize the extent and homogeneity of the fragmentation and dilatation of the ceramic, and test the compressive dynamic behavior of the shock-fractured ceramic under conditions of confining pressure. This effort will provide data to support models of the penetration resistance of fractured ceramics including degraded moduli, failure strength-strain, and post-failure characterization of the erosive properties of comminuted ceramic and penetratot materials.

  17. Dynamic testing and characterization of pre-fractured ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Hunter, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    Nearly all of the mechanical behavior studies of armor ceramics, to date, havc involved the characterization and testing of pristine ceramic material. However, balhstic impact causes a strong shock front to propagate rapidly through the ceramic before much penetration can occur. A strong shock wave can result in localized compressive failure and fragmentation of the ceramic before its amplitude is amnuated below the compressive strength of the ceramic. Goals of this effort were to creatc shock-fractured ceramic using test assemblies which maintain the intergranular coupling and high density of the ceramic, characterize the extent and homogeneity of the fragmentation and dilatation of the ceramic, and test the compressive dynamic behavior of the shock-fractured ceramic under conditions of confining pressure. This effort will provide data to support models of the penetration resistance of fractured ceramics including degraded moduli, failure strength-strain, and post-failure characterization of the erosive properties of comminuted ceramic and penetratot materials.

  18. Effect of Tensile Stress on Cavitation Erosion and Damage of Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, M.; Inaba, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kishimoto, K.; Hayabusa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation erosion tests for epoxy, unsaturated polyester, polycarbonate, and acrylic resin were conducted under various tensile stress conditions (Tensile-Cavitation test). A new testing device was designed to conduct the Tensile-Cavitation test and observe specimen surface during the experiment based on ASTM G32. When tensile stress of 1.31 MPa was loaded on epoxy resin, cracks occurred on the specimen after 0.5 hours during cavitation erosion. When no tensile stress was loaded on the epoxy resin, the damage was general cavitation erosion only. As well as the epoxy resin, unsaturated polyester resin applied tensile stress of 1.31 MPa and polycarbonate resin of 6.54 MPa indicated erosion damages and cracks. When tensile stress of 6.54 MPa was loaded on acrylic resin, the erosion damage was almost the same as the results without tensile stress. We confirmed that anti-cavitation property of epoxy resin was higher than those of acrylic and polycarbonate without tensile stress while the damage of epoxy resin was much serious than that of acrylic resins under tensile stress loadings.

  19. Shake Test Results and Dynamic Calibration Efforts for the Large Rotor Test Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carl R.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to the full-scale wind tunnel test of the UH-60A Airloads rotor, a shake test was completed on the Large Rotor Test Apparatus. The goal of the shake test was to characterize the oscillatory response of the test rig and provide a dynamic calibration of the balance to accurately measure vibratory hub loads. This paper provides a summary of the shake test results, including balance, shaft bending gauge, and accelerometer measurements. Sensitivity to hub mass and angle of attack were investigated during the shake test. Hub mass was found to have an important impact on the vibratory forces and moments measured at the balance, especially near the UH-60A 4/rev frequency. Comparisons were made between the accelerometer data and an existing finite-element model, showing agreement on mode shapes, but not on natural frequencies. Finally, the results of a simple dynamic calibration are presented, showing the effects of changes in hub mass. The results show that the shake test data can be used to correct in-plane loads measurements up to 10 Hz and normal loads up to 30 Hz.

  20. Dynamic testing of a two-dimensional box truss beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    Testing to determine the effects of joint freeplay and pretensioning of diagonal members on the dynamic characteristics of a two-dimensional box truss beam was conducted. The test article was ten bays of planar truss suspended by long wires at each joint. Each bay measured 2 meters per side. Pins of varying size were used to simulate various joint freeplay conditions. Single-point random excitation was the primary method of test. The rational fraction polynomial method was used to extract modal characteristics from test data. A finite element model of the test article was generated from which modal characteristics were predicted. These were compared with those obtained from tests. With the exception of the fundamental mode, correlation of theoretical and experimental results was poor, caused by the resonant coupling of local truss member bending modes with global truss beam modes. This coupling introduced many modes in the frequency range of interest whose frequencies were sensitive to joint boundary conditions. It was concluded that local/global coupling must be avoided in the frequency range where accurate modal characteristics are required.

  1. Characterization of Damage in Triaxial Braid Composites Under Tensile Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites utilizing flattened, large tow yarns in woven or braided forms are being used in many aerospace applications. Their complex fiber architecture and large unit cell size present challenges in both understanding deformation processes and measuring reliable material properties. This report examines composites made using flattened 12k and 24k standard modulus carbon fiber yarns in a 0 /+60 /-60 triaxial braid architecture. Standard straight-sided tensile coupons are tested with the 0 axial braid fibers either parallel with or perpendicular to the applied tensile load (axial or transverse tensile test, respectively). Nonuniform surface strain resulting from the triaxial braid architecture is examined using photogrammetry. Local regions of high strain concentration are examined to identify where failure initiates and to determine the local strain at the time of initiation. Splitting within fiber bundles is the first failure mode observed at low to intermediate strains. For axial tensile tests splitting is primarily in the 60 bias fibers, which were oriented 60 to the applied load. At higher strains, out-of-plane deformation associated with localized delamination between fiber bundles or damage within fiber bundles is observed. For transverse tensile tests, the splitting is primarily in the 0 axial fibers, which were oriented transverse to the applied load. The initiation and accumulation of local damage causes the global transverse stress-strain curves to become nonlinear and causes failure to occur at a reduced ultimate strain. Extensive delamination at the specimen edges is also observed.

  2. Effect of increased quadriceps tensile stiffness on peak anterior cruciate ligament strain during a simulated pivot landing.

    PubMed

    Lipps, David B; Oh, Youkeun K; Ashton-Miller, James A; Wojtys, Edward M

    2014-03-01

    ACL injury prevention programs often involve strengthening the knee muscles. We posit that an unrecognized benefit of such training is the associated increase in the tensile stiffness of the hypertrophied muscle. We tested the hypothesis that an increased quadriceps tensile stiffness would reduce peak anteromedial bundle (AM-)ACL relative strain in female knees. Twelve female cadaver knees were subjected to compound impulsive two-times body weight loads in compression, flexion, and internal tibial torque beginning at 15° flexion. Knees were equipped with modifiable custom springs to represent the nonlinear rapid stretch behavior of a normal and increased stiffness female quadriceps (i.e., 33% greater stiffness). Peak AM-ACL relative strain was measured using an in situ transducer while muscle forces and tibiofemoral kinematics and kinetics were recorded. A 3D ADAMS™ dynamic biomechanical knee model was used in silico to interpret the experimental results which were analyzed using a repeated-measures Wilcoxon test. Female knees exhibited a 16% reduction in peak AM-ACL relative strain and 21% reduction in change in flexion when quadriceps tensile stiffness was increased by 33% (mean (SD) difference: 0.97% (0.65%), p = 0.003). We conclude that increased quadriceps tensile stiffness reduces peak ACL strain during a controlled study simulating a pivot landing.

  3. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Tensile Strength of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masayuki; Shimbo, Minoru; Miyano, Yasushi

    In this paper, the effects of the intensity of electron beam and the variation with time after irradiation of electron beam on the tensile strength of the polypropylene (PP), which is widely used as medicine containers, were investigated. PP with and without colorants were used first and samples irradiated under various intensity of EB. A tensile test on the irradiated samples with elapsed time after the irradiation of the electron beam was carried out. The effects of those factors on the tensile strength were discussed. The following results were obtained (1) The tensile strength of PP decreased due to the influence of the electron beam irradiation, however the rate of the decrease in strength was small compared with the original one. Furthermore, the rate of the decrease in strength was very small owing to the variation with time after the EB irradiation. (2) The tensile rupture strength of PP increased and the rupture strain owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, these rupture strength increased and the rupture strain decreased along with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. (3) The tensile rupture strain energy of PP decreased owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, the strain energy decreases with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. Moreover, the strength characteristics of PP with colorants received greater influence of electron beam compared with the one without colorants.

  4. Noninvasive, quantitative respirator fit testing through dynamic pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D R; Willeke, K

    1988-10-01

    A new method has been invented for the noninvasive and quantitative determination of fit for a respirator. The test takes a few seconds and requires less expensive instrumentation than presently used for invasive testing. In this test, the breath is held at a negative pressure for a few seconds, and the leak-induced pressure decay inside the respirator cavity is monitored. A dynamic pressure sensor is attached to a modified cartridge of an air-purifying respirator or built into the respirator body or into the air supply line of an air-supplied respirator. The method is noninvasive in that the modified cartridge can be mounted onto any air-purifying respirator. The pressure decay during testing quantifies the airflow entered through the leak site. An equation has been determined which gives the air leakage as a function of pressure decay slope, respirator volume and the pressure differential during actual wear--all of which are determined by the dynamic pressure sensor. Thus, the ratio of air inhaled through the filters or via the air supply line to the leak rate is a measure of respirator fit, independent of aerosol deposition in the lung and aerosol distribution in the respirator cavity as found for quantitative fit testing with aerosols. The new method is shown to be independent of leak and sensor locations. The concentration and distribution of aerosols entered through the leak site is dependent only on the physical dimensions of the leak site and the air velocity in it, which can be determined independently.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3189157

  5. Interest of dynamic tests in acute ecotoxicity assessment in algae

    SciTech Connect

    Jouany, J.M.; Ferard, J.F.; Vasseur, P.; Gea, J.; Truhaut, R.; Rast, C.

    1983-04-01

    Sorption of toxics by algae may be important and occurs very early. Thus, a decrease of the experimental toxic concentrations in the medium results in understating toxicity when tests are conducted under static conditions. In this work, two different methods of exposure of algae (Chlorella vulgaris) are studied, the static test and the pseudodynamic test. Acute effects (biological and analytical effects) of inorganic compounds (Cu/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Pb/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 6 +/) have been evaluated for 96 hr of exposure; in each case, IC50 is much lower in the dynamic condition than in the static one. The percentage of reduction varies from 55 to 75% after 96 hr. Accumulation of metal by chlorellae is greater when testing by the pseudodynamic way, with Cu/sup 2 +/ and Pb/sup 2 +/. But in the case of Cd/sup 2 +/ and Cr/sup 6 +/, the concentration factors are similar in the two kinds of exposure. These results point out the advantage of the pseudodynamic test, of which the methodology is very easy, for a more realistic assessment of acute ecotoxicity in these organisms.

  6. Vibration testing and dynamic modeling of automotive shock absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mohan D.; Gruenberg, Scott B.; Torab, Homa; Griffiths, David

    2000-04-01

    This paper is a continuation of previously presented research work involving the dynamic characterization of automotive shock absorbers. The objective was to develop new testing and analysis methodologies for obtaining equivalent linear stiffness and damping of the shock absorbers for use in CAE- NVH low-to-mid frequency chassis models. It is well known that a hydraulic actuated elastomer test machine is not suitable for testing shocks in the mid-to-high frequency range where the typical road input displacements fall within the noise floor of the hydraulic machine. Hence, initially in this project, an electrodynamic shaker was used for exciting the shock absorbers under displacements less than 0.05 mm up to 500 Hz. Furthermore, instead of the swept sine technique, actual road data were used to excite the shocks. Equivalent linear spring-damper models were developed based on least- squares curve-fitting of the test data. The type of road profile did not influence the stiffness and damping values significantly for the range of amplitudes and frequencies considered. The success of the characterization of shock absorbers on the electrodynamic shaker using non-sinusoidal input has led to the development of a similar methodology to be employed on the hydraulic actuated elastomer test machine.

  7. Sensitivity of The Dynamic Visual Acuity Test To Sensorimotor Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Helen; Bloomberg, Jacob; Elizalde, Elizabeth; Fregia, Melody

    1999-01-01

    Post-flight astronauts, acutely post-vestibular nerve section patients, and patients with severe chronic bilateral vestibular deficits have oscillopsia caused by reduced vestibulocular reflex gains and decreased postural stability. Therefore, as previous work has shown, a test of dynamic visual acuity (DVA), in which the subject must read numbers from a computer screen while standing still or walking in place provides a composite measure of sensorimotor integration. This measure may be useful for determining the level of recovery, post-flight, post-operatively, or after vestibular rehabilitation. To determine the sensitivity of DVA to change in impaired populations we have tested patients with acoustic neuromas before and during the first post-operative week after resection of the tumors, and with bilaterally labyrinthine deficient subjects before and after six weeks of balance rehabilitation therapy.

  8. Dynamic tests on the NASA Langley CSI evolutionary model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troidl, H.; Elliott, K. B.

    1993-01-01

    A modal analysis study, representing one of the anticipated 'Cooperative Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Experiments on the NASA Langley CSI Evolutionary Model', was carried out as a sub-task under the NASA/DLR collaboration in dynamics and control of large space systems. The CSI evolutionary testbed (CEM) is designed for the development of Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology to improve space science platform pointing. For orbiting space structures like large flexible trusses, new identification challenges arise due to their specific dynamic characteristics (low frequencies and high modal density) on the one hand, and the limited possibilities of exciting such structures and measuring their responses on orbit on the other. The main objective was to investigate the modal identification potential of several different types of forcing functions that could possibly be realized with on-board excitation equipment using a minimum number of exciter locations as well as response locations. These locations were defined in an analytical test prediction process used to study the implications of measuring and analyzing the responses thus produced. It turned out that broadband excitation is needed for a general modal survey, but if only certain modes are of particular interest, combinations of exponentially decaying sine functions provide favorable excitation conditions as they allow to concentrate the available energy on the modes being of special interest. From a practical point-of-view structural nonlinearities as well as noisy measurements make the analysis more difficult, especially in the low frequency range and when the modes are closely spaced.

  9. Testing quasilinear modified Newtonian dynamics in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galianni, Pasquale; Feix, Martin; Zhao, Hongsheng; Horne, Keith

    2012-08-01

    A unique signature of the modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) paradigm is its peculiar behavior in the vicinity of the points where the total Newtonian acceleration exactly cancels. In the Solar System, these are the saddle points of the gravitational potential near the planets. Typically, such points are embedded into low-acceleration bubbles where modified gravity theories à la MOND predict significant deviations from Newton’s laws. As it has been pointed out recently, the Earth-Sun bubble may be visited by the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft in the near future, providing a unique occasion to put these theories to a direct test. In this work, we present a high-precision model of the Solar System’s gravitational potential to determine accurate positions and motions of these saddle points and study the predicted dynamical anomalies within the framework of quasilinear MOND. Considering the expected sensitivity of the LISA Pathfinder probe, we argue that interpolation functions which exhibit a “faster” transition between the two dynamical regimes have a good chance of surviving a null result. An example of such a function is the QMOND analog of the so-called simple interpolating function which agrees well with much of the extragalactic phenomenology. We have also discovered that several of Saturn’s outermost satellites periodically intersect the Saturn-Sun bubble, providing the first example of Solar System objects that regularly undergo the MOND regime.

