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Sample records for dynamic texture scaling

  1. The interactive scaling hypothesis and dynamic textures in nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, S.

    2002-03-01

    A new approach to the description of the dynamic textures (DT) in the systems with continuous symmetry is proposed. Such textures take place in various dissipative motions of liquid crystals with participation of different extended objects: topological defects in the order parameter field and suspended particles. The main idea of the approach is to transfer the law of interaction between the extended objects (hedgehogs, disclinations, boojums, colloidal particles, etc.) to the host system by redefining its spatiotemporal scales. I call this procedure the interactive scaling (IS). In a number of experiments with nematics^1-3 a pair of objects behaves itself as two point particles interacting by means of the attractive force F_a=CK(a/r)^m-1, where r is the separation between particle centers, K is the Frank elastic constant, C is a constant, and m>= 1. The dynamics of the objects is purely dissipative with the Stokes-type drag due to the reorientation of the order parameter (director) field in some vicinities of the objects. For the pair's dissipative dynamics in nematics we find the velocity v of reducing the interparticle distance r: v(r)=v_c(a/r)^m-1, with v_c=2CK/lη, where η is the orientational viscosity and l is the drag length. The parameters C, a and l can be estimated theoretically and defined experimentally. The IS hypothesis postulates the time dependence of the director field in the form n (r,; t)= n(x+ɛ v(2|x|)t/2,;y,;z) to yield the DT equation for n(r): (2νɛ^m/ax^m-1)partial_xn=nabla^2 n+(nablan)^2n, where ν=Ca/l is the IS ratio, ɛ=sign(x) and v(2|x|) coincides with the velocity of approaching the pair's particles in the x direction. This equation corresponds to the "one-constant approximation" and the absence of fluid flow. For m=2 (the "Coulombic" force) in the planar case: n=[\\cosΦ,sinΦ,0], we find the disclination solution of the DT equation: Φ=(k/2)C_νint_0^φ\\cos^2νφdφ, where k is an integer, φ is the polar angle and C

  2. Emotional effects of dynamic textures

    PubMed Central

    Toet, Alexander; Henselmans, Menno; Lucassen, Marcel P; Gevers, Theo

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effects of various spatiotemporal dynamic texture characteristics on human emotions. The emotional experience of auditory (eg, music) and haptic repetitive patterns has been studied extensively. In contrast, the emotional experience of visual dynamic textures is still largely unknown, despite their natural ubiquity and increasing use in digital media. Participants watched a set of dynamic textures, representing either water or various different media, and self-reported their emotional experience. Motion complexity was found to have mildly relaxing and nondominant effects. In contrast, motion change complexity was found to be arousing and dominant. The speed of dynamics had arousing, dominant, and unpleasant effects. The amplitude of dynamics was also regarded as unpleasant. The regularity of the dynamics over the textures' area was found to be uninteresting, nondominant, mildly relaxing, and mildly pleasant. The spatial scale of the dynamics had an unpleasant, arousing, and dominant effect, which was larger for textures with diverse content than for water textures. For water textures, the effects of spatial contrast were arousing, dominant, interesting, and mildly unpleasant. None of these effects were observed for textures of diverse content. The current findings are relevant for the design and synthesis of affective multimedia content and for affective scene indexing and retrieval. PMID:23145257

  3. Monitoring soil aggregates dynamics at a plot scale using multitemporal image texture and colour analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ymeti, Irena; van der Werff, Harald; van der Meer, Freek; Jetten, Victor

    2016-10-01

    Monitoring of soil aggregate breakdown remains, even at the micro-plot scale, a challenge. Remote sensing has shown its potential to assess many different soil properties and is a fast and non-destructive method to investigate soil susceptibility to water erosion. We designed an outdoor experiment to monitor soil aggregates breakdown under natural rainfall at a micro-plot scale using a regular camera. Five soils susceptible to detachment (silty loam with various organic matter content, loam and sandy loam) were photographed once per day. We collected images and rainfall data from November 2014 until February 2015. Considering that the soil surface roughness causes shadow cast, the blue/red band ratio is used to observe the soil aggregates changes. In addition, a Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) is used to extract the image texture entropy which reflects the process of soil aggregates breakdown. In our research the entropy calculated at 135 degrees along the direction of shadows gives best results. Our results show that both entropy and shadow index follow the wetting and drying cycles with a decrease due to a rain event. This decrease is small due to low rainfall intensity (< 2.5 mmh-1) for the entire period that the experiment ran. However, the biggest rain event of 20 mmday-1 resulted in a decrease in entropy, meaning that sufficient rainfall energy was present to trigger the soil aggregates break down. This research concludes that both entropy and shadow index obtained with a regular camera enable the monitoring of soil aggregate breakdown at a high spatial resolution.

  4. A polynomial texture extraction with application in dynamic texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Moubtahij, R.; Augereau, B.; Fernandez-Maloigne, C.; Tairi, H.

    2015-04-01

    Geometry and texture image decomposition is an important paradigm in image processing. Following to Yves Meyer works based on Total Variation (VT), the decomposition model has known a renewed interest. In this paper, we propose an algorithm which decomposes color image into geometry and texture component by projecting the image in a bivariate polynomial basis and considering the geometry component as the partial reconstruction and the texture component as the remaining part. The experimental results show the adequacy of using our method as a texture extraction tool. Furthermore, we integrate it into a dynamic texture classification process.

  5. Adaptive scale fixing for multiscale texture segmentation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kung-Hao; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses two challenging issues in unsupervised multiscale texture segmentation: determining adequate spatial and feature resolutions for different regions of the image, and utilizing information across different scales/resolutions. The center of a homogeneous texture is analyzed using coarse spatial resolution, and its border is detected using fine spatial resolution so as to locate the boundary accurately. The extraction of texture features is achieved via a multiresolution pyramid. The feature values are integrated across scales/resolutions adaptively. The number of textures is determined automatically using the variance ratio criterion. Experimental results on synthetic and real images demonstrate the improvement in performance of the proposed multiscale scheme over single scale approaches.

  6. Heterogeneous patterns enhancing static and dynamic texture classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa da Silva, Núbia; Martinez Bruno, Odemir

    2013-02-01

    Some mixtures, such as colloids like milk, blood, and gelatin, have homogeneous appearance when viewed with the naked eye, however, to observe them at the nanoscale is possible to understand the heterogeneity of its components. The same phenomenon can occur in pattern recognition in which it is possible to see heterogeneous patterns in texture images. However, current methods of texture analysis can not adequately describe such heterogeneous patterns. Common methods used by researchers analyse the image information in a global way, taking all its features in an integrated manner. Furthermore, multi-scale analysis verifies the patterns at different scales, but still preserving the homogeneous analysis. On the other hand various methods use textons to represent the texture, breaking texture down into its smallest unit. To tackle this problem, we propose a method to identify texture patterns not small as textons at distinct scales enhancing the separability among different types of texture. We find sub patterns of texture according to the scale and then group similar patterns for a more refined analysis. Tests were performed in four static texture databases and one dynamical one. Results show that our method provide better classification rate compared with conventional approaches both in static and in dynamic texture.

  7. Scale-free texture of the fast solar wind.

    PubMed

    Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Gogoberidze, G; Wicks, R T

    2011-12-01

    The higher-order statistics of magnetic field magnitude fluctuations in the fast quiet solar wind are quantified systematically, scale by scale. We find a single global non-Gaussian scale-free behavior from minutes to over 5 h. This spans the signature of an inertial range of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and a ~1/f range in magnetic field components. This global scaling in field magnitude fluctuations is an intrinsic component of the underlying texture of the solar wind and puts a strong constraint on any theory of solar corona and the heliosphere. Intriguingly, the magnetic field and velocity components show scale-dependent dynamic alignment outside of the inertial range.

  8. Magnetization dynamics of imprinted non-collinear spin textures

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert Kopte, Martin; Makarov, Denys; Fischer, Peter; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2015-09-14

    We study the magnetization dynamics of non-collinear spin textures realized via imprint of the magnetic vortex state in soft permalloy into magnetically hard out-of-plane magnetized Co/Pd nanopatterned heterostructures. Tuning the interlayer exchange coupling between soft- and hard-magnetic subsystems provides means to tailor the magnetic state in the Co/Pd stack from being vortex- to donut-like with different core sizes. While the imprinted vortex spin texture leads to the dynamics similar to the one observed for vortices in permalloy disks, the donut-like state causes the appearance of two gyrofrequencies characteristic of the early and later stages of the magnetization dynamics. The dynamics are described using the Thiele equation supported by the full scale micromagnetic simulations by taking into account an enlarged core size of the donut states compared to magnetic vortices.

  9. Dynamic air layer on textured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Chan, Derek Y C; Marston, Jeremy O; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-09-03

    We provide an experimental demonstration that a novel macroscopic, dynamic continuous air layer or plastron can be sustained indefinitely on textured superhydrophobic surfaces in air-supersaturated water by a natural gas influx mechanism. This type of plastron is an intermediate state between Leidenfrost vapor layers on superheated surfaces and the equilibrium Cassie-Baxter wetting state on textured superhydrophobic surfaces. We show that such a plastron can be sustained on the surface of a centimeter-sized superhydrophobic sphere immersed in heated water and variations of its dynamic behavior with air saturation of the water can be regulated by rapid changes of the water temperature. The simple experimental setup allows for quantification of the air flux into the plastron and identification of the air transport model of the plastron growth. Both the observed growth dynamics of such plastrons and millimeter-sized air bubbles seeded on the hydrophilic surface under identical air-supersaturated solution conditions are consistent with the predictions of a well-mixed gas transport model.

  10. Orthogonal combination of local binary patterns for dynamic texture recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yin; Guo, Xuejun; Klein, Dominik

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic texture (DT) is an extension of texture to the temporal domain. Recognizing DTs has received increasing attention. Volume local binary pattern (VLBP) is the most widely used descriptor for DTs. However, it is time consuming to recognize DTs using VLBP due to the large scale of data and the high dimensionality of the descriptor itself. In this paper, we propose a new operator called orthogonal combination of VLBP (OC-VLBP) for DT recognition. The original VLBP is decomposed both longitudinally and latitudinally, and then combined to constitute the OC-VLBP operator, so that the dimensionality of the original VLBP descriptor is lowered. The experimental results show that the proposed operator significantly reduces the computational costs of recognizing DTs without much loss in recognizing accuracy.

  11. Adaptive Texture Synthesis for Large Scale City Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despine, G.; Colleu, T.

    2015-02-01

    Large scale city models textured with aerial images are well suited for bird-eye navigation but generally the image resolution does not allow pedestrian navigation. One solution to face this problem is to use high resolution terrestrial photos but it requires huge amount of manual work to remove occlusions. Another solution is to synthesize generic textures with a set of procedural rules and elementary patterns like bricks, roof tiles, doors and windows. This solution may give realistic textures but with no correlation to the ground truth. Instead of using pure procedural modelling we present a method to extract information from aerial images and adapt the texture synthesis to each building. We describe a workflow allowing the user to drive the information extraction and to select the appropriate texture patterns. We also emphasize the importance to organize the knowledge about elementary pattern in a texture catalogue allowing attaching physical information, semantic attributes and to execute selection requests. Roofs are processed according to the detected building material. Façades are first described in terms of principal colours, then opening positions are detected and some window features are computed. These features allow selecting the most appropriate patterns from the texture catalogue. We experimented this workflow on two samples with 20 cm and 5 cm resolution images. The roof texture synthesis and opening detection were successfully conducted on hundreds of buildings. The window characterization is still sensitive to the distortions inherent to the projection of aerial images onto the facades.

  12. Cosmological texture is incompatible with Planck-scale physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Richard; Hsu, Stephen D. H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Watkins, Richard; Widrow, Lawrence M.

    1992-01-01

    Nambu-Goldstone modes are sensitive to the effects of physics at energies comparable to the scale of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We show that as a consequence of this the global texture proposal for structure formation requires rather severe assumptions about the nature of physics at the Planck scale.

  13. Modeling, clustering, and segmenting video with mixtures of dynamic textures.

    PubMed

    Chan, Antoni B; Vasconcelos, Nuno

    2008-05-01

    A dynamic texture is a spatio-temporal generative model for video, which represents video sequences as observations from a linear dynamical system. This work studies the mixture of dynamic textures, a statistical model for an ensemble of video sequences that is sampled from a finite collection of visual processes, each of which is a dynamic texture. An expectationmaximization (EM) algorithm is derived for learning the parameters of the model, and the model is related to previous works in linear systems, machine learning, time-series clustering, control theory, and computer vision. Through experimentation, it is shown that the mixture of dynamic textures is a suitable representation for both the appearance and dynamics of a variety of visual processes that have traditionally been challenging for computer vision (e.g. fire, steam, water, vehicle and pedestrian traffic, etc.). When compared with state-of-the-art methods in motion segmentation, including both temporal texture methods and traditional representations (e.g. optical flow or other localized motion representations), the mixture of dynamic textures achieves superior performance in the problems of clustering and segmenting video of such processes.

  14. Dynamic microtubules and the texture of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between microtubules and cell-wall texture has had a fitful history in which progress in one area has not been matched by progress in the other. For example, the idea that wall texture arises entirely from self-assembly, independently of microtubules, originated with electron microscopic analyses of fixed cells that gave no clue to the ability of microtubules to reorganize. Since then, live-cell studies have established the surprising dynamicity of plant microtubules involving collisions, changes in angle, parallelization, and rotation of microtubule tracks. Combined with proof that cellulose synthases do track along shifting microtubules, this offers more realistic models for the dynamic influence of microtubules on wall texture than could have been imagined in the electron microscopic era-the era from which most ideas on wall texture originate. This review revisits the classical literature on wall organization from the vantage point of current knowledge of microtubule dynamics.

  15. Higher order SVD analysis for dynamic texture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Roberto; Sbaiz, Luciano; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Videos representing flames, water, smoke, etc., are often defined as dynamic textures: "textures" because they are characterized by the redundant repetition of a pattern and "dynamic" because this repetition is also in time and not only in space. Dynamic textures have been modeled as linear dynamic systems by unfolding the video frames into column vectors and describing their trajectory as time evolves. After the projection of the vectors onto a lower dimensional space by a singular value decomposition (SVD), the trajectory is modeled using system identification techniques. Synthesis is obtained by driving the system with random noise. In this paper, we show that the standard SVD can be replaced by a higher order SVD (HOSVD), originally known as Tucker decomposition. HOSVD decomposes the dynamic texture as a multidimensional signal (tensor) without unfolding the video frames on column vectors. This is a more natural and flexible decomposition, since it permits us to perform dimension reduction in the spatial, temporal, and chromatic domain, while standard SVD allows for temporal reduction only. We show that for a comparable synthesis quality, the HOSVD approach requires, on average, five times less parameters than the standard SVD approach. The analysis part is more expensive, but the synthesis has the same cost as existing algorithms. Our technique is, thus, well suited to dynamic texture synthesis on devices limited by memory and computational power, such as PDAs or mobile phones.

  16. Dynamics of ice mass deformation: Linking processes to rheology, texture, and microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazolo, Sandra; Wilson, Christopher J. L.; Luzin, Vladimir; Brouzet, Christophe; Peternell, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Prediction of glacier and polar ice sheet dynamics is a major challenge, especially in view of changing climate. The flow behavior of an ice mass is fundamentally linked to processes at the grain and subgrain scale. However, our understanding of ice rheology and microstructure evolution based on conventional deformation experiments, where samples are analyzed before and after deformation, remains incomplete. To close this gap, we combine deformation experiments with in situ neutron diffraction textural and grain analysis that allows continuous monitoring of the evolution of rheology, texture, and microstructure. We prepared ice samples from deuterium water, as hydrogen in water ice has a high incoherent neutron scattering rendering it unsuitable for neutron diffraction analysis. We report experimental results from deformation of initially randomly oriented polycrystalline ice at three different constant strain rates. Results show a dynamic system where steady-state rheology is not necessarily coupled to microstructural and textural stability. Textures change from a weak single central c axis maxima to a strong girdle distribution at 35° to the compression axis attributed to dominance of basal slip followed by basal combined with pyramidal slip. Dislocation-related hardening accompanies this switch and is followed by weakening due to new grain nucleation and grain boundary migration. With decreasing strain rate, grain boundary migration becomes increasingly dominant and texture more pronounced. Our observations highlight the link between the dynamics of processes competition and rheological and textural behavior. This link needs to be taken into account to improve ice mass deformation modeling critical for climate change predictions.

  17. Collective Dynamics in Spin-Textured Electronic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Clement H.

    2010-06-01

    In chapter I and II, we develop the hydrodynamic theory of collinear spin currents coupled to magnetization dynamics in metallic ferromagnets. The collective spin density couples to the spin current through a U(1) Berry-phase gauge field determined by the local texture and dynamics of the magnetization. We determine phenomenologically the dissipative corrections to the equation of motion for the electronic current, which consist of a dissipative spin-motive force generated by magnetization dynamics and a magnetic texture-dependent resistivity tensor. The reciprocal dissipative, adiabatic spin torque on the magnetic texture follows from the Onsager principle. By applying general thermodynamic relations, we determine a lower bound on the magnetic-texture resistivity. We investigate the effects of thermal fluctuations and find that electronic dynamics contribute to a nonlocal Gilbert damping tensor in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the magnetization. In chapter III, we apply our general theory to soliton dynamics in spin-textured metals. We find it necessary to modify the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and the corresponding solitonic equations of motion to include higher-order texture effects stemming hydrodynamic backaction. As an example, we consider the gyration of a vortex in a point-contact spin valve, and discuss modifications of orbit radius, frequency, and dissipation power. In chapter IV, we generalize our hydrodynamic theory to a kinetic equation, which we derive in a semiclassical expansion of the density-matrix equation of motion up to the first order in quantum mechanical corrections for a general two-band Hamiltonian. We find, in addition to corrections to the single-particle equation of motion due to Berry curvatures, a modification to the phase-space density of states, and interband terms associated with transport through a general curved phase space. We apply our kinetic equation to the case of inhomogeneities stemming from gauge

  18. Identifying Differences and Similarities in Static and Dynamic Contact Angles between Nanoscale and Microscale Textured Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Slovin, Mitchell R; Shirts, Michael R

    2015-07-28

    We quantify some of the effects of patterned nanoscale surface texture on static contact angles, dynamic contact angles, and dynamic contact angle hysteresis using molecular dynamics simulations of a moving Lennard-Jones droplet in contact with a solid surface. We observe static contact angles that change with the introduction of surface texture in a manner consistent with theoretical and experimental expectations. However, we find that the introduction of nanoscale surface texture at the length scale of 5-10 times the fluid particle size does not affect dynamic contact angle hysteresis even though it changes both the advancing and receding contact angles significantly. This result differs significantly from microscale experimental results where dynamic contact angle hysteresis decreases with the addition of surface texture due to an increase in the receding contact angle. Instead, we find that molecular-kinetic theory, previously applied only to nonpatterned surfaces, accurately describes dynamic contact angle and dynamic contact angle hysteresis behavior as a function of terminal fluid velocity. Therefore, at length scales of tens of nanometers, the kinetic phenomena such as contact line pinning observed at larger scales become insignificant in comparison to the effects of molecular fluctuations for moving droplets, even though the static properties are essentially scale-invariant. These findings may have implications for the design of highly hierarchical structures with particular wetting properties. We also find that quantitatively determining the trends observed in this article requires the careful selection of system and analysis parameters in order to achieve sufficient accuracy and precision in calculated contact angles. Therefore, we provide a detailed description of our two-surface, circular-fit approach to calculating static and dynamic contact angles on surfaces with nanoscale texturing.

  19. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.

    1998-01-01

    Fractals embody important ideas of self-similarity, in which the spatial behavior or appearance of a system is largely independent of scale. Self-similarity is defined as a property of curves or surfaces where each part is indistinguishable from the whole, or where the form of the curve or surface is invariant with respect to scale. An ideal fractal (or monofractal) curve or surface has a constant dimension over all scales, although it may not be an integer value. This is in contrast to Euclidean or topological dimensions, where discrete one, two, and three dimensions describe curves, planes, and volumes. Theoretically, if the digital numbers of a remotely sensed image resemble an ideal fractal surface, then due to the self-similarity property, the fractal dimension of the image will not vary with scale and resolution. However, most geographical phenomena are not strictly self-similar at all scales, but they can often be modeled by a stochastic fractal in which the scaling and self-similarity properties of the fractal have inexact patterns that can be described by statistics. Stochastic fractal sets relax the monofractal self-similarity assumption and measure many scales and resolutions in order to represent the varying form of a phenomenon as a function of local variables across space. In image interpretation, pattern is defined as the overall spatial form of related features, and the repetition of certain forms is a characteristic pattern found in many cultural objects and some natural features. Texture is the visual impression of coarseness or smoothness caused by the variability or uniformity of image tone or color. A potential use of fractals concerns the analysis of image texture. In these situations it is commonly observed that the degree of roughness or inexactness in an image or surface is a function of scale and not of experimental technique. The fractal dimension of remote sensing data could yield quantitative insight on the spatial complexity and

  20. Dynamics of Spreading on Micro-Textured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Karim, Alireza; Rothstein, Jonathan; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2015-11-01

    Ultrahydrophobic surfaces, due to their large water-repellency characteristic, have a vast variety of applications in technology and nature, such as de-icing of airplane wings, efficiency increase of power plants, and efficiency of pesticides on plants, etc. The significance of ultrahydrophobic surfaces requires enhancing the knowledge on the spreading dynamics on such surfaces. The best way to produce an ultrahydrophobic surface is by patterning of smooth hydrophobic surfaces with micron sized posts. In this research, the micro-textured surfaces have been fabricated by patterning several different sizes of micro-textured posts on Teflon plates. The experimental study has been performed using forced spreading with Tensiometer to obtain the dependencw of dynamic contact angle to the contact line velocity to describe the spreading dynamics of Newtonian liquids on the micro-textured surfaces. The effect of the geometrical descriptions of the micro-posts along with the physical properties of liquids on the spreading dynamics on micro-textured Teflon plates have been also studied.

  1. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Azar Alizadeh; Vaibhav Bahadur; Sheng Zhong; Wen Shang; Ri Li; James Ruud; Masako Yamada; Liehi Ge; Ali Dhinojwala; Manohar S Sohal

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially for hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-structure interaction at various temperatures.

  2. Wavelet transform analysis of dynamic speckle patterns texture.

    PubMed

    Limia, Margarita Fernández; Núñez, Adriana Mavilio; Rabal, Héctor; Trivi, Marcelo

    2002-11-10

    We propose the use of the wavelet transform to characterize the time evolution of dynamic speckle patterns. We describe it by using as an example a method used for the assessment of the drying of paint. Optimal texture features are determined and the time evolution is described in terms of the Mahalanobis distance to the final (dry) state. From the behavior of this distance function, two parameters are defined that characterize the evolution. Because detailed knowledge of the involved dynamics is not required, the methodology could be implemented for other complex or poorly understood dynamic phenomena.

  3. Uterus segmentation in dynamic MRI using LBP texture descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namias, R.; Bellemare, M.-E.; Rahim, M.; Pirró, N.

    2014-03-01

    Pelvic floor disorders cover pathologies of which physiopathology is not well understood. However cases get prevalent with an ageing population. Within the context of a project aiming at modelization of the dynamics of pelvic organs, we have developed an efficient segmentation process. It aims at alleviating the radiologist with a tedious one by one image analysis. From a first contour delineating the uterus-vagina set, the organ border is tracked along a dynamic mri sequence. The process combines movement prediction, local intensity and texture analysis and active contour geometry control. Movement prediction allows a contour intitialization for next image in the sequence. Intensity analysis provides image-based local contour detection enhanced by local binary pattern (lbp) texture descriptors. Geometry control prohibits self intersections and smoothes the contour. Results show the efficiency of the method with images produced in clinical routine.

  4. Textures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-09

    Several different surface textures are evident in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. This complex region is located between Lycus Sulci to the south and Acheron Fossae to the north, all of which is just north of Olympus Mons. Both volcanic and tectonic processes combined to create this region. Orbit Number: 61224 Latitude: 34.2934 Longitude: 225.468 Instrument: VIS Captured: 2015-10-02 23:23 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20111

  5. Characterization of Microcirculation in Multiple Sclerosis Lesions by Dynamic Texture Parameter Analysis (DTPA)

    PubMed Central

    Heldner, Mirjam Rahel; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; Kottke, Raimund; Ozdoba, Christoph; Weisstanner, Christian; Kamm, Christian Philipp; Wiest, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Objective Texture analysis is an alternative method to quantitatively assess MR-images. In this study, we introduce dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA), a novel technique to investigate the temporal evolution of texture parameters using dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced (DSCE) imaging. Here, we aim to introduce the method and its application on enhancing lesions (EL), non-enhancing lesions (NEL) and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We investigated 18 patients with MS and clinical isolated syndrome (CIS), according to the 2010 McDonald's criteria using DSCE imaging at different field strengths (1.5 and 3 Tesla). Tissues of interest (TOIs) were defined within 27 EL, 29 NEL and 37 NAWM areas after normalization and eight histogram-based texture parameter maps (TPMs) were computed. TPMs quantify the heterogeneity of the TOI. For every TOI, the average, variance, skewness, kurtosis and variance-of-the-variance statistical parameters were calculated. These TOI parameters were further analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by multiple Wilcoxon sum rank testing corrected for multiple comparisons. Results Tissue- and time-dependent differences were observed in the dynamics of computed texture parameters. Sixteen parameters discriminated between EL, NEL and NAWM (pAVG = 0.0005). Significant differences in the DTPA texture maps were found during inflow (52 parameters), outflow (40 parameters) and reperfusion (62 parameters). The strongest discriminators among the TPMs were observed in the variance-related parameters, while skewness and kurtosis TPMs were in general less sensitive to detect differences between the tissues. Conclusion DTPA of DSCE image time series revealed characteristic time responses for ELs, NELs and NAWM. This may be further used for a refined quantitative grading of MS lesions during their evolution from acute to chronic state. DTPA discriminates lesions beyond features of enhancement or T2

  6. Characterization of microcirculation in multiple sclerosis lesions by dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA).

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajeev Kumar; Slotboom, Johannes; Heldner, Mirjam Rachel; Heldner, Mirjam Rahel; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; Kottke, Raimund; Ozdoba, Christoph; Weisstanner, Christian; Kamm, Christian Philipp; Wiest, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Texture analysis is an alternative method to quantitatively assess MR-images. In this study, we introduce dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA), a novel technique to investigate the temporal evolution of texture parameters using dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced (DSCE) imaging. Here, we aim to introduce the method and its application on enhancing lesions (EL), non-enhancing lesions (NEL) and normal appearing white matter (NAWM) in multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated 18 patients with MS and clinical isolated syndrome (CIS), according to the 2010 McDonald's criteria using DSCE imaging at different field strengths (1.5 and 3 Tesla). Tissues of interest (TOIs) were defined within 27 EL, 29 NEL and 37 NAWM areas after normalization and eight histogram-based texture parameter maps (TPMs) were computed. TPMs quantify the heterogeneity of the TOI. For every TOI, the average, variance, skewness, kurtosis and variance-of-the-variance statistical parameters were calculated. These TOI parameters were further analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by multiple Wilcoxon sum rank testing corrected for multiple comparisons. Tissue- and time-dependent differences were observed in the dynamics of computed texture parameters. Sixteen parameters discriminated between EL, NEL and NAWM (pAVG = 0.0005). Significant differences in the DTPA texture maps were found during inflow (52 parameters), outflow (40 parameters) and reperfusion (62 parameters). The strongest discriminators among the TPMs were observed in the variance-related parameters, while skewness and kurtosis TPMs were in general less sensitive to detect differences between the tissues. DTPA of DSCE image time series revealed characteristic time responses for ELs, NELs and NAWM. This may be further used for a refined quantitative grading of MS lesions during their evolution from acute to chronic state. DTPA discriminates lesions beyond features of enhancement or T2-hypersignal, on a numeric scale allowing for a

  7. Dynamic recrystallization and texture modeling of IN718 superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarbarmas, M.; Aghaie-Khafri, M.

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of IN718 superalloy was modeled based on the experimental data as well as modified cellular automaton (CA) methods. To verify the ability of the presented models for predicting the microstructural features, the electron backscattered diffraction technique was used. Results showed that both models are capable of estimating the mean grain size and volume fraction of DRX grains. Furthermore, the macroscopic flow behavior of the material, and texture evolution of the structure were simulated using the proposed CA model. In this model, the lattice rotation of grains was determined assuming that each grain obeys the rules of single crystal deformation, and the morphological texture was obtained using a topological module in the CA approach.

  8. Texture sensing of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satarupa; Lee, Rachel; Hourwitz, Matthew J.; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    Migrating cells can be directed towards a target by gradients in properties such as chemical concentration or mechanical properties of the surrounding microenvironment. In previous studies we have shown that micro/nanotopographical features on scales comparable to those of natural collagen fibers can guide fast migrating amoeboid cells by aligning actin polymerization waves to such nanostructures. We find that actin microfilaments and microtubules are aligned along the nanoridge topographies, modulating overall cell polarity and directional migration in epithelial cells. This work shows that topographic features on a biologically relevant length scale can modulate migration outcomes by affecting the texture sensing property of the cytoskeleton.

  9. Convolutional Recognition of Dynamic Textures with Preliminary Categorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favorskaya, M. N.; Pyataeva, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic Texture (DT) can be considered as an extension of the static texture additionally comprising the motion features. The DT is very wide but the weak studied type of textures that is employed in many tasks of computer vision. The proposed method of the DTs recognition includes a preliminary categorization based on the proposed four categories, such as natural particles with periodic movement, natural translucency/transparent non-rigid blobs with randomly changed movement, man-made opaque rigid objects with periodic movement, and man-made opaque rigid objects with stationary or chaotic movement. Such formulation permitted to construct the separate spatial and temporal Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) for each category. The inputs of the CNNs are a pair of successive frames (taken through 1, 2, 3, or 4 frames according to a category), while the outputs store the sets of binary features in a view of histograms. In test stage, the concatenated histograms are compared with the histograms of the classes using the Kullback-Leibler distance. The experiments demonstrate the efficiency of the designed CNNs and provided the recognition rates up 97.46-98.32% for the sequences with a single type of the DT conducted on the DynTex database.

  10. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  11. Temperature dependent droplet impact dynamics on flat and textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Azar; Bahadur, Vaibhav; Zhong, Sheng; Shang, Wen; Li, Ri; Ruud, James; Yamada, Masako; Ge, Liehui; Dhinojwala, Ali; Sohal, Manohar

    2012-03-01

    Droplet impact dynamics determines the performance of surfaces used in many applications such as anti-icing, condensation, boiling, and heat transfer. We study impact dynamics of water droplets on surfaces with chemistry/texture ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic and across a temperature range spanning below freezing to near boiling conditions. Droplet retraction shows very strong temperature dependence especially on hydrophilic surfaces; it is seen that lower substrate temperatures lead to lesser retraction. Physics-based analyses show that the increased viscosity associated with lower temperatures combined with an increased work of adhesion can explain the decreased retraction. The present findings serve as a starting point to guide further studies of dynamic fluid-surface interaction at various temperatures.

  12. Probabilistic latent semantic analysis for dynamic textures recognition and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Hu, Shiqiang

    2014-11-01

    We present a framework for dynamic textures (DTs) recognition and localization by using a model developed in the text analysis literature: probabilistic latent semantic analysis (pLSA). The novelty is revealed in three aspects. First, chaotic feature vector is introduced and characterizes each pixel intensity series. Next, the pLSA model is employed to discover the topics by using the bag of words representation. Finally, the spatial layout of DTs can be found. Experimental results are conducted on the well-known DTs datasets. The results show that the proposed method can successfully build DTs models and achieve higher accuracies in DTs recognition and effectively localize DTs.

  13. Effectiveness of Structured Textures on Dynamically Changing Terrain-like Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Butkiewicz, Thomas; Stevens, Andrew H

    2016-01-01

    Previous perceptual research and human factors studies have identified several effective methods for texturing 3D surfaces to ensure that their curvature is accurately perceived by viewers. However, most of these studies examined the application of these techniques to static surfaces. This paper explores the effectiveness of applying these techniques to dynamically changing surfaces. When these surfaces change shape, common texturing methods, such as grids and contours, induce a range of different motion cues, which can draw attention and provide information about the size, shape, and rate of change. A human factors study was conducted to evaluate the relative effectiveness of these methods when applied to dynamically changing pseudo-terrain surfaces. The results indicate that, while no technique is most effective for all cases, contour lines generally perform best, and that the pseudocontour lines induced by banded color scales convey the same benefits.

  14. Textural constraints on the dynamics of the 2000 Miyakejima eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garozzo, Ileana; Romano, Claudia; Giordano, Guido; Geshi, Nobuo; Vona, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Miyakejima Volcano is a basaltic-andesite stratovolcano active from ~10.000 years, located on the north of the Izu-Bonin arc. During the last 600 years the volcano has been characterized mainly by flank fissure activity, with explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions on the coastal areas. In the last century, the activity became more frequent and regular with intervals of 20 to 70 years (1940, 1962, 1983 and 2000). The last activity started on 27 June 2000, with a minor submarine eruption on the west coast of the volcano, and proceeded with six major summit eruptions from July 8 to August 29. The eruptions led to the formation of a collapse caldera ~1.6 km across. The total erupted tephra represents only 1.7% in volume of the caldera, the high fragmentation of magma produced mainly fine-grained volcanic ash. In order to improve the understanding on the triggering and dynamics of this explosive eruption, we carried out a detailed investigation of the erupted materials with particular attention to the textural features of juvenile pyroclasts (Vesicle and Crystal Size Distributions). The stratigraphic record can be divided into six fall units, corresponding to the six summit eruptions, although juvenile materials were identified only in 4 units (unit 2, 4, 5, 6). We selected about 100 juvenile grains sampled from the bottom to the top of each level, to be analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The study of juvenile morphological features allowed us to recognize the existence of three characteristic morphotypes, showing marked differences in their external morphologies and internal textures (from poorly to highly crystallized and vesiculated clasts). The distribution of these morphotypes is non-homogeneous along the eruptive sequence indicating changes of dynamics during magma ascent. Juveniles do not show features inherited from the interaction with external water. Vesicle Volume Distributions of the selected ash grains show that the three types of pyroclasts experienced

  15. Droplets impact on textured surfaces: Mesoscopic simulation of spreading dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxiang; Chen, Shuo

    2015-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have attracted much attention due to their excellent water-repellent property. In the present study, droplets in the ideal Cassie state were focused on, and a particle-based numerical method, many-body dissipative particle dynamics, was employed to explore the mechanism of droplets impact on textured surfaces. A solid-fluid interaction with three linear weight functions was used to generate different wettability and a simple but efficient method was introduced to compute the contact angle. The simulated results show that the static contact angle is in good agreement with the Cassie-Baxter formula for smaller ∅S and Fa, but more deviation will be produced for larger ∅S and Fa, and it is related to the fact that the Cassie-Baxter theory does not consider the contact angle hysteresis effect in their formula. Furthermore, high impact velocity can induce large contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with larger ∅S and Fa. The typical time-based evolutions of the spreading diameter were simulated, and they were analyzed from an energy transformation viewpoint. These results also show that the dynamical properties of droplet, such as rebounding or pinning, contact time and maximum spreading diameters, largely depend on the comprehensive effects of the material wettability, fraction of the pillars and impact velocities of the droplets.

