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Sample records for dynamic tensile tests

  1. Dynamic Tensile Test Results for Several Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    8217• AFWAL-TR-82-4026 SDYNAMIC TENSILE TEST RESULTS FOR SEVERAL METALS SUNIVERSITY OF DAYTON RESEA CH INSTITUTE ’ 300 COLLEGE PARK DR. DAYTON, OHIO... Tensile Test Results for March - September 1981 Several Metals 6. PERFORMING oDG. REPORT NUMBER UDR-TR-82-05 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OfR GRANT NUMBER(&) S...tensile stresses above 10 s The split Hopkinson bar tensile test (see next section) can extend this range another decade. Resolution of rapidly

  2. Semicircular bend testing with split Hopkinson pressure bar for measuring dynamic tensile strength of brittle solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Luo, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    We propose and validate an indirect tensile testing method to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle solids: semicircular bend (SCB) testing with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A strain gauge is mounted near the failure spot on the specimen to determine the rupture time. The momentum trap technique is utilized to ensure single pulse loading for postmortem examination. Tests without and with pulse shaping are conducted on rock specimens. The evolution of tensile stress at the failure spot is determined via dynamic and quasistatic finite element analyses with the dynamic loads measured from SHPB as inputs. Given properly shaped incident pulse, far-field dynamic force balance is achieved and the peak of the loading matches in time with the rupture onset of the specimen. In addition, the dynamic tensile stress history at the failure spot obtained from the full dynamic finite element analysis agrees with the quasistatic analysis. The opposite occurs for the test without pulse shaping. These results demonstrate that when the far-field dynamic force balance is satisfied, the inertial effects associated with stress wave loading are minimized and thus one can apply the simple quasistatic analysis to obtain the tensile strength in the SCB-SHPB testing. This method provides a useful and cost effective way to measure indirectly the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle materials.

  3. Modeling of tensile testing on perfect and defective graphenylene nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhi, Saeed

    2017-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed here to study the mechanical properties of graphenylene nanotubes (NTs). The effects of different geometrical parameters, such as NT length and diameter, on the behavior of graphenylene NTs under tensile testing are investigated. Moreover, the tensile test is simulated at several temperatures, to obtain the stress-strain curves of both armchair and zigzag graphenylene NTs. It is shown that graphenylene NTs with larger diameter possess larger elastic moduli. The elastic modulus of graphenylene NTs is about one half that of carbon NTs. However, the maximum tolerable stress and strain of the graphenylene NTs decreases with increasing NT diameter. Investigating the effect of vacancy defects on the elastic properties of the graphenylene NTs, it is shown that Young’s modulus of armchair and zigzag graphenylene NTs decreases nonlinearly with increasing defect percentages.

  4. Methodology to determine failure characteristics of planar soft tissues using a dynamic tensile test.

    PubMed

    Jacquemoud, C; Bruyere-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2007-01-01

    Predicting the injury risk in automotive collisions requires accurate knowledge of human tissues, more particularly their mechanical properties under dynamic loadings. The present methodology aims to determine the failure characteristics of planar soft tissues such as skin, hollow organs and large vessel walls. This consists of a dynamic tensile test, which implies high-testing velocities close to those in automotive collisions. To proceed, I-shaped tissue samples are subjected to dynamic tensile tests using a customized tensile device based on the drop test principle. Data acquisition has especially been adapted to heterogeneous and soft biological tissues given that standard measurement systems (considered to be global) have been completed with a non-contact and full-field strain measurement (considered to be local). This local measurement technique, called the Image Correlation Method (ICM) provides an accurate strain analysis by revealing strain concentrations and avoids damaging the tissue. The methodology has first been applied to human forehead skin and can be further expanded to other planar soft tissues. The failure characteristics for the skin in terms of ultimate stress are 3 MPa +/- 1.5 MPa. The ultimate global longitudinal strains are equal to 9.5%+/-1.9% (Green-Lagrange strain), which contrasts with the ultimate local longitudinal strain values of 24.0%+/-5.3% (Green-Lagrange strain). This difference is a consequence of the tissue heterogeneity, clearly illustrated by the heterogeneous distribution of the local strain field. All data will assist in developing the tissue constitutive law that will be implemented in finite element models.

  5. Tensile testing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved mechanical extensometer is described for use with a constant load creep test machine. The dead weight of the extensometer is counterbalanced by two pairs of weights connected through a pulley system and to rod extension and leading into the furnace where the test sample is undergoing elevated temperature (above 500 F.) tensile testing. Novel gripper surfaces, conical tip and flat surface are provided in each sampling engaging platens to reduce the grip pressure normally required for attachment of the extensometer to the specimen and reduce initial specimen bending normally associated with foil-gage metal testing.

  6. Validating material modelling for OFHC copper using dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) test at different velocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, N.; Testa, G.; Ruggiero, A.; Iannitti, G.; Colliander, M. Hörnquist; Mortazavi, N.

    2017-01-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using the modified Rusinek-Klepaczko model, are presented. Simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using the visco-plastic self consistent model (VPSC), providing, as input, the velocity gradient history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the axis of the fragment trapped in the extrusion die. Finally, results are compared with EBSD analysis.

  7. Validating Material Modelling of OFHC Copper Using Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) Test at Different Impact Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, Nicola; Testa, Gabriel; Ruggiero, Andrew; Iannitti, Gianluca; Hörnqvist, Magnus; Mortazavi, Nooshin

    2015-06-01

    In the Dynamic Tensile Extrusion (DTE) test, the material is subjected to very large strain, high strain rate and elevated temperature. Numerical simulation, validated comparing with measurements obtained on soft-recovered extruded fragments, can be used to probe material response under such extreme conditions and to assess constitutive models. In this work, the results of a parametric investigation on the simulation of DTE test of annealed OFHC copper - at impact velocity ranging from 350 up to 420 m/s - using phenomenological and physically based models (Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong and Rusinek-Klepaczko), are presented. Preliminary simulation of microstructure evolution was performed using crystal plasticity package CPFEM, providing, as input, the strain history obtained with FEM at selected locations along the extruded fragments. Results were compared with EBSD investigation.

  8. Constitutive modeling of the dynamic-tensile-extrusion test of PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnyansky, A. D.; Brown, E. N.; Trujillo, C. P.; Gray, G. T.

    2017-01-01

    Use of polymers in defense, aerospace and industrial applications under extreme loading conditions makes prediction of the behavior of these materials very important. Crucial to this is knowledge of the physical damage response in association with phase transformations during loading and the ability to predict this via multi-phase simulation accounting for thermodynamical non-equilibrium and strain rate sensitivity. The current work analyzes Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) experiments on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). In particular, the phase transition during loading and subsequent tension are analyzed using a two-phase rate sensitive material model implemented in the CTH hydrocode. The calculations are compared with experimental high-speed photography. Deformation patterns and their link with changing loading modes are analyzed numerically and correlated to the test observations. It is concluded that the phase transformation is not as critical to the response of PTFE under Dyn-Ten-Ext loading as it is during the Taylor rod impact testing.

  9. Constitutive Modeling of the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion Test of PTFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnyansky, Anatoly; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl; Gray, George

    2015-06-01

    Use of polymers in the defence, aerospace and industrial application at extreme conditions makes prediction of behaviour of these materials very important. Crucial to this is knowledge of the physical damage response in association with the phase transformations during the loading and the ability to predict this via multi-phase simulation taking the thermodynamical non-equilibrium and strain rate sensitivity into account. The current work analyses Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (DTE) experiments on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). In particular, the phase transition during the loading with subsequent tension are analysed using a two-phase rate sensitive material model implemented in the CTH hydrocode and the calculations are compared with experimental high-speed photography. The damage patterns and their link with the change of loading modes are analysed numerically and are correlated to the test observations.

  10. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2006-01-10

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  11. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-08-21

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  12. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-07-17

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  13. Evaluation of nondestructive tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowe, J. J.; Polcari, S. M.

    1971-01-01

    The results of a series of experiments performed in the evaluation of nondestructive tensile testing of chip and wire bonds are presented. Semiconductor devices were subjected to time-temperature excursions, static-load life testing and multiple pre-stressing loads to determine the feasibility of a nondestructive tensile testing approach. The report emphasizes the importance of the breaking angle in determining the ultimate tensile strength of a wire bond, a factor not generally recognized nor implemented in such determinations.

  14. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  15. On loading velocity oscillations during dynamic tensile testing with flying wheel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erice, Borja; Roth, Christian; Gary, Gerard; Mohr, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Flying Wheels (FW) provide a space-saving alternative to Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) systems for generating the loading pulse for intermediate and high strain rate material testing. This is particularly attractive in view of performing ductile fracture experiments at intermediate strain rates that require a several milliseconds long loading pulse. More than 50 m long Hopkinson bars are required in that case, whereas the same kinetic energy (for a given loading velocity) can be stored in rather compact flying wheels (e.g. diameter of less than 1.5 m). To gain more insight into the loading capabilities of FW tensile testing systems, a simple analytical model is presented to analyze the loading history applied by a FW system. It is found that due to the presence of a puller bar that transmits the tensile load from the rotating wheel to the specimen, the loading velocity applied onto the specimen oscillates between about zero and twice the tangential loading speed applied by the FW. The theoretical and numerical evaluation for a specific 1.1 m diameter FW system revealed that these oscillations occur at a frequency in the kHz range, thereby questioning the approximate engineering assumption of a constant strain rate in FW tensile experiments at strain rates of the order of 100/s.

  16. Development of a miniature tensile Kolsky bar for dynamic testing of thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jastin V.

    Mechanical properties such as yield stress and ultimate strength are most commonly obtained under quasi-static (strain rate of 10--4 s--1) loading conditions Materials such as metals, ceramics, and polymers may exhibit significant changes in mechanical response when subjected to high strain rate (102 --105 per second) conditions. The loading rate or strain rate can affect the material properties such as elastic modulus, yield strength, work hardening, and ductility. To ensure product quality and reliability under impact conditions, the mechanical responses of materials under dynamic loading conditions must be characterized. A Kolsky bar is a tool that can be used to study the uniaxial compressive constitutive behavior of materials under high strain rates. The goal of this thesis is to develop a miniature Tensile Kolsky bar that can be used to test materials with thickness on the order of 200 micrometers (thin foils). The system consists of a cylindrical launch tube with an internal striker, a rectangular incident bar and a transmitted bar. The specimen is held in pockets that were milled directly into the incident and transmitted bar. The rectangular incident and transmitted bars facilitate specimen and strain gage mounting. The rectangular section also provides a reduced cross sectional bar area compared to a bar of circular cross section with diameter equivalent to the width of the rectangular bar, which increases the system sensitivity. This thesis presents the detailed description of the miniature Kolsky bar device, specimen geometry, diagnostic techniques and different calibration and validation techniques used for developing the system. The Kolsky bar setup was used to test 99.9 percent pure magnesium at two different strain rates (5000 and 10000 per second). Specimens were cut from billets processed via the 4Bc equal channel angular extrusion route and were tested in three different directions: extrusion, longitudinal and transverse. The results from the

  17. Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  18. Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  19. Comparison of the mechanical properties of NiTi/Cu bilayer by nanoindentation and tensile test: molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Sara; Vahedpour, Morteza; Khatiboleslam Sadrnezhaad, Sayed

    2016-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to study of mechanical properties of NiTi/Cu bilayer by nanoindentation and tensile testing. A comparison has been made among mechanical properties measured and plastic deformation process at different copper thickness during nanoindnetation and tensile test of the samples. Embedded atom method potentials for describing of inter-atomic interaction and Nose-Hoover thermostat and barostat are employed in the simulation at 400 K. The results showed that as the copper film thickness decreased, the maximum load and hardness values increased during nanoindetation. Saha and Nix model is used to describe reduced young’s modulus behaviour of the bilayer system through nanoindentation. A good agreement among calculated reduced elastic modulus by nanoindentation test and young’s modulus behaviour via tensile test have been obtained. The ‘incoherent interface’ in both of nanoindentation test and tensile testing is one of the governing factors for the dislocation propagation, which resulted in significant strengthening of the bilayer. It was observed that during tensile test, only copper layers were necked and fractured in all of samples. However, the present study seeks to examine the effect of film thickness on the free energy values that is obtained using Jarzynski’s equality during nanoindentation. As the copper film thickness was decreased, the free energy difference increased. According to both techniques, the thin film copper thickness provides lower number of nucleation locations resulting in the higher value of yield strength, hardness and free energy difference during nanoindenation. Mechanical properties of bilayer systems are improved with decreasing of copper film thickness. However, it specifies that strengths of all bilayer systems have prominent increase in young’s modulus in compared to the pure NiTi.

  20. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  1. Tensile testing of Fe and FeCr nanowires using molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Byggmästar, J. Granberg, F.; Kuronen, A.; Nordlund, K.; Henriksson, K. O. E.

    2015-01-07

    Using molecular dynamics, we have studied the behaviour of cylindrical [001]-oriented Fe and FeCr nanowires under uniaxial tensile strain with both an embedded atom method (EAM) and a Tersoff-like bond order potential. The mechanical properties were analysed and the deformation mechanism was studied and compared between the potentials. The effects of chromium content and size of the wire were studied. Both potentials show elongation by deformation twinning in the 〈111〉/(211) system resulting in a significantly stiffer and stronger [110]-axial nanowire. The pure iron nanowires are elastically softer than bulk iron and an addition of chromium has both a softening and weakening effect. The bond order potential shows a strong dependence on chromium concentration, while the dependence is considerably weaker for the EAM potential.

  2. Tensile Test For Arboform Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavanescu (Mazurchevici), Simona; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Petroleum-based plastic materials constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is received particular attention. Our studied material, "Liquid wood" produced from lignin, natural fibres and natural additives, is completely biodegradable in natural environment, in normal conditions. This paper presents the behaviour of Arboform and Arboform reinforced with Aramidic Fibers tensile test analysis. Experimental data show that the tensile strength reached an average value of 15.8 MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3513.3MPA for Arboform and for the reinforcement the tensile strength is 23.625MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3411.5MPA, the materials present a brittle behaviour. The high mechanical properties of newly developed material, better than of other ordinary plastics, recommend it as a potential environment-friendly substituent for synthetic plastics, which are present in all fields of activity.

  3. Uniaxial Tensile Test for Soil.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    by radiographs to be uniform. 8. Direct tensile triaxial tests performed by Conlon (1966), Bishop and Garga (1969), and Parry and Nadarajah (1974...Parry, R. H. G., and Nadarajah , V. 1974. "Anisotrophy in a Natural Soft Clayey Silt," Engineering Geology, Vol 8, No. 3, pp 287-309. 47 .• ’°"I Peters

  4. Elongation Transducer For Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.; Stokes, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Extensometer transducer measures elongation of tensile-test specimen with negligible distortion of test results. Used in stress-versus-strain tests of small specimens of composite materials. Clamping stress distributed more evenly. Specimen clamped gently between jaw and facing surface of housing. Friction force of load points on conical tips onto specimen depends on compression of spring, adjusted by turning cover on housing. Limp, light nylon-insulated electrical leads impose minimal extraneous loads on measuring elements.

  5. Manual for LDEF tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    One of the experiments aboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) consists of a tray of approximately one hundred tensile specimens of several candidate space structure composite materials. During the LDEF flight the materials will be subjected to the space environment and to possible contamination during launch and recovery. Tensile tests of representative samples were made before the LDEF flight to obtain baseline data. Similar tests will be made on control specimens stored on earth for the length of the LDEF flight and on recovered flight specimens. This manual codifies the details of testing, data acquisition, and handling used in obtaining the baseline data so that the same procedures and equipment will be used on the subsequent tests.

  6. BIAXIAL TENSILE TESTS OF COATED FABRICS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report discusses the design, operation, and purpose of a new biaxial tensile test instrument to measure the stress-strain behavior of fabrics...comparison is made between these data and previous work performed with other tensile test equipment.

  7. Synthetic Mooring Line Tensile Testing Procedure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    tensile test procedure is necessary that will provide commonality among tensile tests of synthetic lines of all materials, diameters and lengths. A relationship was derived that relates material stiffness, diameter, and sample lengths to the strain rate during a tensile test . A first order experiment was conducted in which synthetic lines were tensile tested at various strain rates to determine to what degree tensile strength is affected by strain rate. Results show that the dispersion among individual data points overshadows the general trend of any

  8. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  9. Dynamic tensile strength of lunar rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, S. N.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of four rocks are determined. A flat plate impact experiment is employed to generate approximately one-microsecond-duration tensile stress pulses in rock samples by superposing rarefaction waves to induce fracture. It is noted that the effect of chemical weathering and other factors has not been explicitly studied. The given tensile strengths are based on a series of experiments on each rock where determination of incipient spallation is made by terminal microscopic examination. The data are generally consistent with previous determinations, at least one of which was for a significantly chemically altered but physically coherent rock.

  10. Dynamic tensile strength of lunar rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, S. N.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of four rocks are determined. A flat plate impact experiment is employed to generate approximately one-microsecond-duration tensile stress pulses in rock samples by superposing rarefaction waves to induce fracture. It is noted that the effect of chemical weathering and other factors has not been explicitly studied. The given tensile strengths are based on a series of experiments on each rock where determination of incipient spallation is made by terminal microscopic examination. The data are generally consistent with previous determinations, at least one of which was for a significantly chemically altered but physically coherent rock.

  11. High-speed tensile test instrument.

    PubMed

    Mott, P H; Twigg, J N; Roland, D F; Schrader, H S; Pathak, J A; Roland, C M

    2007-04-01

    A novel high-speed tensile test instrument is described, capable of measuring the mechanical response of elastomers at strain rates ranging from 10 to 1600 s(-1) for strains through failure. The device employs a drop weight that engages levers to stretch a sample on a horizontal track. To improve dynamic equilibrium, a common problem in high speed testing, equal and opposite loading was applied to each end of the sample. Demonstrative results are reported for two elastomers at strain rates to 588 s(-1) with maximum strains of 4.3. At the higher strain rates, there is a substantial inertial contribution to the measured force, an effect unaccounted for in prior works using the drop weight technique. The strain rates were essentially constant over most of the strain range and fill a three-decade gap in the data from existing methods.

  12. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  13. Progressive failure of large deformation composites under dynamic tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Liqun

    The applications of polymer based composite materials in structural components under dynamic loading have increased dramatically. The accurate understanding and modeling of the material mechanical behavior is the basis for the composite structure design and analysis. This research was designed to investigate the progressive failure nature of woven polymer-based composites under dynamic tensile loading conditions. A plain-woven E-glass/vinyl ester composite was selected and a generalized anisotropic material characterization procedure was developed. Off-axial tensile dynamic loading experiments with different strain rates and temperature was conducted. A nonlinear and rate dependent constitutive model used for the polymer-based composites under tensile dynamic tensile loading was constructed. The comparison shows a good match with testing data and a good prediction of stress to failure values. A hybrid method that combined the classical laminate theory with material microstructure analysis was presented to model the large strain to failure phenomenon. A single material parameter failure criteria based on Monkman-Grant concept was built to represent the materials anisotropic and rate dependency natural for tensile loading. And the strength concept based on the material constitution relationship and failure criteria was established to for structure analyses.

  14. Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion of Polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmanski, Jevan; Cady, Carl; Rae, Philip; Trujillo, Carl; Gray, G. T., III; Brown, Eric

    2011-06-01

    Polyurea was investigated under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) loading where spherical projectiles were propelled at 440-509 m/s through an extrusion die with an area reduction of 87%. Momentum of the leading edge imposes a rapid tensile deformation on the extruding material. Polyurea is an elastomer with outstanding high-rate tensile performance of interest in the shock regime. Previous Dyn-Ten-Ext work on semi-crystalline polymers (PTFE, PCTFE) resulted in small-scale fragmentation of the polymer, and did not provide clear information on the evolution of tensile damage in those materials. The polyurea behaved very differently; the polymer first extruded a jet of apparently intact material, which then broke down via void formation and coalescence, followed by fibrillation and tearing of the material. Most of the material in the jet elastically retracted back into the die, and only a few fragments of torn material were liberated from the sample. The surface texture of all failed surfaces was rough indicating a considerable amount of energy was absorbed by sub-critical failure mechanisms. It is interesting to note that while damage nucleation appeared pervasive in the extruded jet, the samples were nevertheless recovered largely intact, with limited fragmentation.

  15. Approaches for Tensile Testing of Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Martin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    For angleply composites, lamina tension and compression strengths are commonly determined by applying classical lamination theory to test data obtained from testing of angleply composite specimens. For textile composites such as 2D triaxial braids, analysis is more complex and standard test methods do not always yield reliable strength measurements. This paper describes recent research focused on development of more reliable tensile test methods for braided composites and presents preliminary data for various approaches. The materials investigated in this work have 0deg+/-60 2D triaxial braid architecture with nearly equal fiber volume fraction in each of the three fiber directions. Flat composite panels are fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) using six layers of the braided preform aligned along the 0deg fiber direction. Various epoxy resins are used as matrix materials. Single layer panels are also fabricated in order to examine local variations in deformation related to the braid architecture. Specimens are cut from these panels in the shape of standard straight-sided coupons, an alternative bowtie geometry, and an alternative notched geometry. Axial tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded along the 0deg fiber direction. Transverse tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded perpendicular to the 0deg fibers. Composite tubes are also fabricated by RTM. These tubes are tested by internal pressurization using a soft rubbery material sealed between the inside diameter of the tube and the load fixtures. The ends of the tube are unconstrained, so the primary load is in the hoop direction. Tubes are fabricated with the 0deg fibers aligned along the tube axis by overbraiding the preform on a mandrel. Since the loading is in the hoop direction, testing of the overbraided tube provides a measure of transverse tensile strength. Previous work has indicated that straight-sided coupons yield a transverse tensile strength that is much lower

  16. Space-resolved diffusing wave spectroscopy measurements of the macroscopic deformation and the microscopic dynamics in tensile strain tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagazi, Med-Yassine; Brambilla, Giovanni; Meunier, Gérard; Marguerès, Philippe; Périé, Jean-Noël; Cipelletti, Luca

    2017-01-01

    We couple a laser-based, space-resolved dynamic light scattering apparatus to a universal traction machine for mechanical extensional tests. We perform simultaneous optical and mechanical measurements on polyether ether ketone, a semi-crystalline polymer widely used in the industry. Due to the high turbidity of the sample, light is multiply scattered by the sample and the diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalism is used to interpret the data. Space-resolved DWS yields spatial maps of the sample strain and of the microscopic dynamics. An excellent agreement is found between the strain maps thus obtained and those measured by a conventional stereo-digital image correlation technique. The microscopic dynamics reveals both affine motion and plastic rearrangements. Thanks to the extreme sensitivity of DWS to displacements as small as 1 nm, plastic activity and its spatial localization can be detected at an early stage of the sample strain, making the technique presented here a valuable complement to existing material characterization methods.

  17. Temperature controlled tensile testing of individual nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lisa Y; Terrab, Soraya; Murphy, Kathryn F; Sullivan, John P; Cheng, Xuemei; Gianola, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel experimental method for quantitatively characterizing the temperature-dependent mechanical behavior of individual nanostructures during uniaxial straining. By combining a microelectromechanical tensile testing device with a low thermal mass and digital image correlation providing nm-level displacement resolution, we show successful incorporation of a testing platform in a vacuum cryostat system with an integrated heater and temperature control. Characterization of the local sample temperature and time-dependent response at both low and high temperature demonstrates a testing range of ∼90-475 K and steady-state drift rates less than 0.04 K/min. In situ operation of the tensile testing device employing resistively heated thermal actuators while imaging with an optical microscope enables high-resolution displacement measurements, from which stress-strain behavior of the nanoscale specimens is deduced. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach in measuring the temperature dependence of tensile strength in nominally defect-free ⟨110⟩ Pd nanowhiskers. We uncover a pronounced sensitivity of the plastic response to testing temperature over a range of ∼300 K, with an ultimate strength in excess of 6 GPa at low temperature. The results are discussed in the context of thermally activated deformation mechanisms and defect nucleation in defect-free metallic nanostructures.

  18. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion of polyurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmanski, Jevan; Cady, Carl; Rae, Philip; Trujillo, Carl P.; Gray, George Thompson, III; Brown, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Polyurea was investigated under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) loading where spherical projectiles were propelled at 440 to 509 ms-1 through a conical extrusion die with an area reduction of 87%. Momentum of the leading edge imposes a rapid tensile deformation on the extruded jet of material. Polyurea is an elastomer with outstanding high-rate tensile performance of interest in the shock regime. Previous Dyn-Ten-Ext work on semi-crystalline fluoropolymers (PTFE, PCTFE) elucidated irregular deformation and profuse stochastic-based damage and failure mechanisms, but with limited insight into damage inception or progression in those polymers. The polyurea behaved very differently; the polymer first extruded a jet of apparently intact material, which then broke down via void coalescence, followed by fibrillation and tearing of the material. Most of the material in the jet elastically retracted back into the die, and only a few unique fragments were formed. The surface texture of all failed surfaces was found to be tortuous and covered with drawn hair-like filaments, implying a considerable amount of energy was absorbed during damage progression.

  19. Effects of chemical composition and test conditions on the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Laws, K. J.; Trujillo, C. P.; Brown, A. D.; Cerreta, E. K.; Hazell, P. J.; Quadir, M. Z.; Ferry, M.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of impact velocity and temperature on the dynamic mechanical behavior of two bulk metallic glasses (BMG) with slightly different elemental compositions (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38) have been investigated. Bullet-shaped samples were accelerated by a gas gun to speeds in the 400 ~ 600m/s range and tested at room temperature and 250 °C. The specimens impacted a steel extrusion die which subjected them to high strains at high strain-rates. The extruded samples were subsequently soft recovered by using low density foams. The deformed specimens were examined by optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and hardness measurements. The characterization results aided to assess the effect of chemical composition on the microstructural evolution, i.e. phase changes or crystallization, which might influence the ductility on the nominally brittle amorphous BMGs. The most significant results from this study will be presented. School of Engineering and Information Technology, UNSW Canberra.

  20. Effects of chemical composition and test conditions on the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Laws, K.; Martinez, D.; Trujillo, C. P.; Brown, A. D.; Cerreta, E. K.; Hazell, P. J.; Ferry, M.; Quadir, M. Z.; Jiang, J.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of impact velocity and temperature on the dynamic mechanical behavior of two bulk metallic (BMG) alloys with slightly different elemental compositions (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38) have been investigated. Bullet-shaped samples were accelerated by a gas gun to speeds in the 400˜600m/s range and tested at both room temperature and 250°C. The samples impacted steel extrusion dies which subjected the bullets to high strains at relatively high strain-rates. The extruded fragments were subsequently soft recovered by using low density foams and examined by means of optical/scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that shear banding was the dictating mechanism responsible for the fracture of all BMGs. At room temperature, the Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 alloy exhibited a higher resistance to fragmentation than the Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38 alloy. At 250°C, significant melting was observed in the recovered fragments of both alloys, which indicates that the BMG glassy structure undergoes a melting process and deformation likely occurs homogeneously.

  1. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  2. The effect of grain size on dynamic tensile extrusion behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Leeju; Kim, Hack Jun; Kim, Seok Bong

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests were conducted on coarse grained and ultrafine grained (UFG) OFHC Cu, Interstitial free (IF) Steel, and pure Ta. Equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) of 16passes with Bc for Cu, IF Steel and 4 passes for Ta was employed to fabricated UFG materials. DTE tests were carried out by launching the sphere samples (Dia. 7.62 mm) to the conical extrusion die at a speed of ˜500 m/sec. The fragmentation behavior of the soft-recovered fragments were examined and compared with each other. The DTE fragmentation behavior of CG and UFG was numerically simulated by the LS-DYNA FEM code.

  3. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Kenneth C.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens having dogbone- or T-shaped end sections without introducing bending stresses in the specimens during the application of a dynamic tensile loading on the specimens is described. A pair of elongated pull rods disposed in a side-by-side relationship are used to grip the shoulders on each T-shaped end section. The pull rods are pivotally attached to a piston-displaceable, disk-shaped member so as to be longitudinally movable with respect to one another effecting the self-alignment thereof with the shoulders on the T-shaped end sections of the specimen to compensate for shoulders being located in different longitudinal positions.

  4. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

  5. Tensile and Compressive Tests of Magnesium Alloy J-1 Sheet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-12-01

    Tensile and compressive properties of longitudinal and transverse specimens of magnesium alloy J-1 sheets, 0.032 and 0.12 in. thick, were tested. It was found that he tensile properties were above the Navy specification 47M2a for magnesium-base-alloy 8H. Longitudinal and transverse specimens were in close agreement in the tensile test . In the compressive yield strengths, longitudinal direction was much less

  6. Dynamic yield and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M.; Frage, N.

    2014-05-01

    Fully dense alumina samples with 0.6 μm grain size were produced from alumina powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two types of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the tests of the first type the samples of 0.28 to 6-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors accelerated up to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed to study the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the SPS-processed alumina and the decay of the elastic precursor wave with propagation distance. In the second type of test the samples of ~3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated up to velocities 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed to study the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina. The data on tensile fracture of the alumina demonstrate a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. The data on the decay of the elastic precursor wave allows for determining the rates of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of shock-induced inelastic deformation and, thus, to derive some conclusions concerning the mechanisms responsible of the deformation.

  7. Dynamic yield and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, Inna; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M.; Frage, N.

    2013-06-01

    Fully dense alumina samples with 0.6- μ grain size were produced from alumina powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two types of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests.. In the tests of the first type the samples of 0.28 to 6-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors accelerated up to velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed to study of the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of the SPS-processed alumina and the decay of the elastic precursor wave with the propagation distance. In the second type of the tests the samples of ~ 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated up to velocities 100-1000 m/s was. These tests were aimed to the study of the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina. The data on the decay of the elastic precursor wave allow determining the rates of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced plastic deformation and, thus, to derive some conclusions concerning the mechanisms responsible of the deformation. The data on the tensile fracture of the alumina demonstrate a monotonous decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse.

  8. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-28

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100–1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  9. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-01

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.

  10. Graphite/Polyimide Tabs For High-Temperature Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1993-01-01

    Delamination from ceramic composite specimens prevented. Tabs made from composite of graphite and PMR-15 polyimide enable high-temperature tensile testing of flat coupons of ceramic-matrix composites. Also used in high-temperature tensile testing of flat coupons of ceramics, metals, and metal-matrix composites.

  11. The Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Railway Wheel Steel at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Lin; Han, Liangliang; Zhao, Longmao; Zhang, Ying

    2016-11-01

    The dynamic tensile tests on D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates were conducted using a split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus, compared to quasi-static tests. Three different types of specimens, which were machined from three different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub) of a railway wheel, were prepared and examined. The rim specimens were checked to have a higher yield stress and ultimate tensile strength than those web and hub specimens under both quasi-static and dynamic loadings, and the railway wheel steel was demonstrated to be strain rate dependent in dynamic tension. The dynamic tensile fracture surfaces of all the wheel steel specimens are cup-cone-shaped morphology on a macroscopic scale and with the quasi-ductile fracture features on the microscopic scale.

  12. Polystyrene cryostat facilitates testing tensile specimens under liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shogan, R. P.; Skalka, R. J.

    1967-01-01

    Lightweight cryostat made of expanded polystyrene reduces eccentricity in a tensile system being tested under liquid nitrogen. The cryostat is attached directly to the tensile system by a special seal, reducing misalignment effects due to cryostat weight, and facilitates viewing and loading of the specimens.

  13. The dynamic tensile strength of ice and ice-silicate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of icy media is measured at strain rates on the order of 10,000/sec to aid in the understanding of impact and cratering phenomena. Compressed samples consisting of ice and ice-silicate mixtures with 5 and 30 wt % sand were impacted at temperatures between 230 and 250 K by projectile plexiglas plates imparting the required strain rates in less than 0.75 microsec. Taking the tensile stress corresponding to the transition from intact to spalled or fragmented samples as the dynamic tensile strength, strengths of 17, 20 and 22 MPa were obtained for the pure ice, 5 wt % sand, and 30 wt % sand specimens, respectively. The values lie considerably above those observed in static testing. A continuum fracturing model is used to obtain relations between tensile strength and stress rate as well as to derive stress and damage histories during tensile loading and the size distribution of icy fragments as a function of strain rate.

  14. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Schulthess, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  15. An Experimental Study of Dynamic Tensile Failure of Rocks Subjected to Hydrostatic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bangbiao; Yao, Wei; Xia, Kaiwen

    2016-10-01

    It is critical to understand the dynamic tensile failure of confined rocks in many rock engineering applications, such as underground blasting in mining projects. To simulate the in situ stress state of underground rocks, a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar system is utilized to load Brazilian disc (BD) samples hydrostatically, and then exert dynamic load to the sample by impacting the striker on the incident bar. The pulse shaper technique is used to generate a slowly rising stress wave to facilitate the dynamic force balance in the tests. Five groups of Laurentian granite BD samples (with static BD tensile strength of 12.8 MPa) under the hydrostatic confinement of 0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 MPa were tested with different loading rates. The result shows that the dynamic tensile strength increases with the hydrostatic confining pressure. It is also observed that under the same hydrostatic pressure, the dynamic tensile strength increases with the loading rate, revealing the so-called rate dependency for engineering materials. Furthermore, the increment of the tensile strength decreases with the hydrostatic confinement, which resembles the static tensile behavior of rock under confining pressure, as reported in the literature. The recovered samples are examined using X-ray micro-computed tomography method and the observed crack pattern is consistent with the experimental result.

  16. Analysis on dynamic tensile extrusion behavior of UFG OFHC Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyung-Tae; Park, Leeju; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Seok Bong; Lee, Chong Soo

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests with the strain rate order of ~105 s-1 were conducted on coarse grained (CG) Cu and ultrafine grained (UFG) Cu. ECAP of 16 passes with route Bc was employed to fabricate UFG Cu. DTE tests were carried out by launching the sphere samples to the conical extrusion die at a speed of ~475 m/sec in a vacuumed gas gun system. UFG Cu was fragmented into 3 pieces and showed a DTE elongation of ~340%. CG Cu exhibited a larger DTE elongation of ~490% with fragmentation of 4 pieces. During DTE tests, dynamic recrystallization occurred in UFG Cu, but not in CG Cu. In order to examine the DTE behavior of CG Cu and UFG Cu under very high strain rates, a numerical analysis was undertaken by using a commercial finite element code (LS-DYNA 2D axis-symmetric model) with the Johnson - Cook model. The numerical analysis correctly predicted fragmentation and DTE elongation of CG Cu. But, the experimental DTE elongation of UFG Cu was much smaller than that predicted by the numerical analysis. This difference is discussed in terms of microstructural evolution of UFG Cu during DTE tests.

  17. Improved Flat Specimens For Tensile And Fatigue Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthem, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    Improved shape proposed for flat, reduced-gauge-section specimens for tensile and fatigue testing of advanced composite materials at ambient and high temperatures. Typical specimen consists of flat bar 15.2 centimeters long, 1.27 centimeters wide, and 0.318 centimeters thick, with full-width tab regions at ends, 3.81-centimeters-long gauge section of reduced width in middle, and two transition regions where width tapers between tab and gauge widths along 6.35-centimeters-radius circular arc tangent to edge of gauge section. Specimen gripped by squeezing between tabs in tab regions, and tensile test load applied via tab grips. Configuration reduces undesired concentrations of stresses in transition and tab regions, forcing tensile failure to occur in gauge section and ensuring more-consistent results in tensile tests.

  18. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber; Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber; and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 C to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  19. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    Static tensile and tensile creep testing of five ceramic fibers at elevated temperature was performed. J.P. Stevens, Co., Astroquartz 9288 glass fiber, Nippon Carbon, Ltd., (Dow Corning) Nicalon NLM-102 silicon carbide fiber, and 3M Company Nextel 312, 380, and 480 alumina/silica/boria fibers were supplied in unsized tows. Single fibers were separated from the tows and tested in static tension and tensile creep. Elevated test temperatures ranged from 400 to 1300 C and varied for each fiber. Room temperature static tension was also performed. Computer software was written to reduce all single fiber test data into engineering constants using ASTM Standard Test Method D3379-75 as a reference. A high temperature furnace was designed and built to perform the single fiber elevated temperature testing up to 1300 C. A computerized single fiber creep apparatus was designed and constructed to perform four fiber creep tests simultaneously at temperatures up to 1300 C. Computer software was written to acquire and reduce all creep data.

  20. Demonstration of concurrent tensile testing and magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Spencer; Klatt, Dieter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a technique used to measure the mechanical properties of soft tissues and has already shown its diagnostic potential for pathologies involving fibrogenesis and neurodegeneration. Experimental investigation of loading during MRE is fairly unexplored and may help to better understand changing mechanical properties in relation to organ function. Tensile testing is a common technique for examining mechanical properties of materials and is used as the simultaneous comparison method with MRE in this study. 3D MRE data was acquired during quasistatic uniaxial tensile loading of an Ecoflex 0010 cylindrical specimen. Individual MRE scans at 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5kHz where performed on engineering strain increments of 20% from 0% to 140% while tensile reaction force was recorded using a load cell attached to an adjustable elongation slide. Tensile stress-strain relation resembled the Fung hyperelastic strain energy model. We observe that the MRE shear storage modulus is related to the state of tensile deformation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous tensile testing during MRE and the new design can potentially be used for MRE calibration using pre-tension.

  1. The role of shear and tensile failure in dynamically triggered landslides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipprich, T.L.; Snieder, R.K.; Jibson, R.W.; Kimman, W.

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic stresses generated by earthquakes can trigger landslides. Current methods of landslide analysis such as pseudo-static analysis and Newmark's method focus on the effects of earthquake accelerations on the landslide mass to characterize dynamic landslide behaviour. One limitation of these methods is their use Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria, which only accounts for shear failure, but the role of tensile failure is not accounted for. We develop a limit-equilibrium model to investigate the dynamic stresses generated by a given ground motion due to a plane wave and use this model to assess the role of shear and tensile failure in the initiation of slope instability. We do so by incorporating a modified Griffith failure envelope, which combines shear and tensile failure into a single criterion. Tests of dynamic stresses in both homogeneous and layered slopes demonstrate that two modes of failure exist, tensile failure in the uppermost meters of a slope and shear failure at greater depth. Further, we derive equations that express the dynamic stress in the near-surface in the acceleration measured at the surface. These equations are used to approximately define the depth range for each mechanism of failure. The depths at which these failure mechanisms occur suggest that shear and tensile failure might collaborate in generating slope failure. ?? 2007 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2007 RAS.

  2. Testing Tensile and Shear Epoxy Strength at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberts, S. J.; Doehne, C. J.; Johnson, W. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper covers cryogenic, tensile testing and research completed on a number of epoxies used in cryogenic applications. Epoxies are used in many different applications; however, this research focused on the use of epoxy used to bond MLI standoffs to cryogenic storage tanks and the loads imparted to the tank through the MLI. To conduct testing, samples were made from bare stainless steel, aluminum and primed aluminum. Testing involved slowly cooling test samples with liquid nitrogen then applying gradually increasing tensile loads to the epoxy. The testing evaluated the strength and durability of epoxies at cryogenic temperatures and serves as a base for future testing. The results of the tests showed that some epoxies withstood the harsh conditions while others failed. The two epoxies yielding the best results were Masterbond EP29LPSP and Scotch Weld 2216. For all metal surfaces tested, both epoxies had zero failures for up to 11.81 kg of mass.

  3. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  4. Polymer deformation gage measures thickness change in tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyles, H. F.; Broyles, H. H.

    1966-01-01

    Lightweight deformation gage attached to a polymer specimen determines the thickness changes undergone by the specimen during the testing of its tensile and elongation properties. Mechanical noise from outside sources is dampened when the assembly is hung on a light rubber band.

  5. Dynamic tensile-failure-induced velocity deficits in rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Allan M.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Planar impact experiments were employed to induce dynamic tensile failure in Bedford limestone. Rock disks were impacted with aluminum and polymethyl methacralate (PMMA) flyer plates at velocities of 10 to 25 m/s. Tensile stress magnitudes and duration were chosen so as to induce a range of microcrack growth insufficient to cause complete spalling of the samples. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave velocities of recovered targets were compared to the velocities prior to impact. Velocity reduction, and by inference microcrack production, occurred in samples subjected to stresses above 35 MPa in the 1.3 microsec PMMA experiments and 60 MPa in the 0.5 microsec aluminum experiments. Using a simple model for the time-dependent stress-intensity factor at the tips of existing flaws, apparent fracture toughnesses of 2.4 and 2.5 MPa sq rt m are computed for the 1.3 and 0.5 microsec experiments. These are a factor of about 2 to 3 greater than quasi-static values. The greater dynamic fracture toughness observed may result from microcrack interaction during tensile failure. Data for water-saturated and dry targets are indistinguishable.

  6. Regional dynamic tensile properties of the TMJ disc.

    PubMed

    Snider, G R; Lomakin, J; Singh, M; Gehrke, S H; Detamore, M S

    2008-11-01

    Although the TMJ disc has been well-characterized under tension and compression, dynamic viscoelastic regional and directional variations have heretofore not been investigated. We hypothesized that the intermediate zone under mediolateral tension would exhibit lower dynamic moduli compared with the other regions of the disc under either mediolateral or anteroposterior tension. Specimens were prepared from porcine discs (3 regions/direction), and dynamic tensile sweeps were performed at 1% strain over a frequency range of 0.1 to 100 rad/sec. Generally, the intermediate zone possessed the lowest storage and loss moduli, and the highest loss tangent. This study further accentuates the known distinct character of the intermediate zone by showing for the first time that these differences also extend to dynamic behavior, perhaps implicating the TMJ disc as a structure primarily exposed to predominantly anteroposterior tension via anterior and posterior attachments, with a need for great distension mediolaterally across the intermediate zone.

  7. Tensile test of dumbbell-shaped specimen in thickness direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Sheet metal forming is widely used in manufacturing shops, and evaluation of forming limit for sheet metal is important. However, specimen shape influences on the fracture of the sheet metal. As one of methods to decrease these effects, an uniaxial tensile test using specimen dumbbell-shaped in thickness direction had been examined using FEM analysis. In this study, actually specimen dumbbell-shaped in thickness direction was fabricated using a new incremental sheet forging method, and uniaxial tensile test was conducted. Load-stroke diagram, fracture morphologies, stress-strain curves and shape after fracture were investigated, and effects of specimen shape were considered. Elongation was larger as using specimen dumbbell-shaped in the width direction. Stress-strain curves until necking occurred were less influenced by specimen shape. However, yield stress decreased and local elongation increased as using specimen dumbbell-shaped in the width direction. The reasons why these tendencies showed were considered in the view of specimen shapes.

  8. High Velocity Tensile Test for Thin Plate Specimen with One Bar Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itabashi, Masaaki

    In order to design thin-walled impact-resistant structure, for example, an automotive body, dynamic behavior of thin plate is essential. So far, except for laminated composite materials, high velocity tensile test of thin plate specimen did not attract impact researchers' and engineers' attention very much. In this paper, the previous thin plate specimen assembly for the one bar method was improved. The one bar method has been utilized for cylindrical specimens of various solid materials and is known as an effective high velocity tensile testing technique. Unfortunately, the previous assembly introduced a tremendous initial peak on stress-strain curves, even for aluminum alloys. With a new specimen assembly, stress-strain curves for IF (Interstitial-atom Free) steel and 7075-T6 aluminum alloy obtained by the one bar method were almost equivalent to those obtained by the tensile version of the split Hopkinson pressure bar method.

  9. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  10. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 104 to 4 × 104 s-1. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  11. Gage for Measuring Decrease in Dimension of Test Specimen in Tensile Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    respect to the frame member and provides an output signal proportional to displacement. Elastic bands are used to support the test gage on a tensile test machine which is used to apply a stress to the test specimen. (Author)

  12. Biaxial tensile testing and constitutive modeling of human supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Peloquin, John M; Cortes, Daniel H; Kadlowec, Jennifer A; Soslowsky, Louis J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2012-02-01

    The heterogeneous composition and mechanical properties of the supraspinatus tendon offer an opportunity for studying the structure-function relationships of fibrous musculoskeletal connective tissues. Previous uniaxial testing has demonstrated a correlation between the collagen fiber angle distribution and tendon mechanics in response to tensile loading both parallel and transverse to the tendon longitudinal axis. However, the planar mechanics of the supraspinatus tendon may be more appropriately characterized through biaxial tensile testing, which avoids the limitation of nonphysiologic traction-free boundary conditions present during uniaxial testing. Combined with a structural constitutive model, biaxial testing can help identify the specific structural mechanisms underlying the tendon's two-dimensional mechanical behavior. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of collagen fiber organization to the planar tensile mechanics of the human supraspinatus tendon by fitting biaxial tensile data with a structural constitutive model that incorporates a sample-specific angular distribution of nonlinear fibers. Regional samples were tested under several biaxial boundary conditions while simultaneously measuring the collagen fiber orientations via polarized light imaging. The histograms of fiber angles were fit with a von Mises probability distribution and input into a hyperelastic constitutive model incorporating the contributions of the uncrimped fibers. Samples with a wide fiber angle distribution produced greater transverse stresses than more highly aligned samples. The structural model fit the longitudinal stresses well (median R(2) ≥ 0.96) and was validated by successfully predicting the stress response to a mechanical protocol not used for parameter estimation. The transverse stresses were fit less well with greater errors observed for less aligned samples. Sensitivity analyses and relatively affine fiber kinematics suggest that

  13. On the off-axis tensile test for unidirectional composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, M. P.; Herakovich, C. T.; Post, D.

    1982-01-01

    The off axis tensile test was examined experimentally to obtain actual displacement fields over the surface of graphite polyimide coupon specimens. The experimental results were compared with approximate analytical solutions and generated finite element results. An optical method of high sensitivity moire interferometry was used to determine the actual displacements to high precision. The approximate analytical solution and the finite element results compare very favorably with the measured centerline displacements in the test section, and the finite element displacement fields provide excellent agreement with the moire displacements throughout the specimen. A 15 degree fiber orientation and coupon aspect ratios of 5 and 15 are presented.

  14. In situ tensile and creep testing of lithiated silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, Steven T.; Kraft, Oliver; Thompson, Carl V.; Mönig, Reiner

    2013-12-23

    We present experimental results for uniaxial tensile and creep testing of fully lithiated silicon nanowires. A reduction in the elastic modulus is observed when silicon nanowires are alloyed with lithium and plastic deformation becomes possible when the wires are saturated with lithium. Creep testing was performed at fixed force levels above and below the tensile strength of the material. A linear dependence of the strain-rate on the applied stress was evident below the yield stress of the alloy, indicating viscous deformation behavior. The observed inverse exponential relationship between wire radius and strain rate below the yield stress indicates that material transport was controlled by diffusion. At stress levels approaching the yield strength of fully lithiated silicon, power-law creep appears to govern the strain-rate dependence on stress. These results have direct implications on the cycling conditions, rate-capabilities, and charge capacity of silicon and should prove useful for the design and construction of future silicon-based electrodes.

  15. ROLE OF SCALE FACTOR DURING TENSILE TESTING OF SMALL SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T; Field, Kevin G; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Gray, Mr. Sean

    2014-01-01

    The influence of scale factor (tensile specimen geometry and dimensions) on mechanical test results was investigated for different widely used types of small specimens (SS-1, SS-2, SS-3, and SS-J3) and a set of materials. It was found that the effect of scale factor on the accurate determination of yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and uniform elongation values was weak; however, clear systematic differences were observed and should be accounted for during interpretation of results. In contrast, total elongation values were strongly sensitive to variations in specimen geometry. Modern experimental methods like digital image correlation allow the impact of scale factor to be reduced. Using these techniques, it was shown that true stress true strain curves describing strain-hardening behavior were very close for different specimen types. The limits of miniaturization are discussed, and an ultra-miniature specimen concept was suggested and evaluated. This type of specimen, as expected, may be suitable for SEM and TEM in situ testing.

  16. Method and device for tensile testing of cable bundles

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Lawrence M; Ardelean, Emil V; Goodding, James C; Babuska, Vit

    2012-10-16

    A standard tensile test device is improved to accurately measure the mechanical properties of stranded cables, ropes, and other composite structures wherein a witness is attached to the top and bottom mounting blocks holding the cable under test. The witness is comprised of two parts: a top and a bottom rod of similar diameter with the bottom rod having a smaller diameter stem on its upper end and the top rod having a hollow opening in its lower end into which the stem fits forming a witness joint. A small gap is present between the top rod and the larger diameter portion of the bottom rod. A standard extensometer is attached to the top and bottom rods of the witness spanning this small witness gap. When a force is applied to separate the mounting blocks, the gap in the witness expands the same length that the entire test specimen is stretched.

  17. Assessing the Applicability of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) Technique in Tensile Testing of Fabric Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    progression of strain on the tool side of the tensile sample. ....................................8 Figure 6. Results of the tensile testing of the basalt ...5 Table 2. The results of tensile testing for the basalt sample. ..........................................................5 Table 3. Line... basalt samples. .............................................................................10 1 1. Introduction Before novel structural

  18. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  19. A microdynamic version of the tensile test machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Very large space structures require structural reactions to control forces associated with nanometer-level displacements; JPL has accordingly built a tensile test machine capable of mN-level force measurements and nm-level displacement measurements, with a view to the study of structural linear joining technology at the lower limit of its resolution. The tester is composed of a moving table that is supported by six flexured legs and a test specimen cantilevered off the table to ground. Three vertical legs contain piezoactuators allowing changes in length up to 200 microns while generating axial load and bending moments. Displacements between ground and table are measured by means of three laser-interferometric channels.

  20. Tensile adhesion testing methodology for thermally sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, Christopher C.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of thermally sprayed coatings consists of lamellae which are oriented parallel to the substrate surface. The lamellae separate and fracture by distinctive mechanisms which are reflected in the failure morphology, and these may be described as adhesive (between the coating and substrate), cohesive (within the coating), or mixed mode. There is a large variability in the failure stress for any nominally identical group of coatings. A lower bound for the fracture toughness of alumina coatings can be calculated as 0.2 MNm exp -3/2. The coating strength values may also be treated as belonging to the statistical distribution of the Weibull function. The Weibull modulus of the coating strength varied from 1.4 to 3.8. This analysis infers that the flaw size within coatings is highly variable and that the flaws are nonuniformly dispersed. The present work focuses on the question of whether tensile adhesion tests are an appropriate testing method for thermally sprayed materials.