  10. Constructing and testing a framework for dynamic risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Thornton, David

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes the construction and testing of a framework for dynamic risk assessment. A review of previous studies identified 4 domains into which dynamic risk factors for sexual offending seem to fall. These were sexual interests, distorted attitudes, socioaffective functioning, and self-management. Psychometric indicators for 3 of the domains were identified, and 2 studies are reported using these indicators to test the framework. Study 1 divided men serving a prison sentence for a sexual offense against a child into 2 groups--those with a previous conviction of this kind (Repeaters) and those for whom this was the only time they had been sentenced for such an offense (Current Only). The Repeaters were found to show more distorted attitudes, worse socioaffective functioning, and poorer self-management than did the Current Only group. Study 2 used a simple algorithm to combine these psychometric indicators into an overall "Deviance" classification. Reconviction data was obtained for offenders classified as high, moderate, or low on Deviance. Sexual reconviction was found to be monotonically associated with the Deviance classification. Logistic regression analysis showed that both static variables (Static-99) and the Deviance classification made independent contributions to prediction. It is suggested that risk assessment procedures should combine these 2 approaches.

  11. One testing method of dynamic linearity of an accelerometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jing-Yu; Guo, Wei-Guo; Tan, Xue-Ming; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2015-09-01

    To effectively test dynamic linearity of an accelerometer over a wide rang of 104 g to about 20 × 104g, one published patent technology is first experimentally verified and analysed, and its deficient is presented, then based on stress wave propagation theory on the thin long bar, the relation between the strain signal and the corresponding acceleration signal is obtained, one special link of two coaxial projectile is developed. These two coaxial metal cylinders (inner cylinder and circular tube) are used as projectiles, to prevent their mutual slip inside the gun barrel during movement, the one end of two projectiles is always fastened by small screws. Ti6-AL4-V bar with diameter of 30 mm is used to propagate loading stress pulse. The resultant compression wave can be measured by the strain gauges on the bar, and a half -sine strain pulse is obtained. The measuring accelerometer is attached on the other end of the bar by a vacuum clamp. In this clamp, the accelerometer only bear compression wave, the reflected tension pulse make the accelerometer off the bar. Using this system, dynamic linearity measurement of accelerometer can be easily tested in wider range of acceleration values. And a really measuring results are presented.

  12. Modeling Airborne Beryllium Concentrations From Open Air Dynamic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. M.

    2003-12-01

    A heightened awareness of airborne beryllium contamination from industrial activities was reestablished during the late 1980's and early 1990's when it became recognized that Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD) had not been eradicated, and that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration standards for occupational air exposure to beryllium may not be sufficiently protective. This was in response to the observed CBD increase in multiple industrial settings where beryllium was manufactured and/or machined, thus producing beryllium particulates which are then available for redistribution by airborne transport. Sampling and modeling design activities were expanded at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico to evaluate potential airborne beryllium exposure to workers who might be exposed during dynamic testing activities associated with nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship. Herein is presented the results of multiple types of collected air measurements that were designed to characterize the production and dispersion of beryllium used in components whose performance is evaluated during high explosive detonation at open air firing sites. Data from fallout, high volume air, medium volume air, adhesive film, particle size impactor, and fine-particulate counting techniques will be presented, integrated, and applied in dispersion modeling to assess potential onsite and offsite personal exposures resulting from dynamic testing activities involving beryllium.

  13. MPLM On-Orbit Interface Dynamic Flexibility Modal Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookout, Paul S.; Rodriguez, Pedro I.; Tinson, Ian; Fleming, Paolo

    2001-01-01

    Now that the International Space Station (ISS) is being constructed, payload developers have to not only verify the Shuttle-to-payload interface, but also the interfaces their payload will have with the ISS. The Multi Purpose Logistic Module (MPLM) being designed and built by Alenia Spazio in Torino, Italy is one such payload. The MPLM is the primary carrier for the ISS Payload Racks, Re-supply Stowage Racks, and the Resupply Stowage Platforms to re-supply the ISS with food, water, experiments, maintenance equipment and etc. During the development of the MPLM there was no requirement for verification of the on-orbit interfaces with the ISS. When this oversight was discovered, all the dynamic test stands had already been disassembled. A method was needed that would not require an extensive testing stand and could be completed in a short amount of time. The residual flexibility testing technique was chosen. The residual flexibility modal testing method consists of measuring the free-free natural frequencies and mode shapes along with the interface frequency response functions (FRF's). Analytically, the residual flexibility method has been investigated in detail by, MacNeal, Martinez, Carne, and Miller, and Rubin, but has not been implemented extensively for model correlation due to difficulties in data acquisition. In recent years improvement of data acquisition equipment has made possible the implementation of the residual flexibility method as in Admire, Tinker, and Ivey, and Klosterman and Lemon. The residual flexibility modal testing technique is applicable to a structure with distinct points (DOF) of contact with its environment, such as the MPLM-to-Station interface through the Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM). The CBM is bolted to a flange on the forward cone of the MPLM. During the fixed base test (to verify Shuttle interfaces) some data was gathered on the forward cone panels. Even though there was some data on the forward cones, an additional modal test was

  14. Correlation of infrared thermographic patterns and acoustic emission signals with tensile deformation and fracture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, B.; Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2001-04-01

    During tensile deformation, part of the mechanical work done on the specimen is transformed into heat and acoustic activity. The amount of acoustic activity and the thermal emissions depend on the test conditions and the deformation behavior of the specimen during loading. Authors have used thermography and acoustic emission (AE) simultaneously for monitoring tensile deformation in AISI type 316 SS. Tensile testing was carried out at 298 K at three different strain rates. It has been shown that the simultaneous use of these techniques can provide complementary information for characterizing the tensile deformation and fracture processes.

  15. In vitro dynamic solubility test: influence of various parameters.

    PubMed Central

    Thélohan, S; de Meringo, A

    1994-01-01

    This article discusses the dissolution of mineral fibers in simulated physiological fluids (SPF), and the parameters that affect the solubility measurement in a dynamic test where an SPF runs through a cell containing fibers (Scholze and Conradt test). Solutions simulate either the extracellular fluid (pH 7.6) or the intracellular fluid (pH 4.5). The fibers have various chemical compositions and are either continuously drawn or processed as wool. The fiber solubility is determined by the amount of SiO2 (and occasionally other ions) released in the solution. Results are stated as percentage of the initial silica content released or as dissolution rate v in nm/day. The reproducibility of the test is higher with the less soluble fibers (10% solubility), than with highly soluble fibers (20% solubility). The influence of test parameters, including SPF, test duration, and surface area/volume (SA/V), has been studied. The pH and the inorganic buffer salts have a major influence: industrial glasswool composition is soluble at pH 7.6 but not at pH 4.5. The opposite is true for rock- (basalt) wool composition. For slightly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate v remains constant with time, whereas for highly soluble fibers, the dissolution rate decreases rapidly. The dissolution rates believed to occur are v1, initial dissolution rate, and v2, dissolution rate of the residual fibers. The SA of fibers varies with the mass of the fibers tested, or with the fiber diameter at equal mass. Volume, V, is the chosen flow rate. An increase in the SA/V ratio leads to a decrease in the dissolution rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7882964

  16. The tensile strength properties of CFRPs and GRRPs for Unnes electric car body material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khumaedi, Muhammad; Sumbodo, Wirawan; Widodo, Rahmat Doni

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes composite materials tensile testing of electric car body material. The UNNES electric car body must be developed using a high strength and lightweight material. A fiber-reinforced plastic composite is widely used for the concerned objective. Selection of the type of composites, variations in fiber orientation, and the number of fiber layers will affect the tensile strength of the material. Composite materials use Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics (CFRPs) and glass-fiber-reinforced plastics (GFRPs) variation to the fiber areal weight, variations in fiber orientation and the number of fiber layers. The CFRPs areal weight consists of 230 gsm and 400 gsm. The GFRPsareal weight consists of 400 gsm and 600 gsm. Fibre orientationsconsist of 0° and 45°. Number of fiber layers consists of one layer and two layers. Various variations were then tested to figure out their tensile to get ultimate tensile strength of materials. Standard test method for tensile test was conducted using ASTM D3039. Tensile specimen geometry used a type of balanced and symmetric fiber orientation, with 25mm in width, 250 mm in length, and 2.5 mm in thickness. The result shows that the more fiber areal weight and the layer number were used, the more its tensile strength would increase, beside it increased the ultimate tensile strength of the material for both glass and carbon fiber with 0o and 45o fiber arientation. Fiber plain wave with 45o has greater tensile strength compared to any other variation.

  17. Tensile properties of fresh human calcaneal (Achilles) tendons.

    PubMed

    Louis-Ugbo, John; Leeson, Benjamin; Hutton, William C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the tensile properties of fresh human calcaneal (Achilles) tendons. Twenty fresh cadaveric (age range = 57-93 years) bone-Achilles tendon complexes were harvested within 24 hr postmortem. The calcaneus together with 15 cm of the Achilles tendon extending proximally from the insertion on the calcaneus was clamped and biomechanically tested. Each tendon was firmly fixed in clamps in an MTS Systems Corporation MTS testing machine and tension was applied at a displacement rate of 8 cm per minute until the tendon failed. The tensile force and tensile strain (as measured using an extensometer) were recorded and plotted using onboard software. The narrow age range of our donors prevented any meaningful correlation between age and tensile properties; however, the results showed that: 1) the average ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the human Achilles tendon was 1189 N (range = 360-1,965), 2) there was a correlation between left and right legs for UTS, 3) there was a correlation between left and right legs in regard to cross sectional area, and 4) there was no correlation between UTS and cross-sectional area.

  18. Cascaded image analysis for dynamic crack detection in material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, U.; Maas, H.-G.

    Concrete probes in civil engineering material testing often show fissures or hairline-cracks. These cracks develop dynamically. Starting at a width of a few microns, they usually cannot be detected visually or in an image of a camera imaging the whole probe. Conventional image analysis techniques will detect fissures only if they show a width in the order of one pixel. To be able to detect and measure fissures with a width of a fraction of a pixel at an early stage of their development, a cascaded image analysis approach has been developed, implemented and tested. The basic idea of the approach is to detect discontinuities in dense surface deformation vector fields. These deformation vector fields between consecutive stereo image pairs, which are generated by cross correlation or least squares matching, show a precision in the order of 1/50 pixel. Hairline-cracks can be detected and measured by applying edge detection techniques such as a Sobel operator to the results of the image matching process. Cracks will show up as linear discontinuities in the deformation vector field and can be vectorized by edge chaining. In practical tests of the method, cracks with a width of 1/20 pixel could be detected, and their width could be determined at a precision of 1/50 pixel.

  19. Dynamic testing and characterization of pre-fractured ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, A.K.; Hunter, D.A. )

    1994-07-10

    Nearly all of the mechanical behavior studies of armor ceramics, to date, have involved the characterization and testing of pristine ceramic material. However, ballistic impact causes a strong shock front to propagate rapidly through the ceramic before much penetration can occur. A strong shock wave can result in localized compressive failure and fragmentation of the ceramic before its amplitude is attenuated below the compressive strength of the ceramic. The goals of this effort were to (1) create shock-fractured ceramic using test assemblies which maintain the intergranular coupling and high density of the ceramic, (2) characterize the extent and homogeneity of the fragmentation and dilatation of the ceramic, and (3) test the compressive dynamic behavior of the shock-fractured ceramic under conditions of confining pressure. This effort will provide data to support models of the penetration resistance of fractured ceramics including degraded moduli, failure strength-strain, and post-failure characterization of the erosive properties of comminuted ceramic and penetrator materials. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

  20. Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Richard Pearson

    2010-02-01

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

  1. Head tracker evaluation utilizing the dynamic tracker test fixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Moure Shattuck, Judson, III; Parisi, Vincent M., II; Smerdon, Arryn J.

    2007-04-01

    In military aviation, head tracker technologies have become increasingly important to track the pilot's head position and orientation, allowing the user to quickly interact with the operational environment. This technology allows the pilot to quickly acquire items of interest and see Fighter Data Link type information. Acquiring the target on a helmet-mounted tracker/display which can automatically slew a weapon's seeker is far more efficient than having to point at the target with the nose of the aircraft as previously required for the heads-up display (HUD) type of target acquisition. The United States Air Force (USAF) has used and evaluated a variety of helmet-mounted trackers for incorporation into their high performance aircrafts. The Dynamic Tracker Test Fixture (DTTF) was designed by the Helmet-Mounted Sensory Technology (HMST) laboratory to accurately measure rotation in one plane both static and dynamic conditions for the purpose of evaluating the accuracy of head trackers, including magnetic, inertial, and optical trackers. This paper describes the design, construction, capabilities, limitations, and performance of the DTTF.

  2. A comparison of results from dynamic-response field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Susan M.; Thresher, Robert W.; Wright, Alan D.

    1988-11-01

    The dynamic response of Howden's 330-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) and the Northern Power Systems 100-kW North Wind 100 HAWT has been measured. The Howden machine incorporates a 26-m-diameter, upwind, three-bladed, wood/epoxy rotor that operates at 42 rpm and is a rigid-hub design. The North Wind 100 rotor has a diameter of 17.8 m, is upwind, two-bladed, and constructed of fiberglass, and has a teetered hub. The Northern Power turbine's blades are fully pitchable, while the Howden machine uses pitchable blade tips. This paper will present the results from each of these test programs in an effort to compare the dynamic response of each turbine. The analysis will focus on rotor bending loads in terms of both time domain and frequency response. The FLAP code will be used to explore sensitivity to teeter stiffness and natural frequency placement to provide a better understanding of the differences in behavior caused by configuration alone. The results are presented in the form of normalized azimuth-averaged plots of the deterministic loads, and spectral density plots of the stochastic responses. This presentation of the results will contrast major response differences due to design configurations.

  3. Development of test methodology for dynamic mechanical analysis instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis instrumentation was used for the development of specific test methodology in the determination of engineering parameters of selected materials, esp. plastics and elastomers, over a broad range of temperature with selected environment. The methodology for routine procedures was established with specific attention given to sample geometry, sample size, and mounting techniques. The basic software of the duPont 1090 thermal analyzer was used for data reduction which simplify the theoretical interpretation. Clamps were developed which allowed 'relative' damping during the cure cycle to be measured for the fiber-glass supported resin. The correlation of fracture energy 'toughness' (or impact strength) with the low temperature (glassy) relaxation responses for a 'rubber-modified' epoxy system was negative in result because the low-temperature dispersion mode (-80 C) of the modifier coincided with that of the epoxy matrix, making quantitative comparison unrealistic.