  16. Dynamic Textures Modeling via Joint Video Dictionary Learning.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xian; Li, Yuanxiang; Shen, Hao; Chen, Fang; Kleinsteuber, Martin; Wang, Zhongfeng

    2017-04-06

    Video representation is an important and challenging task in the computer vision community. In this paper, we consider the problem of modeling and classifying video sequences of dynamic scenes which could be modeled in a dynamic textures (DT) framework. At first, we assume that image frames of a moving scene can be modeled as a Markov random process. We propose a sparse coding framework, named joint video dictionary learning (JVDL), to model a video adaptively. By treating the sparse coefficients of image frames over a learned dictionary as the underlying "states", we learn an efficient and robust linear transition matrix between two adjacent frames of sparse events in time series. Hence, a dynamic scene sequence is represented by an appropriate transition matrix associated with a dictionary. In order to ensure the stability of JVDL, we impose several constraints on such transition matrix and dictionary. The developed framework is able to capture the dynamics of a moving scene by exploring both sparse properties and the temporal correlations of consecutive video frames. Moreover, such learned JVDL parameters can be used for various DT applications, such as DT synthesis and recognition. Experimental results demonstrate the strong competitiveness of the proposed JVDL approach in comparison with state-of-the-art video representation methods. Especially, it performs significantly better in dealing with DT synthesis and recognition on heavily corrupted data.

  17. Experimental Study on the Perception Characteristics of Haptic Texture by Multidimensional Scaling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Li, Na; Liu, Wei; Song, Guangming; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Recent works regarding real texture perception demonstrate that physical factors such as stiffness and spatial period play a fundamental role in texture perception. This research used a multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis to further characterize and quantify the effects of the simulation parameters on haptic texture rendering and perception. In a pilot experiment, 12 haptic texture samples were generated by using a 3-degrees-of-freedom (3-DOF) force-feedback device with varying spatial period, height, and stiffness coefficient parameter values. The subjects' perceptions of the virtual textures indicate that roughness, denseness, flatness and hardness are distinguishing characteristics of texture. In the main experiment, 19 participants rated the dissimilarities of the textures and estimated the magnitudes of their characteristics. The MDS method was used to recover the underlying perceptual space and reveal the significance of the space from the recorded data. The physical parameters and their combinations have significant effects on the perceptual characteristics. A regression model was used to quantitatively analyze the parameters and their effects on the perceptual characteristics. This paper is to illustrate that haptic texture perception based on force feedback can be modeled in two- or three-dimensional space and provide suggestions on improving perception-based haptic texture rendering.

  18. 17.1%-Efficient Multi-Scale-Textured Black Silicon Solar Cells without Dielectric Antireflection Coating

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, F.; Page, M. R.; Branz, H. M.; Yuan, H. C.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present 17.1%-efficient p-type single crystal Si solar cells with a multi-scale-textured surface and no dielectric antireflection coating. Multi-scale texturing is achieved by a gold-nanoparticle-assisted nanoporous etch after conventional micron scale KOH-based pyramid texturing (pyramid black etching). By incorporating geometric enhancement of antireflection, this multi-scale texturing reduces the nanoporosity depth required to make silicon `black' compared to nanoporous planar surfaces. As a result, it improves short-wavelength spectral response (blue response), previously one of the major limiting factors in `black-Si' solar cells. With multi-scale texturing, the spectrum-weighted average reflectance from 350- to 1000-nm wavelength is below 2% with a 100-nm deep nanoporous layer. In comparison, roughly 250-nm deep nanopores are needed to achieve similar reflectance on planar surface. Here, we characterize surface morphology, reflectivity and solar cell performance of the multi-scale textured solar cells.

  19. Bolus matters: the influence of food oral breakdown on dynamic texture perception.

    PubMed

    Devezeaux de Lavergne, Marine; van de Velde, Fred; Stieger, Markus

    2017-02-22

    This review article focuses on design of food structure, characterisation of oral processing by boli characterisation and dynamic texture perception. Knowledge of the food properties governing bolus formation and bolus properties determining temporal changes in texture perception is of major importance. Such knowledge allows academia to better understand the mechanisms underlying texture perception and food industry to improve product texture. For instance, such knowledge can be used for developing foods with desired texture perception that fit in a healthy diet or that are customized to specific consumer groups. The end point of oral processing is the formation of a safe-to-swallow bolus. The transitions of solid and soft solid foods into bolus are accompanied by tremendous modifications of food properties. The review discusses dynamic changes in bolus properties resulting in dynamic changes of texture perception during oral processing. Studies monitoring chewing behaviour are discussed to complement the relationships between bolus properties and dynamic texture perception. We conclude that texture perception evolves over mastication time and depends on food properties, such as mechanical properties, mainly in the beginning of oral processing. Towards the middle and end of oral processing, bolus properties depend on food properties and explain texture perception better than food properties.

  20. Characterization of Enhancing MS Lesions by Dynamic Texture Parameter Analysis of Dynamic Susceptibility Perfusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev K.; Slotboom, Johannes; Locher, Cäcilia; Heldner, Mirjam R.; Weisstanner, Christian; Abela, Eugenio; Kellner-Weldon, Frauke; Zbinden, Martin; Kamm, Christian P.; Wiest, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate statistical differences with MR perfusion imaging features that reflect the dynamics of Gadolinium-uptake in MS lesions using dynamic texture parameter analysis (DTPA). Methods. We investigated 51 MS lesions (25 enhancing, 26 nonenhancing lesions) of 12 patients. Enhancing lesions (n = 25) were prestratified into enhancing lesions with increased permeability (EL+; n = 11) and enhancing lesions with subtle permeability (EL−; n = 14). Histogram-based feature maps were computed from the raw DSC-image time series and the corresponding texture parameters were analyzed during the inflow, outflow, and reperfusion time intervals. Results. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found between EL+ and EL− and between EL+ and nonenhancing inactive lesions (NEL). Main effects between EL+ versus EL− and EL+ versus NEL were observed during reperfusion (mainly in mean and standard deviation (SD): EL+ versus EL− and EL+ versus NEL), while EL− and NEL differed only in their SD during outflow. Conclusion. DTPA allows grading enhancing MS lesions according to their perfusion characteristics. Texture parameters of EL− were similar to NEL, while EL+ differed significantly from EL− and NEL. Dynamic texture analysis may thus be further investigated as noninvasive endogenous marker of lesion formation and restoration. PMID:26885524

  1. Molecular kinetic theory of boundary slip on textured surfaces by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, LiYa; Wang, FengChao; Yang, FuQian; Wu, HengAn

    2014-11-01

    A theoretical model extended from the Frenkel-Eyring molecular kinetic theory (MKT) was applied to describe the boundary slip on textured surfaces. The concept of the equivalent depth of potential well was adopted to characterize the solid-liquid interactions on the textured surfaces. The slip behaviors on both chemically and topographically textured surfaces were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The extended MKT slip model is validated by our MD simulations under various situations, by constructing different complex surfaces and varying the surface wettability as well as the shear stress exerted on the liquid. This slip model can provide more comprehensive understanding of the liquid flow on atomic scale by considering the influence of the solid-liquid interactions and the applied shear stress on the nano-flow. Moreover, the slip velocity shear-rate dependence can be predicted using this slip model, since the nonlinear increase of the slip velocity under high shear stress can be approximated by a hyperbolic sine function.

  2. Texture descriptions of lunar surface derived from LOLA data: Kilometer-scale roughness and entropy maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Ling, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Wu, Zhongchen; Ni, Yuheng; Zhao, Haowei

    2015-11-01

    The lunar global texture maps of roughness and entropy are derived at kilometer scales from Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) data obtained by Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) aboard on Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) spacecraft. We use statistical moments of a gray-level histogram of elevations in a neighborhood to compute the roughness and entropy value. Our texture descriptors measurements are shown in global maps at multi-sized square neighborhoods, whose length of side is 3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 pixels, respectively. We found that large-scale topographical changes can only be displayed in maps with longer side of neighborhood, but the small scale global texture maps are more disorderly and unsystematic because of more complicated textures' details. Then, the frequency curves of texture maps are made out, whose shapes and distributions are changing as the spatial scales increases. Entropy frequency curve with minimum 3-pixel scale has large fluctuations and six peaks. According to this entropy curve we can classify lunar surface into maria, highlands, different parts of craters preliminarily. The most obvious textures in the middle-scale roughness and entropy maps are the two typical morphological units, smooth maria and rough highlands. For the impact crater, its roughness and entropy value are characterized by a multiple-ring structure obviously, and its different parts have different texture results. In the last, we made a 2D scatter plot between the two texture results of typical lunar maria and highlands. There are two clusters with largest dot density which are corresponded to the lunar highlands and maria separately. In the lunar mare regions (cluster A), there is a high correlation between roughness and entropy, but in the highlands (Cluster B), the entropy shows little change. This could be subjected to different geological processes of maria and highlands forming different landforms.

  3. Statistical multiscale blob features for classifying and retrieving image texture from large-scale databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Wu, Haishan; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2010-10-01

    The extraction of texture features from images faces two new challenges: large-scale databases with diversified textures, and varying imaging conditions. We propose a novel method termed multiscale blob features (MBF) to overcome these two difficulties. MBF analyzes textures in both resolution scale and gray level. Proposed statistical descriptors effectively extract structural information from the decomposed binary images. Experimental results show that MBF outperforms other methods on combined large-scale databases (VisTex+Brodatz+CUReT+OuTex). Moreover, experimental results on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign database and the entire Brodatz's atlas show that MBF is invariant to gray-level scaling and image rotation, and is robust across a substantial range of spatial scaling.

  4. The case for aeolian control of meter-scale surface texture on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    The origin of Mars surface units and the extent of subsequent cratering play key roles in determining surface texture. At scale sizes of 0.1-10 meters, however, there is a growing body of evidence that wind is the dominant force. The direct and indirect evidence which implies that meter-scale surface texture on Mars is controlled by the wind is presented. Since radar is uniquely sensitive to structure on these scales, radio wave scattering data can provide insight on aeolian activity available from no other source.

  5. The case for aeolian control of meter-scale surface texture on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. A.; Tyler, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    The origin of Mars surface units and the extent of subsequent cratering play key roles in determining surface texture. At scale sizes of 0.1-10 meters, however, there is a growing body of evidence that wind is the dominant force. The direct and indirect evidence which implies that meter-scale surface texture on Mars is controlled by the wind is presented. Since radar is uniquely sensitive to structure on these scales, radio wave scattering data can provide insight on aeolian activity available from no other source.

  6. Thrombus segmentation by texture dynamics from microscopic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brieu, Nicolas; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Cvejic, Ana; Stemple, Derek; Ouwehand, Willem; Navab, Nassir; Groher, Martin

    2010-03-01

    The genetic factors of thrombosis are commonly explored by microscopically imaging the coagulation of blood cells induced by injuring a vessel of mice or of zebrafish mutants. The latter species is particularly interesting since skin transparency permits to non-invasively acquire microscopic images of the scene with a CCD camera and to estimate the parameters characterizing the thrombus development. These parameters are currently determined by manual outlining, which is both error prone and extremely time consuming. Even though a technique for automatic thrombus extraction would be highly valuable for gene analysts, little work can be found, which is mainly due to very low image contrast and spurious structures. In this work, we propose to semi-automatically segment the thrombus over time from microscopic image sequences of wild-type zebrafish larvae. To compensate the lack of valuable spatial information, our main idea consists of exploiting the temporal information by modeling the variations of the pixel intensities over successive temporal windows with a linear Markov-based dynamic texture formalization. We then derive an image from the estimated model parameters, which represents the probability of a pixel to belong to the thrombus. We employ this probability image to accurately estimate the thrombus position via an active contour segmentation incorporating also prior and spatial information of the underlying intensity images. The performance of our approach is tested on three microscopic image sequences. We show that the thrombus is accurately tracked over time in each sequence if the respective parameters controlling prior influence and contour stiffness are correctly chosen.

  7. Modelling Nonlinear Dynamic Textures using Hybrid DWT-DCT and Kernel PCA with GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadekar, Premanand Pralhad; Chopade, Nilkanth Bhikaji

    2016-12-01

    Most of the real-world dynamic textures are nonlinear, non-stationary, and irregular. Nonlinear motion also has some repetition of motion, but it exhibits high variation, stochasticity, and randomness. Hybrid DWT-DCT and Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) with YCbCr/YIQ colour coding using the Dynamic Texture Unit (DTU) approach is proposed to model a nonlinear dynamic texture, which provides better results than state-of-art methods in terms of PSNR, compression ratio, model coefficients, and model size. Dynamic texture is decomposed into DTUs as they help to extract temporal self-similarity. Hybrid DWT-DCT is used to extract spatial redundancy. YCbCr/YIQ colour encoding is performed to capture chromatic correlation. KPCA is applied to capture nonlinear motion. Further, the proposed algorithm is implemented on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), which comprise of hundreds of small processors to decrease time complexity and to achieve parallelism.

  8. Rotation and Scale Invariant Wavelet Feature for Content-Based Texture Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moon-Chuen; Pun, Chi-Man

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a rotation and scale invariant log-polar wavelet texture feature for image retrieval. The underlying feature extraction process involves a log-polar transform followed by an adaptive row shift invariant wavelet packet transform. Experimental results show that this rotation and scale invariant wavelet feature is quite effective for image…

  9. Rotation and Scale Invariant Wavelet Feature for Content-Based Texture Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Moon-Chuen; Pun, Chi-Man

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a rotation and scale invariant log-polar wavelet texture feature for image retrieval. The underlying feature extraction process involves a log-polar transform followed by an adaptive row shift invariant wavelet packet transform. Experimental results show that this rotation and scale invariant wavelet feature is quite effective for image…

  10. Computer-aided mass detection in mammography: False positive reduction via gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features

    SciTech Connect

    Masotti, Matteo; Lanconelli, Nico; Campanini, Renato

    2009-02-15

    In this work, gray-scale invariant ranklet texture features are proposed for false positive reduction (FPR) in computer-aided detection (CAD) of breast masses. Two main considerations are at the basis of this proposal. First, false positive (FP) marks surviving our previous CAD system seem to be characterized by specific texture properties that can be used to discriminate them from masses. Second, our previous CAD system achieves invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations by encoding regions of interest into ranklet images through the ranklet transform, an image transformation similar to the wavelet transform, yet dealing with pixels' ranks rather than with their gray-scale values. Therefore, the new FPR approach proposed herein defines a set of texture features which are calculated directly from the ranklet images corresponding to the regions of interest surviving our previous CAD system, hence, ranklet texture features; then, a support vector machine (SVM) classifier is used for discrimination. As a result of this approach, texture-based information is used to discriminate FP marks surviving our previous CAD system; at the same time, invariance to linear/nonlinear monotonic gray-scale transformations of the new CAD system is guaranteed, as ranklet texture features are calculated from ranklet images that have this property themselves by construction. To emphasize the gray-scale invariance of both the previous and new CAD systems, training and testing are carried out without any in-between parameters' adjustment on mammograms having different gray-scale dynamics; in particular, training is carried out on analog digitized mammograms taken from a publicly available digital database, whereas testing is performed on full-field digital mammograms taken from an in-house database. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve analysis of the two CAD systems demonstrates that the new approach achieves a higher reduction of FP marks

  11. Perception of spatiotemporal random fractals: an extension of colorimetric methods to the study of dynamic texture.

    PubMed

    Billock, V A; Cunningham, D W; Havig, P R; Tsou, B H

    2001-10-01

    Recent work establishes that static and dynamic natural images have fractal-like l/falpha spatiotemporal spectra. Artifical textures, with randomized phase spectra, and 1/falpha amplitude spectra are also used in studies of texture and noise perception. Influenced by colorimetric principles and motivated by the ubiquity of 1/falpha spatial and temporal image spectra, we treat the spatial and temporal frequency exponents as the dimensions characterizing a dynamic texture space, and we characterize two key attributes of this space, the spatiotemporal appearance map and the spatiotemporal discrimination function (a map of MacAdam-like just-noticeable-difference contours).

  12. Laser induced multi-scale textured zirconia coating on Ti-6Al-4V.

    PubMed

    Kurella, Anil; Dahotre, Narendra B

    2006-06-01

    A textured coating of zirconia on Ti-6Al-4V alloy was produced using pulsed laser based processing technique. Scanning electron microscope observations coupled with fractal analysis revealed the multi-scale nature of the textured coating. Both stylus based profilometric measurements and fractal analysis indicated non-linear nature of the relationship between laser processing speed at constant pulse frequency (10 kHz) and roughness of the textured coating. The textured coatings produced with all the three processing speeds (40, 160, 290 cm/min) were fractal over certain length scales. Processing at 40 cm/min resulted in structures that are fractal across a large number of length scales where as higher processing speeds resulted in fractality over fewer length scales. The processing speed influenced the zirconia content in the coating and the phase transformation within Ti-matrix of the coating. Within the coating, while zirconia content decreased the amount of retained beta-Ti increased with increase in processing speed. Such physical and chemical transformations are desired in a titanium bio-implant for effective contact with protein, cells and tissues at various length scales and its effective chemical performance in bio-environment.

  13. Land use/land cover mapping using multi-scale texture processing of high resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. N.; Sarker, M. L. R.

    2014-02-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) maps are useful for many purposes, and for a long time remote sensing techniques have been used for LULC mapping using different types of data and image processing techniques. In this research, high resolution satellite data from IKONOS was used to perform land use/land cover mapping in Johor Bahru city and adjacent areas (Malaysia). Spatial image processing was carried out using the six texture algorithms (mean, variance, contrast, homogeneity, entropy, and GLDV angular second moment) with five difference window sizes (from 3×3 to 11×11). Three different classifiers i.e. Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Supported Vector Machine (SVM) were used to classify the texture parameters of different spectral bands individually and all bands together using the same training and validation samples. Results indicated that texture parameters of all bands together generally showed a better performance (overall accuracy = 90.10%) for land LULC mapping, however, single spectral band could only achieve an overall accuracy of 72.67%. This research also found an improvement of the overall accuracy (OA) using single-texture multi-scales approach (OA = 89.10%) and single-scale multi-textures approach (OA = 90.10%) compared with all original bands (OA = 84.02%) because of the complementary information from different bands and different texture algorithms. On the other hand, all of the three different classifiers have showed high accuracy when using different texture approaches, but SVM generally showed higher accuracy (90.10%) compared to MLC (89.10%) and ANN (89.67%) especially for the complex classes such as urban and road.

  14. Comparative study of texture features in OCT images at different scales for human breast tissue classification.

    PubMed

    Yu Gan; Xinwen Yao; Chang, Ernest; Bin Amir, Syed; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Feldman, Sheldon; Hendon, Christine P

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death in women in the United States due to cancer. Early detection of breast cancerous regions will aid the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of breast cancer. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a non-invasive imaging modality with high resolution, has been widely used to visualize various tissue types within the human breast and has demonstrated great potential for assessing tumor margins. Imaging large resected samples with a fast imaging speed can be accomplished by under-sampling in the spatial domain, resulting in a large image scale. However, it is unclear whether there is an impact on the ability to classify tissue types based on the selected imaging scale. Our objective is to evaluate how the scale at which the images are acquired impacts texture features and the accuracy of an automated classification algorithm. To this end, we present a comparative study of texture features in OCT images at two image scales for human breast tissue classification. Texture features and attenuation coefficients were inputs to a statistical classification model, relevance vector machine. The automated classification results from the two image scales were compared. We found that more informative tissue features are preserved in small image scale and accordingly, small image scale leads to more accurate tissue type classification.

  15. Dynamic recrystallization and texture evolution of Mg–Y–Zn alloy during hot extrusion process

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, L.B.; Li, X.; Zhang, D.P.; Cheng, L.R.; Meng, J.; Zhang, H.J.

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and texture evolution of Mg{sub 98.5}Y{sub 1}Zn{sub 0.5} and Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} (atomic percent) alloys during hot extrusion were systematically investigated. The coarse LPSO phases with higher volume fraction (∼ 57%) suppressed the twinning generation in the initial stage of extrusion, and accelerated the dynamic recrystallization through the particle deformation zones. Therefore, the volume fraction of DRXed grains in as-extruded Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} alloy was much higher than that of Mg{sub 98.5}Y{sub 1}Zn{sub 0.5} alloy. The intensive recrystallization process resulted in the conventional basal texture weakening, although the texture evolution was mainly dominated by flow behavior. The dynamic recrystallization behavior in Mg{sub 92.5}Y{sub 5}Zn{sub 2.5} alloy restricted the formation of deformation texture, and thus the more random texture was observed during the whole extrusion process. - Highlights: • The densely coarse LPSO phases suppressed the twinning deformation. • Coarse LPSO phases induced the particle stimulated nucleation effect. • Dynamic recrystallization resulted in the basal texture weakening effect.

  16. Probability maps as a way to communicate uncertainty in soil texture classes at landscape scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlins, Barry; Lark, Murray

    2014-05-01

    Soil texture is critical for a range of functions and degradation threats including soil carbon cycling, hydrology and erosion. The texture of a soil at a point in the landscape is often expressed as a class in a soil texture triangle. The boundaries between these classes are based on the proportions of sand, silt and clay-sized particles. Soils are typically attributed to a single class, without considering the uncertainty associated with class membership. We demonstrate an approach for communicating uncertainty in spatial prediction of soil texture classes using a database of 2600 measurements of particle size distribution across part of England. A subset of these measurements included repeated analyses of separate aliquots from the same sample from which we could compute uncertainties associated with analytical and subsampling variance to include in our uncertainty analysis. After appropriate transformation for compositional variables, the spatial variation of the soil particle size classes was modelled geostatistically using robust variogram estimators to produce a validated linear model of coregionalization. This was then used to predict the composition of topsoil at the nodes of a fine grid. The predictions were backtransformed to the original scales of measurement by a Monte Carlo integration over the prediction distribution on the transformed scale. This approach allowed the probability to be computed for each class in the soil texture classification, at each node on the grid. The probability of each class, and derived information such as the class of maximum probability could therefore be mapped. We validated the predictions at a set of randomly sampled locations. We consider this technique has the potential to improve the communication of uncertainty associated with the application of soil texture classifications in soil science.

  17. Multi-modality registration via multi-scale textural and spectral embedding representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Rusu, Mirabela; Viswanath, Satish; Penzias, Gregory; Pahwa, Shivani; Gollamudi, Jay; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-03-01

    Intensity-based similarity measures assume that the original signal intensity of different modality images can provide statistically consistent information regarding the two modalities to be co-registered. In multi-modal registration problems, however, intensity-based similarity measures are often inadequate to identify an optimal transformation. Texture features can improve the performance of the multi-modal co-registration by providing more similar appearance representations of the two images to be co-registered, compared to the signal intensity representations. Furthermore, texture features extracted at different length scales (neighborhood sizes) can reveal similar underlying structural attributes between the images to be co-registered similarities that may not be discernible on the signal intensity representation alone. However one limitation of using texture features is that a number of them may be redundant and dependent and hence there is a need to identify non-redundant representations. Additionally it is not clear which features at which specific scales reveal similar attributes across the images to be co-registered. To address this problem, we introduced a novel approach for multimodal co-registration that employs new multi-scale image representations. Our approach comprises 4 distinct steps: (1) texure feature extraction at each length scale within both the target and template images, (2) independent component analysis (ICA) at each texture feature length scale, and (3) spectrally embedding (SE) the ICA components (ICs) obtained for the texture features at each length scale, and finally (4) identifying and combining the optimal length scales at which to perform the co-registration. To combine and co-register across different length scales, -mutual information (-MI) was applied in the high dimensional space of spectral embedding vectors to facilitate co-registration. To validate our multi-scale co-registration approach, we aligned 45 pairs of prostate

  18. Multi-Scale Fractal Analysis of Image Texture and Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emerson, Charles W.; Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    1997-01-01

    Fractals embody important ideas of self-similarity, in which the spatial behavior or appearance of a system is largely scale-independent. Self-similarity is a property of curves or surfaces where each part is indistinguishable from the whole. The fractal dimension D of remote sensing data yields quantitative insight on the spatial complexity and information content contained within these data. Analyses of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) images of homogeneous land covers near Huntsville, Alabama revealed that the fractal dimension of an image of an agricultural land cover indicates greater complexity as pixel size increases, a forested land cover gradually grows smoother, and an urban image remains roughly self-similar over the range of pixel sizes analyzed(l0 to 80 meters). The forested scene behaves as one would expect-larger pixel sizes decrease the complexity of the image as individual clumps of trees are averaged into larger blocks. The increased complexity of the agricultural image with increasing pixel size results from the loss of homogeneous groups of pixels in the large fields to mixed pixels composed of varying combinations of NDVI values that correspond to roads and vegetation. The same process occur's in the urban image to some extent, but the lack of large, homogeneous areas in the high resolution NDVI image means the initially high D value is maintained as pixel size increases. The slope of the fractal dimension-resolution relationship provides indications of how image classification or feature identification will be affected by changes in sensor resolution.

  19. Bio-inspired scale-like surface textures and their tribological properties.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Christian; Schäfer, Michael

    2015-06-30

    Friction, wear and the associated energy dissipation are major challenges in all systems containing moving parts. Examples range from nanoelectromechanical systems over hip prosthesis to off-shore wind turbines. Bionic approaches have proven to be very successful in many engineering problems, while investigating the potential of a bio-inspired approach in creating morphological surface textures is a relatively new field of research. Here, we developed laser-created textures inspired by the scales found on the skin of snakes and certain lizards. We show that this bio-inspired surface morphology reduced dry sliding friction forces by more than 40%. In lubricated contacts the same morphology increased friction by a factor of three. Two different kinds of morphologies, one with completely overlapping scales and one with the scales arranged in individual rows, were chosen. In lubricated as well as unlubricated contacts, the surface texture with the scales in rows showed lower friction forces than the completely overlapping ones. We anticipate that these results could have significant impact in all dry sliding contacts, ranging from nanoelectromechanical and micro-positioning systems up to large-scale tribological contacts which cannot be lubricated, e.g. because they are employed in a vacuum environment.

  20. Large-scale structure in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Spergel, David N.; Turok, Nail

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the formation of large-scale structure by global texture in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter. A code for evolution of the texture fields was combined with an N-body code for evolving the dark matter. The results indicate some promising aspects: with only one free parameter, the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function is reproduced, clusters of galaxies are found to be significantly clustered on a scale of 20-50/h Mpc, and coherent structures of over 50/h Mpc in the galaxy distribution were found. The large-scale streaming motions observed are in good agreement with the observations: the average magnitude of the velocity field smoothed over 30/h Mpc is 430 km/sec. Global texture produces a cosmic Mach number that is compatible with observation. Also, significant evolution of clusters at low redshift was seen. Possible problems for the theory include too high velocity dispersions in clusters, and voids which are not as empty as those observed.

  1. Large-scale structure in a texture-seeded cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Changbom; Spergel, David N.; Turok, Nail

    1991-01-01

    This paper studies the formation of large-scale structure by global texture in a flat universe dominated by cold dark matter. A code for evolution of the texture fields was combined with an N-body code for evolving the dark matter. The results indicate some promising aspects: with only one free parameter, the observed galaxy-galaxy correlation function is reproduced, clusters of galaxies are found to be significantly clustered on a scale of 20-50/h Mpc, and coherent structures of over 50/h Mpc in the galaxy distribution were found. The large-scale streaming motions observed are in good agreement with the observations: the average magnitude of the velocity field smoothed over 30/h Mpc is 430 km/sec. Global texture produces a cosmic Mach number that is compatible with observation. Also, significant evolution of clusters at low redshift was seen. Possible problems for the theory include too high velocity dispersions in clusters, and voids which are not as empty as those observed.

  2. Lunar textural analysis based on WAC-derived kilometer-scale roughness and entropy maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, XueQiang; Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Jian; Ling, Zongcheng

    2016-06-01

    In general, textures are thought to be some complicated repeated patterns formed by elements, or primitives which are sorted in certain rules. Lunar surfaces record the interactions between its outside environment and itself, thus, based on high-resolution DEM model or image data, there are some topographic features which have different roughness and entropy values or signatures on lunar surfaces. Textures of lunar surfaces can help us to concentrate on typical topographic and photometric variations and reveal the relationships between obvious features (craters, impact basins, sinuous rilles (SRs) and ridges) with resurfacing processes on the Moon. In this paper, the term surface roughness is an expression of the variability of a topographic or photometric surface at kilometer scale, and the term entropy can characterize the variability inherent in a geological and topographic unit and evaluate the uncertainty of predictions made by a given geological process. We use the statistical moments of gray-level histograms in different-sized neighborhoods (e.g., 3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 pixels) to compute the kilometer-scale roughness and entropy values, using the mosaic image from 70°N to 70°S obtained by Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC). Large roughness and entropy signatures were only found in the larger scale maps, while the smallest 3-pixel scale map had more disorderly and unsystematic textures. According to the entropy values in 10-pixel scale entropy map, we made a frequency curve and categorized lunar surfaces into three types, shadow effects, maria and highlands. A 2D scatter plot of entropy versus roughness values was produced and we found that there were two point clusters corresponding to the highlands and maria, respectively. In the last, we compared the topographic and photometric signatures derived from Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data and WAC mosaic image. On the lunar surfaces, the ridges have obvious multilevel

  3. Internal rupture and rapid bouncing of impacting drops induced by submillimeter-scale textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiwen; Hao, Pengfei; He, Feng

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate an internal breakup mechanism for high Weber number drop impact on superhydrophobic surfaces uniformly patterned with submillimeter-scale textures, in which the liquid film ruptures from both interior and rim. The employment of submillimeter-scale posts could help decrease the critical Weber number of internal rupture, due to the small solid fraction and the large dimension ratio between primary structures and droplets. The internal rupture is found to promote more rapid drop bouncing than conventional rebound and rim breakup on superhydrophobic surfaces with small roughness, with a 10%-50% reduction of contact time. The internal rupture results from the film instability inside and the jet instability outside.

  4. Influence of Textured Insoles on Dynamic Postural Balance of Young Dancers.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Tirosh, Oren; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; Waddington, Gordon

    2017-06-01

    Postural balance (PB) is a significant factor in dance performance and injury prevention. We aimed to determine whether the use of textured insoles inserted into casual walking shoes of dancers improved their dynamic PB and whether dancers with previous injury manifested different dynamic PB compared with non-injured dancers. In this crossover design study, 26 ballet dancers from the Australian Ballet School, aged 14-19 yrs, were divided into two groups matched by sex and class levels. Group 1 wore the textured insoles in their walking shoes for at least 2 hrs/day during weeks 1 to 4 of the study, and group 2 wore the textured insoles in their walking shoes during weeks 5 to 8. Reports from the school medical staff identified dancers who had previous injuries. All participants were tested pre-intervention and at 4 and 8 weeks by an accelerometer for dynamic PB (average acceleration magnitude, root mean square acceleration, range, and mean frequency) during single-leg fondu, flexing and extending of the knee. Interactions (group x time) were found in dynamic PB measured in the mediolateral direction, indicating significant differences between the groups at the three testing times. Furthermore, both previously injured and noninjured dancers manifested significant time effects from pre-intervention to 8 weeks, indicating a significant improvement in their PB after using the textured insoles. Textured insoles can improve the dynamic PB of ballet dancers and can also be useful as a routine intervention. PB was improved among both dancers with previous injury and non-injured dancers.

  5. Scale Space Graph Representation and Kernel Matching for Non Rigid and Textured 3D Shape Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Garro, Valeria; Giachetti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel framework for 3D object retrieval that relies on tree-based shape representations (TreeSha) derived from the analysis of the scale-space of the Auto Diffusion Function (ADF) and on specialized graph kernels designed for their comparison. By coupling maxima of the Auto Diffusion Function with the related basins of attraction, we can link the information at different scales encoding spatial relationships in a graph description that is isometry invariant and can easily incorporate texture and additional geometrical information as node and edge features. Using custom graph kernels it is then possible to estimate shape dissimilarities adapted to different specific tasks and on different categories of models, making the procedure a powerful and flexible tool for shape recognition and retrieval. Experimental results demonstrate that the method can provide retrieval scores similar or better than state-of-the-art on textured and non textured shape retrieval benchmarks and give interesting insights on effectiveness of different shape descriptors and graph kernels.

  6. Accuracy of stereomotion speed perception with persisting and dynamic textures.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Kevin R; Stone, Leland S

    2010-12-01

    It has been established that the motion in depth of stimuli visible to both eyes may be signalled binocularly either by a change of disparity over time or by the difference in the velocity of the images projected on each retina, known as an interocular velocity difference. A two-interval forced-choice stereomotion speed discrimination experiment was performed on four participants to ascertain the relative speed of a persistent random dot stereogram (RDS) and a dynamic RDS undergoing directly approaching or receding motion in depth. While the persistent RDS pattern involved identical dot patterns translating in opposite directions in each eye, and hence included both changing disparity and interocular velocity difference cues, the dynamic RDS pattern (which contains no coherent monocular motion signals) specified motion in depth through changing disparity, but no motion through interocular velocity difference. Despite an interocular velocity difference speed signal of zero motion in depth, the dynamic RDS stimulus appeared to move more rapidly. These observations are consistent with a scheme in which cues that rely on coherent monocular motion signals (such as looming and the interocular velocity difference cue) are less influential in dynamic stimuli due to their lack of reliability (i.e., increased noise). While dynamic RDS stimuli may be relatively unaffected by the contributions of such cues when they signal that the stimulus did not move in depth, the persistent RDS stimulus may retain a significant and conflicting contribution from the looming cue, resulting in a lower perceived speed.