  1. Novel approach to tensile testing of micro- and nanoscale fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E. P. S.; Lim, C. T.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the strength and size of the micro- and nanoscale fibers, larger conventional universal testing machines are not suitable in performing stretch test of such fibers. Existing microtensile testing machines are custom-made and are complex and expensive to construct. Here, a novel method of using an existing atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindenation system for the tensile testing of microscale or bundled nanoscale fibers is proposed. The microscale poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber (˜25 μm diameter) was used as an example to illustrate this technique. The microfiber was first attached to a nanoindenter tip and the base via a custom-made holder to ensure that the microfiber was taut and vertically aligned. The force transducer of the nanoindenter was used to measure the tensile force required to stretch the microfiber. The microfiber was stretched using the stepper motor of the AFM system. The elongation of the microfiber was measured by subtracting the elongation of the transducer spring from the total elongation of the microfiber and transducer spring. A plot of the load against elongation of the microfiber was then obtained. The stress and strain of the microfiber was measured by subtracting the elongation of the transducer spring from the total elongation of the microfiber was then obtained. The stress and strain of the microfiber was obtained by dividing the load and elongation by cross-sectional area and gauge length, respectively. With this data, the mechanical behavior of the sample at small strains can be studied. This system is able to provide a high load resolution of 80 nN and displacement resolution of 0.5 nm. However, maximum load and sample elongation is limited and handling of the sample still remains a challenge.

  2. Modified ring stretch tensile testing of Zr-1Nb cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.B.; Majumdar, S.; Ruther, W.E.; Billone, M.C.; Chung, H.M.; Neimark, L.A.

    1998-03-01

    In a round robin effort between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire in France, and the Russian Research Centre-Kurchatov Institute, Argonne National Laboratory conducted 16 modified ring stretch tensile tests on unirradiated samples of zr-1Nb cladding, which is used in Russian VVER reactors. Test were conducted at two temperatures (25 and 400 C) and two strain rates (0.001 and 1 s{sup {minus}1}). At 25 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE), and total elongation (TE) were 201 MPa, 331 MPa, 18.2%, and 57.6%, respectively. At 400 C and 0.001 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 109 MPa, 185 MPa, 15.4%, and 67.7%, respectively. Finally, at 400 C and 1 s{sup {minus}1}, the YS, UTS, UE, and TE were 134 MPa, 189 MPa, 18.9%, and 53.4%, respectively. The high strain rate tests at room temperature were not successful. Test results proved to be very sensitive to the amount of lubrication used on the inserts; because of the large contact area between the inserts and specimen, too little lubrication leads to significantly higher strengths and lower elongations being reported. It is also important to note that only 70 to 80% of the elongation takes place in the gauge section, depending on specimen geometry. The appropriate percentage can be estimated from a simple model or can be calculated from finite-element analysis.

  3. Measurements of radiated elastic wave energy from dynamic tensile cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boler, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fracture-velocity, microstructure, and fracture-energy barriers in elastic wave radiation during a dynamic fracture was investigated in experiments in which dynamic tensile cracks of two fracture cofigurations of double cantilever beam geometry were propagating in glass samples. The first, referred to as primary fracture, consisted of fractures of intact glass specimens; the second configuration, referred to as secondary fracture, consisted of a refracture of primary fracture specimens which were rebonded with an intermittent pattern of adhesive to produce variations in fracture surface energy along the crack path. For primary fracture cases, measurable elastic waves were generated in 31 percent of the 16 fracture events observed; the condition for radiation of measurable waves appears to be a local abrupt change in the fracture path direction, such as occurs when the fracture intersects a surface flaw. For secondary fractures, 100 percent of events showed measurable elastic waves; in these fractures, the ratio of radiated elastic wave energy in the measured component to fracture surface energy was 10 times greater than for primary fracture.

  4. Investigation of the dynamic mechanical behavior of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) in the high stress tensile regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berer, M.; Major, Z.; Pinter, G.; Constantinescu, D. M.; Marsavina, L.

    2014-11-01

    Due to its outstanding mechanical performance both in static and dynamic loading and its resistance up to very high temperatures, Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted many practical applications. The loaded contact state for the application of PEEK rolls as bearing elements was recently analyzed by the corresponding author. High irreversible deformations on the mantle side were caused by the rolling contact and thus the rolling performance is supposed to be strongly affected by the dynamic mechanical properties of this irreversibly deformed material. Tensile fatigue tests at various stress levels up to the thermally dominated fatigue regime were conducted in order to get information regarding the dynamic mechanical material behavior at high stress regimes. Two types of PEEK (annealed and untreated) were investigated and two load ratios, R, were used (0.1 and 0.5). During the fatigue tests extensometer strain, load and surface temperature were recorded and a quantitative hysteresis loop analysis with calculated secant modulus and dynamic modulus was performed. Furthermore, the concept of isocyclic stress-strain diagrams was applied to enlarge and confirm the results obtained from the hysteresis loop analysis. A sharp transition between thermally dominated and mechanically dominated fatigue regimes was found for both PEEK types (annealed and untreated) and for both load ratios. Moreover, the annealed PEEK was stiffer in the tensile fatigue tests than the untreated material. Both examined PEEK types showed distinct hardening throughout the fatigue tests which made them "more elastic" (higher stiffness and less damping).

  5. A novel strategy for utilizing voice coil servoactuators in tensile tests of low volume protein hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Saqlain, Farees; Popa, Ionel; Fernández, Julio M.; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel tensile testing system optimized for the mechanical loading of microliter volume protein hydrogels. Our apparatus incorporates a voice coil servoactuator capable of carrying out fixed velocity extension-relaxation cycles as well as extension step protocols. The setup is equipped with an acrylic cuvette permitting day-long incubations in solution. To demonstrate the functionality of the device, we photochemically crosslinked polyproteins of the I91 immunoglobulin domain from the muscle protein titin to create solid hydrogels that recapitulate elastic properties of muscle. We present data from tensile tests of these low volume biomaterials that support protein unfolding as a main determinant of the elasticity of protein hydrogels. Our results demonstrate the potential use of protein hydrogels as biomaterials whose elastic properties dynamically respond to their environment. PMID:25960689

  6. Tensile tests of ITER TF conductors jacket materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anashkin, O. P.; Kеilin, V. E.; Krivykh, A. V.; Diev, D. N.; Dinisilov, A. S.; Shcherbakov, V. I.; Tronza, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    The set of very tough requirements has been formulated for TF jacket materials with extremely high plasticity at liquid helium temperature. The stainless steel 316LN-IG is recommended to be used for TF jacket tubes. Samples of 316LN-IG tubes (whole tubes and sub-size samples) made of the material from the same electro slag remelt have been tested in different conditions - as received tubes and tubes after prescribed compaction, 2.5% deformation at room temperature and heat treatment at 650 0C, 200 hours. The tensile tests were carried out at room, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures down to 4.2 K, meeting corresponding ASME and ASTM requirements. The low temperature testing devices are described. The tests results for sub-size samples and whole tubes show that the latter tests are considerably more representative and important for butt weld qualification at LHe temperature. It was observed that the ferromagnetic properties of all samples and especially of butt welds increase with lowering the temperature and increasing the degree of deformation. At LHe temperature a non-uniform and highly localized serrated deformations were observed.

  7. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert; George, Easo P

    2007-11-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

  8. TENSILE TESTING OF CARBON STEEL IN HIGH PRESSURE HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A; Thad Adams, T; Ps Lam, P

    2007-05-02

    An infrastructure of new and existing pipelines and systems will be required to carry and to deliver hydrogen as an alternative energy source under the hydrogen economy. Carbon and low alloy steels of moderate strength are currently used in hydrogen delivery systems as well as in the existing natural gas systems. It is critical to understand the material response of these standard pipeline materials when they are subjected to pressurized hydrogen environments. The methods and results from a testing program to quantify hydrogen effects on mechanical properties of carbon steel pipeline and pipeline weld materials are provided. Tensile properties of one type of steel (A106 Grade B) in base metal, welded and heat affected zone conditions were tested at room temperature in air and high pressure (10.34 MPa or 1500 psig) hydrogen. A general reduction in the materials ability to plastically deform was noted in this material when specimens were tested in hydrogen. Furthermore, the primary mode of fracture was changed from ductile rupture in air to cleavage with secondary tearing in hydrogen. The mechanical test results will be applied in future analyses to evaluate service life of the pipelines. The results are also envisioned to be part of the bases for construction codes and structural integrity demonstrations for hydrogen service pipeline and vessels.

  9. Direct laboratory tensile testing of select yielding rock bolt systems

    SciTech Connect

    VandeKraats, J.D.; Watson, S.O.

    1996-08-01

    Yielding rock bolt support systems have been developed to accommodate ground movement in shifting ground such as in coal operations; in creeping ground such as salt, trona, and potash; and in swelling ground associated with some clays. These systems, designed to remain intact despite ground movement, should enhance mine safety and help contain costs in areas where rebolting of rigid non-yielding systems is typically required. Four such systems were tested in straight tensile pulls in the laboratory. They include the Slip Nut System from Dywidag Systems International USA, Inc., Ischebeck`s bolt mounted Titan Load Indicator, Rocky Mountain Bolt Company`s Yielding Cable Bolt, and a rock bolt installed variation of the yielding steel post developed by RE/SPEC Inc. The first two systems are currently marketed products and the latter two are prototype systems. Each system responds to load and displacement by yielding in an unique manner. All are designed to yield at predetermined loads. A description of each system and its yield function is provided. Each system was tested over its prescribed yield range in a test machine. At least five tests were performed on each system. Each system yielded and continued to provide support according to its design. Each shows promise for ground control use in shifting or creeping rock. This work helps to illustrate the comparative differences in performance between these specialized systems and the applications where they may be most useful.

  10. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330 steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-08-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  11. Dynamic tensile characterization of a 4330-V steel with kolsky bar techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Connelly, Kevin

    2010-09-01

    There has been increasing demand to understand the stress-strain response as well as damage and failure mechanisms of materials under impact loading condition. Dynamic tensile characterization has been an efficient approach to acquire satisfactory information of mechanical properties including damage and failure of the materials under investigation. However, in order to obtain valid experimental data, reliable tensile experimental techniques at high strain rates are required. This includes not only precise experimental apparatus but also reliable experimental procedures and comprehensive data interpretation. Kolsky bar, originally developed by Kolsky in 1949 [1] for high-rate compressive characterization of materials, has been extended for dynamic tensile testing since 1960 [2]. In comparison to Kolsky compression bar, the experimental design of Kolsky tension bar has been much more diversified, particularly in producing high speed tensile pulses in the bars. Moreover, instead of directly sandwiching the cylindrical specimen between the bars in Kolsky bar compression bar experiments, the specimen must be firmly attached to the bar ends in Kolsky tensile bar experiments. A common method is to thread a dumbbell specimen into the ends of the incident and transmission bars. The relatively complicated striking and specimen gripping systems in Kolsky tension bar techniques often lead to disturbance in stress wave propagation in the bars, requiring appropriate interpretation of experimental data. In this study, we employed a modified Kolsky tension bar, newly developed at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA, to explore the dynamic tensile response of a 4330-V steel. The design of the new Kolsky tension bar has been presented at 2010 SEM Annual Conference [3]. Figures 1 and 2 show the actual photograph and schematic of the Kolsky tension bar, respectively. As shown in Fig. 2, the gun barrel is directly connected to the incident bar with a coupler. The cylindrical

  12. Characterization of applied tensile stress using domain wall dynamic behavior of grain-oriented electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Fasheng; Ren, Wenwei; Tian, Gui Yun; Gao, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Stress measurement that provides early indication of stress status has become increasingly demanding in the field of Non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). Bridging the correlation between micro magnetic properties and the applied tensile stress is the first conceptual step to come up with a new method of non-destructive testing. This study investigates the characterization of applied tensile stress with in-situ magnetic domain imaging and their dynamic behaviors by using magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscopy assisted with magneto-optical indicator film (MOIF). Threshold magnetic field (TMF) feature to reflect 180 ° domain wall (DW) characteristics behaviors in different grains is proposed for stress detection. It is verified that TMF is a threshold feature with better sensitivity and brings linear correlation for stress characterization in comparison to classical coercive field, remanent magnetization, hysteresis loss and permeability parameters. The results indicate that 180 ° DWs dynamic in the inner grain is highly correlated with stress. The DW dynamics of turn over (TO) tests for different grains is studied to illustrate the repeatability of TMF. Experimental tests of high permeability grain oriented (HGO) electrical steels under stress loading have been conducted to verify this study.

  13. An investigation on dynamic tensile properties of TiAl intermetallic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Lin, T.L.; Zhou, Y.; Xia, Y.; Law, C.C.

    1999-07-01

    Room-temperature tensile properties of polycrystalline Ti-47Al-2Mn-2Nb alloy with nearly lamellar (NL) microstructures were investigated at the strain rate between 10{sup {minus}5} and 1,000 s{sup {minus}1} using a self-designed Split-Hopkinson tensile bar setup with a rotating disk and conventional testing machine. It was found that tensile ductility varies within a narrow range with the strain rate while dynamic strengths ({sigma}{sup d}) of the alloy are obviously higher than static strengths ({sigma}{sup s}). There exists a linear relationship between {sigma}{sup s} and the logarithm of the strain rate (ln{dot {epsilon}}), and between {sigma}{sup d} and the strain rate itself ({dot {epsilon}}). Fractography analysis indicated that the alloy fractured in a mixed mode of predominant transgranular cleavage and minor intergranular cracking under static and dynamic strain rates. Environmental effect was excluded from the main cause for the room-temperature brittleness of the investigated alloy.

  14. Tensile mechanical properties tests of non-standard component in high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei; Liu, Renhuai; Song, Fangfang; Zhu, Junhua

    2017-05-01

    This paper makes research on tensile mechanical properties tests of heater component in electron gun. Tests are studied to get tensile property of heater component at the room and elevated temperature. Though improving test clamping appliance and experimental methods, discussing tensile fracture analysis, rupture mechanism is obtained by in situ observation using scanning electron microscope (SEM). To facilitate engineering application, materials suggestion is given at the end of the paper.

  15. Stiffness reductions during tensile fatigue testing of graphite/epoxy angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odom, E. M.; Adams, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Tensile fatigue data was generated under carefully controlled test conditions. A computerized data acquisition system was used to permit the measurement of dynamic modulus without interrupting the fatigue cycling. Two different 8-ply laminate configurations, viz, + or - 45 (2s) and + or - 67.5 (2s), of a T300/5208 graphite/epoxy composite were tested. The + or - 45 (2s) laminate did exhibit some modulus decay, although there was no well-defined correlation with applied stress level or number of cycles. The + or - 67.5 (2s) laminate did not exhibit any measurable modulus decay. Secondary effects observed included a small but distinct difference between modulus as measured statically and dynamically, a slight recovery of the modulus decay after a test interruption, and a significant viscoelastic (creep) response of the + or - 45 (2s) laminate during fatigue testing.

  16. Tensile testing of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials under Federal specified temperature and relative humidity conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Botner, W.T.

    1980-01-01

    A small 10-ft x 12-ft temperature and relative humidity controlled room for tensile testing of parachute materials is presented. Tensile tests of nylon and Kevlar parachute materials indicate there is a negligible change in break strength of test samples soaked in the controlled environment vs samples soaked in ambient conditions.

  17. EVALUATION OF A RING TEST FOR DETERMINING THE TENSILE STRENGTH OF MORTARS AND CONCRETE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of this paper is to report the results of an evaluation of a specific type of test procedure, the ring tensile test , which results in a...strength’ and the techniques used to obtain them by other investigators over the years with the exception of the work involving the ring tensile test . Some

  18. Biaxial tensile tests of the porcine ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Deplano, Valérie; Boufi, Mourad; Boiron, Olivier; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Alimi, Yves; Bertrand, Eric

    2016-07-05

    One of the aims of this work is to develop an original custom built biaxial set-up to assess mechanical behavior of soft tissues. Stretch controlled biaxial tensile tests are performed and stereoscopic digital image correlation (SDIC) is implemented to measure the 3D components of the generated displacements. Using this experimental device, the main goal is to investigate the mechanical behavior of porcine ascending aorta in the more general context of human ascending aorta pathologies. The results highlight that (i) SDIC arrangement allows accurate assessment of displacements and so stress strain curves, (ii) porcine ascending aorta has a nearly linear and anisotropic mechanical behavior until 30% of strain, (iii) porcine ascending aorta is stiffer in the circumferential direction than in the longitudinal one, (iv) the material coefficient representing the interaction between the two loading directions is thickness dependent, (v) taking into account the variability of the samples the stress values are independent of the stretch rate in the range of values from 10(-3) to 10(-1)s(-1) and finally, (vi) unlike other segments of the aorta, 4-month-old pigs ascending aorta is definitely not a relevant model to investigate the mechanical behavior of the human ascending aorta. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic tensile properties of bovine periodontal ligament: A nonlinear viscoelastic model.

    PubMed

    Oskui, Iman Z; Hashemi, Ata

    2016-03-21

    As a support to the tooth, the mechanical response of the periodontal ligament (PDL) is complex. Like other connective tissues, the PDL exhibits non-linear and time-dependent behavior. The viscoelasticity of the PDL plays a significant role in low and high loading rates. Little information, however, is available on the short-term viscoelastic behavior of the PDL. Also, due to the highly non-linear stress-strain response, it was hypothesized that the dynamic viscoelastic properties of the PDL would be greatly dependent on the preload. Therefore, the present study was designed to explore the dynamic tensile properties of the bovine PDL as a function of loading frequency and preload. The in vitro dynamic tensile tests were performed over a wide range of frequencies (0.01-100Hz) with dynamic force amplitude of 1N and different preloads of 3, 5 and 10N. The generalized Maxwell model was utilized to describe the non-linear viscoelastic behavior of the PDL. The low loss factor of the bovine PDL, measured between 0.04 and 0.08, indicates low energy dissipation due to the high content of collagen fibers. Moreover, the influence of viscous components in the linear region of the stress-strain curve (10N preload) was lower than those of the toe region (3N preload). The data reported in this study could be used in developing accurate computational models of the PDL.

  20. Micro/nano-mechanical test system employing tensile test holder with push-to-pull transformer

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Yunje; Cyrankowski, Edward; Shan, Zhiwei; Syed Asif, Syed Amanula

    2014-07-29

    A micromachined or microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based push-to-pull mechanical transformer for tensile testing of micro-to-nanometer scale material samples including a first structure and a second structure. The second structure is coupled to the first structure by at least one flexible element that enables the second structure to be moveable relative to the first structure, wherein the second structure is disposed relative to the first structure so as to form a pulling gap between the first and second structures such that when an external pushing force is applied to and pushes the second structure in a tensile extension direction a width of the pulling gap increases so as to apply a tensile force to a test sample mounted across the pulling gap between a first sample mounting area on the first structure and a second sample mounting area on the second structure.

  1. Micro/nano-mechanical test system employing tensile test holder with push-to-pull transformer

    DOEpatents

    Oh, Yunje; Cyrankowski, Edward; Shan, Zhiwei; Asif, Syed Amanula Syed

    2013-05-07

    A micromachined or microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based push-to-pull mechanical transformer for tensile testing of micro-to-nanometer scale material samples including a first structure and a second structure. The second structure is coupled to the first structure by at least one flexible element that enables the second structure to be moveable relative to the first structure, wherein the second structure is disposed relative to the first structure so as to form a pulling gap between the first and second structures such that when an external pushing force is applied to and pushes the second structure in a tensile extension direction a width of the pulling gap increases so as to apply a tensile force to a test sample mounted across the pulling gap between a first sample mounting area on the first structure and a second sample mounting area on the second structure.

  2. Dynamic tensile deformation and fracture of a highly particle-filled composite using SHPB and high-speed DIC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Chen, P.; Guo, B.; Huang, F.

    2012-08-01

    In this work, various tensile tests, including Brazilian disc test (BDT), flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) test and semi-circular bending (SCB) test, were carried out on a highly particle-filled composite by using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB). With the consideration of low strength and low wave impedance of the materials, a quartz crystal transducer was embedded in SHPB to measure the loading forces. A high-speed camera was used to capture the deformation and fracture process of materials. Digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to process these digital images to obtain the dynamic deformation information. Based on the measured strain fields, the crack growth path was determined and the failure mechanism of samples was analyzed. Combining SHPB and DIC method, the indirect tensile stress strain plots of disc samples were obtained, and the dynamic fracture toughness of materials was measured using both FBD and SCB tests. The results show that the tensile failure strength and fracture toughness increases with the increase of strain rates, exhibiting strain rate dependence. The high-speed DIC method combined with SHPB is effective to study the dynamic tensile behaviour of brittle materials with low strengths.

  3. Dynamic tensile deformation behavior of Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten or tantalum fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungsoo; Kim, Gyeong Su; Jeon, Changwoo; Sohn, Seok Su; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-07-01

    Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten (W) or tantalum (Ta) continuous fibers were fabricated by liquid pressing process. Their dynamic tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructures and deformation mechanisms by using a split Hopkinson tension bar. The dynamic tensile test results indicated that the maximum strength of the W-fiber-reinforced composite (757 MPa) was much lower than the quasi-statically measured strength, whereas the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite showed very high maximum strength (2129 MPa). In the W-fiber-reinforced composite, the fracture abruptly occurred in perpendicular to the tensile direction because W fibers did not play a role in blocking cracks propagated from the amorphous matrix, thereby resulting in abrupt fracture within elastic range and consequent low tensile strength. The very high dynamic tensile strength of the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite could be explained by the presence of ductile Ta fibers in terms of mechanisms such as (1) interrupted propagation of cracks initiated in the amorphous matrix, (2) formation of lots of cracks in the amorphous matrix, and (3) sharing of loads and severe deformation (necking) of Ta fibers in cracked regions.

  4. 10 Degree Off-Axis Tensile Test for Intralaminar Shear Characterization of Fiber Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen for the...from Mod-I/epoxy, T-300/epoxy, and S-glass/ epoxy were used in the experimental program. It was found that the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen is

  5. Dynamic Tensile Properties of Iron and Steels for a Wide Range of Strain Rates and Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Nobusato; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Terumi; Mimura, Koji; Tanimura, Shinji

    The tensile stress-strain curves of iron and a variety of steels, covering a wide range of strength level, over a wide strain rate range on the order of 10-3 ~ 103 s-1, were obtained systematically by using the Sensing Block Type High Speed Material Testing System (SBTS, Saginomiya). Through intensive analysis of these results, the strain rate sensitivity of the flow stress for the large strain region, including the viscous term at high strain rates, the true fracture strength and the true fracture strain were cleared for the material group of the ferrous metals. These systematical data may be useful to develop a practical constitutive model for computer codes, including a fracture criterion for simulations of the dynamic behavior in crash worthiness studies and of work-pieces subjected to dynamic plastic working for a wide strain rate range.

  6. Eulerian hydrocode modeling of a dynamic tensile extrusion experiment (u)

    SciTech Connect

    Burkett, Michael W; Clancy, Sean P

    2009-01-01

    Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress flow stress model were performed to provide insight into a dynamic extrusion experiment. The dynamic extrusion response of copper (three different grain sizes) and tantalum spheres were simulated with MESA, an explicit, 2-D Eulerian continuum mechanics hydrocode and compared with experimental data. The experimental data consisted of high-speed images of the extrusion process, recovered extruded samples, and post test metallography. The hydrocode was developed to predict large-strain and high-strain-rate loading problems. Some of the features of the features of MESA include a high-order advection algorithm, a material interface tracking scheme and a van Leer monotonic advection-limiting. The Mechanical Threshold Stress (MTS) model was utilized to evolve the flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate and temperature for copper and tantalum. Plastic strains exceeding 300% were predicted in the extrusion of copper at 400 m/s, while plastic strains exceeding 800% were predicted for Ta. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rate were made. Additionally, predictions of the texture evolution (based upon the deformation rate history and the rigid body rotations experienced by the copper during the extrusion process) were compared with the orientation imaging microscopy measurements. Finally, comparisons between the calculated and measured influence of the initial texture on the dynamic extrusion response of tantalum was performed.

  7. Newly Designed Tensile Test System for in vitro Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cytoskeletal Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki

    A tensile test system for isolated cytoskeletal filaments, which enables to control strain rate, was newly designed. A pair of piezo-driven cantilevers were used to manipulate the specimen and to measure tensile load from the deflection of one of the cantilevers. The displacements of the cantilevers were optically and electrically detected. The specimen strain, determined from the cantilever displacements, was used as a feedback signal. We proposed a servo-system for strain rate control in which a desired path for the strain transition was designated. The path was chosen as a triangular-shape waveform against time, along which the strain rate is kept constant. We measured tensile properties of a single stress fiber isolated from a smooth muscle cell with this system to obtain a stretching stiffness of 45nN per strain. Performance evaluation and the tensile test demonstrated that the system enabled to carry out strain rate-controlled tensile test.

  8. [The properties of dentin and resinified dentin in the tensile test].

    PubMed

    Xu, J

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of resinifying therapy to the hard tissue of tooth by using measurement of the tensile strength. The fresh extracted maxillary anterior teeth having been cleaned and sterilized were divided into two groups. The control group was placed into 9% N-saline solution of 37 +/- 1 degrees C. The experimental group was treated with resinifying therapy. The tensile specimens were shaped by turning in a lathe until it satisfied the tensile test requirement of Mechanics of Materials except that they were hollow. A set of special split jig was made for this test. Instron Universal Testing Machine was used for measuring the load on the specimens. The loading speed was 0.05 mm/min. The straining meter was used to measure the tensile strain. The result revealed that tensile strength of resinifying dentin was little lower than that of unresinified dentin. The resinified dentin didn't increases stiffness or brittleness.

  9. Influence of necking propensity on the dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Gray Ill, George T; Trujillo, Carl P

    2009-01-01

    The quasi-static and dynamic responses of two fluoropolymers - polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE) - have been extensively characterized. Here we investigate the influence of the propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their responses under Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-TenExt). The Dyn-Ten-Ext technique was originally developed for metals and applied to copper and tantalum spheres by Gray, et al. as a tensile corollary to compressive Taylor Cylinder Impact Testing. Under Taylor Cylinder loading both PTFE and PCTFE exhibit a classic three-diameter ductile deformation pattern. The ductile-to-brittle transition in PTFE occurs at 131 m s{sup -1} with a very tight transition range in impact stress of less than 4 m s{sup -1}. Conversely, the ductile-to-brittle transition in PCTFE occurs between 165 and 200 m s{sup -1} with a gradual transition to stochastic crack formation and ultimately failure. Under Dyn-Ten-Ext loading the onset of extrusion occurs above 164 and 259 m s{sup -1} for PTFE and PCTFE respectively.

  10. A cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by miniature pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. B.; Liu, S. X.; Gu, K. X.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by a miniature pulse tube cryocooler. At present, tensile tests are widely applied to measure the mechanical properties of materials; most of the cryogenic tensile testing apparatus are designed for samples with standard sizes, while for non-standard size samples, especially for microsamples, the tensile testing cannot be conducted. The general approach to cool down the specimens for tensile testing is by using of liquid nitrogen or liquid helium, which is not convenient: it is difficult to keep the temperature of the specimens at an arbitrary set point precisely, besides, in some occasions, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome these limitations, a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus cooled by a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler has been designed, built and tested. The operating temperatures of the developed tensile testing apparatus cover from 20 K to room temperature with a controlling precision of ±10 mK. The apparatus configurations, the methods of operation and some cooling performance will be described in this paper.

  11. Dynamic tensile stress-strain characteristics of carbon/epoxy laminated composites in through-thickness direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The effect of strain rate up to approximately ɛ˙ = 102/s on the tensile stress-strain properties of unidirectional and cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites in the through-thickness direction is investigated. Waisted cylindrical specimens machined out of the laminated composites in the through-thickness direction are used in both static and dynamic tests. The dynamic tensile stress-strain curves up to fracture are determined using the split Hopkinson bar (SHB). The low and intermediate strain-rate tensile stress-strain relations up to fracture are measured on an Instron 5500R testing machine. It is demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength and absorbed energy up to fracture increase significantly, while the fracture strain decreases slightly with increasing strain rate. Macro- and micro-scopic examinations reveal a marked difference in the fracture surfaces between the static and dynamic tension specimens.

  12. In situ EBSD during tensile test of aluminum AA3003 sheet.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Sören; Peng, Ru Lin; Calmunger, Mattias; Olsson, Björn; Johansson, Sten

    2014-03-01

    Miniature tensile-test specimens of soft-annealed, weakly textured AA3003 aluminum sheet in 0.9 mm thickness were deformed until fracture inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile strength measured by the miniature tensile test stage agreed well with the tensile strength by regular tensile testing. Strain over the microscope field of view was determined from changes in positions of constituent particles. Slip lines were visible in secondary electron images already at 0.3% strain; activity from secondary slip systems became apparent at 2% strain. Orientation rotation behavior of the tensile load axis with respect to the crystallographic axes agreed well with previously reported trends for other aluminum alloys. Start of the fracture and tensile crack propagation were documented in secondary electron images. The region of fracture nucleation included and was surrounded by many grains that possessed high Schmid factors at zero strain. Crystal lattice rotation angles in the grains surrounding the initial fracture zone were higher than average while rotations inside the initial fracture zone were lower than average for strains from zero to 31%. The orientation rotation behavior of the tensile load axes of the grains around the fracture zone deviated from the average behavior in this material. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Design and Validation of a Vacuum Assisted Anchorage for the Uniaxial Tensile Testing of Soft Materials.

    PubMed

    Blose, Kory J; Pichamuthu, Joseph E; Weinbaum, Justin S; Vorp, David A

    2016-01-01

    Current commercial tensile testing systems use spring-loaded or other compression-based grips to clamp materials in place posing a problem for very soft or delicate materials that cannot withstand this mechanical clamping force. In order to perform uniaxial tensile tests on soft tissues or materials, we have created a novel vacuum-assisted anchor (VAA). Fibrin gels were subjected to uniaxial extension, and the testing data was used to determine material mechanical properties. Utilizing the VAA, we achieved successful tensile breaks of soft fibrin gels while finding statistically significant differences between the mechanical properties of gels fabricated at two different fibrinogen concentrations.

  14. Design and Validation of a Vacuum Assisted Anchorage for the Uniaxial Tensile Testing of Soft Materials

    PubMed Central

    Blose, Kory J.; Pichamuthu, Joseph E.; Weinbaum, Justin S.; Vorp, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Current commercial tensile testing systems use spring-loaded or other compression-based grips to clamp materials in place posing a problem for very soft or delicate materials that cannot withstand this mechanical clamping force. In order to perform uniaxial tensile tests on soft tissues or materials, we have created a novel vacuum-assisted anchor (VAA). Fibrin gels were subjected to uniaxial extension, and the testing data was used to determine material mechanical properties. Utilizing the VAA, we achieved successful tensile breaks of soft fibrin gels while finding statistically significant differences between the mechanical properties of gels fabricated at two different fibrinogen concentrations. PMID:27795696

  15. A Surface Damage Investigation on Uniaxial Tensile Test Specimens Prepared by Common Cutting Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    REPORI’ A SURFACE DAMAGE INVESTIGATION ON UNIAXIAL TENSILE TEST SPECIMENSPREPARED BY COMMON CUTTING METHODS JUN 2 1931 THOMAS J. C. CHEW DALE A...Sýrfa-i-mage Investigation on Uniaxial Tensile Test Specimens Prepared by Common Cutting Method I Spi-.i t’ ,, ., • T7. AUTHORý#) . _" ’ /t’ .• r...Saw 10 2.1.3 Cutting by Milling Machine 11 2.1.4 Cutting by Die Cutter 11 2.2 Uniaxial Tensile Test 12 2.3 Electron Microscope Surface Examination 13 3

  16. On the dynamic stability of shear deformable beams under a tensile load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddemi, S.; Caliò, I.; Cannizzaro, F.

    2016-07-01

    Loss of stability of beams in a linear static context due to the action of tensile loads has been disclosed only recently in the scientific literature. However, tensile instability in the dynamic regime has been only marginally covered. Several aspects concerning the role of shear deformation on the tensile dynamic instability on continuous and discontinuous beams are still to be addressed. It may appear as a paradox, but also for the case of the universally studied Timoshenko beam model, despite its old origin, frequency-axial load diagrams in the range of negative values of the load (i.e. tensile load) has never been brought to light. In this paper, for the first time, the influence of a conservative tensile axial loads on the dynamic behaviour of the Timoshenko model, according to the Haringx theory, is assessed. It is shown that, under increasing tensile loads, regions of positive/negative fundamental frequency variations can be distinguished. In addition, the beam undergoes eigen-mode changes, from symmetric to anti-symmetric shapes, until tensile instability of divergence type is reached. As a further original contribution on the subject, taking advantage of a new closed form solution, it is shown that the same peculiarities are recovered for an axially loaded Euler-Bernoulli vibrating beam with multiple elastic sliders. This latter model can be considered as the discrete counterpart of the Timoshenko beam-column in which the internal sliders concentrate the shear deformation that in the Timoshenko model is continuously distributed. Original aspects regarding the evolution of the vibration frequencies and the relevant mode shapes with the tensile load value are highlighted.

  17. DYNAMIC TESTS OF STRUCTURAL ALUMINUM ALLOYS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A series of dynamic tests was conducted on three grades of structural aluminum alloys: (a) 6061-T6, (b) 6063 - T5 , and (c) 5456-H321. The effects of...at the maximum test rates. The 6063 - T5 aluminum shoed no change in yield stress and a 5.8% increase in tensile strength at the maximum test rate

  18. Effect of dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degree}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE).

  19. Dynamical in situ nuclear-magnetic-resonance tensile apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackelöer, H. J.; Kanert, O.; Tamler, H.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    1983-03-01

    A combination of a servohydraulic tensile machine and NMR pulse spectrometer is described enabling nuclear-spin relaxation rates to be recorded simultaneously with stress-strain data incorporating tension as well as compression of nonmetallic as well as of metallic samples. The data of the mechanical system are as follows: Maximum load: 5000 N; minimum deformation speed: 10 μm s-1, maximum deformation speed: 3×105 μm s-1; deformation stroke: digitally controlled between 1 and 8×103 μm; bandwidth: dc to 1 kHz; resolution: 2-4 μm; temperature conditions of the sample: from 80 to 570 K. The operation and performance of the system is described by means of experiments observing nuclear-spin relaxation rates which are induced by the movement of dislocations due to the finite deformation rate of the sample.

  20. Test system accurately determines tensile properties of irradiated metals at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, P. J.; Skalka, R. J.; Vandergrift, E. F.

    1967-01-01

    Modified testing system determines tensile properties of irradiated brittle-type metals at cryogenic temperatures. The system includes a lightweight cryostat, split-screw grips, a universal joint, and a special temperature control system.

  1. Isolation of kinetic and spatial properties of uni-axial dynamic tensile loading of OFHC copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis-Koller, D.; Escobedo-Diaz, J. P.; Cerreta, E. K.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Hansen, B.; Lebensohn, R.; Mourad, H.; Patterson, B.; Tonks, D.

    2012-08-01

    Materials performance is recognized as being central to many emergent technologies. Future technologies will place increasing demands on materials performance with respect to extremes in stress, strain, temperature, and pressure. In this study, the dynamic ductile damage evolution of OFHC Cu is explored as a test bed to understand the role of spatial effects due to loading profile and defect density as well as the role of the kinetics of tensile pulse evolution. Well-characterized OFHC Cu samples of 30 μm, 60 μm, 100 μm, and 200 μm grain sizes were subjected to plate impact uniaxial strain loading in spall geometry to produce early stage (incipient damage. Using 2D metallographic techniques, soft recovered samples were studied to statistically link mesoscale processes to continuum level observations of free surface particle velocity measured with VISAR. Based on these findings, mechanisms for the void nucleation/growth and coalescence are proposed.

  2. Tensile Properties, Ferrite Contents, and Specimen Heating of Stainless Steels in Cryogenic Gas Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, T.; Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.

    2006-03-31

    We performed tensile tests at cryogenic temperatures below 77 K and in helium gas environment for SUS 304L and SUS 316L in order to obtain basic data of mechanical properties of the materials for liquid hydrogen tank service. We evaluate tensile curves, tensile properties, ferrite contents, mode of deformation and/or fracture, and specimen heating during the testing at 4 to 77 K. For both SUS 304L and 316L, tensile strength shows a small peak around 10 K, and specimen heating decreases above 30 K. The volume fraction of {alpha}-phase increases continuously up to 70 % with plastic strain, at approximately 15 % plastic strain for 304L and up to 35 % for 316L. There was almost no clear influence of testing temperature on strain-induced martensitic transformation at the cryogenic temperatures.

  3. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  4. Intrinsic tensile properties of cocoon silk fibres can be estimated by removing flaws through repeated tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Kaur, Jasjeet; Wang, Xungai; Batchelor, Warren

    2015-01-01

    Silk fibres from silkworm cocoons have lower strength than spider silk and have received less attention as a source of high-performance fibres. In this work, we have used an innovative procedure to eliminate the flaws gradually of a single fibre specimen by retesting the unbroken portion of the fibre, after each fracture test. This was done multiple times so that the final test may provide the intrinsic fibre strength. During each retest, the fibre specimen began to yield once the failure load of the preceding test was exceeded. For each fibre specimen, a composite curve was constructed from multiple tests. The composite curves and analysis show that strengths of mass-produced Muga and Eri cocoon silk fibres increased from 446 to 618 MPa and from 337 to 452 MPa, respectively. Similarly, their toughness increased from 84 to 136 MJ m−3 and from 61 to 104 MJ m−3, respectively. Composite plots produced significantly less inter-specimen variations compared to values from single tests. The fibres with reduced flaws as a result of retests in the tested section have a tensile strength and toughness comparable to naturally spun dragline spider silk with a reported strength of 574 MPa and toughness of 91–158 MJ m−3, which is used as a benchmark for developing high-performance fibres. This retesting approach is likely to provide useful insights into discrete flaw distributions and intrinsic mechanical properties of other fatigue-resistant materials. PMID:25948613

  5. Cyclic flattened Brazilian disc tests for measuring the tensile fatigue properties of brittle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Xu, Nuwen; Zhao, Tao

    2017-08-01

    We propose a cyclic flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) testing method to measure the tensile fatigue properties of brittle rocks. Our method has obvious merits in its specimen preparation and experimental operation. Two parallel flattens are introduced in the disc specimen, which facilitate easily and uniformly loading the specimen without special loading devices required. Moreover, the contact regions between two flattens and loading planes barely change during the entire loading and unloading process, ensuring a consistent contact condition. With certain appropriate loading angles, this method guarantees that the very first breakage of the specimen occurs at the center of the disc, which is the prerequisite of the Brazilian-type indirect tensile tests. To demonstrate our new method, nine cyclic FBD tensile tests are conducted. The fatigue load-deformation characteristics of FBD specimens are revealed. The tensile fatigue lives of tested specimens are observed to increase with the increase in cyclic loading frequency. Our proposed method provides a convenient and reliable approach to indirectly measure the fatigue tensile properties of brittle rocks and other brittle solids subjected to cyclic tensile loadings.

  6. Cyclic flattened Brazilian disc tests for measuring the tensile fatigue properties of brittle rocks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Dai, Feng; Xu, Nuwen; Zhao, Tao

    2017-08-01

    We propose a cyclic flattened Brazilian disc (FBD) testing method to measure the tensile fatigue properties of brittle rocks. Our method has obvious merits in its specimen preparation and experimental operation. Two parallel flattens are introduced in the disc specimen, which facilitate easily and uniformly loading the specimen without special loading devices required. Moreover, the contact regions between two flattens and loading planes barely change during the entire loading and unloading process, ensuring a consistent contact condition. With certain appropriate loading angles, this method guarantees that the very first breakage of the specimen occurs at the center of the disc, which is the prerequisite of the Brazilian-type indirect tensile tests. To demonstrate our new method, nine cyclic FBD tensile tests are conducted. The fatigue load-deformation characteristics of FBD specimens are revealed. The tensile fatigue lives of tested specimens are observed to increase with the increase in cyclic loading frequency. Our proposed method provides a convenient and reliable approach to indirectly measure the fatigue tensile properties of brittle rocks and other brittle solids subjected to cyclic tensile loadings.

  7. Subtask 12G2: Effects of dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The objective of this work is to determine the effect of displacement damage and dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy irradiated to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE). One property of vanadium-base alloys that is not well understood in terms of their potential use as fusion reactor structural materials is the effect of simultaneous generation of helium and neutron damage under conditions relevant to fusion reactor operation. In the present Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates of {approx}0.4 to 4.2 appm helium/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 425-600{degrees}C in the Li-filled DHCE capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti, an alloy identified as the most promising vanadium-base alloy for fusion reactors on the basis of its superior baseline and irradiation properties. Effects of helium on tensile strength and ductility were insignificant after irradiation and testing at >420{degrees}C. Contrary to initial expectation, room-temperature ductilities of DHCE specimens were higher than those of non-DHCE specimens (in which there was negligible helium generation), whereas strengths were lower, indicating that different types of hardening centers are produced during DHCE and non-DHCE irradiation. In strong contrast to tritium-trick experiments in which dense coalescence of helium bubbles is produced on grain boundaries in the absence of displacement damage, no intergranular fracture was observed in any tensile specimens irradiated in the DHCE. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Dependence of Dynamic Tensile Strength of Longyou Sandstone on Heat-Treatment Temperature and Loading Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Kanopolous, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    As a material for famous historical underground rock caverns, Longyou sandstone (LS) may fail under the combination of high loading rate and high temperature. The thermal damage induced by various heat-treatment temperatures (150, 250, 350, 450, 600 and 850 °C) is first characterized by X-ray Micro-computed tomography (CT) method. The damage variable derived from the average CT value for heat-treated LS specimen and reference specimen without heat treatment was used to quantify the thermal damage. The dynamic tensile strengths of these LS samples under different dynamic loading rates (ranging from 24 to 540 GPa/s) were then obtained using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The dynamic tensile strength of LS increases with the loading rate at a given heat-treatment temperature, and the tensile strength at the same loading rate decreases with the heat-treatment temperature except for 450 °C. Based on the experimental data, an empirical equation was established to relate the dynamic tensile strength of LS to the loading rate and the heat-treatment temperature.

  9. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A.; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Raston, Colin L.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes. PMID:26965728

  10. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R.; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A.; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J.; Atwood, Jerry L.; Lawrance, Warren D.; Raston, Colin L.

    2016-03-01

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes.

  11. Fluid dynamic lateral slicing of high tensile strength carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Vimalanathan, Kasturi; Gascooke, Jason R; Suarez-Martinez, Irene; Marks, Nigel A; Kumari, Harshita; Garvey, Christopher J; Atwood, Jerry L; Lawrance, Warren D; Raston, Colin L

    2016-03-11

    Lateral slicing of micron length carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is effective on laser irradiation of the materials suspended within dynamic liquid thin films in a microfluidic vortex fluidic device (VFD). The method produces sliced CNTs with minimal defects in the absence of any chemical stabilizers, having broad length distributions centred at ca 190, 160 nm and 171 nm for single, double and multi walled CNTs respectively, as established using atomic force microscopy and supported by small angle neutron scattering solution data. Molecular dynamics simulations on a bent single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with a radius of curvature of order 10 nm results in tearing across the tube upon heating, highlighting the role of shear forces which bend the tube forming strained bonds which are ruptured by the laser irradiation. CNT slicing occurs with the VFD operating in both the confined mode for a finite volume of liquid and continuous flow for scalability purposes.

  12. Dynamic fracture of tantalum under extreme tensile stress

    DOE PAGES

    Albertazzi, Bruno; Ozaki, Norimasa; Zhakhovsky, Vasily; ...

    2017-06-02

    The understanding of fracture phenomena of a material at extremely high strain rates is a key issue for a wide variety of scientific research ranging from applied science and technological developments to fundamental science such as laser-matter interaction and geology. Despite its interest, its study relies on a fine multiscale description, in between the atomic scale and macroscopic processes, so far only achievable by large-scale atomic simulations. Direct ultrafast real-time monitoring of dynamic fracture (spallation) at the atomic lattice scale with picosecond time resolution was beyond the reach of experimental techniques. We show that the coupling between a high-power opticalmore » laser pump pulse and a femtosecond x-ray probe pulse generated by an x-ray free electron laser allows detection of the lattice dynamics in a tantalum foil at an ultrahigh strain rate of Embedded Image ~2 × 108 to 3.5 × 108 s-1. A maximal density drop of 8 to 10%, associated with the onset of spallation at a spall strength of ~17 GPa, was directly measured using x-ray diffraction. The experimental results of density evolution agree well with large-scale atomistic simulations of shock wave propagation and fracture of the sample. Our experimental technique opens a new pathway to the investigation of ultrahigh strain-rate phenomena in materials at the atomic scale, including high-speed crack dynamics and stress-induced solid-solid phase transitions.« less

  13. Tensile Fracture Strength of Brisbane Tuff by Static and Cyclic Loading Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erarslan, N.; Alehossein, H.; Williams, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    This research presents the results of laboratory experiments during the investigation of tensile strength-strain characteristics of Brisbane tuff disc specimens under static and diametral cyclic loading. Three different cyclic loading methods were used; namely, sinusoidal cyclic loading, type I and II increasing cyclic loading with various amplitude values. The first method applied the stress amplitude-cycle number (s-n) curve approach to the measurement of the indirect tensile strength (ITS) and fracture toughness ( K IC) values of rocks for the first time in the literature. The type I and II methods investigated the effect of increasing cyclic loading on the ITS and K IC of rocks. For Brisbane tuff, the reduction in ITS was found to be 30 % under sinusoidal loading, whereas type I and II increasing cyclic loading caused a maximum reduction in ITS of 36 %. The maximum reduction of the static K IC of 46 % was obtained for the highest amplitude type I cyclic loading tested. For sinusoidal cyclic loading, a maximum reduction of the static K IC of 30 % was obtained. A continuous irreversible accumulation of damage was observed in dynamic cyclic tests conducted at different amplitudes and mean stress levels. Scanning electron microscope images showed that fatigue damage in Brisbane tuff is strongly influenced by the failure of the matrix because of both inter-granular fracturing and trans-granular fracturing. The main characteristic was grain breakage under cyclic loading, which probably starts at points of contact between grains and is accompanied by the production of very small fragments, probably due to frictional sliding within the weak matrix.

  14. [The direct tensile test of composite resins using the small specimen--effect of the preparation of specimen, the size of specimen and the testing condition on the tensile properties].

    PubMed

    Fujishima, A; Miyazaki, T; Kuneshita, H; Suzuki, E; Miyaji, T

    1990-09-01

    The direct tensile test of composite resins using the specimen with the gauge length 10 mm has been developed by authors. In this study smaller specimens with the gauge length 5 mm and 2 mm were also investigated. As the gauge length became smaller, tensile properties such as the proportional limit, the proof stress, and the tensile strength showed the tendency to become higher. The effect of strain rate on the tensile properties appeared clearly when using the specimen with the gauge length 2 mm. The small specimen was found to have many advantages for the preparation, the cost of material and the handling during the tensile test.

  15. Dynamic yield and tensile strength of aluminum single crystals at temperatures up to the melting point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Razorenov, S. V.; Baumung, K.; Singer, J.

    2001-07-01

    This article presents experimental results of the dynamic yield strength and dynamic tensile strength ("spall strength") of aluminum single crystals at shock-wave loading as a function of temperature. The load duration was ˜40 and ˜200 ns. The temperature varied from 20 to 650 °C which is only by 10 °C below the melting temperature. A linear growth of the dynamic yield strength by more than a factor of 4 was observed within this temperature range. This is attributed to the phonon drag effect on the dislocation motion. High dynamic tensile strength was maintained over the whole temperature range, including the conditions at which melting should start in a material under tension. This could be an indication of the existence of superheated states in solid crystals.

  16. Effect of Tensile Strain on Thermal Conductivity in Monolayer Graphene Nanoribbons: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; He, Xiaodong; Yang, Lin; Wu, Guoqiang; Sha, Jianjun; Hou, Chengyu; Yin, Cunlu; Pan, Acheng; Li, Zhongzhou; Liu, Yubai

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with different tensile strain is investigated by using a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. Significant increasing amplitude of the molecular thermal vibration, molecular potential energy vibration and thermal conductivity vibration of stretching GNRs were detected. Some 20%∼30% thermal conductivity decay is found in 9%∼15% tensile strain of GNR cases. It is explained by the fact that GNR structural ridges scatter some low-frequency phonons which pass in the direction perpendicular to the direction of GNR stretching which was indicated by a phonon density of state investigation. PMID:23881138

  17. Advances in post-necking flow curve identification of sheet metal through standard tensile testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppieters, Sam; Cooreman, Steven; Debruyne, Dimitri; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    The standard tensile test is still the most common material test to identify the hardening behavior of sheet metal. When using standard equipment and well-known analytical formulas, however, the hardening behavior can only be identified up to the point of maximum uniform elongation. Several methods which deal with the problem of extended flow curve identification of sheet metal through a tensile test have been proposed in the past. This paper gives an overview of the four classes of methods to identify post-necking hardening behavior of sheet metal through tensile testing. In addition, identification methods from the first (average values across the neck), second (Bridgeman correction, modified Siebel and Schwaigerer correction) and third class (special case of the VFM) are used to identify the post-necking hardening behavior of DC05. Finally, these results are used to assess the validity of the different methods.

  18. Mechanical tensile testing of titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, B. L.; Martinez, R. M.; Shirron, P.; Tuttle, J.; Galassi, N. M.; McGuinness, D. S.; Puckett, D.; Francis, J. J.; Flom, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Titanium 15-3-3-3 and Kevlar 49 are highly desired materials for structural components in cryogenic applications due to their low thermal conductivity at low temperatures. Previous tests have indicated that titanium 15-3-3-3 becomes increasingly brittle as the temperature decreases. Furthermore, little is known regarding the mechanical properties of Kevlar 49 at low temperatures, most specifically its Young's modulus. This testing investigates the mechanical properties of both materials at cryogenic temperatures through cryogenic mechanical tensile testing to failure. The elongation, ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and break strength of both materials are provided and analyzed here.