  4. A miniature parachute-probe dynamics test-bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dooley, Jessica; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2004-02-01

    Small-scale sensor packages and parachutes manufactured for model rocket recovery were hand-dropped from within a building in order to gain familiarity with the descent kinematics of a planetary probe through an atmosphere. A number of parachute-probe systems ranging in size, shape, weight, riser length, and sensors were dropped while exterior video cameras and onboard sensor data were collected. Data extracted from the camera images were then compared with sensor data to gain familiarity with the data and corresponding motions of the system such as swing amplitude, rotation, descent rate, etc. These tests allowed for a more detailed look at parachute-probe dynamics and provided the starting point for the development of a simple parachute-probe model.

  5. Selection of Solar Simulator for Solar Dynamic Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Carol M.

    1994-01-01

    The 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) experiment will be conducted in 1995 at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This solar dynamic power system test will be conducted in a simulated space environment and will require an artificial sun. To address the solar simulator requirements for the GTD, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was hired under contract to review and visit four existing solar simulator facilities. The four facilities included, AEDC's Mark 1 Chamber, NASA-JSC Chamber A, AEDC's 12V Chamber, and NASA-JPL Space Simulator Chamber. Two design concepts were considered following several months of evaluating existing solar simulator facilities throughout the United States. To satisfy system requirements for the SD GTD experiment the solar simulator needs to provide a uniform light flux to the SD concentrator, provide the light within a subtense angle of one degree, and provide an intensity of one solar constant (1.37 kW/sq m) at airmass zero. Most solar simulators are designed for supplying heat loads to spacecraft where a cone angle as large as 3 degrees is acceptable. It was also concluded that a solar simulator, such like these considered in the AEDC study, would require major facility modifications for NASA LeRC and result in significant impacts to the program. The advanced solar simulator concept developed by NASA LeRC will meet the system requirements for the SD GTD experiment Since SD GTD solar simulator requirements could not be addressed by existing simulator, an advanced concept was considered.

  6. Selection of solar simulator for solar dynamic ground test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, Carol M.

    1994-08-01

    The 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) experiment will be conducted in 1995 at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This solar dynamic power system test will be conducted in a simulated space environment and will require an artificial sun. To address the solar simulator requirements for the GTD, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was hired under contract to review and visit four existing solar simulator facilities. The four facilities included, AEDC's Mark 1 Chamber, NASA-JSC Chamber A, AEDC's 12V Chamber, and NASA-JPL Space Simulator Chamber. Two design concepts were considered following several months of evaluating existing solar simulator facilities throughout the United States. To satisfy system requirements for the SD GTD experiment the solar simulator needs to provide a uniform light flux to the SD concentrator, provide the light within a subtense angle of one degree, and provide an intensity of one solar constant (1.37 kW/sq m) at airmass zero. Most solar simulators are designed for supplying heat loads to spacecraft where a cone angle as large as 3 degrees is acceptable. It was also concluded that a solar simulator, such like these considered in the AEDC study, would require major facility modifications for NASA LeRC and result in significant impacts to the program. The advanced solar simulator concept developed by NASA LeRC will meet the system requirements for the SD GTD experiment Since SD GTD solar simulator requirements could not be addressed by existing simulator, an advanced concept was considered.

  7. Static and Dynamic Flexural Strength Anisotropy of Barre Granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Zuo, J. P.; Zhang, R.; Xu, N. W.

    2013-11-01

    Granite exhibits anisotropy due to pre-existing microcracks under tectonic loadings; and the mechanical property anisotropy such as flexural/tensile strength is vital to many rock engineering applications. In this paper, Barre Granite is studied to understand the flexural strength anisotropy under a wide range of loading rates using newly proposed semi-circular bend tests. Static tests are conducted with a MTS hydraulic servo-control testing machine and dynamic tests with a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. Six samples groups are fabricated with respect to the three principle directions of Barre granite. Pulse shaping technique is used in all dynamic SHPB tests to facilitate dynamic stress equilibrium. Finite element method is utilized to build up equations calculating the flexural tensile strength. For samples in the same orientation group, a loading rate dependence of the flexural tensile strength is observed. The measured flexural tensile strength is higher than the tensile strength measured using Brazilian disc method at given loading rate and this scenario has been rationalized using a non-local failure theory. The flexural tensile strength anisotropy features obvious dependence on the loading rates, the higher the loading rate, the less the anisotropy and this phenomenon may be explained considering the interaction of the preferentially oriented microcracks.

  8. Tensile Properties of GRCop-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Loewenthal, William S.; Yun, Hee-Man

    2012-01-01

    This is a chapter in the final report on GRCop-84 for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Second Generation/Project Constellation Program. It contains information on the tensile properties of GRCop-84. GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) was produced by extrusion and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing). Some of the extrusions were rolled to plate and sheet while other extrusions were drawn into tubing. The material was further subjected to various heat treatments corresponding to annealing, anticipated typical brazing conditions, an end-of-life condition and various elevated temperature exposures to attempt to improve creep resistance. As anticipated, cold work increased strength while decreasing ductility. Annealing at 600 C (1112 F) and higher temperatures was effective. An exposure for 100 h at 500 C (932 F) resulted in an increase in strength rather than the anticipated decrease. High temperature simulated-braze cycles and thermal exposures lowered the strength of GRCop-84, but the deceases were small compared to precipitation strengthened copper alloys. It was observed that the excess Cr could form large precipitates that lower the reduction in area though it appears a minimum amount is required. Overall, GRCop-84 exhibits good stability of its tensile properties, which makes it an excellent candidate for rocket engine liners and many other high temperature applications.

  9. The GBT Dynamic Scheduling System: Development and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, M.; Clark, M.; Marganian, P.; O'Neil, K.; Shelton, A.; Sessoms, E.

    2009-09-01

    During the summer trimester of 2008, all observations on the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) were scheduled using the new Dynamic Scheduling System (DSS). Beta testing exercised the policies, algorithms, and software developed for the DSS project. Since observers are located all over the world, the DSS was implemented as a web application. Technologies such as iCalendar, Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, email, and instant messaging are used to transfer as much or as little information to observers as they request. We discuss the software engineering challenges leading to our implementation such as information distribution and building rich user interfaces in the web browser. We also relate our adaptation of agile development practices to design and develop the DSS. Additionally, we describe handling differences in expected versus actual initial conditions in the pool of project proposals for the 08B trimester. We then identify lessons learned from beta testing and present statistics on how the DSS was used during the trimester.

  10. Ideal tensile strength of B2 transition-metal aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianshu; Morris, J. W., Jr.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2004-08-01

    The ideal tensile strengths of the B2 -type (CsCl) transition-metal aluminides FeAl , CoAl , and NiAl have been investigated using an ab initio electronic structure total energy method. The three materials exhibit dissimilar mechanical behaviors under the simulated ideal tensile tests along [001], [110], and [111] directions. FeAl is weakest in tension along [001] whereas CoAl and NiAl are strongest in the same direction. The weakness of FeAl along [001] direction is attributed to the instability introduced by the filling of antibonding d states.

  11. Dynamic cone penetration tests in granular media: Determination of the tip's dynamic load-penetration curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, E.; Benz, M.; Gourvès, R.; Breul, P.

    2013-06-01

    In this article a two-dimensional discrete numerical model, realized in PFC2D, is presented. This model is used in the dynamic penetration tests in a granular medium. Its objective being the validation of the measurement technique offered by Panda 3® (Benz et al. 2011) which is designed to calculate the tip's load-penetration curve for each impact in the soil where different parameters are used. To do so, we have compared the results obtained by calculation during the impacts to those measured directly in the model of a penetrometer through the installation of the gauges at the cone.

  12. Tensile and creep data on type 316 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V. K.; Booker, B. L.P.; Booker, M. K.; McEnerney, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes tensile and creep data on 13 heats of type 316 stainless steel. It includes ten different product forms (three plates, four pipes, and three bars) of the reference heat tested at ORNL. Tensile data are presented in tabular form and analyzed as a function of temperature by the heat centering method. This method yielded a measure of variations within a single heat as well as among different heats. The upper and lower scatter bands developed by this method were wider at the lower temperatures than at the high temperatures (for strength properties), a trend reflected by the experimental data. The creep data on both unaged and aged specimens are presented in tabular form along with creep curves for each test. The rupture time data are compared with the ASME Code Case minimum curve at each test temperature in the range from 538 to 704{sup 0}C. The experimental rupture time data are also compared with the values predicted by using the rupture model based on elevated-temperature ultimate tensile strength. A creep ductility trend curve was developed on the basis of the reference heat data and those published in the literature on nitrogen effects. To characterize the data fully, information was also supplied on vendor, product form, fabrication method, material condition (mill-annealed vs laboratory annealed and aged), grain size, and chemical composition for various heats. Test procedures used for tensile and creep results are also discussed.

  13. Tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, C. O.; Schmidt, E. H.

    1969-01-01

    Tests to determine the tensile and fatigue properties of Inconel 718 at cryogenic temperatures show that the alloy increases in strength at low temperatures, with very little change in toughness. The effect of surface finish and grain size on the fatigue properties was also determined.

  14. Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

  15. Effects of LEO Environment on Tensile Properties of PEEK Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Shimamura, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    To clarify the effects of space environment on mechanical properties of polymer, exposure experiments were conducted utilizing the International Space Station Russian Service Module. Poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) films under tensile stress were exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) environment, and reference samples were irradiated with atomic oxygen (AO), electron beam (EB), and ultraviolet light (UV) in ground facilities. By comparing the results of flight and ground tests, the degradation behavior and the influential factors in LEO were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) UV was found to be the harshest factor in LEO on tensile properties, since it decreased elongation to 15% of pristine sample after 46-months exposure. (2) AO in LEO eroded the specimen surface with a cone-like morphology and reduced the thickness; however, it had no significant effect on tensile properties. (3) EB irradiation in LEO had no measurable effects on the material properties.

  16. Tensile Behavior of Alloy 718 in Hot Corrosive Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahobia, G. S.; Paulose, Neeta; Mannan, S. L.; Chattopadhyay, K.; Santhi Srinivas, N. C.; Singh, Vakil

    2013-12-01

    Nickel-iron-based alloy 718 was thermally exposed in peak-aged condition at 550 and 650 °C, from 5 to 100 h, with and without salt coatings and was tested in tension at room temperature and elevated temperatures. Standard tensile specimens were coated with three different salts (in wt.%): NaCl(100), Na2SO4 + NaCl (75/25), and Na2SO4 + NaCl + V2O5 (90/5/5). Exposure of salt-coated specimens at 550 and 650 °C revealed formation of scales and corrosion pits. Tensile deformation resulted in cracking of the surface oxide/corrosion scale. The uncoated specimens showed formation of oxide scales on the surface, without any cracking whereas the salt-coated specimens showed surface cracking and pitting at some places. However, tensile properties were not degraded due to salt coatings.

  17. 16 CFR 1203.16 - Dynamic strength of retention system test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dynamic strength of retention system test... ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.16 Dynamic strength of.... (2) The retention system strength test equipment shall consist of a dynamic impact apparatus...

  18. 16 CFR 1203.16 - Dynamic strength of retention system test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dynamic strength of retention system test... ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.16 Dynamic strength of.... (2) The retention system strength test equipment shall consist of a dynamic impact apparatus...

  19. 16 CFR 1203.16 - Dynamic strength of retention system test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dynamic strength of retention system test... ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.16 Dynamic strength of.... (2) The retention system strength test equipment shall consist of a dynamic impact apparatus...

  20. Development of Test-Analysis Models (TAM) for correlation of dynamic test and analysis results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelucci, Filippo; Javeed, Mehzad; Mcgowan, Paul

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of structural analysis of aerospace applications is to obtain a verified finite element model (FEM). The verified FEM can be used for loads analysis, evaluate structural modifications, or design control systems. Verification of the FEM is generally obtained as the result of correlating test and FEM models. A test analysis model (TAM) is very useful in the correlation process. A TAM is essentially a FEM reduced to the size of the test model, which attempts to preserve the dynamic characteristics of the original FEM in the analysis range of interest. Numerous methods for generating TAMs have been developed in the literature. The major emphasis of this paper is a description of the procedures necessary for creation of the TAM and the correlation of the reduced models with the FEM or the test results. Herein, three methods are discussed, namely Guyan, Improved Reduced System (IRS), and Hybrid. Also included are the procedures for performing these analyses using MSC/NASTRAN. Finally, application of the TAM process is demonstrated with an experimental test configuration of a ten bay cantilevered truss structure.

  1. On the tensile strength of insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2016-08-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young’s modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids.

  2. On the tensile strength of insect swarms.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young's modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids. PMID:27559838

  3. Tensile creep behavior of polycrystalline alumina fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Goldsby, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Tensile creep studies were conducted on polycrystalline Nextel 610 and Fiber FP alumina fibers with grain sizes of 100 and 300 nm, respectively. Test conditions were temperatures from 800 to 1050 C and stresses from 60 to 1000 MPa. For both fibers, only a small primary creep portion occurred followed by steady-state creep. The stress exponents for steady-state creep of Nextel 610 and Fiber FP were found to be about 3 and 1, respectively. At lower temperatures, below 1000 C, the finer grained Nextel 610 had a much higher 0.2 percent creep strength for 100 hr than the Fiber FP; while at higher temperatures, Nextel 610 had a comparable creep strength to the Fiber FP. The stress and grain size dependencies suggest Nextel 610 and Fiber FP creep rates are due to grain boundary sliding controlled by interface reaction and Nabarro-Herring mechanisms, respectively.

  4. Effect of helium on tensile properties of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Billone, M.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-08-01

    Tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti (Heat BL-47), 3Ti-1Si (BL-45), and V-5Ti (BL-46) alloys after irradiation in a conventional irradiation experiment and in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE) were reported previously. This paper presents revised tensile properties of these alloys, with a focus on the effects of dynamically generated helium of ductility and work-hardening capability at <500{degrees}C. After conventional irradiation (negligible helium generation) at {approx}427{degrees}C, a 30-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti (BL-47) exhibited very low uniform elongation, manifesting a strong susceptibility to loss of work-hardening capability. In contrast, a 15-kg heat of V-3Ti-1Si (BL -45) exhibited relatively high uniform elongation ({approx}4%) during conventional irradiation at {approx}427{degrees}C, showing that the heat is resistant to loss of work-hardening capability.