  7. Internal stresses at the crystalline scale in textured ZrO2 films before lateral cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdin, Clotilde; Pascal, Serge; Tang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    Zirconium oxide layers are submitted to internal stresses that play a role in damage of the layer. Lateral cracking is often observed during Zr alloys oxidation. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the microstresses at the crystalline scale on the lateral cracking within a growing oxide on a plane substrate. A parametric study was carried out taking into account the crystallographic texture of the oxide and the presence of a tetragonal zirconia at the metal-oxide interface. Macroscopic computations and polycrystalline aggregate computations were performed. The result indicating the (1 0 6 bar) fiber texture as the most favorable was recovered. It was found that under macroscopic compressive stresses parallel to the plane metal-oxide interface, positive microstresses perpendicular to the interface develops. They can trigger the lateral cracking and the phenomenon is promoted by the presence of tetragonal zirconia at the metal-oxide interface.

  8. Dynamic Crystallization Experiments on LEW97008: Experimental Reproduction of Chondroid Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettles, J. W.; Le, L.; Lofgren, G. E.; McSween, H. Y, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic crystallization experiments were conducted using LEW97008 (L3.4) as starting material. Experiments were melted at temperatures well below its liquidus (1250-1450 C) in order to document the textural and compositional changes that occur in UOC material with modest amounts of partial melting and subsequent crystallization. The textures of the experimental products compare very well to natural chondroids (partially melted nebular particles that would become chondrules if more completely melted). Thus it is possible to use the textures in these experiments as a guide to unraveling the melting and cooling histories of natural chondroids. The Antarctic meteorite LEW97008 was chosen as the starting material for our experiments. As an L3.4 it is slightly more metamorphosed than would ordinarily be preferred, but this meteorite is unusually fresh for an Antarctic meteorite, which made it attractive.

  9. 17.1%-Efficient Multi-Scale-Textured Black Silicon Solar Cells without Dielectric Antireflection Coating: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, F.; Page, M. R.; Branz, H. M.; Yuan, H. C.

    2011-07-01

    In this work we present 17.1%-efficient p-type single crystal Si solar cells with a multi-scale-textured surface and no dielectric antireflection coating. Multi-scale texturing is achieved by a gold-nanoparticle-assisted nanoporous etch after conventional micron scale KOH-based pyramid texturing (pyramid black etching). By incorporating geometric enhancement of antireflection, this multi-scale texturing reduces the nanoporosity depth required to make silicon 'black' compared to nanoporous planar surfaces. As a result, it improves short-wavelength spectral response (blue response), previously one of the major limiting factors in 'black-Si' solar cells. With multi-scale texturing, the spectrum-weighted average reflectance from 350- to 1000-nm wavelength is below 2% with a 100-nm deep nanoporous layer. In comparison, roughly 250-nm deep nanopores are needed to achieve similar reflectance on planar surface. Here, we characterize surface morphology, reflectivity and solar cell performance of the multi-scale textured solar cells.

  10. Double dynamic scaling in human communication dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengfeng; Feng, Xin; Wu, Ye; Xiao, Jinhua

    2017-05-01

    In the last decades, human behavior has been deeply understanding owing to the huge quantities data of human behavior available for study. The main finding in human dynamics shows that temporal processes consist of high-activity bursty intervals alternating with long low-activity periods. A model, assuming the initiator of bursty follow a Poisson process, is widely used in the modeling of human behavior. Here, we provide further evidence for the hypothesis that different bursty intervals are independent. Furthermore, we introduce a special threshold to quantitatively distinguish the time scales of complex dynamics based on the hypothesis. Our results suggest that human communication behavior is a composite process of double dynamics with midrange memory length. The method for calculating memory length would enhance the performance of many sequence-dependent systems, such as server operation and topic identification.

  11. Large-Scale Point-Cloud Visualization through Localized Textured Surface Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Arikan, Murat; Preiner, Reinhold; Scheiblauer, Claus; Jeschke, Stefan; Wimmer, Michael

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel scene representation for the visualization of large-scale point clouds accompanied by a set of high-resolution photographs. Many real-world applications deal with very densely sampled point-cloud data, which are augmented with photographs that often reveal lighting variations and inaccuracies in registration. Consequently, the high-quality representation of the captured data, i.e., both point clouds and photographs together, is a challenging and time-consuming task. We propose a two-phase approach, in which the first (preprocessing) phase generates multiple overlapping surface patches and handles the problem of seamless texture generation locally for each patch. The second phase stitches these patches at render-time to produce a high-quality visualization of the data. As a result of the proposed localization of the global texturing problem, our algorithm is more than an order of magnitude faster than equivalent mesh-based texturing techniques. Furthermore, since our preprocessing phase requires only a minor fraction of the whole data set at once, we provide maximum flexibility when dealing with growing data sets.

  12. Rotation invariant texture retrieval considering the scale dependence of Gabor wavelet.

    PubMed

    Chaorong Li; Guiduo Duan; Fujin Zhong

    2015-08-01

    Obtaining robust and efficient rotation-invariant texture features in content-based image retrieval field is a challenging work. We propose three efficient rotation-invariant methods for texture image retrieval using copula model based in the domains of Gabor wavelet (GW) and circularly symmetric GW (CSGW). The proposed copula models use copula function to capture the scale dependence of GW/CSGW for improving the retrieval performance. It is well known that the Kullback-Leibler distance (KLD) is the commonly used similarity measurement between probability models. However, it is difficult to deduce the closed-form of KLD between two copula models due to the complexity of the copula model. We also put forward a kind of retrieval scheme using the KLDs of marginal distributions and the KLD of copula function to calculate the KLD of copula model. The proposed texture retrieval method has low computational complexity and high retrieval precision. The experimental results on VisTex and Brodatz data sets show that the proposed retrieval method is more effective compared with the state-of-the-art methods.

  13. Dynamic wetting and spreading characteristics of a liquid droplet impinging on hydrophobic textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Bong; Lee, Seong Hyuk

    2011-06-07

    We report on the wetting dynamics of a 4.3 μL deionized (DI) water droplet impinging on microtextured aluminum (Al 6061) surfaces, including microhole arrays (hole diameter 125 μm and hole depth 125 μm) fabricated using a conventional microcomputer numerically controlled (μ-CNC) milling machine. This study examines the influence of the texture area fraction ϕ(s) and drop impact velocity on the spreading characteristics from the measurement of the apparent equilibrium contact angle, dynamic contact angle, and maximum spreading diameter. We found that for textured surfaces the measured apparent contact angle (CA) takes on values of up to 125.83°, compared to a CA of approximately 80.59° for a nontextured bare surface, and that the spreading factor decreases with the increased texture area fraction because of increased hydrophobicity, partial penetration of the liquid, and viscous dissipation. In particular, on the basis of the model of Ukiwe and Kwok (Ukiwe, C.; Kwok, D. Y. Langmuir 2005, 21, 666), we suggest a modified equation for predicting the maximum spreading factor by considering various texturing effects and wetting states. Compared with predictions by using earlier published models, the present model shows better agreement with experimental measurements of the maximum spreading factor.

  14. [Application of optical flow dynamic texture in land use/cover change detection].

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Gong, Yi-Long; Zhang, Yi; Duan, Wei

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, a novel change detection approach for high resolution remote sensing images is proposed based on the optical flow dynamic texture (OFDT), which could achieve the land use & land cover change information automatically with a dynamic description of ground-object changes. This paper describes the ground-object gradual change process from the principle using optical flow theory, which breaks the ground-object sudden change hypothesis in remote sensing change detection methods in the past. As the steps of this method are simple, it could be integrated in the systems and software such as Land Resource Management and Urban Planning software that needs to find ground-object changes. This method takes into account the temporal dimension feature between remote sensing images, which provides a richer set of information for remote sensing change detection, thereby improving the status that most of the change detection methods are mainly dependent on the spatial dimension information. In this article, optical flow dynamic texture is the basic reflection of changes, and it is used in high resolution remote sensing image support vector machine post-classification change detection, combined with spectral information. The texture in the temporal dimension which is considered in this article has a smaller amount of data than most of the textures in the spatial dimensions. The highly automated texture computing has only one parameter to set, which could relax the onerous manual evaluation present status. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is evaluated with the 2011 and 2012 QuickBird datasets covering Duerbert Mongolian Autonomous County of Daqing City, China. Then, the effects of different optical flow smooth coefficient and the impact on the description of the ground-object changes in the method are deeply analyzed: The experiment result is satisfactory, with an 87.29% overall accuracy and an 0.850 7 Kappa index, and the method achieves better

  15. Generic dynamic scaling in kinetic roughening

    PubMed

    Ramasco; Lopez; Rodriguez

    2000-03-06

    We study the dynamic scaling hypothesis in invariant surface growth. We show that the existence of power-law scaling of the correlation functions (scale invariance) does not determine a unique dynamic scaling form of the correlation functions, which leads to the different anomalous forms of scaling recently observed in growth models. We derive all the existing forms of anomalous dynamic scaling from a new generic scaling ansatz. The different scaling forms are subclasses of this generic scaling ansatz associated with bounds on the roughness exponent values. The existence of a new class of anomalous dynamic scaling is predicted and compared with simulations.

  16. Salt and intramuscular fat modulate dynamic perception of flavour and texture in dry-cured hams.

    PubMed

    Lorido, Laura; Estévez, Mario; Ventanas, Jesús; Ventanas, Sonia

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the influence of salt and intramuscular fat (IMF) content on the sensory characteristics of two different types of dry-cured hams (Iberian and Serrano) using the time-intensity (TI) method. All studied TI parameters of flavour attributes (overall flavour, saltiness, cured and rancid flavours) were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by variations in the salt and/or IMF content. However, regarding texture attributes only the maximum intensity (Imax) of hardness was significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the salt content of hams. Compared to Iberian dry-cured hams, the dynamic perception of the flavour and texture of Serrano dry-cured hams was less influenced by variations in salt and/or IMF content. The dynamic sensory techniques may be helpful to guarantee the quality of dry-cured products subjected to strategies of salt and fat reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  18. Dynamics of convective scale interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purdom, James F. W.; Sinclair, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Several of the mesoscale dynamic and thermodynamic aspects of convective scale interaction are examined. An explanation of how sounding data can be coupled with satellite observed cumulus development in the warm sector and the arc cloud line's time evolution to develop a short range forecast of expected convective intensity along an arc cloud line. The formative, mature and dissipating stages of the arc cloud line life cycle are discussed. Specific properties of convective scale interaction are presented and the relationship between arc cloud lines and tornado producing thunderstorms is considered.

  19. Sound texture recognition through dynamical systems modeling of empirical mode decomposition.

    PubMed

    Van Nort, Doug; Braasch, Jonas; Oliveros, Pauline

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes a system for modeling, recognizing, and classifying sound textures. The described system translates contemporary approaches from video texture analysis, creating a unique approach in the realm of audio and music. The signal is first represented as a set of mode functions by way of the Empirical Mode Decomposition technique for time/frequency analysis, before expressing the dynamics of these modes as a linear dynamical system (LDS). Both linear and nonlinear techniques are utilized in order to learn the system dynamics, which leads to a successful distinction between unique classes of textures. Five classes of sounds comprised a data set, consisting of crackling fire, typewriter action, rainstorms, carbonated beverages, and crowd applause, drawing on a variety of source recordings. Based on this data set the system achieved a classification accuracy of 90%, which outperformed both a Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficient based LDS-modeling approach from the literature, as well as one based on a standard Gaussian Mixture Model classifier.

  20. Dynamic scaling in natural swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, Andrea; Conti, Daniele; Creato, Chiara; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Giardina, Irene; Grigera, Tomas S.; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano

    2017-09-01

    Collective behaviour in biological systems presents theoretical challenges beyond the borders of classical statistical physics. The lack of concepts such as scaling and renormalization is particularly problematic, as it forces us to negotiate details whose relevance is often hard to assess. In an attempt to improve this situation, we present here experimental evidence of the emergence of dynamic scaling laws in natural swarms of midges. We find that spatio-temporal correlation functions in different swarms can be rescaled by using a single characteristic time, which grows with the correlation length with a dynamical critical exponent z ~ 1, a value not found in any other standard statistical model. To check whether out-of-equilibrium effects may be responsible for this anomalous exponent, we run simulations of the simplest model of self-propelled particles and find z ~ 2, suggesting that natural swarms belong to a novel dynamic universality class. This conclusion is strengthened by experimental evidence of the presence of non-dissipative modes in the relaxation, indicating that previously overlooked inertial effects are needed to describe swarm dynamics. The absence of a purely dissipative regime suggests that natural swarms undergo a near-critical censorship of hydrodynamics.

  1. Dynamic scaling in chemical ecology.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Richard K; Zimmer, Cheryl Ann

    2008-07-01

    Natural rates of chemical production, release, and transport of fluid-borne molecules drive fundamental biological responses to these stimuli. The scaling of the field signaling environment to laboratory conditions recreates essential features of the dynamics and establishes ecological relevance. If appropriately scaled, laboratory simulations of physical regimes, coupled with natural rates of chemical cue/signal emission, facilitate interpretation of field results. From a meta-analysis of papers published in 11 journals over the last 22 years (1984-1986, 1994-1996, 2004-2006), complete dynamic scaling was rare in both field and laboratory studies. Studies in terrestrial systems often involved chemical determinations, but rarely simulated natural aerodynamics in laboratory wind tunnels. Research in aquatic (marine and freshwater) systems seldom scaled either the chemical or physical environments. Moreover, nearly all research, in all environments, focused on organism-level processes without incorporating the effects of individual-based behavior on populations, communities, and ecosystems. As a result, relationships between chemosensory-mediated behavior and ecological function largely remain unexplored. Outstanding exceptions serve as useful examples for guiding future research. Advanced conceptual frameworks and refined techniques offer exciting opportunities for identifying the ecological significance of chemical cues/signals in behavioral interactions and for incorporating individual effects at higher levels of biological organization.

  2. A Framework for Establishing Standard Reference Scale of Texture by Multivariate Statistical Analysis Based on Instrumental Measurement and Sensory Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ruicong; Zhao, Lei; Xie, Nan; Wang, Houyin; Shi, Bolin; Shi, Jingye

    2016-01-13

    A framework of establishing standard reference scale (texture) is proposed by multivariate statistical analysis according to instrumental measurement and sensory evaluation. Multivariate statistical analysis is conducted to rapidly select typical reference samples with characteristics of universality, representativeness, stability, substitutability, and traceability. The reasonableness of the framework method is verified by establishing standard reference scale of texture attribute (hardness) with Chinese well-known food. More than 100 food products in 16 categories were tested using instrumental measurement (TPA test), and the result was analyzed with clustering analysis, principal component analysis, relative standard deviation, and analysis of variance. As a result, nine kinds of foods were determined to construct the hardness standard reference scale. The results indicate that the regression coefficient between the estimated sensory value and the instrumentally measured value is significant (R(2) = 0.9765), which fits well with Stevens's theory. The research provides reliable a theoretical basis and practical guide for quantitative standard reference scale establishment on food texture characteristics.

  3. Evolution of foredune texture following dynamic restoration, Doughboy Bay, Stewart Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konlechner, T. M.; Ryu, W.; Hilton, M. J.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Growing concern regarding the geomorphic and associated biotic effects of dune management practises has led to an increase in the number of dune restoration projects globally. Most recent projects aim to enhance the efficiency of aeolian sediment dynamics and increase dune mobility by decreasing vegetation cover, but we lack objective measures to evaluate such projects. Here we demonstrate the use of landscape metrics to quantify the evolution of foredune texture following the removal of vegetation. A long-term program of marram grass (Ammophila arenaria) eradication in southern New Zealand (Doughboy Bay, Stewart Island) is examined. Four metrics: bare sand area, patch adjacency, complexity, and the range of proximity, are used to classify a series of foredune textures beginning with the pre-restoration state through the phases of marram removal, to the current state. Foredune texture at Doughboy Bay has evolved from a semi-stable to an active state as the consequence of restoration. Two metrics, bare sand and adjacency, appear to be particularly good measures of change following marram removal. Patterns and rates of change for these metrics are consistent with ground observations of increased 'naturalness' (native plant communities, sand mobility) over the same period. The set of landscape metrics derived for Doughboy Bay were compared to similar sets measured for a nearby foredune system where marram invasion has not occurred, and where conditions presumably represent equilibrium foredune texture. Since the removal of marram at Doughboy Bay and the consequent remobilization of the sand surface, the foredune texture has increased in similarity to that of the reference site, indicating a favourable shift in plant cover as a result of the restoration program. We conclude that landscape metrics can be used to track changes in foredune morphology following restoration. Second, the planning, management, and monitoring of coastal dune restoration programs will benefit

  4. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior and Texture Evolution of NiAl Intermetallic During Hot Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenhan; Lu, Zhen; Jiang, Shaosong; Wang, Chongyang; Zhang, Kaifeng

    2017-05-01

    B2-ordered intermetallic NiAl was fabricated by hot pressing sintering and studied in terms of dynamic recrystallization behavior and texture evolution during isothermal compression over a temperature range of 1100-1300 °C and strain rate of 10-2 s-1 as well as strain rate of 10-3 to 10-1 s-1 and temperature of 1250 °C. It is found that DDRX mechanism operates predominantly at a high temperature and medium strain rate, while CDRX process is enhanced in the deformation condition of medium temperature and high strain rate yet in a localized way. In particular, progressive subgrain rotation takes place at 1250 °C/10-1 s-1. Conversely, dynamic recrystallization process is insufficient in the case of 1250 °C/10-3 s-1 and 1100 °C/10-2 s-1. Original hot pressing sintered billets are microstructurally homogeneous. Orientation distribution function sections reveal that the strong {110}<111> and {112}<111> texture components appear after deformation. Furthermore, the textures are strengthened with increasing temperature and strain rate.

  5. The Effects of Grain Size and Texture on Dynamic Abnormal Grain Growth in Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Philip J.; Taleff, Eric M.

    2016-10-01

    This is the first report of abnormal grain morphologies specific to a Mo sheet material produced from a commercial-purity arc-melted ingot. Abnormal grains initiated and grew during plastic deformation of this material at temperatures of 1793 K and 1813 K (1520 °C and 1540 °C). This abnormal grain growth during high-temperature plastic deformation is termed dynamic abnormal grain growth, DAGG. DAGG in this material readily consumes nearly all grains near the sheet center while leaving many grains near the sheet surface unconsumed. Crystallographic texture, grain size, and other microstructural features are characterized. After recrystallization, a significant through-thickness variation in crystallographic texture exists in this material but does not appear to directly influence DAGG propagation. Instead, dynamic normal grain growth, which may be influenced by texture, preferentially occurs near the sheet surface prior to DAGG. The large grains thus produced near the sheet surface inhibit the subsequent growth of the abnormal grains produced by DAGG, which preferentially consume the finer grains near the sheet center. This produces abnormal grains that span the sheet center but leave unconsumed polycrystalline microstructure near the sheet surface. Abnormal grains are preferentially oriented with the < 110rangle approximately along the tensile axis. These results provide additional new evidence that boundary curvature is the primary driving force for DAGG in Mo.

  6. Impact of Sub-grid Soil Textural Properties on Simulations of Hydrological Fluxes at the Continental Scale Mississippi River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Samaniego, L. E.; Livneh, B.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of soil hydraulic properties such as porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity is required to accurately model the dynamics of near-surface hydrological processes (e.g. evapotranspiration and root-zone soil moisture dynamics) and provide reliable estimates of regional water and energy budgets. Soil hydraulic properties are commonly derived from pedo-transfer functions using soil textural information recorded during surveys, such as the fractions of sand and clay, bulk density, and organic matter content. Typically large scale land-surface models are parameterized using a relatively coarse soil map with little or no information on parametric sub-grid variability. In this study we analyze the impact of sub-grid soil variability on simulated hydrological fluxes over the Mississippi River Basin (≈3,240,000 km2) at multiple spatio-temporal resolutions. A set of numerical experiments were conducted with the distributed mesoscale hydrologic model (mHM) using two soil datasets: (a) the Digital General Soil Map of the United States or STATSGO2 (1:250 000) and (b) the recently collated Harmonized World Soil Database based on the FAO-UNESCO Soil Map of the World (1:5 000 000). mHM was parameterized with the multi-scale regionalization technique that derives distributed soil hydraulic properties via pedo-transfer functions and regional coefficients. Within the experimental framework, the 3-hourly model simulations were conducted at four spatial resolutions ranging from 0.125° to 1°, using meteorological datasets from the NLDAS-2 project for the time period 1980-2012. Preliminary results indicate that the model was able to capture observed streamflow behavior reasonably well with both soil datasets, in the major sub-basins (i.e. the Missouri, the Upper Mississippi, the Ohio, the Red, and the Arkansas). However, the spatio-temporal patterns of simulated water fluxes and states (e.g. soil moisture, evapotranspiration) from both simulations, showed marked

  7. Using Parameters of Dynamic Pulse Function for 3d Modeling in LOD3 Based on Random Textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadehashrafi, B.

    2015-12-01

    The pulse function (PF) is a technique based on procedural preprocessing system to generate a computerized virtual photo of the façade with in a fixed size square(Alizadehashrafi et al., 2009, Musliman et al., 2010). Dynamic Pulse Function (DPF) is an enhanced version of PF which can create the final photo, proportional to real geometry. This can avoid distortion while projecting the computerized photo on the generated 3D model(Alizadehashrafi and Rahman, 2013). The challenging issue that might be handled for having 3D model in LoD3 rather than LOD2, is the final aim that have been achieved in this paper. In the technique based DPF the geometries of the windows and doors are saved in an XML file schema which does not have any connections with the 3D model in LoD2 and CityGML format. In this research the parameters of Dynamic Pulse Functions are utilized via Ruby programming language in SketchUp Trimble to generate (exact position and deepness) the windows and doors automatically in LoD3 based on the same concept of DPF. The advantage of this technique is automatic generation of huge number of similar geometries e.g. windows by utilizing parameters of DPF along with defining entities and window layers. In case of converting the SKP file to CityGML via FME software or CityGML plugins the 3D model contains the semantic database about the entities and window layers which can connect the CityGML to MySQL(Alizadehashrafi and Baig, 2014). The concept behind DPF, is to use logical operations to project the texture on the background image which is dynamically proportional to real geometry. The process of projection is based on two vertical and horizontal dynamic pulses starting from upper-left corner of the background wall in down and right directions respectively based on image coordinate system. The logical one/zero on the intersections of two vertical and horizontal dynamic pulses projects/does not project the texture on the background image. It is possible to define

  8. Predictability of seabed texture: spatial scaling of grain size and bathymetry on glaciated and non-glaciated shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostylev, V.

    2010-12-01

    km) such as positional errors, varying sampling efficiency of different sampling tools, sample processing biases and errors in databases, and lastly the sought after natural heterogeneity of glaciated shelves leading to complex spatial patterns. On broader spatial scale the association of bathymetric and grain size variance in US dataset suggests similarity of dynamic oceanographic processes responsible for sediment distribution patterns across broad bathymetric gradients. In the Canadian dataset which covers formerly glaciated shelves complexity of spatial pattern remains similar regardless of scale and is likely defined by the interaction of current and historical processes responsible for sediment distribution. It is concluded that empirical data-driven spatial interpolation of textural sediment data is more challenging in formerly glaciated shelves than on non-glaciated temperate and subtropical shelves.

  9. The relationship study between texture vibrating plate dynamic wettability and elastic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jing; Li, Bin; Zhou, Chuanping; Xiao, Jing; Ni, Jing

    2017-07-01

    An experimental investigation of wetting behavior of liquid droplet on texture vibrating substrate and the theoretical calculations of elastic wave scattering with two holes which based on the elastodynamics, employing complex functions are investigated to study the relationship between texture vibrating plate dynamic wettability and elastic wave scattering. Experimental results show the dynamic behavior of droplet was unstable. In 0 to π/2 cycle, droplet appeared the waveform with front steep and rear gentle along the flow direction. In π/2 to π cycle, droplet appeared slightly periodic oscillation and accompanied by a certain ripple. Based on the dynamic wetting phenomenon in a single cycle, the influence of elastic wave scattering on wetting property are analyzed. Analysis has shown that the stress concentration is caused by complex elastic wave scattering. The more concentrated the stress, the more concentrated the elastic wave energy. Compared with the single hole, the variations of dynamic stress concentration factors for two holes are complex due to the influence of interaction between two holes. Droplet emerge movement is response to the local vibration. The vibration spread in elastic plate at a time of strain, this elastic force cause droplet displacement and vibration, and accompanied with energy transfer.

  10. Biaxial Texture Evolution of Nanostructured Films under Dynamic Shadowing Effect and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang

    Texture formation and evolution in polycrystalline films are quite complicated, and they still remain as challenging subjects. Oblique angle deposition is an effective way to control the texture due to the shadowing effect introduced by oblique incident flux. A new dynamic oblique angle sputter deposition technique, called flipping rotation, was developed. In this rotation mode, the substrate is arranged to rotate continuously at a fixed speed around an axis lying within and parallel to the substrate. The incident flux is always perpendicular to the rotational axis and the flux incident angle relative to the substrate normal changes continuously. To study the texture formation and evolution of Mo and W films grown by DC magnetron sputter depositions, three film categories were prepared: (1) normal incidence deposition without the shadowing effect, (2) stationary oblique angle deposition at various fixed flux incident angles with static shadowing effect, and (3) convention rotation and flipping rotation deposition with dynamic shadowing effect. Under the normal incidence deposition, ultrathin (2.5 nm) to thin (100 nm) Mo films have been deposited on SO2 membranes on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids. These samples can be directly compared with the films grown on glass or native oxide covered Si substrates. The result of a fiber texture with the [110] out-of-plane direction implies that the growth has gone through a recrystallization process that selects the minimum surface energy plane parallel to the substrate. This is in contrast to the conventional understanding of the selection of out-of-plane orientation, which is the fastest growth direction [100] at room temperature based on the low Mo homologous temperature (room temperature/melting temperature) of ~0.1. Under stationary oblique angle deposition, Mo thin films in the range of 175 nm to 1300 nm were observed to undergo a dramatic change in crystal texture orientation from a (110)[11¯¯0] biaxial

  11. A Comparison of Texture Development in an Experimental and Industrial Tertiary Oxide Scale in a Hot Strip Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xianglong; Jiang, Zhengyi; Zhao, Jingwei; Wei, Dongbin; Zhou, Ji; Zhou, Cunlong; Huang, Qingxue

    2015-12-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) has been used to investigate the microstructure and texture-based features of an industrial tertiary oxide scale formed on a micro-alloyed low-carbon steel from a hot strip mill. EBSD-derived maps demonstrate that the oxide scale consists primarily of magnetite (Fe3O4) with a small amount of hematite ( α-Fe2O3) which scatters near the surface, at the oxide/steel interface and at the cracking edges. The results extracted from these maps reveal that there is a significant difference between the industrial and the laboratory oxide scales in their grain boundaries, phase boundaries, and texture evolutions. There are high proportions of special coincidence site lattice boundaries Σ3 and Σ13b in the magnetite of the industrial oxide scale, rather than the lower orders of Σ5, Σ7, and Σ17b, which develop in the experimental oxide scale. Within the phase boundaries, the orientation relationships between the magnetite and the hematite correspond to the matching planes and directions {111}Fe3O4||{0001} α-Fe2O3 and {110}Fe3O4||{110} α-Fe2O3. Magnetite in both of these oxide scales develops a relatively weak {001} fiber texture component including a strong {001}<100> cube and a slightly strong {100}<210> texture components. Unlike the {001}<110> rotated cube component in the experimental oxide scale, the magnetite in the industrial tertiary oxide scale develops a strong {112}<110> and a relatively strong {113}<110> and {111}<110> texture components. These findings have the potential to provide a convincing step forward for oxidation research.

  12. Clustering dynamic textures with the hierarchical em algorithm for modeling video.

    PubMed

    Mumtaz, Adeel; Coviello, Emanuele; Lanckriet, Gert R G; Chan, Antoni B

    2013-07-01

    Dynamic texture (DT) is a probabilistic generative model, defined over space and time, that represents a video as the output of a linear dynamical system (LDS). The DT model has been applied to a wide variety of computer vision problems, such as motion segmentation, motion classification, and video registration. In this paper, we derive a new algorithm for clustering DT models that is based on the hierarchical EM algorithm. The proposed clustering algorithm is capable of both clustering DTs and learning novel DT cluster centers that are representative of the cluster members in a manner that is consistent with the underlying generative probabilistic model of the DT. We also derive an efficient recursive algorithm for sensitivity analysis of the discrete-time Kalman smoothing filter, which is used as the basis for computing expectations in the E-step of the HEM algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the efficacy of the clustering algorithm on several applications in motion analysis, including hierarchical motion clustering, semantic motion annotation, and learning bag-of-systems (BoS) codebooks for dynamic texture recognition.

  13. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON TEXTURE EVOLUTION IN TANTALUM DURING DYNAMIC-EXTRUSION

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, Carl P.; Escobedo-Diaza, Juan P.; Gray III, George T.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Martinez, Daniel T.

    2012-06-20

    Motivation of this project is: (1) Build a furnace as a cross section of a gun barrel capable of temperatures up to 600 Celsius; (2) To examine the influence of temperature, texture, and extrusion velocity in Tantalum; (3) Constrain parameters to improve and assist in constitutive model development using high speed imaging & PDV (in-situ); (4) Understanding microstructural development in materials using the dynamic extrusion technique; and (5) Use as a validation test for developing fracture models important to industry, the DoD, and the DOE.

  14. Causes and implications of the loss of small-scale surface texture in Viking Orbiter images

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, R.; Guinness, E.; Arvidson, R.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies of orbital images of Mars suggest that the equatorial regions have been stripped of sedimentary debris and that the polar regions are covered with a deposit that thins equatorward. These conclusions were based, in part, on the presence or absence of small-scale texture in images. The absence of small-scale features in Orbiter images must be interpreted with caution because of atmospheric haze that will also preferentially obscure high spatial frequency features. Two sets of overlapping images taken under different atmospheric conditions allow one to verify a single scattering atmospheric model that quantitatively accounts for the observations. Application of the model shows that twelve crater size-frequency distributions for areas in the northern hemisphere behave in the manner predicted for hazy conditions. Loss of surface resolution due to the nearly ubiquitous haze in the northern mid to high latitudes makes it impossible to assess, with existing images, the validity of suggestions that small-scale features have been preferentially degraded by surface processes. To the limited degree that the present data set samples the northern hemisphere, there is no evidence in these data for wide-spread young debris deposits hundreds of meters thick, other than the polar layered terrain. A debris deposit about 100 meters thick is a likely explanation for the observed crater size-frequency distribution at two mid northern latitude locations, one each in Arcadia and Acidalia Planitias.

  15. Use of mobile gammaspectrometry for estimation of texture at regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierke, C.; Werban, U.; Dietrich, P.

    2012-04-01

    In the last years gamma-ray measurements from air and ground were increasingly used for spatial mapping of physical soil parameters. Many applications of gamma-ray measurements for soil characterisation and in digital soil mapping (DSM) are known from Australia or single once from Northern America. During the last years there are attempts to use that method in Europe as well. The measured isotope concentration of the gamma emitter 40K, 238U and 232Th in soils depends on different soil parameters, which are the result of composition and properties of parent rock and processes during soil geneses under different climatic conditions. Grain size distribution, type of clay minerals and organic matter are soil parameters which influence directly the gamma-ray concentration. From former studies we know, that there are site specific relationships at the field scale between gamma-ray measurements and soil properties. One of the target soil properties in DSM is for e.g. the spatial distribution of texture at the landscape scale. Thus there is a need of more regional understanding of gamma-ray concentration and soil properties with regard to the complex geology of Europe. We did systematic measurements at different field sites across Europe to investigate the relationship between the concentrations of gamma radiant and grain size. The areas are characterised by different pedogenesis and varying clay content. For the measurement we used a mobile 4l Na(I) detector with GPS connection, which is mounted on a sledge and can be towed across the agricultural used plane. Additionally we selected points for soil sampling and analysis of soil texture. For the interpretation we used the single nuclide concentration as well as the ratios. The results show site specific relationships dependent from source material. At soils developed from alluvial sediments the K/Th ratio is an indicator for clay content at regional scale. At soils developed from loess sediments Th can be used do

  16. Tribological analysis of the ventral scale structure in a Python regius in relation to laser textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, H. A.; El Mansori, M.

    2013-09-01

    Laser texturing is one of the leading technologies applied to modify surface topography. To date, however, a standardized procedure to generate deterministic textures is virtually non-existent. In nature, especially in squamata, there are many examples of deterministic structured textures that allow species to control friction and condition their tribological response for efficient function. In this work, we draw a comparison between industrial surfaces and reptilian surfaces. We chose the Python regius species as a bio-analogue with a deterministic surface. We first study the structural make up of the ventral scales of the snake (both construction and metrology). We further compare the metrological features of the ventral scales to experimentally recommended performance indicators of industrial surfaces extracted from open literature. The results indicate the feasibility of engineering a laser textured surface based on the reptilian ornamentation constructs. It is shown that the metrological features, key to efficient function of a rubbing deterministic surface, are already optimized in the reptile. We further show that optimization in reptilian surfaces is based on synchronizing surface form, textures and aspects to condition the frictional response. Mimicking reptilian surfaces, we argue, may form a design methodology potentially capable of generating advanced deterministic surface constructs capable of efficient tribological function.