  19. Instrumented impact and residual tensile strength testing of eight-ply carbon eopoxy specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, A. T.

    1990-01-01

    Instrumented drop weight impact testing was utilized to examine a puncture-type impact on thin carbon-epoxy coupons. Four different material systems with various eight-ply lay-up configurations were tested. Specimens were placed over a 10.3-mm diameter hole and impacted with a smaller tup (4.2-mm diameter) than those used in previous studies. Force-time plots as well as data on absorbed energy and residual tensile strength were gathered and examined. It was found that a critical impact energy level existed for each material tested, at which point tensile strength began to rapidly decrease with increasing impact energy.

  20. Mechanical state assessment using lamb wave technique in static tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, M. V.; Shah, R. T.; Eremin, A. V.; Byakov, A. V.; Panin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of Lamb wave ultrasonic technique for damage (or mechanical state) evaluation of AA7068T3 specimens in the course of tensile testing. Two piezoelectric transducers (PZT), one of which is used as an actuator and the other as sensor, were adhesively bonded on the specimen surface using epoxy. Two frequencies of testing signals (60 kHz and 350 kHz) were used. The set of static tensile tests were performed. The recorded signals were processed to calculate the informative parameters in order to evaluate the changes in stress-strain state of the specimens and their microstructure.

  1. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of polytetrafluoroethylene (EPFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, Carl P; Brown, Eric N; Gray, George T

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) experiments have been utilized to probe the dynamic tensile responses of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). These fluoropolymers exhibit more irregular deformation and stochastic-based damage and failure mechanisms than the stable plastic elongation and shear instabilities observed in metals. The technique elucidates a number of tensile mechanisms that are consistent with quasi-static, SHPB, and Taylor Impact results. Similar to the observed ductile-to-brittle transition for Taylor Impact loading, PCTFE failure occurs at a peak velocity greater than for PTFE. However, for the Dyn-Ten-Ext PCTFE exhibits even greater resistance to failure due to the tensile stress-state. While PTFE generates a large number of small fragments when extruded through the die, PCTFE draws out a smaller number of larger particles that dynam ically evolve during the extrusion process through a com bination of local necking mechanisms and bulk relaxation. Under Dyn-Ten-Ext loading, the propensity of PTFE to fail along normal planes is observed without indication of any localization, while the PCTFE clearly forms necks during the initial extrusion process that continue to evolve.

  2. Dynamic tensile strength of terrestrial rocks and application to impact cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Huirong-Anita; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    2004-02-01

    Dynamic tensile strengths and fracture strengths of 3 terrestrial rocks, San Marcos gabbro, Coconino sandstone, and Sesia eclogite were determined by carrying out flat-plate (PMMA and aluminum) impact experiments on disc-shaped samples in the 5 to 60 m/sec range. Tensile stresses of 125 to 300 MPa and 245 to 580 MPa were induced for gabbro and eclogite, respectively (with duration time of ~1 ms). For sandstone (porosity 25%), tensile stresses normal to bedding of ~13 to 55 MPa were induced (with duration times of 2.4 and ~1.4 ms). Tensile crack failure was detected by the onset of shock-induced (damage) P and S wave velocity reduction. The dynamic tensile strength of gabbro determined from P and S wave velocity deficits agrees closely with the value of previously determined values by post-impact microscopic examination (~150 MPa). Tensile strength of Coconino sandstone is 20 MPa for a 14 ms duration time and 17 MPa for a 2.4 ms duration time. For Sesia eclogite, the dynamic tensile strength is ~240 MPa. The fracture strength for gabbro is ~250 MPa, ~500 MPa for eclogite, and ~40 MPa for sandstone. Relative crack induced reduction of S wave velocities is less than that of post-impact P wave velocity reductions for both gabbro and eclogite, indicating that the cracks were predominantly spall cracks. Impacts upon planetary surfaces induce tensile failure within shock-processed rocks beneath the resulting craters. The depth of cracking beneath impact craters can be determined both by seismic refraction methods for rocks of varying water saturation and, for dry conditions (e.g., the Moon), from gravity anomalies. In principle, depth of cracking is related to the equations-of-state of projectile and target, projectile dimension, and impact velocity. We constructed a crack-depth model applicable to Meteor Crater. For the observed 850 m depth of cracking, our preferred strength scaling model yields an impact velocity of 33 km/s and impactor radius of 9 m for an iron

  3. Evaluation of damage models by finite element prediction of fracture in cylindrical tensile test.

    PubMed

    Eom, Jaegun; Kim, Mincheol; Lee, Seongwon; Ryu, Hoyeun; Joun, Mansoo

    2014-10-01

    In this research, tensile tests of cylindrical specimens of a mild steel are predicted via the finite element method, with emphasis on the fracture predictions of various damage models. An analytical model is introduced for this purpose. An iterative material identification procedure is used to obtain the flow stress, making it possible to exactly predict a tensile test up to the fracture point, in the engineering sense. A node-splitting technique is used to generate the cracks on the damaged elements. The damage models of McClintock, Rice-Tracey, Cockcroft-Latham, Freudenthal, Brozzo et al. and Oyane et al. are evaluated by comparing their predictions from the tensile test perspective.

  4. Uniaxial tensile testing approaches for characterisation of atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M T; Cunnane, E M; Mulvihill, J J; Akyildiz, A C; Gijsen, F J H; Holzapfel, G A

    2014-03-03

    The pathological changes associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques within arterial vessels result in significant alterations to the mechanical properties of the diseased arterial wall. There are several methods available to characterise the mechanical behaviour of atherosclerotic plaque tissue, and it is the aim of this paper to review the use of uniaxial mechanical testing. In the case of atherosclerotic plaques, there are nine studies that employ uniaxial testing to characterise mechanical behaviour. A primary concern regarding this limited cohort of published studies is the wide range of testing techniques that are employed. These differing techniques have resulted in a large variance in the reported data making comparison of the mechanical behaviour of plaques from different vasculatures, and even the same vasculature, difficult and sometimes impossible. In order to address this issue, this paper proposes a more standardised protocol for uniaxial testing of diseased arterial tissue that allows for better comparisons and firmer conclusions to be drawn between studies. To develop such a protocol, this paper reviews the acquisition and storage of the tissue, the testing approaches, the post-processing techniques and the stress-strain measures employed by each of the nine studies. Future trends are also outlined to establish the role that uniaxial testing can play in the future of arterial plaque mechanical characterisation.

  5. Carbon Fiber Strand Tensile Failure Dynamic Event Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth L.; Reeder, James

    2016-01-01

    There are few if any clear, visual, and detailed images of carbon fiber strand failures under tension useful for determining mechanisms, sequences of events, different types of failure modes, etc. available to researchers. This makes discussion of physics of failure difficult. It was also desired to find out whether the test article-to-test rig interface (grip) played a part in some failures. These failures have nothing to do with stress rupture failure, thus representing a source of waste for the larger 13-00912 investigation into that specific failure type. Being able to identify or mitigate any competing failure modes would improve the value of the 13-00912 test data. The beginnings of the solution to these problems lay in obtaining images of strand failures useful for understanding physics of failure and the events leading up to failure. Necessary steps include identifying imaging techniques that result in useful data, using those techniques to home in on where in a strand and when in the sequence of events one should obtain imaging data.

  6. Determination of tensile and compressive moduli of laminae in unidirectionally reinforced laminate by flexural tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklinski, Mariusz

    2017-03-01

    The Euler-Bernoulli beam theory is widely used in engineering despite of various simplifications. One of which, that do matters in this article, is neglecting the difference between tensile and compressive moduli. Experimental tests reveal that for fibre reinforced composites tensile moduli are generally greater than compressive ones. This paper presents the results of testing the laminate composed of four unidirectionally glass reinforced laminae separated by layers of glass mat. The specimens were subjected to flexural, tensile and compressive loading in order to calculate corresponding moduli of elasticity. The results were compared using equations of Classical Beam Theory. Knowing the tensile and compressive moduli of glass mat reinforced laminae and performing flexural tests of laminate it is possible to calculate the tensile and compressive moduli of unidirectionally glass reinforced laminae. The experimental data taken into calculations correspond to linear normal strains of 0.0005 and 0.0025. The experimental data are consistent with results of calculations within acceptable margin of tolerance.

  7. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of conditioned foamed asphalt mix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of Indirect Tensile Strength (ITS) Test for samples prepared with reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP). Samples were conditioned in water at 25°C for 24 hours prior to testing. Results show that recycled aggregate from reclaimed asphalt pavement performs as well as virgin aggregate.

  8. A combined analytical-experimental tensile test technique for brittle materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    A semiconventional tensile test technique is developed for impact ices and other brittle materials. Accurate results have been obtained on ultimate strength and modulus of elasticity in a refrigerated ice test. It is noted that the technique can be used to determine the physical properties of impact ices accreted inside icing wind tunnels or other brittle materials.

  9. Finite Element Simulations for Investigating the Effects of Specimen Geometry in Superplastic Tensile Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazzal, Mohammad; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Curtis, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the behavior of superplastic materials is largely based on the uniaxial tensile test; yet the unique nature of these materials requires a particularly tailored testing methodology, different to that used with conventional materials. One of the crucial testing facets is the specimen geometry, which has a great impact on the outcome of a superplastic tensile test, as a result of the associated extreme conditions. And while researchers agree that it should take a notably different form than the typical dog-bone shape; there is no universal agreement on the specimen's particular size and dimensions, as evident by the disparities in test specimens used in the various superplastic testing efforts found throughout the literature. In view of that, this article is dedicated to understanding the effects of specimen geometry on the superplastic behavior of the material during tensile testing. Deformation of the Ti6Al4V titanium alloy is FE simulated based on a multitude of specimen geometries, covering a wide range of gauge length, gauge width, grip length, and grip width values. The study provides key insights on the influences of each geometrical parameter as well as their interactions, and provides recommendations on selecting the specimen's proportions for accurate and unified tensile testing of superplastic materials.

  10. A novel tensile test method to assess texture and gaping in salmon fillets.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Thomas J; Michie, Ian; Johnston, Ian A

    2010-05-01

    A new tensile strength method was developed to quantify the force required to tear a standardized block of Atlantic salmon muscle with the aim of identifying those samples more prone to factory downgrading as a result of softness and fillet gaping. The new method effectively overcomes problems of sample attachment encountered with previous tensile strength tests. The repeatability and sensitivity and predictability of the new technique were evaluated against other common instrumental texture measurement methods. The relationship between sensory assessments of firmness and parameters from the instrumental texture methods was also determined. Data from the new method were shown to have the strongest correlations with gaping severity (r =-0.514, P < 0.001) and the highest level of repeatability of data when analyzing cold-smoked samples. The Warner Bratzler shear method gave the most repeatable data from fresh samples and had the highest correlations between fresh and smoked product from the same fish (r = 0.811, P < 0.001). A hierarchical cluster analysis placed the tensile test in the top cluster, alongside the Warner Bratzler method, demonstrating that it also yields adequate data with respect to these tests. None of the tested sensory analysis attributes showed significant relationships to mechanical tests except fillet firmness, with correlations (r) of 0.42 for cylinder probe maximum force (P = 0.005) and 0.31 for tensile work (P = 0.04). It was concluded that the tensile test method developed provides an important addition to the available tools for mechanical analysis of salmon quality, particularly with respect to the prediction of gaping during factory processing, which is a serious commercial problem. A novel, reliable method of measuring flesh tensile strength in salmon, provides data of relevance to gaping.

  11. Tensile adhesion test measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berndt, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion measurements on plasma-sprayed coatings are briefly studied, including a critical analysis of the experimental scatter for duplicate tests. The application of a simple method which presents adhesion strength data in a fracture mechanics perspective is demonstrated. Available data are analyzed in a way which suggests an approach to finding the overall defect contribution to reducing the apparent strength of coatings.

  12. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, Easo P.

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.

  13. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; ...

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends ofmore » the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.« less

  14. Tensile tests and metallography of brazed AISI 316L specimens after irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groot, P.; Franconi, E.

    1994-08-01

    Stainless steel type 316L tensile specimens were vacuum brazed with three kinds of alloys: BNi-5, BNi-6, and BNi-7. The specimens were irradiated up to 0.7 dpa at 353 K in the High Flux Reactor at JRC Petten, the Netherlands. Tensile tests were performed at a constant displacement rate of 10 -3 s -1 at room temperature in the ECN hot cell facility. BNi-5 brazed specimens showed ductile behaviour. Necking and fractures were localized in the plate material. BNi-6 and BNi-7 brazed specimens failed brittle in the brazed zone. This was preceded by uniform deformation of the plate material. Tensile test results of irradiated specimens showed higher stresses due to radiation hardening and a reduction of the elongation of the plate material compared to the reference. SEM examination of the irradiated BNi-6 and BNi-7 fracture surfaces showed nonmetallic phases. These phases were not found in the reference specimens.

  15. ATI SAA Annex 3 Button Tensile Test Report I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the results of a study carried out under Splace Act Agreement SAA-EA-10-004 between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Astro Technology Incorpporated (ATI). NASA and ATI have entered into this agreement to collaborate on the development of technologies that can benefit both the US government space programs and the oil and gas industry. The report documents the results of a test done on an adnesive system for attaching new monitoring sensor devices to pipelines under Annex III of SAA-EA-10-004: "Proof-of-Concept Design and Testing of a Post Installed Sensing Device on Subsea Risers and Pipelines". The tasks of Annex III are to design and test a proof-of-concept sensing device for in-situ installation on pipelines, risers, or other structures deployed in deep water. The function of the sensor device is to measure various signals such as strain, stress and temperature. This study complements the work done, in Annex I of the SAA, on attaching a fiber optic sensing device to pipe via adhesive bonding. Both Annex I and Annex III studies were conducted in the Crew and Thermal System Division (CTSD) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in collaboration with ATI.

  16. Serration Phenomena Occurring During Tensile Tests of Three High-Manganese Twinning-Induced Plasticity (TWIP) Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Junghoon; Ahn, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Chin, Kwang-Geun; Lee, Sunghak

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the serration phenomena of two high-Mn TWIP steels and an Al-added TWIP steel were examined by tensile tests, and were explained by the microstructural evolution including formation of localized Portevin-Le Chatelier deformation bands and twins. In stress-strain curves of the high-Mn steels, serrations started in a fine and short shape, and their height and periodic interval increased with increasing strain, whereas the Al-added steel did not show any serrations. According to digital images of strain rate and strain obtained from a vision strain gage system, deformation bands were initially formed at the upper region of the gage section, and moved downward along the tensile loading direction. The time when the band formation started was matched with the time when one serration occurred in the stress-time curve. This serration behavior was generally explained by dynamic strain aging, which was closely related with the formation of deformation bands.

  17. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  18. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2009-03-10

    TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

  19. Dynamic tensile response of Zr-based bulk amorphous alloys: Fracture morphologies and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, J. P.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2010-06-01

    Plate impact experiments were conducted to examine the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based bulk amorphous alloys (BAAs) having a nominal composition of Zr56.7Cu15.3Ni12.5Nb5.0Al10.0Y0.5. The experimental configuration used in our work permitted soft recovery of the samples to allow a careful examination of the fractured samples along with real-time measurements of the sample free-surface velocity (FSV) histories. Tensile loading was preceded by elastic compressive loading to peak stresses in the 3.6 to 6.0 GPa range. Tensile damage in the recovered samples was examined using optical and electron microscopy. The microscopy results showed that the BAA samples exhibit a brittle behavior (as a glass) at the macroscopic level and a ductile behavior (as a metal) at the microscopic level; in addition, corrugations and bumps are observed at the nanoscale. The observed fracture morphologies are related to three key features present in our spall experiments: preceding compressive stress (3.6-6.0 GPa), high tensile loading rate (˜106/s), high mean tensile stress (˜2.3 GPa); and are intrinsically related to the amorphous glassy structure of the BAAs (free volume content). We propose that the compressive stress depletes the free volume content. With increasing compressive stress, the available free volume decreases causing a suppression of shear stresses during tension. Thus, the mean tensile component becomes more dominant at higher stresses. Consequently, the observed surface morphology results from brittle cleavage, causing an increased damage localization in the recovered samples spalled at higher stresses. These observations support the inferences made from measurements of FSV histories. The high tensile loading rate is proposed to be responsible for cracking by multiple shear band propagation and interception, rendering the observed serrated surface morphology. Finally, we proposed that the corrugations are created due to a succession of arrest and propagation of mode

  20. Rheological behaviour of commercial cooked meat products evaluated by tensile test and texture profile analysis (TPA).

    PubMed

    Romero de Ávila, M Dolores; Isabel Cambero, M; Ordóñez, Juan A; de la Hoz, Lorenzo; Herrero, Ana M

    2014-10-01

    The breaking strength (BS) and energy to fracture (EF) of commercial cooked meat products (CMP) manufactured from different entire pieces were determined by tensile test. BS and EF were related to texture profile analysis (TPA) and physico-chemical data. Two textural profiles were characterized mainly by BS, springiness adhesiveness and fat content. Multivariate regression analysis confirms that TPA parameters could be used to construct models to predict BS and EF. Therefore, just one TPA analysis will allow to obtain both TPA and tensile parameters, providing valuable information about mechanical behaviour to improve product handling at industrial level especially in sliced CMP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel temperature dependent tensile test of freestanding copper thin film structures.

    PubMed

    Smolka, M; Motz, C; Detzel, T; Robl, W; Griesser, T; Wimmer, A; Dehm, G

    2012-06-01

    The temperature dependent mechanical properties of the metallization of electronic power devices are studied in tensile tests on micron-sized freestanding copper beams at temperatures up to 400 °C. The experiments are performed in situ in a scanning electron microscope. This allows studying the micromechanical processes during the deformation and failure of the sample at different temperatures.

  2. Test report: effect of specimen orientation and location on the tensile properties of GTS forging 1472859

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Ryan J

    2008-02-12

    ASTM standardized tensile tests were performed on GTS WR-quality 1472859 forging (21-6- 9 material) to determine the dependence of tensile properties on specimen orientation (longitudinal vs. transverse) with respect to forging ‘grain flow’ and location within the forging. Statistical analyses of the results show that location has a statistically measurable effect on the longitudinal tensile properties (as compared to the error involved in tensile testing). However, this dependence of the properties with location, especially in the circumferential orientation, causes large variability in the results that clouds the statistical determination of any orientation effect. As a result, this forging is determined to be inhomogeneous along the forging length, with a significant range in properties observed (e.g. yield strengths from 85 to 117 ksi) and highest strength/lowest ductility in the spherical region. Additional specimens should be tested to acquire a higher resolution view of this inhomogeneity if the end use of the data is structural integrity analyses using spatially dependent properties; however, sufficient data is provided in this study to extract a statistical lower bound for conservative, homogeneous structural analysis.

  3. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Crustal Rocks and Application to Impact Cratering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, H.; Ahrens, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic tensile strengths of two crustal rocks, San Marcos gabbro and Coconino sandstone (Meteor Crater, Arizona), were determined by carrying out flat plate impact experiments. Porosity of San Marcos gabbro is very low, and the reported porosity for Coconino sandstone is approx. 25%. Aluminum flyer plates were used for gabbro with impact velocities of 13 to 50 m/s, which produce tensile stresses in the range of 120 to 450 MPa. PMMA flyer plates were used for sandstone with impact velocities of 5 to 25 m/s, resulting tensile stresses in the range of approx. 13 to 55 MPa. Impact was normal to the bedding of sandstone. Tensile duration times for two cases were approx. 1 and approx. 2.3 microns, respectively. Pre-shot and post-shot ultrasonic P and S wave velocities were measured for the targets. Velocity reduction for gabbro occurred at approx. 150 MPa, very close to the earlier result determined by microscopic examination. The reduction of S wave is slightly higher than that of P wave. This indicates that the impact-induced cracks were either aligned, or there were residual fluids within cracks, or both. Data for sandstone velocity reduction was few and scattered caused by its high porosity. The range of dynamic tensile strength of Coconino sandstone is within 25 and 30 MPa. Obvious radial cracks at certain stresses indicate that deformation was not restricted to one dimensional strain as being assumed. Spall fragmentation occurred above 40 MPa. The combination of impact velocities, U (km/s), and impactor radii, a0)(m, are constrained by Meteor Crater fracture depth, approx. 850 m, and the dynamic tensile fracture strength from our experiments, 40 MPa. Volume of the crater for each impact was calculated using V = 0.009mU1.65, where V is crater volume (cu m), m is the mass of the impactor (kg). Volume of impact with U = 28 km/s, a0 = 10 m is close to the real Meteor Crater volume, 7.6e7 cu m. Impact energy for this case is 3.08 Mt., which agrees well with theoretical

  4. Assessment of local vocal fold deformation characteristics in an in vitro static tensile test.

    PubMed

    Dollinger, M; Berry, D A; Huttner, B; Bohr, C

    2011-08-01

    Voice quality is strongly dependent on vocal fold dynamics, which in turn are dependent on lung pressure and vocal fold biomechanics. Numerical and physical models are often used to investigate the interactions of these different subsystems. However, the utility of numerical and physical models is limited unless appropriately validated with data from physiological models. Hence a method that enables analysis of local vocal fold deformations along the entire surface is presented. In static tensile tests, forces are applied to distinctive working points being located in cover and muscle, respectively, so that specific layer properties can be investigated. The forces are directed vertically upward and are applied along or above the vocal fold edge. The resulting deformations are analyzed using multiple perspectives and three-dimensional reconstruction. Deformation characteristics of four human vocal folds were investigated. Preliminary results showed two phases of deformation: a range with a small slope for small deformations fading into a significant nonlinear deformation trend with a high slope. An increase of tissue stiffness from posterior to anterior was detected. This trend is more significant for muscle and in the mid-anterior half of the vocal fold.

  5. Analysis of Factors Influencing Measurement Accuracy of Al Alloy Tensile Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornik, Bojan; Žužek, Borut; Sedlaček, Marko; Kevorkijan, Varužan; Hostej, Boris

    2016-02-01

    In order to properly use materials in design, a complete understanding of and information on their mechanical properties, such as yield and ultimate tensile strength must be obtained. Furthermore, as the design of automotive parts is constantly pushed toward higher limits, excessive measuring uncertainty can lead to unexpected premature failure of the component, thus requiring reliable determination of material properties with low uncertainty. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of different metrology factors, including the number of tested samples, specimens machining and surface quality, specimens input diameter, type of testing and human error on the tensile test results and measurement uncertainty when performed on 2xxx series Al alloy. Results show that the most significant contribution to measurement uncertainty comes from the number of samples tested, which can even exceed 1 %. Furthermore, moving from experimental laboratory conditions to very intense industrial environment further amplifies measurement uncertainty, where even if using automated systems human error cannot be neglected.

  6. Comparative tensile and torsion tests as a method of determination of the crack growth mechanism in corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Marichev, V.A.

    1987-11-01

    The author present and review tensile and torsional testing techniques for determining the contribution of electrochemical corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement to the mechanics of crack propagation in aluminium and molybdenum alloys and in a nickel-chromium steel. They suggest and analyze testing parameters and considerations whose implementations are shown to increase the accuracy of tensile and torsion determinations of fracture and embrittlement behavior.

  7. In situ micro-tensile testing on proton beam-irradiated stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H. T.; Reichardt, A.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2017-09-01

    Small-scale mechanical testing techniques are currently being explored and developed for engineering applications. In particular, micro-tensile testing can add tremendous value, since the entire stress-strain curve, including the strain to failure, can be measured directly. In this work, 304 stainless steel specimens irradiated with 2 MeV protons to 10 dpa (full-cascade setting in the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter, SRIM, software) at 360 °C was evaluated using micro-tensile testing. It was found that even on the micron scale, the measured strain corresponds well with macroscopic expectations. In addition, a new approach to analyzing sudden slip events is presented.

  8. Ten deg off-axis tensile test for intralaminar shear characterization of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen for the intralaminar shear characterization of unidirectional composites. Composite mechanics, a combined-stress failure criterion, and a finite element analysis were used to determine theoretically the stress-strain variation across the specimen width and the relative stress and strain magnitudes at the 10 deg plane. Strain gages were used to measure the strain variation across the specimen width at specimen midlength and near the end tabs. Specimens from Mod-I/epoxy, T-300/epoxy, and S-glass/epoxy were used in the experimental program. It was found that the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen is suitable for intralaminar shear characterization and it is recommended that it should be considered as a possible standard test specimen for such a characterization.

  9. Investigation of the applicability of a tensile testing machine for measuring mucoadhesive strength.

    PubMed

    Dyvik, K; Graffner, C

    1992-01-01

    The applicability of a tensile testing machine (M30K, JJ Lloyd Instruments Ltd, GB) is investigated for measuring mucoadhesive strengths. A sample of an aqueous dispersion of a polymer with expected mucoadhesive properties is placed between two homemade discs of polyoxymethylene. The upper disc is mounted on a movable part of the machine while the lower disc is fixed on the stationary frame. A tensile force is submitted and the maximum detachment force at fracture and the adhesion work are estimated from the force displacement curve recorded. In some experiments, native mucous tissue of the large intestine of pigs was glued to the upper disc. Four polymers polycarbophil (Carbopol EX-55), carboxypolymethylene (Carbopol 934P), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (Methocel K4M), and sodium alginate, are used in five different concentrations. At least three measurements are made of each polymer and concentration. Viscosity and osmolality are determined. By standardizing the time of sample equilibration and the run rate before measurement, it is possible to get good reproducibility of the tensile values. Based on the maximum nominal breaking force and the work consumed, it is concluded that the tensile strength is dependent both on the concentration and the type of polymer. The conclusions are the same independent of whether mucous pig tissue is used, or not. The same rank order in adhesive properties of the polymers is achieved as from using modified surface tensiometers.

  10. A tensile test to facilitate identification of defects in dentine bonded specimens.

    PubMed

    Nakabayashi, N; Watanabe, A; Arao, T

    1998-05-01

    To determine the efficacy of a miniaturized dumbbell test procedure designed to more easily identify defect(s) in bonded dentine test specimens. Extracted human dentine substrates were pre-conditioned with 10-3 solution for 10, 30 or 60 s prior to dentine bonding with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. Miniaturized dumbbell-shaped test specimens were prepared from the resin bonded samples. After 24 h storage in 37 degrees C water, the specimens were tensile-loaded to failure. Fractured surfaces and cross-sections were examined and compared under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cohesive failure within the bonding resin was observed in specimens pre-conditioned for 10 s. The tensile bond strength of these was excellent. Bond strengths of specimens that were pre-conditioned for 30 and 60 s were significantly lower, and defects in these specimens, formerly difficult or impossible to identify, were readily identified under SEM and TEM microscopy. The proposed method of tensile stressing to failure and microscopically examining fractured miniaturized dumbbell-shaped test specimens is a simple and reproducible test procedure. The protocol is capable of clearly elucidating defective resin infiltration of demineralized dentine in bonded interfaces. These defects are difficult to visualize by conventional and/or ISO recommended methods.

  11. A Microsample Tensile Test Application: Local Strength of Impact Welds Between Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzing, J. T.; He, M.; Vivek, A.; Taber, G. A.; Mills, M. J.; Daehn, G. S.

    2017-03-01

    Microsample tensile testing was conducted to evaluate the quality of impact welds created by vaporizing foil actuator welding. Tensile test samples with a gauge length of 0.6 mm were electro-discharge machined out of welds created between 1-mm-thick aluminum alloy type 6061 (AA6061) sheets and 6-mm-thick copper (Cu110) plates. Aluminum sheets were used as flyers, while copper plates acted as targets. Flyer sheets in T6 as well as T4 temper conditions were utilized to create welds. Some of the welds made with T4 temper flyers were heat treated to a T6 temper. It was found that the welds made with T4 temper flyers were slightly stronger (max. of 270 MPa) than those produced with T6 temper flyers. Generally, failure propagated in a brittle manner across the weld interface; however, elemental mapping reveals material transfer on either member of the welded system. This work proves the feasibility to apply microsample tensile testing to assess impact welding, even when conducted with flyer sheets of 1 mm or less, and provides insight that is complementary to other test methods.

  12. The effectiveness of combined gripping method in tensile testing of UHMWPE single yarn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. X.; Hazell, P. J.; Shankar, K.; Morozov, E. V.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental study on the effectiveness of combined gripping method employed in the tensile testing of UHMWPE (Dyneema® SK75) single yarn. Seven different solutions including epoxy, acrylic, and ethyl cyanoacrylate adhesives were tested under quasi-static loadings in order to determine the most effective adhesive for bonding UHMWPE single yarn to aluminium sheets. The ethyl cyanoacrylate adhesive combined with polyolefin surface primer was found to be the best choice which could prevent yarn slippage and ensure the failure of yarn occurs in the gauge section. The single yarns were then tested at three strain rates of 3.3×10-5, 3.3×10-3, and 0.33 s-1. The tensile strength, maximum strain, and Young's modulus were determined from the measured stress-strain curves and compared with the values from literature; the results showed these tensile properties of single yarn depend on strain rate over the range tested.

  13. A Microsample Tensile Test Application: Local Strength of Impact Welds Between Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzing, J. T.; He, M.; Vivek, A.; Taber, G. A.; Mills, M. J.; Daehn, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    Microsample tensile testing was conducted to evaluate the quality of impact welds created by vaporizing foil actuator welding. Tensile test samples with a gauge length of 0.6 mm were electro-discharge machined out of welds created between 1-mm-thick aluminum alloy type 6061 (AA6061) sheets and 6-mm-thick copper (Cu110) plates. Aluminum sheets were used as flyers, while copper plates acted as targets. Flyer sheets in T6 as well as T4 temper conditions were utilized to create welds. Some of the welds made with T4 temper flyers were heat treated to a T6 temper. It was found that the welds made with T4 temper flyers were slightly stronger (max. of 270 MPa) than those produced with T6 temper flyers. Generally, failure propagated in a brittle manner across the weld interface; however, elemental mapping reveals material transfer on either member of the welded system. This work proves the feasibility to apply microsample tensile testing to assess impact welding, even when conducted with flyer sheets of 1 mm or less, and provides insight that is complementary to other test methods.

  14. Ethylene propylene cable degradation during LOCA research tests: tensile properties at the completion of accelerated aging

    SciTech Connect

    Bustard, L.D.

    1982-05-01

    Six ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) insulation materials were aged at elevated temperature and radiation stress exposures common in cable LOCA qualification tests. Material samples were subjected to various simultaneous and sequential aging simulations in preparation for accident environmental exposures. Tensile properties subsequent to the aging exposure sequences are reported. The tensile properties of some, but not all, specimens were sensitive to the order of radiation and elevated temperature stress exposure. Other specimens showed more severe degradation when simultaneously exposed to radiation and elevated temperature as opposed to the sequential exposure to the same stresses. Results illustrate the difficulty in defining a single test procedure for nuclear safety-related qualification of EPR elastomers. A common worst-case sequential aging sequence could not be identified.

  15. Tensile test of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride at elevated temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsusue, K.; Fujisawa, Y.; Takahara, K.

    1985-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile strength tests of pressureless sintered silicon nitride were carried out in air at temperatures ranging from room temperature up to 1600 C. Silicon nitrides containing Y2O3, Al2O3, Al2O3-MgO, or MgO-CeO2 additives were tested. The results show that the composition of the additive used influences the strength characteristics of the silicon nitride. The tensile strength rapidly decreased at temperatures above 1000 C for the materials containing MgO as the additive and above 1000 C for the material with Y2O3. When the temperature increased to as high as 1300 C, the strength decreased to about 10 percent of the room temperature strength in each case. Observations of the fracture origin and of the crack propagation on the fracture surfaces are discussed.

  16. Microstructure and fracture behavior of F82H steel under different irradiation and tensile test conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of martensitic steel F82H were irradiated to doses ranging from 10.7 dpa/850 appm He to 19.6 dpa/1740 appm He at temperatures between 165 and 305 °C in the second experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-II). Tensile tests were conducted at different temperatures and various fracture modes were observed. Microstructural changes including irradiation-induced defect clusters, dislocation loops and helium bubbles under different irradiation conditions were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The deformation microstructures of tensile tested specimens were carefully examined to understand the underlying deformation mechanisms. Deformation twinning was for the first time observed in irradiated martensitic steels. A change of deformation mechanism from dislocation channeling to deformation twinning was observed when the fracture mode changed from rather ductile (quasi-cleavage) to brittle (intergranular or cleavage and intergranular mixed).

  17. Single-crystal copper nanorods under uniaxial tensile load with different period by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zailin; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Guowei; Yang, Yong; Wang, Xizhi

    The single crystal nanorods under uniaxial loading and unloading tensile with different period along crystallographic orientations [1 1 0] and axial directions being applied constant tensile rates are simulated respectively by method of molecular dynamics to elucidate the effect of periodical tensile stress and another mechanical properties of the single crystal copper within the Nano-scope. After stimulation, we compare the different features and phenomenon between the loading style of period and none of period. In the case of periodical loading, nanorods show the various maximum stress at yielding stage, and after yield, the degree of fatigue depends on the period of step heavily. Our results suggest that the mechanical character of single crystal copper nanorods is remarkably influenced by the steps of loading period when we use the maximum yield stress σs at none of periodical loading condition as underlying reference. At the following text description, it has been expressed that the total number of loading and unloading circle may affect the mechanical response of the MD system. When the semi-periodical loading steps or the total steps of whole periodical load near to 5.1 × 103 steps (8.7 × 103 steps for the other model), the model system occurs to the Nano-scale fatigue. And the Nano-scale fatigue will lead to the yield point decreasing in turn on account of various periodical steps.

  18. Necking of Q&P steel during uniaxial tensile test with the aid of DIC technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Lin, Jianping; Min, Junying; Pang, Zheng; Ye, You

    2013-05-01

    A lot of research has been focused on the necking process during the plastic deformation of sheet metals, but the localized necking is rarely distinguished form diffused necking by experiments, due to the limit of measurement equipment and method. Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) steel is a 3rd generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS). Its good combination of high strength and ductility ensures potential application in automobile industry. Uniaxial tensile tests of QP980 steel sheet at five strain rates are performed to investigate the necking process and the effect of strain rate on necking behavior of Q&P steel. Digital image correlation (DIC) method is applied during tensile tests, and evolutions of major strain, minor strain and normal strain distributions along gauge section of the tensile specimens are obtained. The diffused and localized necking strains are determined according to SWIFT necking theory and HILL necking theory respectively. The test results indicate that with the increasing of strain rate in the investigated range, the diffused necking strain decreases from 0.152 to 0.120 and localized necking strain decreases from 0.245 to 0.137. Meanwhile, the difference of the two strains decreases form 0.096 to 0.017. Thus it can be concluded that strain rate has an influence on both necking strains during the deformation of QP980 steel sheet. Diffused and localized necking strains are determined by uniaxial tensile tests with the aid of DIC technique and the effect of strain rate on necking strains is evaluated.

  19. Thermal and tensile strength testing of thermally-conductive adhesives and carbon foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chertok, M.; Fu, M.; Irving, M.; Neher, C.; Shi, M.; Tolfa, K.; Tripathi, M.; Vinson, Y.; Wang, R.; Zheng, G.

    2017-01-01

    Future collider detectors, including silicon tracking detectors planned for the High Luminosity LHC, will require components and mechanical structures providing unprecedented strength-to-mass ratios, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. This paper studies carbon foam used in conjunction with thermally conductive epoxy and thermally conductive tape for such applications. Thermal performance and tensile strength measurements of aluminum-carbon foam-adhesive stacks are reported, along with initial radiation damage test results.

  20. Biomechanical Characterization of Human Soft Tissues Using Indentation and Tensile Testing

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Michelle; Premakumar, Yaami; Seifalian, Alexander; Butler, Peter Edward; Szarko, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative medicine aims to engineer materials to replace or restore damaged or diseased organs. The mechanical properties of such materials should mimic the human tissues they are aiming to replace; to provide the required anatomical shape, the materials must be able to sustain the mechanical forces they will experience when implanted at the defect site. Although the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered scaffolds are of great importance, many human tissues that undergo restoration with engineered materials have not been fully biomechanically characterized. Several compressive and tensile protocols are reported for evaluating materials, but with large variability it is difficult to compare results between studies. Further complicating the studies is the often destructive nature of mechanical testing. Whilst an understanding of tissue failure is important, it is also important to have knowledge of the elastic and viscoelastic properties under more physiological loading conditions. This report aims to provide a minimally destructive protocol to evaluate the compressive and tensile properties of human soft tissues. As examples of this technique, the tensile testing of skin and the compressive testing of cartilage are described. These protocols can also be directly applied to synthetic materials to ensure that the mechanical properties are similar to the native tissue. Protocols to assess the mechanical properties of human native tissue will allow a benchmark by which to create suitable tissue-engineered substitutes. PMID:28060331

  1. Biomechanical Characterization of Human Soft Tissues Using Indentation and Tensile Testing.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Michelle; Premakumar, Yaami; Seifalian, Alexander; Butler, Peter Edward; Szarko, Matthew

    2016-12-13

    Regenerative medicine aims to engineer materials to replace or restore damaged or diseased organs. The mechanical properties of such materials should mimic the human tissues they are aiming to replace; to provide the required anatomical shape, the materials must be able to sustain the mechanical forces they will experience when implanted at the defect site. Although the mechanical properties of tissue-engineered scaffolds are of great importance, many human tissues that undergo restoration with engineered materials have not been fully biomechanically characterized. Several compressive and tensile protocols are reported for evaluating materials, but with large variability it is difficult to compare results between studies. Further complicating the studies is the often destructive nature of mechanical testing. Whilst an understanding of tissue failure is important, it is also important to have knowledge of the elastic and viscoelastic properties under more physiological loading conditions. This report aims to provide a minimally destructive protocol to evaluate the compressive and tensile properties of human soft tissues. As examples of this technique, the tensile testing of skin and the compressive testing of cartilage are described. These protocols can also be directly applied to synthetic materials to ensure that the mechanical properties are similar to the native tissue. Protocols to assess the mechanical properties of human native tissue will allow a benchmark by which to create suitable tissue-engineered substitutes.

  2. Effects of reclaimed asphalt pavement on indirect tensile strength test of foamed asphalt mix tested in dry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yati Katman, Herda; Rasdan Ibrahim, Mohd; Yazip Matori, Mohd; Norhisham, Shuhairy; Ismail, Norlela

    2013-06-01

    Indirect tensile strength (ITS) test was conducted to analyse strength of the foamed asphalt mixes incorporating reclaimed asphalt pavement. Samples were tested for ITS after cured in the oven at 40°C for 72 hours. This testing condition known as dry condition or unconditioned. Laboratory results show that reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) contents insignificantly affect the ITS results. ITS results significantly affected by foamed bitumen contents.

  3. Deformation Behavior of Severely Deformed Al and Related Mechanisms Through Warm Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charkhesht, V.; Kazeminezhad, M.

    2017-03-01

    Flow stress and ductility behaviors of the annealed and severely deformed Al were investigated at warm deformation temperatures. Constrained groove pressing (CGP) method as a severe plastic deformation process was used. The tensile test was carried out at the temperature range of the 298-573 K and strain rate range of 0.001-0.1 s-1 to present the elevated temperature deformation behavior utilizing hyperbolic sine constitutive equation. The flow stress of the CGPed sample is increased with the number of CGP passes and decreased with temperature. Dynamic recovery and strain softening are found as main restoration mechanisms. Flow stress amounts are not remarkably affected by the strain rate. Values of the elongation are decreased with the number of CGP passes. Values of the calculated strain rate sensitivity are utilized to justify the elongation behavior. Shear bands created by CGP remarkably decrease the fracture elongation values. Temperature interval of 298-473 K cannot remarkably affect the flow stress and ductility. The interval of 473-573 K is chosen as critical temperature interval in which the values of flow stress and elongation are remarkably decreased and increased, respectively. Increasing the temperature up to 573 K causes recrystallization in shear bands. Scanning electron microscope was used to study fracture surface which can truly predict the elongation behavior. With increasing the temperature, the shear decohesion area is gradually replaced with fully dimpled structures. Finally, hot deformation activation energy for CGPed samples was calculated about 85 kJ/mol which is close to the grain boundary diffusion activation energy in pure Al.

  4. Deformation Behavior of Severely Deformed Al and Related Mechanisms Through Warm Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charkhesht, V.; Kazeminezhad, M.

    2017-01-01

    Flow stress and ductility behaviors of the annealed and severely deformed Al were investigated at warm deformation temperatures. Constrained groove pressing (CGP) method as a severe plastic deformation process was used. The tensile test was carried out at the temperature range of the 298-573 K and strain rate range of 0.001-0.1 s-1 to present the elevated temperature deformation behavior utilizing hyperbolic sine constitutive equation. The flow stress of the CGPed sample is increased with the number of CGP passes and decreased with temperature. Dynamic recovery and strain softening are found as main restoration mechanisms. Flow stress amounts are not remarkably affected by the strain rate. Values of the elongation are decreased with the number of CGP passes. Values of the calculated strain rate sensitivity are utilized to justify the elongation behavior. Shear bands created by CGP remarkably decrease the fracture elongation values. Temperature interval of 298-473 K cannot remarkably affect the flow stress and ductility. The interval of 473-573 K is chosen as critical temperature interval in which the values of flow stress and elongation are remarkably decreased and increased, respectively. Increasing the temperature up to 573 K causes recrystallization in shear bands. Scanning electron microscope was used to study fracture surface which can truly predict the elongation behavior. With increasing the temperature, the shear decohesion area is gradually replaced with fully dimpled structures. Finally, hot deformation activation energy for CGPed samples was calculated about 85 kJ/mol which is close to the grain boundary diffusion activation energy in pure Al.

  5. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  6. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  7. Strength, Hardening, and Failure Observed by In Situ TEM Tensile Testing.

    PubMed

    Kiener, Daniel; Kaufmann, Petra; Minor, Andrew M

    2012-11-01

    We present in situ transmission electron microscope tensile tests on focused ion beam fabricated single and multiple slip oriented Cu tensile samples with thicknesses in the range of 100-200 nm. Both crystal orientations fail by localized shear. While failure occurs after a few percent plastic strain and limited hardening in the single slip case, the multiple slip samples exhibit extended homogenous deformation and necking due to the activation of multiple dislocation sources in conjunction with significant hardening. The hardening behavior at 1% plastic strain is even more pronounced compared to compression samples of the same orientation due to the absence of sample taper and the interface to the compression platen. Moreover, we show for the first time that the strain rate sensitivity of such FIB prepared samples is an order of magnitude higher than that of bulk Cu.

  8. Application of a tensile-strength test method to the evaluation of hydrating hair products.

    PubMed

    Mercelot, V

    1998-08-01

    The usual methods applied to studying the hydration state of hair (e.g. gravimetry, microscopy, evaporimetry) are mostly concerned with a limited area of the fibre. Consequently, the results obtained do not reflect the variability of the physicochemical properties of the whole fibre. Moreover, there are not many experimental methods to evaluate the hydrating power of hair care products in the literature. This study proposes a new method to measure the hydration state of treated or untreated hair by using a tensile strength test. A graphic analysis of tensile strength variation as a function of relative humidity after hair treatment allows the calculation of three hydration indexes: protection index, instant hydration index and permanent hydration index. This technique can give useful information on the behaviour of hair versus relative humidity and on the different hydrating mechanisms exhibited by hair care products.

  9. Direct Shear Tests of Sandstone Under Constant Normal Tensile Stress Condition Using a Simple Auxiliary Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Duofeng; Huang, Da

    2017-06-01

    Tension-shear failure is a typical failure mode in the rock masses in unloading zones induced by excavation or river incision, etc., such as in excavation-disturbed zone of deep underground caverns and superficial rocks of high steep slopes. However, almost all the current shear failure criteria for rock are usually derived on the basis of compression-shear failure. This paper proposes a simple device for use with a servo-controlled compression-shear testing machine to conduct the tension-shear tests of cuboid rock specimens, to test the direct shear behavior of sandstone under different constant normal tensile stress conditions ( σ = -1, -1.5, -2, -2.5 and -3 MPa) as well as the uniaxial tension behavior. Generally, the fracture surface roughness decreases and the proportion of comminution areas in fracture surface increases as the change of stress state from tension to tension-shear and to compression-shear. Stepped fracture is a primary fracture pattern in the tension-shear tests. The shear stiffness, shear deformation and normal deformation (except the normal deformation for σ = -1 MPa) decrease during shearing, while the total normal deformation containing the pre-shearing portion increases as the normal tensile stress level (| σ|) goes up. Shear strength is more sensitive to the normal tensile stress than to the normal compressive stress, and the power function failure criterion (or Mohr envelope form of Hoek-Brown criterion) is examined to be the optimal criterion for the tested sandstone in the full region of tested normal stress in this study.

  10. Investigation on thermoformability of PLA by rheological and hot tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, Emilia; Iannaccone, Giovanni; Scarfato, Paola; Di Maio, Luciano; Incarnato, Loredana

    2012-07-01

    In this work the correlation between the thermoformability of different grades of polylactide acid (PLA 4032D, PLA 4042D and PLA 2003D) and their mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties was explored. In particular, hot tensile tests, at different stretching temperatures and crosshead speeds, were performed in order to identify an optimum windows of temperature and strain rate for improved thermoforming performance. The properties measured from the creep experiments were correlated with the propensity of PLA sheet to sag, while the unrecovered strains by the creep recovery tests were associated to mold replication attitude of the materials investigated.

  11. In situ tensile testing of nanofibers by combining atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hang, Fei; Lu, Dun; Bailey, Russell J; Jimenez-Palomar, Ines; Stachewicz, Urszula; Cortes-Ballesteros, Beatriz; Davies, Martin; Zech, Martin; Bödefeld, Christoph; Barber, Asa H

    2011-09-07

    A nanomechanical testing set-up is developed by integrating an atomic force microscope (AFM) for force measurements with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to provide imaging capabilities. Electrospun nanofibers of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), nylon-6 and biological mineralized collagen fibrils (MCFs) from antler bone were manipulated and tensile-tested using the AFM-SEM set-up. The complete stress-strain behavior to failure of individual nanofibers was recorded and a diversity of mechanical properties observed, highlighting how this technique is able to elucidate mechanical behavior due to structural composition at nanometer length scales.

  12. Self-Healing Nanofiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites. 1. Tensile Testing and Recovery of Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Wook; An, Seongpil; Jo, Hong Seok; Yoon, Sam S; Yarin, Alexander L

    2015-09-09

    The present work aims at development of self-healing materials capable of partially restoring their mechanical properties under the conditions of prolonged periodic loading and unloading, which is characteristic, for example, of aerospace applications. Composite materials used in these and many other applications frequently reveal multiple defects stemming from their original inhomogeneity, which facilitates microcracking and delamination at ply interfaces. Self-healing nanofiber mats may effectively prevent such damage without compromising material integrity. Two types of core-shell nanofibers were simultaneously electrospun onto the same substrate in order to form a mutually entangled mat. The first type of core-shell fibers consisted of resin monomer (dimethylsiloxane) within the core and polyacrylonitrile within the shell. The second type of core-shell nanofibers consisted of cure (dimethyl-methyl hydrogen-siloxane) within the core and polyacrylonitrile within the shell. These mutually entangled nanofiber mats were used for tensile testing, and they were also encased in polydimethylsiloxane to form composites that were also subsequently subjected to tensile testing. During tensile tests, the nanofibers can be damaged in stretching up to the plastic regime of deformation. Then, the resin monomer and cure was released from the cores and the polydimethylsiloxane resin was polymerized, which might be expected to result in the self-healing properties of these materials. To reveal and evaluate the self-healing properties of the polyacrylonitrile-resin-cure nanofiber mats and their composites, the results were compared to the tensile test results of the monolithic polyacrylonitrile nanofiber mats or composites formed by encasing polyacrylonitrile nanofibers in a polydimethylsiloxane matrix. The latter do not possess self-healing properties, and indeed, do not recover their mechanical characteristics, in contrast to the polyacrylonitrile-resin-cure nanofiber mats and

  13. Orthodontic brackets removal under shear and tensile bond strength resistance tests - a comparative test between light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, P. C. G.; Porto-Neto, S. T.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    We have investigated if a new LEDs system has enough efficient energy to promote efficient shear and tensile bonding strength resistance under standardized tests. LEDs 470 ± 10 nm can be used to photocure composite during bracket fixation. Advantages considering resistance to tensile and shear bonding strength when these systems were used are necessary to justify their clinical use. Forty eight human extracted premolars teeth and two light sources were selected, one halogen lamp and a LEDs system. Brackets for premolar were bonded through composite resin. Samples were submitted to standardized tests. A comparison between used sources under shear bonding strength test, obtained similar results; however, tensile bonding test showed distinct results: a statistical difference at a level of 1% between exposure times (40 and 60 seconds) and even to an interaction between light source and exposure time. The best result was obtained with halogen lamp use by 60 seconds, even during re-bonding; however LEDs system can be used for bonding and re-bonding brackets if power density could be increased.

  14. An investigation of the dynamic separation of spot welds under plane tensile pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Bohan; Fan, Chunlei; Chen, Danian; Wang, Huanran; Zhou, Fenghua

    2014-08-01

    We performed ultra-high-speed tests for purely opening spot welds using plane tensile pulses. A gun system generated a parallel impact of a projectile plate onto a welded plate. Induced by the interactions of the release waves, the welded plate opened purely under the plane tensile pulses. We used the laser velocity interferometer system for any reflector to measure the velocity histories of the free surfaces of the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate. We then used a scanning electron microscope to investigate the recovered welded plates. We found that the interfacial failure mode was mainly a brittle fracture and the cracks propagated through the spot nugget, while the partial interfacial failure mode was a mixed fracture comprised ductile fracture and brittle fracture. We used the measured velocity histories to evaluate the tension stresses in the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate by applying the characteristic theory. We also discussed the different constitutive behaviors of the metals under plane shock loading and under uniaxial split Hopkinson pressure bar tests. We then compared the numerically simulated velocity histories of the free surfaces of the free part and the spot weld of the welded plate with the measured results. The numerical simulations made use of the fracture stress criteria, and then the computed fracture modes of the tests were compared with the recovered results.