  5. Kinetic studies on the tensile state of water in trees.

    PubMed

    Tributsch, Helmut; Cermak, Jan; Nadezhdina, Nadezhda

    2005-09-22

    The solar-powered generation and turnover of tensile, cohesive water in trees is described as a kinetic phenomenon of irreversible thermodynamics. A molecular kinetic model for tensile water formation and turnover is presented, which is found to be mathematically equivalent with an autocatalytic reaction (Brusselator). It is also shown to be consistent with the van der Waals equation for real liquid-gas systems, which empirically considers intermolecular forces. It can therefore be used to explain both the irreversible thermodynamics and the kinetics of the tensile liquid state of water. A nonlinear bistable evaporation behavior of tensile water is predicted, which has not yet been experimentally characterized in trees. Conventional sap flow techniques in combination with infrared imaging of heat flow around a local heat source were used to study the dynamics and energetics of water transport of trees during the eclipse of August 11, 1999. The evaporative "pulling force" in a tree was demonstrated with infrared techniques and shown to respond within seconds. While the ambient temperature during the eclipse did not drop by more than 2 degrees C, evaporative water transport was reduced by a factor of up to 2-3. The expected hysteresis (with an up to 50% decrease in energy-conversion-related entropy production) was measured, reflecting a bistable mode of conversion of solar energy into tensile water flow. This nonlinear (autocatalytic) phenomenon, together with tensile molecular order, damped the oscillating behavior of xylem tensile water, and its occasional all-or-none rupture (cavitation) can thus be explained by the nonlinear nature of intermolecular forces active in the water conduit/parenchyma environment. This characterizes the physical chemistry and energetics of tensile water in trees as an active-solar-energy-driven self-organizing process. Water is handled in the form of microcanonical ensembles and transformed into a stretched, metastable icelike state

  6. Characteristics of dynamic triaxial testing of asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulloa Calderon, Alvaro

    Due to the increasing traffic loads and tire pressures, a serious detrimental impact has occurred on flexible pavements in the form of excessive permanent deformation once the critical combination of loading and environmental conditions are reached. This distress, also known as rutting, leads to an increase in road roughness and ultimately jeopardizes the road users' safety. The flow number (FN) simple performance test for asphalt mixtures was one of the final three tests selected for further evaluation from the twenty-four test/material properties initially examined under the NCHRP 9-19 project. Currently, no standard triaxial testing conditions in terms of the magnitude of the deviator and confining stresses have been specified. In addition, a repeated haversine axial compressive load pulse of 0.1 second and a rest period of 0.9 second are commonly used as part of the triaxial testing conditions. The overall objective of this research was to define the loading conditions that created by a moving truck load in the hot mixed asphalt (HMA) layer. The loading conditions were defined in terms of the triaxial stress levels and the corresponding loading time. Dynamic mechanistic analysis with circular stress distribution was used to closely simulate field loading conditions. Extensive mechanistic analyses of three different asphalt pavement structures subjected to moving traffic loads at various speeds and under braking and non-braking conditions were conducted using the 3D-Move model. Prediction equations for estimating the anticipated deviator and confining stresses along with the equivalent deviator stress pulse duration as a function of pavement temperature, vehicle speed, and asphalt mixture's stiffness have been developed. The magnitude of deviator stress, sigmad and confining stress, sigmac, were determined by converting the stress tensor computed in the HMA layer at 2" below pavement surface under a moving 18-wheel truck using the octahedral normal and shear

  7. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  8. 3D Dynamic Earthquake Fracture Simulation (Test Case)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Ando, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    A 3D dynamic earthquake fracture simulation is being developed for the fault structures which are non-planar to understand heterogeneous stress states in the Marmara Sea. Locating in a seismic gap, a large earthquake is expected in the center of the Sea of Marmara. Concerning the fact that more than 14 million inhabitants of İstanbul, located very closely to the Marmara Sea, the importance of the analysis of the Central Marmara Sea is extremely high. A few 3D dynamic earthquake fracture studies have been already done in the Sea of Marmara for pure right lateral strike-slip stress regimes (Oglesby and Mai, 2012; Aochi and Ulrich, 2015). In this study, a 3D dynamic earthquake fracture model with heterogeneous stress patches from the TPV5, a SCEC code validation case, is adapted. In this test model, the fault and the ground surfaces are gridded by a scalene triangulation technique using GMSH program. For a grid size changing between 0.616 km and 1.050 km the number of elements for the fault surface is 1984 and for the ground surface is 1216. When these results are compared with Kaneko's results for TPV5 from SPECFEM3D, reliable findings could be observed for the first 6.5 seconds (stations on the fault) although a stability problem is encountered after this time threshold. To solve this problem grid sizes are made smaller, so the number of elements increase 7986 for the fault surface and 4867 for the ground surface. On the other hand, computational problems arise in that case, since the computation time is directly proportional to the number of total elements and the required memory also increases with the square of that. Therefore, it is expected that this method can be adapted for less coarse grid cases, regarding the main difficulty coming from the necessity of an effective supercomputer and run time limitations. The main objective of this research is to obtain 3D dynamic earthquake rupture scenarios, concerning not only planar and non-planar faults but also

  9. [Utility of dynamic pupillometry in alcohol testing on drivers].

    PubMed

    Lobato-Rincón, Luis Lucio; Cabanillas Campos, María Carmen; Navarro-Valls, Juan José; Bonnin-Arias, Cristina; Chamorro, Eva; Sánchez-Ramos Roda, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Pupillometry is becoming a relevant tool in Vision Sciences. So far, only a few studies have explored the relationship between pupil reflex measures and drug consumption. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of dynamic mesopic pupillometry as an objective measurement method for the detection of blood alcohol levels above the legal limit. In a quasiexperimental design, 19 volunteers were asked to participate in two conditions (before and after alcohol intake). In session with alcohol intake, participants were asked to consume 27.5 ml of alcohol in 60 minute intervals for four hours. Pupillometry records were conducted by means of the Power Refractor II, using four types of light stimulation: white (5600 K), blue (450 nm), green (510 nm) and red (600 nm). The basal diameter of the pupil increased significantly for alcohol concentrations equal to or greater than 0.25 mg/l in exhaled breath. Moreover, the value of the amplitude for red light constriction also provided significant differences between the two conditions. These results are promising in the search for new methods to detect illegal alcohol levels among drivers. This study demonstrates that basal pupil diameter increase and amplitude response could be used as an alcohol consumption level indicator. However, further studies are necessary to validate this and other diagnose methods complementary to breathalyzer and other drugs tests.

  10. Dynamic ground effects flight test of an F-15 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Stephenson, Mark T.; Burcham, Frank W.; Curry, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Flight tests to determine the changes in the aerodynamic characteristics of an F-15 aircraft caused by dynamic ground effects are described. Data were obtained for low and high sink rates between 0.7 and 6.5 ft/sec and at two landing approach speeds and flap settings: 150 kn with the flaps down and 170 kn with the flaps up. Simple correlation curves are given for the change in aerodynamic coefficients because of ground effects as a function of sink rate. Ground effects generally caused an increase in the lift, drag, and nose-down pitching movement coefficients. The change in the lift coefficient increased from approximately 0.05 at the high-sink rate to approximately 0.10 at the low-sink rate. The change in the drag coefficient increased from approximately 0 to 0.03 over this decreasing sink rate range. No significant difference because of the approach configuration was evident for lift and drag; however, a significant difference in pitching movement was observed for the two approach speeds and flap settings. For the 170 kn with the flaps up configuration, the change in the nose-down pitching movement increased from approximately -0.008 to -0.016. For the 150 kn with the flaps down configuration, the change was approximately -0.008 to -0.038.

  11. Creasable Batteries: Understanding Failure Modes through Dynamic Electrochemical Mechanical Testing.

    PubMed

    Blake, Aaron J; Kohlmeyer, Ryan R; Drummy, Lawrence F; Gutiérrez-Kolar, Jacob S; Carpena-Núñez, Jennifer; Maruyama, Benji; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Huang, Hong; Durstock, Michael F

    2016-03-01

    Thin-film batteries that can be folded, bent, and even repeatedly creased with minimal or no loss in electrochemical performance have been demonstrated and systematically evaluated using two dynamic mechanical testing approaches for either controlled bending or creasing of flexible devices. The results show that mechanically robust and flexible Li-ion batteries (Li4Ti5O12//LiFePO4) based on the use of a nonwoven multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) mat as a current collector (CC) exhibited a 14-fold decrease in voltage fluctuation at a bending strain of 4.2%, as compared to cells using traditional metal foil CCs. More importantly, MWNT-based full-cells exhibited excellent mechanical integrity through 288 crease cycles, whereas the foil full-cell exhibited continuously degraded performance with each fold and catastrophic fracture after only 94 folds. The enhancements due to MWNT CCs can be attributed to excellent interfacial properties as well as high mechanical strength coupled with compliancy, which allow the batteries to easily conform during mechanical abuse. These results quantitatively demonstrate the substantial enhancement offered in both mechanical and electrochemical stability which can be realized with traditional processing approaches when an appropriate choice of a flexible and robust CC is utilized. PMID:26741734

  12. [Utility of dynamic pupillometry in alcohol testing on drivers].

    PubMed

    Lobato-Rincón, Luis Lucio; Cabanillas Campos, María Carmen; Navarro-Valls, Juan José; Bonnin-Arias, Cristina; Chamorro, Eva; Sánchez-Ramos Roda, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Pupillometry is becoming a relevant tool in Vision Sciences. So far, only a few studies have explored the relationship between pupil reflex measures and drug consumption. The aim of this study was to assess the applicability of dynamic mesopic pupillometry as an objective measurement method for the detection of blood alcohol levels above the legal limit. In a quasiexperimental design, 19 volunteers were asked to participate in two conditions (before and after alcohol intake). In session with alcohol intake, participants were asked to consume 27.5 ml of alcohol in 60 minute intervals for four hours. Pupillometry records were conducted by means of the Power Refractor II, using four types of light stimulation: white (5600 K), blue (450 nm), green (510 nm) and red (600 nm). The basal diameter of the pupil increased significantly for alcohol concentrations equal to or greater than 0.25 mg/l in exhaled breath. Moreover, the value of the amplitude for red light constriction also provided significant differences between the two conditions. These results are promising in the search for new methods to detect illegal alcohol levels among drivers. This study demonstrates that basal pupil diameter increase and amplitude response could be used as an alcohol consumption level indicator. However, further studies are necessary to validate this and other diagnose methods complementary to breathalyzer and other drugs tests. PMID:23748942

  13. Nanoindentation cannot accurately predict the tensile strength of graphene or other 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Han, Jihoon; Pugno, Nicola M; Ryu, Seunghwa

    2015-10-14

    Due to the difficulty of performing uniaxial tensile testing, the strengths of graphene and its grain boundaries have been measured in experiments by nanoindentation testing. From a series of molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the strength measured in uniaxial simulation and the strength estimated from the nanoindentation fracture force can differ significantly. Fracture in tensile loading occurs simultaneously with the onset of crack nucleation near 5-7 defects, while the graphene sheets often sustain the indentation loads after the crack initiation because the sharply concentrated stress near the tip does not give rise to enough driving force for further crack propagation. Due to the concentrated stress, strength estimation is sensitive to the indenter tip position along the grain boundaries. Also, it approaches the strength of pristine graphene if the tip is located slightly away from the grain boundary line. Our findings reveal the limitations of nanoindentation testing in quantifying the strength of graphene, and show that the loading-mode-specific failure mechanism must be taken into account in designing reliable devices from graphene and other technologically important 2D materials.

  14. Aging test and dynamic fatigue test of apatite-wollastonite-containing glass ceramics and dense hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Kitsugi, T; Yamamuro, T; Nakamura, T; Kakutani, Y; Hayashi, T; Ito, S; Kokubo, T; Takagi, M; Shibuya, T

    1987-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the changes in mechanical strength of two bioactive ceramics in living tissue. An aging test and dynamic fatigue test were performed using apatite-wollastonite-containing glass ceramics (A X W-GC) and dense hydroxyapatite (HA). Specimens (5 mm X 5 mm X 25 mm, abraded with No. 2000 Al2O3 powder) were implanted into subcutaneous tissue of rats for varying periods of time. The bending strength of aged samples was measured by the three-point loading method. The bending strength of A X W-GC was greater than that of HA (P less than 0.001). There was no reduction in bending strength for both A X W-GC and HA in living tissue. The n value of both A X W-GC and HA did not decrease significantly after implantation as assessed by the results of the dynamic fatigue test according to analysis of covariance. SEM-EPMA showed that Si and Mg contents decreased, Ca content did not change, while P content increased in the surface of A X W-GC. The area where x-ray intensity changed increased moderately after implantation. There were no changes in Ca and P at the interface between HA and soft tissue. In macroscopic and microscopic observations, specimens were found to be encapsulated with a thin layer of connective tissue. Foreign body giant cells, osteoblasts, or osteoclasts were not observed in the soft tissue. There was no bonding between ceramics and soft tissue.

  15. Track/train dynamics test report modal survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The modal survey vibration test conducted on an 80 ton open hopper freight car is described. The test data, the post-test update of the modal survey test requirements and procedure, and an index to the test data are presented. Photographs of actual measurement locations and the test historical log are included.

  16. Effect of Root Moisture Content and Diameter on Root Tensile Properties

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuanjun; Chen, Lihua; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiufen

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of slopes by vegetation has been a topical issue for many years. Root mechanical characteristics significantly influence soil reinforcement; therefore it is necessary to research into the indicators of root tensile properties. In this study, we explored the influence of root moisture content on tensile resistance and strength with different root diameters and for different tree species. Betula platyphylla, Quercus mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Larix gmelinii, the most popular tree species used for slope stabilization in the rocky mountainous areas of northern China, were used in this study. A tensile test was conducted after root samples were grouped by diameter and moisture content. The results showedthat:1) root moisture content had a significant influence on tensile properties; 2) slightly loss of root moisture content could enhance tensile strength, but too much loss of water resulted in weaker capacity for root elongation, and consequently reduced tensile strength; 3) root diameter had a strong positive correlation with tensile resistance; and4) the roots of Betula platyphylla had the best tensile properties when both diameter and moisture content being controlled. These findings improve our understanding of root tensile properties with root size and moisture, and could be useful for slope stabilization using vegetation. PMID:27003872

  17. Effect of Root Moisture Content and Diameter on Root Tensile Properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanjun; Chen, Lihua; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiufen

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of slopes by vegetation has been a topical issue for many years. Root mechanical characteristics significantly influence soil reinforcement; therefore it is necessary to research into the indicators of root tensile properties. In this study, we explored the influence of root moisture content on tensile resistance and strength with different root diameters and for different tree species. Betula platyphylla, Quercus mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Larix gmelinii, the most popular tree species used for slope stabilization in the rocky mountainous areas of northern China, were used in this study. A tensile test was conducted after root samples were grouped by diameter and moisture content. The results showedthat:1) root moisture content had a significant influence on tensile properties; 2) slightly loss of root moisture content could enhance tensile strength, but too much loss of water resulted in weaker capacity for root elongation, and consequently reduced tensile strength; 3) root diameter had a strong positive correlation with tensile resistance; and4) the roots of Betula platyphylla had the best tensile properties when both diameter and moisture content being controlled. These findings improve our understanding of root tensile properties with root size and moisture, and could be useful for slope stabilization using vegetation. PMID:27003872

  18. Effect of Root Moisture Content and Diameter on Root Tensile Properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuanjun; Chen, Lihua; Li, Ning; Zhang, Qiufen

    2016-01-01

    The stabilization of slopes by vegetation has been a topical issue for many years. Root mechanical characteristics significantly influence soil reinforcement; therefore it is necessary to research into the indicators of root tensile properties. In this study, we explored the influence of root moisture content on tensile resistance and strength with different root diameters and for different tree species. Betula platyphylla, Quercus mongolica, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Larix gmelinii, the most popular tree species used for slope stabilization in the rocky mountainous areas of northern China, were used in this study. A tensile test was conducted after root samples were grouped by diameter and moisture content. The results showedthat:1) root moisture content had a significant influence on tensile properties; 2) slightly loss of root moisture content could enhance tensile strength, but too much loss of water resulted in weaker capacity for root elongation, and consequently reduced tensile strength; 3) root diameter had a strong positive correlation with tensile resistance; and4) the roots of Betula platyphylla had the best tensile properties when both diameter and moisture content being controlled. These findings improve our understanding of root tensile properties with root size and moisture, and could be useful for slope stabilization using vegetation.