  17. Growth, dynamics, and texture modeling of the lamellar smectic-A liquid crystalline transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin

    2009-11-01

    This thesis is focused on the study of material transformations from the disordered state to the lamellar-ordered/smectic-A liquid crystalline state via multi-scale multi-transport modeling and simulation. This approach utilizes a high-order Landau-de Gennes phenomenological model able to bridge the gap between experimentally observed macro-scale phenomena and the nano-scale growth and structure inherent to liquid crystalline ordering. A unique feature of this simulation-based thesis is the direct verification of predictions with past experimental observations. In this context, the main contributions of this thesis work focuses on three experimental systems: free growth of an isolated domain, defect/texture formation, and the evolution of texture/defect interactions as the system approaches equilibrium. Simulation studies of free growth were first performed under conditions of deep undercooling, where non-isothermal effects can be neglected. The growth/shape kinetic evolution of initially textured and homogeneous spherulites growing into an unstable isotropic matrix phase was found, elucidating nano-scale morphology/texture processes and growth instabilities inaccessible experimentally. Undulation instabilities in growing smectic-A spherulites discovered in this work shed light on a possible mechanism for the formation of experimentally observed anisotropic "batonnet" morphologies and two-dimension focal conic defect structures. Recent experimental observations of growth kinetic phenomena of meta-stable nematic pre-ordering was studied, showing that the high-order model both predicts this phenomenon and explains the underlying mechanisms for experimentally determined morphological trends. A non-isothermal extension to the high-order model is derived and applied to study free growth under shallow undercooling conditions, where latent heat and anisotropic thermal diffusion are non-negligible. Growth laws, agreeing with experimental observations, are determined and

  18. Spin supercurrent, magnetization dynamics, and φ-state in spin-textured Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulagina, Iryna; Linder, Jacob

    2014-08-01

    The prospect of combining the dissipationless nature of superconducting currents with the spin polarization of magnetic materials is interesting with respect to exploring superconducting analogs of topics in spintronics. In order to accomplish this aim, it is pivotal to understand not only how such spin supercurrents can be created, but also how they interact dynamically with magnetization textures. In this paper, we investigate the appearance of a spin supercurrent and the resulting magnetization dynamics in a textured magnetic Josephson current by using three experimentally relevant models: (i) a superconductor∣ferromagnet∣superconductor (S∣F∣S) junction with spin-active interfaces, (ii) a S∣F1∣F2∣F3∣S Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic trilayer, and (iii) a Josephson junction containing a domain wall. In all of these cases, the supercurrent is spin polarized and exerts a spin-transfer torque on the ferromagnetic interlayers which causes magnetization dynamics. Using a scattering matrix formalism in the clean limit, we compute the Andreev bound states and resulting free energy of the system which in turn is used to solve the Landau-Lifshiftz-Gilbert equation. We compute both how the inhomogeneous magnetism influences the phase dependence of the charge supercurrent and the magnetization dynamics caused by the spin polarization of the supercurrent. Using a realistic experimental parameter set, we find that the spin supercurrent can induce magnetization switching that is controlled by the superconducting phase difference. Moreover, we demonstrate that the combined effect of chiral spin symmetry breaking of the system as a whole with interface scattering causes the systems above to act as phase batteries that may supply any superconducting phase difference φ in the ground state. Such a φ-junction is accompanied by an anomalous supercurrent appearing even at zero phase difference, and we demonstrate that the flow direction of this current is

  19. A multi-scale model for texture development in Zr/Nb nanolayered composites processed by accumulative roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeljan, M.; Knezevic, M.; Nizolek, T.; Beyerlein, I. J.; Zheng, S. J.; Carpenter, J. S.; McCabe, R. J.; Mara, N. A.; Pollock, T. M.

    2014-08-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that nanolayered hcp/bcc Zr/Nb composites can be fabricated with a severe plastic deformation technique called accumulative roll bonding (ARB) [1]. The final layer thickness averaged to approximately 90 nm for both phases. Interestingly, the texture measurements show that the textures in each phase correspond to those of rolled single-phase rolled Zr and Nb for a wide range of layer thickness from the micron to the nanoscales. This is in remarkable contrast to fcc/bcc Cu/Nb layered composites made by the same ARB technique, which developed textures that strongly deviated from theoretical rolling textures of Cu or Nb alone when the layers were refined to submicron and nanoscale dimensions. To model texture evolution and reveal the underlying deformation mechanisms, we developed a 3D multiscale model that combines crystal plasticity finite element with a thermally activated dislocation density based hardening law [2]. For systematic study, the model is applied to a two-phase Zr/Nb polycrystalline laminate and to the same polycrystalline Zr and polycrystalline Nb as single-phase metals. Consistent with the measurement, the model predicts that texture evolution in the phases in the composite and the relative activities of the hcp slip modes are very similar to those in the phases in monolithic form. In addition, the two-phase model also finds that no through-thickness texture gradient develops. This result suggests that neither the nanoscale grain sizes nor the bimetal Zr/Nb interfaces induce deformation mechanisms different from those at the coarse-grain scale.

  20. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of texture evolution in 904L stainless steel under dynamic shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Nanan; Wang, Y. D.; Peng, R. Lin; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Wang, L.; Cai, H. N.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of strain rate on development of deformation texture under a dynamic shock compression of a 904L stainless steel was quantitatively investigated using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and crystallographic orientation distribution function (ODF) analysis. Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar technique was used to generate a high strain rate of > 103 s-1 for preparing the deformed samples. Starting with an almost random texture in a solution treatment condition, the deformed material developed several typical texture components, such as ‘Goss’ texture and ‘Brass’ texture. Compared to the texture components displayed in the state of quasi-static compression deformation, it was found that the high-speed deformation generated much weaker texture components. In combination with the change in microstructures observed by EBSD and TEM technique, the high-energy X-ray diffraction provides a powerful tool for characterizing the strain-rate dependence of grain rotation at each stage of deformation. The deformation heterogeneity evident in our experiment can be explained by a transition of deformation mechanism from the dislocation/twin-dominated mode to shear-band-dominated one with increasing strain rate.

  1. It is time to integrate: the temporal dynamics of object motion and texture motion integration in multiple object tracking.

    PubMed

    Huff, Markus; Papenmeier, Frank

    2013-01-14

    In multiple-object tracking, participants can track several moving objects among identical distractors. It has recently been shown that the human visual system uses motion information in order to keep track of targets (St. Clair et al., Journal of Vision, 10(4), 1-13). Texture on the surface of an object that moved in the opposite direction to the object itself impaired tracking performance. In this study, we examined the temporal interval at which texture motion and object motion is integrated in dynamic scenes. In two multiple-object tracking experiments, we manipulated the texture motion on the objects: The texture either moved in the same direction as the objects, in the opposite direction, or alternated between the same and opposite direction at varying intervals. In Experiment 1, we show that the integration of object motion and texture motion can take place at intervals as short as 100 ms. In Experiment 2, we show that there is a linear relationship between the proportion of opposite texture motion and tracking performance. We suggest that texture motion might cause shifts in perceived object locations, thus influencing tracking performance.

  2. Micro-scale surface texturing design and development for friction reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, Aaron C.

    Improving energy utilization is becoming increasingly important given the impact that energy resource management can have on the environmental, economic, and security. Reducing friction losses in mechanical systems is an effective approach to improve energy efficiency. Engineering the surface of bearing components with designed micro-sized texture is a potential method of improving the tribological performance, specifically friction reduction. The present research aims to advance surface texturing technology by developing cost effective, investigating its friction reduction potential in journal bearing applications and by developing an effective micro-texture machining method that is easily adaptable to an industrial manufacturing environment. First, the vibro-mechanical texturing (VMT) method is developed, which is based on the original work of C. Wang and K. Ehmann; this technique is conveniently based on a standard machining method so that it is easily retrofitted on a common lathe setup. The method is tested for its versatility and accuracy in treating a variety of bearing types and materials. An improved closed-loop control system is implement that reduces micro-feature dimension error to less than 11%. Second, tribological performance of textured surfaces are investigated for the mechanism of lubrication enhancement in journal bearing applications. A local optimal micro-dimple design is determined at 215 mum diameter, 5 mum depth and 5% coverage density, which is shown experimentally to reduce the friction transition speed by 76% compared to the non-textured baseline. Third, the fatigue of textured surface is studied under an extreme condition of concentrated rolling contact to reveal the limit of application of VMT surfaces. Experimental evaluation shows that the durability of textured components is compromised in these applications, and the dimple design significantly influences the amount of fatigue life reduction. This research advances the understanding

  3. Nanometer Scale Titanium Surface Texturing Are Detected by Signaling Pathways Involving Transient FAK and Src Activations

    PubMed Central

    Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R.; Beltrão, Paulo J.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Granjeiro, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Methodology Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. Principal Findings The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. Conclusions It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces. PMID:24999733

  4. Nanometer scale titanium surface texturing are detected by signaling pathways involving transient FAK and Src activations.

    PubMed

    Zambuzzi, Willian F; Bonfante, Estevam A; Jimbo, Ryo; Hayashi, Mariko; Andersson, Martin; Alves, Gutemberg; Takamori, Esther R; Beltrão, Paulo J; Coelho, Paulo G; Granjeiro, José M

    2014-01-01

    It is known that physico/chemical alterations on biomaterial surfaces have the capability to modulate cellular behavior, affecting early tissue repair. Such surface modifications are aimed to improve early healing response and, clinically, offer the possibility to shorten the time from implant placement to functional loading. Since FAK and Src are intracellular proteins able to predict the quality of osteoblast adhesion, this study evaluated the osteoblast behavior in response to nanometer scale titanium surface texturing by monitoring FAK and Src phosphorylations. Four engineered titanium surfaces were used for the study: machined (M), dual acid-etched (DAA), resorbable media microblasted and acid-etched (MBAA), and acid-etch microblasted (AAMB). Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, interferometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thereafter, those 4 samples were used to evaluate their cytotoxicity and interference on FAK and Src phosphorylations. Both Src and FAK were investigated by using specific antibody against specific phosphorylation sites. The results showed that both FAK and Src activations were differently modulated as a function of titanium surfaces physico/chemical configuration and protein adsorption. It can be suggested that signaling pathways involving both FAK and Src could provide biomarkers to predict osteoblast adhesion onto different surfaces.

  5. Estimating groundwater evapotranspiration from irrigated cropland incorporating root zone soil texture and moisture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwang; Huo, Zailin; Feng, Shaoyuan; Guo, Ping; Guan, Huade

    2016-12-01

    Estimating evapotranspiration from groundwater (ETg) is of importance to understanding water cycle and agricultural water management. Traditional ETg estimation was developed for regional steady condition and is difficult to be used for cropland where ETg changes with crop growth and irrigation schemes. In the present study, a new method estimating daily ETg during the crop growing season was developed. In this model, the effects of crop growth stage, climate condition, groundwater depth and soil moisture are considered. The method was tested with controlled lysimeter experiments of winter wheat including five controlled water table depths and four soil profiles of different textures. The simulated ETg is in good agreement with the measured data for four soil profiles and different depths to groundwater table. Coefficient of determination (R2) and coefficient of efficiency (NSE) are mostly larger than 0.85 and 0.70, respectively. This result suggests that the new method incorporating both soil texture and moisture dynamics can be used to estimate average daily groundwater evapotranspiration in cropland and contribute to quantifying the field water cycle.

  6. Inpainting for videos with dynamic objects using texture and structure reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Gapon, N. V.; Zhuravlev, A. V.; Maslennikov, S.; Stradanchenko, S.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a novel inpainting approach for removing marked dynamic objects from videos captured with a camera, so long as the objects occlude parts of the scene with a static background. Proposed approach allow to remove objects or restore missing or tainted regions present in a video sequence by utilizing spatial and temporal information from neighboring scenes. The algorithm iteratively performs following operations: achieve frame; update the scene model; update positions of moving objects; replace parts of the frame occupied by the objects marked for remove with use of a background model. In this paper, we extend an image inpainting algorithm based texture and structure reconstruction by incorporating an improved strategy for video. An image inpainting approach based on the construction of a composite curve for the restoration of the edges of objects in a frame using the concepts of parametric and geometric continuity is presented. It is shown that this approach allows to restore the curved edges and provide more flexibility for curve design in damaged frame by interpolating the boundaries of objects by cubic splines. After edge restoration stage, a texture reconstruction using patch-based method is carried out. We demonstrate the performance of a new approach via several examples, showing the effectiveness of our algorithm and compared with state-of-the-art video inpainting methods.

  7. A lattice-based MRF model for dynamic near-regular texture tracking.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Chieh; Liu, Yanxi

    2007-05-01

    A near-regular texture (NRT) is a geometric and photometric deformation from its regular origin--a congruent wallpaper pattern formed by 2D translations of a single tile. A dynamic NRT is an NRT under motion. Although NRTs are pervasive in man-made and natural environments, effective computational algorithms for NRTs are few. This paper addresses specific computational challenges in modeling and tracking dynamic NRTs, including ambiguous correspondences, occlusions, and drastic illumination and appearance variations. We propose a lattice-based Markov-Random-Field (MRF) model for dynamic NRTs in a 3D spatiotemporal space. Our model consists of a global lattice structure that characterizes the topological constraint among multiple textons and an image observation model that handles local geometry and appearance variations. Based on the proposed MRF model, we develop a tracking algorithm that utilizes belief propagation and particle filtering to effectively handle the special challenges of the dynamic NRT tracking without any assumption on the motion types or lighting conditions. We provide quantitative evaluations of the proposed method against existing tracking algorithms and demonstrate its applications in video editing.

  8. Textured micrometer scale templates as light managing fabrication platform for organic solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhary, Sumit; Ho, Kai-Ming; Park, Joong-Mok; Nalwa, Kanwar Singh; Leung, Wai Y.

    2016-07-26

    A three-dimensional, microscale-textured, grating-shaped organic solar cell geometry. The solar cells are fabricated on gratings to give them a three-dimensional texture that provides enhanced light absorption. Introduction of microscale texturing has a positive effect on the overall power conversion efficiency of the devices. This grating-based solar cell having a grating of pre-determined pitch and height has shown improved power-conversion efficiency over a conventional flat solar cell. The improvement in efficiency is accomplished by homogeneous coverage of the grating with uniform thickness of the active layer, which is attributed to a sufficiently high pitch and low height of the underlying gratings. Also the microscale texturing leads to suppressed reflection of incident light due to the efficient coupling of the incident light into modes that are guided in the active layer.

  9. Robust Texture Analysis Using Multi-Resolution Gray-Scale Invariant Features for Breast Sonographic Tumor Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Min-Chun Yang; Woo Kyung Moon; Wang, Yu-Chiang Frank; Min Sun Bae; Chiun-Sheng Huang; Jeon-Hor Chen; Ruey-Feng Chang

    2013-12-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems in gray-scale breast ultrasound images have the potential to reduce unnecessary biopsy of breast masses. The purpose of our study is to develop a robust CAD system based on the texture analysis. First, gray-scale invariant features are extracted from ultrasound images via multi-resolution ranklet transform. Thus, one can apply linear support vector machines (SVMs) on the resulting gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM)-based texture features for discriminating the benign and malignant masses. To verify the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed texture analysis, breast ultrasound images obtained from three different platforms are evaluated based on cross-platform training/testing and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-CV) schemes. We compare our proposed features with those extracted by wavelet transform in terms of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The AUC values derived from the area under the curve for the three databases via ranklet transform are 0.918 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.848 to 0.961), 0.943 (95% CI, 0.906 to 0.968), and 0.934 (95% CI, 0.883 to 0.961), respectively, while those via wavelet transform are 0.847 (95% CI, 0.762 to 0.910), 0.922 (95% CI, 0.878 to 0.958), and 0.867 (95% CI, 0.798 to 0.914), respectively. Experiments with cross-platform training/testing scheme between each database reveal that the diagnostic performance of our texture analysis using ranklet transform is less sensitive to the sonographic ultrasound platforms. Also, we adopt several co-occurrence statistics in terms of quantization levels and orientations (i.e., descriptor settings) for computing the co-occurrence matrices with 0.632+ bootstrap estimators to verify the use of the proposed texture analysis. These experiments suggest that the texture analysis using multi-resolution gray-scale invariant features via ranklet transform is useful for designing a robust CAD system.

  10. Eruptive Dynamics Inferred from Textural Analysis of Ash Time Series: The 2015 Reawakening of Cotopaxi Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunt, H. E.; Bernard, B.; Hidalgo, S.; Proaño, A.; Wright, H. M. N.; Mothes, P. A.; Criollo, E.

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of the composition and texture of ash ejected during eruptive episodes can provide valuable information about magma storage and ascent conditions. After 73 years of repose, Cotopaxi volcano erupted after approximately four months of precursory activity that included an increase in seismicity, gas emissions, and minor ground deformation. High frequency ash sampling was realized throughout the new eruptive period and near real-time petrological monitoring of ash samples was used to infer eruption dynamics at Cotopaxi volcano. We collected twenty ash samples between August 14 and November 23, 2015 from a seismic monitoring site on the west flank of the volcano. We classified the different components of the ash into four groups: hydrothermal/altered grains, lithic fragments, potentially juvenile material, and free crystals. The relative proportions of theses grains evolved as the eruption progressed, with increasing amounts of potentially juvenile material and a decrease in hydrothermally altered material through time. Potentially juvenile grains from the initial explosion are microlite-poor and contain hydrothermal minerals (opal and alunite) in contact with fresh glass. The interaction of juvenile magma with the hydrothermal system may have provided the energy to trigger phreatomagmatic explosions at Cotopaxi. However, only the initial explosions preserve textural evidence for this process. Completely aphyric, glassy fragments are absent; likewise, the absence of highly vesiculated pumice or scoria indicates that fragmentation was not the result of bubble wall breakage due to rapid exsolution and expansion of gas in the melt. Furthermore, the crystallinity of juvenile particles increased through time, indicating slowing integrated ascent rates. Nevertheless, continued high SO2 emission rates indicate that the system was open to gas loss, which inhibited the pressurization of the conduit through gas accumulation, reducing the short term possibility of a large

  11. Fluid dynamics: Swimming across scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Johannes; Friedrich, Benjamin M.

    2014-10-01

    The myriad creatures that inhabit the waters of our planet all swim using different mechanisms. Now, a simple relation links key physical observables of underwater locomotion, on scales ranging from millimetres to tens of metres.

  12. Characterization of Urban Landscape Using Super-Resolution UAS Data, Multiple Textural Scales and Data-Mining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, M.; Blundell, B.

    2015-12-01

    Characterization of urban environments is a high priority for the U.S. Army as battlespaces have transitioned from the predominantly open spaces of the 20th century to urban areas where soldiers have reduced situational awareness due to the diversity and density of their surroundings. Creating high-resolution urban terrain geospatial information will improve mission planning and soldier effectiveness. In this effort, super-resolution true-color imagery was collected with an Altivan NOVA unmanned aerial system over the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center near Butlerville, Indiana on September 16, 2014. Multispectral texture analysis using different algorithms was conducted for urban surface characterization at a variety of scales. Training samples extracted from the true-color and texture images. These data were processed using a variety of meta-algorithms with a decision tree classifier to create a high-resolution urban features map. In addition to improving accuracy over traditional image classification methods, this technique allowed the determination of the most significant textural scales in creating urban terrain maps for tactical exploitation.

  13. Change in Magma Dynamics at Okataina Rhyolite Caldera revealed by Plagioclase Textures and Geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, P. A. R.

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental reorganization of magma dynamics at Okataina volcano, New Zealand, occurred at 26 ka involving a change from smaller volume, high-temperature rhyodacite magmas to a lower eruptive tempo of larger volume, low-temperature, rhyolite magmas. Zircon studies demonstrate the presence of a periodically active, long-lived (100,000 yr) magmatic reservoir. However, there is little correlation between periods of zircon crystallization and eruption events. In contrast, the changing magmatic dynamics is revealed in plagioclase growth histories. Crystals from the ~0.7 ka Kaharoa eruption are characterized by resorbed cores displaying a cellular-texture of high-An (>40) zones partially replaced by low-An (<30) zones, surrounded by a resorption surface and a prominent normal-zoned rim (An50-20). Elevated An, Fe, Mg, Sr and Ti follow the resorption surface and display rimward depletion trends, accompanied by Ba and REE enrichment. The zonation is consistent with fractional crystallization and cooling. The cores display wide trace element diversity, pointing to crystallization in a variety of melts, before transport and mixing into a common magma where the rims grew. Plagioclase from the ~36 ka Hauparu eruption display several regrowth zones separated by resorption surfaces, which surround small resorbed cores with a spongy cellular texture of variable An content (An 40-50). The crystals display step-wise re-growth of successively higher An, Fe, Mg and Ti content, consistent with progressive mafic recharge. Two crystal groups are distinguished by trace element chemistry indicating growth in separate melts and co-occurrence via magma-mingling. The contrasting zoning patterns in plagioclase correspond to the evolutionary history of magmatism at Okataina. Emptying of the magma reservoir following caldera eruption at 46 ka reduced barriers to mafic magma ascent. This is recorded by the frequent resorption and recharge episodes in Hauparu crystals. Subsequent re

  14. Dynamical advantages of scale-free networks.

    PubMed

    Willeboordse, Frederick H

    2006-01-13

    A dynamical analysis of common network topologies is given and it is reported that a scale-free structure has two vital and distinctive features. First, complex but nevertheless reproducible states exist and, second, single-site induced state switching reminiscent of gene-expression control exists also. This indicates that scale-free networks have key dynamical advantages over other network topologies that could have contributed to their evolutionary success and thus may provide another reason for their prevalence in nature.

  15. Effects of foreground scale in texture discrimination tasks: performance is size, shape, and content specific.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, B S; Sagi, D

    1993-01-01

    Textural gradients can be defined as differences across space in orientation and spatial frequency content, along with absolute luminance and contrast. In this study, stimuli were created with gradients of these types to see how changing the size and shape of the foreground region affects the psychophysical task. The foreground regions were designed as clusters of target texels alternating with interplaced background texels (of the same cluster size). This design gives rise to a texture square-wave, with texture frequency defined by the distance from the beginning of one target cluster to the next. It was found that for stimuli with vertical and horizontal Gabor patches, the relationship between the global and local orientation of the foreground region is a critical variable, indicating some global-local interaction. When the global orientation of the foreground region is orthogonal to local target texel orientation, visibility is optimal for high texture frequencies, while for parallel arrangements, low texture frequencies are most visible. The latter result was also found to a lesser degree for tasks involving contrast gradients as well as spatial-frequency gradients, but with no effect caused by varying the global orientation. The results indicate the existence of a second-stage filter that integrates (across space) responses of similar first-stage spatial filters, and then sums the resultant activities with those of orthogonal first-stage filters, whose spatial proximity are to the sides of the local orientation. The size of these integrating mechanisms may extend to more than 7 deg, with connections between smoothed activities of filters with orthogonal orientations spanning approximately 1-2 deg.

  16. From dynamical scaling to local scale-invariance: a tutorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Malte

    2017-03-01

    Dynamical scaling arises naturally in various many-body systems far from equilibrium. After a short historical overview, the elements of possible extensions of dynamical scaling to a local scale-invariance will be introduced. Schrödinger-invariance, the most simple example of local scale-invariance, will be introduced as a dynamical symmetry in the Edwards-Wilkinson universality class of interface growth. The Lie algebra construction, its representations and the Bargman superselection rules will be combined with non-equilibrium Janssen-de Dominicis field-theory to produce explicit predictions for responses and correlators, which can be compared to the results of explicit model studies. At the next level, the study of non-stationary states requires to go over, from Schrödinger-invariance, to ageing-invariance. The ageing algebra admits new representations, which acts as dynamical symmetries on more general equations, and imply that each non-equilibrium scaling operator is characterised by two distinct, independent scaling dimensions. Tests of ageing-invariance are described, in the Glauber-Ising and spherical models of a phase-ordering ferromagnet and the Arcetri model of interface growth.

  17. Dynamic Scaling of Manipulator Trajectories.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Manipulators Robotics Trajectory Planning Manipulator Dynamics 20. ABSTRACT (Conftnue wn reverse side ID neceeOor Oine Identlfy b? block nuemNer) A...receives a c factor for each b(i). ’lhus both terms change equally with differing movement speeds. This contradicts the normal assumption in the robotics ...as well since they share the same significance as the velocity terms, yet this is not done. In any case, future generations of robots will contain

  18. Dynamic scaling study of nanostructured silver films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehnejad, M.; Nabiyouni, G.; Gholipour Shahraki, M.

    2017-09-01

    Silver thin films were electrodeposited at various thicknesses and current densities, and their surface morphology was studied with scaling analysis based on atomic force microscopy. The Ag thin films show intrinsic anomalous dynamic scaling that was evaluated with a set of local exponents {{α }loc}=0.88 and {{β }loc}= 0.61, and global ones, α = 1.75 and β = 1.21. Local slope scales with time as ρ ={{t}0.58} . High-order local roughness exponents decrease with q indicating the existence of multi-scaling of the system (and hence anomalous scaling). All the experimental data collapse into one curve of the anomalous dynamic scaling. The results demonstrate that the film deposited with higher current density has higher surface roughness and grain size. Calculation of {{α }loc} values indicates that they are not dependent on the current density.

  19. Electrically Switchable and Permanently Stable Light Scattering Modes by Dynamic Fingerprint Chiral Textures.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ko-Ting; Lee, Po-Yi; Qasim, Malik M; Liu, Cheng-Kai; Cheng, Wen-Fa; Wilkinson, Timothy D

    2016-04-27

    Negative dielectric nematic liquid crystals (LCs) doped with two azobenzene materials provide electrically switchable and permanently stable scattering mode light modulators based on dynamic fingerprint chiral textures (DFCT) with inhomogeneously helical axes. These light modulators can be switched between transparent (stable large domains of DFCT) states and scattering (stable small domains of DFCT) states by applying electric fields with different frequencies. The generation of DFCT results from the long flexible side chains of the doped chiral dopant. That is, if the DFCT can be obtained, then the large domains of DFCT reflect an intrinsically stable state. Moreover, the stabilization of the small domains of DFCT are caused by the terminal rigid restricted side chains of the other doped chiral dopant. Experimentally, the required amplitude to switch the light modulator from a scattering (transparent) state to a transparent (scattering) state decreases as the frequency of the applied electric field increases (decreases) within the set limits. This study is the first report on the advantages of the light scattering mode of DFCT, including low operating voltage, permanently stable transmission, wide viewing angle, high contrast, and polarization-independent scattering and transparency.

  20. Dynamic scaling of dilute polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Marqusee, J.A.; Deutch, J.M.

    1981-04-15

    Dynamic scaling relations are presented for the diffusion coefficient and intrinsic viscosity of dilute polymer solutions in D dimensions. The functional integration description of Adler and Freed is used with the correct D-dimensional hydrodynamic interaction and assumptions of power law dependence to obtain the scaling relations. Recursion relations for the exponents are determined in the asymptotic region of large N by an interdimensional scaling argument. 19 references.

  1. Dynamical scaling analysis of plant callus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, J.; Buceta, J.; Juarez, K.; Pumariño, B.; de la Torre, J.; Iriondo, J. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present experimental results for the dynamical scaling properties of the development of plant calli. We have assayed two different species of plant calli, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa, under different growth conditions, and show that their dynamical scalings share a universality class. From a theoretical point of view, we introduce a scaling hypothesis for systems whose size evolves in time. We expect our work to be relevant for the understanding and characterization of other systems that undergo growth due to cell division and differentiation, such as, for example, tumor development.

  2. Combined micro- and nano-scale surface textures for enhanced near-infrared light harvesting in silicon photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chia-Hua; Yu, Peichen; Hsu, Min-Hsiang; Tseng, Ping-Cheng; Chang, Wei-Lun; Sun, Wen-Ching; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Hsu, Shih-Hsin; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2011-03-01

    As silicon photovoltaics evolve towards thin-wafer technologies, efficient optical absorption for the near-infrared wavelengths has become particularly challenging. In this work, we present a solution that employs combined micro- and nano-scale surface textures to increase light harvesting in the near-infrared for crystalline silicon photovoltaics, and discuss the associated antireflection and scattering mechanisms. The surface textures are achieved by uniformly depositing a layer of indium-tin-oxide nanowhiskers on micro-grooved silicon substrates using electron-beam evaporation. The nanowhiskers facilitate optical transmission in the near-infrared by functioning as impedance matching layers with effective refractive indices gradually varying from 1 to 1.3. Materials with such unique refractive index characteristics are not readily available in nature. As a result, the solar cell with combined textures achieves over 90% external quantum efficiencies for a broad wavelength range of 460-980 nm, which is crucial to the development of advanced thin-substrate silicon solar cells.

  3. Large-scale dynamics of magnetic helicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkmann, Moritz; Dallas, Vassilios

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the dynamics of magnetic helicity in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulent flows focusing at scales larger than the forcing scale. Our results show a nonlocal inverse cascade of magnetic helicity, which occurs directly from the forcing scale into the largest scales of the magnetic field. We also observe that no magnetic helicity and no energy is transferred to an intermediate range of scales sufficiently smaller than the container size and larger than the forcing scale. Thus, the statistical properties of this range of scales, which increases with scale separation, is shown to be described to a large extent by the zero flux solutions of the absolute statistical equilibrium theory exhibited by the truncated ideal MHD equations.

  4. Multi-scale textural feature extraction and particle swarm optimization based model selection for false positive reduction in mammography.

    PubMed

    Zyout, Imad; Czajkowska, Joanna; Grzegorzek, Marcin

    2015-12-01

    The high number of false positives and the resulting number of avoidable breast biopsies are the major problems faced by current mammography Computer Aided Detection (CAD) systems. False positive reduction is not only a requirement for mass but also for calcification CAD systems which are currently deployed for clinical use. This paper tackles two problems related to reducing the number of false positives in the detection of all lesions and masses, respectively. Firstly, textural patterns of breast tissue have been analyzed using several multi-scale textural descriptors based on wavelet and gray level co-occurrence matrix. The second problem addressed in this paper is the parameter selection and performance optimization. For this, we adopt a model selection procedure based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for selecting the most discriminative textural features and for strengthening the generalization capacity of the supervised learning stage based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. For evaluating the proposed methods, two sets of suspicious mammogram regions have been used. The first one, obtained from Digital Database for Screening Mammography (DDSM), contains 1494 regions (1000 normal and 494 abnormal samples). The second set of suspicious regions was obtained from database of Mammographic Image Analysis Society (mini-MIAS) and contains 315 (207 normal and 108 abnormal) samples. Results from both datasets demonstrate the efficiency of using PSO based model selection for optimizing both classifier hyper-parameters and parameters, respectively. Furthermore, the obtained results indicate the promising performance of the proposed textural features and more specifically, those based on co-occurrence matrix of wavelet image representation technique.

  5. Untangling the effects of shallow groundwater and soil texture as drivers of subfield-scale yield variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zipper, Samuel C.; Soylu, Mehmet Evren; Booth, Eric G.; Loheide, Steven P.

    2015-08-01

    Water table depth (WTD), soil texture, and growing season weather conditions all play critical roles in determining agricultural yield; however, the interactions among these three variables have never been explored in a systematic way. Using a combination of field observations and biophysical modeling, we answer two questions: (1) under what conditions can a shallow water table provide a groundwater yield subsidy and/or penalty to corn production?; and (2) how do soil texture and growing season weather conditions influence the relationship between WTD and corn yield?. Subfield-scale yield patterns during a dry (2012) and wet (2013) growing season are used to identify sensitivity to weather. Areas of the field that are negatively impacted by wet growing seasons have the shallowest observed WTD (<1 m), while areas with consistently strong yield have intermediate WTD (1-3 m). Parts of the field that perform consistently poorly are characterized by deep WTD (>3 m) and coarse soil textures. Modeling results find that beneficial impacts of shallow groundwater are more common than negative impacts under the conditions studied, and that the optimum WTD is shallower in coarser soils. While groundwater yield subsidies have a higher frequency and magnitude in coarse-grained soils, the optimum WTD responds to growing season weather at a relatively constant rate across soil types. We conclude that soil texture defines a baseline upon which WTD and weather interact to determine overall yield. Our work has implications for water resource management, climate/land use change impacts on agricultural production, and precision agriculture.

  6. Small scale dynamics of isotropic viscoelastic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, M. Quan; Delache, Alexandre; Simoëns, Serge; Bos, Wouter J. T.; El Hajem, Mamoud

    2016-12-01

    The comparison of the results of direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence of Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid provides evidence that viscoelasticity modifies qualitatively the behavior of the smallest scales: we observe a power law in the far dissipation range of the fluid kinetic energy spectrum and we show that it is a robust feature, roughly independent of the large scale dynamics. A detailed analysis of the energy transfer shows that at these scales energy is injected into the fluid flow through polymer relaxation. It is further shown that a part of the total energy is transferred among scales through an interaction of the velocity field with the polymer field.

  7. Recognizing and Incrementally Evolving Texture Concepts in Dynamic Environments: A Model Generalization Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    learning. While the initial acquisition of texture models is driven by a teacher, the evolution of these models is performed over a sequence of images...learning processes to improve its models. This paper presents both an outline of the iterative evolution methodology and the investigation of an incremental...model generalization approach as a part of the evolution of texture models. Experiments were run in a partially-supervised mode rather than a fully

  8. Texture evolution in thin-sheets on AISI 301 metastable stainless steel under dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.Y.; Kozaczek, K.; Kulkarni, S.M.; Bastias, P.C.; Hahn, G.T.

    1995-05-08

    The evolution of texture in thin sheets of metastable austenitic stainless steel AISI 301 is affected by external conditions such as loading rate and temperature, by inhomogeneous deformation phenomena such as twinning and shear band formation, and by the concurent strain induced phase transformation of the retained austenitc ({gamma}) into martensite ({alpha}). The present paper describes texture measurements on different gauges of AISI 301 prior and after uniaxial stretching under different conditions.

  9. Scale criticality in estimating ecosystem carbon dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang

    2014-01-01

    Scaling is central to ecology and Earth system sciences. However, the importance of scale (i.e. resolution and extent) for understanding carbon dynamics across scales is poorly understood and quantified. We simulated carbon dynamics under a wide range of combinations of resolution (nine spatial resolutions of 250 m, 500 m, 1 km, 2 km, 5 km, 10 km, 20 km, 50 km, and 100 km) and extent (57 geospatial extents ranging from 108 to 1 247 034 km2) in the southeastern United States to explore the existence of scale dependence of the simulated regional carbon balance. Results clearly show the existence of a critical threshold resolution for estimating carbon sequestration within a given extent and an error limit. Furthermore, an invariant power law scaling relationship was found between the critical resolution and the spatial extent as the critical resolution is proportional to An (n is a constant, and A is the extent). Scale criticality and the power law relationship might be driven by the power law probability distributions of land surface and ecological quantities including disturbances at landscape to regional scales. The current overwhelming practices without considering scale criticality might have largely contributed to difficulties in balancing carbon budgets at regional and global scales.