  15. Localized strain measurements of the intervertebral disc annulus during biaxial tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-01-01

    Both inter-lamellar and intra-lamellar failures of the annulus have been described as potential modes of disc herniation. Attempts to characterize initial lamellar failure of the annulus have involved tensile testing of small tissue samples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a method of measuring local surface strains through image analysis of a tensile test conducted on an isolated sample of annular tissue in order to enhance future studies of intervertebral disc failure. An annulus tissue sample was biaxial strained to 10%. High-resolution images captured the tissue surface throughout testing. Three test conditions were evaluated: submerged, non-submerged and marker. Surface strains were calculated for the two non-marker conditions based on motion of virtual tracking points. Tracking algorithm parameters (grid resolution and template size) were varied to determine the effect on estimated strains. Accuracy of point tracking was assessed through a comparison of the non-marker conditions to a condition involving markers placed on tissue surface. Grid resolution had a larger effect on local strain than template size. Average local strain error ranged from 3% to 9.25% and 0.1% to 2.0%, for the non-submerged and submerged conditions, respectively. Local strain estimation has a relatively high potential for error. Submerging the tissue provided superior strain estimates.

  16. Lamb wave ultrasonic evaluation of welded AA2024 specimens at tensile static and fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, M. V.; Byakov, A. V.; Shah, R. T.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of Lamb waves ultrasonic testing technique applied for evaluation of different stress-strain and damaged state of aluminum specimens at static and fatigue loading in order to develop a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) approach. The experimental results of tensile testing of AA2024T3 specimens with welded joints are presented. Piezoelectric transducers used as actuators and sensors were adhesively bonded to the specimen's surface using two component epoxy. The set of static and cyclic tensile tests with two frequencies of acoustic testing (50 kHz and 335 kHz) were performed. The recorded signals were processed to calculate the maximum envelope in order to evaluate the changes of the stress-strain state of the specimen and its microstructure during static tension. The registered data are analyzed and discussed in terms of signal attenuation due to the formation of fatigue defects during cyclic loading. Understanding the relations between acoustic signal features and fatigue damages will provide us the ability to determine the damage state of the structure and its residual lifetime in order to design a robust SHM system.

  17. Tensile strength testing for resorbable mesh fixation systems in laparoscopic ventral hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Reynvoet, Emmelie; Berrevoet, Frederik; De Somer, Filip; Vercauteren, Griet; Vanoverbeke, Ingrid; Chiers, Koen; Troisi, Roberto

    2012-09-01

    In an attempt to improve patient outcome and quality of life after laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, resorbable fixation devices have been developed to allow adequate mesh fixation while minimizing accompanying side-effects as tack erosion and adhesion formation. In experimental set-up, 24 pigs were treated by laparoscopic mesh placement. Two different meshes (PP/ORC and PP/ePTFE) and four fixation devices were evaluated: a 6.4 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide pushpin (tack I), a 6.8 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide with blunt tip (tack II), a 4.1 mm poly(glycolide-co-L-lactide) (tack III) and one titanium tack (control tack). A first group of animals (n = 12) was euthanized after 2 weeks survival and a second group (n = 12) after 6 months. At euthanasia, a relaparoscopy was performed to assess adhesion formation followed by laparotomy with excision of the entire abdominal wall. Tensile strength of the individual fixation systems was tested with the use of a tensiometer by measuring the force to pull the tack out of the mesh. Additionally, the foreign body reaction to the fixation systems was evaluated histologically as was their potential degradation. At 2 weeks the tensile strength was significantly higher for the control tack (31.98 N/cm²) compared to the resorbable devices. Except for tack II, the tensile strength was higher when the devices were fixed in a PP/ePTFE mesh compared to the PP/ORC mesh. After 6 months only tack III was completely resorbed, while tack I (9.292 N/cm²) had the lowest tensile strength. At this time-point similar tensile strength was observed for both tack II (29.56 N/cm²) and the control tack (27.77 N/cm²). Adhesions seem to be more depending on the type of mesh, in favor of PP/ePTFE. At long term, the 4.1 mm poly(glycolide-co-L-lactide) tack was the only tack completely resorbed while the 6.8 mm poly(D,L: )-lactide tack with blunt tip reached equal strengths to the permanent tack.

  18. Measurement of field-dependence elastic modulus of iron-gallium alloy using tensile test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Flatau, Alison B.

    2005-05-01

    An experimental approach is used to identify Galfenol material properties under dc magnetic bias fields. Dog-bone-shaped specimens of single crystal Fe100-xGax, where 18.6⩽x⩽33.2, underwent tensile testing along two crystallographic axis orientations, [110] and [100]. Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio sensitivity to magnetic fields and stoichiometry are investigated. Data are presented that demonstrate the dependence of these properties on applied magnetic-field levels and provide a substantial assessment of the trends in material properties for performance of alloys of different stoichiometries under varied operating conditions.

  19. An Analytical Approach For Earing In Cylindrical Deep Drawing Based On Uniaxial Tensile Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, J.; Vegter, H.

    2011-05-01

    The prediction of earing and wall thickness distribution in cylindrical deep drawing is a challenging task even for today's FEA programs with advanced yield loci like Yld2004-18p, BBC2003 or Vegter. The current work involves an analytical description of cylindrical deep drawing that is comparable in accuracy to advanced numerical models. The analytical approach shows the importance for these type of simulations of fitting the yield locus description to uniaxial tensile test results in different directions, considering the full hardening curves.

  20. Design and construction of a tensile tester for the testing of simple composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borst, Mark A.; Spiegel, F. Xavier

    1994-01-01

    The following is a design for a tensile tester which will be used to test the tensile strength and anisotropic properties of simple composites. These simple composites are suspected to be anisotropic primarily in a single plane. When the composites undergo a tensile force, they will undergo deformation, causing movement either to the left or right. The composites are suspect due to their method of construction. Each sample has a single layer of unidirectional continuous fibers embedded in a rubbery resin. It has been well established that a serious limitation of unidirectional fiber composites is the very large in-plane anisotropy. The design presented here incorporates a single degree of freedom such that distortion (to the left or right) due to anisotropic tendencies may be measured. The device will spend the vast majority of its time in an undergraduate materials lab. As a result, ease of use and durability are valued more highly than research grade accuracy. Additional concerns focus on the fact that this machine will be built as a student project. Issues which are dealt with during this design include: specimen configuration or shape; a method of applying consistent, linear tension force; a method of gripping specimen without affecting its overall properties; a method of collecting data; repeatability of data; ease of use; ease of construction; and cost. After the device has been constructed, it will be used to test the simple composites which were fabricated in house. A comparison will be made between composites manufactured using aluminum screening as the strengthening fibers and those manufactured using fiberglass screening.

  1. A comparative study on the restrictions of dynamic test methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majzoobi, GH.; Lahmi, S.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic behavior of materials is investigated using different devices. Each of the devices has some restrictions. For instance, the stress-strain curve of the materials can be captured at high strain rates only with Hopkinson bar. However, by using a new approach some of the other techniques could be used to obtain the constants of material models such as Johnson-Cook model too. In this work, the restrictions of some devices such as drop hammer, Taylor test, Flying wedge, Shot impact test, dynamic tensile extrusion and Hopkinson bars which are used to characterize the material properties at high strain rates are described. The level of strain and strain rate and their restrictions are very important in examining the efficiency of each of the devices. For instance, necking or bulging in tensile and compressive Hopkinson bars, fragmentation in dynamic tensile extrusion and petaling in Taylor test are restricting issues in the level of strain rate attainable in the devices.

  2. Change in dynamic young's modulus of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite during tensile and compressive stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.; Oku, T.

    1983-12-01

    The effect of mechanical stresses on the dynamic Young's modulus measured by the ultrasonic wave method was examined for an isotropic graphite. Young's modulus of the graphite decreased with increasing applied stress, though the amount of its decrease was different between tensile and compressive stresses. The change in Young's modulus under mechanical stresses clearly corresponded to the stress-strain behavior of the graphite. Change in pore volume caused by mechanical stressing plays an important role in the decrease in Young's modulus under tension and compression. The change in Young's modulus was well represented by the formula E/E 0 = exp(- Aɛ + B) within a limited strain. A and B in the equation appeared to differ between tension and compression. The strain above which the formula showed deviation would be associated with the formation of cracks as observed in previous work.

  3. Dynamic behavior of nano-voids in magnesium under hydrostatic tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponga, Mauricio; Ramabathiran, Amuthan A.; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the mechanisms responsible for nano-void growth in single crystal magnesium under dynamic hydrostatic tensile stress. A key conclusion derived from our study is that there is no secondary strain hardening near the nano-void. This behavior, which is in remarkable contrast to face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic materials, greatly limits the peak stress and explains the relatively lower spall strength of magnesium. The lack of secondary strain hardening is due to the fact that pyramidal dislocations do not interact with basal or prismatic dislocations. Our analysis also shows that for loads applied at moderate strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ɛ} ≤slant {{10}6} s-1) the peak stress, dislocation velocity and temperature distribution converge asymptotically. However at very high strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ɛ} ≥slant {{10}8} s-1), there is a sharp transition in these quantities.

  4. Effects of oxidation on tensile deformation of iron nanowires: Insights from reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aral, Gurcan; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Ogata, Shigenobu; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of oxidation on the mechanical properties of nanostructured metals is rarely explored and remains poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, in this work, we systematically investigate the mechanical properties and changes in the metallic iron (Fe) nanowires (NWs) under various atmospheric conditions of ambient dry O2 and in a vacuum. More specifically, we focus on the effect of oxide shell layer thickness over Fe NW surfaces at room temperature. We use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the variable charge ReaxFF force field potential model that dynamically handles charge variation among atoms as well as breaking and forming of the chemical bonds associated with the oxidation reaction. The ReaxFF potential model allows us to study large length scale mechanical atomistic deformation processes under the tensile strain deformation process, coupled with quantum mechanically accurate descriptions of chemical reactions. To study the influence of an oxide layer, three oxide shell layer thicknesses of ˜4.81 Å, ˜5.33 Å, and ˜6.57 Å are formed on the pure Fe NW free surfaces. It is observed that the increase in the oxide layer thickness on the Fe NW surface reduces both the yield stress and the critical strain. We further note that the tensile mechanical deformation behaviors of Fe NWs are dependent on the presence of surface oxidation, which lowers the onset of plastic deformation. Our MD simulations show that twinning is of significant importance in the mechanical behavior of the pure and oxide-coated Fe NWs; however, twin nucleation occurs at a lower strain level when Fe NWs are coated with thicker oxide layers. The increase in the oxide shell layer thickness also reduces the external stress required to initiate plastic deformation.

  5. Strain measurement technique for elevated temperature tensile and creep testing of foil-gage metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a strain measurement technique suitable for elevated-temperature tensile and creep testing of foil-gage metals, using a modified commonly available mechanical extensometer in conjunction with a displacement transducer. The extensometer was modified by attaching to it a counterbalance (to reduce the effect of the extensometer weight on the total maximum test load) and by incorporating a conical tip/flat-edge design (to minimize induced stresses in the specimen resulting from extensometer attachment). Creep tests were performed on 0.102-mm-thick specimens of Ti-6Al-4V at temperatures of 427 and 538 C, at nominal applied stresses of 310.3 and 172.4 MPa, respectively. Examination of the resulting creep curves suggested that the strain measurement system provided actual creep strain values with good accuracy.

  6. Baseline tensile tests of composite materials for LDEF (Long Duration Exposure Facility) exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Tensile specimens of five graphite fiber reinforced composite materials were tested at room temperature to provide baseline data for similar specimens exposed to the space environment in low-Earth orbit on the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility. All specimens were 4-ply (+ or - 45 deg)s layups; at least five replicate specimens were tested for each parameter evaluated. Three epoxy-matrix materials and two polysulfone-matrix materials, several fiber volume fractions, and two sizes of specimen were evaluated. Stress-strain and Poisson's ratio-stress curves, ultimate stress, strain at failure, secant modulus at 0.004 strain, inplane shear stress-strain curves, and unidirectional shear modulus at .004 shear strain are presented.

  7. Analysis of Sandwich Shells with Metallic Foam Cores based on the Uniaxial Tensile Test

    SciTech Connect

    Mata, H.; Fernandes, A. A.; Parente, M. P. L.; Jorge, R. Natal; Santos, A.; Valente, R. A. F.

    2011-05-04

    On this work, the authors present the development and evaluation of an innovative system able to perform reliable panels of sandwich sheets with metallic foam cores for industrial applications, especially in automotive and aeronautical industries. This work is divided into two parts; in the first part the mathematical model used to describe the behavior of sandwich shells with metal cores form is presented and some numerical examples are presented. In the second part of this work, the numerical results are validated using the experimental results obtained from the mechanical experiments. Using the isotropic hardening crushable foam constitutive model, available on ABAQUS, a set of different mechanical tests were simulated. The isotropic hardening model available uses a yield surface that is an ellipse centered at the origin in the p-q stress plane. Using this constitutive model, the uniaxial tensile test for this material was simulated, and a comparison with the experimental results was made.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Tensile Test on Connection of Cold-formed Cut-curved Steel Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Mohd Syahrul Hisyam Mohd; Muftah, Fadhluhartini; Rahman, Nurul Farraheeda Abdul; Fakri Muda, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Cold-formed steel (CFS) is widely used as structural and non-structural components such as roof trusses and purlin. A CFS channel section with double intermediate web stiffener and lipped is chosen based on the broader usage in roof truss construction. CFS section is cut to form cold-formed pre-cut-curved steel section and lastly strengthened by several types of method or likely known as connection to establish the cold-formed cut-curved steel (CFCCS) section. CFCCS is proposed to be used as a top chord section in the roof truss system. The CFCCS is to resist the buckling phenomena of the roof truss structure and reduced the compression effect on the top chord. The tensile test connection of CFCCS section, especially at the flange element with eight types of connection by welding, plate with self-drilling screw and combination is investigated. The flange element is the weakest part that must be solved first other than the web element because they are being cut totally, 100% of their length for curving process. The testing is done using a universal testing machine for a tensile load. From the experiment, specimen with full welding has shown as a good result with an ultimate load of 13.37 kN and reported having 35.41% when compared with normal specimen without any of connection methods. Furthermore, the experimental result is distinguished by using Eurocode 3. The failure of a full welding specimen is due to breaking at the welding location. Additionally, all specimens with either full weld or spot weld or combination failed due to breaking on weld connection, but specimen with flange plate and self-drilling screw failed due to tilting and bearing. Finally, the full welding specimen is chosen as a good connection to perform the strengthening method of CFCCS section.

  9. Inflation and Bi-Axial Tensile Testing of Healthy Porcine Carotid Arteries.

    PubMed

    Boekhoven, Renate W; Peters, Mathijs F J; Rutten, Marcel C M; van Sambeek, Marc R; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2016-02-01

    Knowledge of the intrinsic material properties of healthy and diseased arterial tissue components is of great importance in diagnostics. This study describes an in vitro comparison of 13 porcine carotid arteries using inflation testing combined with functional ultrasound and bi-axial tensile testing. The measured tissue behavior was described using both a linear, but geometrically non-linear, one-parameter (neo-Hookean) model and a two-parameter non-linear (Demiray) model. The shear modulus estimated using the linear model resulted in good agreement between the ultrasound and tensile testing methods, GUS = 25 ± 5.7 kPa and GTT = 23 ± 5.4 kPa. No significant correspondence was observed for the non-linear model aUS = 1.0 ± 2.7 kPa vs. aTT = 17 ± 8.8 kPa, p ∼ 0); however, the exponential parameters were in correspondence (bUS = 12 ± 4.2 vs. bTT = 10 ± 1.7, p > 0.05). Estimation of more complex models in vivo is cumbersome considering the sensitivity of the model parameters to small changes in measurement data and the absence of intraluminal pressure data, endorsing the use of a simple, linear model in vivo. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.O.

    1994-09-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to a least 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work was to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite`s potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests were conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests were performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating tests specimens up to 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Tensile stress-strain data were obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  11. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to at least 1093 C (2000F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work is to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite's potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests are conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests are performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating test specimens up to 1093 C (2000 F). Tensile stress-strain data are obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  12. Directionally solidified lamellar eutectic superalloys by edge-defined, film-fed growth. [including tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    A program was performed to scale up the edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) method for the gamma/gamma prime-beta eutectic alloy of the nominal composition Ni-19.7 Cb - 6 Cr-2.5 Al. Procedures and problem areas are described. Flat bars approximately 12 x 1.7 x 200 mm were grown, mostly at speeds of 38 mm/hr, and tensile tests on these bars at 25 and 1000 C showed lower strength than expected. The feasibility of growing hollow airfoils was also demonstrated by growing bars over 200 mm long with a teardrop shaped cross-section, having a major dimension of 12 mm and a maximum width of 5 mm.

  13. Analysis of Ninety Degree Flexure Tests for Characterization of Composite Transverse Tensile Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OBrien, T. Kevin; Krueger, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis was performed on 3-point and 4-point bending test configurations of ninety degree oriented glass-epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite beams to identify deviations from beam theory predictions. Both linear and geometric non-linear analyses were performed using the ABAQUS finite element code. The 3-point and 4-point bending specimens were first modeled with two-dimensional elements. Three-dimensional finite element models were then performed for selected 4-point bending configurations to study the stress distribution across the width of the specimens and compare the results to the stresses computed from two-dimensional plane strain and plane stress analyses and the stresses from beam theory. Stresses for all configurations were analyzed at load levels corresponding to the measured transverse tensile strength of the material.

  14. An In-situ Tensile Test Apparatus for Polymers in High Pressure Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Pitman, Stan G.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Tucker, Joseph C.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2014-10-10

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex-situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in-situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials like Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in-situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 5,000 psi. Modulus data from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  15. An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Alvine, K J; Kafentzis, T A; Pitman, S G; Johnson, K I; Skorski, D; Tucker, J C; Roosendaal, T J; Dahl, M E

    2014-10-01

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  16. An in situ tensile test apparatus for polymers in high pressure hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, K. J. Kafentzis, T. A.; Pitman, S. G.; Johnson, K. I.; Skorski, D.; Tucker, J. C.; Roosendaal, T. J.; Dahl, M. E.

    2014-10-15

    Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.

  17. Analysing the optimal value for titanium implant roughness in bone attachment using a tensile test.

    PubMed

    Rønold, H J; Lyngstadaas, S P; Ellingsen, J E

    2003-11-01

    This study aims at studying the effect of surface roughness on bone attachment of coin-shaped titanium implants. All implants in this study were blasted with TiO(2) particles of 180-220 microm, and then divided into three groups. One group had no further surface treatment whereas the other two groups were subsequently etched with hot hydrochloric acid (0.01M or 1M). The surface topography of the implant specimens was examined by SEM and by a confocal laser scanner for a numeric evaluation of S(a), S(t) and S(dr). The ranging implants in the three groups differed significantly in surface structure. The implants with modified surfaces were then placed into the tibias of 12 rabbits (n=16). After 8 weeks healing, the attachment of bone to implants were examined using a standardised tensile test analysis. The implants that were only blasted (positive control) showed significantly better functional attachment (p<0.001) than the acid etched. Implant surfaces etched with 1M HCl solution had the lowest retention in bone. There was a negative correlation between the increasing roughness and mechanical retention in bone of the implants in this study. The results support observations from earlier studies that suggested an optimal surface roughness for bone attachment, identified by in situ tensile tests and expressed as the arithmetic mean deviation (S(a)), to be in the range between 3.62 and 3.90 microm and that a further attachment depended on mechanical interlocking between bone and implant.

  18. Tensile Tests of Round-head, Flat-head, and Brazier-head Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuette, Evan H; Bartone, Leonard M; Mandel, Merven W

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the tensile strength of round-head (AN43C), flat-head(AN442), and brazier-head (AN4556) aluminum-alloy rivets because of the scarcity of information on the tensile strength of rivets. The results of the investigation are presented as curves that show the variation of the ratio of the tensile strength of the rivet to the tensile strength of the rivet crank with the ratio of the sheet thickness to the rivet diameter for the different types of rivet.

  19. Glass Fiber Post/Composite Core Systems Bonded to Human Dentin: Analysis of Tensile Load vs Calculated Tensile Strength of Various Systems Using Pull-out Tests.

    PubMed

    Keul, Christine; Köhler, Patrick; Hampe, Rüdiger; Roos, Malgorzata; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    Pull-out testing was used to determine the tensile load (TL) and tensile strength (TS) of five different fiber post systems bonded to human intracanal dentin. 120 caries-free premolars, canines, and maxillary central incisors were divided into 5 different groups for 5 fiber post systems (n = 24): 1. RelyX Fiber Post 3D (RX3D); 2. RelyX Fiber Post (RX); 3. Luxa- Post (LP); 4. FibreKleer 4X Tapered Post (FK); 5. ParaPost Taper Lux (PP). The teeth were prepared and posts inserted. Core buildups were performed with the corresponding product's resin composite. All specimens were stored in water for 24 h at 37°C. TL and TS were tested on half of the specimens (n = 12/group). The remaining samples were thermocycled (10,000 x 5°C/55°C) before testing. TL was directly measured and TS was calculated using the bonding surface. Failure modes were identified using a stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using twoway ANOVA with the post-hoc Scheffé test, as well as the chi-squared test (p < 0.05). FK and LP resulted in the lowest mean TL but were not significantly different from those of RX and RX3D. The highest mean TL and TS were observed for PP. Nevertheless, PP fell within the same statistical subset as RX3D and RX. Thermocycling showed no impact on the results. RX3D predominantly showed debonding of the post plus core buildup from the tooth; all other systems mainly demonstrated detachment of the core from the posts. PP, RX, and RX3D together with an adhesive core buildup yielded the highest bond strength to human dentin. Parameters TL and TS showed the same tendencies and statistical evidence.

  20. Effect of native oxide layers on copper thin-film tensile properties: A reactive molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarlinski, Michael D.; Quesnel, David J.

    2015-12-01

    Metal-oxide layers are likely to be present on metallic nano-structures due to either environmental exposure during use, or high temperature processing techniques such as annealing. It is well known that nano-structured metals have vastly different mechanical properties from bulk metals; however, difficulties in modeling the transition between metallic and ionic bonding have prevented the computational investigation of the effects of oxide surface layers. Newly developed charge-optimized many body [Liang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., R 74, 255 (2013)] potentials are used to perform fully reactive molecular dynamics simulations which elucidate the effects that metal-oxide layers have on the mechanical properties of a copper thin-film. Simulated tensile tests are performed on thin-films while using different strain-rates, temperatures, and oxide thicknesses to evaluate changes in yield stress, modulus, and failure mechanisms. Findings indicate that copper-thin film mechanical properties are strongly affected by native oxide layers. The formed oxide layers have an amorphous structure with lower Cu-O bond-densities than bulk CuO, and a mixture of Cu2O and CuO charge character. It is found that oxidation will cause modifications to the strain response of the elastic modulii, producing a stiffened modulii at low temperatures (<75 K) and low strain values (<5%), and a softened modulii at higher temperatures. While under strain, structural reorganization within the oxide layers facilitates brittle yielding through nucleation of defects across the oxide/metal interface. The oxide-free copper thin-film yielding mechanism is found to be a tensile-axis reorientation and grain creation. The oxide layers change the observed yielding mechanism, allowing for the inner copper thin-film to sustain an FCC-to-BCC transition during yielding. The mechanical properties are fit to a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory. The fit implies that the oxidation of the films

  1. Effect of curing and silanizing on composite repair bond strength using an improved micro-tensile test method

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, Sigfus Thor; Dahl, Jon E.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the micro-tensile repair bond strength between aged and new composite, using silane and adhesives that were cured or left uncured when new composite was placed. Methods: Eighty Filtek Supreme XLT composite blocks and four control blocks were stored in water for two weeks and thermo-cycled. Sandpaper ground, etched and rinsed specimens were divided into two experimental groups: A, no further treatment and B, the surface was coated with bis-silane. Each group was divided into subgroups: (1) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, (2) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive, (3) Adper Scotchbond Universal, (4) Clearfil SE Bond and (5) One Step Plus. For each adhesive group, the adhesive was (a) cured according to manufacturer’s instructions or (b) not cured before repair. The substrate blocks were repaired with Filtek Supreme XLT. After aging, they were serially sectioned, producing 1.1 × 1.1 mm square test rods. The rods were prepared for tensile testing and tensile strength calculated at fracture. Type of fracture was examined under microscope. Results: Leaving the adhesive uncured prior to composite repair placement increased the mean tensile values statistically significant for all adhesives tested, with or without silane pretreatment. Silane surface treatment improved significantly (p < 0.001) tensile strength values for all adhesives, both for the cured and uncured groups. The mean strength of the control composite was higher than the strongest repair strength (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Application of freshly made silane and a thin bonding layer, rendered higher tensile bond strength. Not curing the adhesive before composite placement increased the tensile bond strength. PMID:28642928

  2. Effect of curing and silanizing on composite repair bond strength using an improved micro-tensile test method.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Sigfus Thor; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the micro-tensile repair bond strength between aged and new composite, using silane and adhesives that were cured or left uncured when new composite was placed. Methods: Eighty Filtek Supreme XLT composite blocks and four control blocks were stored in water for two weeks and thermo-cycled. Sandpaper ground, etched and rinsed specimens were divided into two experimental groups: A, no further treatment and B, the surface was coated with bis-silane. Each group was divided into subgroups: (1) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, (2) Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive, (3) Adper Scotchbond Universal, (4) Clearfil SE Bond and (5) One Step Plus. For each adhesive group, the adhesive was (a) cured according to manufacturer's instructions or (b) not cured before repair. The substrate blocks were repaired with Filtek Supreme XLT. After aging, they were serially sectioned, producing 1.1 × 1.1 mm square test rods. The rods were prepared for tensile testing and tensile strength calculated at fracture. Type of fracture was examined under microscope. Results: Leaving the adhesive uncured prior to composite repair placement increased the mean tensile values statistically significant for all adhesives tested, with or without silane pretreatment. Silane surface treatment improved significantly (p < 0.001) tensile strength values for all adhesives, both for the cured and uncured groups. The mean strength of the control composite was higher than the strongest repair strength (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Application of freshly made silane and a thin bonding layer, rendered higher tensile bond strength. Not curing the adhesive before composite placement increased the tensile bond strength.

  3. The influence of design and production on the structural integrity of tensile test specimens and stated values for mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A J

    1978-06-01

    Two sizes of tensile test specimens were produced, the smaller of them by several techniques each incorporating a particular casting variable. All castings were subsequently subjected to radiographic evaluation and mechanical testing. An attempt has been made to relate the application of each variable to the degree of metal integrity produced in the specimens and ultimately to mechanical behaviour.

  4. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the tensile behavior of a thermosetting polymer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaorui; Qu, Jianmin

    2014-07-01

    Using a previously developed coarse-grained model, we conducted large-scale (∼ 85 × 85 × 85 nm(3)) molecular dynamics simulations of uniaxial-strain deformation to study the tensile behavior of an epoxy molding compound, epoxy phenol novolacs (EPN) bisphenol A (BPA). Under the uniaxial-strain deformation, the material is found to exhibit cavity nucleation and growth, followed by stretching of the ligaments separated by the cavities, until the ultimate failure through ligament scissions. The nucleation sites of cavities are rather random and the subsequent cavity growth accounts for much (87%) of the volumetric change during the uniaxial-strain deformation. Ultimate failure of the materials occurs when the cavity volume fraction reaches ∼ 60%. During the entire deformation process, polymer strands in the network are continuously extended to their linear states and broken in the postyielding strain hardening stage. When most of the strands are stretched to their taut configurations, rapid scission of a large number of strands occurs within a small strain increment, which eventually leads to fracture. Finally, through extensive numerical simulations of various loading conditions in addition to uniaxial strain, we find that yielding of the EPN-BPA can be described by the pressure-modified von Mises yield criterion.

  5. DYNAMIC DUCTILE EVOLUTION AND TENSILE FRACTURE: NEW EXPERIMENTAL INSIGHTS FOR MODELS EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    A. ZUREK

    2000-08-01

    Under dynamic loading conditions, the rapid nature of the fracture process may simultaneously activate a considerable number of nucleation sites for void formation at the region of the tensile stress field. The growth and coalescence of these voids forms the deformation plane and eventually the fracture surface. Attempts to quantify damage evolution during fracture using microstructural observations, specifically for spallation, were pioneered by Seaman and his coworkers. They performed incipient spallation experiments in which they imposed a peak stress below the spall strength of the material, thereby developing an incipient spallation zone rather than complete separation. When this experimental methodology is applied, recovery techniques are utilized to recover the deformed samples without introducing any additional damage. Seaman and his coworkers, and later Lacomme, et al., developed damage quantification techniques based on area measurements of incipient fracture. However, measuring the area of a fracture opening with a certain degree of precision from a two dimensional image can be extremely inaccurate due to the irregular shape of the image. In recent years several techniques have been developed, or improved, that may allow a better and more accurate quantification of image features observed in metallographic analyses in incipient damage of fracture surfaces. Many of these measured quantities are essential towards developing a solid, robust understanding necessary for a good constitutive model.

  6. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the tensile behavior of a thermosetting polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shaorui; Qu, Jianmin

    2014-07-01

    Using a previously developed coarse-grained model, we conducted large-scale (˜85×85×85nm3) molecular dynamics simulations of uniaxial-strain deformation to study the tensile behavior of an epoxy molding compound, epoxy phenol novolacs (EPN) bisphenol A (BPA). Under the uniaxial-strain deformation, the material is found to exhibit cavity nucleation and growth, followed by stretching of the ligaments separated by the cavities, until the ultimate failure through ligament scissions. The nucleation sites of cavities are rather random and the subsequent cavity growth accounts for much (87%) of the volumetric change during the uniaxial-strain deformation. Ultimate failure of the materials occurs when the cavity volume fraction reaches ˜60%. During the entire deformation process, polymer strands in the network are continuously extended to their linear states and broken in the postyielding strain hardening stage. When most of the strands are stretched to their taut configurations, rapid scission of a large number of strands occurs within a small strain increment, which eventually leads to fracture. Finally, through extensive numerical simulations of various loading conditions in addition to uniaxial strain, we find that yielding of the EPN-BPA can be described by the pressure-modified von Mises yield criterion.

  7. Influence of Shock Prestraining and Grain Size on the Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion Response of Copper: Experiments and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G. T. III; Cerreta, E.; Yablinsky, C. A.; Addessio, L. B.; Henrie, B. L.; Sencer, B. H.; Maloy, S. A.; Trujillo, C. P.; Lopez, M. F.; Burkett, M.; Maudlin, P. J.

    2006-07-28

    The mechanical behavior of, and damage evolution in high-purity Cu is influenced by strain rate, temperature, stress state, grain size, and shock prestraining. The effects of grain size on the tensile mechanical response of high-purity Cu have been probed and are correlated with the evolution of the substructure. The dynamic extrusion response of shock prestrained Cu demonstrates the significant influence of grain size on the large-strain dynamic tensile ductility of high-purity copper. Eulerian hydrocode simulations utilizing the Mechanical Threshold Stress constitutive model were performed to provide insight into the dynamic extrusion process. Quantitative comparisons between the predicted and measured deformation topologies and extrusion rates are presented.

  8. Effects of grain size and boundary structure on the dynamic tensile response of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, J. P.; Dennis-Koller, D.; Cerreta, E. K.; Patterson, B. M.; Bronkhorst, C. A.; Hansen, B. L.; Tonks, D.; Lebensohn, R. A.

    2011-08-01

    Plate impact experiments have been carried out to examine the influence of grain boundary characteristics on the dynamic tensile response of Cu samples with grain sizes of 30, 60, 100, and 200 μm. The peak compressive stress is ˜1.50 GPa for all experiments, low enough to cause an early stage of incipient spall damage that is correlated to the surrounding microstructure in metallographic analysis. The experimental configuration used in this work permits real-time measurements of the sample free surface velocity histories, soft-recovery, and postimpact examination of the damaged microstructure. The resulting tensile damage in the recovered samples is examined using optical and electron microscopy along with micro x-ray tomography. The free surface velocity measurements are used to calculate spall strength values and show no significant effect of the grain size. However, differences are observed in the free surface velocity behavior after the pull-back minima, when reacceleration occurs. The magnitude of the spall peak and its acceleration rate are dependent upon the grain size. The quantitative, postimpact, metallographic analyses of recovered samples show that for the materials with grain sizes larger than 30 μm, the void volume fraction and the average void size increase with increasing grain size. In the 30 and 200 μm samples, void coalescence is observed to dominate the void growth behavior, whereas in 60 and 100 μm samples, void growth is dominated by the growth of isolated voids. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) observations show that voids preferentially nucleate and grow at grain boundaries with high angle misorientation. However, special boundaries corresponding to Σl (low angle, < 5 °) and Σ3 (˜60 ° <111> misorientation) types are more resistant to void formation. Finally, micro x-ray tomography results show three dimensional (3D) views of the damage fields consistent with the two dimensional (2D) surface observations. Based on these

  9. Effect of dynamically charged helium on tensile properties of V-5Ti, V-4Cr-4Ti, and V-3Ti-1Si

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Nowicki, L.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    In the Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment (DHCE), helium was produced uniformly in the specimen at linear rates of {approx}0.4 to 4.2 appm He/dpa by the decay of tritium during irradiation to 18-31 dpa at 424-600{degrees}C in the lithium-filled DHCE capsules in the Fast Flux Test Facility. This report presents results of postirradiation tests of tensile properties of V-5Ti, V-4Cr-4Ti, V-3Ti-1Si. The effect of helium on tensile strength and ductility was insignificant after irradiation and testing at >420{degrees}C. Contrary to initial expectation, room temperature ductility of DHCE specimens was higher than that on non-DHCE specimens, whereas strength was lower, indicating that different types of hardening centers are produced during DHCE and non-DHCE irradiation. In strong contrast to results of tritium-trick experiments, in which dense coalescence of helium bubbles is produced on grain boundaries in the absence of displacement damage, no intergranular fracture was observed in any tensile specimens irradiated in the DHCE.

  10. Dynamic Tensile Loading Improves the Functional Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Laden Nanofiber-Based Fibrocartilage

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Shah, Roshan P.; Huang, Alice H.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrocartilaginous tissues such as the meniscus serve critical load-bearing roles, relying on arrays of collagen fibers to resist tensile loads experienced with normal activity. As these structures are frequently injured and possess limited healing capacity, there exists great demand for tissue-engineered replacements. Toward recreating the structural features of these anisotropic tissues in vitro, we employ scaffolds composed of co-aligned nanofibers that direct mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) orientation and the formation of organized extracellular matrix (ECM). Concomitant with ECM synthesis, the mechanical properties of constructs increase with free-swelling culture, but ultimately failed to achieve equivalence with meniscal fibrocartilage. As mechanical forces are essential to the development and maintenance of musculoskeletal tissues, this work examined the effect of cyclic tensile loading on MSC-laden nanofibrous constructs. We hypothesized that loading would modulate the transcriptional behavior of MSCs, spur the deposition of ECM, and lead to enhancements in construct mechanical properties compared to free-swelling controls. Fiber-aligned scaffolds were seeded with MSCs and dynamically loaded daily in tension or maintained as nonloaded controls for 4 weeks. With mechanical stimulation, fibrous gene expression increased, collagen deposition increased, and the tensile modulus increased by 16% relative to controls. These results show that dynamic tensile loading enhances the maturation of MSC-laden aligned nanofibrous constructs, suggesting that recapitulation of the structural and mechanical environment of load-bearing tissues results in increases in functional properties that can be exploited for tissue engineering applications. PMID:21247342

  11. Hyperelastic Property Measurements of Heat-Cured Silicone Adhesives by Cyclic Uniaxial Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jue; Tarvainen, Tapio; Rich, Jaana; Turunen, Markus; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2012-09-01

    Most of the commonly used linear elastic properties of silicone adhesives cannot precisely represent their material behavior, knowledge of which is crucial to the reliability study of electronic devices. For this reason, in this paper a widely used silicone adhesive, namely Loctite 5404, is chosen for measuring hyperelastic properties via cyclic uniaxial tensile tests. A special sample preparation procedure is developed to avoid the formation of detrimental air bubbles in the samples. Two maximum strain levels, 20% and 40%, are used in the tests. Each test includes five cyclic loadings to produce a stable stress-strain loop. Three orders of magnitude of strain rate changes are studied, and the stress-strain response of the material is found to be strain rate dependent. The measured stress-strain data are imported into Abaqus finite-element software to calibrate the material coefficients of hyperelastic material models (Mooney-Rivlin, Yeoh, Ogden, and van der Waals models). This is the first time that the hyperelastic properties of the studied silicone adhesive are presented. The determined material coefficients can be used directly in finite-element analyses and thus in reliability studies of electronic devices.

  12. Tensile test and interface retention forces between wires and composites in lingual fixed retainers.

    PubMed

    Paolone, Maria Giacinta; Kaitsas, Roberto; Obach, Patricia; Kaitsas, Vasilios; Benedicenti, Stefano; Sorrenti, Eugenio; Barberi, Fabrizio

    2015-06-01

    In daily orthodontic clinical practice retention is very important, and lingual retainers are part of this challenge. The failure of lingual retainers may be due to many factors. The aim of this study was to assess the retention forces and mechanical behavior of different types of wires matched with different kinds of composites in lingual retainers. A tensile test was performed on cylindrical composite test specimens bonded to orthodontic wires. The specimens were constructed using four different wires: a straight wire (Remanium .016×.022″ Dentaurum), two round twisted wires (Penta One .0215″ Masel, Gold Penta Twisted .0215″ Gold N'braces) and a rectangular braided wire (D-Rect .016×.022″ Ormco); and three composites: two micro-hybrids (Micro-Hybrid Enamel Plus HFO Micerium, and Micro-Hybrid SDR U Dentsply) and a micro-nano-filled composite (Micro-Nano-Filled Transbond LR 3M). The test was performed at a speed of 10mm/min on an Inström device. The wire was fixed with a clamp. The results showed that the bonding between wires and composites in lingual fixed retainers seemed to be lowest for rectangular smooth wires and increased in round twisted and rectangular twisted wires where the bonding was so strong that the maximum tension/bond strength was greater than the ultimate tensile strength of the wire. The highest values were in rectangular twisted wires. Concerning the composites, hybrid composites had the lowest interface bonding values and broke very quickly, while the nano- and micro-composites tolerated stronger forces and displayed higher bonding values. The best results were observed with the golden twisted wire and reached 21.46 MPa with the Transbond composite. With the rectangular braided wire the retention forces were so high that the Enamel Plus composite fractured when the load exceeded 154.6 N/MPa. When the same wire was combined with the Transbond LR either the wire or the composite broke when the force exceeded 240 N. The results of this

  13. Measurement of pressure and displacement of the membranous labyrinth in endolymphatic hydrops by the tensile test.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Ishii, T; Takayama, M

    1997-01-01

    We measured the mechanical characteristics, particularly the strength of various regions of the membranous labyrinth by the penetration test with a specially designed machine. A load-displacement curve was drawn by the tensile test for the Reissner's and basement membranes. Additionally, a stress-strain curve was drawn. The modulus of elasticity was measured showing a straight line in the stress-strain curve: 1.5 x 10(2) mN/mm2 for Reissner's membrane and 9.3 x 10(2)-1.3 x 10(3) mN/mm2 for the basement membrane. Furthermore, the endolymphatic pressure was calculated at the point in time when the maximum strain as the limit of elasticity was 0.2. It was 81 Pa. The displacement of Reissner's membrane was 0.2 mm when the initial tension was taken as 0 in the formula, and that of the basement membrane was 3 to 37 microns when the initial tension was 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3.

  14. Fracture Testing with Surface Crack Specimens. [especially the residual tensile strength test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Recommendations are given for the design, preparation, and static fracture testing of surface crack specimens. The recommendations are preceded by background information including discussions of stress intensity factors, crack opening displacements, and fracture toughness values associated with surface crack specimens. Cyclic load and sustained load tests are discussed briefly.

  15. Tensile Tests of NACA and Conventional Machine-countersunk Flush Rivets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartone, Leonard M.; Mandel, Merven W.

    1944-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine and compare the tensile strength of NACA and conventional machine-countersunk flush rivets of several rivet-head angles and varying countersunk depth. The results of the investigation are presented in the form of curves that show the variation of the tensile strength of the rivet with the ratio of the sheet thickness to the rivet diameter. For the same rivet-head angle and for a given angle of c/d, the NACA rivets developed higher tensile strength than the conventional rivets.

  16. Infrared information testing and numerical experiment analysis of the tensile necking-down phenomena of metal specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Laigui; Zhao, Na

    2008-11-01

    Under the action of tensile load obvious necking-down phenomena will occur in the metal test-piece. The tensile experiment about the metal test-piece has been studied, but the finite element simulation of the tensile necking-down phenomena has not been reported. The paper first studies the experiment of the mental test-piece, using the universal testing machine of WE-10A and WI-60T to load the mental test-piece and using IZ-910 infrared thermal imager to test the change process of infrared radiation temperature fields, then works out the finite element program to simulate the tensile necking-down phenomena of the metal test-piece with the elastic-plastic model. The experiment result shows that the infrared thermal effect of the metal test-piece in the process of loading is obvious, before the sample fracture will appear the omen of high temperature in the position where the future fracture will occur; in stress concentration the microcracks concentrate and the thermal figure is obvious; in the whole loading process the fracture starts from the local part, develops and evolutes gradually; with the stress change on the metal test-piece the infrared radiation temperature of the test-piece surface changes, having the temperature-rising tendency in the total and the temperature rising trend in the local fracture position is obvious. This is because the metal test-piece material or the force is uneven and the stress concentration is formed, In the position of the stress concentration the deformation destruction firstly occurs. Because the energy is released in the process of deformation destruction, so the temperature change is obvious in the fracture position. After the experiment the obvious necking-down phenomena occurs in the test-piece. At the same time, in order to provide the theoretical basis for the experiment, with the finite element software of FEPG the finite element program is worked out, with the elastic-plastic model and the uneven material the fracture

  17. Biaxial Tensile Test of Cold Rolled IF Steel Sheet for Large Plastic Strain Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enatsu, Ryotaro; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2011-08-01

    Deformation behavior of cold rolled IF steel sheet (SPCE) under biaxial tension has been investigated for large plastic strain range over 15%. The test material was bent and TIG welded to form a tubular specimen with an outer diameter of 46.2 mm and wall thickness of 0.8 mm. The tubular specimens have been subjected to linear stress paths in the first quadrant of stress space with the use of a servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine developed by one of the authors [T. Kuwabara, K. Yoshida, K. Narihara, S. Takahashi, Anisotropic plastic deformation of extruded aluminum alloy tube under axial forces and internal pressure, Int. J. Plasticity 21, 101-117 (2005)]. Moreover, biaxial tensile tests using a cruciform specimen have also been carried out to more precisely measure the deformation behavior for a small strain range following initial yielding. True stress-true plastic strain curves, contours of plastic work in stress space and the directions of plastic strain rates have been measured and compared with those calculated using selected yield functions: the von Mises, Hill's quadratic and Yld2000-2d [Barlat, F., Brem, J.C., Yoon, J.W., Chung, K., Dick, R.E., Lege, D.J., Pourboghrat, F., Choi, S.H., Chu, E., Plane stress yield function for aluminum alloy sheets—Part 1: Theory. Int. J. Plasticity 19, 1297-1319 (2003)]. The plastic deformation behavior up to a work equivalent plastic strain of ɛ0p = 0.19 has been successfully measured. It is found that the test material exhibits differential hardening and that the Yld2000-2d yield function with an exponent of six most closely predicts the contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates.

  18. Study, by Raman Spectroscopy, of the microstructure evolution of isotactic polypropylene during tensile test and relaxation: Measuring the chains orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudemanche, S.; Ponçot, M.; Martin, J.; Hiver, J. M.; Bourson, P.; Dahoun, A.

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents the use of a Raman spectrometer coupled to a machine VideoTraction. For uniaxial tensile mechanical testing, Raman spectra are realized, that by using spectral signatures date back to the microstructure of the material: isotactic polypropylene. Here we are particularly interested in analyzing the orientation of the chains of the crystalline phase during the elastic recovery.

  19. Micro-Tensile Testing and 3D-EBSD Characterization of Pure Nickel Multi-Crystals (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4391 MICRO-TENSILE TESTING AND 3D- EBSD CHARACTERIZATION OF PURE NICKEL MULTI- CRYSTALS (Preprint) Paul A. Shade...Yoon-Suk Choi and Robert Wheeler UES Inc. NOVEMBER 2011 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. See additional restrictions...described on inside pages STINFO COPY AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON

  20. Cubical Mass-Spring Model design based on a tensile deformation test and nonlinear material model.

    PubMed

    San-Vicente, Gaizka; Aguinaga, Iker; Tomás Celigüeta, Juan

    2012-02-01

    Mass-Spring Models (MSMs) are used to simulate the mechanical behavior of deformable bodies such as soft tissues in medical applications. Although they are fast to compute, they lack accuracy and their design remains still a great challenge. The major difficulties in building realistic MSMs lie on the spring stiffness estimation and the topology identification. In this work, the mechanical behavior of MSMs under tensile loads is analyzed before studying the spring stiffness estimation. In particular, the performed qualitative and quantitative analysis of the behavior of cubical MSMs shows that they have a nonlinear response similar to hyperelastic material models. According to this behavior, a new method for spring stiffness estimation valid for linear and nonlinear material models is proposed. This method adjusts the stress-strain and compressibility curves to a given reference behavior. The accuracy of the MSMs designed with this method is tested taking as reference some soft-tissue simulations based on nonlinear Finite Element Method (FEM). The obtained results show that MSMs can be designed to realistically model the behavior of hyperelastic materials such as soft tissues and can become an interesting alternative to other approaches such as nonlinear FEM.

  1. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  2. Grain Size Effect on Fracture Behavior of the Axis-Tensile Test of Inconel 718 Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. B.; Han, J. Q.; Zhao, R.; Liu, W.; Wan, M.

    2016-11-01

    Change in mechanical parts from macro-size to micro-size has become a trend in the metal- and alloy-forming process, with an increasing demand on micro-parts in the last decades. The material mechanical behaviors of micro-size parts are quite different from the conventional ones of macro-size parts due to size effect. It is necessary to further investigate the effects of grain size on material mechanisms in micro-scales, especially fracture behaviors. The fracture behaviors of Inconel 718 sheet with the thickness of 300 μm are studied by uniaxial tensile tests in different grain sizes ranging from 18 to 130 μm. The results show that fracture stress and strain decrease with the increase of grain size. A critical value in the specimen thickness (t) to grain size (d) ratio divides the strength levels into separate stages on the basis of an increase of the inverse of grain size. In addition, the grain size-dependent fracture morphology is changed in the number of dimples and micro-voids decreasing on the fracture surfaces and the sizes of micro-voids changing larger with the increase of grain size.

  3. Evaluation of the plastic yield locus for embossed sheet using biaxial tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Suk; Oh, Seok-Hwan; Do, Van-Cuong; Lee, Bong-Hyun

    2016-11-01

    3D-structured (embossed) aluminium sheets have been used as heat insulation materials in automotive exhaust parts because the embossments on the sheets increase the surface area and reinforce the stiffness of exhaust components. Unlike the press-forming process for flat (non-embossed) sheets, however, that for embossed aluminium sheets is constrained by many restrictions given the distinct mechanical properties and geometric 3D shape of the latter. In designing sheet-stamping tools, manufacturers have recently used CAE technologies based on finite element analysis. Guaranteeing the effectiveness of CAE technologies necessitates information about the plastic yield criterion, which is determined primarily by performing a biaxial tensile test on cruciform-shaped specimens. We measured the yield locus of an embossed aluminium 3004-P sheet by using the camera vision method instead of strain gauge measurement because of the difficulty in attaching a strain gauge to the central region of the aluminium body. The measured yield locus of the studied sheet shows that its yield stress in equi-biaxial stress is smaller than the flat sheet yield locus measured by the strain gauge method. The shape of the yield locus of the embossed aluminium sheet also adequately corresponds with Logan-Hosford anisotropic yield function.

  4. Biaxial tensile tests identify epidermis and hypodermis as the main structural elements of sweet cherry skin

    PubMed Central

    Brüggenwirth, Martin; Fricke, Heiko; Knoche, Moritz

    2014-01-01

    The skin of developing soft and fleshy fruit is subjected to considerable growth stress, and failure of the skin is associated with impaired barrier properties in water transport and pathogen defence. The objectives were to establish a standardized, biaxial tensile test of the skin of soft and fleshy fruit and to use it to characterize and quantify mechanical properties of the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) fruit skin as a model. A segment of the exocarp (ES) comprising cuticle, epidermis, hypodermis and adhering flesh was mounted in the elastometer such that the in vivo strain was maintained. The ES was pressurized from the inner surface and the pressure and extent of associated bulging were recorded. Pressure : strain responses were almost linear up to the point of fracture, indicating that the modulus of elasticity was nearly constant. Abrading the cuticle decreased the fracture strain but had no effect on the fracture pressure. When pressure was held constant, bulging of the ES continued to increase. Strain relaxation upon releasing the pressure was complete and depended on time. Strains in longitudinal and latitudinal directions on the bulging ES did not differ significantly. Exocarp segments that released their in vivo strain before the test had higher fracture strains and lower moduli of elasticity. The results demonstrate that the cherry skin is isotropic in the tangential plane and exhibits elastic and viscoelastic behaviour. The epidermis and hypodermis, but not the cuticle, represent the structural ‘backbone’ in a cherry skin. This test is useful in quantifying the mechanical properties of soft and fleshy fruit of a range of species under standardized conditions. PMID:24876301

  5. A novel approach for preparation and in situ tensile testing of silica glass membranes in the TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mačković, Mirza; Przybilla, Thomas; Dieker, Christel; Herre, Patrick; Romeis, Stefan; Stara, Hana; Schrenker, Nadine; Peukert, Wolfgang; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2017-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of glasses in the micro- and/or nanometer regime increasingly gains importance in nowadays modern technology. However, suitable small scale preparation and mechanical testing approaches for a reliable assessment of the mechanical properties of glasses still remain a big challenge. In the present work, a novel approach for site-specific preparation and quantitative in situ tensile testing of thin silica glass membranes in the transmission electron microscope is presented. Thereby, advanced focused ion beam techniques are used for the preparation of nanoscale dog bone shaped silica glass specimens suitable for in situ tensile testing. Small amounts of gallium are detected on the surface of the membranes resulting from redeposition effects during the focused ion beam preparation procedure. Possible structural changes of silica glass upon irradiation with electrons and gallium ions are investigated by controlled irradiation experiments, followed by a structural analysis using Raman spectroscopy. While moderate electron beam irradiation does not alter the structure of silica glass, ion beam irradiation results in minor densification of the silica glass membranes. In situ tensile testing of membranes under electron beam irradiation results in distinctive elongations without fracture confirming the phenomenon of superplasticity. In contrast, in situ tensile testing in the absence of the electron beam reveals an elastic/plastic deformation behavior, and finally leads to fracture of the membranes. The Young’s moduli of the glass membranes pulled at beam off conditions in the TEM are comparable with values known for bulk fused silica, while the tensile strength is in the range of values reported for silica glass fibers with comparable dimensions. The impact of electron beam irradiation on the mechanical properties of silica glass membranes is further discussed. The results of the present work open new avenues for dedicated preparation and

  6. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  7. Simulating plastic surgery: from human skin tensile tests, through hyperelastic finite element models to real-time haptics.