  19. Static and dynamic pile testing of reinforced concrete piles with structure integrated fibre optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Kohlhoff, Harald; Hofmann, Detlef; Basedau, Frank; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Baeßler, Matthias; Niederleithinger, Ernst; Georgi, Steven; Herten, Markus

    2013-05-01

    Static and dynamic pile tests are carried out to determine the load bearing capacity and the quality of reinforced concrete piles. As part of a round robin test to evaluate dynamic load tests, structure integrated fibre optic strain sensors were used to receive more detailed information about the strains along the pile length compared to conventional measurements at the pile head. This paper shows the instrumentation of the pile with extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometers sensors and fibre Bragg gratings sensors together with the results of the conducted static load test as well as the dynamic load tests and pile integrity tests.

  20. Objective measures on knee instability: dynamic tests: a review of devices for assessment of dynamic knee laxity through utilization of the pivot shift test.

    PubMed

    Sundemo, David; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Hoshino, Yuichi; Musahl, Volker; Karlsson, Jón; Samuelsson, Kristian

    2016-06-01

    Current reconstructive methods used after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury do not entirely restore native knee kinematics. Evaluation of dynamic knee laxity is important to accurately diagnose ACL deficiency, to evaluate reconstructive techniques, and to construct treatment algorithms for patients with ACL injury. The purpose of this study is to present recent progress in evaluation of dynamic knee laxity through utilization of the pivot shift test. A thorough electronic search was performed and relevant studies were assessed. Certain dynamic knee laxity measurement methods have been present for over 10 years (Navigation system, Electromagnetic sensor system) while other methods (Inertial sensor, Image analysis system) have been introduced recently. Methods to evaluate dynamic knee laxity through the pivot shift test are already potent. However, further refinement is warranted. In addition, to correctly quantify the pivot shift test, the involved forces need to be controlled through either standardization or mechanization of the pivot shift test. PMID:26984465

  1. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  2. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  3. Evaluation of Sled Tests for Spacecraft Dynamic Environments using the Small Female and Large Male Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Jessica A.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Newby, Nathaniel J.; Putnam, Jacob F.; Currie-Gregg, Nancy J.; Lawrence, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Anthropomorphic test devices (ATD) are widely used for military and automotive applications. These ATDs have been correlated to certain types of human injuries largely involving automotive-type energetics and directions of impact. Spacecraft dynamic events involve very different impact characteristics and, in the case of landings, require lower levels of acceptable injury risk due to the certainty of impact occurrence. This test series evaluated the small female and large male Hybrid IIII ATDs for spacecraft dynamic events.

  4. Growth of immature articular cartilage in vitro: correlated variation in tensile biomechanical and collagen network properties.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Amanda K; Masuda, Koichi; Thonar, Eugene J-M A; Sah, Robert L

    2003-08-01

    Articular cartilage biochemical composition and mechanical properties evolve during in utero and in vivo growth, with marked differences between fetus, newborn, and young adult. The objectives of this study were to test whether in vitro growth of bovine fetal and newborn calf articular cartilage explants resulted in changes in biochemical and tensile properties during up to 6 weeks of free-swelling culture in serum-supplemented medium. During this culture period, both fetal and calf cartilage grew markedly in size, increasing in dry and wet mass by 150-270%. This was due in part to increases in sulfated glycosaminoglycan (+248%), collagen (+96%), and pyridinoline cross-link (+133%). This was accompanied by an increase in water content so that the concentration of matrix components decreased, despite the overall net increase in mass. The ratio of pyridinoline cross-link to collagen remained low and characteristic of immature tissue. The equilibrium and dynamic tensile moduli and strength of both fetal and calf cartilage decreased during the culture period. The biochemical and biomechanical properties of the cartilage explants were correlated, such that the low values of modulus and strength were associated with low concentrations of collagen and pyridinoline. Thus, the tested culture conditions supported growth and maintenance cartilage in an immature state, but did not induce biomechanical or collagen network maturation.

  5. Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotubes Under Realistic Temperature and Strain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chen-Yu; Cho, Kyeong-Jae; Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Strain rate and temperature dependence of the tensile strength of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The tensile failure or yield strain is found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and strain rate. A transition state theory based predictive model is developed for the tensile failure of nanotubes. Based on the parameters fitted from high-strain rate and temperature dependent molecular dynamics simulations, the model predicts that a defect free micrometer long single-wall nanotube at 300 K, stretched with a strain rate of 1%/hour, fails at about 9 plus or minus 1% tensile strain. This is in good agreement with recent experimental findings.

  6. The Tensile Behavior of High-Strength Carbon Fibers.

    PubMed

    Langston, Tye

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fibers exhibit exceptional properties such as high stiffness and specific strength, making them excellent reinforcements for composite materials. However, it is difficult to directly measure their tensile properties and estimates are often obtained by tensioning fiber bundles or composites. While these macro scale tests are informative for composite design, their results differ from that of direct testing of individual fibers. Furthermore, carbon filament strength also depends on other variables, including the test length, actual fiber diameter, and material flaw distribution. Single fiber tensile testing was performed on high-strength carbon fibers to determine the load and strain at failure. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted to evaluate the fiber surface morphology and precisely measure each fiber's diameter. Fiber strength was found to depend on the test gage length and in an effort to better understand the overall expected performance of these fibers at various lengths, statistical weak link scaling was performed. In addition, the true Young's modulus was also determined by taking the system compliance into account. It was found that all properties (tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus) matched very well with the manufacturers' reported values at 20 mm gage lengths, but deviated significantly at other lengths.

  7. The Tensile Behavior of High-Strength Carbon Fibers.

    PubMed

    Langston, Tye

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fibers exhibit exceptional properties such as high stiffness and specific strength, making them excellent reinforcements for composite materials. However, it is difficult to directly measure their tensile properties and estimates are often obtained by tensioning fiber bundles or composites. While these macro scale tests are informative for composite design, their results differ from that of direct testing of individual fibers. Furthermore, carbon filament strength also depends on other variables, including the test length, actual fiber diameter, and material flaw distribution. Single fiber tensile testing was performed on high-strength carbon fibers to determine the load and strain at failure. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted to evaluate the fiber surface morphology and precisely measure each fiber's diameter. Fiber strength was found to depend on the test gage length and in an effort to better understand the overall expected performance of these fibers at various lengths, statistical weak link scaling was performed. In addition, the true Young's modulus was also determined by taking the system compliance into account. It was found that all properties (tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus) matched very well with the manufacturers' reported values at 20 mm gage lengths, but deviated significantly at other lengths. PMID:27278219

  8. Chain Ends and the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Polyethylene Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Thomas C.; Robbins, Mark O.

    Determining the tensile yield mechanisms of oriented polymer fibers remains a challenging problem in polymer mechanics. By maximizing the alignment and crystallinity of polyethylene (PE) fibers, tensile strengths σ ~ 6 - 7 GPa have been achieved. While impressive, first-principal calculations predict carbon backbone bonds would allow strengths four times higher (σ ~ 20 GPa) before breaking. The reduction in strength is caused by crystal defects like chain ends, which allow fibers to yield by chain slip in addition to bond breaking. We use large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine the tensile yield mechanism of orthorhombic PE crystals with finite chains spanning 102 -104 carbons in length. The yield stress σy saturates for long chains at ~ 6 . 3 GPa, agreeing well with experiments. Chains do not break but always yield by slip, after nucleation of 1D dislocations at chain ends. Dislocations are accurately described by a Frenkel-Kontorova model, parametrized by the mechanical properties of an ideal crystal. We compute a dislocation core size ξ = 25 . 24 Å and determine the high and low strain rate limits of σy. Our results suggest characterizing such 1D dislocations is an efficient method for predicting fiber strength. This research was performed within the Center for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (CMEDE) under the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute at Johns Hopkins University. Financial support was provided by Grant W911NF-12-2-0022.

  9. Dynamic test of radio altimeter based on IQ modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hongfei; Tian, Yu; Li, Miao

    2010-08-01

    This paper based on the analysis and research of radio altimeter and its basic principles, it introduces a design for I/Q modulator's radio altimeter testing system. Further, data got from the test had been analyzed. Combined with the testing data of the altimeter, a construction of the I/Q modulator's radio altimeter testing system is built.

  10. A unique facility for V/STOL aircraft hover testing. [Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culpepper, R. G.; Murphy, R. D.; Gillespie, E. A.; Lane, A. G.

    1979-01-01

    The Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) was modified to obtain static force and moment data and to allow assessment of aircraft handling qualities during dynamic tethered hover flight. Test probe procedures were also established. Static lift and control measurements obtained are presented along with results of limited dynamic tethered hover flight.

  11. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  12. Tensile Properties of Electrodeposited Nanocrystalline Ni-Cu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, P. Q.; Zhang, C.; Wen, J. C.; Rao, H. C.; Wang, Q. T.

    2016-02-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni-Cu alloys with a Cu content of 6, 10, 19, and 32 wt.% were prepared by pulse electrodeposition. The microstructure and tensile properties of the nanocrystalline Ni-Cu alloys were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and tensile testing. The x-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the structure of the nanocrystalline Ni-Cu alloys is a face-centered cubic, single-phase solid solution with an average grain size of 18 to 24 nm, and that the average grain size decreased with increasing Cu content. The ultimate tensile strength (~1265 to 1640 MPa) and elongation to failure (~5.8 to 8.9%) of the Ni-Cu alloys increased with increasing Cu content. The increase in tensile strength results from the solid solution and fine-grain strengthening. Elemental Cu addition results in a decrease in stacking fault energy, an increase in work hardening rate, a delay in plasticity instability, and consequently, a higher plasticity.

  13. Validation of the shear punch-tensile correlation technique using irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1998-03-01

    It was recently demonstrated that tensile data could be successfully related to shear punch data obtained on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) discs for a variety of irradiated alloys exhibiting yield strengths that ranged from 100 to 800 MPa. This implies that the shear punch test might be a viable alternative for obtaining tensile properties using a TEM disk, which is much smaller than even the smallest miniature tensile specimens, especially when irradiated specimens are not available or when they are too radioactive to handle easily. The majority of the earlier tensile-shear punch correlation work was done using a wide variety of unirradiated materials. The current work extends this correlation effort to irradiated materials and demonstrates that the same relationships that related shear punch tests remain valid for irradiated materials. Shear punch tests were performed on two sets of specimens. In the first group, three simple alloys from the {sup 59}Ni isotopic doping series in the solution annealed and cold worked conditions were irradiated at temperatures ranging from 365 to 495 C in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The corresponding tensile data already existed for tensile specimens fabricated from the same raw materials and irradiated side-by-side with the disks. In the second group, three variants of 316 stainless steel were irradiated in FFTF at 5 temperatures between 400 and 730 C to doses ranging from 12.5 to 88 dpa. The specimens were in the form of both TEM and miniature tensile specimens and were irradiated side-by-side.

  14. Dynamic Testing with Tangible Electronics: Measuring Children's Change in Strategy Use with a Series Completion Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resing, Wilma C. M.; Elliott, Julian G.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study sought to explore the use of a novel approach that incorporates dynamic testing and tangible electronics in the assessment of children's learning potential and strategy use. Sample: A total of 77 children with a mean age 8.9 years participated in the study; half of them were dynamically tested using graduate prompt techniques; the…

  15. Estimating the tensile strength of super hard brittle materials using truncated spheroidal specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serati, Mehdi; Alehossein, Habib; Williams, David J.

    2015-05-01

    New approaches need to be introduced to measure the tensile capacity of super hard materials since the standard methods are not effective. To pursue this objective, a series of laboratory tests were constructed to replicate the fracture mechanism of diamond-based materials. Experiments indicate that under a certain compressive test condition, stresses normal to the axisymmetric line in truncated spheroidal specimens (bullet-shaped specimens) are in tension contributing to the tensile fracture of the material. From experimental and numerical studies, it is concluded that semi-prolate spheroidal specimens can be used to determine precisely the tensile strength of brittle stiff diamond-like composites.

  16. The Uniaxial Tensile Response of Porous and Microcracked Ceramic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Watkins, Thomas R; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Stafford, Randall; Hemker, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial tensile stress-strain behavior of three porous ceramic materials was determined at ambient conditions. Test specimens in the form of thin beams were obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter honeycombs and tested using a microtesting system. A digital image correlation technique was used to obtain full-field 2D in-plane surface displacement maps during tensile loading, and in turn, the 2D strains obtained from displacement fields were used to determine the Secant modulus, Young s modulus and initial Poisson s ratio of the three porous ceramic materials. Successive unloading-reloading experiments were performed at different levels of stress to decouple the linear elastic, anelastic and inelastic response in these materials. It was found that the stress-strain response of these materials was non-linear and that the degree of nonlinearity is related to the initial microcrack density and evolution of damage in the material.

  17. Processing and dynamic testing of Al/W granular composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Po-Hsun; Lee, Chien-Wei; Nesterenko, Vitali F.

    2012-03-01

    High density Al-W granular/porous composites were fabricated using Cold Isostatic Pressing (CIPing) and CIPing with subsequent Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing) with vacuum encapsulation. All samples had an identical weight ratio of Al and W components but different porosities due to different processing procedures. Their quasistatic and dynamic strength and fracture behavior were investigated at strain rate about 10-3 1/s and 300 1/s, respectively. Sizes of W and Al particles, bonding between Al particles and morphology of W inclusions had a strong effect on dynamic strength and shear instability of the investigated granular composites.

  18. Examination of a Rock Failure Criterion Based on Circumferential Tensile Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, , Y.; Kiyama, , T.; Ishijima, Y.; Kodama, J.