  10. Supervised classification of brain tissues through local multi-scale texture analysis by coupling DIR and FLAIR MR sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poletti, Enea; Veronese, Elisa; Calabrese, Massimiliano; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Grisan, Enrico

    2012-02-01

    The automatic segmentation of brain tissues in magnetic resonance (MR) is usually performed on T1-weighted images, due to their high spatial resolution. T1w sequence, however, has some major downsides when brain lesions are present: the altered appearance of diseased tissues causes errors in tissues classification. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we employed two different MR sequences: fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and double inversion recovery (DIR). The former highlights both gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), the latter highlights GM alone. We propose here a supervised classification scheme that does not require any anatomical a priori information to identify the 3 classes, "GM", "WM", and "background". Features are extracted by means of a local multi-scale texture analysis, computed for each pixel of the DIR and FLAIR sequences. The 9 textures considered are average, standard deviation, kurtosis, entropy, contrast, correlation, energy, homogeneity, and skewness, evaluated on a neighborhood of 3x3, 5x5, and 7x7 pixels. Hence, the total number of features associated to a pixel is 56 (9 textures x3 scales x2 sequences +2 original pixel values). The classifier employed is a Support Vector Machine with Radial Basis Function as kernel. From each of the 4 brain volumes evaluated, a DIR and a FLAIR slice have been selected and manually segmented by 2 expert neurologists, providing 1st and 2nd human reference observations which agree with an average accuracy of 99.03%. SVM performances have been assessed with a 4-fold cross-validation, yielding an average classification accuracy of 98.79%.

  11. Investigating nitrate dynamics in a fine-textured soil affected by feedlot effluents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veizaga, E. A.; Rodríguez, L.; Ocampo, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    Feedlots concentrate large volumes of manure and effluents that contain high concentrations of nitrate, among other constituents. If not managed properly, pen surfaces run-off and lagoons overflows may spread those effluents to surrounding land, infiltrating into the soil. Soil nitrate mobilization and distribution are of great concern due to its potential migration towards groundwater resources. This work aimed at evaluating the migration of nitrate originated on feedlots effluents in a fine-textured soil under field conditions. Soil water constituents were measured during a three-year period at three distinct locations adjacent to feedlot retention lagoons representing different degrees of exposure to water flow and manure accumulation. A simple statistical analysis was undertaken to identify patterns of observed nitrate and chloride concentrations and electrical conductivity and their differences with depth. HYDRUS-1D was used to simulate water flow and solute transport of Cl-, NO4+sbnd N, NO3-sbnd N and electrical conductivity to complement field data interpretation. Results indicated that patterns of NO3-sbnd N concentrations were not only notoriously different from electrical conductivity and Cl- but also ranges and distribution with depth differed among locations. A combination of dilution, transport, reactions such as nitrification/denitrification and vegetation water and solute uptake took place at each plots denoting the complexity of soil-solution behavior under extreme polluting conditions. Simulations using the concept of single porosity-mobile/immobile water (SP-MIM) managed structural controls and correctly simulated -all species concentrations under field data constrains. The opposite was true for the other two locations experiencing near-saturation conditions, absence of vegetation and frequent manure accumulation and runoff from feedlot lagoons. Although the results are site specific, findings are relevant to advance the understanding of NO3-sbnd

  12. Investigating nitrate dynamics in a fine-textured soil affected by feedlot effluents.

    PubMed

    Veizaga, E A; Rodríguez, L; Ocampo, C J

    2016-10-01

    Feedlots concentrate large volumes of manure and effluents that contain high concentrations of nitrate, among other constituents. If not managed properly, pen surfaces run-off and lagoons overflows may spread those effluents to surrounding land, infiltrating into the soil. Soil nitrate mobilization and distribution are of great concern due to its potential migration towards groundwater resources. This work aimed at evaluating the migration of nitrate originated on feedlots effluents in a fine-textured soil under field conditions. Soil water constituents were measured during a three-year period at three distinct locations adjacent to feedlot retention lagoons representing different degrees of exposure to water flow and manure accumulation. A simple statistical analysis was undertaken to identify patterns of observed nitrate and chloride concentrations and electrical conductivity and their differences with depth. HYDRUS-1D was used to simulate water flow and solute transport of Cl(-), NO4(+)N, NO3(-)N and electrical conductivity to complement field data interpretation. Results indicated that patterns of NO3(-)N concentrations were not only notoriously different from electrical conductivity and Cl(-) but also ranges and distribution with depth differed among locations. A combination of dilution, transport, reactions such as nitrification/denitrification and vegetation water and solute uptake took place at each plots denoting the complexity of soil-solution behavior under extreme polluting conditions. Simulations using the concept of single porosity-mobile/immobile water (SP-MIM) managed structural controls and correctly simulated (-)all species concentrations under field data constrains. The opposite was true for the other two locations experiencing near-saturation conditions, absence of vegetation and frequent manure accumulation and runoff from feedlot lagoons. Although the results are site specific, findings are relevant to advance the understanding of NO3(-)N

  13. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics and extended textures of topological defects in spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udagawa, M.; Jaubert, L. D. C.; Castelnovo, C.; Moessner, R.

    2016-09-01

    Memory effects have been observed across a wide range of geometrically frustrated magnetic materials, possibly including Pr2Ir2O7 where a spontaneous Hall effect has been observed. Frustrated magnets are also famous for the emergence of topological defects. Here we explore how the interaction between these defects can be responsible for a rich diversity of out-of-equilibrium dynamics, dominated by topological bottlenecks and multiscale energy barriers. Our model is an extension of the spinice model on the pyrochlore lattice, where farther-neighbor spin interactions give rise to a nearest-neighbor coupling between topological defects. This coupling can be chosen to be "unnatural" or not, i.e., attractive or repulsive between defects carrying the same topological charge. After applying a field quench, our model supports, for example, long-lived magnetization plateaux, and allows for the metastability of a "fragmented" spin liquid, an unconventional phase of matter where long-range order co-exists with a spin liquid. Perhaps most strikingly, the attraction between same-sign charges produces clusters of these defects in equilibrium, whose stability is due to a combination of energy and topological barriers. These clusters may take the form of a "jellyfish" spin texture, centered on a hexagonal ring with branches of arbitrary length. The ring carries a clockwise or counterclockwise circular flow of magnetization. This emergent toroidal degrees of freedom provide a possibility for time-reversal symmetry breaking with potential relevance to the spontaneous Hall effect observed in Pr2Ir2O7 .

  14. Plant and Microbial Dynamics Along Gradients in Soil Texture and Eolian Dust Accumulation in the Colorado Plateau.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, J. C.; Reynolds, R.; Lamothe, P.; Belnap, J.

    2001-12-01

    The canyonlands region of Southwest Utah is made up of soils with a range of textures and chemistries. We have identified three transects of soils that range from high sand to high silt content in order to examine the effect of soil texture and chemistry on plant and microbial dynamics. We also take advantage of new techniques that allow separation of eolian-derived fine soil particles from in situ weathering and erosion products to evaluate the role that dust deposition plays in the chemistry of desert ecosystems. We present results from several studies along these transects including measurements of hydrologic fluxes and comparisons of soil and plant chemistry. We have also carried out experiments on microbial and plant processes along gradients with the aim of linking biological dynamics to variation in surficial chemistry and hydrology. Our initial results indicate that water holding capacity is substantially higher in silts vs. sandy soils but that increases in water availability in sands have a disproportionate effect on soil respiration rates with a more rapid and prolonged response to wetting in sands vs. silts. Comparisons of plant and soil chemistry suggest that plants and soils show similar increases in Mg and Mn concentrations along our textural transects. In addition, native bunch grasses growing in high eolian silt environments show elevated P content in their tissues and may reflect the input of P in eolian deposition. With these studies, we are beginning to build a mechanistic framework for understanding the relationship between eolian deposition and ecosystem response in arid environments.

  15. Dynamics on Scale-Invariant Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, Alexis

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We investigate dynamical processes on random and regular fractals. The (static) problem of percolation in the semi -infinite plane introduces many pertinent ideas including real space renormalisation group (RSRG) fugacity transformations and scaling forms. We study the percolation probability to determine the surface critical behaviour and to establish exponent relations. The fugacity approach is generalised to study random walks on diffusion-limited aggregates (DLA). Using regular and random models, we calculate the walk dimensionality and demonstrate that it is consistent with a conjecture by Aharony and Stauffer. It is shown that the kinetically grown DNA is in a distinct dynamic universality class to lattice animals. Similarly, the speculation of Helman -Coniglio-Tsallis regarding diffusion on self-avoiding walks (SAWs) is shown to be incorrect. The results are corroborated by an exact enumeration analysis of the internal structure of SAWs. A 'spin' and field theoretic Hamiltonian formulation for the conformational and resistance properties of random walks is presented. We consider Gaussian random walks, SAWs, spiral SAWs and valence walks. We express resistive susceptibilities as correlation functions and hence epsilon-expansions are calculated for the resistance exponents. For SAWs, the local crosslinks are shown to be irrelevant and we calculate corrections to scaling. A scaling description is introduced into an equation -of-motion method in order to study spin wave damping in d-dimensional isotropic Heisenberg ferro-, antiferro- and ferri- magnets near p_{rm c} . Dynamic scaling is shown to be obeyed by the Lorentzian spin wave response function and lifetime. The ensemble of finite clusters and multicritical behaviour is also treated. In contrast, the relaxational dynamics of the dilute Anisotropic Heisenberg model is shown to violate conventional dynamic scaling near the

  16. Simple scaling of catastrophic landslide dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Göran; Stark, Colin P

    2013-03-22

    Catastrophic landslides involve the acceleration and deceleration of millions of tons of rock and debris in response to the forces of gravity and dissipation. Their unpredictability and frequent location in remote areas have made observations of their dynamics rare. Through real-time detection and inverse modeling of teleseismic data, we show that landslide dynamics are primarily determined by the length scale of the source mass. When combined with geometric constraints from satellite imagery, the seismically determined landslide force histories yield estimates of landslide duration, momenta, potential energy loss, mass, and runout trajectory. Measurements of these dynamical properties for 29 teleseismogenic landslides are consistent with a simple acceleration model in which height drop and rupture depth scale with the length of the failing slope.

  17. Multi-scale modelling and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Plathe, Florian

    Moving from a fine-grained particle model to one of lower resolution leads, with few exceptions, to an acceleration of molecular mobility, higher diffusion coefficient, lower viscosities and more. On top of that, the level of acceleration is often different for different dynamical processes as well as for different state points. While the reasons are often understood, the fact that coarse-graining almost necessarily introduces unpredictable acceleration of the molecular dynamics severely limits its usefulness as a predictive tool. There are several attempts under way to remedy these shortcoming of coarse-grained models. On the one hand, we follow bottom-up approaches. They attempt already when the coarse-graining scheme is conceived to estimate their impact on the dynamics. This is done by excess-entropy scaling. On the other hand, we also pursue a top-down development. Here we start with a very coarse-grained model (dissipative particle dynamics) which in its native form produces qualitatively wrong polymer dynamics, as its molecules cannot entangle. This model is modified by additional temporary bonds, so-called slip springs, to repair this defect. As a result, polymer melts and solutions described by the slip-spring DPD model show correct dynamical behaviour. Read more: ``Excess entropy scaling for the segmental and global dynamics of polyethylene melts'', E. Voyiatzis, F. Müller-Plathe, and M.C. Böhm, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16, 24301-24311 (2014). [DOI: 10.1039/C4CP03559C] ``Recovering the Reptation Dynamics of Polymer Melts in Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations via Slip-Springs'', M. Langeloth, Y. Masubuchi, M. C. Böhm, and F. Müller-Plathe, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104907 (2013). [DOI: 10.1063/1.4794156].

  18. Deformation and texture development in deep Earth mineral phases: Implications for seismic anisotropy and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Lowell Masataka

    The contribution of this thesis is to expand the current knowledge of deformation mechanisms in mineral phases of the lower mantle, the D" region, and the inner core. Quantitative information about texture and stress is obtained using in-situ radial synchrotron x-ray diffraction and the Rietveld method to deconvolute diffraction images. Transformation textures are interpreted in terms of structural relationships between the starting material and product phases or in terms of minimization of strain energy. Polycrystal plasticity modeling is used to interpret deformation textures in terms of activity of slip systems and mechanical twinning. In Chapter 2 texture development resulting from phase transformations and deformation is explored in (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite and (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 perovskite + (Mg,Fe)O magnesiowiistite aggregates in the diamond anvil cell (DAC). For (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite synthesized from enstatite a strong 001 texture develops that is related to a structural relationship between the enstatite and perovskite phases. For (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite + (Mg,Fe)O magnesiowiistite aggregates synthesized from (Mg,Fe)2SiO 4 olivine and ringwoodite, transformation textures are controlled by minimization of strain energy during the phase transformation via mechanical twinning and/or nucleation of grains in low strain energy configurations. Polycrystal plasticity modeling of deformation textures indicates that slip on (001) planes dominates in (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite at high pressure and room temperature and this does not appear to change with laser heating. Interestingly when two phase aggregates of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite + (Mg,Fe)O magnesiowtistite are deformed, magnesiowustite does not develop significant texturing, which may indicate that it would not be a source of anisotropy in the lower mantle. Deformation of CaIrO3 post-perovskite (an analog for (Mg,Fe)SiO 3 postperovskite) in the deformation-DIA large volume press is explored in chapter 3. A sintered

  19. Identifying and Quantifying Carbonate and Serpentine Textures and Abundances at Multiple Scales with VSWIR Imaging Spectroscopy, Samail Ophiolite, Oman

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leask, E.; Ehlmann, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Visible-shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging reflectance spectroscopy is a technique that can be used to identify minerals, quantify abundances, and assess textural relationships at many scales, from microscopic(<100μm/pixel) to orbital data (>10m/pixel). Here, we assess microscopic-, outcrop-, and airborne-scale data of rocks from serpentine-hosted carbonate springs and veins within the Samail Ophiolite (Oman), a system of interest to terrestrial geologists and an analog for early Martian environments. Multi-scale VSWIR imaging spectroscopy enables study of the fracturing and mineralization processes of serpentinization at multiple spatial scales from sub-mm to meters, as it can be used to identify minerals (even if partially altered), trace veins and quantify their approximate volume, and directly compare active serpentine springs sites to their inactive equivalents. It also allows non-destructive estimation of carbonation. We tested the efficacy of microimaging spectroscopy to evaluate serpentinization textures while simultaneously quantifying abundances of different minerals, comparing values from linear spectral unmixing to traditional techniques (quantitative XRD, EDS/SEM). We find abundances derived typically agree to within 10%. At the microscopic scale, VSWIR imaging spectroscopy identifies spatially coherent rare phases missed by XRD as well as XRD `amorphous' component (partially serpentinized clasts) and can quickly differentiate between carbonates and different phyllosilicate minerals (e.g., serpentine vs. chlorite) through subtle wavelength shifts. While outcrop and landscape-scale data are noisier (and lack key wavelength regions around 1.4 and 1.9 μm due to atmospheric absorptions), for standoff distances 3-15 m it is possible to identify different types/generations of veining and track the specific wavelength of major absorptions as well as their depth/shape as a proxy for crystal size. Network scales of veining and fracturing are quantified and

  20. Effects of texture on salt precipitation dynamics and deposition patterns in drying porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi Rad, Mansoureh; Shokri, Nima

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the physics of water evaporation from saline porous media is important in many natural and engineering applications such as durability of building materials and preservation of monuments, CO2 sequestration and water quality. Also excess of salt accumulation in soil may result in soil salinization which is a global problem adversely affecting vegetation, plant growth and crop production. Thus it is important to understand the parameters affecting salt transport and precipitation in porous media. We applied X-ray micro-tomography to investigate the dynamics of salt precipitation during evaporation from porous media as influenced by the particle and pore sizes. The packed beds were saturated with NaCl solution of 3 Molal and the time-lapse X-ray imaging was continued for one day. The results show that the presence of preferential evaporation sites (associated with fine pores) on the surface of the sand columns influences significantly the patterns and dynamics of NaCl precipitation (Norouzi Rad et al., 2013; Norouzi Rad and Shokri, 2014). They confirm the formation of an increasingly thick and discrete salt crust with increasing grain size in the sand column due to the presence of fewer fine pores (preferential precipitation sites) at the surface compared to the sand packs with finer grains. Fewer fine pores on the surface also results in shorter stage-1 precipitation for the columns with larger grain sizes. A simple model for the evolution of salt crust thickness based on this principle shows a good agreement with our experiments. Our results provide new insights regarding the physics of salt precipitation and its complex dynamics in porous media during evaporation. References Norouzi Rad, M., Shokri, N., Sahimi, M. (2013), Pore-Scale Dynamics of Salt Precipitation in Drying Porous Media, Phys. Rev. E, 88, 032404. Norouzi Rad, M., Shokri, N. (2014), Effects of grain angularity on NaCl precipitation in porous media during evaporation, Water Resour. Res

  1. Scaling laws and dynamics of bubble coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Christopher R.; Kamat, Pritish M.; Thete, Sumeet S.; Munro, James P.; Lister, John R.; Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2017-08-01

    The coalescence of bubbles and drops plays a central role in nature and industry. During coalescence, two bubbles or drops touch and merge into one as the neck connecting them grows from microscopic to macroscopic scales. The hydrodynamic singularity that arises when two bubbles or drops have just touched and the flows that ensue have been studied thoroughly when two drops coalesce in a dynamically passive outer fluid. In this paper, the coalescence of two identical and initially spherical bubbles, which are idealized as voids that are surrounded by an incompressible Newtonian liquid, is analyzed by numerical simulation. This problem has recently been studied (a) experimentally using high-speed imaging and (b) by asymptotic analysis in which the dynamics is analyzed by determining the growth of a hole in the thin liquid sheet separating the two bubbles. In the latter, advantage is taken of the fact that the flow in the thin sheet of nonconstant thickness is governed by a set of one-dimensional, radial extensional flow equations. While these studies agree on the power law scaling of the variation of the minimum neck radius with time, they disagree with respect to the numerical value of the prefactors in the scaling laws. In order to reconcile these differences and also provide insights into the dynamics that are difficult to probe by either of the aforementioned approaches, simulations are used to access both earlier times than has been possible in the experiments and also later times when asymptotic analysis is no longer applicable. Early times and extremely small length scales are attained in the new simulations through the use of a truncated domain approach. Furthermore, it is shown by direct numerical simulations in which the flow within the bubbles is also determined along with the flow exterior to them that idealizing the bubbles as passive voids has virtually no effect on the scaling laws relating minimum neck radius and time.

  2. Multi-Scale Modeling of Magnetospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Toth, G.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a key element in many phenomena in space plasma, e.g. Coronal mass Ejections, Magnetosphere substorms. One of the major challenges in modeling the dynamics of large-scale systems involving magnetic reconnection is to quantifY the interaction between global evolution of the magnetosphere and microphysical kinetic processes in diffusion regions near reconnection sites. Recent advances in small-scale kinetic modeling of magnetic reconnection significantly improved our understanding of physical mechanisms controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site in collisionless plasma. However the progress in studies of small-scale geometries was not very helpful for large scale simulations. Global magnetosphere simulations usually include non-ideal processes in terms of numerical dissipation and/or ad hoc anomalous resistivity. Comparative studies of magnetic reconnection in small scale geometries demonstrated that MHD simulations that included non-ideal processes in terms of a resistive term 11 J did not produce fast reconnection rates observed in kinetic simulations. In collisionless magnetospheric plasma, the primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site is nongyrotropic pressure effects with spatial scales comparable with the particle Larmor radius. We utilize the global MHD code BATSRUS and replace ad hoc parameters such as "critical current density" and "anomalous resistivity" with a physically motivated model of dissipation. The primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of the reconnection site in incorporated into MHD description in terms of non-gyrotropic corrections to the induction equation. We will demonstrate that kinetic nongyrotropic effects can significantly alter the global magnetosphere evolution. Our approach allowed for the first time to model loading/unloading cycle in response to steady southward IMF driving. The role of solar wind parameters and

  3. Analysis of image versus position, scale and direction reveals pattern texture anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoucq, Roland; Weiss, Jerome; Dubrulle, Berengere; Amon, Axelle; Le Bouil, Antoine; Crassous, Jerome; Amitrano, David; Graner, Francois

    2014-12-01

    Pattern heterogeneities and anisotropies often carry significant physical information. We provide a toolbox which: (i) cumulates analysis in terms of position, direction and scale; (ii) is as general as possible; (iii) is simple and fast to understand, implement, execute and exploit. It consists in dividing the image into analysis boxes at a chosen scale; in each box an ellipse (the inertia tensor) is fitted to the signal and thus determines the direction in which the signal is more present. This tensor can be averaged in position and/or be used to study the dependence with scale. This choice is formally linked with Leray transforms and anisotropic wavelet analysis. Such protocol is intutively interpreted and consistent with what the eye detects: relevant scales, local variations in space, priviledged directions. It is fast and parallelizable. Its several variants are adaptable to the user's data and needs. It is useful to statistically characterize anisotropies of 2D or 3D patterns in which individual objects are not easily distinguished, with only minimal pre-processing of the raw image, and more generally applies to data in higher dimensions. It is less sensitive to edge effects, and thus better adapted for a multiscale analysis down to small scale boxes, than pair correlation function or Fourier transform. Easy to understand and implement, it complements more sophisticated methods such as Hough transform or diffusion tensor imaging. We use it on various fracture patterns (sea ice cover, thin sections of granite, granular materials), to pinpoint the maximal anisotropy scales. The results are robust to noise and to user choices. This toolbox could turn also useful for granular materials, hard condensed matter, geophysics, thin films, statistical mechanics, characterisation of networks, fluctuating amorphous systems, inhomogeneous and disordered systems, or medical imaging, among others.

  4. Multi-Scale Rotation-Invariant Convolutional Neural Networks for Lung Texture Classification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiangchang; Zheng, Yuanjie; Yang, Gongping; Jin, Weidong; Chen, Xinjian; Yin, Yilong

    2017-03-21

    We propose a new Multi-scale Rotation-invariant Convolutional Neural Network (MRCNN) model for classifying various lung tissue types on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). MRCNN employs Gabor-local binary pattern (Gabor-LBP) which introduces a good property in image analysis - invariance to image scales and rotations. In addition, we offer an approach to deal with the problems caused by imbalanced number of samples between different classes in most of the existing works, accomplished by changing the overlapping size between the adjacent patches. Experimental results on a public Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) database show a superior performance of the proposed method to state-of-the-art.

  5. Entomopathogenic nematodes, root weevil larvae, and dynamic interactions among soil texture, plant growth, herbivory, and predation.

    PubMed

    El-Borai, Fahiem E; Stuart, Robin J; Campos-Herrera, Raquel; Pathak, Ekta; Duncan, Larry W

    2012-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments were conducted to assess the influence of soil texture on the persistence, efficacy and plant protection ability of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) applied to control larvae of the Diaprepes root weevil (DRW), Diaprepes abbreviatus, infesting potted citrus seedlings. Seedlings were grown in pots containing either coarse sand, fine sand, or sandy loam. Three DRW larvae were added to each of 80 pots of each soil type. 24 h later, 20 pots of each soil type that had received weevil larvae were inoculated with EPN infective juveniles (IJs) of one of the following species: Steinernema diaprepesi, Steinernema riobrave and Heterorhabditis indica. Pots of each soil without EPNs were established as controls with DRW and controls without DRWs. Subsequently, pots with larvae received three additional larvae monthly, and the experiment continued for 9 months. Plant root and top weights at the end of the experiment were affected by both soil (P≤0.0001) and nematodes (P≤0.0001), and nematode species protected plants differently in different soils (interaction P≤0.0001). Soil porosity was inversely related to plant damage by DRW, whether or not EPNs were present; and porosity was directly related to the level of plant protection by EPNs. Mortality of caged sentinel weevil larvae placed in pots near the end of the experiment was highest in pots treated with S. diaprepesi. In a second, similar experiment that included an additional undescribed steinernematid of the Steinernema glaseri-group, soil type affected root damage by DRW and root protection by EPNs in the same manner as in the first experiment. Final numbers of S. diaprepesi and Steinernema sp. as measured by real-time PCR were much greater than those of S. riobrave or H. indica in all soils. Across all treatments, the number of weevil larvae in soil at the end the experiment was inversely related to soil porosity. In all soils, fewer weevil larvae survived in soil treated with S. diaprepesi or

  6. Testing particle filters on convective scale dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslehner, Mylene; Craig, George. C.; Janjic, Tijana

    2014-05-01

    Particle filters have been developed in recent years to deal with highly nonlinear dynamics and non Gaussian error statistics that also characterize data assimilation on convective scales. In this work we explore the use of the efficient particle filter (P.v. Leeuwen, 2011) for convective scale data assimilation application. The method is tested in idealized setting, on two stochastic models. The models were designed to reproduce some of the properties of convection, for example the rapid development and decay of convective clouds. The first model is a simple one-dimensional, discrete state birth-death model of clouds (Craig and Würsch, 2012). For this model, the efficient particle filter that includes nudging the variables shows significant improvement compared to Ensemble Kalman Filter and Sequential Importance Resampling (SIR) particle filter. The success of the combination of nudging and resampling, measured as RMS error with respect to the 'true state', is proportional to the nudging intensity. Significantly, even a very weak nudging intensity brings notable improvement over SIR. The second model is a modified version of a stochastic shallow water model (Würsch and Craig 2013), which contains more realistic dynamical characteristics of convective scale phenomena. Using the efficient particle filter and different combination of observations of the three field variables (wind, water 'height' and rain) allows the particle filter to be evaluated in comparison to a regime where only nudging is used. Sensitivity to the properties of the model error covariance is also considered. Finally, criteria are identified under which the efficient particle filter outperforms nudging alone. References: Craig, G. C. and M. Würsch, 2012: The impact of localization and observation averaging for convective-scale data assimilation in a simple stochastic model. Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc.,139, 515-523. Van Leeuwen, P. J., 2011: Efficient non-linear data assimilation in geophysical

  7. Atomic scale dynamics of ultrasmall germanium clusters.

    PubMed

    Bals, S; Van Aert, S; Romero, C P; Lauwaet, K; Van Bael, M J; Schoeters, B; Partoens, B; Yücelen, E; Lievens, P; Van Tendeloo, G

    2012-06-12

    Starting from the gas phase, small clusters can be produced and deposited with huge flexibility with regard to composition, materials choice and cluster size. Despite many advances in experimental characterization, a detailed morphology of such clusters is still lacking. Here we present an atomic scale observation as well as the dynamical behaviour of ultrasmall germanium clusters. Using quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with ab initio calculations, we are able to characterize the transition between different equilibrium geometries of a germanium cluster consisting of less than 25 atoms. Seven-membered rings, trigonal prisms and some smaller subunits are identified as possible building blocks that stabilize the structure.

  8. Atomic scale dynamics of ultrasmall germanium clusters

    PubMed Central

    Bals, S.; Van Aert, S.; Romero, C.P.; Lauwaet, K.; Van Bael, M.J.; Schoeters, B.; Partoens, B.; Yücelen, E.; Lievens, P.; Van Tendeloo, G.

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the gas phase, small clusters can be produced and deposited with huge flexibility with regard to composition, materials choice and cluster size. Despite many advances in experimental characterization, a detailed morphology of such clusters is still lacking. Here we present an atomic scale observation as well as the dynamical behaviour of ultrasmall germanium clusters. Using quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with ab initio calculations, we are able to characterize the transition between different equilibrium geometries of a germanium cluster consisting of less than 25 atoms. Seven-membered rings, trigonal prisms and some smaller subunits are identified as possible building blocks that stabilize the structure. PMID:22692540

  9. A dynamical weak scale from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Tevong

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical scanning of the Higgs mass by an axion-like particle during inflation may provide a cosmological component to explaining part of the hierarchy problem. We propose a novel interplay of this cosmological relaxation mechanism with inflation, whereby the backreaction of the Higgs vacuum expectation value near the weak scale causes inflation to end. As Hubble drops, the relaxion's dissipative friction increases relative to Hubble and slows it down enough to be trapped by the barriers of its periodic potential. Such a scenario raises the natural cut-off of the theory up to ~ 1010 GeV, while maintaining a minimal relaxion sector without having to introduce additional scanning scalars or new physics coincidentally close to the weak scale.

  10. Effect of laser surface texturing (LST) on tribochemical films dynamics and friction and wear performance

    DOE PAGES

    Olofinjana, Bolutife; Lorenzo-Martin, Cinta; Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; ...

    2015-06-06

    Surface texturing or topographical design is one of the primary techniques to control friction and wear performance of surfaces in tribological contact. Laser surface texturing (LST), whereby a laser beam is used to produce regular arrays of dimples on a surface, has been demonstrated to reduce friction in conformal lubricated contacts. Friction and wear behavior under boundary lubrication is also known to be dependent on the formation and durability of the tribochemical film formed from lubricant additives. In this paper, the effects of LST on the formation and durability of tribochemical films and its consequent impacts on friction and wearmore » behavior in various lubrication regimes were evaluated. Friction and wear tests that cycled through different lubrication regimes were conducted with both polished and LST treated surfaces using a synthetic lubricant with and without model additives of ZDDP and MoDTC mixture. In the base oil without additives, LST produced noticeable reduction in friction in all lubrication regimes. However, with low-friction model additives, friction was higher in tests with LST due to significant differences in the tribochemical film formation in the polished and LST surfaces, as well as the sliding counterface. Continuous tribo-films were formed on ball conterface rubbed against polished surfaces while the films were streaky and discontinuous in ball rubbed against LST surfaces. LST produced more wear on the ball counterface in both base and additized oils. Lastly, no measurable wear was observed in both the polished and LST flat specimens.« less

  11. Effect of laser surface texturing (LST) on tribochemical films dynamics and friction and wear performance

    SciTech Connect

    Olofinjana, Bolutife; Lorenzo-Martin, Cinta; Ajayi, Oyelayo O.; Ajayi, Ezekiel O.

    2015-06-06

    Surface texturing or topographical design is one of the primary techniques to control friction and wear performance of surfaces in tribological contact. Laser surface texturing (LST), whereby a laser beam is used to produce regular arrays of dimples on a surface, has been demonstrated to reduce friction in conformal lubricated contacts. Friction and wear behavior under boundary lubrication is also known to be dependent on the formation and durability of the tribochemical film formed from lubricant additives. In this paper, the effects of LST on the formation and durability of tribochemical films and its consequent impacts on friction and wear behavior in various lubrication regimes were evaluated. Friction and wear tests that cycled through different lubrication regimes were conducted with both polished and LST treated surfaces using a synthetic lubricant with and without model additives of ZDDP and MoDTC mixture. In the base oil without additives, LST produced noticeable reduction in friction in all lubrication regimes. However, with low-friction model additives, friction was higher in tests with LST due to significant differences in the tribochemical film formation in the polished and LST surfaces, as well as the sliding counterface. Continuous tribo-films were formed on ball conterface rubbed against polished surfaces while the films were streaky and discontinuous in ball rubbed against LST surfaces. LST produced more wear on the ball counterface in both base and additized oils. Lastly, no measurable wear was observed in both the polished and LST flat specimens.

  12. Symmetric textures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramond, P. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-01-01

    The Wolfenstein parametrization is extended to the quark masses in the deep ultraviolet, and an algorithm to derive symmetric textures which are compatible with existing data is developed. It is found that there are only five such textures.

  13. Symmetric textures

    SciTech Connect

    Ramond, P.

    1993-04-01

    The Wolfenstein parametrization is extended to the quark masses in the deep ultraviolet, and an algorithm to derive symmetric textures which are compatible with existing data is developed. It is found that there are only five such textures.

  14. Texture Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Julie

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to provide an opportunity for her first graders to explore texture through an engaging subject, the author developed a three-part lesson that features fish in a mixed-media artwork: (1) Exploring Textured Paint; (2) Creating the Fish; and (3) Role Playing. In this lesson, students effectively explore texture through painting, drawing,…

  15. Texture Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Julie

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to provide an opportunity for her first graders to explore texture through an engaging subject, the author developed a three-part lesson that features fish in a mixed-media artwork: (1) Exploring Textured Paint; (2) Creating the Fish; and (3) Role Playing. In this lesson, students effectively explore texture through painting, drawing,…

  16. Classification of dynamic contrast enhanced MR images of cervical cancers using texture analysis and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Torheim, Turid; Malinen, Eirik; Kvaal, Knut; Lyng, Heidi; Indahl, Ulf G; Andersen, Erlend K F; Futsaether, Cecilia M

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) provides insight into the vascular properties of tissue. Pharmacokinetic models may be fitted to DCE-MRI uptake patterns, enabling biologically relevant interpretations. The aim of our study was to determine whether treatment outcome for 81 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer could be predicted from parameters of the Brix pharmacokinetic model derived from pre-chemoradiotherapy DCE-MRI. First-order statistical features of the Brix parameters were used. In addition, texture analysis of Brix parameter maps was done by constructing gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) from the maps. Clinical factors and first- and second-order features were used as explanatory variables for support vector machine (SVM) classification, with treatment outcome as response. Classification models were validated using leave-one-out cross-model validation. A random value permutation test was used to evaluate model significance. Features derived from first-order statistics could not discriminate between cured and relapsed patients (specificity 0%-20%, p-values close to unity). However, second-order GLCM features could significantly predict treatment outcome with accuracies (~70%) similar to the clinical factors tumor volume and stage (69%). The results indicate that the spatial relations within the tumor, quantified by texture features, were more suitable for outcome prediction than first-order features.