    PubMed

    Lapeer, R J; Gasson, P D; Karri, V

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we provide a summary of a number of experiments we conducted to arrive at a prototype real-time simulator for plastic surgical interventions such as skin flap repair and inguinal herniotomy. We started our research with a series of in-vitro tensile stress tests on human skin, harvested from female patients undergoing plastic reconstructive surgery. We then used the acquired stress-strain data to fit hyperelastic models. Three models were considered: General Polynomial, Reduced Polynomial and Ogden. Only Reduced Polynomial models were found to be stable, hence they progressed to the next stage to be used in an explicit finite element model aimed at real-time performance in conjunction with a haptic feedback device. A total Lagrangian formulation with the half-step central difference method was employed to integrate the dynamic equation of motion of the mesh. The mesh was integrated into two versions of a real-time skin simulator: a single-threaded version running on a computer's main central processing unit and a multi-threaded version running on the computer's graphics card. The latter was achieved by exploiting recent advances in programmable graphics technology.

  8. The effects of cyclic tensile and stress-relaxation tests on porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Remache, D; Caliez, M; Gratton, M; Dos Santos, S

    2017-09-11

    When a living tissue is subjected to cyclic stretching, the stress-strain curves show a shift down with the increase in the number of cycles until stabilization. This phenomenon is referred to in the literature as a preconditioning and is performed to obtain repeatable and predictable measurements. Preconditioning has been routinely performed in skin tissue tests; however, its effects on the mechanical properties of the material such as viscoelastic response, tangent modulus, sensitivity to strain rate, the stress relaxation rate, etc….remain unclear. In addition, various physical interpretations of this phenomenon have been proposed and there is no general agreement on its origin at the microscopic or mesoscopic scales. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the cyclical stretching and the stress-relaxation tests on the mechanical properties of the porcine skin. Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests at large and constant strain were performed on different skin samples. The change in the reaction force, and skin's tangent modulus as a function of the number of cycles, as well as the strain rate effect on the mechanical behavior of skin samples after cycling were investigated. Stress-relaxation tests were also performed on skin samples. The change in the reaction force as a function of relaxation time and the strain rate effect on the mechanical behavior of skin samples after the stress-relaxation were investigated. The mechanical behavior of a skin sample under stress-relaxation test was modeled using a combination of hyperelasticity and viscoelasticity. Overall, the results showed that the mechanical behavior of the skin was strongly influenced by cycling and stress relaxation tests. Indeed, it was observed that the skin's resistance decreased by about half for two hours of cycling; the tangent modulus degraded by nearly 30% and skin samples became insensitive to the strain rates and accumulated progressively an inelastic deformation over time during

  9. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in shear and tensile bond strength tests.

    PubMed

    Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Magnani, Maria Beatriz Borges de Araújo; Nouer, Darcy Flávio

    2005-09-01

    The coefficient of variation is a dispersion measurement that does not depend on the unit scales, thus allowing the comparison of experimental results involving different variables. Its calculation is crucial for the adhesive experiments performed in laboratories because both precision and reliability can be verified. The aim of this study was to evaluate and to suggest a classification of the coefficient variation (CV) for in vitro experiments on shear and tensile strengths. The experiments were performed in laboratory by fifty international and national studies on adhesion materials. Statistical data allowing the estimation of the coefficient of variation was gathered from each scientific article since none of them had such a measurement previously calculated. Excel worksheet was used for organizing the data while the sample normality was tested by using Shapiro Wilk tests (alpha = 0.05) and the Statistical Analysis System software (SAS). A mean value of 6.11 (SD = 1.83) for the coefficient of variation was found by the data analysis and the data had a normal distribution (p>0.05). A range classification was proposed for the coefficient of variation from such data, that is, it should be considered low for a value lesser than 2.44; intermediate for a value between 2.44 and 7.94, high for a value between 7.94 and 9.78, and finally, very high for a value greater than 9.78. Such classification can be used as a guide for experiments on adhesion materials, thus making the planning easier as well as revealing precision and validity concerning the data.

  10. An Evaluation of Some Current Practices for Short-Time Elevated-Temperature Tensile Tests of Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Charles R., Jr.; Heimerl, George J.

    1960-01-01

    The effect of different testing practices on the short-time elevated-temperature tensile properties was determined for 2024-T3 aluminum-alloy, HM21A-T8 and HK31A-H24 magnesium-alloy, and 12 MoV stainless-steel sheet. Tests were made under single strain-rate and single head-speed conditions. A dual strain-rate test was also included. An evaluation of the effects of these practices is given for the tensile and yield strengths, the elongation in 2 inches, and the uniform elongation. The need for a uniform testing practice is demonstrated. Recommended practices suggested by different organizations are included.

  11. Effect of native oxide layers on copper thin-film tensile properties: A reactive molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Skarlinski, Michael D.; Quesnel, David J.

    2015-12-21

    Metal-oxide layers are likely to be present on metallic nano-structures due to either environmental exposure during use, or high temperature processing techniques such as annealing. It is well known that nano-structured metals have vastly different mechanical properties from bulk metals; however, difficulties in modeling the transition between metallic and ionic bonding have prevented the computational investigation of the effects of oxide surface layers. Newly developed charge-optimized many body [Liang et al., Mater. Sci. Eng., R 74, 255 (2013)] potentials are used to perform fully reactive molecular dynamics simulations which elucidate the effects that metal-oxide layers have on the mechanical properties of a copper thin-film. Simulated tensile tests are performed on thin-films while using different strain-rates, temperatures, and oxide thicknesses to evaluate changes in yield stress, modulus, and failure mechanisms. Findings indicate that copper-thin film mechanical properties are strongly affected by native oxide layers. The formed oxide layers have an amorphous structure with lower Cu-O bond-densities than bulk CuO, and a mixture of Cu{sub 2}O and CuO charge character. It is found that oxidation will cause modifications to the strain response of the elastic modulii, producing a stiffened modulii at low temperatures (<75 K) and low strain values (<5%), and a softened modulii at higher temperatures. While under strain, structural reorganization within the oxide layers facilitates brittle yielding through nucleation of defects across the oxide/metal interface. The oxide-free copper thin-film yielding mechanism is found to be a tensile-axis reorientation and grain creation. The oxide layers change the observed yielding mechanism, allowing for the inner copper thin-film to sustain an FCC-to-BCC transition during yielding. The mechanical properties are fit to a thermodynamic model based on classical nucleation theory. The fit implies that the oxidation of the

  12. Effect of Test Specimen Shape and Size on Interlaminar Tensile Properties of Advanced Carbon-Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2015-01-01

    The interlaminar tensile strength of 1000-tow T-300 fiber ACC-6 carbon-carbon composites was measured using the method of bonding the coupons to adherends at room temperature. The size, 0.70 to 1.963 inches maximum width or radius, and shape, round or square, of the test coupons were varied to determine if the test method was sensitive to these variables. Sixteen total variations were investigated and the results modeled.

  13. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  14. Dynamic tensile characterization of Vascomax® maraging C250 and C300 alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Wakeland, Peter Eric; Furnish, Michael D.

    2015-04-14

    Vascomax® maraging C250 and C300 alloys were dynamically characterized in tension with Kolsky tension bar techniques. Compared with conventional Kolsky tension bar experiments, a pair of lock nuts was used to minimize the pseudo stress peak and a laser system was applied to directly measure the specimen displacement. Dynamic engineering stress–strain curves of the C250 and C300 alloys were obtained in tension at 1000 and 3000 s–1. The dynamic yield strengths for both alloys were similar, but significantly higher than those obtained from quasi-static indentation tests. Both alloys exhibited insignificant strain-rate effect on dynamic yield strength. The C300 alloy showedmore » approximately 10 % higher in yield strength than the C250 alloy at the same strain rates. Necking was observed in both alloys right after yield. The Bridgman correction was applied to calculate the true stress and strain at failure for both alloys. The true failure stress showed a modest strain rate effect for both alloys but no significant difference between the two alloys at the same strain rate. As a result, the C250 alloy was more ductile than the C300 alloy under dynamic loading.« less

  15. Dynamic tensile characterization of Vascomax® maraging C250 and C300 alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Wakeland, Peter Eric; Furnish, Michael D.

    2015-04-14

    Vascomax® maraging C250 and C300 alloys were dynamically characterized in tension with Kolsky tension bar techniques. Compared with conventional Kolsky tension bar experiments, a pair of lock nuts was used to minimize the pseudo stress peak and a laser system was applied to directly measure the specimen displacement. Dynamic engineering stress–strain curves of the C250 and C300 alloys were obtained in tension at 1000 and 3000 s–1. The dynamic yield strengths for both alloys were similar, but significantly higher than those obtained from quasi-static indentation tests. Both alloys exhibited insignificant strain-rate effect on dynamic yield strength. The C300 alloy showed approximately 10 % higher in yield strength than the C250 alloy at the same strain rates. Necking was observed in both alloys right after yield. The Bridgman correction was applied to calculate the true stress and strain at failure for both alloys. The true failure stress showed a modest strain rate effect for both alloys but no significant difference between the two alloys at the same strain rate. As a result, the C250 alloy was more ductile than the C300 alloy under dynamic loading.

  16. Exposure Assessment of a High-energy Tensile Test With Large Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Cables.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Kuo, Yu-Ying; Michel, Silvain; Terrasi, Giovanni; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the particle and fiber release from two carbon fiber reinforced polymer cables that underwent high-energy tensile tests until rupture. The failing event was the source of a large amount of dust whereof a part was suspected to be containing possibly respirable fibers that could cause adverse health effects. The released fibers were suspected to migrate through small openings to the experiment control room and also to an adjacent machine hall where workers were active. To investigate the fiber release and exposure risk of the affected workers, the generated particles were measured with aerosol devices to obtain the particle size and particle concentrations. Furthermore, particles were collected on filter samples to investigate the particle shape and the fiber concentration. Three situations were monitored for the control room and the machine hall: the background concentrations, the impact of the cable failure, and the venting of the exposed rooms afterward. The results showed four important findings: The cable failure caused the release of respirable fibers with diameters below 3 μm and an average length of 13.9 μm; the released particles did migrate to the control room and to the machine hall; the measured peak fiber concentration of 0.76 fibers/cm(3) and the overall fiber concentration of 0.07 fibers/cm(3) in the control room were below the Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for fibers without indication of carcinogenicity; and the venting of the rooms was fast and effective. Even though respirable fibers were released, the low fiber concentration and effective venting indicated that the suspected health risks from the experiment on the affected workers was low. However, the effect of long-term exposure is not known therefore additional control measures are recommended.

  17. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  18. Dynamic Punch Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, Amos; Seidt, Jeremy

    2009-06-01

    A dynamic punch test is introduced. The test is conducted by placing a punching device between the incident and transmitter bars of a compression split Hopkinson bar apparatus. The punch has a rounded end that penetrates into the specimen which is a thin round plate clamped around the circumference. The force of the punch and the relative motion between the punch and the specimen holder are determined from the waves recorded on split Hopkinson bars. Digital image correlation technique is used to verify the displacements determined from the waves. Results are shown from tests on specimens made of 2024-T351 aluminum. The results can be used for the development and validation of continuum failure models for high stain rates applications. Many existing failure models relate stress triaxiality (ratio of the pressure and the von Mises stress) to equivalent failure strain, and some models have been modified to include the Lode parameter. The coefficients in the failure models are determined from experiments in which specimens are subjected to a combined state of stress. Such experiments are relatively easy to conduct in low (quasi-static) strain rate applications, but are very difficult to conduct at high strain rate.

  19. Bonding characteristics in NiAl intermetallics with O impurity: a first-principles computational tensile test.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xue-Lan; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong; Wang, Tianmin

    2009-01-14

    We have performed a first-principles computational tensile test on NiAl intermetallics with O impurity along the [001] crystalline direction on the (110) plane to investigate the tensile strength and the bonding characteristics of the NiAl-O system. We show that the ideal tensile strength is largely reduced due to the presence of O impurity in comparison with pure NiAl. The investigations of the atomic configuration and bond-length evolution show that O prefers to bond with Al, forming an O-Al cluster finally with the break of O-Ni bonds. The O-Ni bonds are demonstrated to be weaker than the O-Al bonds, and the reduced tensile strength originates from such weaker O-Ni bonds. A void-like structure forms after the break of the O-Ni and some Ni-Al bonds. Such a void-like structure can act as the initial nucleation or the propagation path of the crack, and thus produce large effects on the mechanical properties of NiAl.

  20. Grips for Lightweight Tensile Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, William G., Jr.; Gibson, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    Set of grips developed for tensile testing of lightweight composite materials. Double-wedge design substantially increases gripping force and reduces slippage. Specimen held by grips made of hardened wedges. Assembly screwed into load cell in tensile-testing machine.

  1. Revision of the tensile database for V-Ti and V-Cr-Ti alloys tested at ANL.

    SciTech Connect

    Billone, M. C.

    1998-01-13

    The published database for the tensile properties of unirradiated and irradiated vanadium-based alloys tested at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been reviewed. The alloys tested are in the ranges of V-(0-18)wt.%Ti and V-(4-15)wt.%Cr-(3-15)wt.%Ti. A consistent methodology, based on ASTM terminology and standards, has been used to re-analyze the unpublished load vs. displacement curves for 162 unirradiated samples and 91 irradiated samples to determine revised values for yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), uniform elongation (UE) and total elongation (TE). The revised data set contains lower values for UE ({minus}5{+-}2% strain) and TE ({minus}4{+-}2% strain) than previously reported. Revised values for YS and UTS are consistent with the previously-published values in that they are within the scatter usually associated with these properties.

  2. Accelerated Testing of Polymeric Composites Using the Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Magid, Becky M.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2000-01-01

    Creep properties of IM7/K3B composite material were obtained using three accelerated test methods at elevated temperatures. Results of flexural creep tests using the dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) were compared with results of conventional tensile and compression creep tests. The procedures of the three test methods are described and the results are presented. Despite minor differences in the time shift factor of the creep compliance curves, the DMA results compared favorably with the results from the tensile and compressive creep tests. Some insight is given into establishing correlations between creep compliance in flexure and creep compliance in tension and compression. It is shown that with careful consideration of the limitations of flexure creep, a viable and reliable accelerated test procedure can be developed using the DMA to obtain the viscoelastic properties of composites in extreme environments.

  3. Mechanical and Linear Viscoelastic Properties of High Density Polyethylene Obtained from Tensile and Dead-Load Creep Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    from virgin pellets. Table 1. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THREE GRADES OF HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE Molecular Weight Mw Mn Melt Weight Number Flow HLMI...SECURITM CLASSIFICATON OF THIS PAGE (When Data Entered) Block No. 20 ABSTRACT Three grades of high density polyethylene ( HDPE ) are tested for tensile...66 Company’s materials literature, along with melt - flow index values, are tabulated in Table I along with our values obtained from the gel per

  4. Investigation of structure-property relationships of polyisobutylene-based biomaterials: Morphology, thermal, quasi-static tensile and long-term dynamic fatigue behavior.

    PubMed

    Götz, C; Lim, G T; Puskas, J E; Altstädt, V

    2012-06-01

    This study examines the morphology, thermal, quasi-static and long-term dynamic creep properties of one linear and three arborescent polyisobutylene-based block copolymers (L_SIBS31, D_IBS16, D_IBS27 and D_IBS33). Silicone rubber, a common biopolymer, was considered as a benchmark material for comparison. A unique hysteretic testing methodology of Stepwise Increasing Load Test (SILT) and Single Load Test (SLT) was used in this study to evaluate the long-term dynamic fatigue performance of these materials. Our experimental findings revealed that the molecular weight of polyisobutylene (PIB) and polystyrene (PS) arms [M(n)(PIB(arm)) and M(n)(PS(arm))], respectively had a profound influence on the nano-scaled phase separation, quasi-static tensile, thermal transition, and dynamic creep resistance behaviors of these PIB-based block copolymers. However, silicone rubber outperformed the PIB-based block copolymers in terms of dynamic creep properties due to its chemically crosslinked structure. This indicates a need for a material strategy to improve the dynamic fatigue and creep of this class of biopolymers to be considered as alternative to silicone rubber for biomedical devices.

  5. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  6. Acoustic emission monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad aluminum 2024-T3 and characterization of effects of corrosion on AE source events and material tensile properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okafor, A. Chukwujekwu; Natarajan, Shridhar

    2014-02-01

    Corrosion damage affects structural integrity and deteriorates material properties of aluminum alloys in aircraft structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) is an effective nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technique for monitoring such damages and predicting failure in large structures of an aircraft. For successful interpretation of data from AE monitoring, sources of AE and factors affecting it need to be identified. This paper presents results of AE monitoring of tensile testing of corroded and un-corroded clad Aluminum 2024-T3 test specimens, and characterization of the effects of strain-rate and corrosion damage on material tensile properties and AE source events. Effect of corrosion was studied by inducing corrosion in the test specimens by accelerated corrosion testing in a Q-Fog accelerated corrosion chamber for 12 weeks. Eight (8) masked dog-bone shaped specimens were placed in the accelerated corrosion chamber at the beginning of the test. Two (2) dog-bone shaped specimens were removed from the corrosion chamber after exposure time of 3, 6, 9, and 12 weeks respectively, and subjected to tension testing till specimen failure along with AE monitoring, as well as two (2) reference samples not exposed to corrosion. Material tensile properties (yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, toughness, and elongation) obtained from tension test and AE parameters obtained from AE monitoring were analyzed and characterized. AE parameters increase with increase in exposure period of the specimens in the corrosive environment. Aluminum 2024-T3 is an acoustically silent material during tensile deformation without any damage. Acoustic emission events increase with increase of corrosion damage and with increase in strain rate above a certain value. Thus AE is suitable for structural health monitoring of corrosion damage. Ultimate tensile strength, toughness and elongation values decrease with increase of exposure period in corrosion chamber.

  7. The NanoBeamBalance: A passive, tensile-test device for the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, M. P. E.; Mesquida, P.

    2011-05-01

    An add-on device is presented, which significantly expands the force measurement capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM). The device consists of a completely passive mechanism, which translates the vertical motion of the AFM tip in force measurements into a horizontal motion of two sample support pads. The advantage is that it is much easier to deposit microscopic samples from suspension onto flat surfaces than to attach them reliably between tip and a surface. The working-principle and the design of the device is comprehensively described and demonstrated on the example of collagen fibres with a diameter of a few μm. Well-defined tensile measurements in longitudinal direction were performed, showing that the tensile stiffness of collagen fibres from rat tail tendon decreases by a factor of 5 when rehydrated from a dried sample and slowly increases upon cross-linking with glutaraldehyde.

  8. The NanoBeamBalance: a passive, tensile-test device for the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Wenger, M P E; Mesquida, P

    2011-05-01

    An add-on device is presented, which significantly expands the force measurement capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM). The device consists of a completely passive mechanism, which translates the vertical motion of the AFM tip in force measurements into a horizontal motion of two sample support pads. The advantage is that it is much easier to deposit microscopic samples from suspension onto flat surfaces than to attach them reliably between tip and a surface. The working-principle and the design of the device is comprehensively described and demonstrated on the example of collagen fibres with a diameter of a few μm. Well-defined tensile measurements in longitudinal direction were performed, showing that the tensile stiffness of collagen fibres from rat tail tendon decreases by a factor of 5 when rehydrated from a dried sample and slowly increases upon cross-linking with glutaraldehyde.

  9. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Kenneth C.

    1987-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensil specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen irregardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis.

  10. Self-aligning hydraulic piston assembly for tensile testing of ceramic

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1987-08-18

    The present invention is directed to a self-aligning grip housing assembly that can transmit an uniaxial load to a tensile specimen without introducing bending stresses into the specimen. Disposed inside said grip housing assembly are a multiplicity of supporting pistons connected to a common source of pressurized oil that carry equal shares of the load applied to the specimen regardless whether there is initial misalignment between the specimen load column assembly and housing axis. 4 figs.

  11. High-speed imaging on static tensile test for unidirectional CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusano, Hideaki; Aoki, Yuichiro; Hirano, Yoshiyasu; Kondo, Yasushi; Nagao, Yosuke

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) under static tensile loading. The advantages of CFRP are higher specific stiffness and strength than the metal material. The use of CFRP is increasing in not only the aerospace and rapid transit railway industries but also the sports, leisure and automotive industries. The tensile fracture mechanism of unidirectional CFRP has not been experimentally made clear because the fracture speed of unidirectional CFRP is quite high. We selected the intermediate modulus and high strength unidirectional CFRP laminate which is a typical material used in the aerospace field. The fracture process under static tensile loading was captured by a conventional high-speed camera and a new type High-Speed Video Camera HPV-1. It was found that the duration of fracture is 200 microseconds or less, then images taken by a conventional camera doesn't have enough temporal-resolution. On the other hand, results obtained by HPV-1 have higher quality where the fracture process can be clearly observed.

  12. In-situ TEM observation of dynamic interaction between dislocation and cavity in BCC metals in tensile deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tougou, Kouichi; Shikata, Akihito; Kawase, Uchu; Onitsuka, Takashi; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the effect of irradiation hardening of structural materials due to cavity formation in BCC metals for nuclear applications, an in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation in tensile test was performed for the helium ion-irradiated specimens of pure molybdenum and pure iron. The obstacle barrier strength, α was calculated from the bow-out dislocation based on line tension model, and the obstacle barrier strengths of cavity in pure molybdenum and pure iron were about 0.5-0.7. The fractions of cross-slip generation of dislocation of screw type due to interaction with the cavities were about 16-18 % for pure molybdenum.

  13. Fluid dynamics test method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayman, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Test method and apparatus determine fluid effective mass and damping in frequency range where effective mass may be considered as total mass less sum of slosh masses. Apparatus is designed so test tank and its mounting yoke are supported from structural test wall by series of flexures.

  14. Comparison of Superelasticity of Nickel Titanium Orthodontic Arch wires using Mechanical Tensile Testing and Correlating with Electrical Resistivity.

    PubMed

    Sivaraj, Aravind

    2013-06-01

    Application of light and continuous forces for optimum physiological response and least damage to the tooth supporting structures should be the primary aim of the orthodontist. Nickel titanium alloys with the properties of excellent spring back, super elasticity and wide range of action is one of the natural choices for the clinicians to achieve this goal. In recent periods, various wire manufacturers have come with a variety of wires exhibiting different properties. It is the duty of the clinician to select appropriate wires during various stages of treatment for excellent results. For achieving this evaluation of the properties of these wires is essential. This study is focussed on evaluating the super elastic property of eight groups of austenite active nickel titanium wires. Eight groups of archwires bought from eight different manufacturers were studied. These wires were tested through mechanical tensile testing and electrical resistivity methods. Unloading curves were carefully assessed for superelastic behaviour on deactivation. Rankings of the wires tested were based primarily upon the unloading curve's slope Conclusion: Ortho organisers wires ranked first and superior, followed by American Orthodontics and Ormco A wires. Morelli and GAClowland NiTi wires were ranked last. It can be concluded that the performance of these wires based on rankings should be further evaluated by clinical studies. How to cite this article: Sivaraj A. Comparison of Superelasticity of Nickel Titanium Orthodontic Arch wires using Mechanical Tensile Testing and Correlating with Electrical Resistivity. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(3):1-12.

  15. Rapid heating tensile tests of hydrogen-charged high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1989-05-19

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. Proper design of the equipment will require an understanding of how tritium and its decay product helium affect mechanical properties. This memorandum describes results of rapid heating tensile testing of hydrogen-charged specimens of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) 316L stainless steel. These results provide a data base for comparison with uncharged and tritium-charged-and-aged specimens to distinguish the effects of hydrogen and helium. Details of the experimental equipment and procedures and results for uncharged specimens were reported previously. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  16. Stiffness and strength of fracture callus. Relative rates of mechanical maturation as evaluated by a uniaxial tensile test.

    PubMed

    Black, J; Perdigon, P; Brown, N; Pollack, S R

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical evaluation of healing fractures in rabbits suggests that tensile testing both minimizes artifacts and permits direct intrinsic determinations of tissue quality. In healing osteotomies in the rabbit fibula, there is a rapid return of stiffness at 16 days, correlating with callus maturation. The failure mode proved to be a "delamination" fracture. Values for the strength of bone (3.3 N/m2) and fibrocartilage (0.2 N/m2) correlate well with the results of other studies but are probably values of maximum tissue adhesion strength.

  17. Micro-tensile bond testing of resin cements to dentin and an indirect resin composite.

    PubMed

    Mak, Yiu-Fai; Lai, Shirley C N; Cheung, Gary S P; Chan, Alex W K; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2002-12-01

    Micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) evaluation and fractographic analysis were used to compare four resin cement systems (AC: All-Bond 2/Choice; RX: Single Bond/RelyX ARC; SB: Super-Bond C & B; and PF: Panavia F) in indirect composite/dentin adhesive joints. Flat dentin surfaces were created on extracted human third molars. The resin cements were used according to the manufacturers' instructions for bonding silanized composite overlays to deep coronal dentin. 0.9x0.9 composite-dentin beams prepared from the luted specimens were stressed to failure in tension. Dentin sides of all fractured specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the failure modes. In group PF, morphologic features that could not be resolved at the SEM level were further validated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination of the SEM specimens. Statistical analyses revealed significant difference (p<0.05) among microTBS and failure modes in the resin cement groups. The two groups (AC and RX) with highest microTBS failed predominantly along the composite overlay/cement interface. Cohesive failure in resin cement was primarily observed in group SB that exhibited intermediate microTBS values. In group PF with the lowest microTBS, failure occurred mostly along the dentin surface. Globular resin agglomerates seen by SEM on PF-treated dentin were distinguished from silica fillers by TEM. The bond between the processed composite and the luting resin cement was the weak link in indirect composite restorations cemented with AC or RX. Super-Bond C&B exhibited intermediate tensile strength and Panavia F is less reliable when used in conjunction with a self-etching primer for bonding indirect restorations to dentin.

  18. Estimation of uncertainty with the modulus of elasticity measured by means of tensile test for BSCCO tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, Kozo; Nyilas, Arman; Shin, H.

    2010-10-01

    The international round robin test (RRT) was conducted in order to establish the international standard for the tensile test method for BSCCO-2223 tape shaped wires. The measurands of mechanical properties were statistically analyzed to estimate their standard uncertainties and their correlation among laboratories. Consequently the large variance was observed with the modulus of elasticity determined from the initial loading curve. The reason has been examined by estimating type B uncertainties causing at every step of the experimental procedure. With respect to the modulus of elasticity, the grand intra-lab average of relative standard uncertainty (RSU) obtained from the RRT coincided roughly with that derived by means of type B evaluation. Thus it is emphasized that the type B evaluation is very effective tool for expecting the uncertainties of the observations like the modulus of elasticity. On the other hand, the grand over-all RSU was larger than the grand intra-lab one. The combined standard uncertainties were calculated by changing the strain rate, but kept other parameters constant. In order to suppress the influence from the strain rate to the variance, it has been recommended that the strain rate shall be regulated less than 2 × 10 -4 1/s in the tensile test method.

  19. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  20. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Advantages of a 3-parameter reduced constitutive model for the measurement of polymers elastic modulus using tensile tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaise, A.; André, S.; Delobelle, P.; Meshaka, Y.; Cunat, C.

    2016-11-01

    Exact measurements of the rheological parameters of time-dependent materials are crucial to improve our understanding of their intimate relation to the internal bulk microstructure. Concerning solid polymers and the apparently simple determination of Young's modulus in tensile tests, international standards rely on basic protocols that are known to lead to erroneous values. This paper describes an approach allowing a correct measurement of the instantaneous elastic modulus of polymers by a tensile test. It is based on the use of an appropriate reduced model to describe the behavior of the material up to great strains, together with well-established principles of parameter estimation in engineering science. These principles are objective tools that are used to determine which parameters of a model can be correctly identified according to the informational content of a given data set. The assessment of the methodology and of the measurements is accomplished by comparing the results with those obtained from two other physical experiments, probing the material response at small temporal and length scales, namely, ultrasound measurements with excitation at 5 MHz and modulated nanoindentation tests over a few nanometers of amplitude.

  2. Ultimate Tensile Strength as a Function of Test Rate for Various Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    Ultimate tensile strength of five different continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/BSAS (2D 2 types), SiC/MAS-5 (2D), SiC/SiC (2D enhanced), and C/SiC(2D) was determined as a function of test rate at I 100 to 1200 'C in air. All five composite materials exhibited a significant dependency of ultimate strength on test rate such that the ultimate strength decreased with decreasing test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress rate) to another (constant stress loading) for SiC/BSAS suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law type of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics.

  3. Influence of static tensile testing on the deformation behavior of Al-4% Cu alloy containing micro- and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrustalyov, Anton; Vorozhtov, Sergey; Kulkov, Sergey

    2016-11-01

    At present, aluminum alloys reinforced with nonmetallic particles are of great interest in various fields of science and technology due to their high specific strength, hardness, wear resistance, and other properties. At the same time there is a great interest in the study of processes occurring during plastic deformation of such materials under static tensile loading. Plastic flow of metals occurs through the creation and movement of linear defects (dislocations), in which there is a phenomenon of discontinuous yielding. An introduction of particles into aluminum alloy promotes a considerable increase of stiffness and specific strength of alloys, and the study of the deformation behavior of such alloys is of great interest. The objective of this research is to analyze mechanical properties and the deformation behavior of aluminum alloy with the identification of mechanisms of plastic deformation when introducing solid nonmetallic micro- and nanoparticles into the soft aluminum matrix. An analysis of the microstructure of the obtained alloys shows that the introduction of particles (Al2O3, TiB2, TiC) leads to a reduction of the alloy grain size from 350 to 170 µm while residual porosity does not exceed 2%. Tensile tests performed show that the change in the type and quantity of particles also changes characteristics of discontinuous yielding, thus resulting in an increase of yield strength (from 18 to 40 MPa), reduction of ductility (from 15 to 2%), and moreover a significant increase of tensile strength (from 77 to 130 MPa), as compared to the initial Al-4 wt % Cu alloy.

  4. In vivo mechanical properties of thoracic aortic aneurysmal wall estimated from in vitro biaxial tensile test.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Tomohiro; Matsumoto, Takeo; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Ohashi, Toshiro; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Akimoto, Hiroji; Tabayashi, Koichi; Sato, Masaaki

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism of aneurysm rupture, it is necessary to examine the mechanical properties of aneurysm tissues in vivo. A new approach to evaluate in vivo mechanical properties of aortic aneurysmal tissues has been proposed in this study. The shape of the aneurysm was modeled as a sphere, and equi-biaxial stress in the in vivo state was estimated from the diameter and the wall thickness of each aneurysm and mean blood pressure of each patient. The mechanical properties of the aneurysm at the in vivo stress were estimated from its in vitro biaxial tensile properties. There were no significant correlations among maximum diameter D, wall thickness t, and mean infinitesimal strain in the in vivo state epsilon(m). This indicates the wall deformation during aneurysm development was not elastic but plastic. The mean incremental elastic modulus H(m), an index of tissue stiffness, had a significant positive correlation with elastic modulus anisotropy index K(H). This indicates the aneurysmal wall got more anisotropic in vivo as it becomes stiffer.

  5. Viscoelastic properties and residual strain in a tensile creep test on bovine temporomandibular articular discs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Tanaka, M; Aoyama, J; Watanabe, M; Hattori, Y; Asai, D; Iwabe, T; Sasaki, A; Sugiyama, M; Tanne, K

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the creep characteristics and residual strain of bovine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs in tension. Twenty discs were divided into three specimens each: central, lateral and medial regions. Tension of 1.0 MPa was applied and sustained for 20 min to the specimens from 10 right-side discs, and tension of 1.5 MPa to specimens from 10 left-side discs. After the period of tension for creep, the specimens were removed from the tension devices and restoration observed for 20 min. Time-dependent creep curves showed a marked change in strain during the initial 5s. The essential time delay in strain ceased after 2 min, and strain reached an almost steady level after 3 min. At a tensile stress of 1.5 MPa, a strain of 14.5% on average was produced after 20 min creep in the central specimens; peripheral specimens showed strains of 12.4% on average. There were significant differences in strain between the central and peripheral specimens. The residual strain after 20 min restoration was 0.93% on average and there were no significant regional differences. This creep feature could be well represented by a generalized linear viscoelastic model. It was concluded that the regional differences in viscoelasticity might be caused by the complicated articulating functions of the TMJ, and that the residual strain caused by sustained stress could be an important factor in disc deformation.

  6. Advances in experimental assessment of dynamic tensile strength of concrete by the spalling technique. …in tribute to Janusz Roman Klepaczko, Emeritus Professor at the Université Paul Verlaine in Metz, passed away on August 15, 2008.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brara, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    An experimental method to test concrete in dynamic tension by spalling with a Hopkinson bar as loading and measuring tool was developed in 1999. The dynamic strength of concrete specimen and strain rate were indirectly derived from an accurate data processing of the signals measured on the Hopkinson bar surface. This method suggested by late Prof. Klepaczko, allowed for reaching the highest strain rate reported in literature for which an intriguing tensile strength increase was highlighted. This simple and efficient technique has been adopted by many researchers around the world. Some significant improvements in terms of definition and reproducibility of the incident loading pulse travelling along the bar and direct and/or contactless measurements on concrete specimens have been introduced. The very high rate sensitivity of concrete tensile strength was corroborated by the additional experimental data obtained with this experimental technique during the last fifteen years.

  7. [Aging effect on mechanical properties in fluid resin. (Part 3) Affection of residual monomer on the surface morphology after tensile test by microscopic observation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, A

    1981-04-01

    Affection of residual monomer on the surface morphology after tensile test was observed by an scanning microscope. Evaporation or leaching of the monomer gave big influence on the morphology of pearls and matrix. The observation suggested that the residual monomer existed mainly in the matrix. When the residual monomer disappeared, the surface morphology did not change by tensile load. It is the most important point to get good denture with fluid resin that we could decrease the residual monomer as possible.

  8. The evaluation of ordinary Portland cement concrete subject to elevated temperatures in conjunction with acoustic emission and splitting tensile test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Min; Hou, Tsung-Chin; Chen, Guan-Ying; Hou, Ping-Ni

    2017-04-01

    The research objective was to evaluate Ordinary Portland Cement concrete subject to various elevated temperatures. Single OPC concrete mixture with water to cementitious (w/c) equal to 0.45 was proportioned. Concrete specimens were cast and placed in the curing tank in which water was saturated with calcium hydroxide. After ninety days of moist-cure, three elevated temperatures, namely 300, 600, and 900-°C, were carried out upon hardened concrete specimens. Furthermore, two post-damaged curing conditions were executed to recover damaged concrete specimens: one was to recure under 23°C with 50% humidity in a controlled environmental chamber and the other was to recure in the same curing tank. Acoustic emission apparatus coupled with the splitting tensile test was utilized and found able to assess damaged concrete. Before concrete subject to elevated temperatures, the development of indirect tensile strength versus displacement diagram fit well with the tendency of AE energy release. It was found there was a large amount of AE energy released when stress and displacement diagram developed about 40-50%. As such could be identified as the onset of first fracture and the plain concrete generally exhibited a quasi-brittle fracture with two major series of AE energy dissipations; however when concrete specimens were subject to elevated temperatures, the damaged concrete specimens displayed neither fracture pattern nor the "double-hump" AE energy dissipation in comparison with those of plain concrete.

  9. Semi-analytical and Numerical Studies on the Flattened Brazilian Splitting Test Used for Measuring the Indirect Tensile Strength of Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. G.; Wang, L. G.; Lu, Y. L.; Chen, J. R.; Zhang, J. H.

    2015-09-01

    Based on the two-dimensional elasticity theory, this study established a mechanical model under chordally opposing distributed compressive loads, in order to perfect the theoretical foundation of the flattened Brazilian splitting test used for measuring the indirect tensile strength of rocks. The stress superposition method was used to obtain the approximate analytic solutions of stress components inside the flattened Brazilian disk. These analytic solutions were then verified through a comparison with the numerical results of the finite element method (FEM). Based on the theoretical derivation, this research carried out a contrastive study on the effect of the flattened loading angles on the stress value and stress concentration degree inside the disk. The results showed that the stress concentration degree near the loading point and the ratio of compressive/tensile stress inside the disk dramatically decreased as the flattened loading angle increased, avoiding the crushing failure near-loading point of Brazilian disk specimens. However, only the tensile stress value and the tensile region were slightly reduced with the increase of the flattened loading angle. Furthermore, this study found that the optimal flattened loading angle was 20°-30°; flattened load angles that were too large or too small made it difficult to guarantee the central tensile splitting failure principle of the Brazilian splitting test. According to the Griffith strength failure criterion, the calculative formula of the indirect tensile strength of rocks was derived theoretically. This study obtained a theoretical indirect tensile strength that closely coincided with existing and experimental results. Finally, this paper simulated the fracture evolution process of rocks under different loading angles through the use of the finite element numerical software ANSYS. The modeling results showed that the Flattened Brazilian Splitting Test using the optimal loading angle could guarantee the tensile

  10. Tensile strength of Iß crystalline cellulose predicted by molecular dynamics simulation

    Treesearch

    Xiawa Wu; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Iß crystalline cellulose are studied using molecular dynamics simulation. A model Iß crystal is deformed in the three orthogonal directions at three different strain rates. The stress-strain behaviors for each case are analyzed and then used to calculate mechanical properties. The results show that the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio...

  11. Reliability design and assessment of a micro-probe using the results of a tensile test of a beryllium-copper alloy thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Hyub; Shin, Myung-Soo

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the results of tensile tests for a beryllium-copper (BeCu) alloy thin film and the application of the results to the design of a probe. The copper alloy films were fabricated by electroplating. To obtain the tensile characteristics of the film, the dog-bone type specimen was fabricated by the etching method. The tensile tests were performed with the specimen using a test machine developed by the authors. The BeCu alloy has an elastic modulus of 119 GPa and the 0.2% offset yield and ultimate tensile strengths of 1078 MPa and 1108 MPa, respectively. The design and manufacture of a smaller probe require higher pad density and smaller pad-pitch chips. It should be effective in high-frequency testing. For the design of a new micro-probe, we investigated several design parameters that may cause problems, such as the contact force and life, using the tensile properties and the design of experiment method in conjunction with finite element analysis. The optimal dimensions of the probe were found using the response surface method. The probe with optimal dimensions was manufactured by a precision press process. It was verified that the manufactured probe satisfied the life, the contact force and the over drive through the compression tests and the life tests of the probes.

  12. Dynamic impact testing with servohydraulic testing machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardenheier, R.; Rogers, G.

    2006-08-01

    The design concept of “Crashworthiness” requires the information on material behaviour under dynamic impact loading in order to describe and predict the crash behaviour of structures. Especially the transport related industries, like car, railway or aircraft industry, pursue the concept of lightweight design for a while now. The materials' maximum constraint during loading is pushed to permanently increasing figures. This means in terms of crashworthiness that the process of energy absorption in structures and the mechanical behaviour of materials must well understood and can be described appropriately by material models. In close cooperation with experts from various industries and research institutes Instron has developed throughout the past years a new family of servohydraulic testing machines specifically designed to cope with the dynamics of high rate testing. Main development steps are reflected versus their experimental necessities.

  13. Determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of the smooth adhesive organs of Carausius morosus using tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, Michael; Backhaus, Stefan; Scholz, Ingo; Park, Daesung; Mayer, Joachim; Baumgartner, Werner

    2014-10-15

    Adhesive organs like arolia of insects allow these animals to climb on different substrates by creating high adhesion forces. According to the Dahlquist criterion, adhesive organs must be very soft, exhibiting an effective Young's modulus of below 100 kPa to adhere well to substrates. Such a low effective Young's modulus allows the adhesive organs to make almost direct contact with the substrate and results in van der Waals forces along with capillary forces. In previous studies, the effective Young's moduli of adhesive organs were determined using indentation tests, revealing their structure to be very soft. However, adhesive organs show a layered structure, thus the measured values comprise the effective Young's moduli of several layers of the adhesive organs. In this study, a new approach is illustrated to measure the Young's modulus of the outermost layer of the arolium, i.e. of the epicuticle, of the stick insect Carausius morosus. As a result of the epicuticle being supported by upright fibres, tensile tests allow the determination of the Young's modulus of the epicuticle with hardly influence from subjacent layers. In our tensile tests, arolia of stick insects adhering on a latex membrane were stretched by stretching the membrane while the elongation of the contact area between an arolium and the membrane was recorded. For analysis, mathematical models of the mechanical system were developed. When fed with the observed elongations, these models yield estimates for the Young's modulus of the epicuticle of approximately 100 MPa. Thus, in arolia, a very thin layer (~225 nm) of a rather stiff material, which is less susceptible to abrasion, makes contact with the substrates, whereas the inner fibrous structure of arolia is responsible for their softness.

  14. Determination of carbon fiber adhesion to thermoplastic polymers using the single fiber/matrix tensile test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Cordner, L. W.; Hinkley, J. L.; Johnston, N. J.

    1986-01-01

    The single fiber adhesion shear test has been adapted to testing the adhesion between carbon fiber and thermoplastic polymers. Tests of three thermoplastics, polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide and polyetherimide indicate the shear adhesion strength is significantly less than of an epoxy polymer to the same carbon fiber.

  15. High dynamic range subjective testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allan, Brahim; Nilsson, Mike

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes of a set of subjective tests that the authors have carried out to assess the end user perception of video encoded with High Dynamic Range technology when viewed in a typical home environment. Viewers scored individual single clips of content, presented in High Definition (HD) and Ultra High Definition (UHD), in Standard Dynamic Range (SDR), and in High Dynamic Range (HDR) using both the Perceptual Quantizer (PQ) and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) transfer characteristics, and presented in SDR as the backwards compatible rendering of the HLG representation. The quality of SDR HD was improved by approximately equal amounts by either increasing the dynamic range or increasing the resolution to UHD. A further smaller increase in quality was observed in the Mean Opinion Scores of the viewers by increasing both the dynamic range and the resolution, but this was not quite statistically significant.

  16. High temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Stevens, C.O.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests have been performed on V-4Cr-4Ti at 750 and 800 C in order to extend the data base beyond the current limit of 700 C. From comparison with previous measurements, the yield strength is nearly constant and tensile elongations decrease slightly with increasing temperature between 300 and 800 C. The ultimate strength exhibits an apparent maximum near 600 C (attributable to dynamic strain aging) but adequate strength is maintained up to 800 C. The reduction in area measured on tensile specimens remained high ({approximately}80%) for test temperatures up to 800 C, in contrast to previous reported results.

  17. Utilization of the Bend Test for Determining Tensile Properties of a Brittle Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    8217 5itCUmIV=CLAS5IFICATION OlP TMIS PAGC(Wb.. Date Uff-)- Block- No. 20 ABSTR.ACT A imited number of send as well as tension tests were performed...tends to predict-fracture stressesof -the -tnson s-cmn prxmtl %higher- -than- -those obtained in- the actual’ - tension tests. (Author) UNCLASSIFIEDp...SIIAP.D TENSION TEST SPECI.ENS ...... ................... .... 19 iI I. INTRODUCTION Interest in the bend test has gained considerable attention in

  18. Effects of Heat Shock on the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Granitic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardoukhi, Ahmad; Mardoukhi, Yousof; Hokka, Mikko; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a new experimental method for the characterization of the surface damage caused by a heat shock on a Brazilian disk test sample. Prior to mechanical testing with a Hopkinson Split Pressure bar device, the samples were subjected to heat shock by placing a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample's surface for periods of 10, 30, and 60 s. The sample surfaces were studied before and after the heat shock using optical microscopy and profilometry, and the images were analyzed to quantify the damage caused by the heat shock. The complexity of the surface crack patterns was quantified using fractal dimension of the crack patterns, which were used to explain the results of the mechanical testing. Even though the heat shock also causes damage below the surface which cannot be quantified from the optical images, the presented surface crack pattern analysis can give a reasonable estimate on the drop rate of the tension strength of the rock.

  19. Nucleation and growth of damage in polycrystalline aluminum under dynamic tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, M. L.; Yao, Y.; Ran, X. X.; Ye, W.; Bie, B. X.; Fan, D.; Li, P.

    2015-03-15

    Plate-impact experiments were conducted to study the features and mechanisms of void nucleation and growth in the polycrystalline of pure aluminum under dynamic loading. Soft-recovered samples have been analyzed by metallographic microscopy, electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD), and synchrotron radiation x-ray tomography technology. It was found that most of the void nucleation in grains neared the boundaries of “weak-orientation” grains and grew toward the grain boundaries with fractured small grains around the boundaries. This was mainly caused by the accumulation and interaction of slip systems in the “weak-orientation” grains. In addition, the micro voids were nearly octahedron because the octahedral slip systems were formed by 8 slip planes in the polycrystalline of pure aluminum. The EBSD results are consistent with the three-dimensional structure observed by synchrotron radiation x-ray.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-06-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  1. 3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW LOOKING NORTH, COMPONENTS TEST LABORATORY, DYNAMIC TEST FACILITY (SATURN V IN BACKGROUND). - Marshall Space Flight Center, East Test Area, Components Test Laboratory, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  2. Comparisons of planar and tubular biaxial tensile testing protocols of the same porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Joseph T; Lockwood, Danielle R; Utzinger, Urs; Montilla, Leonardo G; Witte, Russell S; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2013-07-01

    To identify the orthotropic biomechanical behavior of arteries, researchers typically perform stretch-pressure-inflation tests on tube-form arteries or planar biaxial testing of splayed sections. We examined variations in finite element simulations (FESs) driven from planar or tubular testing of the same coronary arteries to determine what differences exist when picking one testing technique vs. another. Arteries were tested in tube-form first, then tested in planar-form, and fit to a Fung-type strain energy density function. Afterwards, arteries were modeled via finite element analysis looking at stress and displacement behavior in different scenarios (e.g., tube FESs with tube- or planar-driven constitutive models). When performing FESs of tube inflation from a planar-driven constitutive model, pressure-diameter results had an error of 12.3% compared to pressure-inflation data. Circumferential stresses were different between tube- and planar-driven pressure-inflation models by 50.4% with the planar-driven model having higher stresses. This reduced to 3.9% when rolling the sample to a tube first with planar-driven properties, then inflating with tubular-driven properties. Microstructure showed primarily axial orientation in the tubular and opening-angle configurations. There was a shift towards the circumferential direction upon flattening of 8.0°. There was also noticeable collagen uncrimping in the flattened tissue.

  3. Comparisons of planar and tubular biaxial tensile testing protocols of the same porcine coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Joseph T; Lockwood, Danielle R; Utzinger, Urs; Montilla, Leonardo G; Witte, Russell S; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01

    To identify the orthotropic biomechanical behavior of arteries, researchers typically perform stretch-pressure-inflation tests on tube-form arteries or planar biaxial testing of splayed sections. We examined variations in finite element simulations (FESs) driven from planar or tubular testing of the same coronary arteries to determine what differences exist when picking one testing technique versus another. Arteries were tested in tube-form first, then tested in planar-form, and fit to a Fung-type strain energy density function. Afterwards, arteries were modeled via finite element analysis looking at stress and displacement behavior in different scenarios (e.g., tube FESs with tube- or planar-driven constitutive models). When performing FESs of tube inflation from a planar-driven constitutive model, pressure-diameter results had an error of 12.3% compared to pressure-inflation data. Circumferential stresses were different between tube- and planar-driven pressure-inflation models by 50.4% with the planar-driven model having higher stresses. This reduced to 3.9% when rolling the sample to a tube first with planar-driven properties, then inflating with tubular-driven properties. Microstructure showed primarily axial orientation in the tubular and opening-angle configurations. There was a shift towards the circumferential direction upon flattening of 8.0 . There was also noticeable collagen uncrimping in the flattened tissue. PMID:23132151

  4. Mechanical behavior and failure analysis of prosthetic retaining screws after long-term use in vivo. Part 3: Preload and tensile fracture load testing.

    PubMed

    Al Jabbari, Youssef S; Fournelle, Raymond; Ziebert, Gerald; Toth, Jeffrey; Iacopino, Anthony M

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the preload and tensile fracture load values of prosthetic retaining screws after long-term use in vivo compared to unused screws (controls). Additionally, the investigation addressed whether the preload and fracture load values of prosthetic retaining screws reported by the manufacturer become altered after long-term use in vivo. For preload testing, 10 new screws (controls) from Nobel Biocare (NB) and 73 used retaining screws [58 from NB and 15 from Sterngold (SG)] were subjected to preload testing. For tensile testing, eight controls from NB and 58 used retaining screws (46 from NB and 12 from SG) were subjected to tensile testing. Used screws for both tests were in service for 18-120 months. A custom load frame, load cell, and torque wrench setup were used for preload testing. All 83 prosthetic screws were torqued once to 10 Ncm, and the produced preload value was recorded (N) using an X-Y plotter. Tensile testing was performed on a universal testing machine and the resulting tensile fracture load value was recorded (N). Preload and tensile fracture load values were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. There was a significant difference between preload values for screws from NB and screws from SG (p < 0.001). The preload values for gold alloy screws from NB decreased as the number of years in service increased. There was a significant difference between tensile fracture values for the three groups (gold alloy screws from NB and SG and palladium alloy screws from NB) at p < 0.001. The tensile fracture values for gold alloy screws from NB and SG decreased as the number of years in service increased. In fixed detachable hybrid prostheses, perhaps as a result of galling, the intended preload values of prosthetic retaining screws may decrease with increased in-service time. The reduction of the fracture load value may be related to the increase of in-service time; however, the actual determination of this

  5. Molecular dynamics study on the grain boundary dislocation source in nanocrystalline copper under tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Kiet; Pei, Linqing; Zhao, Xing; Cheng, Kuiyu

    2015-03-01

    Grain boundary (GB) is the interface between different oriented crystals of the same material, and it can have a significant effect on the many properties of materials. When the average or entire range of grain size is reduced to less than 100 nm, the conventional plastic deformation mechanisms dominated by dislocation processes become difficult and GB mediated deformation mechanisms become increasingly important. One of the mechanisms that can play a profound role in the strength and plasticity of metallic polycrystalline materials is the heterogeneous nucleation and emission of dislocations from GB. In this study, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dislocation nucleation from copper bicrystal with a number of <1 1 0> tilt GBs that covered a wide range of misorientation angles (θ). We will show from this analysis that the mechanic behavior of GBs and the energy barrier of dislocation nucleation from GBs are closely related to the lattice crystallographic orientation, GB energy, and the intrinsic GB structures. An atomistic analysis of the nucleation mechanisms provided details of this nucleation and emission process that can help us to better understand the dislocation source in GB.