    Uniaxial compression, triaxial compression and Brazialian tests were conducted on several kinds of rock, with particular attention directed to the principal tensile strain. In this paper we aim to clarify the effects of the experimental environment-such as confining pressure, loading rate, water content and anisotropy-on the critical tensile strain, i.e., the measured principal tensile strain at peak load.It was determined that the chain-type extensometer is a most suitable method for measuring the critical tensile strain in uniaxial compression tests. It is also shown that the paper-based strain gage, whose effective length is less than or equal to a tenth of the specimen's diameter and glued on with a rubber-type adhesive, can be effectively used in the Brazilian tests.The effect of confining pressure PC on the critical tensile strain ɛTC in the brittle failure region was between -0.02 × 10-10 Pa-1 and 0.77 × 10-10 Pa-1. This pressure sensitivity is small compared to the critical tensile strain values of around -0.5 × 10-2. The strain rate sensitivities ∂ɛTC/∂{log(d|ɛ|/dt)} were observed in the same way as the strength constants in other failure criteria. They were found to be from -0.10 × 10-3 to -0.52 × 10-3 per order of magnitude in strain rate in the triaxial tests. The average magnitude of the critical tensile strain ɛTC increased due to the presence of water by 4% to 20% for some rocks, and decreased by 22% for sandstone. It can at least be said that the critical tensile strain is less sensitive to water content than the uniaxial compressive strength under the experimental conditions reported here. An obvious anisotropy was observed in the P-wave velocity and in the uniaxial compressive strength of Pombetsu sandstone. It was not observed, however, in the critical tensile strain, although the data do show some variation.A "tensile strain criterion" was proposed, based on the above experimental results. This criterion signifies that stress begins

  19. Elastic-plastic analysis of the SS-3 tensile specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests of most irradiated specimens of vanadium alloys are conducted using the miniature SS-3 specimen which is not ASTM approved. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the specimen was conducted to show that, as long as the ultimate to yield strength ratio is less than or equal to 1.25 (which is satisfied by many irradiated materials), the stress-plastic strain curve obtained by using such a specimen is representative of the true material behavior.

  20. Contact dynamics testing of automated three-point docking mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, Kenneth H.

    An evaluation of an OMV docking mechanism, based on an adaptation of the Shuttle Flight Support System Pallet Berthing Mechanism was completed. The mechanism uses automatically actuated motorized latches to engage towel bars on the target satellite. LED sensors establish the towel bar position within the capture envelope and the latch capture commands are issued. Then, locking pawls engage the bar, locking and pre-loading the mechanism. Two series of tests were conducted to test nominal and failure mode captures and to evaluate design parameters such as LED sensor locations, automatic closure algorithms, latch closure velocity, position/velocity entry envelopes, and closure method. The first test series involved single latch testing on the Flat Floor Facility, the 6 DOF Facility, and an analytic simulation model. The intent was to compare results in order to validate the various facilities. Reasonably good agreement was achieved. The second test series repeated the single latch testing on the refurbished 6 DOF Facility to validate the facility modifications. The individual latches were tested under free-drift conditions for functionality and performance. Next, the three-latch configuration underwent parametric testing. Test results validated the improved fidelity of the 6 DOF Facility and verified successful docking at the required entry velocity. The tests determined the 'best' design parameter definitions and concluded that the locking pawls should not lock until all three latches completely close.

  1. Method for dynamic fracture initiation testing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.; Suresh, S.; Cho, K.; Bopp, E.R.

    1987-05-01

    An experimental method is described whereby the dynamic fracture initiation toughness of ceramics and ceramic composites can be measured in pure tension or pure torsion at stress intensity factor rates of 100,000 to 1,000,000 MPA sq rt m/s. In this procedure, circumferentially-notched cylindrical rods are subjected to uniaxial cyclic compression at room temperature to introduce a self-arresting, concentric Mode I fatigue pre-crack, following the technique presented by Suresh et al. (1987) and Suresh and Tschegg (1987). Subsequently, dynamic-fracture initiation is effected by stress-wave loading with a sharp-fronted pulse which subjects the specimen to a dynamic load inducing either Mode I or Mode III fracture. Instrumentation appropriate to the loading mode provides a record of average stress at the fracture site as a function of time. The capability of this method to yield highly reproducible dynamic fracture initiation toughness values for ceramics is demonstrated with the aid of experiments conducted on a polycrystalline aluminum oxide.

  2. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Burley Tobacco (u.s. Type 31 and Foreign Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing....

  3. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Burley Tobacco (u.s. Type 31 and Foreign Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing....

  4. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Burley Tobacco (u.s. Type 31 and Foreign Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing....

  5. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Burley Tobacco (u.s. Type 31 and Foreign Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing....

  6. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted.

  7. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  8. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations. PMID:24474361

  9. Testing and Validation of the Dynamic Interia Measurement Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Alexander; Herrera, Claudia; Spivey, Natalie; Fladung, William; Cloutier, David

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes the DIM method and how it measures the inertia properties of an object by analyzing the frequency response functions measured during a ground vibration test (GVT). The DIM method has been in development at the University of Cincinnati and has shown success on a variety of small scale test articles. The NASA AFRC version was modified for larger applications.

  10. Unique Testing Capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, an Exercise in Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is the world's most capable aeroelastic test facility. Its large size, transonic speed range, variable pressure capability, and use of either air or R-134a heavy gas as a test medium enable unparalleled manipulation of flow-dependent scaling quantities. Matching these scaling quantities enables dynamic similitude of a full-scale vehicle with a sub-scale model, a requirement for proper characterization of any dynamic phenomenon, and many static elastic phenomena. Select scaling parameters are presented in order to quantify the scaling advantages of TDT and the consequence of testing in other facilities. In addition to dynamic testing, the TDT is uniquely well-suited for high risk testing or for those tests that require unusual model mount or support systems. Examples of recently conducted dynamic tests requiring unusual model support are presented. In addition to its unique dynamic test capabilities, the TDT is also evaluated in its capability to conduct aerodynamic performance tests as a result of its flow quality. Results of flow quality studies and a comparison to a many other transonic facilities are presented. Finally, the ability of the TDT to support future NASA research thrusts and likely vehicle designs is discussed.

  11. Test of modified Newtonian dynamics with recent Boomerang data

    SciTech Connect

    Slosar, Anze; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph I.

    2005-11-15

    Purely baryonic dark matter dominated models like modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) based on modification of Newtonian gravity have been successful in reproducing some dynamical properties of galaxies. More recently, a relativistic formulation of MOND proposed by Bekenstein seems to agree with cosmological large scale structure formation. In this work, we revise the agreement of MOND with observations in light of the new results on the cosmic microwave anisotropies provided by the 2003 flight of Boomerang. The measurements of the height of the third acoustic peak, provided by several small scale CMB experiments have reached enough sensitivity to severely constrain models without cold dark matter. Assuming that acoustic peak structure in the CMB is unchanged and that local measurements of the Hubble constant can be applied, we find that the cold dark matter is strongly favored with Bayesian probability ratio of about one in two hundred.

  12. Initial testing of a dynamic column for fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, R.W.; Patton, R.A.; He, D.X.; Joyce, T.; Chiang, S.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the design and initial performance of a dynamic column for fine coal column flotation. A dynamic column is a modified conventional column with the insertion of a series of draft tubes that provide individual mixing stages. The mixing is beneficial in generating small and uniform bubbles over a wide range of frother dosages. It is also beneficial in the control of flotation where the fluctuation of froth volume should be minimized. In the modified design, a vortex-inducing plate is attached to the top of each draft tube to create an artificial vortex. In theory the vortex action is desirable for collecting the light clean coal froth within the inner mixing zone, and for passing it upward to the next draft tube stage. The mineral laden slurry, particularly the pyrite, is accelerated outside the vortex zone by centrifugal force to reach the wall where it is carried downward to the bottom of the column. The draft tubes are arranged in a series to accomplish multistage cleaning. The experimental results showed that this dynamic column has the potential advantage of higher throughput and better product recovery as well as improved product quality.

  13. Testing the Goodwin growth-cycle macroeconomic dynamics in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, N. J.; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.

    2013-05-01

    This paper discusses the empirical validity of Goodwin’s (1967) macroeconomic model of growth with cycles by assuming that the individual income distribution of the Brazilian society is described by the Gompertz-Pareto distribution (GPD). This is formed by the combination of the Gompertz curve, representing the overwhelming majority of the population (˜99%), with the Pareto power law, representing the tiny richest part (˜1%). In line with Goodwin’s original model, we identify the Gompertzian part with the workers and the Paretian component with the class of capitalists. Since the GPD parameters are obtained for each year and the Goodwin macroeconomics is a time evolving model, we use previously determined, and further extended here, Brazilian GPD parameters, as well as unemployment data, to study the time evolution of these quantities in Brazil from 1981 to 2009 by means of the Goodwin dynamics. This is done in the original Goodwin model and an extension advanced by Desai et al. (2006). As far as Brazilian data is concerned, our results show partial qualitative and quantitative agreement with both models in the studied time period, although the original one provides better data fit. Nevertheless, both models fall short of a good empirical agreement as they predict single center cycles which were not found in the data. We discuss the specific points where the Goodwin dynamics must be improved in order to provide a more realistic representation of the dynamics of economic systems.

  14. Structural Monitoring of a Weapons Test Unit Using Imaging Methods for Dynamic Signature Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, S A; Malsbury, T N; Leach Jr., R R; Tsap, L V

    2004-09-23

    A methodology to identify structural changes in weapons systems during environmental tests is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The method is coherence based and relies on comparing the ''dynamic signature'' response of the test article before and after an environmental test or test series. Physical changes in the test article result in changes in the dynamic signature and are mapped to an image matrix where a color scale represents changes in sensor-to-sensor coherence. This methodology is convenient because it allows an image to represent large amounts of information in a very compact form, where even subtle system changes may be easily and quickly identified. Furthermore, comparison of the dynamic signature response data before and after any test event can be made on a quasi-real-time basis. This approach is particularly useful on large and/or complex test articles where many sensors are present, and large volumes of data are generated.

  15. Structural Dynamics Testing of Advanced Stirling Convertor Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oriti, Sal; Williams, Zach

    2013-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has been supporting the development of Stirling energy conversion for use in space. Lockheed Martin has been contracted by the Department of Energy to design and fabricate flight-unit Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators, which utilize Sunpower, Inc., free-piston Advanced Stirling Convertors. The engineering unit generator has demonstrated conversion efficiency in excess of 20 percent, offering a significant improvement over existing radioisotope-fueled power systems. NASA Glenn has been supporting the development of this generator by developing the convertors through a technology development contract with Sunpower, and conducting research and experiments in a multitude of areas, such as high-temperature material properties, organics testing, and convertor-level extended operation. Since the generator must undergo launch, several launch simulation tests have also been performed at the convertor level. The standard test sequence for launch vibration exposure has consisted of workmanship and flight acceptance levels. Together, these exposures simulate what a flight convertor will experience. Recently, two supplementary tests were added to the launch vibration simulation activity. First was a vibration durability test of the convertor, intended to quantify the effect of vibration levels up to qualification level in both the lateral and axial directions. Second was qualification-level vibration of several heater heads with small oxide inclusions in the material. The goal of this test was to ascertain the effect of the inclusions on launch survivability to determine if the heater heads were suitable for flight.

  16. Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System (DOORS) System Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, A.L.

    2000-04-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (ORP) will use the Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System (DOORS) as a tool to assist in identifying, capturing, and maintaining the necessary and sufficient set of requirements for accomplishing the ORP mission. By managing requirements as one integrated set, the ORP will be able to carry out its mission more efficiently and effectively. DOORS is a Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) requirements management tool. The tool has not been customized for the use of the PIO, at this time.

  17. Tensile property of low carbon steel with gridding units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuanwei; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Zhihui; Jing, Zhengjun; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Ren, Luquan

    2013-05-01

    Although much effort has been devoted to the mechanical properties of biomimetic coupled laser remelting (BCLR) processed steels, our understanding to the strengthening and toughening mechanisms of it has still remained unclear. To address it, here we studied the roles played by the gridding units of BCLR steels. Tensile tests show that the gridding units have a significant influence on the tensile properties. Interestingly, such an influence is essentially decided by the unit distance of gridding units. The strength increases with the unit distance narrowing while the ductility first increases with it up to a maximum then decreases. The mechanism behind these changes is attributed to the combined effects of the microstructure changes in the units and the stress transition throughout the BCLR samples.

  18. Tensile deformation mechanisms of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. H.; Gao, J.; Lin, S. X.; Zhang, P.; Huang, J.; Xu, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    The tensile deformation mechanisms of acrylonitrile - butadiene - styrene (ABS) / polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) blends toughened by ethylene methacrylate (EMA) copolymer was investigated by analysing the fracture morphology. ABS/PMMA was blended with EMA copolymer by melt mixing technique using co-rotating twin extruder. Tensile tests show that the elongation at break of ABS/PMMA blends can be efficiently improved with the increase in EMA content. Fracture morphology of ABS/PMMA/EMA blends reveals that the material yield induced by hollowing-out of EMA particles and its propagation into yield zone is the main toughening mechanism. Moreover, the appearance that EMA particles in the central area are given priority to hollowing-out may be related to the skin-core structure of the injection moulded parts caused by the different cooling rate between surface and inside in the process of injection moulding.

  19. A theoretical model to predict tensile deformation behavior of balloon catheter.

    PubMed

    Todo, Mitsugu; Yoshiya, Keiji; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    In this technical note, a simple theoretical model was proposed to express the tensile deformation and fracture of balloon catheter tested by the ISO standard using piece-wise linear force-displacement relations. The model was then validated by comparing with the tensile force-displacement behaviors of two types of typical balloon catheters clinically used worldwide. It was shown that the proposed model can effectively be used to express the tensile deformation behavior and easily be handled by physicians who are not familiar with mechanics of materials. PMID:27214691

  20. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  1. Effects of Antiparasitic Treatment on Dynamically and Statically Tested Cognitive Skills over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L.; Sternberg, Robert J.; Jukes, Mathew; Alcock, Katie; Lambo, Jane; Ngorosho, Damaris; Nokes, Catherine; Bundy, Donald A.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate two testing procedures, repeated static tests and dynamic testing, that can more clearly demonstrate the impact of treatment for parasites in children. Rural Tanzanian children were assessed for the presence/absence and burden of helminth parasites and assigned to one of three…

  2. Tensile Yielding of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Srivastava, Deepak; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The tensile yielding of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been studied using Molecular Dynamics simulations and a Transition State Theory based model. We find a strong dependence of the yielding on the strain rate. A critical strain rate has been predicted above/below which yielding strain of a MWCNT is larger/smaller than that of the corresponding single-wall carbon nanotubes. At experimentally feasible strain rate of 1% /hour and T = 300K, the yield strain of a MWCNT is estimated to be about 3-4 % higher than that of an equivalent SWCNT (Single Wall Carbon Nanotube), in good agreement with recent experimental observations.

  3. Dynamic and static error analyses of neutron radiography testing

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, H.; Glickstein, S.S.