  17. Dynamics And Remediation Of Fine Textured Soils And Ground Water Contaminated With Salts And Chlorinated Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Alison; Naeth, M. Anne

    2017-04-01

    Soil and ground water are frequently contaminated by industrial activities, posing a potential risk to human and environmental health and limiting land use. Proper site management and remediation treatments can return contaminated areas to safe and useful states. Most remediation research focuses on single contaminants in coarse and medium textured soils. Contaminant mixtures are common and make remediation efforts complex due to differing chemical properties. Remediation in fine textured soils is difficult since their low hydraulic conductivities hinder addition of amendments into and removal of contaminated media out of the impacted zone. The objective of this research is to assess contaminant dynamics and potential remediation techniques for fine textured soil and ground water impacted by multiple contaminants in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The University of Alberta's Ellerslie Waste Management Facility was used to process liquid laboratory waste from 1972 to 2007. A waste water pond leak prior to 1984 resulted in salt and chlorinated organic compound contamination. An extensive annual ground water monitoring data set for the site is available since 1988. Analytical parameters include pH, electrical conductivity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, and metals. Data have been compared to Alberta Tier 1 Soil and Groundwater Remediation Guidelines to identify exceedances. The parameters of greatest concern, based on magnitude and frequency of detection, are electrical conductivity, sodium, chloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane. Spatial analyses of the data show that the contamination is focused in and down gradient of the former waste water pond. Temporal analyses show different trends depending on monitoring well location. Laboratory column experiments were used to assess leaching as a potential treatment for salt contamination in fine textured soils. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured for seven soils from two depth intervals with or without

  18. Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting surimi as affected by nano-scaled fish bone and heating rates.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Park, Jae W

    2015-08-01

    Textural and rheological properties of Pacific whiting (PW) surimi were investigated at various heating rates with the use of nano-scaled fish bone (NFB) and calcium chloride. Addition of NFB and slow heating improved gel strength significantly. Activity of endogenous transglutaminase (ETGase) from PW surimi was markedly induced by both NFB calcium and calcium chloride, showing an optimal temperature at 30°C. Initial storage modulus increased as NFB calcium concentration increased and the same trend was maintained throughout the temperature sweep. Rheograms with temperature sweep at slow heating rate (1°C/min) exhibited two peaks at ∼ 35°C and ∼ 70°C. However, no peak was observed during temperature sweep from 20 to 90°C at fast heating rate (20°C/min). Protein patterns of surimi gels were affected by both heating rate and NFB calcium concentration. Under slow heating, myosin heavy chain intensity decreased with NFB calcium concentration, indicating formation of ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine cross-links by ETGase and NFB calcium ion.

  19. A supervised learning framework for pancreatic islet segmentation with multi-scale color-texture features and rolling guidance filters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Liu, Chi; Eisses, John F; Husain, Sohail Z; Rohde, Gustavo K

    2016-10-01

    Islet cell quantification and function is important for developing novel therapeutic interventions for diabetes. Existing methods of pancreatic islet segmentation in histopathological images depend strongly on cell/nuclei detection, and thus are limited due to a wide variance in the appearance of pancreatic islets. In this paper, we propose a supervised learning pipeline to segment pancreatic islets in histopathological images, which does not require cell detection. The proposed framework firstly partitions images into superpixels, and then extracts multi-scale color-texture features from each superpixel and processes these features using rolling guidance filters, in order to simultaneously reduce inter-class ambiguity and intra-class variation. Finally, a linear support vector machine (SVM) is trained and applied to segment the testing images. A total of 23 hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained histopathological images with pancreatic islets are used for verifying the framework. With an average accuracy of 95%, training time of 20 min and testing time of 1 min per image, the proposed framework outperforms existing approaches with better segmentation performance and lower computational cost. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  20. A computationally efficient strength model for textured HCP metals undergoing dynamic loading conditions: Application to Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Jeffrey; Becker, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Predicting the behavior of HCP metals presents challenges beyond those of FCC and BCC metals because several deformation mechanisms, each with their own distinct behavior, compete simultaneously. Understanding and capturing the competition of these mechanisms is essential for modeling the anisotropic and highly orientation-dependent behavior exhibited by most HCP metals, yet doing so in a computationally efficient manner has been elusive. In this work an orientation-dependent strength model is developed that captures the competition between basal slip, extension twinning, and non-basal slip at significantly lower computational cost than conventional crystal plasticity models. The model is applied to various textured Magnesium polycrystals, and where applicable, compared with experimental results. Although the model developed in this work is only applied to Magnesium, both the framework and model are applicable to other non-cubic crystal structures.

  1. Impacts of pore to regional scale variations in authigenic composition and texture on anthropogenically influenced fluid-rock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Diagenetic history plays a dominant role in determining the suitability of subsurface rock units as hosts for fluids that have societal importance. The performance of subsurface aquifers and storage facilities for CO2, natural gas, and liquid waste, is largely tied to the evolution of pore space and distribution and composition of authigenic minerals. While geoscientists may be well aware of the importance and nuances of diagenesis, project managers and decision-makers are unlikely to have a geologic understanding of determining factors such as burial history, fluid flow, and mineral thermodynamics. Thus, if falls to the geoscientists to effectively communicate meaningful conceptual models that adequately capture diagenetic heterogeneity and the potential for temporal changes with anthropogenically-induced changes in subsurface chemistry. This can be particularly difficult in subsurface systems that are sparsely sampled. Here, we look at the example of the basal Cambrian Mount Simon Sandstone and overlying Eau Claire Formation in the Illinois Basin, the respective reservoir and seal for the largest ongoing demonstration of anthropogenic CO2 sequestration in the United States. Relatively few cores are available to study the pore-scale composition and structure of these units, and those that are available show a complex and spatially variable diagenetic history. Compilation of past studies and new analyses from the Illinois Basin are combined to illustrate the burial history and fluid flow record that will influence how these units respond to the massive volumes of supercritical CO2 injected into the subsurface. Pore to regional scale differences in authigenic mineral composition and texture result in significantly different predicted fluid-rock interactions and various potential consequences of injection. This project provides examples of both successes and challenges associated with communicating the diagentic complexity to stakeholders and the potential

  2. The dynamics of texture perception of hard solid food: A review of the contribution of the temporal dominance of sensations technique.

    PubMed

    Fiszman, Susana; Tarrega, Amparo

    2017-05-04

    The present paper reviews the use of temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) sensory methodology in relation to texture evaluation. From more than 100 papers initially screened, 28 dealing with the texture of hard solid foods that require mastication were selected. The attributes evaluated by TDS were comprehensively analyzed and the phases of the mastication period in which they occurred were studied. The relation between these attributes and the initial mechanical food properties, the particle size, shape, and aggregation of the increasingly destroyed food structure, and the evolving properties of the bolus through to swallowing were also examined. Results from complementary techniques used alongside TDS, both sensory and nonsensory, were also analyzed. The contribution of TDS methodology to understanding the texture construct is shown to be reliable and suggestions are made for future lines of research. The literature on the temporal dominance of sensations method is constantly increasing. The present review examines the application of this method to the dynamics of texture perception of hard solid foods. The key texture attributes perceived in each phase of mastication, together with their relation to the initial food structure, gradual comminution, and bolus formation, will shed light on the usefulness of this methodology for food texture appraisal. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Colloquium: Hierarchy of scales in language dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blythe, Richard A.

    2015-11-01

    Methods and insights from statistical physics are finding an increasing variety of applications where one seeks to understand the emergent properties of a complex interacting system. One such area concerns the dynamics of language at a variety of levels of description, from the behaviour of individual agents learning simple artificial languages from each other, up to changes in the structure of languages shared by large groups of speakers over historical timescales. In this Colloquium, we survey a hierarchy of scales at which language and linguistic behaviour can be described, along with the main progress in understanding that has been made at each of them - much of which has come from the statistical physics community. We argue that future developments may arise by linking the different levels of the hierarchy together in a more coherent fashion, in particular where this allows more effective use of rich empirical data sets.

  4. Food texture: pleasure and pain.

    PubMed

    Civille, Gail Vance

    2011-03-09

    Food texture provides sensory signals to consumers. Most of these signals stimulate responses from consumers, both good and bad, because of the expected pleasure - from creamy puddings and ice cream to crispy crackers and snacks. One critical role that texture plays in the success of products is its indication of the freshness and stability of the food product. The mechanical properties of food texture, such as hardness, cohesiveness, crispness, crunchiness, and denseness, are easy indicators of a product's freshness and wholesomeness. Although texture is often considered to be secondary to flavor in evaluating a product's success and acceptability, texture will tip the scales for the consumer, if the texture does not meet the consumer's expectation. Two case studies demonstrate the different texture properties of foods, how they function to generate consumer likes and dislikes, and how texture is key in determining food staleness versus freshness.

  5. Ascent and emplacement dynamics of obsidian lavas inferred from microlite textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kenneth S.; Manga, Michael; Gardner, James E.; Williams, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    To assess the eruption and emplacement of volumetrically diverse rhyolite lavas, we measured microlite number densities and orientations from samples collected from nine lavas in Yellowstone Caldera and two from Mono Craters, USA. Microlite populations are composed of Fe-Ti oxides ± alkali feldspar ± clinopyroxene. Number densities range from 108.11 ± 0.03 to 109.45 ± 0.15 cm-3 and do not correlate with distance from the vent across individual flows and are remarkably similar between large- and small-volume lavas. Together, those observations suggest that number densities are unmodified during emplacement and that ascent rates in the conduit are similar between small domes and large lava flows. Microtextures produced by continuous decompression experiments best replicate natural textures at decompression rates of 1-2 MPa hr-1. Acicular microlites have a preferred orientation in all natural samples. Because the standard deviation of microlite orientation does not become better aligned with distance travelled, we conclude that microlites exit the conduit aligned and that strain during subaerial flow was insufficient to further align microlites. The orientations of microlite trend and plunge in near-vent samples indicate that pure shear was the dominant style of deformation in the conduit. We speculate that collapsing permeable foam(s) provides a mechanism to concurrently allow microlite formation and alignment in response to the combination of degassing and flattening by pure shear.

  6. Unusual dynamic dewetting behavior of smooth perfluorinated hybrid films: potential advantages over conventional textured and liquid-infused perfluorinated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Cheng, Dalton F; Hozumi, Atsushi

    2013-10-08

    From a viewpoint of reducing the burden on the environment and human health, an alternative method for preparing liquid-repellent surfaces without relying on the long perfluorocarbons (C((X-1)/2)F(X), X ≥ 17) has been strongly demanded lately. In this study, we have successfully demonstrated that dynamic dewettability toward various probe liquids (polar and nonpolar liquids with high or low surface tension) can be tuned by not only controlling surface chemistries (surface energies) but also the physical (solid-like or liquid-like) nature of the surface. We prepared smooth and transparent organic-inorganic hybrid films exhibiting unusual dynamic dewetting behavior toward various probe liquids using a simple sol-gel reaction based on the co-hydrolysis and co-condensation of a mixture including a range of perfluoroalkylsilanes (FASX, C((X-1)/2)F(X)CH2CH2Si(OR)3, where X = 3, 9, 13, and 17) and tetramethoxysilane (Si(OCH3)4, TMOS). Dynamic contact angle (CA) and substrate tilt angle (TA) measurements confirmed that our FASX-hybrid films exhibited excellent dynamic dewetting properties and were mostly independent of the length of perfluoroalkyl (Rf) groups. For example, 10 μL droplets of ultralow surface tension liquids (e.g., diethyl ether (γ = 16.26 dyn/cm) and n-pentane (γ = 15.51 dyn/cm)) could move easily on our FAS9-, FAS13-, and FAS17-hybrid film surfaces at low substrate TAs (<4°) without pinning. This is comparable or superior to the best perfluorinated textured and flat surfaces reported so far. This exceptional dynamic dewetting behavior appeared only when TMOS molecules were added to the precursor solutions; we assume this is due to co-condensed TMOS-derived silica species working as spacers between the neighboring Rf chains, enabling them to rotate freely and in doing so provide a surface with liquid-like properties. This led to the distinguished dynamic dewettability of our hybrid films, regardless of the small static CAs. Our FASX-hybrid films also

  7. Nano-granular texture of cement hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Del Gado, Emanuela; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.

    2017-06-01

    Mechanical behavior of concrete crucially depends on cement hydrates, the "glue" of cement. The design of high performance and more environmentally friendly cements demands a deeper understanding of the formation of the multiscale structure of cement hydrates, when they precipitate and densify. We investigate the precipitation and setting of nano-grains of cement hydrates using a combination of Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics numerical simulations and study their texture from nano up to the micron scale. We characterize the texture of cement hydrates using the local volume fraction distribution, the pore size distribution, the scattering intensity and the chord length distribution and we compare them with experiments. Our nano-granular model provides cement structure with realistic texture and mechanics and can be further used to investigate degradation mechanisms.

  8. Current Scientific Issues in Large Scale Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, T. L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Topics in large scale atmospheric dynamics are discussed. Aspects of atmospheric blocking, the influence of transient baroclinic eddies on planetary-scale waves, cyclogenesis, the effects of orography on planetary scale flow, small scale frontal structure, and simulations of gravity waves in frontal zones are discussed.

  9. The Challenge of Scale - SEM Imaging of the Textural and Compositional Heterogeneity of Tight Shales from the Nanometer to Centimeter Scale (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, J.; Green, S.; Suarez-Rivera, R. F.

    2013-12-01

    Shales and mudstones are heterogeneous at all scales. Their inherent variability derives from the complex interplay between original composition, processes of transport and deposition, compaction, and diagenetic processes that start shortly after deposition and may continue for 100,000's and even millions of years. Multiple pathways lead from fresh mud to solid shale, and the course taken determines the physical and chemical characteristics of the resulting rock. The journey from mud to rock and the controls on rock properties are encoded in the fine scale microscopic details of rock constituents. To visualize these details in a context that extends multiple orders of length scales away from a specific observation is critical, and requires high resolution SEM imaging across representative areas that include the full assemblage of shale components (fecal pellets, silt streaks, winnowed lags, clay drapes, fossil tests, organic macerals, etc.) as well as fine scale stratification (sub-mm to mm scale). Characterization of shale cores (or outcrop) through mm-cm scale visual observations of sedimentary structures and textures, as well as through closely spaced (mm-scale) measurements of physical and compositional properties, enables robust differentiation of rock intervals with unique characteristics. The latter can be designated as representative shale microfacies, and it is these that we then sample for high resolution imaging. The micro-scale fabrics revealed by this imaging are critical for understanding the small scale spatial variability that crucially influences how fluids and gases travel through this rock, how well it may perform as a seal, how likely it may leak, or how well it might perform as a reservoir. We found that high resolution examination of argon ion milled areas of approximately 5 mm by 5 mm size allows us to overcome the contextual limitations of traditional SEM study of shales where typical observation footprints range from of 50 to 100 μm in

  10. Extrapolating dynamic leidenfrost principles to metallic nanodroplets on asymmetrically textured surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Horne, Joseph E.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Terrones, Humberto; ...

    2015-06-30

    In an effort to enhance our knowledge on how to control the movement of metallic nanodroplets, here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu nanostructures deposited on nanopillared substrates can be made to jump at desired angles. We find that such control is possible, especially for Cu nanostructures that are symmetric; for asymmetric nanostructures, however, control is more uncertain. The work presented here borrows ideas from two seemingly different fields, metallic droplets and water droplets in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime. Despite the differences in the respective systems, we find common ground in their behavior on nanostructuredmore » surfaces. As a result, we suggest that the ongoing research in Leidenfrost droplets is a fertile area for scientists working on metallic nanodroplets.« less

  11. Extrapolating Dynamic Leidenfrost Principles to Metallic Nanodroplets on Asymmetrically Textured Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Horne, Joseph E.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Terrones, Humberto; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to enhance our knowledge on how to control the movement of metallic nanodroplets, here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu nanostructures deposited on nanopillared substrates can be made to jump at desired angles. We find that such control is possible, especially for Cu nanostructures that are symmetric; for asymmetric nanostructures, however, control is more uncertain. The work presented here borrows ideas from two seemingly different fields, metallic droplets and water droplets in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime. Despite the differences in the respective systems, we find common ground in their behavior on nanostructured surfaces. Due to this, we suggest that the ongoing research in Leidenfrost droplets is a fertile area for scientists working on metallic nanodroplets. PMID:26123648

  12. Extrapolating Dynamic Leidenfrost Principles to Metallic Nanodroplets on Asymmetrically Textured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Joseph E.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Terrones, Humberto; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to enhance our knowledge on how to control the movement of metallic nanodroplets, here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu nanostructures deposited on nanopillared substrates can be made to jump at desired angles. We find that such control is possible, especially for Cu nanostructures that are symmetric; for asymmetric nanostructures, however, control is more uncertain. The work presented here borrows ideas from two seemingly different fields, metallic droplets and water droplets in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime. Despite the differences in the respective systems, we find common ground in their behavior on nanostructured surfaces. Due to this, we suggest that the ongoing research in Leidenfrost droplets is a fertile area for scientists working on metallic nanodroplets.

  13. Extrapolating Dynamic Leidenfrost Principles to Metallic Nanodroplets on Asymmetrically Textured Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Horne, Joseph E; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Terrones, Humberto; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2015-06-30

    In an effort to enhance our knowledge on how to control the movement of metallic nanodroplets, here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu nanostructures deposited on nanopillared substrates can be made to jump at desired angles. We find that such control is possible, especially for Cu nanostructures that are symmetric; for asymmetric nanostructures, however, control is more uncertain. The work presented here borrows ideas from two seemingly different fields, metallic droplets and water droplets in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime. Despite the differences in the respective systems, we find common ground in their behavior on nanostructured surfaces. Due to this, we suggest that the ongoing research in Leidenfrost droplets is a fertile area for scientists working on metallic nanodroplets.

  14. Extrapolating dynamic leidenfrost principles to metallic nanodroplets on asymmetrically textured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, Joseph E.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Terrones, Humberto; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2015-06-30

    In an effort to enhance our knowledge on how to control the movement of metallic nanodroplets, here we have used classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate whether Cu nanostructures deposited on nanopillared substrates can be made to jump at desired angles. We find that such control is possible, especially for Cu nanostructures that are symmetric; for asymmetric nanostructures, however, control is more uncertain. The work presented here borrows ideas from two seemingly different fields, metallic droplets and water droplets in the dynamic Leidenfrost regime. Despite the differences in the respective systems, we find common ground in their behavior on nanostructured surfaces. As a result, we suggest that the ongoing research in Leidenfrost droplets is a fertile area for scientists working on metallic nanodroplets.

  15. Dynamic finite-size scaling at first-order transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Vicari, Ettore

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the dynamic behavior of finite-size systems close to a first-order transition (FOT). We develop a dynamic finite-size scaling (DFSS) theory for the dynamic behavior in the coexistence region where different phases coexist. This is characterized by an exponentially large time scale related to the tunneling between the two phases. We show that, when considering time scales of the order of the tunneling time, the dynamic behavior can be described by a two-state coarse-grained dynamics. This allows us to obtain exact predictions for the dynamical scaling functions. To test the general DFSS theory at FOTs, we consider the two-dimensional Ising model in the low-temperature phase, where the external magnetic field drives a FOT, and the 20-state Potts model, which undergoes a thermal FOT. Numerical results for a purely relaxational dynamics fully confirm the general theory.

  16. Large scale dynamics of protoplanetary discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béthune, William

    2017-08-01

    Planets form in the gaseous and dusty disks orbiting young stars. These protoplanetary disks are dispersed in a few million years, being accreted onto the central star or evaporated into the interstellar medium. To explain the observed accretion rates, it is commonly assumed that matter is transported through the disk by turbulence, although the mechanism sustaining turbulence is uncertain. On the other side, irradiation by the central star could heat up the disk surface and trigger a photoevaporative wind, but thermal effects cannot account for the observed acceleration and collimation of the wind into a narrow jet perpendicular to the disk plane. Both issues can be solved if the disk is sensitive to magnetic fields. Weak fields lead to the magnetorotational instability, whose outcome is a state of sustained turbulence. Strong fields can slow down the disk, causing it to accrete while launching a collimated wind. However, the coupling between the disk and the neutral gas is done via electric charges, each of which is outnumbered by several billion neutral molecules. The imperfect coupling between the magnetic field and the neutral gas is described in terms of "non-ideal" effects, introducing new dynamical behaviors. This thesis is devoted to the transport processes happening inside weakly ionized and weakly magnetized accretion disks; the role of microphysical effects on the large-scale dynamics of the disk is of primary importance. As a first step, I exclude the wind and examine the impact of non-ideal effects on the turbulent properties near the disk midplane. I show that the flow can spontaneously organize itself if the ionization fraction is low enough; in this case, accretion is halted and the disk exhibits axisymmetric structures, with possible consequences on planetary formation. As a second step, I study the launching of disk winds via a global model of stratified disk embedded in a warm atmosphere. This model is the first to compute non-ideal effects from

  17. Eruptive dynamics and hazards associated with obsidian bearing ignimbrites of the Geghama Volcanic Highland, Central Armenia: a textural insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Zoe; Manning, Christina J.

    2017-04-01

    insight into the eruptive dynamics and emplacement history [5]. In particular, microlite number density, volume and alignment represent the summation of degassing, conduit flow and emplacement [6]. As such, there is great significance in the quantification of these parameters for the determination of eruption dynamics. Analysis of these obsidians will establish patterns of textural heterogeneity as a signature for the distinction of volcanic glasses formed by different mechanisms and allow for identification of patterns in microlite number density, volume, alignment and plunge that characterise differing modes of emplacement. Together, these measurements will aid interpretation and improve understanding of this volcanic system, with applicability to the determination of the impact of these volcanic episodes on the distribution of early man in Armenia as well as assessment of the potential for future events. [1] Lebedev et al (2013) JVS, 7, 204-229 [2] Arutyunyan et al (2007) Dokl Earth Sci, 416, 1042-1046 [3] Alder et al (2014) Science, 345, 1609-1613 [4] Hutchison et al (2016) Nat. Commun, 7 [5] Manga (1998) JVGR, 86, 107-115 [6] Befus et al (2015) Bull. Volcanol, 77, 88

  18. Pore Scale Dynamics of Microemulsion Formation.

    PubMed

    Unsal, Evren; Broens, Marc; Armstrong, Ryan T

    2016-07-19

    Experiments in various porous media have shown that multiple parameters come into play when an oleic phase is displaced by an aqueous solution of surfactant. In general, the displacement efficiency is improved when the fluids become quasi-miscible. Understanding the phase behavior oil/water/surfactant systems is important because microemulsion has the ability to generate ultralow interfacial tension (<10(-2) mN m(-1)) that is required for miscibility to occur. Many studies focus on microemulsion formation and the resulting properties under equilibrium conditions. However, the majority of applications where microemulsion is present also involve flow, which has received relatively less attention. It is commonly assumed that the characteristics of an oil/water/surfactant system under flowing conditions are identical to the one under equilibrium conditions. Here, we show that this is not necessarily the case. We studied the equilibrium phase behavior of a model system consisting of n-decane and an aqueous solution of olefin sulfonate surfactant, which has practical applications for enhanced oil recovery. The salt content of the aqueous solution was varied to provide a range of different microemulsion compositions and oil-water interfacial tensions. We then performed microfluidic flow experiments to study the dynamic in situ formation of microemulsion by coinjecting bulk fluids of n-decane and surfactant solution into a T-junction capillary geometry. A solvatochromatic fluorescent dye was used to obtain spatially resolved compositional information. In this way, we visualized the microemulsion formation and the flow of it along with the excess phases. A complex interaction between the flow patterns and the microemulsion properties was observed. The formation of microemulsion influenced the flow regimes, and the flow regimes affected the characteristics of the microemulsion formation. In particular, at low flow rates, slug flow was observed, which had profound

  19. Modeling broad-scale patterns of avian species richness across the Midwestern United States with measures of satellite image texture

    Treesearch

    Patrick D. Culbert; Volker C. Radeloff; Veronique St-Louis; Curtis H. Flather; Chadwick D. Rittenhouse; Thomas P. Albright; Anna M. Pidgeon

    2012-01-01

    Avian biodiversity is threatened, and in order to prioritize limited conservation resources and conduct effective conservation planning a better understanding of avian species richness patterns is needed. The use of image texture measures, as a proxy for the spatial structure of land cover and vegetation, has proven useful in explaining patterns of avian abundance and...

  20. Multiscale functions, scale dynamics, and applications to partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky; Pierret, Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Modeling phenomena from experimental data always begins with a choice of hypothesis on the observed dynamics such as determinism, randomness, and differentiability. Depending on these choices, different behaviors can be observed. The natural question associated to the modeling problem is the following: "With a finite set of data concerning a phenomenon, can we recover its underlying nature? From this problem, we introduce in this paper the definition of multi-scale functions, scale calculus, and scale dynamics based on the time scale calculus [see Bohner, M. and Peterson, A., Dynamic Equations on Time Scales: An Introduction with Applications (Springer Science & Business Media, 2001)] which is used to introduce the notion of scale equations. These definitions will be illustrated on the multi-scale Okamoto's functions. Scale equations are analysed using scale regimes and the notion of asymptotic model for a scale equation under a particular scale regime. The introduced formalism explains why a single scale equation can produce distinct continuous models even if the equation is scale invariant. Typical examples of such equations are given by the scale Euler-Lagrange equation. We illustrate our results using the scale Newton's equation which gives rise to a non-linear diffusion equation or a non-linear Schrödinger equation as asymptotic continuous models depending on the particular fractional scale regime which is considered.

  1. Spin Texture and Spin Dynamics in Superconducting Cuprates Near the Phase Transition Revealed by the Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochelaev, B. I.

    2016-12-01

    A short review of experimental results and theoretical models of the spin texture and spin dynamics in superconducting cuprates near the phase transition developed on the basis of the EPR measurements is given. Distortions of the long-range antiferromagnetic order in the YBa_2Cu_3O_{6+y} were investigated for y=0.1-0.4 using Yb^{3+} ions as the EPR probe. In weakly doped samples with y=0.1, a strong anisotropy of the EPR linewidth is revealed which was related to the indirect spin-spin interaction between the ytterbium ions via antiferromagnetic spin-waves. In the case of the doping level y=0.2-0.3, the EPR signal consists of narrow and broad lines, which were attributed to formation of charged domain walls. A theoretical analysis is well consistent with experimental results for the case of coplanar elliptical domain walls. A discussion of possible reasons for the observed unusual planar oxygen isotope effect on a critical temperature T_c related to charge heterogeneity in underdoped cuprates is given.

  2. Texture-defined objects influence responses of blowfly motion-sensitive neurons under natural dynamical conditions.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Thomas W; Kern, Roland; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The responses of visual interneurons of flies involved in the processing of motion information do not only depend on the velocity, but also on other stimulus parameters, such as the contrast and the spatial frequency content of the stimulus pattern. These dependencies have been known for long, but it is still an open question how they affect the neurons' performance in extracting information about the structure of the environment under the specific dynamical conditions of natural flight. Free-flight of blowflies is characterized by sequences of phases of translational movements lasting for just 30-100 ms interspersed with even shorter and extremely rapid saccade-like rotational shifts in flight and gaze direction. Previous studies already analyzed how nearby objects, leading to relative motion on the retina with respect to a more distant background, influenced the response of a class of fly motion sensitive visual interneurons, the horizontal system (HS) cells. In the present study, we focused on objects that differed from their background by discontinuities either in their brightness contrast or in their spatial frequency content. We found strong object-induced effects on the membrane potential even during the short intersaccadic intervals, if the background contrast was small and the object contrast sufficiently high. The object evoked similar response increments provided that it contained higher spatial frequencies than the background, but not under reversed conditions. This asymmetry in the response behavior is partly a consequence of the depolarization level induced by the background. Thus, our results suggest that, under the specific dynamical conditions of natural flight, i.e., on a very short timescale, the responses of HS cells represent object information depending on the polarity of the difference between object and background contrast and spatial frequency content.

  3. Unusual Texture

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-01

    The unusual texture in this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft is located on the plains of Elysium Planitia. The surface appears to be layered. The top layer has parallel, linear hills and channels.

  4. Atomic-scale visualization of inertial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, A M; Larsson, J; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Gaffney, K J; Blome, C; Synnergren, O; Sheppard, J; Caleman, C; Macphee, A G; Weinstein, D; Lowney, D P; Allison, T K; Matthews, T; Falcone, R W; Cavalieri, A L; Fritz, D M; Lee, S H; Bucksbaum, P H; Reis, D A; Rudati, J; Fuoss, P H; Kao, C C; Siddons, D P; Pahl, R; Als-Nielsen, J; Duesterer, S; Ischebeck, R; Schlarb, H; Schulte-Schrepping, H; Tschentscher, Th; Schneider, J; von der Linde, D; Hignette, O; Sette, F; Chapman, H N; Lee, R W; Hansen, T N; Techert, S; Wark, J S; Bergh, M; Huldt, G; van der Spoel, D; Timneanu, N; Hajdu, J; Akre, R A; Bong, E; Krejcik, P; Arthur, J; Brennan, S; Luening, K; Hastings, J B

    2005-04-15

    The motion of atoms on interatomic potential energy surfaces is fundamental to the dynamics of liquids and solids. An accelerator-based source of femtosecond x-ray pulses allowed us to follow directly atomic displacements on an optically modified energy landscape, leading eventually to the transition from crystalline solid to disordered liquid. We show that, to first order in time, the dynamics are inertial, and we place constraints on the shape and curvature of the transition-state potential energy surface. Our measurements point toward analogies between this nonequilibrium phase transition and the short-time dynamics intrinsic to equilibrium liquids.

  5. Temporal Changes of Texture Features Extracted From Pulmonary Nodules on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Chest Computed Tomography: How Influential Is the Scan Delay?

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungjin; Park, Chang Min; Park, Sang Joon; Song, Yong Sub; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Hwang, Eui Jin; Goo, Jin Mo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the temporal changes of various texture features extracted from pulmonary nodules on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and to compare the feature values among multiple scanning time points. We also aimed to analyze the variability of texture features across multiple scan delay times. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board of Seoul National University Hospital with waiver of patients' informed consent. Twenty patients (M:F, 6:14; mean age, 60.25 ± 11.97 years) with 20 lung nodules (mean size, 24.1 ± 12.3 mm) underwent DCE-CT with multiple scan delays (30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, and 480 seconds) after precontrast scans. Lung nodule segmentation and texture feature extraction were performed at each time point using in-house software. Texture feature values were compared among the multiple time points using the Friedman test with post hoc pairwise Wilcoxon signed rank test. In addition, the dynamic range (DR) reflecting the variability between 2 time points to the interpatient range was calculated. Thereafter, we determined the stable time range that met both "DR greater than 0.90" and "no statistically significant difference" between all time point pairs for each feature. The degree of variability across all scan delay times was obtained using coefficients of variation. Standard deviation, variance, entropy, sphericity, discrete compactness, gray-level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM) inverse difference moment (IDM), GLCM contrast, and GLCM entropy did not show significant differences between scan delays of 30 and 180 seconds with DR greater than 0.90 between all time point pairs. When the range was narrowed down to 60 to 150 seconds, an additional 2 values (mean and homogeneity) showed stability. Among the 13 texture features, entropy, sphericity, discrete compactness, and GLCM entropy exhibited the lowest variability (coefficient of variation ≤5%). Most texture

  6. Dynamic control of substrate bias for highly c-axis textured thin ferromagnetic CoCrTa film in inductively coupled plasma-assisted sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Okimura, Kunio; Oyanagi, Junya

    2005-01-01

    This study shows highly c-axis textured thin ferromagnetic Co-based alloy (CoCrTa) film growth in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-assisted sputtering with an internal coil with an insulated surface. Dynamic control of the substrate bias achieved highly c-axis textured CoCrTa film with a thickness of 70 nm in 3 min depositions on a Si substrate. The prepared film showed a smooth, dense surface consisting of small crystal grains. The film had a perpendicular magnetic coercivity of 1030 Oe and coercive squareness of 0.36. ICP-assisted sputtering with an internal coil with an insulated surface enabled higher-density ({>=}1.0x10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) plasma with lower space potential ({<=}30 V) compared to ICP-assisted sputtering with bare coil systems. Therefore, the proposed bias control is quite effective for textured growth of thinner Co layers via the effect of a high flux of ions with proper energies. This method can be a candidate for the deposition technique of c-axis textured films as perpendicular magnetic recording media.

  7. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  8. Molecular Scale Dynamics of Large Ring Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooßen, S.; Brás, A. R.; Krutyeva, M.; Sharp, M.; Falus, P.; Feoktystov, A.; Gasser, U.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Wischnewski, A.; Richter, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  9. Gravitational effects of global textures

    SciTech Connect

    Noetzold, D. . Astronomy and Astrophysics Center Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1990-03-01

    A solution for the dynamics of global textures is obtained. Their gravitational field during the collapse and the subsequent evolution is found to be given solely by a space-time dependent deficit solid angle.'' The frequency shift of photons traversing this gravitational field is calculated. The space-time dependent texture metric locally contracts the volume of three-space and thereby induces overdensities in homogeneous matter distributions. There are no gravitational forces unless matter has a nonzero angular momentum with respect to the texture origin which would be the case for moving textures.

  10. Scaling for Dynamical Systems in Biology.

    PubMed

    Ledder, Glenn

    2017-09-22

    Asymptotic methods can greatly simplify the analysis of all but the simplest mathematical models and should therefore be commonplace in such biological areas as ecology and epidemiology. One essential difficulty that limits their use is that they can only be applied to a suitably scaled dimensionless version of the original dimensional model. Many books discuss nondimensionalization, but with little attention given to the problem of choosing the right scales and dimensionless parameters. In this paper, we illustrate the value of using asymptotics on a properly scaled dimensionless model, develop a set of guidelines that can be used to make good scaling choices, and offer advice for teaching these topics in differential equations or mathematical biology courses.

  11. Independent Component Analysis of Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manduchi, Roberto; Portilla, Javier

    2000-01-01

    A common method for texture representation is to use the marginal probability densities over the outputs of a set of multi-orientation, multi-scale filters as a description of the texture. We propose a technique, based on Independent Components Analysis, for choosing the set of filters that yield the most informative marginals, meaning that the product over the marginals most closely approximates the joint probability density function of the filter outputs. The algorithm is implemented using a steerable filter space. Experiments involving both texture classification and synthesis show that compared to Principal Components Analysis, ICA provides superior performance for modeling of natural and synthetic textures.

  12. Dynamic scaling at classical phase transitions approached through nonequilibrium quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Wei; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Sandvik, Anders W.

    2014-02-01

    We use Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate generic scaling aspects of classical phase transitions approached through a quench (or annealing) protocol where the temperature changes as a function of time with velocity v. Using a generalized Kibble-Zurek ansatz, we demonstrate dynamic scaling for different types of stochastic dynamics (Metropolis, Swendsen-Wang, and Wolff) on Ising models in two and higher dimensions. We show that there are dual scaling functions governing the dynamic scaling, which together describe the scaling behavior in the entire velocity range v ∈[0,∞). These functions have asymptotics corresponding to the adiabatic and diabatic limits, and close to these limits they are perturbative in v and 1/v, respectively. Away from their perturbative domains, both functions cross over into the same universal power-law scaling form governed by the static and dynamic critical exponents (as well as an exponent characterizing the quench protocol). As a by-product of the scaling studies, we obtain high-precision estimates of the dynamic exponent z for the two-dimensional Ising model subject to the three variants of Monte Carlo dynamics: for single-spin Metropolis updates zM=2.1767(5), for Swendsen-Wang multicluster updates zSW=0.297(3), and for Wolff single-cluster updates zW=0.30(2). For Wolff dynamics, we find an interesting behavior with a nonanalytic breakdown of the quasiadiabatic and diabatic scalings, instead of the generic smooth crossover described by a power law. We interpret this disconnect between the two scaling regimes as a dynamic phase transition of the Wolff algorithm, caused by an effective sudden loss of ergodicity at high velocity.