  6. Effect of Heat Treatment and Layer Orientation on the Tensile Strength of a Crystalline Rock Under Brazilian Test Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha Roy, Debanjan; Singh, T. N.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of heat treatment and the layer orientation on the tensile properties of granitic gneiss were studied under the unconfined stress condition. The tensile strength of the samples was studied using a Brazilian configuration, and the geochemical and microstructural properties were studied using the X-ray diffraction technique as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The fracture pattern and the geometrical analyses were performed using the digital photographs. The results show that both the heat treatment and layer orientation have strong control on the tensile strength, force-parallel and layer-parallel strains, and on the tensile fracture geometry. A general decrease in the tensile strength of the rock was documented with the increasing heat treatment. Although, in the heat-treated samples, X-ray diffraction study do not reveal any major change in the mineral composition, but the SEM shows the development of several micro-cracks in the grains. In the samples with different layer orientation, along with the changes in the tensile strength and layer-parallel to force-parallel strain ratio, the layer activation under shear stress is also noticed. Here, the ratio between the tensile to shear stress, acting along the layers is thought to be the major controlling factor of the tensile properties of rocks, which has many applications in mining, civil constructions, and waste disposal work.

  7. Relating tensile, bending, and shear test data of asphalt binders to pavement performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.S.; Tsai, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Eight different asphalt binders representing a wide range of applications for pavement construction were tested in uniaxial tension, bending, and shear stresses. Theoretical analyses were performed in this study to covert the data from the three engineering tests to stiffness moduli for predicting pavement performance. At low temperatures, high asphalt stiffness may induce pavement thermal cracking; thus, the allowable maximum stiffness was set at 1,000 MPa. At high temperatures, low asphalt stiffness may lead to pavement rutting (ruts in the road); master curves were constructed to rank the potential for rutting in the asphalts. All three viscoelastic functions were shown to be interchangeable within the linear viscoelastic region. When subjected to large deformation in the direct tension test, asphalt binders behaved nonlinear viscoelastic in which the data under bending, shear and tension modes were not comparable. The asphalts were, however, found toe exhibit linear viscoelasticity up to the failure point in the steady-state strain region.

  8. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating - A molecular dynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  9. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1991-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semicircular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semicircular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is underway to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  10. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1990-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semi-circular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semi-circular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is under way to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  11. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1990-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semi-circular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semi-circular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is under way to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  12. A curved beam test specimen for determining the interlaminar tensile strength of a laminated composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, Clement C.; Sumich, Mark; Chappell, David P.

    1991-01-01

    A curved beam type of test specimen is evaluated for use in determining the through-the-thickness strength of laminated composites. Two variations of a curved beam specimen configuration (semicircular and elliptical) were tested to failure using static and fatigue loads. The static failure load for the semicircular specimens was found to be highly sensitive to flaw content, with the specimens falling into two distinct groups. This result supports the use of proof testing for structural validation. Static design allowables are derived based on the Weibull distribution. Fatigue data indicates no measured increase in specimen compliance prior to final fracture. All static and fatigue failures at room temperature dry conditions occurred catastrophically. The elliptical specimens demonstrated unusually high failure strengths indicating the presence of phenomena requiring further study. Results are also included for specimens exposed to a wet environment showing a matrix strength degradation due to moisture content. Further testing is underway to evaluate a fatigue methodology for matrix dominated failures based on residual static strength (wearout).

  13. [Relationship between mechanical properties and amounts of casting porosities in tensile-test fracture surface of Au-Pd-Ag-Cu alloy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ohno, H; Miyakawa, O; Watanabe, K; Siokawa, N

    1978-04-01

    One hundred and thirty-nine tensile-test specimens of Au-Pd-Ag-Cu alloy were cast in various casting conditions. The specimens were subjected age-hardening heat-treatment. The casting porosities and the nonmetallic inclusions in the surface of a tensile-test fracture of cast specimens were observed and analyzed by use of Electron Probe X-ray Microanalyzer (EPMA). The polosity ratio that is the area ratio of the porosities to the fracture surface was determined. Studies were quantitatively made on the effect of the porosity ratio on the tensile strength and the elongation. Furthermore, the effect of the casting conditions on the tensile strength was investigated. The main results were summarized as follows; The tensile strength decreased only slightly within about 15% of the porosity ratio and remarkably with an increase in its ratio in the range from about 15% to 50%. The elongation, however, decreased considerably in the presence of the porosities of only a few per cent. Aspects of the decrease curves on the tensile strength and the elongation were represented in the shape of an inverse S-type and hyperbolic curve with an increase in the porosity ratio, respectively. With an increase in the porosity ratio, the shapes of the tensile-test specimens at the fracture part and load-elongation curves in the tensile-tests were shown as a brittle fracture. However, the result observed by a scanning electron microscope revealed that the fracture surfaces without the porosities showed mostly "dimple pattern" suggesting a characteristic figure of a ductile fracture. The nonmetallic inclusions in the fracture surfaces were identified as SiO2 (quartz) which was derived from an ingredient of an investment by comparing the inclusion with the reference standards on the characteristic X-ray O Kalpha spectra by EPMA. The microstructures observed by a light microscope showed a coarse structure with the high temperature casting conditions. However, the results of a scanning

  14. Cardiomyogenesis of periodontal ligament-derived stem cells by dynamic tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Daniel; Acosta Torres, Zenith; Ng, Tsz Kin; Choy, Kwong Wai; Pang, Chi Pui; Cheung, Herman S

    2017-02-01

    Cellular therapies for the treatment of myocardial infarction have proven to be an invaluable tool in recent years and provide encouraging evidence for the possibility to restore normal heart function. However, questions still remain as to the optimal cell source, pre-conditioning methods and delivery techniques for such an application. This study explores the use of a population of stem cells arising from the neural crest and isolated from adult human periodontal ligament along with short-term mechanical strain as an inducer of cardiomyogenesis and possibly pre-conditioning stimulus for cellular cardiomyoplasty. Cells were subjected to a short-term dynamic mechanical tension in our custom-built bioreactor and analyzed for cardiomyogenic commitment. Mechanical strain elicited a cardiomyogenic response from the cells following just 2 h of stimulation. Mechanical strain activated and translocated cardiac-specific transcription factors GATA4, MEF2C and Nkx2.5, and induced expression of the sarcomeric actin and cardiac troponin T proteins. Mechanical strain induced production of significantly higher levels of nitric oxide when compared to static controls. Elimination of elevated ROS levels by free radical scavengers completely abolished the cardiomyogenic response of the cells. MicroRNA profile changes in stretched cells were detected for 39 miRNAs with 16 of the differentially expressed miRNAs related to heart development. The use of stem cells in combination with mechanical strain prior to their delivery in vivo may pose a valuable alternative for the treatment of myocardial infarction and merits further exploration for its capacity to augment the already observed beneficial effects of cellular therapies.

  15. An open-end burst test method to obtain uniaxial hoop tensile properties of fuel cladding in a hot cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Aita, Makoto; Sakamoto, Kan; Higuchi, Toru

    2013-03-01

    The hoop stress-hoop strain relationship of fuel cladding is one of the essential input parameters for safety analysis of fuel rods. The three objectives of this paper were: to propose a burst test method for open-end tube specimens with the uniaxial hoop stress condition; to develop the necessary in-cell high temperature open-end burst (OEB) techniques to implement the method; and to determine the optimum specimen length for the proposed OEB test method. Silicone oil was selected as the pressurization medium, and it was sealed inside the specimens not by welding but by O-rings so that no axial tensile stress was induced in the specimens. The specimens with combined end plugs and O-rings were successfully assembled by manipulators in a hot cell, and a high temperature (⩽350 °C), high pressure (⩽100 MPa) seal was achieved. The optimum specimen length was determined by using ductile and embrittled tubes with various lengths of 30-60 mm and was found to be around 45 mm for typical BWR fuel rods. During the OEB test, internal pressure and diametral expansion were monitored to obtain the basic mechanical performance properties of the fuel cladding such as yield stress, ultimate strength, as well as the true hoop stress-hoop strain curve.

  16. A Dynamic Testing Complexity Metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    This paper introduces a dynamic metric that is based on the estimated ability of a program to withstand the effects of injected "semantic mutants" during execution by computing the same function as if the semantic mutants had not been injected. Semantic mutants include: (1) syntactic mutants injected into an executing program and (2) randomly selected values injected into an executing program's internal states. The metric is a function of a program, the method used for injecting these two types of mutants, and the program's input distribution; this metric is found through dynamic executions of the program. A program's ability to withstand the effects of injected semantic mutants by computing the same function when executed is then used as a tool for predicting the difficulty that will be incurred during random testing to reveal the existence of faults, i.e., the metric suggests the likelihood that a program will expose the existence of faults during random testing assuming faults were to exist. If the metric is applied to a module rather than to a program, the metric can be used to guide the allocation of testing resources among a program's modules. In this manner the metric acts as a white-box testing tool for determining where to concentrate testing resources. Index Terms: Revealing ability, random testing, input distribution, program, fault, failure.

  17. Dynamic Testing of Gasifier Refractory

    SciTech Connect

    Michael D. Mann; Wayne S. Seames; Devdutt Shukla; Xi Hong; John P. Hurley

    2005-12-01

    The University of North Dakota (UND) Chemical Engineering Department in conjunction with the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have initiated a program to examine the combined chemical (reaction and phase change) and physical (erosion) effects experienced by refractory materials under slagging coal gasification conditions. The goal of this work is to devise a mechanism of refractory loss under these conditions. The controlled-atmospheric dynamic corrodent application furnace (CADCAF) was utilized to simulate refractory/slag interactions under dynamic conditions that more realistically simulate the environment in a slagging coal gasifier than any of the static tests used previously by refractory manufacturers and researchers. High-alumina and high-chromia refractory bricks were tested using slags obtained from two solid fuel gasifiers. Testing was performed at 1475 C in a reducing atmosphere (2% H{sub 2} in N{sub 2}) The CADCAF tests show that high-chrome refractories have greater corrosion resistance than high-aluminum refractories; coal slag readily diffuses into the refractory through its grain boundaries; the refractory grains are more stable than the matrix in the tests, and the grains are the first line of defense against corrosion; calcium and alkali in the slag are more corrosive than iron; and silicon and calcium penetrate the deepest into the refractory. The results obtained from this study are preliminary and should be combined with result from other research programs. In particular, the refractory corrosion results from this study should be compared with refractories removed from commercial gasifiers.

  18. Determination of the elastic properties of rabbit vocal fold tissue using uniaxial tensile testing and a tailored finite element model.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Neda; Miri, Amir K; Mongeau, Luc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the effects of the specimen shape on the accuracy of mechanical properties determined from a shape-specific model generation strategy. Digital images of five rabbit vocal folds (VFs) in their initial undeformed conditions were used to build corresponding specific solid models. The displacement field of the VFs under uniaxial tensile test was then measured over the visible portion of the surface using digital image correlation. A three-dimensional finite element model was built, using ABAQUS, for each solid model, while imposing measured boundary conditions. An inverse-problem method was used, assuming a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic constitutive model. Unknown elastic properties were identified iteratively through an error minimization technique between simulated and measured force-time data. The longitudinal elastic moduli of the five rabbit VFs were calculated and compared to values from a simple analytical method and those obtained by approximating the cross-section as elliptical. The use of shape-specific models significantly reduced the standard deviation of the Young׳s moduli of the tested specimens. However, a non-parametric statistical analysis test, i.e., the Friedman test, yielded no statistically significant differences between the shape-specific method and the elliptic cylindrical finite element model. Considering the required procedures to reconstruct the shape-specific finite element model for each tissue specimen, it might be expedient to use the simpler method when large numbers of tissue specimens are to be compared regarding their Young׳s moduli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic Brazilian Tests of Granite Under Coupled Static and Dynamic Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zilong; Li, Xibing; Zou, Yang; Jiang, Yihui; Li, Guonan

    2014-03-01

    Rocks in underground projects at great depth, which are under high static stresses, may be subjected to dynamic disturbance at the same time. In our previous work (Li et al. Int J Rock Mech Min Sci 45(5):739-748, 2008), the dynamic compressive behaviour of pre-stressed rocks was investigated using coupled-load equipment. The current work is devoted to the investigation of the dynamic tensile behaviour of granite rocks under coupled loads using the Brazilian disc (BD) method with the aid of a high-speed camera. Through wave analyses, stress measurements and crack photography, the fundamental problems of BD tests, such as stress equilibrium and crack initiation, were investigated by the consideration of different loading stresses with abruptly or slowly rising stress waves. The specially shaped striker method was used for the coupled-load test; this generates a slowly rising stress wave, which allows gradual stress accumulation in the specimen, whilst maintaining the load at both ends of the specimen in an equilibrium state. The test results showed that the tensile strength of the granite under coupled loads decreases with increases in the static pre-stresses, which might lead to modifications of the blasting design or support design in deep underground projects. Furthermore, the failure patterns of specimens under coupled loads have been investigated.

  20. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  1. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  2. Acoustic emission signals can discriminate between compressive bone fractures and tensile ligament injuries in the spine during dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Van Toen, C; Street, J; Oxland, T R; Cripton, P A

    2012-06-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) sensors are a reliable tool in detecting fracture; however they have not been used to differentiate between compressive osseous and tensile ligamentous failures in the spine. This study evaluated the effectiveness of AE data in detecting the time of injury of ligamentum flavum (LF) and vertebral body (VB) specimens tested in tension and compression, respectively, and in differentiating between these failures. AE signals were collected while LF (n=7) and VB (n=7) specimens from human cadavers were tested in tension and compression (0.4m/s), respectively. Times of injury (time of peak AE amplitude) were compared to those using traditional methods (VB: time of peak force, LF: visual evidence in high speed video). Peak AE signal amplitudes and frequencies (using Fourier and wavelet transformations) for the LF and VB specimens were compared. In each group, six specimens failed (VB, fracture; LF, periosteal stripping or attenuation) and one did not. Time of injury using AE signals for VB and LF specimens produced average absolute differences to traditional methods of 0.7 (SD=0.2) ms and 2.4 (SD=1.5) ms (representing 14% and 20% of the average loading time), respectively. AE signals from VB fractures had higher amplitudes and frequencies than those from LF failures (average peak amplitude 87.7 (SD=6.9) dB vs. 71.8 (SD=9.8)dB for the inferior sensor, p<0.05; median characteristic frequency from the inferior sensor 97 (interquartile range, IQR, 41) kHz vs. 31 (IQR 2) kHz, p<0.05). These findings demonstrate that AE signals could be used to delineate complex failures of the spine.

  3. Test methods for the dynamic mechanical properties of polymeric materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.K.

    1980-06-01

    Various test geometries and procedures for the dynamic mechanical analysis of polymers employing a mechanical spectrometer have been evaluated. The methods and materials included in this work are forced torsional pendulum testing of Kevlar/epoxy laminates and rigid urethane foams, oscillatory parallel plate testing to determine the kinetics of the cure of VCE with Hylene MP, oscillatory compressive testing of B-3223 cellular silicone, and oscillatory tensile testing of Silastic E and single Kevlar filaments. Fundamental dynamic mechanical properties, including the storage and loss moduli and loss tangent of the materials tested, were determined as a function of temperature and sometimes of frequency.

  4. Extreme Cold Testing of High Performance Fabric Materials: Gelbo Flex, Tensile Strength, and UV Exposure Test Results

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    designed for the containment and transport of bulk-waste products in more temperate climates and required evaluation and testing to determine whether or...behavior at both room temperature and at −40°C. It was vital to determine if the failure mode changed from an elastic-plastic deformation at room...for Testing and Materials. Bernhard, G., C. R. Booth, and J. C. Ehramjian. 2008. Comparison of UV irradiance measurements at Summit, Greenland

  5. Ex-situ tensile fatigue-creep testing: A powerful tool to simulate in-situ mechanical degradation in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, A.; Venkatesan, S. V.; Khorasany, R. M. H.; Kim, W. H. J.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-04-01

    An ex-situ tensile fatigue and creep based accelerated stress test (TFC-AST) is proposed to evaluate the mechanical stability of catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) used in fuel cells. The fatigue-creep action of the TFC test is analyzed by tensile and hygrothermal expansion measurements on partially degraded specimens supplemented by microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy, revealing significant decay in mechanical properties as well as morphological rearrangement due to the combined fatigue and creep loading. Through comparison with in-situ hygrothermally degraded CCMs, the TFC-AST protocol is demonstrated to be an economical alternative to the costly in-situ mechanical accelerated stress tests that can reduce the test duration by more than 99%.

  6. Comparison and ranking of superelasticity of different austenite active nickel-titanium orthodontic archwires using mechanical tensile testing and correlating with its electrical resistivity.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, D; Baskaranarayanan, Balashanmugam; Usha, K; Jayanthi, M S; Vijjaykanth, M

    2016-10-01

    The application of light and continuous forces for optimum physiological response and the least damage to the tooth supporting structures should be the primary aim of an orthodontist. Nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys with their desirable properties are one of the natural choices of the clinicians. This study was aimed to compare and rank them based on its tensile strength and electrical resistivity. The sample consisted of eight groups of 0.017 inch × 0.025 inch rectangular archwires from eight different manufacturers, and five samples from each group for tensile testing and nine samples for electrical resistivity tests were used. Data for stress at 10% strain and the initial slope were statistically analyzed with an analysis of variance and Scheffe tests with P < 0.05. The stress/strain plots of each product were ranked for superelastic behavior. The rankings of the wires tested were based primarily on the unloading curve's slope which is indicative of the magnitude of the deactivation force and secondarily on the length of the horizontal segment which is indicative of continuous forces during deactivation. For calculating the electric resistivity, the change in resistance after inducing strain in the wires was taken into account for the calculation of degree of martensite transformation and for ranking. In tensile testing Ortho Organizers wires ranked first and GAC Lowland NiTi wires ranked last. For resistivity tests Ormco A wires were found superior and Morelli remained last. these rankings should be correlated clinically and need further studies.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of a solid platinum nanowire under uniaxial tensile strain: Temperature and strain-rate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, S. J. A.; Lee, H. P.; Lu, C.; Cheng, Q. H.

    2005-08-01

    Nanoscale research has been an area of active research over the past fifteen years. This is due to the overall enhanced properties of nanomaterials due to size effects, surface effects, and interface effects, which typically showed up in materials with characteristic size smaller than 100nm . This study focuses on the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of an infinitely long, cylindrical platinum nanowire, with an approximate diameter of 1.4nm . The nanowire was subjected to uniaxial tensile strain along the [001] axis. The changes in crystal structure during deformation were analyzed and its mechanical properties were deduced from the simulation. Classical MD simulation was employed in this study, with the empirical Sutton-Chen pair functional used to describe the interatomic potential between the platinum atoms. The Berendsen loose-coupling thermostat was selected for finite-temperature control of the simulated system, with a time constant of 25% of the total relaxation time during each strain increment. The nanowire was subjected to strain rates of 0.04%, 0.4%, and 4.0%ps-1 , at simulation temperatures of 50 and 300K , in order to study the effects of different strain rates and thermal conditions on the deformation characteristics and mechanical properties of the nanowire. It was found that the stress-strain response of the nanowire showed clear periodic, stepwise dislocation-relaxation-recrystallization behavior at low temperature and strain rate, where crystal order and stability were highly preserved. The onset of amorphous crystal deformation occurred at 0.4%ps-1 , and fully amorphous deformation took place at 4.0%ps-1 , with amorphous melting detected at 300K . Due to higher entropy of the nanowire at higher temperature and strain rate, periodic stress-strain behavior became less clearly defined, and superplasticity behavior was observed. This characteristic was significantly enhanced due to the development of a single-walled helical substructure at 300K

  8. Evaluation of the histological and mechanical features of tendon healing in a rabbit model with the use of second-harmonic-generation imaging and tensile testing

    PubMed Central

    Hase, E.; Sato, K.; Yonekura, D.; Minamikawa, T.; Takahashi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the histological and mechanical features of tendon healing in a rabbit model with second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging and tensile testing. Materials and Methods A total of eight male Japanese white rabbits were used for this study. The flexor digitorum tendons in their right leg were sharply transected, and then were repaired by intratendinous stitching. At four weeks post-operatively, the rabbits were killed and the flexor digitorum tendons in both right and left legs were excised and used as specimens for tendon healing (n = 8) and control (n = 8), respectively. Each specimen was examined by SHG imaging, followed by tensile testing, and the results of the two testing modalities were assessed for correlation. Results While the SHG light intensity of the healing tendon samples was significantly lower than that of the uninjured tendon samples, 2D Fourier transform SHG images showed a clear difference in collagen fibre structure between the uninjured and the healing samples, and among the healing samples. The mean intensity of the SHG image showed a moderate correlation (R2 = 0.37) with Young’s modulus obtained from the tensile testing. Conclusion Our results indicate that SHG microscopy may be a potential indicator of tendon healing. Cite this article: E. Hase, K. Sato, D. Yonekura, T. Minamikawa, M. Takahashi, T. Yasui. Evaluation of the histological and mechanical features of tendon healing in a rabbit model with the use of second-harmonic-generation imaging and tensile testing. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:577–585. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.BJR-2016-0162.R1. PMID:27881441

  9. An evaluation of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, S.; Morton, J.; Jackson, K. E.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of advanced composite laminates is studied. The assumptions used for the development of the shear strength formulas were examined, and factors such as the specimen geometry and stacking sequence were assessed experimentally. It was found that the strength of symmetric and balanced +/-45 deg laminates depends primarily upon the specimen thickness rather than the specimen width. These findings have important implications for the +/-45 deg tensile test which is recommended by several organizations for the determination of the in-plane shear stress/strain response and the shear strength of continuous fiber reinforced composites. Modifications to the recommended practices for specimen selection and shear strength determination are suggested.

  10. An evaluation of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, S.; Morton, J.; Jackson, K. E.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of the +/-45 deg tensile test for the determination of the in-plane shear strength of advanced composite laminates is studied. The assumptions used for the development of the shear strength formulas were examined, and factors such as the specimen geometry and stacking sequence were assessed experimentally. It was found that the strength of symmetric and balanced +/-45 deg laminates depends primarily upon the specimen thickness rather than the specimen width. These findings have important implications for the +/-45 deg tensile test which is recommended by several organizations for the determination of the in-plane shear stress/strain response and the shear strength of continuous fiber reinforced composites. Modifications to the recommended practices for specimen selection and shear strength determination are suggested.

  11. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, A.; Seidt, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen's stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s-1 to 200 s-1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing).

  12. Morphology study of peroxide-induced dynamically vulcanized polypropylene/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer/zinc dimethacrylate blends during tensile deformation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Xu, Chuanhui; Cao, Liming; Wang, Yanpeng; Fang, Liming

    2013-06-27

    Polypropylene (PP)/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)/zinc dimethacrylate (ZDMA) blend (EPDM/PP ratio of 30/70) with remarkable extensibility was successfully prepared via peroxide dynamic vulcanization. The uniaxial tensile properties, crystallization behavior, structure, and morphology during stretching were investigated. The tensile process study showed that the PP/EPDM/ZDMA blend exhibited the rubbery-like behavior with an elongation beyond 600%. The ZDMA graft-product domain increased the compatibility and interfacial adhesion between rubber and PP phases, while it reduced the crystallinity of the PP phase. On the basis of TEM and SEM analyses, we found that the cross-linked rubber particles could be elongated and oriented along the tensile direction, whereas the ZDMA graft-product domain "encapsulated" rubber phase together, acting as a "bridge" between elongated rubber phases and the PP phase during uniaxial stretching. The stress could be effectively transferred from the PP phase to the numerous elongated rubber phases due to the excellent compatibility and interfacial adhesion between rubber and PP phases, resulting in the rubbery-like behavior.

  13. Investigation of the elastic modulus, tensile and flexural strength of five skull simulant materials for impact testing of a forensic skin/skull/brain model.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Waddell, J Neil; Chun Li, Kai; Tong, Darryl; Brunton, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Conducting in vitro research for forensic, impact and injury simulation modelling generally involves the use of a skull simulant with mechanical properties similar to those found in the human skull. For this study epoxy resin, fibre filled epoxy resin, 3D-printing filaments (PETG, PLA) and self-cure acrylic denture base resin were used to fabricate the specimens (n=20 per material group), according to ISO 527-2 IBB and ISO20795-1. Tensile and flexural testing in a universal testing machine was used to measure their tensile/flexural elastic modulus and strength. The results showed that the epoxy resin and fibre filled epoxy resin had similar tensile elastic moduli (no statistical significant difference) with lower values observed for the other materials. The fibre filled epoxy resin had a considerably higher flexural elastic modulus and strength, possibly attributed to the presence of fibres. Of the simulants tested, epoxy resin had an elastic modulus and flexural strength close to that of mean human skull values reported in the literature, and thus can be considered as a suitable skull simulant for a skin/skull/brain model for lower impact forces that do not exceed the fracture stress. For higher impact forces a 3D printing filament (PLA) may be a more suitable skull simulant material, due to its closer match to fracture stresses found in human skull bone. Influencing factors were also anisotropy, heterogeneity and viscoelasticity of human skull bone and simulant specimens.

  14. Comparison of the direct burst pressure and the ring tensile test methods for mechanical characterization of tissue-engineered vascular substitutes.

    PubMed

    Laterreur, Véronique; Ruel, Jean; Auger, François A; Vallières, Karine; Tremblay, Catherine; Lacroix, Dan; Tondreau, Maxime; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Germain, Lucie

    2014-06-01

    Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative for small diameter vascular grafts, especially with the self-assembly method. It is crucial that these grafts possess mechanical properties that allow them to withstand physiological flow and pressure without being damaged. Therefore, an accurate assessment of their mechanical properties, especially the burst pressure, is essential prior to clinical release. In this study, the burst pressure of self-assembled tissue-engineered vascular substitutes was first measured by the direct method, which consists in pressurizing the construct with fluid until tissue failure. It was then compared to the burst pressure estimated by Laplace׳s law using data from a ring tensile test. The major advantage of this last method is that it requires a significantly smaller tissue sample. However, it has been reported as overestimating the burst pressure compared to a direct measurement. In the present report, it was found that an accurate estimation of the burst pressure may be obtained from a ring tensile test when failure internal diameter is used as the diameter parameter in Laplace׳s law. Overestimation occurs with the method previously reported, i.e. when the unloaded internal diameter is used for calculations. The estimation of other mechanical properties was also investigated. It was demonstrated that data from a ring tensile test provide an accurate estimate of the failure strain and the stiffness of the constructs when compared to measurements with the direct method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamic Testing: Toward a Multiple Exciter Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    en- hanced environmental testing. The combination of higher-per- formance vehicles generating more severe vibration environ - ments and the use of...critical vibration testing element. The field vibration environment may be described as the simultaneous vibration in three translational and three...high uncontrolled harmonic dis- tortions associated with the drive mechanisms. While they provided a rudimentary vibration environment , the

  16. Stress-induced martensitic transformation during tensile test of full-size TF conductor jacket tube at 4.2 K

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. H.; Li, S. P.; Wu, Z. X.; Huang, C. J.; Huang, R. J.; Li, L. F.

    2014-01-27

    The toroidal-field (TF) conductor jacket of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is made of modified 316LN stainless steel, which is influenced by heat treatment at approximately 650 °C for 200 h to produce Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting materials at the final stage. Due to the high electromagnetic forces arising during magnet operation, higher mechanical properties of the jacket materials at cryogenic temperatures are required. In our work, mechanical properties of the full-size TF conductor jacket tube were investigated, which satisfied the ITER requirements. Stress-induced martensitic transformation mechanism during tensile test of the conductor jacket material at 4.2 K was characterized by means of in-situ temperature dependent XRD, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The tensile behavior related to the amount of stress-induced phase transformation at cryogenic temperature was also discussed.

  17. A practical test for noisy chaotic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenSaïda, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    This code computes the largest Lyapunov exponent and tests for the presence of a chaotic dynamics, as opposed to stochastic dynamics, in a noisy scalar series. The program runs under MATLAB​® programming language.

  18. Dynamic versus static bond-strength testing of adhesive interfaces.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, André; De Munck, Jan; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Mine, Atsushi; Peumans, Marleen; Lambrechts, Paul; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2010-11-01

    A static bond-strength test is often regarded as clinically less relevant, since such abrupt loading of the adhesive-tooth bond clinically never occurs. Therefore, dynamic fatigue testing is often claimed to better predict the clinical effectiveness of adhesives. To measure the micro-tensile fatigue resistance (μTFR) of adhesives bonded to dentin, and to compare their μTFR to their micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS). The bonding effectiveness (including fracture analysis) of three adhesives (OptiBond FL, Kerr: 3-step etch-and-rinse adhesive or 3-E&Ra; Clearfil SE, Kuraray: 2-step self-etch adhesive or 2-SEa; G-Bond, GC: 1-step self-etch adhesive or 1-SEa) was measured by means of both a dynamic μTFR and a static μTBS approach. Preparation and test set-up of the micro-specimens were identical for both tests. In fatigue, specimens were tested with a wide range of selected loads at 2Hz and at 10Hz until failure, or until 10(4) cycles were reached. At 2Hz, the μTFR was also measured after 3-month water storage. The μTFR was determined using a logistic regression model. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD multiple comparisons test were used to determine statistical differences in μTBS. The 1-SEa recorded significantly lower values in μTFR at 10Hz and in μTBS than the 2-SEa and 3-E&Ra. The 1-SEa and the 2-SEa performed significantly lower in μTFR than the 3-E&Ra, when tested at 2Hz after 3-month water storage. Fatigue testing at 2Hz after 1-week water storage did not reveal any differences in μTFR between the three adhesives. The 3-E&Ra performed best in terms of bonding effectiveness, irrespective of the experimental condition or test used. The μTBS test proved once more to be a reliable laboratory test in ranking contemporary adhesives on their bonding effectiveness. Copyright © 2010 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison and ranking of superelasticity of different austenite active nickel-titanium orthodontic archwires using mechanical tensile testing and correlating with its electrical resistivity

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, D.; Baskaranarayanan, Balashanmugam; Usha, K.; Jayanthi, M. S.; Vijjaykanth, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The application of light and continuous forces for optimum physiological response and the least damage to the tooth supporting structures should be the primary aim of an orthodontist. Nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys with their desirable properties are one of the natural choices of the clinicians. Aim: This study was aimed to compare and rank them based on its tensile strength and electrical resistivity. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of eight groups of 0.017 inch × 0.025 inch rectangular archwires from eight different manufacturers, and five samples from each group for tensile testing and nine samples for electrical resistivity tests were used. Data for stress at 10% strain and the initial slope were statistically analyzed with an analysis of variance and Scheffe tests with P < 0.05. The stress/strain plots of each product were ranked for superelastic behavior. The rankings of the wires tested were based primarily on the unloading curve's slope which is indicative of the magnitude of the deactivation force and secondarily on the length of the horizontal segment which is indicative of continuous forces during deactivation. For calculating the electric resistivity, the change in resistance after inducing strain in the wires was taken into account for the calculation of degree of martensite transformation and for ranking. Results: In tensile testing Ortho Organizers wires ranked first and GAC Lowland NiTi wires ranked last. For resistivity tests Ormco A wires were found superior and Morelli remained last. Conclusion: these rankings should be correlated clinically and need further studies. PMID:27829751

  20. Considerable different frequency dependence of dynamic tensile modulus between self-heating (Joule heat) and external heating for polymer--nickel-coated carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Bin, Yuezhen; Dong, Enyuan; Matsuo, Masaru

    2014-06-26

    Dynamic tensile moduli of polyethylene--nickel-coated carbon fiber (NiCF) composites with 10 and 4 vol % NiCF contents under electrical field were measured by a homemade instrument in the frequency range of 100--0.01 Hz. The drastic descent of the storage modulus of the composite with 10 vol % was verified in lower frequency range with elevating surface temperature (T(s)) by self-heating (Joule heat). The composite was cut when T(s) was beyond 108 °C. On the other hand, the measurement of the composite with 4 vol % beyond 88 °C was impossible, since T(s) did not elevate because of the disruption of current networks. Incidentally, the dynamic tensile moduli by external heating could be measured up to 130 and 115 °C for 10 and 4 vol %, respectively, but the two composites could be elongated beyond the above temperatures. Such different properties were analyzed in terms of crystal dispersions, electrical treeing, and thermal fluctuation-induced tunneling effect.

  1. Characterization of fracture behavior of human atherosclerotic fibrous caps using a miniature single edge notched tensile test.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lindsey A; Stewart, Samantha E; Carsten, Christopher G; Snyder, Bruce A; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2016-10-01

    One well-established cause of ischemic stroke is atherosclerotic plaque rupture in the carotid artery. Rupture occurs when a tear in the fibrous cap exposes highly thrombogenic material in the lipid core. Though some fibrous cap material properties have been measured, such as ultimate tensile strength and stress-strain responses, there has been very little, if any, data published regarding the fracture behavior of atherosclerotic fibrous caps. This study aims to characterize the qualitative and quantitative fracture behavior of human atherosclerotic plaque tissue obtained from carotid endarterectomy samples using two different metrics. Uniaxial tensile experiments along with miniature single edge notched tensile (MSENT) experiments were performed on strips of isolated fibrous cap. Crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) and stress in the un-cracked segment (UCS) were measured at failure in fibrous cap MSENT specimens subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. Both CTOD and the degree of crack blunting, measured as the radius of curvature of the crack tip, increased as tearing propagated through the tissue. Higher initial stress in the UCS is significantly correlated with higher collagen content and lower macrophage content in the fibrous cap (ρ=0.77, P=0.009; ρ=-0.64, P=0.047; respectively). Trends in the data show that higher CTOD is inversely related to collagen content, though the sample size in this study is insufficient to statistically substantiate this relationship. To the authors' knowledge, this is the pioneering study examining the fracture behavior of fibrous caps and the first use of the CTOD metric in vascular tissue. A tear in the fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaque can lead to ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. While there is some information in the literature regarding quantitative measures of fibrous cap failure, there is little information regarding the behavior of the tissue during failure. This study examines the failure behavior of fibrous

  2. Effects of Changes in Test Temperature on Tensile Properties and Notched Vs Fatigue Precracked Toughness of a Zr-Based BMG Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, Jessica A.; Morrison, Rachel L.; Carter, Jennifer L. W.

    2017-07-01

    Tensile and fracture toughness behavior of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite (BMGMC) containing a body-centered cubic crystalline phase was examined over temperatures from 77 K to 653 K (-196 °C to 380 °C). The BMGMC exhibited tensile plasticity at all test temperatures. The sample tested in tension at 173 K (-100 °C) exhibited work hardening but the remaining samples tested at higher temperatures exhibited work softening. EBSD analysis of the crystalline phase after tensile testing provides insight into active deformation mechanisms in the crystalline phase. At 603 K (330 °C), the dendrites exhibit significant plastic strain, with the dendrites oriented {101} parallel to the loading direction exhibiting the least amount of strain. Schmid factor analysis leads to the hypothesis that {110}<111> dislocation mechanisms are active at this temperature. Additionally, measurements of dendrite shape as a function of macroscopic strain state in the tension experiments provide insight into cooperative deformation mechanisms in the composite. At low temperatures, the fracture toughness of the notch toughness samples exceeded that of fatigue precracked samples; but at and above room temperature, the toughness values of notched and fatigue precracked samples converge. These observations are rationalized based on the changes to the flow and fracture behavior of the glass and the crystalline phases over this temperature range. At low temperatures, the crystalline phase is sensitive to defects and changes in stress state that reduce its energy absorbing ability. At higher temperatures, both constituents possess lower strength and are less sensitive to defects, enabling more significant crack tip blunting in the fatigue precracked samples. This produces toughness values that are similar to those obtained for the notched samples.

  3. Tensile and pack compressive tests of some sheets of aluminum alloy, 1025 carbon steel, and chromium-nickel steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atchison, C S; Miller, James A

    1942-01-01

    Tensile and compressive stress-strain curves, stress-deviation curves, and secant modulus-stress curves are given for longitudinal and transverse specimens of 17S-T, 24S-T, and 24S-RT aluminum-alloy sheet in thicknesses from 0.032 to 0.081 inch, 1025 carbon steel sheet in thicknesses of 0.054 and 0.120 inch, and chromium-nickel steel sheet in thicknesses form 0.020 to 0.0275 inch. Significant differences were found between the tensile and the compressive stress-strain curves, and also the corresponding corollary curves; similarly, differences were found between the curves for the longitudinal and transverse directions. These differences are of particular importance in considering the compressive strength of aircraft structures made of thin sheet. They are explored further for the case of compression by giving tangent modulus-stress curves in longitudinal and transverse compression and dimensionless curves of the ratio of tangent modulus to Young's modulus and of the ratio of reduced modulus for a rectangular section to Young's modulus, both plotted against the ratio of stress to secant yield strength.

  4. First principles molecular dynamics studies of elastic constants, ideal tensile strength, chemistry of crack initiation, and surface and cohesive energies in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shodja, Hossein M.; Tabatabaei, Maryam; Esfarjani, Keivan

    2014-09-01

    First principles Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT)-based molecular dynamics (MD) is employed to investigate some physical and mechanical properties of amorphous Si (a-Si) samples, as-quenched and annealed containing dangling and floating bonds as well as distorted tetrahedral bonds. The total energy and true stress as functions of the engineering strain for a-Si samples subjected to uniaxial tensile stress as well as uniaxial extension are obtained. It is well-known that the electron density of the state of matters can be determined via ab initio DFT-based MD with high accuracy. Using this technique, such inherent properties as the elastic constants, ideal tensile strength, ultimate tensile strength, and surface and cohesive energies will be calculated. Since the employed ab initio MD, in contrast to the empirical potentials simulations, is capable of providing the evolution of the electronic charge distribution, we can afford to study the chemistry of crack initiation and reconstructed surfaces at final rupture. The calculated cohesive and surface energies are compared with the available theoretical and experimental results; Tyson's empirical relation and universal binding energy relations (UBERs) are also examined. The calculated elastic constants using the symmetry-general scheme satisfy well the isotropic relation ?. To date, the ab initio MD samples of a-Si generated from the completely melted scheme were all free of three-fold-coordinated Si. In contrast, as we will show, by implementing special thermal treatments, generation of all inherent structural defects is possible. Based on the electronic charge distribution, dative bonds and trigonal prisms for, respectively, floating and dangling bonds have been observed.

  5. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, Amos; Seidt, Jeremy D.

    2015-09-01

    New techniques for dynamic characterization of materials that have been developed in the last three years (since the last DYMAT conference in 2012), and results from recent dynamic testing of Inconel 718 are presented. The first development is a dynamic punch test in which three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is used to measure the deformation of the rear surface of a specimen as it being penetrated. The second experimental technique that is under development is a dynamic tension experiment in which full-field strain measurement with DIC and full-field temperature measurement are done simultaneously during the test.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  7. Experimental and numerical study on tensile strength of concrete under different strain rates.

    PubMed

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10(-7) s(-1) to 10(-4) s(-1) in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates.

  8. Dynamic Tensile Testing of Structural Materials Using a Split Hopkinson Bar Apparatus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Stress-Strain Curves, Tungsten Alloy 90W-7Ni-3Fe 38 24 Stress-Strain Curves, Depleted Uranium 39 vi AFWAL-TR-80-4053 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (CONCLUDED...IN718 (a) (b) 90-7-3W (a); No swaging (b) DU (a) (b) ETP CU (a) Annealed at 1000F, 1 hr; (c) S-65 Be (a) Etch to remove 0.004" per surface; (c) (a

  9. An in-plane tensile test for rheological and formability identification: comparison between experimental and numerical FLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leotoing, L.; Guines, D.; Ragneau, E.

    2011-05-01

    Both accurate constitutive laws and formability limits of materials are essential for a numerical optimization of sheet forming processes. To identify these behaviors, experimental databases are needed. In this work, experiments are performed from a biaxial device able to give for a unique in-plane specimen a good prediction of rheological parameters and formability. The proposed device is a servo-hydraulic testing machine provided with four independent dynamic actuators. By localizing necking in the central zone of the specimen, the strain path in this zone is controlled by the speed ratio between the two axes and the whole forming limit diagram can be covered. The experimental forming limit curve for the aluminium alloy AA5086 is determined thanks to a rigorous procedure for detecting the onset of necking in the specimen. Material parameters (constants of both hardening law and anisotropic yield criterion) are identified from the global measurement of force versus displacement curves by means of an inverse analysis procedure. Comparison between experimental and numerical forming limit curves are presented. For the numerical FLCs, two sets of material parameters are compared, the former is identified through the classical uniaxial test and the latter thanks to the dedicated cruciform specimen.

  10. An in-plane tensile test for rheological and formability identification: comparison between experimental and numerical FLC

    SciTech Connect

    Leotoing, L.; Guines, D.; Ragneau, E.

    2011-05-04

    Both accurate constitutive laws and formability limits of materials are essential for a numerical optimization of sheet forming processes. To identify these behaviors, experimental databases are needed. In this work, experiments are performed from a biaxial device able to give for a unique in-plane specimen a good prediction of rheological parameters and formability. The proposed device is a servo-hydraulic testing machine provided with four independent dynamic actuators. By localizing necking in the central zone of the specimen, the strain path in this zone is controlled by the speed ratio between the two axes and the whole forming limit diagram can be covered. The experimental forming limit curve for the aluminium alloy AA5086 is determined thanks to a rigorous procedure for detecting the onset of necking in the specimen. Material parameters (constants of both hardening law and anisotropic yield criterion) are identified from the global measurement of force versus displacement curves by means of an inverse analysis procedure. Comparison between experimental and numerical forming limit curves are presented. For the numerical FLCs, two sets of material parameters are compared, the former is identified through the classical uniaxial test and the latter thanks to the dedicated cruciform specimen.

  11. Modeling of the stress-strain behaviour during monotonic and cyclic tensile testing of unidirectional SiC-fibre reinforced BMAS glass-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vanswijgenhoven, E.; Wevers, M.; Van Der Biest, O.

    1995-12-01

    A model is proposed which gives a complete description of the stress-strain behaviour during monotonic and cyclic tensile testing of unidirectional SiC-fibre toughened BMAS glass-ceramic matrix composites using parameters describing the microstructure, the micromechanical behaviour, the damage development in matrix and fibre and the residual stress state as input. The model reproduces the main features of the stress-strain behaviour of the material and is versatile enough to take different damage development sequences and residual stress states into account. Furthermore, it offers the possibility to evaluate the impact of changes in microstructure and micromechanical behaviour on the macromechanical behaviour.

  12. A microstructural investigation of ``machining rings'' and deformation uniformity for dynamic ring compression tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloete, T. J.; Hartley, R. S.; Nurick, G. N.

    2006-08-01

    A series of ring compression tests, conducted both quasi-statically (using a Zwick tensile test machine) and dynamically (using a split Hopkinson bar) are presented. The friction conditions were inferred from the behaviour of the inner diameter of the ring specimen using the analysis of Avitzur. Both quasi-static and dynamic specimens displayed machining rings. Microstructural analysis revealed that under quasi-static conditions the machining rings correlate with fold-over, while under dynamic conditions machining rings can appear without fold over. This indicates that machining rings formed during dynamic tests may be due to lubrication breakdown. The results indicate that the assumption of uniform specimen deformation is reasonable for strains attainable during split Hopkinson bar tests.

  13. Dynamic tensile deformation and damage of B4C-reinforced Al composites: Time-resolved imaging with synchrotron x-rays

    DOE PAGES

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J. Y.; Su, B.; ...

    2016-03-30

    Dynamic tensile experiments are conducted on 15% and 30% in weight percentage B4C/Al composites with a split Hopkinson tension bar, along with high-speed synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation (XDIC) to map strain fields at μ m and μ s scales. As manifested by bulk-scale stress – strain curves, a higher particle content leads to a higher yield strength but lower ductility. Strain field mapping by XDIC demonstrates that tension deformation and tensile fracture, as opposed to shear and shear failure, dominate deformation and failure of the composites. The fractographs of recovered samples show consistent features. The particle-matrix interfaces are nucleationmore » sites for strain localizations, and their propagation and coalescence are diffused by the Al matrix. The reduced spacing between strain localization sites with increasing particle content, facilitates their coalescence and leads to decreased ductility. Furthermore, designing a particle-reinforced, metallic-matrix composite with balanced strength and ductility should consider optimizing the inter-particle distance as a key par« less

  14. Dynamic tensile deformation and damage of B4C-reinforced Al composites: Time-resolved imaging with synchrotron x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J. Y.; Su, B.; Lu, L.; Fan, D.; E, J. C.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Qi, M. L.; Luo, S. N.

    2016-03-30

    Dynamic tensile experiments are conducted on 15% and 30% in weight percentage B4C/Al composites with a split Hopkinson tension bar, along with high-speed synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation (XDIC) to map strain fields at μ m and μ s scales. As manifested by bulk-scale stress – strain curves, a higher particle content leads to a higher yield strength but lower ductility. Strain field mapping by XDIC demonstrates that tension deformation and tensile fracture, as opposed to shear and shear failure, dominate deformation and failure of the composites. The fractographs of recovered samples show consistent features. The particle-matrix interfaces are nucleation sites for strain localizations, and their propagation and coalescence are diffused by the Al matrix. The reduced spacing between strain localization sites with increasing particle content, facilitates their coalescence and leads to decreased ductility. Furthermore, designing a particle-reinforced, metallic-matrix composite with balanced strength and ductility should consider optimizing the inter-particle distance as a key par

  15. Correcting for Supports in Structual Dynamic Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, B. K.; Kuo, C. P.; Glaser, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Testing under variety of support conditions combined with computer analysis to update mathematical models to match test data. Report suggests dynamic characteristics of large space structures predicted, without full-scale testing, by method that combines experiment and analysis. Method, multiple-boundary-condition testing, developed for such large space structures as dish antennas, towers, and solar-cell arrays.

  16. Dynamic Testing of ADC: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Bhawana; Mishra, D. K.

    2012-09-01

    Analog to digital converters are Mixed signal devices. With the increasing popularity of these devices , it is important to get more faster and accurate device. Along with design, testing of ADC plays major role . Static and Dynamic methods are available for ADC testing. Ideal ADC itself has quantization error. A NonIdeal ADC consists many other errors like offset error, Gain error, DNL, INL,ENOB,SNR,THD,SINAD etc. In this paper various methods of dynamic testing of ADC are discussed.

  17. Space station structures and dynamics test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.; Townsend, John S.; Ivey, Edward W.

    1987-01-01

    The design, construction, and operation of a low-Earth orbit space station poses unique challenges for development and implementation of new technology. The technology arises from the special requirement that the station be built and constructed to function in a weightless environment, where static loads are minimal and secondary to system dynamics and control problems. One specific challenge confronting NASA is the development of a dynamics test program for: (1) defining space station design requirements, and (2) identifying the characterizing phenomena affecting the station's design and development. A general definition of the space station dynamic test program, as proposed by MSFC, forms the subject of this report. The test proposal is a comprehensive structural dynamics program to be launched in support of the space station. The test program will help to define the key issues and/or problems inherent to large space structure analysis, design, and testing. Development of a parametric data base and verification of the math models and analytical analysis tools necessary for engineering support of the station's design, construction, and operation provide the impetus for the dynamics test program. The philosophy is to integrate dynamics into the design phase through extensive ground testing and analytical ground simulations of generic systems, prototype elements, and subassemblies. On-orbit testing of the station will also be used to define its capability.

  18. Use of micro-tomography for validation of method to identify interfacial shear strength from tensile tests of short regenerated cellulose fibre composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajlane, A.; Miettinen, A.; Madsen, B.; Beauson, J.; Joffe, R.

    2016-07-01

    The interfacial shear strength of short regenerated cellulose fibre/polylactide composites was characterized by means of an industry-friendly adhesion test method. The interfacial shear strength was back-calculated from the experimental tensile stress-strain curves of composites by using a micro-mechanical model. The parameters characterizing the microstructure of the composites, e.g. fibre length and orientation distributions, used as input in the model were obtained by micro-tomography. The investigation was carried out on composites with untreated and surface treated fibres with various fibre weight contents (5wt%, 10wt%, and 15wt% for untreated fibres, and 15wt% for treated fibres). The properties of fibres were measured by an automated single fibre tensile test method. Based on these results, the efficiency of the fibre treatment to improve fibre/matrix adhesion is evaluated, and the applicability of the method to measure the interfacial shear strength is discussed. The results are compared with data from previous work, and with other results from the literature.

  19. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; Nasiatka, James R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2014-08-15

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C.

  20. Tensile testing of materials at high temperatures above 1700 °C with in situ synchrotron X-ray micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haboub, Abdel; Bale, Hrishikesh A.; Nasiatka, James R.; Cox, Brian N.; Marshall, David B.; Ritchie, Robert O.; MacDowell, Alastair A.