    1999-03-01

    Neutron radiography systems are being used for real-time visualization of the dynamic behavior as well as time-averaged measurements of spatial vapor fraction distributions for two phase fluids. The data in the form of video images are typically recorded on videotape at 30 frames per second. Image analysis of he video pictures is used to extract time-dependent or time-averaged data. The determination of the average vapor fraction requires averaging of the logarithm of time-dependent intensity measurements of the neutron beam (gray scale distribution of the image) that passes through the fluid. This could be significantly different than averaging the intensity of the transmitted beam and then taking the logarithm of that term. This difference is termed the dynamic error (error in the time-averaged vapor fractions due to the inherent time-dependence of the measured data) and is separate from the static error (statistical sampling uncertainty). Detailed analyses of both sources of errors are discussed.

  4. Crushable structure performance determined from reconstructed dynamic forces during impact tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    A force reconstruction technique has been used to assess the dynamic performance of a crushable structure (a bomb nose) in both the axial (90{degrees}) and slapdown (30{degrees}) impact conditions. The dynamic force characteristics for the nose design, determined from these test results, have been used to write a dynamic force specification for a new nose design that will replace the old nose. The dynamic forces are reconstructed from measured acceleration responses with the Sum of Weighted Accelerations Technique (SWAT) developed at Sandia National Laboratories. Axial characterizations for the old nose are presented from tests at two SNL facilities: a rocket rail launcher facility and an 18-Inch horizontal actuator facility. The characterizations for the old nose are compared to the characterizations for two new nose designs. Slapdown characterizations for the old nose are presented. Incorporation of the test results into a dynamic force specification is discussed.

  5. Effects of Aluminum Addition on Tensile and Cup Forming Properties of Three Twinning Induced Plasticity Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Shin, Sang Yong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Chin, Kwang-Geun; Kim, Nack J.

    2012-06-01

    In the present study, a high Mn twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel and two Al-added TWIP steels were fabricated, and their microstructures, tensile properties, and cup formability were analyzed to investigate the effects of Al addition on deformation mechanisms in tensile and cup forming tests. In the high Mn steel, the twin formation was activated to increase the strain hardening rate and ultimate tensile strength, which needed the high punch load during the cup forming test. In the Al-added TWIP steels, the twin formation was reduced, while the slip activation increased, thereby leading to the decrease in strain hardening rate and ultimate tensile strength. As twins and slips were homogeneously formed during the tensile or cup forming test, the punch load required for the cup forming and residual stresses were relatively low, and the tensile ductility was sufficiently high even after the cup forming test. This indicated that making use of twins and slips simultaneously in TWIP steels by the Al addition was an effective way to improve overall properties including cup formability.

  6. Impact tensile properties and strength development mechanism of glass for reinforcement fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Oshima, K.; Kawada, H.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, impact tensile properties of E-glass were investigated by fiber bundle testing under a high strain rate. The impact tests were performed employing two types of experiments. One is the tension-type split Hopkinson pressure bar system, and the other is the universal high-speed tensile-testing machine. As the results, it was found that not only the tensile strength but also the fracture strain of E-glass fiber improved with the strain rate. The absorbed strain energy of this material significantly increased. It was also found that the degree of the strain rate dependency of E-glass fibers on the tensile strength was varied according to fiber diameter. As for the strain rate dependency of the glass fiber under tensile loading condition, change of the small crack-propagation behaviour was considered to clarify the development of the fiber strength. The tensile fiber strength was estimated by employing the numerical simulation based on the slow crack-growth model (SCG). Through the parametric study against the coefficient of the crack propagation rate, the numerical estimation value was obtained for the various testing conditions. It was concluded that the slow crack-growth behaviour in the glass fiber was an essential for the increase in the strength of this material.

  7. The development of a tensile-shear punch correlation for yield properties of model austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1997-08-01

    The effective shear yield and maximum strengths of a set of neutron-irradiated, isotopically tailored austentic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The dependence on composition and neutron dose showed the same trends as were observed in the corresponding miniature tensile specimen study conducted earlier. A single tensile-shear punch correlation was developed for the three alloys in which the maximum shear stress or Tresca criterion was successfully applied to predict the slope. The correlation will predict the tensile yield strength of the three different austenitic alloys tested to within {+-}53 MPa. The accuracy of the correlation improves with increasing material strength, to within {+-} MPa for predicting tensile yield strengths in the range of 400-800 MPa.

  8. Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, LeBarian

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the SDTS. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non- NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  9. NASA’s new High Dynamic Range Camera Records Rocket Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    This is footage of Orbital ATK’s QM-2 solid rocket booster test taken by NASA’s High Dynamic Range Stereo X (HiDyRS-X) camera. HiDyRS-X records high speed, high dynamic range footage in multiple ex...

  10. PACE: A test bed for the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Moon K.; Smith, Monty J.; Das, Alok

    1993-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory at Edwards AFB has constructed a test bed for the validation and comparison of modeling and control theories for the dynamics and control of flexible multibody systems. This project is called the Planar Articulating Controls Experiment (PACE). This paper presents the experimental apparatus for PACE and the problem formulation. An in-depth analysis on DC motor dynamics was also performed.

  11. 16 CFR 1203.16 - Dynamic strength of retention system test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dynamic strength of retention system test. 1203.16 Section 1203.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.16 Dynamic strength...

  12. 16 CFR 1203.16 - Dynamic strength of retention system test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dynamic strength of retention system test. 1203.16 Section 1203.16 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR BICYCLE HELMETS The Standard § 1203.16 Dynamic strength...

  13. Testing modified Newtonian dynamics in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iocco, Fabio; Pato, Miguel; Bertone, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) is an empirical theory originally proposed to explain the rotation curves of spiral galaxies by modifying the gravitational acceleration, rather than by invoking dark matter. Here, we set constraints on MOND using an up-to-date compilation of kinematic tracers of the Milky Way and a comprehensive collection of morphologies of the baryonic component in the Galaxy. In particular, we find that the so-called "standard" interpolating function cannot explain at the same time the rotation curve of the Milky Way and that of external galaxies for any of the baryonic models studied, while the so-called "simple" interpolating function can for a subset of models. Upcoming astronomical observations will refine our knowledge on the morphology of baryons and will ultimately confirm or rule out the validity of MOND in the Milky Way. We also present constraints on MOND-like theories without making any assumptions on the interpolating function.

  14. Advanced radial inflow turbine rotor program: Design and dynamic testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, C.

    1976-01-01

    The advancement of small, cooled, radial inflow turbine technology in the area of operation at higher turbine inlet temperature is discussed. The first step was accomplished by designing, fabricating, and subjecting to limited mechanical testing an advanced gas generator rotating assembly comprising a radial inflow turbine and two-stage centrifugal compressor. The radial inflow turbine and second-stage compressor were designed as an integrally machined monorotor with turbine cooling taking place basically by conduction to the compressor. Design turbine inlet rotor gas temperature, rotational speed, and overall gas generator compressor pressure ratio were 1422 K (2560 R), 71,222 rpm, and 10/1 respectively. Mechanical testing on a fabricated rotating assembly and bearing system covered 1,000 cold start/stop cycles and three spins to 120 percent design speed (85,466 rpm).

  15. Dyke propagation and tensile fracturing at high temperature and pressure, insights from experimental rock mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Richard; Benson, Philip; Vinciguerra, Sergio

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that magma ascends trough the crust by the process of dyking. To enable dyke emplacement, basement rocks typically fail in a mode 1 fracture, which acts as conduits for magma transport. An overpressure of the ascending magma will further open/widen the fracture and permit the fracture to propagate. In order to further understand the emplacement and arrest of dykes in the subsurface, analogue and numerical studies have been conducted. However, a number of assumptions regarding rock mechanical behaviour frequently has to be made as such data are very hard to directly measure at the pressure/temperature conditions of interest: high temperatures at relatively shallow depths. Such data are key to simulating the magma intrusion dynamics through the lithologies that underlie the volcanic edifice. Here we present a new laboratory setup, which allows us to investigate the tensile fracturing properties under both temperature and confining pressure, and the emplacement of molten material within the newly formed fracture. We have modified a traditional tri-axial test assembly setup to be able to use a Paterson type High Pressure, High Temperature deformation apparatus. Sample setup consists of cylindrical rock samples with a 22 mm diameter and a 8 mm bore at their centre, filled with a material chosen as such that it's in a liquid state at the experimental temperature and solid at room temperature to enable post-experiment analysis. The top and lower parts of the rock sample are fitted with plugs, sealing in the melt. The assembly is then placed between ceramic pistons to ensure there are no thermal gradients across the sample. The assembly is jacketed to ensure the confining medium (Ar) cannot enter the assembly. A piston is driven into the sample such that the inner conduit materials pressure is slowly increased. At some point a sufficient pressure difference between the inner and outer surfaces causes the sample to deform and fail in the tensile regime

  16. Practical application of RINO, a smartphone-based dynamic displacement sensing application for wind tunnel tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Knez, Kyle P.; Min, Jae-Hong; Jo, Hongki

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic displacement is one of the most important measurands in wind tunnel tests of structures. Laser sensors or optical sensors are usually used in wind tunnel tests to measure displacements. However, these commercial sensors have limitations in its use, cost and installation despite of their good performance in accuracy. RINO (Real-time Image- processing for Non-contact monitoring), an iOS software application for dynamic displacement monitoring, has been developed in the previous study. In this study, feasibility of RINO in practical use for wind tunnel tests is explored. Series of wind tunnel tests show that performances of RINO are comparable with those of conventional displacement sensors.

  17. Measurements of SCRF cavity dynamic heat load in horizontal test system

    SciTech Connect

    DeGraff, B.D.; Bossert, R.J.; Pei, L.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    The Horizontal Test System (HTS) at Fermilab is currently testing fully assembled, dressed superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities. These cavities are cooled in a bath of superfluid helium at 1.8K. Dissipated RF power from the cavities is a dynamic heat load on the cryogenic system. The magnitude of heat flux from these cavities into the helium is also an important variable for understanding cavity performance. Methods and hardware used to measure this dynamic heat load are presented. Results are presented from several cavity tests and testing accuracy is discussed.

  18. Tensile and fatigue behavior of tungsten/copper composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Kim, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    Work on W/Cu unidirectional composites was initiated to study the behavior of this ductile-ductile composite system under thermomechanical fatigue and to examine the applicability of fatigue-life prediction methods for thermomechanical fatigue of this metal matrix composite. The first step was to characterize the tensile behavior of four ply, 10 vol. percent W/Cu plates at room and elevated temperatures. Fatigue tests were conducted in load control on 0 degree specimens at 260 C. The maximum cyclic stress was varied but the minimum cyclic stress was kept constant. All tests were performed in vacuum. The strain at failure increased with increasing maximum cyclic stress.

  19. An investigation into geometry and microstructural effects upon the ultimate tensile strengths of butt welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical theory was evaluated empirically. This theory predicts weld ultimate tensile strength based on material properties and fusion line angles, mismatch, peaking, and weld widths. Welds were made on 1/4 and 1/2 in. aluminum 2219-T87, their geometries were measured, they were tensile tested, and these results were compared to theoretical predictions. Statistical analysis of results was performed to evaluate correlation of theory to results for many different categories of weld geometries.

  20. Correlation between shear punch and tensile data for neutron-irradiated aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.L.; Edwards, D.J.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1995-04-01

    This work was performed to determine whether shear punch and tensile data obtained on neutron irradiated aluminum alloys exhibited the same type of relationship as had been seen in other work and to assess the validity of extrapolating the results to proton-irradiated alloys. This work was also meant to be the first of a series of similar test matrices designed to determine whether the shear punch/tensile relationship varied or was the same for different alloy classes.

  1. Dynamic Open-Rotor Composite Shield Impact Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Carney, Kelly S.; Emmerling, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the aircraft. NASA Glenn and Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) China Lake collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test a shield that would protect the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. This report documents the live-fire test from a full-scale rig at NAWC China Lake. NASA provided manpower and photogrammetry expertise to document the impact and damage to the shields. The test was successful: the blade was stopped from penetrating the shield, which validates the design analysis method and the parameters used in the analysis. Additional work is required to implement the shielding into the aircraft.

  2. A technique for combined dynamic compression-shear test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.; Chen, R.; Lin, Y. L.; Li, J. L.; Lu, L.; Sun, G. L.

    2011-03-01

    It is critically important to study the dynamic response of materials under a combined compression-shear loading for developing constitutive laws more accurately and fully. We present a novel technique to achieve the combined compression and shear loadings at high strain rates. The main apparatus consists of a strike bar, an incident bar, and two transmission bars. The close-to-specimen end of the incident bar is wedge-shaped with 90°. In each experiment, there are two identical specimens, respectively, agglutinated between one side of the wedge and one of transmission bars. When a loading impulse travels to specimens along the incident bar, because of the special geometrical shape, the specimen-incident bar interface gets an axial and a transverse velocity. Specimens endure a combined compression-shear loading at high strain rates. The compression stress and strain of the specimens are deduced from signals recorded by strain gages mounted on the bars. The shear stress is measured by two piezoelectric transducers of quartz (Y-cut with rotation angle 17.7°) embedded at the close-to-specimen end of transmission bars; the shear strain is measured with a novel optical technique, which is based on the luminous flux method. An analytic model was proposed and validated by the numerical simulations. The simulation results yield good agreement with the analytic results. The proposed technique was then validated through experiments carried out on lead specimens, by comparing experimental results with that of the split Hopkinson pressure bar experiments.

  3. Extended tests of an SU(3) partial dynamical symmetry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Couture, Aaron Joseph; Casten, Richard F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2015-01-16

    Background: A recent survey of well-deformed rare earth nuclei showed that B(E2) values from the γ band to the ground band could be explained rather well by a parameter-free description in terms of a partial dynamical symmetry (PDS). Purpose: Our purpose in this paper is to extend this study to deformed and transitional nuclei in the actinide and A ~ 100 regions to determine if the success of the PDS description is general in medium- and heavy-mass nuclei and to investigate further where it breaks down. Method: As with the previous study we study the empirical relative B(E2 : γmore » to ground) values in comparison to a pure rotor (Alaga) model and to the SU(3) PDS. Results: The data for the actinides, albeit sparser than in the rare-earth region, are reasonably well accounted for by the PDS but with systematic discrepancies. For the Mo isotopes, the PDS improves on the Alaga rules but largely fails to account for the data. Conclusions: As in the rare earths, the parameter-free PDS gives improved predictions compared to the Alaga rules for the actinides. The differences between the PDS predictions and the data are shown to point directly to specific mixing effects. Finally, in the Mo isotopes, their transitional character is directly seen in the large deviations of the B(E2) values from the PDS in the direction of the selection rules of the vibrator.« less

  4. Extended tests of an SU(3) partial dynamical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, Aaron Joseph; Casten, Richard F.; Cakirli, R. B.