  13. SU-E-I-100: Heterogeneity Studying for Primary and Lymphoma Tumors by Using Multi-Scale Image Texture Analysis with PET-CT Images

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dengwang; Wang, Qinfen; Li, H; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is studying tumor heterogeneity of the primary and lymphoma by using multi-scale texture analysis with PET-CT images, where the tumor heterogeneity is expressed by texture features. Methods: Datasets were collected from 12 lung cancer patients, and both of primary and lymphoma tumors were detected with all these patients. All patients underwent whole-body 18F-FDG PET/CT scan before treatment.The regions of interest (ROI) of primary and lymphoma tumor were contoured by experienced clinical doctors. Then the ROI of primary and lymphoma tumor is extracted automatically by using Matlab software. According to the geometry size of contour structure, the images of tumor are decomposed by multi-scale method.Wavelet transform was performed on ROI structures within images by L layers sampling, and then wavelet sub-bands which have the same size of the original image are obtained. The number of sub-bands is 3L+1.The gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated within different sub-bands, thenenergy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity were extracted from GLCM.Finally, heterogeneity statistical analysis was studied for primary and lymphoma tumor using the texture features. Results: Energy, inertia, correlation and gray in-homogeneity are calculated with our experiments for heterogeneity statistical analysis.Energy for primary and lymphomatumor is equal with the same patient, while gray in-homogeneity and inertia of primaryare 2.59595±0.00855, 0.6439±0.0007 respectively. Gray in-homogeneity and inertia of lymphoma are 2.60115±0.00635, 0.64435±0.00055 respectively. The experiments showed that the volume of lymphoma is smaller than primary tumor, but thegray in-homogeneity and inertia were higher than primary tumor with the same patient, and the correlation with lymphoma tumors is zero, while the correlation with primary tumor isslightly strong. Conclusion: This studying showed that there were effective heterogeneity

  14. Toward a dynamical understanding of planetary-scale flow regimes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Molteni, F.

    1993-06-01

    A strategy for diagnosing and interpreting flow regimes that is firmly rooted in dynamical theory is presented and applied to the study of observed and modeled planetary-scale regimes of the wintertime circulation in the Northern Hemisphere.

  15. Dynamical scaling in ferric oxide spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, G. M.

    1995-06-01

    A stochastic relaxation model for the Mössbauer spectra of ferric oxide spin glasses was used to analyze the spectra for the mixed spinel Mg1+tFe2-2tTitO4 with composition t=0.70. The results compare favorably with previously published results on the system BaSnxTi2-xFe4O11 with compositions x=0.40 and x=0.80, and suggest empirical scaling laws for the spin-order parameter defined as q=/S and the spin correlation time τc in these ferric oxide spin glasses. It was found that the quantity τcTG versus T/TG follows a scaling curve with approximately a power-law dependence below the glass temperature. The order parameter follows a scaling curve q=1-(T/TG)β, with a value β=2.48+/-0.19.

  16. Large Scale Interconnections Using Dynamic Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliat, Gilles; Roosen, Gerald

    1987-01-01

    Optics is attractive for interconnects because the possibility of crossing without any interaction multiple light beams. A crossbar network can be achieved using holographic elements which permit to connect independently all inputs and all outputs. The incorporation of dynamic holographic materials is enticing as this will render the interconnection changeable. However, it is necessary to find first a passive method permitting to achieve beam deflection and secondly a photosensitive material of high optical quality requiring low power levels to optically induce the refractive index changes. We first describe an optical method allowing to produce very large deflections of light beams thus enabling to randomly address any spot on a plane. Such a technique appears applicable to both interconnections of VLSI chips and random access of optical memories. Our scheme for realizing dynamic optical interconnects is based on Bragg diffraction of the beam to steer by a dynamic phase grating which spacing and orientation are changeable in real time. This is achieved in a passive way by acting on the optical frequency of the control beams used to record the dynamic grating. Deflection angles of 15° have been experimentally demonstrated for a 27 nm shift in the control wavelength. For a larger wavelength scanning (50 nm), 28° deflections are anticipated while maintaining the Bragg condition satisfied. We then discuss some issues related to photosensitive materials able to dynamically record the optically induced refractive index change. The specific example of Bi12 Si 020 or Bi12 Ge 020 photorefractive crystals is presented. Indeed these materials are very attractive as they require low driving energy and exhibit a memory effect. This latter property permits to achieve numerous iterations between computing cells before reconfiguration of the interconnect network.

  17. Human seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martinet, L-E; Fiddyment, G; Madsen, J R; Eskandar, E N; Truccolo, W; Eden, U T; Cash, S S; Kramer, M A

    2017-04-04

    Epilepsy-the propensity toward recurrent, unprovoked seizures-is a devastating disease affecting 65 million people worldwide. Understanding and treating this disease remains a challenge, as seizures manifest through mechanisms and features that span spatial and temporal scales. Here we address this challenge through the analysis and modelling of human brain voltage activity recorded simultaneously across microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. We show that during seizure large-scale neural populations spanning centimetres of cortex coordinate with small neural groups spanning cortical columns, and provide evidence that rapidly propagating waves of activity underlie this increased inter-scale coupling. We develop a corresponding computational model to propose specific mechanisms-namely, the effects of an increased extracellular potassium concentration diffusing in space-that support the observed spatiotemporal dynamics. Understanding the multi-scale, spatiotemporal dynamics of human seizures-and connecting these dynamics to specific biological mechanisms-promises new insights to treat this devastating disease.

  18. Human seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Martinet, L-E; Fiddyment, G.; Madsen, J. R.; Eskandar, E. N.; Truccolo, W.; Eden, U. T.; Cash, S. S.; Kramer, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy—the propensity toward recurrent, unprovoked seizures—is a devastating disease affecting 65 million people worldwide. Understanding and treating this disease remains a challenge, as seizures manifest through mechanisms and features that span spatial and temporal scales. Here we address this challenge through the analysis and modelling of human brain voltage activity recorded simultaneously across microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. We show that during seizure large-scale neural populations spanning centimetres of cortex coordinate with small neural groups spanning cortical columns, and provide evidence that rapidly propagating waves of activity underlie this increased inter-scale coupling. We develop a corresponding computational model to propose specific mechanisms—namely, the effects of an increased extracellular potassium concentration diffusing in space—that support the observed spatiotemporal dynamics. Understanding the multi-scale, spatiotemporal dynamics of human seizures—and connecting these dynamics to specific biological mechanisms—promises new insights to treat this devastating disease. PMID:28374740

  19. Human seizures couple across spatial scales through travelling wave dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinet, L.-E.; Fiddyment, G.; Madsen, J. R.; Eskandar, E. N.; Truccolo, W.; Eden, U. T.; Cash, S. S.; Kramer, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    Epilepsy--the propensity toward recurrent, unprovoked seizures--is a devastating disease affecting 65 million people worldwide. Understanding and treating this disease remains a challenge, as seizures manifest through mechanisms and features that span spatial and temporal scales. Here we address this challenge through the analysis and modelling of human brain voltage activity recorded simultaneously across microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales. We show that during seizure large-scale neural populations spanning centimetres of cortex coordinate with small neural groups spanning cortical columns, and provide evidence that rapidly propagating waves of activity underlie this increased inter-scale coupling. We develop a corresponding computational model to propose specific mechanisms--namely, the effects of an increased extracellular potassium concentration diffusing in space--that support the observed spatiotemporal dynamics. Understanding the multi-scale, spatiotemporal dynamics of human seizures--and connecting these dynamics to specific biological mechanisms--promises new insights to treat this devastating disease.

  20. RotoTexture: automated tools for texturing raw video.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Hart, John C

    2006-01-01

    We propose a video editing system that allows a user to apply a time-coherent texture to a surface depicted in the raw video from a single uncalibrated camera, including the surface texture mapping of a texture image and the surface texture synthesis from a texture swatch. Our system avoids the construction of a 3D shape model and instead uses the recovered normal field to deform the texture so that it plausibly adheres to the undulations of the depicted surface. The texture mapping method uses the nonlinear least-squares optimization of a spring model to control the behavior of the texture image as it is deformed to match the evolving normal field through the video. The texture synthesis method uses a coarse optical flow to advect clusters of pixels corresponding to patches of similarly oriented surface points. These clusters are organized into a minimum advection tree to account for the dynamic visibility of clusters. We take a rather crude approach to normal recovering and optical flow estimation, yet the results are robust and plausible for nearly diffuse surfaces such as faces and t-shirts.

  1. Imbibition of a textured surface decorated by short pillars with rounded edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Noriko; Okumura, Ko

    2012-08-01

    Imbibition of micropatterned surfaces can have broad technological and fundamental implications for areas ranging from biomedical devices and fuel transport to writing with ink. Despite rapidly growing interests aimed at various applications, a fundamental physical understanding of the imbibition dynamics is still in its infancy. Recently, two simple scaling regimes for the dynamics have been established for a textured surface decorated with long pillars whose top and bottom edges are sharp. Here, we study the imbibition dynamics of textured surfaces decorated by short pillars with rounded edges, to find a different scaling regime. Interestingly, this regime originates not from the balance of two effects but from the hybrid balance of three effects. Furthermore, this scaling law can be universal or independent of the details of the texture geometry. We envision that this potentially universal scaling regime might be ubiquitous and will be useful in the handling and transportation of a small amount of liquid.

  2. Dynamic Assessment in Phonological Disorders: The Scaffolding Scale of Stimulability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaspey, Amy M.; Stoel-Gammon, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic assessment is applied to phonological disorders with the Scaffolding Scale of Stimulability (SSS). The SSS comprises a 21-point hierarchical scale of cues and linguistic environments. With the SSS, clinicians assess stimulability as a diagnostic indicator and use the measure to monitor progress across treatment. Unlike other phonological…

  3. Dynamic Assessment in Phonological Disorders: The Scaffolding Scale of Stimulability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaspey, Amy M.; Stoel-Gammon, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic assessment is applied to phonological disorders with the Scaffolding Scale of Stimulability (SSS). The SSS comprises a 21-point hierarchical scale of cues and linguistic environments. With the SSS, clinicians assess stimulability as a diagnostic indicator and use the measure to monitor progress across treatment. Unlike other phonological…

  4. On the Density Scaling of Liquid Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    units is negligible in the supercooled regime; however, at higher temperature the difference can be substantial, accounting for the purported...since the potential energy and the virial are perfectly correlated only for an IPL. This applicability of the IPL approximation to the supercooled ...relaxation time. The difference between scaling using reduced rather than unreduced units is negligible in the supercooled regime; however,at higher

  5. Analyzing µCT images of bone specimen with wavelets and scaling indices: Which texture measure does better to depict the trabecular bone structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Bauer, Jan; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Eckstein, Felix; Monetti, Roberto

    2007-03-01

    The visualisation and subsequent quantification of the inner bone structure plays an important role for better understanding the disease- or drug-induced changes of the bone in the context of osteoporosis. Scaling indices (SIM) are well suited to quantify these structures on a local level, especially to discriminate between plate-like and rod-like structural elements. Local filters based on wavelets (WVL) are a standard technique in texture analysis. So far, they are mainly used for two-dimensional image data sets. Here we extend the formalism of the spherical Mexican hat wavelets to the analysis of three-dimensional tomographic images and evaluate its performance in comparison with scaling indices, histomorphometric measures and BMD. μCT images with isotropic resolution of 30 x 30 x 30 μm of a sample of 19 trabecular bone specimen of human thoracic vertebrae were acquired. In addition, the bone mineral density was measured by QCT. The maximum compressive strength (MCS) was determined in a biomechanical test. Some wavelet-based as well as all scaling index- based texture measures show a significantly higher correlation with MCS (WVL: ρ2=0.54, SIM: ρ2=0.53-0.56) than BMD (ρ2=0.46), where we find slightly better correlations for SIM than for WVL. The SIM and WVL results are comparable but not better to those obtained with histomorphometric measures (BV/TV: ρ2=0.45, Tr. N.: ρ2=0.67, Tr.Sp.: ρ2=0.67). In conclusion, WVL and SIM techniques can successfully be applied to μCT image data. Since the two measures characterize the image structures on a local scale, they offer the possibility to directly identify and discriminate rods and sheets of the trabecular structure. This property may give new insights about the bone constituents responsible for the mechanical strength.

  6. Wind Texture

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-06

    This image from NASA Mars Odyssey shows a region on the north end of Gordii Dorsum. Wind is the main source of erosion in this region, so the unusual texture may indicate that the surface material in this region is different from nearby regions.

  7. Metastable and scaling regimes of one-dimensional Kawasaki dynamics.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, F A Gómez; Rosales, H D; Grynberg, M D

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the large-time scaling regimes arising from a variety of metastable structures in a chain of Ising spins with both first- and second-neighbor couplings while subject to Kawasaki dynamics. Depending on the ratio and sign of these former, different dynamic exponents are suggested by finite-size scaling analyses of relaxation times. At low but nonzero temperatures these are calculated via exact diagonalizations of the evolution operator in finite chains under several activation barriers. In the absence of metastability the dynamics is always diffusive.

  8. Metastable and scaling regimes of one-dimensional Kawasaki dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, F. A. Gómez; Rosales, H. D.; Grynberg, M. D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the large-time scaling regimes arising from a variety of metastable structures in a chain of Ising spins with both first- and second-neighbor couplings while subject to Kawasaki dynamics. Depending on the ratio and sign of these former, different dynamic exponents are suggested by finite-size scaling analyses of relaxation times. At low but nonzero temperatures these are calculated via exact diagonalizations of the evolution operator in finite chains under several activation barriers. In the absence of metastability the dynamics is always diffusive.

  9. Time-series analysis of lung texture on bone-suppressed dynamic chest radiograph for the evaluation of pulmonary function: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Matsuda, Hiroaki; Sanada, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    The density of lung tissue changes as demonstrated on imagery is dependent on the relative increases and decreases in the volume of air and lung vessels per unit volume of lung. Therefore, a time-series analysis of lung texture can be used to evaluate relative pulmonary function. This study was performed to assess a time-series analysis of lung texture on dynamic chest radiographs during respiration, and to demonstrate its usefulness in the diagnosis of pulmonary impairments. Sequential chest radiographs of 30 patients were obtained using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD; 100 kV, 0.2 mAs/pulse, 15 frames/s, SID = 2.0 m; Prototype, Konica Minolta). Imaging was performed during respiration, and 210 images were obtained over 14 seconds. Commercial bone suppression image-processing software (Clear Read Bone Suppression; Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, Ohio, USA) was applied to the sequential chest radiographs to create corresponding bone suppression images. Average pixel values, standard deviation (SD), kurtosis, and skewness were calculated based on a density histogram analysis in lung regions. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually located in the lungs, and the same ROIs were traced by the template matching technique during respiration. Average pixel value effectively differentiated regions with ventilatory defects and normal lung tissue. The average pixel values in normal areas changed dynamically in synchronization with the respiratory phase, whereas those in regions of ventilatory defects indicated reduced variations in pixel value. There were no significant differences between ventilatory defects and normal lung tissue in the other parameters. We confirmed that time-series analysis of lung texture was useful for the evaluation of pulmonary function in dynamic chest radiography during respiration. Pulmonary impairments were detected as reduced changes in pixel value. This technique is a simple, cost-effective diagnostic tool for the evaluation of regional

  10. Energy conserving, linear scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cawkwell, M J; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2012-10-07

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with long-term conservation of the total energy and a computational cost that scales linearly with system size have been obtained simultaneously. Linear scaling with a low pre-factor is achieved using density matrix purification with sparse matrix algebra and a numerical threshold on matrix elements. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] yields microcanonical trajectories with the approximate forces obtained from the linear scaling method that exhibit no systematic drift over hundreds of picoseconds and which are indistinguishable from trajectories computed using exact forces.

  11. Scale-invariant entropy-based theory for dynamic ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Mahulikar, Shripad P. E-mail: spm@aero.iitb.ac.in; Kumari, Priti

    2014-09-01

    Dynamically Ordered self-organized dissipative structure exists in various forms and at different scales. This investigation first introduces the concept of an isolated embedding system, which embeds an open system, e.g., dissipative structure and its mass and/or energy exchange with its surroundings. Thereafter, scale-invariant theoretical analysis is presented using thermodynamic principles for Order creation, existence, and destruction. The sustainability criterion for Order existence based on its structured mass and/or energy interactions with the surroundings is mathematically defined. This criterion forms the basis for the interrelationship of physical parameters during sustained existence of dynamic Order. It is shown that the sufficient condition for dynamic Order existence is approached if its sustainability criterion is met, i.e., its destruction path is blocked. This scale-invariant approach has the potential to unify the physical understanding of universal dynamic ordering based on entropy considerations.

  12. Multi-scale peridynamic modeling of dynamic fracture in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Christopher J.; Zhou, Min

    2017-01-01

    Peridynamics simulations of the dynamic deformation and failure of high-performance concrete are performed at the meso-scale. A pressure-dependent, peridynamic plasticity model and failure criteria are used to capture pressure-sensitive granular flow and fracture. The meso-scale framework explicitly resolves reinforcing phases, pores, and intrinsic flaws. A novel scaling approach is formulated to inform the engineering-scale plasticity model parameters with meso-scale simulation results. The effects of composition, porosity, and fracture energy at the meso-scale on the engineering-scale impact resistance are assessed. The fracture process zone at the meso-scale is found to propagate along adjacent pores and reinforcing phases under tensile and shear loading conditions. The simulations show that tensile strength decreases and dissipation increases as the porosity in the concrete increases. The framework and modeling approach allow the delineation of trends that can be used to design more impact-resistant materials.

  13. Multi-scale peridynamic modeling of dynamic fracture in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Christopher; Zhou, Min; Dynamic Properties Research Lab Team

    2015-06-01

    Peridynamics simulations of the dynamic deformation and failure of high-performance concrete are performed at the meso-scale. A pressure-dependent, peridynamic plasticity model and failure criteria are used to capture pressure-sensitive granular flow and fracture. The meso-scale framework explicitly resolves reinforcing phases, pores, and intrinsic flaws. A novel scaling approach is formulated to inform the engineering-scale plasticity model parameters with meso-scale simulation results. The effects of composition, porosity, and fracture energy at the meso-scale on the engineering-scale impact resistance are assessed. The fracture process zone at the meso-scale is found to propagate along adjacent pores and reinforcing phases under tensile and shear loading conditions. The simulations show that tensile strength decreases and dissipation increases as the porosity in the concrete increases. The framework and modeling approach allow the delineation of trends that can be used to design more impact-resistant materials.

  14. The scale-free dynamics of eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Aon, Miguel A; Roussel, Marc R; Cortassa, Sonia; O'Rourke, Brian; Murray, Douglas B; Beckmann, Manfred; Lloyd, David

    2008-01-01

    Temporal organization of biological processes requires massively parallel processing on a synchronized time-base. We analyzed time-series data obtained from the bioenergetic oscillatory outputs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolated cardiomyocytes utilizing Relative Dispersional (RDA) and Power Spectral (PSA) analyses. These analyses revealed broad frequency distributions and evidence for long-term memory in the observed dynamics. Moreover RDA and PSA showed that the bioenergetic dynamics in both systems show fractal scaling over at least 3 orders of magnitude, and that this scaling obeys an inverse power law. Therefore we conclude that in S. cerevisiae and cardiomyocytes the dynamics are scale-free in vivo. Applying RDA and PSA to data generated from an in silico model of mitochondrial function indicated that in yeast and cardiomyocytes the underlying mechanisms regulating the scale-free behavior are similar. We validated this finding in vivo using single cells, and attenuating the activity of the mitochondrial inner membrane anion channel with 4-chlorodiazepam to show that the oscillation of NAD(P)H and reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be abated in these two evolutionarily distant species. Taken together these data strongly support our hypothesis that the generation of ROS, coupled to redox cycling, driven by cytoplasmic and mitochondrial processes, are at the core of the observed rhythmicity and scale-free dynamics. We argue that the operation of scale-free bioenergetic dynamics plays a fundamental role to integrate cellular function, while providing a framework for robust, yet flexible, responses to the environment.

  15. Grain-scale Dynamics in Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2002-09-30

    High explosives can have reactions to external stimuli that range from mild pressure bursts to full detonation. The ability to predict these responses is important for understanding the performance as well as the safety and reliability of these important materials. At present, we have only relatively simple phenomenological computational models for the behavior of high explosives under these conditions. These models are limited by the assumption that the explosive can be treated as homogeneous. In reality the explosive is a highly heterogeneous composite of irregular crystallites and plastic binder. The heterogeneous nature of explosives is responsible for many of their unique mechanical and chemical properties. We use computational models to simulate the response of explosives to external mechanical stimuli at the grain-scale level. The ultimate goal of this work is to understand the detailed processes involved with the material response, so that we can develop realistic material models, which can be used in a hydrodynamics/multi-physics code to model real systems. The new material models will provide a more realistic description of the explosive system during the most critical period of ignition and initiation. The focus of this work is to use the results of grain-scale simulations to develop an advanced macroscopic reactive flow model that is consistent with our understanding of the grain-scale details, and that can incorporate such information quantitatively. The objective is to connect changes to observed properties of the explosive (grain size distribution, binder thickness distribution, void shape, size, and separation distribution, binder mechanical properties, etc.) with predictions of the resulting sensitivity and performance.

  16. Mesochem: Chemical Dynamics on a Mesoscopic Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Calef, D F; Wu, C J; Gee, R H

    2004-03-02

    Most chemically stable organic materials age through changes on the mesoscopic scale (from 10 nm to 10 mm). Examples include the slow crystallization of polymers, changes in particle size distributions with age, and the swelling of pressed powders. We began the Mesochem project to develop a new mesoscopic modeling capability for organic materials, including polymers, molecular crystals, and filled polymer composites. Our goal was to develop and validate novel mesoscopic modeling techniques that are well suited for materials of interest to LLNL's nation security mission, such as high explosives, binding agents, and foams.

  17. Modes and emergent time scales of embayed beach dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratliff, Katherine M.; Murray, A. Brad

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we use a simple numerical model (the Coastline Evolution Model) to explore alongshore transport-driven shoreline dynamics within generalized embayed beaches (neglecting cross-shore effects). Using principal component analysis (PCA), we identify two primary orthogonal modes of shoreline behavior that describe shoreline variation about its unchanging mean position: the rotation mode, which has been previously identified and describes changes in the mean shoreline orientation, and a newly identified breathing mode, which represents changes in shoreline curvature. Wavelet analysis of the PCA mode time series reveals characteristic time scales of these modes (typically years to decades) that emerge within even a statistically constant white-noise wave climate (without changes in external forcing), suggesting that these time scales can arise from internal system dynamics. The time scales of both modes increase linearly with shoreface depth, suggesting that the embayed beach sediment transport dynamics exhibit a diffusive scaling.

  18. Scaling and Universality at Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions.

    PubMed

    Heyl, Markus

    2015-10-02

    Dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs) at critical times appear as nonanalyticities during nonequilibrium quantum real-time evolution. Although there is evidence for a close relationship between DQPTs and equilibrium phase transitions, a major challenge is still to connect to fundamental concepts such as scaling and universality. In this work, renormalization group transformations in complex parameter space are formulated for quantum quenches in Ising models showing that the DQPTs are critical points associated with unstable fixed points of equilibrium Ising models. Therefore, these DQPTs obey scaling and universality. On the basis of numerical simulations, signatures of these DQPTs in the dynamical buildup of spin correlations are found with an associated power-law scaling determined solely by the fixed point's universality class. An outlook is given on how to explore this dynamical scaling experimentally in systems of trapped ions.

  19. Scaling properties of excursions in heartbeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Ramírez, I.; Guzmán-Vargas, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this work we study the excursions, defined as the number of beats to return to a local mean value, in heartbeat interval time series from healthy subjects and patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). First, we apply the segmentation procedure proposed by Bernaola-Galván et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 87 (2001) 168105), to nonstationary heartbeat time series to identify stationary segments with a local mean value. Next, we identify local excursions around the local mean value and construct the distributions to analyze the time organization and memory in the excursions sequences from the whole time series. We find that the cumulative distributions of excursions are consistent with a stretched exponential function given by g(x)~e-aτb, with a=1.09±0.15 (mean value±SD) and b=0.91±0.11 for healthy subjects and a=1.31±0.23 and b=0.77±0.13 for CHF patients. The cumulative conditional probability G(τ|τ0) is considered to evaluate if τ depends on a given interval τ0, that is, to evaluate the memory effect in excursion sequences. We find that the memory in excursions sequences under healthy conditions is characterized by the presence of clusters related to the fact that large excursions are more likely to be followed by large ones whereas for CHF data we do not observe this behavior. The presence of correlations in healthy data is confirmed by means of the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) while for CHF records the scaling exponent is characterized by a crossover, indicating that for short scales the sequences resemble uncorrelated noise.

  20. Dynamic Scaling of Island-size Distribution on Anisotropic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Maozhi; Wang, E. G.; Liu, Banggui; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2002-03-01

    Dynamic scaling of island-size distribution on isotropic and anisotropic surfaces in submonolayer growth is systematically studied using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the island-size distribution in anisotropic submonolayer growth exhibits a general dynamic scaling behavior. An analytic expression is proposed for the scaling function, and is compared with the simulation results. This scaling function not only improves previous results for the isotropic growth (1), but also describes the scaling behavior of the island-size distribution in anisotropic submonolayer growth very well (2). 1. J. G. Amar and F. Family, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 2066 (1995). 2. M. Z. Li, E. G. Wang, B. G. Liu, and Z. Y. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. (submitted).

  1. Probing scale interaction in brain dynamics through synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Barardi, Alessandro; Malagarriga, Daniel; Sancristobal, Belén; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Pons, Antonio J.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian brain operates in multiple spatial scales simultaneously, ranging from the microscopic scale of single neurons through the mesoscopic scale of cortical columns, to the macroscopic scale of brain areas. These levels of description are associated with distinct temporal scales, ranging from milliseconds in the case of neurons to tens of seconds in the case of brain areas. Here, we examine theoretically how these spatial and temporal scales interact in the functioning brain, by considering the coupled behaviour of two mesoscopic neural masses (NMs) that communicate with each other through a microscopic neuronal network (NN). We use the synchronization between the two NM models as a tool to probe the interaction between the mesoscopic scales of those neural populations and the microscopic scale of the mediating NN. The two NM oscillators are taken to operate in a low-frequency regime with different peak frequencies (and distinct dynamical behaviour). The microscopic neuronal population, in turn, is described by a network of several thousand excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons operating in a synchronous irregular regime, in which the individual neurons fire very sparsely but collectively give rise to a well-defined rhythm in the gamma range. Our results show that this NN, which operates at a fast temporal scale, is indeed sufficient to mediate coupling between the two mesoscopic oscillators, which evolve dynamically at a slower scale. We also establish how this synchronization depends on the topological properties of the microscopic NN, on its size and on its oscillation frequency. PMID:25180311

  2. Probing scale interaction in brain dynamics through synchronization.

    PubMed

    Barardi, Alessandro; Malagarriga, Daniel; Sancristobal, Belén; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Pons, Antonio J

    2014-10-05

    The mammalian brain operates in multiple spatial scales simultaneously, ranging from the microscopic scale of single neurons through the mesoscopic scale of cortical columns, to the macroscopic scale of brain areas. These levels of description are associated with distinct temporal scales, ranging from milliseconds in the case of neurons to tens of seconds in the case of brain areas. Here, we examine theoretically how these spatial and temporal scales interact in the functioning brain, by considering the coupled behaviour of two mesoscopic neural masses (NMs) that communicate with each other through a microscopic neuronal network (NN). We use the synchronization between the two NM models as a tool to probe the interaction between the mesoscopic scales of those neural populations and the microscopic scale of the mediating NN. The two NM oscillators are taken to operate in a low-frequency regime with different peak frequencies (and distinct dynamical behaviour). The microscopic neuronal population, in turn, is described by a network of several thousand excitatory and inhibitory spiking neurons operating in a synchronous irregular regime, in which the individual neurons fire very sparsely but collectively give rise to a well-defined rhythm in the gamma range. Our results show that this NN, which operates at a fast temporal scale, is indeed sufficient to mediate coupling between the two mesoscopic oscillators, which evolve dynamically at a slower scale. We also establish how this synchronization depends on the topological properties of the microscopic NN, on its size and on its oscillation frequency.

  3. Large scale static and dynamic friction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtar, K.; Barton, N.

    1984-12-31

    A series of nineteen shear tests were performed on fractures 1 m/sup 2/ in area, generated in blocks of sandstone, granite, tuff, hydrostone and concrete. The tests were conducted under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. A vertical stress assisted fracturing technique was developed to create the fractures through the large test blocks. Prior to testing, the fractured surface of each block was characterized using the Barton JRC-JCS concept. the results of characterization were used to generate the peak strength envelope for each fractured surface. Attempts were made to model the stress path based on the classical transformation equations which assumes a theoretical plane, elastic isotropic properties, and therefore no slip. However, this approach gave rise to a stress path passing above the strength envelope which is clearly unacceptable. The results of the experimental investigations indicated that actual stress path is affected by the dilatancy due to fracture roughness, as well as by the side friction imposed by the boundary conditions. By introducing the corrections due to the dilation and boundary conditions into the stress transformation equation, the fully corrected stress paths for predicting the strength of fractured blocks were obtained.

  4. Leptogenesis with a dynamical seesaw scale

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Vicente, A.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J.W.F. E-mail: mariam@ific.uv.es E-mail: Avelino.Vicente@ulg.ac.be

    2014-07-01

    In the simplest type-I seesaw leptogenesis scenario right-handed neutrino annihilation processes are absent. However, in the presence of new interactions these processes are possible and can affect the resulting B-L asymmetry in an important way. A prominent example is provided by models with spontaneous lepton number violation, where the existence of new dynamical degrees of freedom can play a crucial role. In this context, we provide a model-independent discussion of the effects of right-handed neutrino annihilations. We show that in the weak washout regime, as long as the scattering processes remain slow compared with the Hubble expansion rate throughout the relevant temperature range, the efficiency can be largely enhanced, reaching in some cases maximal values. Moreover, the B-L asymmetry yield turns out to be independent upon initial conditions, in contrast to the ''standard'' case. On the other hand, when the annihilation processes are fast, the right-handed neutrino distribution tends to a thermal one down to low temperatures, implying a drastic suppression of the efficiency which in some cases can render the B-L generation mechanism inoperative.

  5. Large Scale, High Resolution, Mantle Dynamics Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geenen, T.; Berg, A. V.; Spakman, W.

    2007-12-01

    To model the geodynamic evolution of plate convergence, subduction and collision and to allow for a connection to various types of observational data, geophysical, geodetical and geological, we developed a 4D (space-time) numerical mantle convection code. The model is based on a spherical 3D Eulerian fem model, with quadratic elements, on top of which we constructed a 3D Lagrangian particle in cell(PIC) method. We use the PIC method to transport material properties and to incorporate a viscoelastic rheology. Since capturing small scale processes associated with localization phenomena require a high resolution, we spend a considerable effort on implementing solvers suitable to solve for models with over 100 million degrees of freedom. We implemented Additive Schwartz type ILU based methods in combination with a Krylov solver, GMRES. However we found that for problems with over 500 thousend degrees of freedom the convergence of the solver degraded severely. This observation is known from the literature [Saad, 2003] and results from the local character of the ILU preconditioner resulting in a poor approximation of the inverse of A for large A. The size of A for which ILU is no longer usable depends on the condition of A and on the amount of fill in allowed for the ILU preconditioner. We found that for our problems with over 5×105 degrees of freedom convergence became to slow to solve the system within an acceptable amount of walltime, one minute, even when allowing for considerable amount of fill in. We also implemented MUMPS and found good scaling results for problems up to 107 degrees of freedom for up to 32 CPU¡¯s. For problems with over 100 million degrees of freedom we implemented Algebraic Multigrid type methods (AMG) from the ML library [Sala, 2006]. Since multigrid methods are most effective for single parameter problems, we rebuild our model to use the SIMPLE method in the Stokes solver [Patankar, 1980]. We present scaling results from these solvers for 3D

  6. Scale-Independent Measures and Pathologic Cardiac Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Luís A.; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    1998-09-01

    We study several scale-independent measures of cardiac interbeat interval dynamics defined through the application of the wavelet transform. We test their performance in detecting heart disease using a database consisting of records of interbeat intervals for a group of healthy individuals and subjects with congestive heart failure. We find that scale-independent measures effectively distinguish healthy from pathologic behavior and propose a new two-variable scale-independent measure that could be clinically useful. We compare the performance of a recently proposed scale-dependent measure and find that the results depend on the database analyzed and on the analyzing wavelet.

  7. Universal dynamic scaling in three-dimensional Ising spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Wei; Polkovnikov, Anatoli; Sandvik, Anders W.; Young, A. P.

    2015-08-01

    We use a nonequilibrium Monte Carlo simulation method and dynamical scaling to study the phase transition in three-dimensional Ising spin glasses. The transition point is repeatedly approached at finite velocity v (temperature change versus time) in Monte Carlo simulations starting at a high temperature. This approach has the advantage that the equilibrium limit does not have to be strictly reached for a scaling analysis to yield critical exponents. For the dynamic exponent we obtain z =5.85 (9 ) for bimodal couplings distribution and z =6.00 (10 ) for the Gaussian case. Assuming universal dynamic scaling, we combine the two results and obtain z =5.93 ±0.07 for generic 3D Ising spin glasses.