    2014-08-01

    A compact ultrahigh temperature tensile testing instrument has been designed and fabricated for in situ x-ray micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It allows for real time x-ray micro-tomographic imaging of test materials under mechanical load at temperatures up to 2300 °C in controlled environments (vacuum or controlled gas flow). Sample heating is by six infrared halogen lamps with ellipsoidal reflectors arranged in a confocal configuration, which generates an approximately spherical zone of high heat flux approximately 5 mm in diameter. Samples are held between grips connected to a motorized stage that loads the samples in tension or compression with forces up to 2.2 kN. The heating chamber and loading system are water-cooled for thermal stability. The entire instrument is mounted on a rotation stage that allows stepwise recording of radiographs over an angular range of 180°. A thin circumferential (360°) aluminum window in the wall of the heating chamber allows the x-rays to pass through the chamber and the sample over the full angular range. The performance of the instrument has been demonstrated by characterizing the evolution of 3D damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials under tensile loading at 1750 °C.

  1. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    PubMed

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  2. Temperature increase of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes due to plastic heat dissipation during tensile tests at 0.1-10 s-1 strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Arthur; Auzoux, Quentin; Besson, Jacques; Crépin, Jérôme

    2014-11-01

    This study is focused on the impact of rapid Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) representative strain rates (about 1 s-1 NEA, 2010) on the behavior and fracture of unirradiated cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes. Uniaxial ring tests (HT) and plane strain ring tensile tests (PST) were performed in the 0.1-10 s-1 strain rate range, at 25 °C. The local temperature increase due to plastic dissipation was measured with a high-speed infrared camera. Limited temperature increases were measured at 0.1 s-1 strain rate. Limited but not strongly localized temperature increases were measured at 1 s-1. Large temperature increase were measured at 5 and 10 s-1 (142 °C at 5 s-1 strain rate in HT tests). The local temperature increase induced heterogeneous temperature fields, which enhanced strain localization and resulted in a reduction of the plastic elongation at fracture.

  3. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  4. PBX 9502 TENSILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, D.J.; Larson, S.A.

    2000-10-01

    With the recent creation of the PX HE Core Surveillance Database, individual specimen surveillance values can be easily compared to the corresponding individual qualification values to evaluate for trends. A review of the data shows a broad scatter in measured stress-strain values. Using the available HE surveillance database, it is clear that the surveillance measurements from the two Cycle 15 charges fall within the range of qualification stress and strain values recorded previously for PBX 9502 lots and that no apparent stockpile-age related trends are evident in the tensile stress-strain data. As a result of this investigation, some changes are being made to the core surveillance specifications to minimize the effects on tensile data scatter due to temperature and humidity differences and method to method changes. These data analyses do point out the need for a comprehensive understanding of the effect of a number of variables, i.e. formulation and pressing method, density, stockpile age, lot-to-lot variations, temperature, and humidity on the mechanical property behavior of HE composite materials. Too often data have been compared without the relevant details made available to determine if the test conditions were nominally the same or different. These results also point out the critical need to establish useful stress-strain limits for qualification and surveillance testing of HEs.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  6. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  7. Evolution of tensile design stresses for lumber

    Treesearch

    William L. Galligan; C. C. Gerhards; R. L. Ethington

    1979-01-01

    Until approximately 1965, allowable design stresses for lumber in tension were taken as equal to those assigned for bending. As interest in tensile properties increased, testing machines were designed specifically to stress lumber in tension. Research results that accumulated on tensile tests of full-size lumber suggested lower design stresses for tension than for...

  8. Tensile properties of epoxy encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Wischmann, K.B.; Stavig, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Tensile properties were measured for nineteen different formulations of epoxy encapsulating materials. Formulations were of different combinations of two neat resins (Epon 828 and Epon 826, with and without CTBN modification), three fillers (ALOX, GNM and mica) and four hardeners (Z, DEA, DETDA-SA and ANH-2). Five of the formulations were tested at -55, -20, 20 and 60C, one formulation at -55, 20 and 71C; and the remaining formulations at 20C. Complete stress-strain curves are presented along with tables of tensile strength, initial modulus and Poisson's ratio. The stress-strain responses are nonlinear and are temperature dependent. The reported data provide information for comparing the mechanical properties of encapsulants containing the suspected carcinogen Shell Z with the properties of encapsulants containing noncarcinogenic hardeners. Also, calculated shear moduli, based on measured tensile moduli and Poisson's ratio, are in very good agreement with reported shear moduli from experimental torsional pendulum tests.

  9. Tensile properties of epoxy encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Wischmann, K.B.; Stavig, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Tensile properties were measured for nineteen different formulations of epoxy encapsulating materials. Formulations were of different combinations of two neat resins (Epon 828 and Epon 826, with and without CTBN modification), three fillers (ALOX, GNM and mica) and four hardeners (Z, DEA, DETDA-SA and ANH-2). Five of the formulations were tested at -55, -20, 20 and 60C, one formulation at -55, 20 and 71C; and the remaining formulations at 20C. Complete stress-strain curves are presented along with tables of tensile strength, initial modulus and Poisson`s ratio. The stress-strain responses are nonlinear and are temperature dependent. The reported data provide information for comparing the mechanical properties of encapsulants containing the suspected carcinogen Shell Z with the properties of encapsulants containing noncarcinogenic hardeners. Also, calculated shear moduli, based on measured tensile moduli and Poisson`s ratio, are in very good agreement with reported shear moduli from experimental torsional pendulum tests.

  10. Tensile properties of impact ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Kellackey, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A special test apparatus was developed to measure the tensile strength of impact ices perpendicular to the direction of growth. The apparatus consists of a split tube carefully machined to minimize the effect of the joint on impact ice strength. The tube is supported in the wind tunnel by two carefully aligned bearings. During accretion the tube is turned slowly in the icing cloud to form a uniform coating of ice on the split tube specimen. The two halves of the split tube are secured firmly by a longitudinal bolt to prevent relative motion between the two halves during ice accretion and handling. Tensile test strength results for a variety of icing conditions were obtained. Both glaze and rime ice conditions were investigated. In general, the tensile strength of impact ice was significantly less than refrigerator ice. Based on the limited data taken, the median strength of rime ice was less than glaze ice. However, the mean values were similar.

  11. Dynamic assertion testing of flight control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.; Mahmood, A.; Mccluskey, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment in using assertions to dynamically test fault tolerant flight software is described. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters.

  12. Dynamic assertion testing of flight control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. M.; Mahmood, A.; Mccluskey, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    Assertions are used to dynamically test fault tolerant flight software. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters.

  13. Dynamic testing for shuttle design verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, C. E.; Leadbetter, S. A.; Rheinfurth, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Space shuttle design verification requires dynamic data from full scale structural component and assembly tests. Wind tunnel and other scaled model tests are also required early in the development program to support the analytical models used in design verification. Presented is a design philosophy based on mathematical modeling of the structural system strongly supported by a comprehensive test program; some of the types of required tests are outlined.

  14. Muscular response to physiologic tensile stretch of the caprine c5/6 facet joint capsule: dynamic recruitment thresholds and latencies.

    PubMed

    Azar, Nadia R; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Chen, Chaoyang; Cavanaugh, John M

    2011-11-01

    This study examined the cervical muscle response to physiologic, high-rate (100 mm/s) tensile facet joint capsule (FJC) stretch. Six in-vivo caprine C5/6 FJC preparations were subjected to an incremental tensile loading paradigm. EMG activity was recorded from the right trapezius (TR) and multifidus (MF) muscle groups at the C5 and C6 levels; and from the sternomastoid (SM) and longus colli (LC) muscle groups bilaterally at the C5/6 level; during FJC stretch. Capsule load during the displacement applications was recorded via a miniature load cell, and 3D capsule strains (based on stereoimaging of an array of markers on the capsule surface) were reconstructed using finite element methods. EMG traces from each muscle were examined for onset of muscular activity. Capsule strains and loads at the time of EMG onset were recorded for each muscle, as was the time from the onset of FJC stretch to the onset of muscle activity. All muscles were responsive to physiologic high-rate FJC stretch. The deep muscles (MF and LC) were recruited at significantly smaller capsule loads and onset latencies than the superficial muscles (TR and SM). MF activation strain was significantly smaller than LC and TR activation strains. These data were also compared to previously published low-rate data. MF was the first muscle group to be recruited regardless of the activation criterion under consideration (i.e. strain, load, or latency) or the rate of FJC stretch. LC recruitment occurred significantly sooner under high-rate vs. low-rate FJC stretch. The results of this study provide further evidence of extensive ligamento-muscular reflex pathways between the FJC and the cervical musculature, which are responsive to both low-rate and high-rate FJC stretch. These data add to our knowledge of the dynamic response of paraspinal muscles relative to facet joint motion and provide a unique contribution to enhance the precision of computer-simulated impacts.

  15. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  16. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan; Zhao, Hongwei; Liang, Yunhong; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  17. A novel in situ device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator to study tensile and fatigue properties of bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shupeng; Zhang, Zhihui Ren, Luquan; Liang, Yunhong; Zhao, Hongwei; Zhu, Bing

    2014-06-15

    In this work, a miniaturized device based on a bionic piezoelectric actuator was developed to investigate the static tensile and dynamic fatigue properties of bulk materials. The device mainly consists of a bionic stepping piezoelectric actuator based on wedge block clamping, a pair of grippers, and a set of precise signal test system. Tensile and fatigue examinations share a set of driving system and a set of signal test system. In situ tensile and fatigue examinations under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. The structure and working principle of the device were discussed and the effects of output difference between two piezoelectric stacks on the device were theoretically analyzed. The tensile and fatigue examinations on ordinary copper were carried out using this device and its feasibility was verified through the comparison tests with a commercial tensile examination instrument.

  18. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG

  19. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Kuroyanagi, Yuki; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Gustafsson, Gustaf

    2015-09-01

    Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar) method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  20. Academy of Dental Materials guidance on in vitro testing of dental composite bonding effectiveness to dentin/enamel using micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) approach.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Steve; Breschi, Lorenzo; Özcan, Mutlu; Pfefferkorn, Frank; Ferrari, Marco; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-02-01

    An ideal dental adhesive should provide retentive strength, marginal seal, be relatively simple to achieve and demonstrate clinical durability. Future improvements in adhesive bonding to tooth structure require in vitro test methods that provide reliable data for materials development and/or evaluation of experimental variables. The objective of this project was to identify a test method that is relatively easy to perform, repeatable and ultimately useful for predicting clinical outcomes. The Academy of Dental Materials initiated a project to develop and distribute guidance documents on laboratory test methods that are useful for the evaluation of dental adhesives and cements, composite resins and ceramics. The dental adhesive sub-group has identified the micro-tensile bond strength test, especially after subjecting the specimens to a durability challenge, as currently the best practical surrogate measure of dental composite restoration retention. The following μTBS guidance is meant to aid the researcher in conducting the μTBS test. The authors, while recognizing the limitations of a static, strength-based test method, welcome comments and suggestions for improvements of this guidance document in future revisions. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Preliminary report on tests of tensile specimens with a part-through surface notch for a filament wound graphite/epoxy material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. E.; Morris, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of tensile coupons with surface notches of various semi-elliptical shapes were evaluated for specimens obtained from a filament wound graphite/epoxy cylinder. The quasi-static test results, in some instances, are inadequate for defining complete trend curves and the interpretive analysis is considered to be preliminary. Specimens with very shallow notches were observed to be notch insensitive and the unnotched strength from these specimens was determined to be 54.97 Ksi. The failure strain of the laminate was found to be 1.328%. Specimens with deeper notches were sensitive to notch depth, notch aspect ratio, and specimen width. Using the unnotched strength of 54.97 Ksi and Poe's general toughness parameter, the fracture toughness was estimated to be 27.2 Ksi square root of In. Isotropic linear elastic fracture mechanics together with the estimated fracture toughness correctly predicted the influence of notch depth, aspect ratio, and specimen finitewidth.

  2. Bond mobility mechanism in grain boundary embrittlement: First-principles tensile tests of Fe with a P-segregated {Sigma}3 grain boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Yuasa, Motohiro; Mabuchi, Mamoru

    2010-09-01

    First-principles simulated tensile tests have been performed on Fe with a P-segregated grain boundary to investigate the nature of the bond mobility mechanism in grain boundary embrittlement. The first site for bond breaking was the Fe-P bond, despite its high charge density. This is because the Fe-P bond exhibited the covalentlike characteristics of a localized bonding and the mobility of electrons was reduced. The breaking of the Fe-P bond accelerated the breaking of the Fe-Fe bond around the Fe-P bond because the Fe-P bond breaking affected the electron density of states of the Fe-Fe bond. Thus, P segregation enhanced the grain boundary embrittlement in Fe.

  3. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-12-31

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  4. Rapid heating tensile tests of high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel containing internal helium from radioactive decay of absorbed tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. This austenitic stainless steel is frequently used in the high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) metallurgical condition to take advantage of increased strength produced by cold work introduced by this process. Proper design of tritium-handling equipment will require an understanding of how helium-3, the product of radioactive decay of tritium, affects mechanical properties. This report describes results of elevated-temperature tensile testing of HERF 316L stainless steel specimens containing helium concentrations of 171 (calculated) atomic parts per million (appm). Results are compared with those reported previously for specimens containing 0 and 94 (measured) appm helium.

  5. Investigation of adhesive properties of dental composite materials using an improved tensile test procedure and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rider, M; Tanner, A N; Kenny, B

    1977-04-01

    A standardized tension test was used to evaluate the adhesive properties of several composite materials when used on both dentin and enamel specimens. The nature of the test surfaces was examined by roughness tests using a Talysurf machine and also in more detail by means of a scanning electron microscope. Poor results were obtained for the adhesion of composite materials to dentin whereas good retention to enamel was obtained.

  6. Effect of sample test volume and geometry on the tensile mechanical behavior of SiC/SiC continuous fiber ceramic composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Neogi, J.

    1998-09-01

    The development of a silicon carbide-type fiber from an organometallic precursor has led to a major resurgence of interest in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites. By combining this high strength fiber with a variety of ceramic matrices it has been possible to achieve tough composites offering significant potential advantages over monolithic ceramics and carbon-carbon for high temperature applications. A continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composite (CFCC) typical of materials proposed for such industrial applications as power generation, heat recovery and chemical production as well as biomedical and environmental applications was tested in uniaxial tension using a universal test machine. Test parameters investigated included: test mode (load versus displacement), test rate (0.003 mm/s, 0.03 mm/s, 50 N/s and 500 N/s), specimen geometry (straight-sided versus reduced-gauge section) and type of specimen volume (long/thin versus short/fat). Typical properties include an average elastic modulus 130 {+-} 10 Gpa, an average proportional limit stress of 45 {+-} 20 Mpa, an average ultimate tensile strength of 180 {+-} 20 MPa and an average modulus of toughness of 8.4 {+-} 2 (x10{sup 5})J/m{sup 3}.

  7. Continuous waves probing in dynamic acoustoelastic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalerandi, M.; Gliozzi, A. S.; Ait Ouarabi, M.; Boubenider, F.

    2016-05-01

    Consolidated granular media display a peculiar nonlinear elastic behavior, which is normally analysed with dynamic ultrasonic testing exploiting the dependence on amplitude of different measurable quantities, such as the resonance frequency shift, the amount of harmonics generation, or the break of the superposition principle. However, dynamic testing allows measuring effects which are averaged over one (or more) cycles of the exciting perturbation. Dynamic acoustoelastic testing has been proposed to overcome this limitation and allow the determination of the real amplitude dependence of the modulus of the material. Here, we propose an implementation of the approach, in which the pulse probing waves are substituted by continuous waves. As a result, instead of measuring a time-of-flight as a function of the pump strain, we study the dependence of the resonance frequency on the strain amplitude, allowing to derive the same conclusions but with an easier to implement procedure.

  8. Dynamic Breaking Tests of Airplane Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hertel, Heinrich

    1933-01-01

    The static stresses of airplane parts, the magnitude of which can be determined with the aid of static load assumptions, are mostly superposed by dynamic stresses, the magnitude of which has been but little explored. The object of the present investigation is to show how the strength of airplane parts can best be tested with respect to dynamic stresses with and without superposed static loading, and to what extent the dynamic strength of the parts depends on their structural design. Experimental apparatus and evaluation methods were developed and tried for the execution of vibration-strength tests with entire structural parts both with and without superposed static loading. Altogether ten metal spars and spar pieces and two wooden spars were subjected to vibration breaking tests.

  9. Effect of Load Rate on Tensile Strength of Various CFCCs at Elevated Temperatures: An Approach to Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Strength of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-11, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, was determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 - 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law tyw of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for the composite materials at least for the short range of lifetime.

  10. Effect of Load Rate on Tensile Strength of Various CFCCs at Elevated Temperatures: An Approach to Life Prediction Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2001-01-01

    Strength of three continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic composites, including SiC/CAS-11, SiC/MAS-5 and SiC/SiC, was determined as a function of test rate in air at 1100 - 1200 C. All three composite materials exhibited a strong dependency of strength on test rate, similar to the behavior observed in many advanced monolithic ceramics at elevated temperatures. The application of the preloading technique as well as the prediction of life from one loading configuration (constant stress-rate) to another (constant stress loading) suggested that the overall macroscopic failure mechanism of the composites would be the one governed by a power-law tyw of damage evolution/accumulation, analogous to slow crack growth commonly observed in advanced monolithic ceramics. It was further found that constant stress-rate testing could be used as an alternative to life prediction test methodology even for the composite materials at least for the short range of lifetime.

  11. Mini-tensile specimen application for sheets characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džugan, J.; Rund, M.; Prantl, A.; Konopík, P.

    2017-02-01

    There are many cases when there is a shortage of the experimental material for detailed analysis and then small size specimens techniques becomes essential. The current paper deals with investigations of mini-tensile tests (MTT) application to metal sheets characterization. In the case of metal sheets assessment the most common are tensile tests for Lankford parameters and strain hardening determination. As most of the processes are not quasi-static and constant strain rate processes, thus assessment of strain rate hardening is also crucial part of the characterization. Previously developed and verified testing procedure of M-TTs for bulk materials is applied here for steel sheet made of DC01 characterization. Tests under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions are carried out in order to describe above mentioned properties at room temperature. Accurate strain measurement is carried out with digital image correlation systems and results obtained with M-TTs are going to be confronted with standard size specimens’ results.

  12. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  13. NASA Handbook for Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Dennis L.; Scharton, Terry D.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the area of structural dynamics and vibrations, in both methodology and capability, have the potential to make spacecraft system testing more effective from technical, cost, schedule, and hardware safety points of view. However, application of these advanced test methods varies widely among the NASA Centers and their contractors. Identification and refinement of the best of these test methodologies and implementation approaches has been an objective of efforts by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory on behalf of the NASA Office of the Chief Engineer. But to develop the most appropriate overall test program for a flight project from the selection of advanced methodologies, as well as conventional test methods, spacecraft project managers and their technical staffs will need overall guidance and technical rationale. Thus, the Chief Engineer's Office has recently tasked JPL to prepare a NASA Handbook for Spacecraft Structural Dynamics Testing. An outline of the proposed handbook, with a synopsis of each section, has been developed and is presented herein. Comments on the proposed handbook are solicited from the spacecraft structural dynamics testing community.

  14. Innovations in dynamic test restraint systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuld, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Recent launch system development programs have led to a new generation of large scale dynamic tests. The variety of test scenarios share one common requirement: restrain and capture massive high velocity flight hardware with no structural damage. The Space Systems Lab of McDonnell Douglas developed a remarkably simple and cost effective approach to such testing using ripstitch energy absorbers adapted from the sport of technical rockclimbing. The proven system reliability of the capture system concept has led to a wide variety of applications in test system design and in aerospace hardware design.

  15. Component testing for dynamic model verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasselman, T. K.; Chrostowski, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamic model verification is the process whereby an analytical model of a dynamic system is compared with experimental data, adjusted if necessary to bring it into agreement with the data, and then qualified for future use in predicting system response in a different dynamic environment. These are various ways to conduct model verification. The approach taken here employs Bayesian statistical parameter estimation. Unlike curve fitting, whose objective is to minimize the difference between some analytical function and a given quantity of test data (or curve), Bayesian estimation attempts also to minimize the difference between the parameter values of that funciton (the model) and their initial estimates, in a least squares sense. The objectives of dynamic model verification, therefore, are to produce a model which: (1) is in agreement with test data; (2) will assist in the interpretation of test data; (3) can be used to help verify a design; (4) will reliably predict performance; and (5) in the case of space structures, will facilitate dynamic control.

  16. Tailoring dynamic qualification tests for interplanetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the word 'tailoring' has become quite popular in the past few years. Thus, two recently revised environmental test documents make frequent mention of test tailoring. 'Tailoring' is defined by MIL STD 810D (Environmental Test Methods and Engineering Guidelines). The word refers to 'the process of choosing or altering test procedures, conditions, values, tolerances, measures of failure, etc., to simulate or exaggerate the effects of one or more forcing functions to which an item will be subjected during its life cycle...'. This paper is concerned with requirement level test tailoring. Attention is given to examples of dynamic qualification test tailoring for an interplanetary spacecraft program. These examples are to provide ideas for test tailoring which can be applied to other space flight programs.

  17. Saturn IB in MSFC Dynamic Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    A completely assembled Saturn IB launch vehicle stands in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Dynamic Test Stand, April 14, 1965, for testing on the structural integrity of the vehicle. Developed by the MSFC as an interim vehicle in MSFC's 'building block' approach to Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine large boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  18. Improvement in Mechanical Properties of A356 Tensile Test Bars Cast in a Permanent Mold by Application of a Knife Ingate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaou; Schwam, David; Neff, David V.; Chen, Chai-Jung; Zhu, Xuejun

    2012-03-01

    As a standard test-bar permanent mold, the "Stahl" Mold has been widely used in foundries to assess the properties of cast alloys. However, inferior mechanical properties are often obtained with this mold due to shrinkage-induced microporosity in the gage section. In order to improve the mechanical properties, a design modification comprising a thin knife ingate between the feeder and test-bar cavity was evaluated in this work. The new design was studied by computer-aided simulation. Simulations predicted that the knife ingate improved the metal feeding capability and reduced the shrinkage microporosity at the gage section from 3 to 1 pct. Experimental verification work has been undertaken with aluminum alloy A356, and the results were analyzed by a statistics theory-based factorial analysis method. The new design resulted in main effects with ultimate tensile strength (UTS) improvement of 20 MPa (relative 12 pct) and elongation increment of 2 pct (relative 45 pct) for the as-cast test bars.

  19. Anti-buckling fatigue test assembly. [for subjecting metal specimen to tensile and compressive loads at constant temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Imig, L. A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An antibuckling fatigue test assembly is described for holding a metal specimen which is subjected to compression and to rapid cyclical heating and cooling while permitting visual observation. In an illustrative embodiment of this invention, the anti-buckling fatigue test apparatus includes first and second guide members between which the metal specimen is disposed and held, a heating assembly comprising a suitable heating source such as a quartz lamp and a reflecting assembly directing the heat onto the specimen, and a cooling assembly for directing a suitable cooling fluid such as air onto the specimen. The guide members each have a passage to permit the heat to be directed onto the specimen. An opening is provided in the reflecting assembly to permit visual inspection of that region of the specimen adjacent to the opening onto which the heat is directed.

  20. MOD-0 wind turbine dynamics test correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, B. M.

    1981-01-01

    The behavior of the teetered, downwind, free yaw, MOD-0 wind turbine, as represented by NASA dynamic test data, was used to support confidence in the Hamilton Standard computer code simulations. Trim position, performance at trim, and teeter response as predicted by the computer codes were compared to test results. Using the computer codes, other possible configurations for MOD-0 were investigated. Several new test configurations are recommended for exploring free yaw behavior. It is shown that eliminating rotor tilt and optimizing cooling and blade twist can contribute to good free yaw behavior and stability. The effects of rotor teeter, teeter gravity balance, inflow and other physical and operating parameters were also investigated.

  1. Test of a flexible spacecraft dynamics simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dichmann, Donald; Sedlak, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    There are a number of approaches one can take to modeling the dynamics of a flexible body. While one can attempt to capture the full dynamical behavior subject to disturbances from actuators and environmental torques, such a detailed description often is unnecessary. Simplification is possible either by limiting the amplitude of motion to permit linearization of the dynamics equations or by restricting the types of allowed motion. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of bending deformations of wire booms on spinning spacecraft. The theory allows for large amplitude excursions from equilibrium while enforcing constraints on the dynamics to prohibit those modes that are physically less relevant or are expected to damp out fast. These constraints explicitly remove the acoustic modes (i.e., longitudinal sound waves and shear waves) while allowing for arbitrary bending and twisting, motions which typically are of lower frequency. As a test case, a spin axis reorientation maneuver by the Polar Plasma Laboratory (POLAR) spacecraft has been simulated. POLAR was chosen as a representative spacecraft because it has flexible wire antennas that extend to a length of 65 meters. Bending deformations in these antennas could be quite large and have a significant effect on the attitude dynamics of the spacecraft body. Summary results from the simulation are presented along, with a comparison with POLAR flight data.

  2. Tensile Properties and Viscoelastic Model of a Polyimide Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengde; Mori, Syuhei; Sakane, Masao; Nagasawa, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    This paper presents tensile properties of a polyimide thin film used in electronic devices. Tensile tests were performed to determine Young's modulus, proportional limit, yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the polyimide film. Effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile properties were discussed. There was a little effect of strain rate on Young's modulus but proportional limit, yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increased with increasing strain rate. Only elongation decreased with strain rate. Young's modulus, proportional limit, yield stress and ultimate tensile strength decreased with increasing temperature, but elongation increased. Applicability of a viscoelastic model for describing the stress-strain curves of the polyimide film was discussed.

  3. Stability precision dynamic testing system on artillery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunyan; Li, Bo

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic feature of Weapon equipments is one of important performance index for evaluating the performance of the whole weapon system. The construction of target range in our country in fire control dynamic testing is relatively backward; therefore, it has greatly influenced the evaluation on the fire control system. In order to solve this problem, it's urgent to develop a new testing instrument so as to adjust to the armament research process and promote weapon system working more efficiently and thereby meeting the needs of modernization in national defense. This paper proposes a new measure which is used to test the stability precision of the fire control system, and it is installed on the moving base. Using the method, we develop a testing system which can test the stability precision of the fire control system and achieve a high precision results after testing. The innovation of the system is we can receive the image not only by CCD, but our eyes. It also adopts digital image-forming and image processing technique for real-time measurement and storing of the target information; it simultaneously adopts the method adjusting the platform and the corresponding fixture mounted on a sample to measure the stable precision and the precision of corner of stabilizator. In this paper, we make a description on the construction of the system and the idea of the designing of the optical system. Finally, we introduce the actual application of the system and testing results.

  4. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  5. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, Joe L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  6. The Finite Deformation Dynamic Sphere Test Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Versino, Daniele; Brock, Jerry Steven

    2016-09-02

    In this manuscript we describe test cases for the dynamic sphere problem in presence of finite deformations. The spherical shell in exam is made of a homogeneous, isotropic or transverse isotropic material and elastic and elastic-plastic material behaviors are considered. Twenty cases, (a) to (t), are thus defined combining material types and boundary conditions. The inner surface radius, the outer surface radius and the material's density are kept constant for all the considered test cases and their values are ri = 10mm, ro = 20mm and p = 1000Kg/m3 respectively.

  7. Impact Landing Dynamics Facility Crash Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-08-03

    Photographed on: 08/03/75. -- By 1972 the Lunar Landing Research Facility was no longer in use for its original purpose. The 400-foot high structure was swiftly modified to allow engineers to study the dynamics of aircraft crashes. "The Impact Dynamics Research Facility is used to conduct crash testing of full-scale aircraft under controlled conditions. The aircraft are swung by cables from an A-frame structure that is approximately 400 ft. long and 230 foot high. The impact runway can be modified to simulate other grand crash environments, such as packed dirt, to meet a specific test requirement." "In 1972, NASA and the FAA embarked on a cooperative effort to develop technology for improved crashworthiness and passenger survivability in general aviation aircraft with little or no increase in weight and acceptable cost. Since then, NASA has "crashed" dozens of GA aircraft by using the lunar excursion module (LEM) facility originally built for the Apollo program." This photograph shows Crash Test No. 7. Crash Test: Test #7

  8. Micromechanics of ultra-toughened electrospun PMMA/PEO fibres as revealed by in-situ tensile testing in an electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Richard L.; Ström, Valter; Gedde, Ulf W.; Mallon, Peter E.; Hedenqvist, Mikael S.; Olsson, Richard T.

    2014-09-01

    A missing cornerstone in the development of tough micro/nano fibre systems is an understanding of the fibre failure mechanisms, which stems from the limitation in observing the fracture of objects with dimensions one hundredth of the width of a hair strand. Tensile testing in the electron microscope is herein adopted to reveal the fracture behaviour of a novel type of toughened electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene oxide) fibre mats for biomedical applications. These fibres showed a toughness more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of pristine PMMA fibres. The in-situ microscopy revealed that the toughness were not only dependent on the initial molecular alignment after spinning, but also on the polymer formulation that could promote further molecular orientation during the formation of micro/nano-necking. The true fibre strength was greater than 150 MPa, which was considerably higher than that of the unmodified PMMA (17 MPa). This necking phenomenon was prohibited by high aspect ratio cellulose nanocrystal fillers in the ultra-tough fibres, leading to a decrease in toughness by more than one order of magnitude. The reported necking mechanism may have broad implications also within more traditional melt-spinning research.

  9. Micromechanics of ultra-toughened electrospun PMMA/PEO fibres as revealed by in-situ tensile testing in an electron microscope

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Richard L.; Ström, Valter; Gedde, Ulf W.; Mallon, Peter E.; Hedenqvist, Mikael S.; Olsson, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    A missing cornerstone in the development of tough micro/nano fibre systems is an understanding of the fibre failure mechanisms, which stems from the limitation in observing the fracture of objects with dimensions one hundredth of the width of a hair strand. Tensile testing in the electron microscope is herein adopted to reveal the fracture behaviour of a novel type of toughened electrospun poly(methyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene oxide) fibre mats for biomedical applications. These fibres showed a toughness more than two orders of magnitude greater than that of pristine PMMA fibres. The in-situ microscopy revealed that the toughness were not only dependent on the initial molecular alignment after spinning, but also on the polymer formulation that could promote further molecular orientation during the formation of micro/nano-necking. The true fibre strength was greater than 150 MPa, which was considerably higher than that of the unmodified PMMA (17 MPa). This necking phenomenon was prohibited by high aspect ratio cellulose nanocrystal fillers in the ultra–tough fibres, leading to a decrease in toughness by more than one order of magnitude. The reported necking mechanism may have broad implications also within more traditional melt–spinning research. PMID:25208692

  10. Dynamic (Vibration) Testing: Design-Certification of Aerospace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, Pravin K.

    2010-01-01

    Various types of dynamic testing of structures for certification purposes are described, including vibration, shock and acoustic testing. Modal testing is discussed as it frequently complements dynamic testing and is part of the structural verification/validation process leading up to design certification. Examples of dynamic and modal testing are presented as well as the common practices, procedures and standards employed.

  11. Dynamic Docking Test System (DDTS) active table frequency response test results. [Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of the frequency response test performed on the dynamic docking test system (DDTS) active table. Sinusoidal displacement commands were applied to the table and the dynamic response determined from measured actuator responses and accelerometers mounted to the table and one actuator.

  12. Type-II recombination dynamics of tensile-strained GaP quantum dots in GaAs grown by droplet epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prongjit, Patchareewan; Ratanathammaphan, Somchai; Ha, Neul; Mano, Takaaki; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Kuroda, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    We use droplet epitaxy to create tensile-strained GaP quantum dots in a GaAs matrix. A strong biaxial tensile strain leads to the formation of a type-II band lineup with a transition energy lower than the bulk GaAs band gap. The luminescence transients exhibit highly non-exponential decay behavior with an average time constant of 11 ± 2 μs, which is more than three orders of magnitude longer than the lifetime of standard type-I quantum dots. The prolonged luminescence decay time for the GaP/GaAs dots confirms the formation of the type-II band alignment associated with the tensile strain.

  13. Testing relativity with solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A major breakthrough is described in the accuracy of Solar System dynamical tests of relativistic gravity. The breakthrough was achieved by factoring in ranging data from Viking Landers 1 and 2 from the surface of Mars. Other key data sources included optical transit circle observations, lunar laser ranging, planetary radar, and spacecraft (Mariner 9 to Mars and Mariner 10 to Mercury). The Solar System model which is used to fit the data and the process by which such fits are performed are explained and results are discussed. The results are fully consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  14. Testing relativity with solar system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A major breakthrough is described in the accuracy of Solar System dynamical tests of relativistic gravity. The breakthrough was achieved by factoring in ranging data from Viking Landers 1 and 2 from the surface of Mars. Other key data sources included optical transit circle observations, lunar laser ranging, planetary radar, and spacecraft (Mariner 9 to Mars and Mariner 10 to Mercury). The Solar System model which is used to fit the data and the process by which such fits are performed are explained and results are discussed. The results are fully consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  15. Low-temperature Mechanical Properties of Fe-0.06C-18Cr-10Ni-0.4Ti Austenitic Steel Determined Using Ring-Pull Tensile Tests and Microhardness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neustroev, V. S.; Boev, E. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-08-01

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels removed from Russian water-cooled VVERs experience irradiation temperatures and He/dpa conditions that are very similar to steels to be used in ITER. Data are presented on the radiation hardening of the Russian analog of AISI 321 at 0.2 to 15 dpa in the range of 285 to 320оС. The Russian variant of the ring-pull tensile test was used to obtain mechanical prop-erty data. Microhardness tests on the ring specimens provide useful information throughout the deformed regions, but at high hardening levels caution must be exercised before application of a widely accepted hardness-yield stress correla-tion to prediction of tensile properties. Low-nickel austenitic steels are very prone to form deformation martensite, a phase that increases strongly with the larger deformation levels characteristic of microhardness tests, especially when compared to the 0.2% deformation used to define yield stress.

  16. Novel in situ device for investigating the tensile and fatigue behaviors of bulk materials.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qinchao; Wang, Kaiting; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Hongbing; Lu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    For investigating the static tensile and dynamic fatigue behaviors of bulk materials, a miniaturized device with separate modular tensile and fatigue actuators was developed. The fatigue actuator presented good compatibility with the tensile actuator and mainly consisted of a special flexure hinge and piezoelectric stack. In situ fatigue tests under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. A displacement correction method of tensile actuator based on load sensor compliance was investigated, and the feasibility of the method was verified by the comparison tests with a commercial tensile instrument. The application of testing the storage and loss modulus as a function of frequency was explained, and the temperature rises of both the piezoelectric stack and specimen were obtained as a function of frequency. Output characteristics of the fatigue actuator were also investigated. Additionally, the discharge performance of piezoelectric stack based on various initial voltages and fatigue tests on C11000 copper was carried out. This paper shows a modularized example that combines a servo motor with a piezoelectric actuator attached to the specimen grip to realize the in situ fatigue tests.

  17. Novel in situ device for investigating the tensile and fatigue behaviors of bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Li, Qinchao; Wang, Kaiting; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Hu, Xiaoli; Cheng, Hongbing; Lu, Shuai

    2013-04-01

    For investigating the static tensile and dynamic fatigue behaviors of bulk materials, a miniaturized device with separate modular tensile and fatigue actuators was developed. The fatigue actuator presented good compatibility with the tensile actuator and mainly consisted of a special flexure hinge and piezoelectric stack. In situ fatigue tests under scanning electron microscope or metallographic microscope could be carried out due to the miniaturized dimensions of the device. A displacement correction method of tensile actuator based on load sensor compliance was investigated, and the feasibility of the method was verified by the comparison tests with a commercial tensile instrument. The application of testing the storage and loss modulus as a function of frequency was explained, and the temperature rises of both the piezoelectric stack and specimen were obtained as a function of frequency. Output characteristics of the fatigue actuator were also investigated. Additionally, the discharge performance of piezoelectric stack based on various initial voltages and fatigue tests on C11000 copper was carried out. This paper shows a modularized example that combines a servo motor with a piezoelectric actuator attached to the specimen grip to realize the in situ fatigue tests.

  18. A Method for Selecting Software for Dynamic Event Analysis II: the Taylor Anvil and Dynamic Brazilian Tests

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Richins; J. M. Lacy; T. K. Larson; S. R. Novascone

    2008-05-01

    New nuclear power reactor designs will require resistance to a variety of possible malevolent attacks as well as traditional dynamic accident scenarios. The design/analysis team may be faced with a broad range of phenomena including air and ground blasts, high-velocity penetrators or shaped charges, and vehicle or aircraft impacts. With a host of software tools available to address these high-energy events, the analysis team must evaluate and select the software most appropriate for their particular set of problems. The accuracy of the selected software should then be validated with respect to the phenomena governing the interaction of the threat and structure. Several software codes are available for the study of blast, impact, and other shock phenomena. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), a study is underway to investigate the comparative characteristics of a group of shock and high-strain rate physics codes including ABAQUS, LS-DYNA, CTH, ALEGRA, and ALE-3D. In part I of this report, a series of five benchmark problems to exercise some important capabilities of the subject software was identified. The benchmark problems selected are a Taylor cylinder test, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test, a free air blast, the dynamic splitting tension (Brazilian) test, and projectile penetration of a concrete slab. Part II-- this paper-- reports the results of two of the benchmark problems: the Taylor cylinder and the dynamic Brazilian test. The Taylor cylinder test is a method to determine the dynamic yield properties of materials. The test specimen is a right circular cylinder which is impacted against a theoretically rigid target. The cylinder deforms upon impact, with the final shape depending upon the dynamic yield stress, in turn a function of strain and strain rate. The splitting tension test, or Brazilian test, is a method to measure the tensile strength of concrete using a cylindrical specimen. The specimen is loaded diametrically in compression, producing a

  19. Tensile and Fatigue Testing and Material Hardening Model Development for 508 LAS Base Metal and 316 SS Similar Metal Weld under In-air and PWR Primary Loop Water Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-09-01

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in September 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In an April 2015 report we presented a baseline mechanistic finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR) for systemlevel heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis and fatigue life estimation under reactor thermal-mechanical cycles. In the present report, we provide tensile and fatigue test data for 508 low-alloy steel (LAS) base metal, 508 LAS heat-affected zone metal in 508 LAS–316 stainless steel (SS) dissimilar metal welds, and 316 SS-316 SS similar metal welds. The test was conducted under different conditions such as in air at room temperature, in air at 300 oC, and under PWR primary loop water conditions. Data are provided on materials properties related to time-independent tensile tests and time-dependent cyclic tests, such as elastic modulus, elastic and offset strain yield limit stress, and linear and nonlinear kinematic hardening model parameters. The overall objective of this report is to provide guidance to estimate tensile/fatigue hardening parameters from test data. Also, the material models and parameters reported here can directly be used in commercially available finite element codes for fatigue and ratcheting evaluation of reactor components under in-air and PWR water conditions.

  20. Fracturing and Failure Behavior of Carrara Marble in Quasistatic and Dynamic Brazilian Disc Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Zou, Chunjiang; Cheng, Yi

    2014-07-01

    The tensile strength and fracturing behavior of Carrara marble subjected to the dynamic Brazilian disc test using the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique are determined and compared with those obtained by the conventional quasistatic Brazilian disc test. Detailed observation of the cracking processes is aided by high-speed video footage captured at a frame rate of 100,000 frames per second. The dynamic increase factor is computed, revealing a strong strain rate dependence of the Carrara marble when subjected to strain rates above 1 s-1. Similar to the quasistatic loading tests, conspicuous white zones/patches commonly appear prior to the initiation of visible cracks in the dynamic loading tests. Identification of the white patch initiation and evolution is aided by image comparison software. Comparing the cracking and failure processes under quasistatic and dynamic loading, some distinct differences in the white patch geometry and initiation load are observed. In addition, the extent of the compressive failure zones around the contact points between the loading platens and specimens is found to increase with the strain rate.

  1. Unified tensile fracture criterion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z F; Eckert, J

    2005-03-11

    We find that the classical failure criteria, i.e., maximum normal stress criterion, Tresca criterion, Mohr-Coulomb criterion, and von Mises criterion, cannot satisfactorily explain the tensile fracture behavior of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials. For a better description, we propose an ellipse criterion as a new failure criterion to unify the four classical criteria above and apply it to exemplarily describe the tensile fracture behavior of BMGs as well as a variety of other materials. It is suggested that each of the classical failure criteria can be unified by the present ellipse criterion depending on the difference of the ratio alpha=tau(0)/sigma(0).

  2. Measurement error of Young’s modulus considering the gravity and thermal expansion of thin specimens for in situ tensile testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhichao; Zhao, Hongwei; Ren, Luquan

    2016-06-01

    Most miniature in situ tensile devices compatible with scanning/transmission electron microscopes or optical microscopes adopt a horizontal layout. In order to analyze and calculate the measurement error of the tensile Young’s modulus, the effects of gravity and temperature changes, which would respectively lead to and intensify the bending deformation of thin specimens, are considered as influencing factors. On the basis of a decomposition method of static indeterminacy, equations of simplified deflection curves are obtained and, accordingly, the actual gage length is confirmed. By comparing the effects of uniaxial tensile load on the change of the deflection curve with gravity, the relation between the actual and directly measured tensile Young’s modulus is obtained. Furthermore, the quantitative effects of ideal gage length l o, temperature change ΔT and the density ρ of the specimen on the modulus difference and modulus ratio are calculated. Specimens with larger l o and ρ present more obvious measurement errors for Young’s modulus, but the effect of ΔT is not significant. The calculation method of Young’s modulus is particularly suitable for thin specimens.

  3. Evaluating Freeze-Thaw Deterioration with Tensile Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, A. J. K.; Boyd, A. J.

    2017-06-01

    Freeze-thaw damage is one of the leading contributors to infrastructure deterioration in temperate northern climates. Deterioration caused by freeze-thaw cycling is primarily induced by hydraulic pressures within the hydrated cement paste matrix that cause tensile cracking. Such damage should, therefore, be more effectively detected with tensile testing. This work presents the detection and evaluation of ongoing freeze-thaw (F/T) damage in plain concrete cylinders using the pressure tensile strength test, as it compares to compressive strength evaluation. Pressure tension test results exhibited significantly higher levels of deterioration compared to compression testing, with the samples losing up to 90% of their undamaged tensile capacity. Moreover, it was shown that tensile strength testing is far more sensitive to freeze-thaw deterioration, evidenced by a significant drop in the tensile to compressive strength ratio to below 5%.

  4. Dynamic leaching test of personal computer components.

    PubMed

    Li, Yadong; Richardson, Jay B; Niu, Xiaojun; Jackson, Ollie J; Laster, Jeremy D; Walker, Aaron K

    2009-11-15

    A dynamic leaching test (DLT) was developed and used to evaluate the leaching of toxic substances for electronic waste in the environment. The major components in personal computers (PCs) including motherboards, hard disc drives, floppy disc drives, and compact disc drives were tested. The tests lasted for 2 years for motherboards and 1.5 year for the disc drives. The extraction fluids for the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) were used as the DLT leaching solutions. A total of 18 elements including Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Ni, Pd, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, and Zn were analyzed in the DLT leachates. Only Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb, and Zn were commonly found in the DLT leachates of the PC components. Their leaching levels were much higher in TCLP extraction fluid than in SPLP extraction fluid. The toxic heavy metal Pb was found to continuously leach out of the components over the entire test periods. The cumulative amounts of Pb leached out of the motherboards in TCLP extraction fluid reached 2.0 g per motherboard over the 2-year test period, and that in SPLP extraction fluid were 75-90% less. The leaching rates or levels of Pb were largely affected by the content of galvanized steel in the PC components. The higher was the steel content, the lower the Pb leaching rate would be. The findings suggest that the obsolete PCs disposed of in landfills or discarded in the environment continuously release Pb for years when subjected to landfill leachate or rains.

  5. Experimental Testing of Dynamically Optimized Photoelectron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; Dunning, M.; England, R. J.; Musumeci, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Fillipetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Palumbo, L.; Vicario, C.; Serafini, L.; Jones, S.

    2006-11-27

    We discuss the design of and initial results from an experiment in space-charge dominated beam dynamics which explores a new regime of high-brightness electron beam generation at the SPARC photoinjector. The scheme under study employs the tendency of intense electron beams to rearrange to produce uniform density, giving a nearly ideal beam from the viewpoint of space charge-induced emittance. The experiments are aimed at testing the marriage of this idea with a related concept, emittance compensation. We show that this new regime of operating photoinjector may be the preferred method of obtaining highest brightness beams with lower energy spread. We discuss the design of the experiment, including developing of a novel time-dependent, aerogel-based imaging system. This system has been installed at SPARC, and first evidence for nearly uniformly filled ellipsoidal charge distributions recorded.

  6. Experimental Testing of Dynamically Optimized Photoelectron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; Dunning, M.; England, R. J.; Musumeci, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Fillipetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.; Vicario, C.; Jones, S.

    2006-11-01

    We discuss the design of and initial results from an experiment in space-charge dominated beam dynamics which explores a new regime of high-brightness electron beam generation at the SPARC photoinjector. The scheme under study employs the tendency of intense electron beams to rearrange to produce uniform density, giving a nearly ideal beam from the viewpoint of space charge-induced emittance. The experiments are aimed at testing the marriage of this idea with a related concept, emittance compensation. We show that this new regime of operating photoinjector may be the preferred method of obtaining highest brightness beams with lower energy spread. We discuss the design of the experiment, including developing of a novel time-dependent, aerogel-based imaging system. This system has been installed at SPARC, and first evidence for nearly uniformly filled ellipsoidal charge distributions recorded.

  7. Testing particle filters on convective scale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslehner, Mylene; Craig, George. C.; Janjic, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    Particle filters have been developed in recent years to deal with highly nonlinear dynamics and non Gaussian error statistics that also characterize data assimilation on convective scales. In this work we explore the use of the efficient particle filter (P.v. Leeuwen, 2011) for convective scale data assimilation application. The method is tested in idealized setting, on two stochastic models. The models were designed to reproduce some of the properties of convection, for example the rapid development and decay of convective clouds. The first model is a simple one-dimensional, discrete state birth-death model of clouds (Craig and Würsch, 2012). For this model, the efficient particle filter that includes nudging the variables shows significant improvement compared to Ensemble Kalman Filter and Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) particle filter. The success of the combination of nudging and resampling, measured as RMS error with respect to the 'true state', is proportional to the nudging intensity. Significantly, even a very weak nudging intensity brings notable improvement over SIR. The second model is a modified version of a stochastic shallow water model (Würsch and Craig 2013), which contains more realistic dynamical characteristics of convective scale phenomena. Using the efficient particle filter and different combination of observations of the three field variables (wind, water 'height' and rain) allows the particle filter to be evaluated in comparison to a regime where only nudging is used. Sensitivity to the properties of the model error covariance is also considered. Finally, criteria are identified under which the efficient particle filter outperforms nudging alone. References: Craig, G. C. and M. Würsch, 2012: The impact of localization and observation averaging for convective-scale data assimilation in a simple stochastic model. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.,139, 515-523. Van Leeuwen, P. J., 2011: Efficient non-linear data assimilation in geophysical

  8. Nondestructive characterization of tie-rods by means of dynamic testing, added masses and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentilini, C.; Marzani, A.; Mazzotti, M.

    2013-01-01

    The structural characterization of tie-rods is crucial for the safety assessments of historical buildings. The main parameters that characterize the behavior of tie-rods are the tensile force, the modulus of elasticity of the material and the rotational stiffness at both restraints. Several static, static-dynamic and pure dynamic nondestructive methods have been proposed in the last decades to identify such parameters. However, none of them is able to characterize all the four mentioned parameters. To fill this gap, in this work a procedure based on dynamic testing, added masses and genetic algorithms (GA) is proposed. The identification is driven by GA where the objective function is a metric of the discrepancy between the experimentally determined (by dynamic impact testing) and the numerically computed (by a fast and reliable finite element formulation) frequencies of vibration of some modified systems obtained from the tie-rod by adding a concentrated mass in specific positions. It is shown by a comprehensive numerical testing campaign in which several cases spanning from short, low-stressed, and almost hinged tie-rods to long, high-tensioned, and nearly clamped tie-rods, that the proposed strategy is reliable in the identification of the four unknowns. Finally, the procedure has been applied to characterize a metallic tie-rod located in Palazzo Paleotti, Bologna (Italy).

  9. Viking Mars lander 1975 dynamic test model/orbiter developmental test model forced vibration test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, J.; Brownlee, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Viking Mars Lander 1975 dynamic test model and orbiter developmental test model were subjected to forced vibration sine tests. Flight acceptance (FA) and type approval (TA) test levels were applied to the spacecraft structure in a longitudinal test configuration using a 133,440-N (30,000-lb) force shaker. Testing in the two lateral axes (X, Y) was performed at lower levels using four 667-N (150-lb) force shakers. Forced vibration qualification (TA) test levels were successfully imposed on the spacecraft at frequencies down to 10 Hz. Measured responses showed the same character as analytical predictions, and correlation was reasonably good. Because of control system test tolerances, orbiter primary structure generally did not reach the design load limits attained in earlier static testing. A post-test examination of critical orbiter structure disclosed no apparent damage to the structure as a result of the test environment.

  10. Experimental Testing of Dynamically Optimized Photoelectron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; Dunning, M.; England, R. J.; Musumeci, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Pirro, G. Di; Ferrario, M.; Fillipetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.; Vicario, C.

    2007-09-01

    We discuss the design of and initial results from an experiment in space-charge dominated beam dynamics which explores a new regime of high-brightness electron beam generation at the SPARC (located at INFN-LNF, Frascati) photoinjector. The scheme under study employs the natural tendency in intense electron beams to configure themselves to produce a uniform density, giving a nearly ideal beam from the viewpoint of space charge-induced emittance. The experiments are aimed at testing the marriage of this idea with a related concept, emittance compensation, We show that the existing infrastructure at SPARC is nearly ideal for the proposed tests, and that this new regime of operating photoinjector may be the preferred method of obtaining highest brightness beams with lower energy spread. We discuss the design of the experiment, including developing of a novel time-dependent, aerogel-based imaging system. This system has been installed at SPARC, and first evidence for nearly uniformly filled ellipsoidal charge distributions recorded.

  11. Experimental Testing of Dynamically Optimized Photoelectron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Cook, A. M.; Dunning, M.; England, R. J.; Musumeci, P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Boscolo, M.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Fillipetto, D.; Gatti, G.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.; Vicario, C.