    2015-01-16

    Background: A recent survey of well-deformed rare earth nuclei showed that B(E2) values from the γ band to the ground band could be explained rather well by a parameter-free description in terms of a partial dynamical symmetry (PDS). Purpose: Our purpose in this paper is to extend this study to deformed and transitional nuclei in the actinide and A ~ 100 regions to determine if the success of the PDS description is general in medium- and heavy-mass nuclei and to investigate further where it breaks down. Method: As with the previous study we study the empirical relative B(E2 : γ to ground) values in comparison to a pure rotor (Alaga) model and to the SU(3) PDS. Results: The data for the actinides, albeit sparser than in the rare-earth region, are reasonably well accounted for by the PDS but with systematic discrepancies. For the Mo isotopes, the PDS improves on the Alaga rules but largely fails to account for the data. Conclusions: As in the rare earths, the parameter-free PDS gives improved predictions compared to the Alaga rules for the actinides. The differences between the PDS predictions and the data are shown to point directly to specific mixing effects. Finally, in the Mo isotopes, their transitional character is directly seen in the large deviations of the B(E2) values from the PDS in the direction of the selection rules of the vibrator.

  5. Development of structural health monitoring techniques using dynamics testing

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.H. III

    1996-03-01

    Today`s society depends upon many structures (such as aircraft, bridges, wind turbines, offshore platforms, buildings, and nuclear weapons) which are nearing the end of their design lifetime. Since these structures cannot be economically replaced, techniques for structural health monitoring must be developed and implemented. Modal and structural dynamics measurements hold promise for the global non-destructive inspection of a variety of structures since surface measurements of a vibrating structure can provide information about the health of the internal members without costly (or impossible) dismantling of the structure. In order to develop structural health monitoring for application to operational structures, developments in four areas have been undertaken within this project: operational evaluation, diagnostic measurements, information condensation, and damage identification. The developments in each of these four aspects of structural health monitoring have been exercised on a broad range of experimental data. This experimental data has been extracted from structures from several application areas which include aging aircraft, wind energy, aging bridges, offshore structures, structural supports, and mechanical parts. As a result of these advances, Sandia National Laboratories is in a position to perform further advanced development, operational implementation, and technical consulting for a broad class of the nation`s aging infrastructure problems.

  6. Microstructure and tensile properties of tungsten at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tielong; Dai, Yong; Lee, Yongjoong

    2016-01-01

    In order to support the development of the 5 MW spallation target for the European Spallation Source, the effect of fabrication process on microstructure, ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), tensile and fracture behaviour of powder-metallurgy pure tungsten materials has been investigated. A hot-rolled (HR) tungsten piece of 12 mm thickness and a hot-forged (HF) piece of about 80 mm thickness were used to simulate the thin and thick blocks in the target. The two tungsten pieces were characterized with metallography analysis, hardness measurement and tensile testing. The HR piece exhibits an anisotropic grain structure with an average size of about 330 × 140 × 40 μm in rolling, long transverse and short transverse (thickness) directions. The HF piece possesses a bimodal grain structure with about 310 × 170 × 70 μm grain size in deformed part and about 25 μm sized grains remained from sintering process. Hardness (HV0.2) of the HR piece is slightly greater than that of the HF one. The ductility of the HR tungsten specimens is greater than that of the HF tungsten. For the HF tungsten piece, specimens with small grains in gauge section manifest lower ductility but higher strength. The DBTT evaluated from the tensile results is 250-300 °C for the HR tungsten and about 350 °C for the HF tungsten.

  7. Tensile and impact properties of iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-12-31

    Tensile and impact tests have been conducted on specimens from a series of five heats of iron-aluminum alloys. These results have been compared to data for the iron aluminide alloy FA-129. The transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys [based on Fe-8Al (wt %)] had lower transition temperatures and higher upper-shelf energy levels than the Fe{sub 3}Al-type alloys. The reduced aluminum alloy with yttrium showed excellent tensile properties, with a room temperature total elongation of 40%, and a very high upper-shelf energy level. Despite the high tensile ductility at room temperature, the transition temperature of the yttrium-containing alloy was still about 150 C, compared to approximately 300 C for FA-129. In general, the microstructures were coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  8. Tensile Deformation and Morphological Evolution of Precise Acid Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Luri Robert; Szewczyk, Steve; Schwartz, Eric; Azoulay, Jason; Murtagh, Dustin; Cordaro, Joseph; Wagener, Kenneth; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Acid- and ion-containing polymers have specific interactions that produce complex and hierarchical morphologies that provide tunable mechanical properties. We report tensile testing and in situ x-ray scattering measurements of a homologous series of precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymers (pxAA). Upon variation of the number of backbone carbons (x = 9, 15, 21) between pendant acrylic acid groups along the linear polyethylene chain, these materials exhibit pronounced changes in both their tensile properties as well as their morphological evolution during deformation. The hierarchical layered acid aggregate structure coincides with the onset of a strain hardening mechanism and was observed in both a semi-crystalline sample (p21AA) as well as an amorphous sample (p15AA). The polymer with the shortest spacing between acid groups (p9AA) maintains a liquid-like distribution of acid aggregates during deformation, exhibiting low tensile strength which we attribute to facile acid exchange between acid aggregates during deformation. Our results indicate that the formation of the hierarchical layered structure, which coincides with polymer strain-hardening regime, originates from the associating acid groups cooperatively preventing disentanglement. NSF-DMR-1103858.

  9. [The dynamic circulatory reaction of pilots to the standard test].

    PubMed

    Doroshev, V G; Vonarshenko, A P; Kirillova, Z A

    1994-05-01

    The examination of cardiovascular system in pilots in the process of their training has shown that the Valsalva test can execute the function of a slight or strong irritant with further changes in hemodynamics, particularly in the frequency of systoles and arterial pressure. These changes are accompanied by the shifts of cardiac volume per minute from hypo to hyper reaction. A correlation was disclosed between the reaction in the frequency of systoles and cardiac volume per minute which can be studied from the point of view of adaptation of blood circulation system to the factors of physical loads.

  10. The CSG-2 Canadian strapdown gyroscope - Rate and dynamic tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallop, L. D.; Vinnins, M.; Sinkiewicz, J. S.

    The development, general design, and performance characteristics of the Canadian Strapdown Gyroscope Model-2 (CSG-2), a two-degree-of-freedom dry tuned gyroscope, are reviewed. The manufacture of the gyro involves flexure mechanization, electric-discharge machining, and laser welding techniques, which lend themselves well to low-cost production. The instrument performance is highly repeatable, and reduction of thermal effects can be achieved either through changes in the torquer coil magnet material or through software compensation in systems applications. Static and rate test results qualify the CSG-2 gyroscope for inertial grade applications with thermal compensation.

  11. Dynamic fatigue testing of Zerodur glass-ceramic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent brittleness of glass invariably leads to a large variability in strength data and a time dependence in strength. Leading rate plays a large role in strength values. Glass is found to be weaker when supporting loads over long periods of time as compared to glass which undergoes rapid leading. These properties complicate the structural design allowables for the utilization of glass components in an application such as Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The test methodology to obtain parameters which can be used to predict the reliability and life time of Zerodur glass-ceramic which is to be used for the mirrors in the AXAF is described.

  12. Comparative evaluation of tensile strength of Gutta-percha cones with a herbal disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Mahali, Raghunandhan Raju; Dola, Binoy; Tanikonda, Rambabu; Peddireddi, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the tensile strength values and influence of taper on the tensile strength of Gutta-percha (GP) cones after disinfection with sodium hypochlorite (SH) and Aloe vera gel (AV). Materials and Methods: Sixty GP cones of size 110, 2% taper, 60 GP cones F3 ProTaper, and 60 GP of size 30, 6% taper were obtained from sealed packs as three different groups. Experimental groups were disinfected with 5.25% SH and 90% AV gel except the control group. Tensile strengths of GP were measured using the universal testing machine. Results: The mean tensile strength values for Group IA, IIA and IIIA are 11.8 MPa, 8.69 MPa, and 9.24 MPa, respectively. Results were subjected to statistical analysis one-way analysis of variance test and Tukey post-hoc test. 5.25% SH solutions decreased the tensile strength of GP cones whereas with 90% AV gel it was not significantly altered. Conclusion: Ninety percent Aloe vera gel as a disinfectant does not alter the tensile strength of GP cones PMID:26752842

  13. A Historical Perspective on Dynamics Testing at the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.; Hanks, Brantley R.

    2000-01-01

    The experience and advancement of Structural dynamics testing for space system applications at the Langley Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) over the past four decades is reviewed. This experience began in the 1960's with the development of a technology base using a variety of physical models to explore dynamic phenomena and to develop reliable analytical modeling capability for space systems. It continued through the 1970's and 80's with the development of rapid, computer-aided test techniques, the testing of low-natural frequency, gravity-sensitive systems, the testing of integrated structures with active flexible motion control, and orbital flight measurements, It extended into the 1990's where advanced computerized system identification methods were developed for estimating the dynamic states of complex, lightweight, flexible aerospace systems, The scope of discussion in this paper includes ground and flight tests and summarizes lessons learned in both successes and failures.

  14. Effects of Long-Term Thermal Exposure on Commercially Pure Titanium Grade 2 Elevated-Temperature Tensile Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated-temperature tensile testing of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) Grade 2 was conducted for as-received commercially produced sheet and following thermal exposure at 550 and 650 K (531 and 711 F) for times up to 5000 h. The tensile testing revealed some statistical differences between the 11 thermal treatments, but most thermal treatments were statistically equivalent. Previous data from room temperature tensile testing was combined with the new data to allow regression and development of mathematical models relating tensile properties to temperature and thermal exposure. The results indicate that thermal exposure temperature has a very small effect, whereas the thermal exposure duration has no statistically significant effects on the tensile properties. These results indicate that CP Ti Grade 2 will be thermally stable and suitable for long-duration space missions.

  15. Gas Dynamic Spray Technology Demonstration Project Management. Joint Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie

    2011-01-01

    The standard practice for protecting metallic substrates in atmospheric environments is the use of an applied coating system. Current coating systems used across AFSPC and NASA contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). These coatings are sUbject to environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their usage. In addition, these coatings often cannot withstand the high temperatures and exhaust that may be experienced by Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) and NASA structures. In response to these concerns, AFSPC and NASA have approved the use of thermal spray coatings (TSCs). Thermal spray coatings are extremely durable and environmentally friendly coating alternatives, but utilize large cumbersome equipment for application that make the coatings difficult and time consuming to repair. Other concerns include difficulties coating complex geometries and the cost of equipment, training, and materials. Gas Dynamic Spray (GOS) technology (also known as Cold Spray) was evaluated as a smaller, more maneuverable repair method as well as for areas where thermal spray techniques are not as effective. The technology can result in reduced maintenance and thus reduced hazardous materials/wastes associated with current processes. Thermal spray and GOS coatings also have no VOCs and are environmentally preferable coatings. The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs. The aim was that successful completion of this project would result in approval of GDS technology as a repair method for TSCs at AFSPC and NASA installations to improve corrosion protection at critical systems, facilitate easier maintenance activity, extend maintenance cycles, eliminate flight hardware contamination, and reduce the amount of hazardous waste generated.

  16. Engineering evaluation of SSME dynamic data from engine tests and SSV flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An engineering evaluation of dynamic data from SSME hot firing tests and SSV flights is summarized. The basic objective of the study is to provide analyses of vibration, strain and dynamic pressure measurements in support of MSFC performance and reliability improvement programs. A brief description of the SSME test program is given and a typical test evaluation cycle reviewed. Data banks generated to characterize SSME component dynamic characteristics are described and statistical analyses performed on these data base measurements are discussed. Analytical models applied to define the dynamic behavior of SSME components (such as turbopump bearing elements and the flight accelerometer safety cut-off system) are also summarized. Appendices are included to illustrate some typical tasks performed under this study.

  17. Comparison of Elevated Temperature Tensile Properties and Fatigue Behavior of Two Variants of a Woven SiC/SiC Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Brewer, David N.; Sreeramesh, Kalluri

    2005-01-01

    Tensile properties (elastic modulus, proportional limit strength, in-plane tensile strength, and strain at failure) of two variants of a woven SiC/SiC composite, manufactured during two separate time periods (9/99 and 1/01), were determined at 1038 and 1204 C by conducting tensile tests on specimens machined from plates. Continuous cycling fatigue tests (R = 0.05) and 20 cpm) were also conducted at the same two temperatures on specimens from both composites. In this study, average tensile properties, 95% confidence intervals associated with the tensile properties, and geometric mean fatigue lives of both composite materials are compared. The observed similarities and differences in the tensile properties are highlighted and an attempt is made to understand the relationship, if any, between the tensile properties and the fatigue behaviors of the two woven composites.

  18. Testing cosmic geometry without dynamic distortions using voids

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P.M.; Lavaux, Guilhem; Wandelt, Benjamin D. E-mail: sutter@iap.fr E-mail: wandelt@iap.fr

    2014-12-01

    We propose a novel technique to probe the expansion history of the Universe based on the clustering statistics of cosmic voids. In particular, we compute their two-point statistics in redshift space on the basis of realistic mock galaxy catalogs and apply the Alcock-Paczynski test. In contrast to galaxies, we find void auto-correlations to be marginally affected by peculiar motions, providing a model-independent measure of cosmological parameters without systematics from redshift-space distortions. Because only galaxy-galaxy and void-galaxy correlations have been considered in these types of studies before, the presented method improves both statistical and systematic uncertainties on the product of angular diameter distance and Hubble rate, furnishing the potentially cleanest probe of cosmic geometry available to date.

  19. Testing the dynamics of B ->pi pi and constraints onalpha

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Yuval; Hocker, Andreas; Ligeti, Zoltan; Pirjol, Dan

    2005-07-07

    In charmless nonleptonic B decays to {pi}{pi} or {rho}{rho}, the ''color allowed'' and ''color suppressed'' tree amplitudes can be studied in a systematic expansion in {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub b}) and {Lambda}{sub QCD}/m{sub b}. At leading order in this expansion their relative strong phase vanishes. The implications of this prediction are obscured by penguin contributions. They propose to use this prediction to test the relative importance of the various penguin amplitudes using experimental data. The present B {yields} {pi}{pi} data suggest that there are large corrections to the heavy quark limit, which can be due to power corrections to the tree amplitudes, large up-penguin amplitude, or enhanced weak annihilation. Because the penguin contributions are smaller, the heavy quark limit is more consistent with the B {yields} {rho}{rho} data, and its implications may become important for the extraction of {alpha} from this mode in the future.

  20. Results of dynamic testing of GP-B spherical gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiser, G. M.; Breakwell, J. V.; Xiao, Y.; Feteih, S.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory tests of the spherical electrostatically levitated cryogenically cooled coated gyroscope being developed for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) spacecraft (Bardas et al., 1986) are reported. Spin speed and the dc components of the trapped magnetic field are measured with three orthogonal pickup loops attached to SQUID detectors as the levitated gyro is brought up to speed by an He gas jet. Data on the spin-vector time history, mass unbalance, higher rotor-shape harmonics, and spin-vector position are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail, and a mathematical model of the electrostatic suspension torques is derived. Prototype gyro 86-4 is found to have mass unbalance within the range required for the GP-B mission (to detect the geodetic and motional effects predicted by general relativity theory).