    We discuss the design of and initial results from an experiment in space-charge dominated beam dynamics which explores a new regime of high-brightness electron beam generation at the SPARC (located at INFN-LNF, Frascati) photoinjector. The scheme under study employs the natural tendency in intense electron beams to configure themselves to produce a uniform density, giving a nearly ideal beam from the viewpoint of space charge-induced emittance. The experiments are aimed at testing the marriage of this idea with a related concept, emittance compensation, We show that the existing infrastructure at SPARC is nearly ideal for the proposed tests, and that this new regime of operating photoinjector may be the preferred method of obtaining highest brightness beams with lower energy spread. We discuss the design of the experiment, including developing of a novel time-dependent, aerogel-based imaging system. This system has been installed at SPARC, and first evidence for nearly uniformly filled ellipsoidal charge distributions recorded.

  12. Tensile test of a silicon microstructure fully coated with submicrometer-thick diamond like carbon film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenlei; Uesugi, Akio; Hirai, Yoshikazu; Tsuchiya, Toshiyuki; Tabata, Osamu

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the tensile properties of single-crystal silicon (SCS) microstructures fully coated with sub-micrometer thick diamond like carbon (DLC) film using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). To minimize the deformations or damages caused by non-uniform coating of DLC, which has high compression residual stress, released SCS specimens with the dimensions of 120 µm long, 4 µm wide, and 5 µm thick were coated from the top and bottom side simultaneously. The thickness of DLC coating is around 150 nm and three different bias voltages were used for deposition. The tensile strength improved from 13.4 to 53.5% with the increasing of negative bias voltage. In addition, the deviation in strength also reduced significantly compared to bare SCS sample.

  13. Effect of yttrium additions on the elevated-temperature tensile properties and hardness of an advanced iron-nickel-chromium LMFBR cladding and duct alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, M.H.

    1981-10-01

    The effect of the addition of yttrium on the elevated temperature tensile properties and hardness of an Fe-34% Ni-12% Cr candidate LMFBR cladding and duct alloy was investigated. Tensile tests were performed from room temperature to 800/sup 0/C in 100/sup 0/C steps at strain rates of 2.2 x 10/sup -3/ and 2.2 x 10/sup -4/ sec/sup -1/. Hardness tests were performed from room temperature to 850/sup 0/C in 50/sup 0/C steps. The addition of 0.1% yttrium decreased the yield stress and ultimate tensile stress in the test temperature range employed. Hardness also decreased over this test temperature range. In tensile tests, dynamic strain aging behavior occurred both for the undoped and doped alloy in the temperature range from 200 to 600/sup 0/C and 300 to 600/sup 0/C for the lower and higher strain rate, respectively.

  14. Tensile properties of irradiated surveillance coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1994-06-01

    Tensile testing of austenitic steel and superalloy samples irradiated in the HMO 13 assembly was performed in support of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Surveillance Program. Postirradiation yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, uniform elongation, total elongation, and reduction in area of 304 stainless steel (SS), 308 SS weld, 316 SS, A286, In718, and In718 weld were determined. Results showed the strength of austenitic steels increased while the ductility decreased as a result of irradiation. Low irradiation exposure produced little property change in In718. Overall, the tensile properties of HMO 13 surveillance coupons showed a lower magnitude of irradiation-induced property change than was expected based on earlier studies. Results from these tests gave no indications of unexpectedly severe irradiation damage to FFTF components.

  15. Testing Modified Newtonian Dynamics with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkel, Christian; Kemble, Steve; Bevis, Neil; Magueijo, Joao

    2012-12-01

    We suggest that LISA Pathfinder, a technology demonstrator for the future gravitational wave observatory LISA, could be used to carry out a direct experimental test of Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND). The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft is currently being built and the launch date is just a few years away. No modifications of the spacecraft are required, nor any interference with its nominal mission. The basic concept is to fly LISA Pathfinder through the region around the Sun-Earth saddle point, in an extended mission phase, once the original mission goals are achieved. We examine various strategies to reach the saddle point, and find that the preferred strategy, yielding relatively short transfer times of just over 1 year, probably involves a lunar fly-by. LISA Pathfinder will be able to probe the intermediate MOND regime, i.e. the transition between deep MOND and Newtonian gravity. We present robust estimates of the anomalous gravity gradients that LISA Pathfinder should be exposed to, based on MONDian effects as derived from the Tensor-Vector-Scalar (TeVeS) theory. The spacecraft speed and spatial scale of the MOND signal combine in a way that the spectral signature of the signal falls precisely into LISA Pathfinder's measurement bandwidth. We find that if the gravity gradiometer on-board the spacecraft achieves its currently predicted sensitivity, these anomalous gradients could not just be detected, but measured in some detail.

  16. Improved Tensile Adhesion Specimens for High Strength Epoxy Systems in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, M. Reed; McLennan, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    An improved tensile adhesion button has been designed and tested that results in higher measured tensile adhesion strength while providing increased capability for testing high strength epoxy adhesive systems. The best attributes of two well-established tensile button designs were combined and refined into an optimized tensile button. The most significant design change to the tensile button was to improve alignment of the bonded tensile button specimens during tensile testing by changing the interface between the tensile button and the tensile test machine. The established or old button design uses a test fixture that pulls from a grooved annulus or anvil head while the new button design pulls from a threaded hole in the centerline of the button. Finite element (FE) analysis showed that asymmetric loading of the established anvil head tensile button significantly increases the stress concentration in the adhesive, causing failure at lower tensile test loads. The new tensile button was designed to eliminate asymmetric loading and eliminate misalignment sensitivity. Enhanced alignment resulted in improved tensile adhesion strength measurement up to 13.8 MPa (2000psi) over the established button design. Another design change increased the capability of the button by increasing the threaded hole diameter allowing it to test high strength epoxy systems up to 85 MPa(less than 12,000 psi). The improved tensile button can be used in button- to-button or button-to-panel configurations.

  17. An experimental evaluation of the tensile strength of impact ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xian, X.; Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1989-01-01

    The evaluation of the tensile strength of impact built-up ice on structural components has been prompted by such problems as electrical transmission line losses and catastrophic failures in Arctic regions, deicing problems with fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, etc. It is demonstrated that the conventional tensile-testing technique furnishes adequate data on artificially refrigerated ice, and helps establish the influence of extrinsic factors on ice tensile strength.

  18. An experimental evaluation of the tensile strength of impact ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xian, X.; Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    1989-01-01

    The evaluation of the tensile strength of impact built-up ice on structural components has been prompted by such problems as electrical transmission line losses and catastrophic failures in Arctic regions, deicing problems with fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, etc. It is demonstrated that the conventional tensile-testing technique furnishes adequate data on artificially refrigerated ice, and helps establish the influence of extrinsic factors on ice tensile strength.

  19. Dataset of tensile strength development of concrete with manufactured sand.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shunbo; Hu, Feijia; Ding, Xinxin; Zhao, Mingshuang; Li, Changyong; Pei, Songwei

    2017-04-01

    This article presents 755 groups splitting tensile strength tests data of concrete with manufactured sand (MSC) in different curing age ranged from 1 day to 388 days related to the research article "Experimental study on tensile strength development of concrete with manufactured sand" (Zhao et al., 2017) [1]. These data were used to evaluate the precision of the prediction formulas of tensile strength of MSC, and can be applied as dataset for further studies.

  20. Tensile properties of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Lyon, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    The importance of textile composite materials in aerospace structural applications has been gaining momentum in recent years. With a view to better understand the suitability of these materials in aerospace applications, an experimental program was undertaken to assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Specifically, the braided textile preforms were infiltrated with suitable polymeric matrices leading to the fabrication of composite test coupons. Evaluation of the tensile properties and the analyses of the results in the form of strength moduli, Poisson's ratio, etc., for the braided composites are presented. Based on our past experience with the textile coupons, the fabrication techniques have been modified (by incorporating glass microballoons in the matrix and/or by stabilizing the braid angle along the length of the specimen with axial fibers) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of the textile composites. This paper outlines the preliminary experimental results obtained from testing these composites.

  1. Structural dynamic testing of the Engineering Test Satellite-IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraki, K.; Mitsuma, H.; Matsushita, T.; Izumi, H.

    The Engineering Test Satellite-IV (ETS-IV) was the first large scale spacecraft developed and launched successfully in Japan on a new N-II launch vehicle. This paper presents an approach taken for the structural development of the ETS-IV. Extensive structural tests were performed to demonstrate that the ETS-IV spacecraft meets all design requirements and will survive all critical environments. Details of the static load test, vibration tests, acoustic test, and pyrotechnic shock test were described. The test results were compared with analyses and measured flight data.

  2. Mechanical properties of LaFe11.5Si1.5/Cu negative thermal composite and its application as clamp materials for tensile test at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Y.; Huang, R.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, C.; Li, L.

    2017-09-01

    La (Fe, Si)13 compounds have been widely studied for their excellent negative thermal expansion (NTE) properties. However, their poor mechanical properties limit their practical applications. In this work, LaFe11.5Si1.5/Cu material was fabricated. It was found that the NTE behavior occurs obviously at cryogenic temperatures and the ratio of ΔL/L can reach to 0.12%. Mechanical tests indicated that the absolute value of compressive strength at 77K and 300K is 365MPa and 222MPa, respectively. The elastic modulus at 77K and 300K is -109GPa and -87GPa, respectively. In addition, the average hardness is 337Hv performed in the Vickers hardness tester. Loose between the samples and clamps in the tensile test due to the contraction of clamp at low temperatures remains a big issue. In order to solve this problem, some LaFe11.5Si1.5/Cu NTE sheets are added between the clamp and the tested samples. Results showed that the samples with NTE materials sheets embedded is held tighter by the clamp. The maximum force of the tensile test is 9.77N and 5.48N, respectively, which illustrates that the adding of NTE material does make sense.

  3. A predictive model of the tensile strength of twisted carbon nanotube yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Seung-Yeol; Jang, Jinhyeok; Koo, Bon-Woong; Kim, Young-Woon; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2017-01-01

    Due to the outstanding mechanical properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale, CNT yarns are expected to demonstrate high strength at the macroscale. In this study, a predictable model was developed to predict the tensile strength of twisted CNT yarns. First, the failure mechanism of twisted CNT yarns was investigated using in situ tensile tests and ex situ observations. It was revealed that CNT bundles, which are groups of CNTs that are tightly bound together, formed during tensile loading, leaving some voids around the bundles. Failure of the CNT yarns occurred as the CNT bundles were pulled out of the yarns. Two stresses that determined the tensile strength of the CNT yarns were identified: interfacial shear and frictional stresses originating from van der Waals interactions, and the lateral pressure generated by the twisted yarn structure. Molecular dynamics and yarn mechanics were used to calculate these two stresses. Finally, the tensile strength of CNT yarns was predicted and compared with experimental data, showing reasonable agreement.

  4. A predictive model of the tensile strength of twisted carbon nanotube yarns.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seung-Yeol; Jang, Jinhyeok; Koo, Bon-Woong; Kim, Young-Woon; Yu, Woong-Ryeol

    2017-01-06

    Due to the outstanding mechanical properties of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at the nanoscale, CNT yarns are expected to demonstrate high strength at the macroscale. In this study, a predictable model was developed to predict the tensile strength of twisted CNT yarns. First, the failure mechanism of twisted CNT yarns was investigated using in situ tensile tests and ex situ observations. It was revealed that CNT bundles, which are groups of CNTs that are tightly bound together, formed during tensile loading, leaving some voids around the bundles. Failure of the CNT yarns occurred as the CNT bundles were pulled out of the yarns. Two stresses that determined the tensile strength of the CNT yarns were identified: interfacial shear and frictional stresses originating from van der Waals interactions, and the lateral pressure generated by the twisted yarn structure. Molecular dynamics and yarn mechanics were used to calculate these two stresses. Finally, the tensile strength of CNT yarns was predicted and compared with experimental data, showing reasonable agreement.

  5. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Ground load dynamic tests. 23.726 Section 23.726 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...

  6. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Ground load dynamic tests. 23.726 Section 23.726 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...

  7. Need for Instruction: Dynamic Testing in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosma, Tirza; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of dynamic testing in the measuring of children's need for instruction and to explore responses of special education teachers to dynamic testing results. Thirty-six 10-12-year-old children with a moderate to mild intellectual disability and their teachers participated. Children in the…

  8. Need for Instruction: Dynamic Testing in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosma, Tirza; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of dynamic testing in the measuring of children's need for instruction and to explore responses of special education teachers to dynamic testing results. Thirty-six 10-12-year-old children with a moderate to mild intellectual disability and their teachers participated. Children in the…

  9. Dynamic materials testing and constitutive modeling of structural sheet steel for automotive applications. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, C.M.; Chen, S.R.; Gray, G.T. III

    1996-08-23

    The objective of this study was to characterize the dynamic mechanical properties of four different structural sheet steels used in automobile manufacture. The analysis of a drawing quality, special killed (DQSK) mild steel; high strength, low alloy (HSLA) steel; interstitial free (IF); and a high strength steel (M-190) have been completed. In addition to the true stress-true strain data, coefficients for the Johnson-Cook, Zerilli-Armstrong, and Mechanical Threshold Stress constitutive models have been determined from the mechanical test results at various strain rates and temperatures and are summarized. Compression, tensile, and biaxial bulge tests and low (below 0.1/s) strain rate tests were completed for all four steels. From these test results it was determined to proceed with the material modeling optimization using the through thickness compression results. Compression tests at higher strain rates and temperatures were also conducted and analyzed for all the steels. Constitutive model fits were generated from the experimental data. This report provides a compilation of information generated from mechanical tests, the fitting parameters for each of the constitutive models, and an index and description of data files.

  10. High-Tensile Strength Tape Versus High-Tensile Strength Suture: A Biomechanical Study.

    PubMed

    Gnandt, Ryan J; Smith, Jennifer L; Nguyen-Ta, Kim; McDonald, Lucas; LeClere, Lance E

    2016-02-01

    To determine which suture design, high-tensile strength tape or high-tensile strength suture, performed better at securing human tissue across 4 selected suture techniques commonly used in tendinous repair, by comparing the total load at failure measured during a fixed-rate longitudinal single load to failure using a biomechanical testing machine. Matched sets of tendon specimens with bony attachments were dissected from 15 human cadaveric lower extremities in a manner allowing for direct comparison testing. With the use of selected techniques (simple Mason-Allen in the patellar tendon specimens, whip stitch in the quadriceps tendon specimens, and Krackow stitch in the Achilles tendon specimens), 1 sample of each set was sutured with a 2-mm braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength tape and the other with a No. 2 braided, nonabsorbable, high-tensile strength suture. A total of 120 specimens were tested. Each model was loaded to failure at a fixed longitudinal traction rate of 100 mm/min. The maximum load and failure method were recorded. In the whip stitch and the Krackow-stitch models, the high-tensile strength tape had a significantly greater mean load at failure with a difference of 181 N (P = .001) and 94 N (P = .015) respectively. No significant difference was found in the Mason-Allen and simple stitch models. Pull-through remained the most common method of failure at an overall rate of 56.7% (suture = 55%; tape = 58.3%). In biomechanical testing during a single load to failure, high-tensile strength tape performs more favorably than high-tensile strength suture, with a greater mean load to failure, in both the whip- and Krackow-stitch models. Although suture pull-through remains the most common method of failure, high-tensile strength tape requires a significantly greater load to pull-through in a whip-stitch and Krakow-stitch model. The biomechanical data obtained in the current study indicates that high-tensile strength tape may provide better repair

  11. Tensile and shear strength of adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stibolt, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    This experiment is conducted in a freshman-level course: Introduction to Engineering Materials. There are no prerequisites for the course although students should have some knowledge of basic algebra. The objectives are to tension and shear test adhesives and to determine the tensile and shear properties of adhesives. Details of equipment of procedure are given.

  12. Dynamic Multivariate Accelerated Corrosion Test Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    include the development of a test chamber, modified to include the synergistic effects of UV and ozone and the exposure of bare and coated samples to yield...prediction of performance lifetime based upon a relatively short timeframe accelerated test. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Corrosion, ozone , ultraviolet...modified to include the synergistic effects of UV and ozone and the exposure of bare and coated samples to yield an accelerated corrosion test. This test

  13. Low-Temperature Mechanical Properties Of Fe-0.06c-18cr-10ni-0.4ti Austenitic Steel Determined Using Ring-Pull Tensile Tests And Microhardness Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neustroev, V. S.; Boev, E. V.; Garner, Francis A.

    2007-03-01

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels removed from Russian water-cooled VVERs experience irradia-tion temperatures and He/dpa conditions that are very similar to steels to be used in ITER. Data are presented on the radiation hardening of the Russian analog of AISI 321 at 0.2 to 15 dpa in the range of 285 to 320оС. The Russian variant of the ring-pull tensile test was used to obtain mechanical prop-erty data. Microhardness tests on the ring specimens provide useful information throughout the de-formed regions, but at high hardening levels caution must be exercised before application of a widely accepted hardness-yield stress correlation to prediction of tensile properties. Low-nickel austenitic steels are very prone to form deformation martensite, a phase that increases strongly with the larger deformation levels characteristic of microhardness tests, especially when compared to the 0.2% de-formation used to define yield stress.

  14. Dynamics Explorer twin spacecraft under evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmond, C.

    1981-01-01

    The Dynamics Explorer A and B satellites designed to explore the interactive processes occuring between the magnetosphere and Earth's ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and plasmasphere are described. Effects of these interactions, satellite orbits, data collecting antennas, solar power systems, axes, configurations, and Earth based command, control and data display systems are mentioned.

  15. Dynamics of thematic activation in recognition testing

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Muntean, William J.; Smith, Troy A.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the effects of spreading semantic activation during a recognition test. In Experiment 1, activation spreading during testing from words that were thematic associates of unstudied critical words yielded a linear increase in false alarms to such critical words as the number of tested associates increased, regardless of whether the theme appeared during study or whether any thematic processing occurred during study at all. In Experiment 2, with the number of tested associates held constant, false alarms to critical words from unstudied themes increased linearly with the strength of association between the critical word and its tested associates, consistent with predictions of spreading activation theory. However, for studied themes, testing weaker or stronger associates yielded similar rates of such false alarms, contrary to spreading activation theory. These results suggest that test-induced thematic priming is driven by spreading activation for unstudied themes but by thematic reactivation for studied themes. PMID:20551358

  16. Mechanical shear and tensile characteristics of selected biomass stems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mechanical characteristics (stress and energy of tensile and shear modes) of selected biomass stems, such as big bluestem, bromegrass, and Barlow wheat were determined. A high capacity MTI-100K universal testing machine attached with standard tensile clamps and designed fabricated double-shear devic...

  17. Quantitative respirator fit testing: dynamic pressure versus aerosol measurement.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D R; Willeke, K

    1988-10-01

    A noninvasive, fast, inexpensive new fit testing method has been invented which relates the slope of the pressure decay inside a respirator during breath-holding to the fit of the respirator on the wearer's face. The dynamic pressure test has been compared with the conventional aerosol test at different leakage levels. The results of this comparison show that the sensitivity of the dynamic pressure test is similar to that of the aerosol test. The pressure test, however, is independent of leak site and probe location and can be performed on respirators before and after their use.

  18. Subsonic Dynamic Stability Tests of a Sample Return Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael; Johnson, R. Keith

    2006-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to determine the subsonic dynamic stability characteristics of a proposed atmospheric entry vehicle for sample return missions. In particular, the effects of changes in aft-body geometry on stability were examined. Freeflying tests of a dynamically scaled model with various geometric features were conducted, including cases in which the model was perturbed to measure dynamic response. Both perturbed and non-perturbed runs were recorded as motion time histories using the VST optical data acquisition system and reduced for post-test analysis. In addition, preliminary results from a static force and moment test of a similar model in the Langley 12-Foot Low Speed Tunnel are presented. Results indicate that the configuration is dynamically stable for the baseline geometry, but exhibits degraded dynamic behavior for the geometry modifications tested.

  19. Effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on tensile properties of laser welded joint of high strength steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Daimaruya, M.; Tsuda, H.; Horikawa, K.

    2006-08-01

    The impact tensile properties of laser welded butt joints of two kinds of high strength steel plates with the tensile strength level of 590 MPa and 780 MPa (denoted by HR590 and HR780, respectively), were investigated using split Hopkinson bar tensile testing apparatus. Impact tension tests for the joint specimens pre-fatigued were also carried out to examine the effect of pre-fatigue. There were no significant effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on the dynamic and quasi-static tensile strength of laser welded butt joints. However, the decrease in the elongation of HR780 welded joints subjected high cycle pre-fatigue was observed only at a high strain-rate. From the observation of fracture surface, it was found that the decrease in the elongation may be caused by a number of damages due to the combination of high cycle pre-fatigue and high strain-rate.

  20. Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl P.; Martinez, Daniel Tito; Gray, George T. III

    2012-06-07

    The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

  1. Overview of Dynamic Test Techniques for Flight Dynamics Research at NASA LaRC (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, D. Bruce; Brandon, Jay M.; Croom, Mark A.; Fremaux, C. Michael; Heim, Eugene H.; Vicroy, Dan D.

    2006-01-01

    An overview of dynamic test techniques used at NASA Langley Research Center on scale models to obtain a comprehensive flight dynamics characterization of aerospace vehicles is presented. Dynamic test techniques have been used at Langley Research Center since the 1920s. This paper will provide a partial overview of the current techniques available at Langley Research Center. The paper will discuss the dynamic scaling necessary to address the often hard-to-achieve similitude requirements for these techniques. Dynamic test techniques are categorized as captive, wind tunnel single degree-of-freedom and free-flying, and outside free-flying. The test facilities, technique specifications, data reduction, issues and future work are presented for each technique. The battery of tests conducted using the Blended Wing Body aircraft serves to illustrate how the techniques, when used together, are capable of characterizing the flight dynamics of a vehicle over a large range of critical flight conditions.

  2. Static and Dynamic Testing of Interceptor Substructures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    0 0 c; C’- 410 +3) M% NIVVULS 00 a).* 4- 0 - 00M V IL 0 0 w0 Le4. 0 4.-E 0c a) .0 Lo. 0 C z 0or > 410 U0 Q4 o 4- 0xr 0~ Cs 0 CL CD " F. " -L7,- ox I...were filled with stellite , an . extremely hard surfacing steel, and refinished. - ’ 4.5 Dynamic Axial Loading: Boron/Aluminum Frustum A loading rate of

  3. Analyses of the dynamic docking test system for advanced mission docking system test programs. [Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.; Williams, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Results are given of analytical studies performed in support of the design, implementation, checkout and use of NASA's dynamic docking test system (DDTS). Included are analyses of simulator components, a list of detailed operational test procedures, a summary of simulator performance, and an analysis and comparison of docking dynamics and loads obtained by test and analysis.

  4. Dynamic tests of composite panels of an aircraft wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splichal, Jan; Pistek, Antonin; Hlinka, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    The paper describes the analysis of aerospace composite structures under dynamic loading. Today, it is common to use design procedures based on assumption of static loading only, and dynamic loading is rarely assumed and applied in design and certification of aerospace structures. The paper describes the application of dynamic loading for the design of aircraft structures, and the validation of the procedure on a selected structure. The goal is to verify the possibility of reducing the weight through improved design/modelling processes using dynamic loading instead of static loading. The research activity focuses on the modelling and testing of a composite panel representing a local segment of an aircraft wing section, investigating in particular the buckling behavior under dynamic loading. Finite Elements simulation tools are discussed, as well as the advantages of using a digital optical measurement system for the evaluation of the tests. The comparison of the finite element simulations with the results of the tests is presented.

  5. Theoretical investigations into the influence of the position of a breaking line on the tensile failure of flat, round, bevel-edged tablets using finite element methodology (FEM) and its practical relevance for industrial tablet strength testing.

    PubMed

    Podczeck, Fridrun; Newton, J Michael; Fromme, Paul

    2014-12-30

    Flat, round tablets may have a breaking ("score") line. Pharmacopoeial tablet breaking load tests are diametral in their design, and industrially used breaking load testers often have automatic tablet feeding systems, which position the tablets between the loading platens of the machine with the breaking lines in random orientation to the applied load. The aim of this work was to ascertain the influence of the position of the breaking line in a diametral compression test using finite element methodology (FEM) and to compare the theoretical results with practical findings using commercially produced bevel-edged, scored tablets. Breaking line test positions at an angle of 0°, 22.5°, 45°, 67.5° and 90° relative to the loading plane were studied. FEM results obtained for fully elastic and elasto-plastic tablets were fairly similar, but they highlighted large differences in stress distributions depending on the position of the breaking line. The stress values at failure were predicted to be similar for tablets tested at an angle of 45° or above, whereas at lower test angles the predicted breaking loads were up to three times larger. The stress distributions suggested that not all breaking line angles would result in clean tensile failure. Practical results, however, did not confirm the differences in the predicted breaking loads, but they confirmed differences in the way tablets broke. The results suggest that it is not advisable to convert breaking loads obtained on scored tablets into tablet tensile strength values, and comparisons between different tablets or batches should carefully consider the orientation of the breaking line with respect to the loading plane, as the failure mechanisms appear to vary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic Assessment: An Approach Toward Reducing Test Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Jerry S.; Wiedl, Karl Heinz

    Through dynamic testing (the notion that tailored testing can be extended to the use of a learning oriented approach to assessment), analysis were made of how motivational, personality, and cognitive style factors interact with assessment approaches to yield performance data. Testing procedures involving simple feedback, elaborated feedback, and…

  7. Dynamic Test Generation for Large Binary Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-12

    Dalal and Mallows framed this question as a size-dependent sequential search problem, in which each bug has a different probability of being found, or...observed size for each bug. We could then derive for each test run the cutoff according to the Dalal and Mallows rule, then run for, say, twice that number...Software En- gineering). ACM, May 2005. [27] S. R. Dalal and C. L. Mallows . When should one stop testing software. j-J-AM-STAT- ASSOC, 83(403):872–879

  8. Testing Lorentz symmetry with planetary orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hees, A.; Bailey, Q. G.; Le Poncin-Lafitte, C.; Bourgoin, A.; Rivoldini, A.; Lamine, B.; Meynadier, F.; Guerlin, C.; Wolf, P.

    2015-09-01

    Planetary ephemerides are a very powerful tool to constrain deviations from the theory of general relativity (GR) using orbital dynamics. The effective field theory framework called the Standard-Model Extension (SME) has been developed in order to systematically parametrize hypothetical violations of Lorentz symmetry (in the Standard Model and in the gravitational sector). In this communication, we use the latest determinations of the supplementary advances of the perihelia and of the nodes obtained by planetary ephemerides analysis to constrain SME coefficients from the pure gravity sector and also from gravity-matter couplings. Our results do not show any deviation from GR and they improve current constraints. Moreover, combinations with existing constraints from Lunar Laser Ranging and from atom interferometry gravimetry allow us to disentangle contributions from the pure gravity sector from the gravity-matter couplings.

  9. Investigation of the Microstructure Evolution in a Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C Steel via In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction during a Tensile Test.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Song, Wenwen; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2017-09-25

    The quantitative characterization of the microstructure evolution in high-Mn steel during deformation is of great importance to understanding its strain-hardening behavior. In the current study, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was employed to characterize the microstructure evolution in a Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel during a tensile test. The microstructure at different engineering strain levels-in terms of ε-martensite and α'-martensite volume fractions, the stacking fault probability, and the twin fault probability-was analyzed by the Rietveld refinement method. The Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel exhibits a high ultimate tensile strength with a superior uniform elongation and a high strain-hardening rate. The remaining high strain-hardening rate at the strain level about 0.025 to 0.35 results from ε-martensite dominant transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) effect. The increase in the strain-hardening rate at the strain level around 0.35 to 0.43 is attributed to the synergetic α'-martensite dominant TRIP and twinning-induced-plasticity (TWIP) effects. An evaluation of the stacking fault energy (SFE) of the Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel by the synchrotron measurements shows good agreement with the thermodynamic calculation of the SFE.

  10. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  11. 14 CFR 23.726 - Ground load dynamic tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.726 Ground load dynamic tests. (a) If compliance with the ground load requirements of...); or (2) Sufficient to develop 1.5 times the limit load factor. (b) The critical landing condition...

  12. Structural dynamics test simulation and optimization for aerospace components

    SciTech Connect

    Klenke, S.E.; Baca, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    This paper initially describes an innovative approach to product realization called Knowledge Based Testing (KBT). This research program integrates test simulation and optimization software, rapid fabrication techniques and computational model validation to support a new experimentally-based design concept. This design concept implements well defined tests earlier in the design cycle enabling the realization of highly reliable aerospace components. A test simulation and optimization software environment provides engineers with an essential tool needed to support this KBT approach. This software environment, called the Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO), integrates analysis and test based models to support optimal structural dynamic test design. A goal in developing this software tool is to provide test and analysis engineers with a capability of mathematically simulating the complete structural dynamics test environment within a computer. A developed computational model of an aerospace component can be combined with analytical and/or experimentally derived models of typical structural dynamic test instrumentation within the VETO to determine an optimal test design. The VETO provides the user with a unique analysis and visualization environment to evaluate new and existing test methods in addition to simulating specific experiments designed to maximize test based information needed to validate computational models. The results of both a modal and a vibration test design are presented for a reentry vehicle and a space truss structure.

  13. Ship Dynamics in the Surf Zone Model Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    Department Technical Report Ship Dynamics in the Surf Zone Model Testing By Miguel Quintero Faydra Schaffer N SW C C D -C IS D -2 00 8...Dynamics in the Surf Zone Model Testing 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5e. TASK...NUMBER Miguel Quintero and Faydra Schaffer 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  14. Cost effective dynamic design and test requirements for Shuttle payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloff, H. R.; Bangs, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study examining current spacecraft dynamic design and test requirements for the cost effective design and development of Shuttle payloads are presented. Dynamic environments, payload configurations, design/test requirements, test levels, assembly level of testing, simulation methods, prototype role, load limiting, test facilities, and flight measurements are discussed as they relate to the development of a cost effective design and test philosophy for Shuttle Spacelab payloads. It is concluded that changes to current design/test practices will minimize long range payload costs. However, changes to current practices need be quantitatively evaluated before an orderly progression to more cost effective methods can be achieved without undue risk of mission failures. Of major importance is optimization of test levels and plans for payloads and payload subsystems which will result in minimum project costs.

  15. Tensile Strength of Carbon/Carbon Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatta, Hiroshi; Aoi, Tatsuji; Kawahara, Itaru; Kogo, Yasuo; Shiota, Ichiro

    In order to identify ruling mechanisms of tensile fracture of Carbon/Carbon composites (C/Cs), tensile tests were carried out for various C/Cs as functions of the density, heat treatment temperature, and interfacial strength between fiber and matrix. Three processing routes of preformed yarn, resin char, and HIP processes were adopted to densify C/Cs. These C/Cs were finally heat-treated at temperatures from 2273K to 3300K. The interfacial strength between fiber and matrix was varied by the selection of processing routes. As a result, two ruling failure mechanisms were identified. At density lower than 1.6g/cm3, the tensile fracture was controlled by stress transfer capability from the matrix to reinforcing fibers. However, at higher density than 1.6g/cm3, tensile strength was primarily governed by the interfacial strength between the matrix and fibers. Thus the latter mechanism is nearly same as ceramic matrix composites.

  16. Test results from a dynamic model dynaflex rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niebanck, C. F.; Goodman, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    A one-fifth scale dynamic model of the Sikorsky Dynaflex rotor was tested in hover and in forward flight conditions in a wind tunnel. The Dynaflex rotor features an advanced composite structure which flexes to provide a constant speed universal joint action. Testing concentrated on confirming that the stability and dynamic response of the rotor were satisfactory. Lift conditions of up to .11 Ct/sigma and advance ratios as high as .46 were reached. Vibratory loads were compared to those of articulated rotors. The Dynaflex rotor concept appears to be a practical concept from the standpoint of dynamic response and stability.

  17. Discriminating chaotic and stochastic dynamics through the permutation spectrum test

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, C. W.; Zunino, L.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a new heuristic symbolic tool for unveiling chaotic and stochastic dynamics: the permutation spectrum test. Several numerical examples allow us to confirm the usefulness of the introduced methodology. Indeed, we show that it is robust in situations in which other techniques fail (intermittent chaos, hyperchaotic dynamics, stochastic linear and nonlinear correlated dynamics, and deterministic non-chaotic noise-driven dynamics). We illustrate the applicability and reliability of this pragmatic method by examining real complex time series from diverse scientific fields. Taking into account that the proposed test has the advantages of being conceptually simple and computationally fast, we think that it can be of practical utility as an alternative test for determinism.

  18. Dynamic Testing and Test Anxiety amongst Gifted and Average-Ability Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogelaar, Bart; Bakker, Merel; Elliott, Julian G.; Resing, Wilma C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dynamic testing has been proposed as a testing approach that is less disadvantageous for children who may be potentially subject to bias when undertaking conventional assessments. For example, those who encounter high levels of test anxiety, or who are unfamiliar with standardized test procedures, may fail to demonstrate their true…

  19. Dynamic Particle Growth Testing - Phase I Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z-C.

    2001-05-17

    There is clearly a great need to understand the processes of crystallization and solid scale formation that led to the shutdown of 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and could possibly cause similar problems in the future in other evaporators. Waste streams from SRS operations that enter the evaporators generally contain alkaline, sodium nitrate/nitrite-based solutions with various changing concentrations of silicates and aluminates. It has been determined. that the silicates and aluminates served as precursor reactants for forming unwanted minerals during solution evaporation, upon transport, or upon storage. Mineral forms of the Zeolite Linde A group--sodalites and cancrinite--along with gibbsite, have often been identified as contributing to deposit (scale) formation on surfaces of the 2H evaporator as well as to the formation of solid plugs in the gravity drain line and lift line. Meanwhile, solids (amorphous or crystalline minerals) are believed, without direct evidence, to form in the bulk solutions in the evaporator. In addition, the position of deposits in the 2H evaporator suggests that scale formation depends on the interplay of heat and mass transfer, hydrodynamics, and reaction mechanisms and kinetics. The origin of solid scale formation on walls could be due to heterogeneous nucleation and/or to homogeneous nucleation followed by cluster/particle deposition. Preliminary laboratory tests at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with standing metal coupons seem to support the latter mechanism for initial deposition; that is, the solid particles form in the bulk solution first and then deposit on the metal surfaces. Further buildup of deposits may involve both mechanisms: deposition and crystal growth. Therefore, there may be a direct linkage between the solid particle growth in bulk solution and the scale buildup on the wall surfaces. On the other hand, even if scale formation is due solely to a heterogeneous mechanism

  20. Dynamic testing in schizophrenia: does training change the construct validity of a test?

    PubMed

    Wiedl, Karl H; Schöttke, Henning; Green, Michael F; Nuechterlein, Keith H

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic testing typically involves specific interventions for a test to assess the extent to which test performance can be modified, beyond level of baseline (static) performance. This study used a dynamic version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) that is based on cognitive remediation techniques within a test-training-test procedure. From results of previous studies with schizophrenia patients, we concluded that the dynamic and static versions of the WCST should have different construct validity. This hypothesis was tested by examining the patterns of correlations with measures of executive functioning, secondary verbal memory, and verbal intelligence. Results demonstrated a specific construct validity of WCST dynamic (i.e., posttest) scores as an index of problem solving (Tower of Hanoi) and secondary verbal memory and learning (Auditory Verbal Learning Test), whereas the impact of general verbal capacity and selective attention (Verbal IQ, Stroop Test) was reduced. It is concluded that the construct validity of the test changes with dynamic administration and that this difference helps to explain why the dynamic version of the WCST predicts functional outcome better than the static version.

  1. Early Results from Solar Dynamic Space Power System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Mason, Lee S.

    1996-01-01

    A government/industry team designed, built and tested a 2-kWe solar dynamic space power system in a large thermal vacuum facility with a simulated Sun at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The Lewis facility provides an accurate simulation of temperatures, high vacuum and solar flux as encountered in low-Earth orbit. The solar dynamic system includes a Brayton power conversion unit integrated with a solar receiver which is designed to store energy for continuous power operation during the eclipse phase of the orbit. This paper reviews the goals and status of the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration project and describes the initial testing, including both operational and performance data. System testing to date has accumulated over 365 hours of power operation (ranging from 400 watts to 2.0-W(sub e)), including 187 simulated orbits, 16 ambient starts and 2 hot restarts. Data are shown for an orbital startup, transient and steady-state orbital operation and shutdown. System testing with varying insolation levels and operating speeds is discussed. The solar dynamic ground test demonstration is providing the experience and confidence toward a successful flight demonstration of the solar dynamic technologies on the Space Station Mir in 1997.

  2. SH-60B/DDG-994 Dynamic Interface Tests

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NAVAIRTESTCEN was tasked by reference (a) to conduct dynamic interface (DI) testing of the SH-60B helicopter on the DDG - 993 class ships. Testing was...conducted on board the USS CALLAGHAN, DDG -994, from 14 through 18 May 1984. Lack of ambient winds precluded completion of day/night launch/recovery

  3. Ultrasound transmission measurements for tensile strength evaluation of tablets.

    PubMed

    Simonaho, Simo-Pekka; Takala, T Aleksi; Kuosmanen, Marko; Ketolainen, Jarkko

    2011-05-16

    Ultrasound transmission measurements were performed to evaluate the tensile strength of tablets. Tablets consisting of one ingredient were compressed from dibasic calcium phosphate dehydrate, two grades of microcrystalline cellulose and two grades of lactose monohydrate powders. From each powder, tablets with five different tensile strengths were directly compressed. Ultrasound transmission measurements were conducted on every tablet at frequencies of 2.25 MHz, 5 MHz and 10 MHz and the speed of sound was calculated from the acquired waveforms. The tensile strength of the tablets was determined using a diametrical mechanical testing machine and compared to the calculated speed of sound values. It was found that the speed of sound increased with the tensile strength for the tested excipients. There was a good correlation between the speed of sound and tensile strength. Moreover, based on the statistical tests, the groups with different tensile strengths can be differentiated from each other by measuring the speed of sound. Thus, the ultrasound transmission measurement technique is a potentially useful method for non-destructive and fast evaluation of the tensile strength of tablets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of tensile stress on cavitation damage formation in mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshihito; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2010-03-01

    Cavitation erosion or so called pitting damage was investigated under tensile stress conditions in mercury. In MW-class liquid metal spallation targets, pitting damage is a critical issue to satisfy required power and/or lifetime of the target vessel. Cavitation occurs by negative pressure which is induced through pressure wave propagation due to proton beam injection. Pitting damage is formed by microjet and/or shock wave during cavitation bubble collapse. A mercury target vessel suffers tensile stress due to thermal stress or welding. In order to investigate the effect of tensile stress on pitting damage formation, cavitation erosion tests were performed using stress imposed specimens in mercury. An ultrasonic vibratory horn and electro-Magnetic IMpact Testing Machine (MIMTM) were used to vary the cavitation intensity. In the incubation period of pitting damage, damaged area was slightly increased with increasing imposed tensile stress. In the steady state period, a mean depth of erosion was increased by the tensile stress. Additionally, in order to quantitatively evaluate the effect of tensile stress, an indentation test with Vickers indenter was carried out to quasi-statically simulate the impact load. From the measurement of the diagonal length of the indent aspect ratio and hardness, it is recognized that the threshold of the deformation, i.e. pitting damage formation, was decreased by the tensile stress.

  5. Mechanical properties of gold twinned nanocubes under different triaxial tensile rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zailin; Zhang, Guowei; Luo, Gang; Sun, Xiaoqing; Zhao, Jianwei

    2016-08-01

    The gold twinned nanocubes under different triaxial tensile rates are explored by molecular dynamics simulation. Hydrostatic stress and Mises stress are defined in order to understand triaxial stresses. Twin boundaries prevent dislocations between twin boundaries from developing and dislocation angles are inconspicuous, which causes little difference between triaxial stresses. The mechanical properties of the nanocubes under low and high tensile rates are different. The curves of nanocubes under high tensile rates are more abrupt than those under low tensile rates. When the tensile rate is extremely big, the loadings are out of the nanocubes and there are not deformation and fracture in the internal nanocubes.

  6. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  7. Shake Test Results and Dynamic Calibration Efforts for the Large Rotor Test Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carl R.

    2014-01-01

    A shake test of the Large Rotor Test Apparatus (LRTA) was performed in an effort to enhance NASAscapability to measure dynamic hub loads for full-scale rotor tests. This paper documents the results of theshake test as well as efforts to calibrate the LRTA balance system to measure dynamic loads.Dynamic rotor loads are the primary source of vibration in helicopters and other rotorcraft, leading topassenger discomfort and damage due to fatigue of aircraft components. There are novel methods beingdeveloped to reduce rotor vibrations, but measuring the actual vibration reductions on full-scale rotorsremains a challenge. In order to measure rotor forces on the LRTA, a balance system in the non-rotatingframe is used. The forces at the balance can then be translated to the hub reference frame to measure therotor loads. Because the LRTA has its own dynamic response, the balance system must be calibrated toinclude the natural frequencies of the test rig.

  8. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  9. Ergodicity convergence test suggests telomere motion obeys fractional dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepten, E.; Bronshtein, I.; Garini, Y.

    2011-04-01

    Anomalous diffusion, observed in many biological processes, is a generalized description of a wide variety of processes, all obeying the same law of mean-square displacement. Identifying the basic mechanisms of these observations is important for deducing the nature of the biophysical systems measured. We implement a previously suggested method for distinguishing between fractional Langevin dynamics, fractional Brownian motion, and continuous time random walk based on the ergodic nature of the data. We apply the method together with the recently suggested P-variation test and the displacement correlation to the lately measured dynamics of telomeres in the nucleus of mammalian cells and find strong evidence that the telomeres motion obeys fractional dynamics. The ergodic dynamics are observed experimentally to fit fractional Brownian or Langevin dynamics.

  10. Verification Challenges of Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Six Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a test facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas for performing dynamic verification of space structures and hardware. Some examples of past and current tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility is able to integrate a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or demating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is utilized for input to the simulation during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents many unique challenges, one particular area of interest is with respect to the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. There are many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) measurement systems available on the market, and the test facility measurement systems have evolved over time to include two separate COTS systems. The first system incorporates infra-red sensing cameras, while the second system employs a laser interferometer to determine position and orientation data. The specific technical challenges with the measurement systems in a large dynamic environment include changing thermal and humidity levels, operational area and measurement volume, dynamic tracking, and data synchronization. The facility is located in an expansive high-bay area that is occasionally exposed to outside temperature when large retractable doors at each end of the building are opened. The laser interferometer system, in particular, is vulnerable to the environmental changes in the building. The operational area of the test facility itself is sizeable, ranging from seven meters wide and five meters deep to as much as seven meters high. Both facility measurement systems have desirable measurement volumes and the accuracies vary

  11. Verification Challenges of Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Six Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a test facility at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas for performing dynamic verification of space structures and hardware. Some examples of past and current tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility is able to integrate a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or demating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is utilized for input to the simulation during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents many unique challenges, one particular area of interest is with respect to the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. There are many commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) measurement systems available on the market, and the test facility measurement systems have evolved over time to include two separate COTS systems. The first system incorporates infra-red sensing cameras, while the second system employs a laser interferometer to determine position and orientation data. The specific technical challenges with the measurement systems in a large dynamic environment include changing thermal and humidity levels, operational area and measurement volume, dynamic tracking, and data synchronization. The facility is located in an expansive high-bay area that is occasionally exposed to outside temperature when large retractable doors at each end of the building are opened. The laser interferometer system, in particular, is vulnerable to the environmental changes in the building. The operational area of the test facility itself is sizeable, ranging from seven meters wide and five meters deep to as much as seven meters high. Both facility measurement systems have desirable measurement volumes and the accuracies vary

  12. The tensile properties of single sugar palm (Arenga pinnata) fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachtiar, D.; Sapuan, S. M.; Zainudin, E. S.; Khalina, A.; Dahlan, K. Z. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a brief description and characterization of the sugar palm fibres, still rare in the scientific community, compared to other natural fibres employed in polymeric composites. Sugar palm fibres are cellulose-based fibres extracted from the Arenga pinnata plant. The characterization consists of tensile test and the morphological examination. The average tensile properties results of fibres such as Young's modulus is equal to 3.69 GPa, tensile strength is equal to 190.29 MPa, and strain at failure is equal to 19.6%.

  13. Tensile Strength of Polyester Composites Reinforced with Thinner Ramie Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; de Pontes, Lucas Almeida; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Ferreira, Jordana; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Margem, Jean Igor

    This study evaluated the tensile properties of polyester composites reinforced with ramie fibers with thinner diameters. Specimens with different ramie fibers percentages (0,10,20 and 30%) in continuous and aligned ramie stalk fibers volume, were tensile tested at room temperature to evaluate the ultimate strength, elastic modulus and total strain. The results indicated that the tensile properties tend to improve with increasing volume fraction of ramie fibers. The role played by the fiber/matrix interaction was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

  14. OOK power model based dynamic error testing for smart electricity meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewei; Chen, Jingxia; Yuan, Ruiming; Jia, Xiaolu; Zhu, Meng; Jiang, Zhenyu

    2017-02-01

    This paper formulates the dynamic error testing problem for a smart meter, with consideration and investigation of both the testing signal and the dynamic error testing method. To solve the dynamic error testing problems, the paper establishes an on-off-keying (OOK) testing dynamic current model and an OOK testing dynamic load energy (TDLE) model. Then two types of TDLE sequences and three modes of OOK testing dynamic power are proposed. In addition, a novel algorithm, which helps to solve the problem of dynamic electric energy measurement’s traceability, is derived for dynamic errors. Based on the above researches, OOK TDLE sequence generation equipment is developed and a dynamic error testing system is constructed. Using the testing system, five kinds of meters were tested in the three dynamic power modes. The test results show that the dynamic error is closely related to dynamic power mode and the measurement uncertainty is 0.38%.

  15. Tensile strength of bovine trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, S J; Hayes, W C; Stone, J L; Beaupré, G S

    1985-01-01

    Data on the tensile and compressive properties of trabecular bone are needed to define input parameters and failure criteria for modeling total joint replacements. To help resolve differences in reports comparing tensile and compressive properties of trabecular bone, we have developed new methods, based on porous foam technology, for tensile testing of fresh/frozen trabecular bone specimens. Using bovine trabecular bone from an isotropic region from the proximal humerus as a model material, we measured ultimate strengths in tension and compression for two groups of 24 specimens each. The average ultimate strength in tension was 7.6 +/- 2.2 (95% C.I.) MPa and in compression was 12.4 +/- 3.2 MPa. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.013) and was not related to density differences between the test groups (p = 0.28). Strength was related by a power-law function of the local apparent density, but, even accounting for density influences, isotropic bovine trabecular bone exhibits significantly lower strengths in tension than in compression.

  16. Tensile, Compression, Open-Hole Compression and Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Multiple NASA Langley Research Center Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    The attached data summarizes the work performed by the Composite Materials Research Group at the University of Wyoming funded by the NASA LaRC Research Grant NAG-1-1294. The work consisted primarily of tension, compression, open-hole compression and double cantilever beam fracture toughness testing performed an a variety of NASA LaRC composite materials. Tests were performed at various environmental conditions and pre-conditioning requirements. The primary purpose of this work was to support the LaRC material development efforts. The data summaries are arranged in chronological order from oldest to newest.

  17. Dynamic test/analysis correlation using reduced analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, Paul E.; Angelucci, A. F.; Javeed, Mehzad

    1992-01-01

    Test/analysis correlation is an important aspect of the verification of analysis models which are used to predict on-orbit response characteristics of large space structures. This paper presents results of a study using reduced analysis models for performing dynamic test/analysis correlation. The reduced test-analysis model (TAM) has the same number and orientation of DOF as the test measurements. Two reduction methods, static (Guyan) reduction and the Improved Reduced System reduction, are applied to the test/analysis correlation of a laboratory truss structure. Simulated test results and modal test data are used to examine the performance of each method. It is shown that selection of DOF to be retained in the TAM is critical when large structural masses are involved. In addition, the use of modal test results may provide difficulties in TAM accuracy even if a large number of DOF are retained in the TAM.

  18. Dynamic test/analysis correlation using reduced analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, Paul E.; Angelucci, A. Filippo; Javeed, Mehzad

    1992-01-01

    Test/analysis correlation is an important aspect of the verification of analysis models which are used to predict on-orbit response characteristics of large space structures. This paper presents results of a study using reduced analysis models for performing dynamic test/analysis correlation. The reduced test-analysis model (TAM) has the same number and orientation of DOF as the test measurements. Two reduction methods, static (Guyan) reduction and the Improved Reduced System (IRS) reduction, are applied to the test/analysis correlation of a laboratory truss structure. Simulated test results and modal test data are used to examine the performance of each method. It is shown that selection of DOF to be retained in the TAM is critical when large structural masses are involved. In addition, the use of modal test results may provide difficulties in TAM accuracy even if a large number of DOF are retained in the TAM.

  19. Cumulative Measurement Errors for Dynamic Testing of Space Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winnitoy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Located at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX, the Six-Degree-of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS) is a real-time, six degree-of-freedom, short range motion base simulator originally designed to simulate the relative dynamics of two bodies in space mating together (i.e., docking or berthing). The SDTS has the capability to test full scale docking and berthing systems utilizing a two body dynamic docking simulation for docking operations and a Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) simulation for berthing operations. The SDTS can also be used for nonmating applications such as sensors and instruments evaluations requiring proximity or short range motion operations. The motion base is a hydraulic powered Stewart platform, capable of supporting a 3,500 lb payload with a positional accuracy of 0.03 inches. The SDTS is currently being used for the NASA Docking System testing and has been also used by other government agencies. The SDTS is also under consideration for use by commercial companies. Examples of tests include the verification of on-orbit robotic inspection systems, space vehicle assembly procedures and docking/berthing systems. The facility integrates a dynamic simulation of on-orbit spacecraft mating or de-mating using flight-like mechanical interface hardware. A force moment sensor is used for input during the contact phase, thus simulating the contact dynamics. While the verification of flight hardware presents unique challenges, one particular area of interest involves the use of external measurement systems to ensure accurate feedback of dynamic contact. The measurement systems for the test facility have two separate functions. The first is to take static measurements of facility and test hardware to determine both the static and moving frames used in the simulation and control system. The test hardware must be measured after each configuration change to determine both sets of reference frames. The second function is to take dynamic

  20. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.