  8. Seismic texture and amplitude analysis of large scale fluid escape pipes using time lapses seismic surveys: examples from the Loyal Field (Scotland, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrelli, Daniele; Jihad, Ali; Iacopini, David; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    Fluid escape pipes are key features of primary interest for the analysis of vertical fluid flow and secondary hydrocarbon migration in sedimentary basin. Identified worldwide (Løset et al., 2009), they acquired more and more importance as they represent critical pathways for supply of methane and potential structure for leakage into the storage reservoir (Cartwright & Santamarina, 2015). Therefore, understanding their genesis, internal characteristics and seismic expression, is of great significance for the exploration industry. Here we propose a detailed characterization of the internal seismic texture of some seal bypass system (e.g fluid escape pipes) from a 4D seismic survey (released by the BP) recently acquired in the Loyal Field. The seal by pass structure are characterized by big-scale fluid escape pipes affecting the Upper Paleogene/Neogene stratigraphic succession in the Loyal Field, Scotland (UK). The Loyal field, is located on the edge of the Faroe-Shetland Channel slope, about 130 km west of Shetland (Quadrants 204/205 of the UKCS) and has been recently re-appraised and re developed by a consortium led by BP. The 3D detailed mapping analysis of the full and partial stack survey (processed using amplitude preservation workflows) shows a complex system of fluid pipe structure rooted in the pre Lista formation and developed across the paleogene and Neogene Units. Geometrical analysis show that pipes got diameter varying between 100-300 m and a length of 500 m to 2 km. Most pipes seem to terminate abruptly at discrete subsurface horizons or in diffuse termination suggesting multiple overpressured events and lateral fluid migration (through Darcy flows) across the overburden units. The internal texture analysis of the large pipes, (across both the root and main conduit zones), using near, medium and far offset stack dataset (processed through an amplitude preserved PSTM workflow) shows a tendency of up-bending of reflection (rather than pulls up artefacts

  9. Peak mass in large-scale structure and dynamical friction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.; Gambera, M.

    1996-04-01

    We show how the results given by several authors relatively to the mass of a density peak are changed when small scale substructure induced by dynamical friction are taken into account. The peak mass obtained is compared to the result of Peacock & Heavens (1990) and to the peak mass when dynamical friction is absent to show how these effects conspire to reduce the mass accreted by the peak.

  10. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI . If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than H/I 2 π , CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehow does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.

  11. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-31

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI. If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than HI/2π, CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehowmore » does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Lastly, avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.« less

  12. Scaling of the dynamics of flexible Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Veldhorst, Arno A; Dyre, Jeppe C; Schrøder, Thomas B

    2014-08-07

    The isomorph theory provides an explanation for the so-called power law density scaling which has been observed in many molecular and polymeric glass formers, both experimentally and in simulations. Power law density scaling (relaxation times and transport coefficients being functions of ρ(γ(S)), where ρ is density, T is temperature, and γ(S) is a material specific scaling exponent) is an approximation to a more general scaling predicted by the isomorph theory. Furthermore, the isomorph theory provides an explanation for Rosenfeld scaling (relaxation times and transport coefficients being functions of excess entropy) which has been observed in simulations of both molecular and polymeric systems. Doing molecular dynamics simulations of flexible Lennard-Jones chains (LJC) with rigid bonds, we here provide the first detailed test of the isomorph theory applied to flexible chain molecules. We confirm the existence of isomorphs, which are curves in the phase diagram along which the dynamics is invariant in the appropriate reduced units. This holds not only for the relaxation times but also for the full time dependence of the dynamics, including chain specific dynamics such as the end-to-end vector autocorrelation function and the relaxation of the Rouse modes. As predicted by the isomorph theory, jumps between different state points on the same isomorph happen instantaneously without any slow relaxation. Since the LJC is a simple coarse-grained model for alkanes and polymers, our results provide a possible explanation for why power-law density scaling is observed experimentally in alkanes and many polymeric systems. The theory provides an independent method of determining the scaling exponent, which is usually treated as an empirical scaling parameter.

  13. Scaling of the dynamics of flexible Lennard-Jones chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhorst, Arno A.; Dyre, Jeppe C.; Schrøder, Thomas B.

    2014-08-01

    The isomorph theory provides an explanation for the so-called power law density scaling which has been observed in many molecular and polymeric glass formers, both experimentally and in simulations. Power law density scaling (relaxation times and transport coefficients being functions of ρ ^{γ _S}/T, where ρ is density, T is temperature, and γS is a material specific scaling exponent) is an approximation to a more general scaling predicted by the isomorph theory. Furthermore, the isomorph theory provides an explanation for Rosenfeld scaling (relaxation times and transport coefficients being functions of excess entropy) which has been observed in simulations of both molecular and polymeric systems. Doing molecular dynamics simulations of flexible Lennard-Jones chains (LJC) with rigid bonds, we here provide the first detailed test of the isomorph theory applied to flexible chain molecules. We confirm the existence of isomorphs, which are curves in the phase diagram along which the dynamics is invariant in the appropriate reduced units. This holds not only for the relaxation times but also for the full time dependence of the dynamics, including chain specific dynamics such as the end-to-end vector autocorrelation function and the relaxation of the Rouse modes. As predicted by the isomorph theory, jumps between different state points on the same isomorph happen instantaneously without any slow relaxation. Since the LJC is a simple coarse-grained model for alkanes and polymers, our results provide a possible explanation for why power-law density scaling is observed experimentally in alkanes and many polymeric systems. The theory provides an independent method of determining the scaling exponent, which is usually treated as an empirical scaling parameter.

  14. Improved scaling of temperature-accelerated dynamics using localization.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques G

    2016-07-07

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) is a powerful method for carrying out non-equilibrium simulations of systems over extended time scales, the computational cost of serial TAD increases approximately as N(3) where N is the number of atoms. In addition, although a parallel TAD method based on domain decomposition [Y. Shim et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007)] has been shown to provide significantly improved scaling, the dynamics in such an approach is only approximate while the size of activated events is limited by the spatial decomposition size. Accordingly, it is of interest to develop methods to improve the scaling of serial TAD. As a first step in understanding the factors which determine the scaling behavior, we first present results for the overall scaling of serial TAD and its components, which were obtained from simulations of Ag/Ag(100) growth and Ag/Ag(100) annealing, and compare with theoretical predictions. We then discuss two methods based on localization which may be used to address two of the primary "bottlenecks" to the scaling of serial TAD with system size. By implementing both of these methods, we find that for intermediate system-sizes, the scaling is improved by almost a factor of N(1/2). Some additional possible methods to improve the scaling of TAD are also discussed.

  15. Scaled control moment gyroscope dynamics effects on performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leve, Frederick A.

    2015-05-01

    The majority of the literature that discusses the dynamics of control moment gyroscopes (CMG) contains formulations that are not derived from first principles and make simplifying assumptions early in the derivation, possibly neglecting important contributions. For small satellites, additional dynamics that are no longer negligible are shown to cause an increase in torque error and loss of torque amplification. The goal of the analysis presented here is to provide the reader with a complete and general analytical derivation of the equations for dynamics of a spacecraft with n-CMG and to discuss the performance degradation imposed to CMG actuators when scaling them for small satellites. The paper first derives the equations of motion from first principles for a very general case of a spacecraft with n-CMG. Each contribution of the dynamics is described with its effect on the performance of CMG and its significance on scaled CMG performance is addressed. It is shown analytically and verified numerically, that CMG do not scale properly with performance and care must be taken in their design to trade performance, size, mass, and power when reducing their scale.

  16. Growth of Cognitive Abilities: Dynamic Models and Scaling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckstein, Shulamith Graus

    2000-01-01

    Extends dynamic model of cognitive growth proposed by van Geert in three directions: (1) added a term to consider exposure to material to be learned; (2) developed method to apply model to cross-sectional studies; and (3) developed procedure to scale cognitive abilities tests with items of varying difficulty. Tests model with 2- to 15-year-olds'…

  17. Evolution of deformation heterogeneity at multiple length scales in a strongly textured zinc layer on galvanized steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Gurao, N. P.

    2015-04-01

    The evolution of heterogeneity of plastic deformation in a zinc layer has been probed at multiple length scales using a battery of characterization tools like X-ray diffraction, electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and digital image correlation. The experimental results indicate that plastic deformation is heterogeneous at different length scales and the value of micro, meso and macro strain by different characterization techniques shows a different value. The value of strain determined at the meso and micro length scale from EBSD and X-ray diffraction was negligible, however, the macro-strain as determined from X-ray peak shift was significant. EBSD results showed evidence of profuse {101¯2} <101¯1> contraction twinning in the zinc layer with higher intragranular misorientation in the twin compared to the matrix. It is therefore, inferred that the evolution of higher intergranular (between matrix and twin) strain due to prolific contraction twinning contributes to the failure of zinc layer on galvanized steel.

  18. Polar Textures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03638 Polar Textures

    This image illustrates the variety of textures that appear in the south polar region during late summer.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.5S, Longitude 57.9E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Enzyme dynamics and activity: time-scale dependence of dynamical transitions in glutamate dehydrogenase solution.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R M; Finney, J L; Réat, V; Dunn, R; Ferrand, M; Smith, J C

    1999-10-01

    We have examined the temperature dependence of motions in a cryosolution of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and compared these with activity. Dynamic neutron scattering was performed with two instruments of different energy resolution, permitting the separate determination of the average dynamical mean square displacements on the sub-approximately 100 ps and sub-approximately 5 ns time scales. The results demonstrate a marked dependence on the time scale of the temperature profile of the mean square displacement. The lowest temperature at which anharmonic motion is observed is heavily dependent on the time window of the instrument used to observe the dynamics. Several dynamical transitions (inflexions of the mean squared displacement) are observed in the slower dynamics. Comparison with the temperature profile of the activity of the enzyme in the same solvent reveals dynamical transitions that have no effect on GDH function.

  20. Scaling laws of gelatin hydrogels for steady dynamic friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vinit; Singh, Arun K.

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we use population balance based dynamic friction model for steady sliding to develop scaling laws in the terms of mesh size of gelatin hydrogels. First of all, it is observed in the sliding experiments that shear modulus of gelatin hydrogels depends on sliding velocity. This dependence is more evident in the case of low sliding velocity. Moreover, relaxation time constant of a dangling chain at the sliding interface scales with the same exponent as its stiffness. The scaling law is also developed for chain density and viscous retardation at the sliding interface. It is also established that the Hookean-based dynamic friction model is sufficient to study frictional behaviour of hydrogels. The reason for this observation is attributed to the weak bonding between a gelatin hydrogel and glass interface.

  1. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical ``Big Data'' sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction.

  2. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical “Big Data” sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction. PMID:24326949

  3. Scale generation via dynamically induced multiple seesaw mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Okawa, Shohei; Omura, Yuji

    2017-04-01

    We propose a model which accounts for the dynamical origin of the electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB), directly linking to the mass generation of dark matter (DM) candidates and active neutrinos. The standard model (SM) is weakly charged under the U (1 )B -L gauge symmetry, in conjunction with newly introduced three right-handed Majorana neutrinos and the U (1 )B -L Higgs. The model is built on the classical scale invariance, that is dynamically broken by a new strongly coupled sector, that is called the hypercolor (HC) sector, which is also weakly coupled to the U (1 )B-L gauge. At the HC strong scale, the simultaneous breaking of the EW and U (1 )B-L gauge symmetries is triggered by dynamically induced multiple seesaw mechanisms, namely bosonic seesaw mechanisms. Thus, all of the origins of masses are provided singly by the HC dynamics: that is what we call the dynamical scalegenesis. We also find that a HC baryon, with a mass on the order of a few TeV, can be stabilized by the HC baryon number and the U (1 )B-L charge, so identified as a DM candidate. The relic abundance of the HC-baryon DM can be produced dominantly via the bosonic-seesaw portal process, and the HC-baryon DM can be measured through the large magnetic moment coupling generated from the HC dynamics, or the U (1 )B-L-gauge boson portal in direct detection experiments.

  4. Dynamic research of masonry vault in a technical scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golebiewski, Michal; Lubowiecka, Izabela; Kujawa, Marcin

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents preliminary results of dynamic tests of the masonry barrel vault in a technical scale. Experimental studies are intended to identify material properties of homogenized masonry vaults under dynamic loads. The aim of the work is to create numerical models to analyse vault's dynamic response to dynamic loads in a simplest and accurate way. The process of building the vault in a technical scale is presented in the paper. Furthermore a excitation of vibrations with an electrodynamic modal exciter placed on the vault, controlled by an arbitrary waveform function generator, is discussed. Finally paper presents trends in the research for homogenization algorithm enabling dynamic analysis of masonry vaults. Experimental results were compared with outcomes of so-called macromodels (macromodel of a brick masonry is a model in which masonry, i.e. a medium consisting of two different fractions - bricks and mortar, is represented by a homogenized, uniformed, material). Homogenization entail significant simplifications, nevertheless according to the authors, can be a useful approach in a static and dynamic analysis of masonry structures.

  5. Emergence of scaling in human-interest dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Yang, Zimo; Zhang, Zike; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Zi-Gang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2013-12-11

    Human behaviors are often driven by human interests. Despite intense recent efforts in exploring the dynamics of human behaviors, little is known about human-interest dynamics, partly due to the extreme difficulty in accessing the human mind from observations. However, the availability of large-scale data, such as those from e-commerce and smart-phone communications, makes it possible to probe into and quantify the dynamics of human interest. Using three prototypical "Big Data" sets, we investigate the scaling behaviors associated with human-interest dynamics. In particular, from the data sets we uncover fat-tailed (possibly power-law) distributions associated with the three basic quantities: (1) the length of continuous interest, (2) the return time of visiting certain interest, and (3) interest ranking and transition. We argue that there are three basic ingredients underlying human-interest dynamics: preferential return to previously visited interests, inertial effect, and exploration of new interests. We develop a biased random-walk model, incorporating the three ingredients, to account for the observed fat-tailed distributions. Our study represents the first attempt to understand the dynamical processes underlying human interest, which has significant applications in science and engineering, commerce, as well as defense, in terms of specific tasks such as recommendation and human-behavior prediction.

  6. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamic properties of liquid crystals: Verifying the scaling parameters using a molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-08-01

    The thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamic properties of rotation and thermodynamic parameters in a nematic phase was investigated by a molecular dynamic simulation using the Gay-Berne potential. A master curve for the relaxation time of flip-flop motion was obtained using thermodynamic scaling, and the dynamic property could be solely expressed as a function of TV^{γ _τ }, where T and V are the temperature and volume, respectively. The scaling parameter γτ was in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic parameter Γ, which is the logarithm of the slope of a line plotted for the temperature and volume at constant P2. This line was fairly linear, and as good as the line for p-azoxyanisole or using the highly ordered small cluster model. The equivalence relation between Γ and γτ was compared with results obtained from the highly ordered small cluster model. The possibility of adapting the molecular model for the thermodynamic scaling of other dynamic rotational properties was also explored. The rotational diffusion constant and rotational viscosity coefficients, which were calculated using established theoretical and experimental expressions, were rescaled onto master curves with the same scaling parameters. The simulation illustrates the universal nature of the equivalence relation for liquid crystals.

  7. Thermodynamic scaling of dynamic properties of liquid crystals: verifying the scaling parameters using a molecular model.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Katsuhiko

    2013-08-28

    The thermodynamic scaling of molecular dynamic properties of rotation and thermodynamic parameters in a nematic phase was investigated by a molecular dynamic simulation using the Gay-Berne potential. A master curve for the relaxation time of flip-flop motion was obtained using thermodynamic scaling, and the dynamic property could be solely expressed as a function of TV(γτ) , where T and V are the temperature and volume, respectively. The scaling parameter γτ was in excellent agreement with the thermodynamic parameter Γ, which is the logarithm of the slope of a line plotted for the temperature and volume at constant P2. This line was fairly linear, and as good as the line for p-azoxyanisole or using the highly ordered small cluster model. The equivalence relation between Γ and γ(τ) was compared with results obtained from the highly ordered small cluster model. The possibility of adapting the molecular model for the thermodynamic scaling of other dynamic rotational properties was also explored. The rotational diffusion constant and rotational viscosity coefficients, which were calculated using established theoretical and experimental expressions, were rescaled onto master curves with the same scaling parameters. The simulation illustrates the universal nature of the equivalence relation for liquid crystals.

  8. Generalized dynamic scaling for quantum critical relaxation in imaginary time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyi; Yin, Shuai; Zhong, Fan

    2014-10-01

    We study the imaginary-time relaxation critical dynamics of a quantum system with a vanishing initial correlation length and an arbitrary initial order parameter M0. We find that in quantum critical dynamics, the behavior of M0 under scale transformations deviates from a simple power law, which was proposed for very small M0 previously. A universal characteristic function is then suggested to describe the rescaled initial magnetization, similar to classical critical dynamics. This characteristic function is shown to be able to describe the quantum critical dynamics in both short- and long-time stages of the evolution. The one-dimensional transverse-field Ising model is employed to numerically determine the specific form of the characteristic function. We demonstrate that it is applicable as long as the system is in the vicinity of the quantum critical point. The universality of the characteristic function is confirmed by numerical simulations of models belonging to the same universality class.

  9. Automated Macular Pathology Diagnosis in Retinal OCT Images Using Multi-Scale Spatial Pyramid and Local Binary Patterns in Texture and Shape Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Chen, Mei; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S.; Rehg, James M.

    2011-01-01

    We address a novel problem domain in the analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images: the diagnosis of multiple macular pathologies in retinal OCT images. The goal is to identify the presence of normal macula and each of three types of macular pathologies, namely, macular edema, macular hole, and age-related macular degeneration, in the OCT slice centered at the fovea. We use a machine learning approach based on global image descriptors formed from a multi-scale spatial pyramid. Our local features are dimension-reduced Local Binary Pattern histograms, which are capable of encoding texture and shape information in retinal OCT images and their edge maps, respectively. Our representation operates at multiple spatial scales and granularities, leading to robust performance. We use 2-class Support Vector Machine classifiers to identify the presence of normal macula and each of the three pathologies. To further discriminate sub-types within a pathology, we also build a classifier to differentiate full-thickness holes from pseudo-holes within the macular hole category. We conduct extensive experiments on a large dataset of 326 OCT scans from 136 subjects. The results show that the proposed method is very effective (all AUC > 0.93). PMID:21737338

  10. Automated macular pathology diagnosis in retinal OCT images using multi-scale spatial pyramid and local binary patterns in texture and shape encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ying; Chen, Mei; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Rehg, James M

    2011-10-01

    We address a novel problem domain in the analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) images: the diagnosis of multiple macular pathologies in retinal OCT images. The goal is to identify the presence of normal macula and each of three types of macular pathologies, namely, macular edema, macular hole, and age-related macular degeneration, in the OCT slice centered at the fovea. We use a machine learning approach based on global image descriptors formed from a multi-scale spatial pyramid. Our local features are dimension-reduced local binary pattern histograms, which are capable of encoding texture and shape information in retinal OCT images and their edge maps, respectively. Our representation operates at multiple spatial scales and granularities, leading to robust performance. We use 2-class support vector machine classifiers to identify the presence of normal macula and each of the three pathologies. To further discriminate sub-types within a pathology, we also build a classifier to differentiate full-thickness holes from pseudo-holes within the macular hole category. We conduct extensive experiments on a large dataset of 326 OCT scans from 136 subjects. The results show that the proposed method is very effective (all AUC>0.93).

  11. Neural Computations in a Dynamical System with Multiple Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Lin, Xiaohan; Wu, Si

    2016-01-01

    Neural systems display rich short-term dynamics at various levels, e.g., spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) at the single-neuron level, and short-term facilitation (STF) and depression (STD) at the synapse level. These dynamical features typically cover a broad range of time scales and exhibit large diversity in different brain regions. It remains unclear what is the computational benefit for the brain to have such variability in short-term dynamics. In this study, we propose that the brain can exploit such dynamical features to implement multiple seemingly contradictory computations in a single neural circuit. To demonstrate this idea, we use continuous attractor neural network (CANN) as a working model and include STF, SFA and STD with increasing time constants in its dynamics. Three computational tasks are considered, which are persistent activity, adaptation, and anticipative tracking. These tasks require conflicting neural mechanisms, and hence cannot be implemented by a single dynamical feature or any combination with similar time constants. However, with properly coordinated STF, SFA and STD, we show that the network is able to implement the three computational tasks concurrently. We hope this study will shed light on the understanding of how the brain orchestrates its rich dynamics at various levels to realize diverse cognitive functions. PMID:27679569

  12. Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zidovska, Alexandra; Weitz, David A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood, especially at large length scales. We developed an approach, displacement correlation spectroscopy based on time-resolved image correlation analysis, to map chromatin dynamics simultaneously across the whole nucleus in cultured human cells. This method revealed that chromatin movement was coherent across large regions (4–5 µm) for several seconds. Regions of coherent motion extended beyond the boundaries of single-chromosome territories, suggesting elastic coupling of motion over length scales much larger than those of genes. These large-scale, coupled motions were ATP dependent and unidirectional for several seconds, perhaps accounting for ATP-dependent directed movement of single genes. Perturbation of major nuclear ATPases such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase II, and topoisomerase II eliminated micron-scale coherence, while causing rapid, local movement to increase; i.e., local motions accelerated but became uncoupled from their neighbors. We observe similar trends in chromatin dynamics upon inducing a direct DNA damage; thus we hypothesize that this may be due to DNA damage responses that physically relax chromatin and block long-distance communication of forces. PMID:24019504

  13. Reaching extended length-scales with accelerated dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubartt, Bradley; Shim, Yunsic; Amar, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    While temperature-accelerated dynamics (TAD) has been quite successful in extending the time-scales for non-equilibrium simulations of small systems, the computational time increases rapidly with system size. One possible solution to this problem, which we refer to as parTAD^1 is to use spatial decomposition combined with our previously developed semi-rigorous synchronous sublattice algorithm^2. However, while such an approach leads to significantly better scaling as a function of system-size, it also artificially limits the size of activated events and is not completely rigorous. Here we discuss progress we have made in developing an alternative approach in which localized saddle-point searches are combined with parallel GPU-based molecular dynamics in order to improve the scaling behavior. By using this method, along with the use of an adaptive method to determine the optimal high-temperature^3, we have been able to significantly increase the range of time- and length-scales over which accelerated dynamics simulations may be carried out. [1] Y. Shim et al, Phys. Rev. B 76, 205439 (2007); ibid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 116101 (2008). [2] Y. Shim and J.G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 71, 125432 (2005). [3] Y. Shim and J.G. Amar, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 054127 (2011).

  14. Solar chromospheric fine scale structures: dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2012-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer of the solar atmosphere that exhibits several phenomena on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution and long-duration observations, employing mostly lines, such as Halpha, the Ca II infrared lines and the Ca II H and K lines, obtained both from ground-based telescope facilities (e.g. DST, VTT, THEMIS, SST, DOT), as well as state-of-the-art satellites (e.g. SOHO, TRACE, HINODE) reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured chromospheric environment. What is known in literature as the chromospheric fine-scale structure mainly consists of small fibrilar-like features that connect various parts of quiet/active regions or span across the chromospheric network cell interiors, showing a large diversity of both physical and dynamic characteristics. The highly dynamic, fine-scale chromospheric structures are mostly governed by flows which reflect the complex geometry and dynamics of the local magnetic field and play an important role in the propagation and dissipation of waves. A comprehensive study of these structures requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved and investigation of their intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric levels. Furthermore, due to their large number present on the solar surface, it is essential to investigate their impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through processes such as magnetic reconnection and propagation of waves. The in-depth study of all aforementioned characteristics and processes, with the further addition of non-LTE physics, as well as the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations poses a fascinating challenge for both theory and numerical modeling of chromospheric fine-scale structures.

  15. Simulating the directional, spectral and textural properties of a large-scale scene at high resolution using a MODIS BRDF product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengarajan, Rajagopalan; Goodenough, Adam A.; Schott, John R.

    2016-10-01

    Many remote sensing applications rely on simulated scenes to perform complex interaction and sensitivity studies that are not possible with real-world scenes. These applications include the development and validation of new and existing algorithms, understanding of the sensor's performance prior to launch, and trade studies to determine ideal sensor configurations. The accuracy of these applications is dependent on the realism of the modeled scenes and sensors. The Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool has been used extensively to model the complex spectral and spatial texture variation expected in large city-scale scenes and natural biomes. In the past, material properties that were used to represent targets in the simulated scenes were often assumed to be Lambertian in the absence of hand-measured directional data. However, this assumption presents a limitation for new algorithms that need to recognize the anisotropic behavior of targets. We have developed a new method to model and simulate large-scale high-resolution terrestrial scenes by combining bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) products from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, high spatial resolution data, and hyperspectral data. The high spatial resolution data is used to separate materials and add textural variations to the scene, and the directional hemispherical reflectance from the hyperspectral data is used to adjust the magnitude of the MODIS BRDF. In this method, the shape of the BRDF is preserved since it changes very slowly, but its magnitude is varied based on the high resolution texture and hyperspectral data. In addition to the MODIS derived BRDF, target/class specific BRDF values or functions can also be applied to features of specific interest. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the techniques and the methodology used to model a forest region at a high resolution. The simulated scenes using this method for varying

  16. A dynamic explanation of size-density scaling in carnivores.

    PubMed

    DeLong, John P; Vasseur, David A

    2012-03-01

    Population abundance is negatively related to body size for many types of organisms. Despite the ubiquity of size-density scaling relationships, we lack a general understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Although dynamic models suggest that it is possible to predict the intercept and slope of the scaling relationship from prior observations, this has never been empirically attempted. Here we fully parameterize a set of consumer-resource models for mammalian carnivores and successfully predict the size-density scaling relationship for this group without the use of free parameters. All models produced similar predictions, but comparison of nested models indicated that the primary factors generating size-density scaling in mammalian carnivores are prey productivity, predator-prey size ratios, and consumer area of capture.

  17. A Lagrangian dynamic subgrid-scale model turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneveau, C.; Lund, T. S.; Cabot, W.

    1994-01-01

    A new formulation of the dynamic subgrid-scale model is tested in which the error associated with the Germano identity is minimized over flow pathlines rather than over directions of statistical homogeneity. This procedure allows the application of the dynamic model with averaging to flows in complex geometries that do not possess homogeneous directions. The characteristic Lagrangian time scale over which the averaging is performed is chosen such that the model is purely dissipative, guaranteeing numerical stability when coupled with the Smagorinsky model. The formulation is tested successfully in forced and decaying isotropic turbulence and in fully developed and transitional channel flow. In homogeneous flows, the results are similar to those of the volume-averaged dynamic model, while in channel flow, the predictions are superior to those of the plane-averaged dynamic model. The relationship between the averaged terms in the model and vortical structures (worms) that appear in the LES is investigated. Computational overhead is kept small (about 10 percent above the CPU requirements of the volume or plane-averaged dynamic model) by using an approximate scheme to advance the Lagrangian tracking through first-order Euler time integration and linear interpolation in space.

  18. Improving predictions of large scale soil carbon dynamics: Integration of fine-scale hydrological and biogeochemical processes, scaling, and benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, W. J.; Dwivedi, D.; Ghimire, B.; Hoffman, F. M.; Pau, G. S. H.; Randerson, J. T.; Shen, C.; Tang, J.; Zhu, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical model representations of decadal- to centennial-scale soil-carbon dynamics are a dominant cause of uncertainty in climate change predictions. Recent attempts by some Earth System Model (ESM) teams to integrate previously unrepresented soil processes (e.g., explicit microbial processes, abiotic interactions with mineral surfaces, vertical transport), poor performance of many ESM land models against large-scale and experimental manipulation observations, and complexities associated with spatial heterogeneity highlight the nascent nature of our community's ability to accurately predict future soil carbon dynamics. I will present recent work from our group to develop a modeling framework to integrate pore-, column-, watershed-, and global-scale soil process representations into an ESM (ACME), and apply the International Land Model Benchmarking (ILAMB) package for evaluation. At the column scale and across a wide range of sites, observed depth-resolved carbon stocks and their 14C derived turnover times can be explained by a model with explicit representation of two microbial populations, a simple representation of mineralogy, and vertical transport. Integrating soil and plant dynamics requires a 'process-scaling' approach, since all aspects of the multi-nutrient system cannot be explicitly resolved at ESM scales. I will show that one approach, the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation, improves predictions of forest nitrogen and phosphorus experimental manipulations and leads to very different global soil carbon predictions. Translating model representations from the site- to ESM-scale requires a spatial scaling approach that either explicitly resolves the relevant processes, or more practically, accounts for fine-resolution dynamics at coarser scales. To that end, I will present recent watershed-scale modeling work that applies reduced order model methods to accurately scale fine-resolution soil carbon dynamics to coarse-resolution simulations. Finally, we

  19. An integrated spectral-textural approach for environmental change monitoring and assessment: analyzing the dynamics of green covers in a highly developing region.

    PubMed

    Sakieh, Yousef; Gholipour, Mostafa; Salmanmahiny, Abdolrassoul

    2016-04-01

    The present study compares the effectiveness of two common preclassification change detection (CD) methods that use two-dimensional data space of spectral-textural (S-T) change information. The methods are principal component analysis (PCA) and change vector analysis (CVA) in the Gorgan Township area, Golestn Province, Iran. A series of texture-based information was calculated mainly to separate those land use/land cover (LULC) conversions that are spectrally indistinguishable and also to provide a basis for automatic classification of S-T data space. Both methods were evaluated in terms of accuracy and the required time and expertise. Having the two-dimensional S-T data space generated, support vector machine (SVM) classifier was implemented to automatically extract changed pixels and the receiving operator characteristic (ROC) was employed to assess the accuracy of the output. According to the results, the study area has witnessed substantial mutual transformations between various LULCs among agricultural lands were the most dynamic category in the region. The PCA method applied to the S-T information achieved a ROC of 0.90-indicating an acceptable performance-while the S-T CVA method achieved a lower value of 0.75. The S-T PCA method was considerably less time-consuming and less expertise demanding as well as more accurate in our study area.

  20. Multi-Scale Dynamics, Control, and Simulation of Granular Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Basinger, Scott; Swartzlander, Grover

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present some ideas regarding the modeling, dynamics and control aspects of granular spacecraft. Granular spacecraft are complex multibody systems composed of a spatially disordered distribution of a large number of elements, for instance a cloud of grains in orbit. An example of application is a spaceborne observatory for exoplanet imaging, where the primary aperture is a cloud instead of a monolithic aperture. A model is proposed of a multi-scale dynamics of the grains and cloud in orbit, as well as a control approach for cloud shape maintenance and alignment, and preliminary simulation studies are carried out for the representative imaging system.

  1. Scale-Invariant Correlations in Dynamic Bacterial Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiao; Dong, Xu; Be'er, Avraham; Swinney, Harry L.; Zhang, H. P.

    2012-04-01

    In Bacillus subtilis colonies, motile bacteria move collectively, spontaneously forming dynamic clusters. These bacterial clusters share similarities with other systems exhibiting polarized collective motion, such as bird flocks or fish schools. Here we study experimentally how velocity and orientation fluctuations within clusters are spatially correlated. For a range of cell density and cluster size, the correlation length is shown to be 30% of the spatial size of clusters, and the correlation functions collapse onto a master curve after rescaling the separation with correlation length. Our results demonstrate that correlations of velocity and orientation fluctuations are scale invariant in dynamic bacterial clusters.

  2. Multi-Scale Dynamics, Control, and Simulation of Granular Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Basinger, Scott; Swartzlander, Grover

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present some ideas regarding the modeling, dynamics and control aspects of granular spacecraft. Granular spacecraft are complex multibody systems composed of a spatially disordered distribution of a large number of elements, for instance a cloud of grains in orbit. An example of application is a spaceborne observatory for exoplanet imaging, where the primary aperture is a cloud instead of a monolithic aperture. A model is proposed of a multi-scale dynamics of the grains and cloud in orbit, as well as a control approach for cloud shape maintenance and alignment, and preliminary simulation studies are carried out for the representative imaging system.

  3. Bed form dynamics in distorted lightweight scale models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aberle, Jochen; Henning, Martin; Ettmer, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    The adequate prediction of flow and sediment transport over bed forms presents a major obstacle for the solution of sedimentation problems in alluvial channels because bed forms affect hydraulic resistance, sediment transport, and channel morphodynamics. Moreover, bed forms can affect hydraulic habitat for biota, may introduce severe restrictions to navigation, and present a major problem for engineering structures such as water intakes and groynes. The main body of knowledge on the geometry and dynamics of bed forms such as dunes originates from laboratory and field investigations focusing on bed forms in sand bed rivers. Such investigations enable insight into the physics of the transport processes, but do not allow for the long term simulation of morphodynamic development as required to assess, for example, the effects of climate change on river morphology. On the other hand, this can be achieved through studies with distorted lightweight scale models allowing for the modification of the time scale. However, our understanding of how well bed form geometry and dynamics, and hence sediment transport mechanics, are reproduced in such models is limited. Within this contribution we explore this issue using data from investigations carried out at the Federal Waterways and Research Institute in Karlsruhe, Germany in a distorted lightweight scale model of the river Oder. The model had a vertical scale of 1:40 and a horizontal scale of 1:100, the bed material consisted of polystyrene particles, and the resulting dune geometry and dynamics were measured with a high spatial and temporal resolution using photogrammetric methods. Parameters describing both the directly measured and up-scaled dune geometry were determined using the random field approach. These parameters (e.g., standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis) will be compared to prototype observations as well as to results from the literature. Similarly, parameters describing the lightweight bed form dynamics, which

  4. Some distinguishing characteristics of contour and texture phenomena in images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jobson, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of generalized contour/texture discrimination techniques is a central element necessary for machine vision recognition and interpretation of arbitrary images. Here, the visual perception of texture, selected studies of texture analysis in machine vision, and diverse small samples of contour and texture are all used to provide insights into the fundamental characteristics of contour and texture. From these, an experimental discrimination scheme is developed and tested on a battery of natural images. The visual perception of texture defined fine texture as a subclass which is interpreted as shading and is distinct from coarse figural similarity textures. Also, perception defined the smallest scale for contour/texture discrimination as eight to nine visual acuity units. Three contour/texture discrimination parameters were found to be moderately successful for this scale discrimination: (1) lightness change in a blurred version of the image, (2) change in lightness change in the original image, and (3) percent change in edge counts relative to local maximum.

  5. Survey of decentralized control methods. [for large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is presented of the types of problems that are being considered by control theorists in the area of dynamic large scale systems with emphasis on decentralized control strategies. Approaches that deal directly with decentralized decision making for large scale systems are discussed. It is shown that future advances in decentralized system theory are intimately connected with advances in the stochastic control problem with nonclassical information pattern. The basic assumptions and mathematical tools associated with the latter are summarized, and recommendations concerning future research are presented.

  6. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Keke; Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  7. Dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Keke Luo, Yiping

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, the dynamics symmetries of Hamiltonian system on time scales are studied. We study the symmetries and quantities based on the calculation of variation and Lie transformation group. Particular focus lies in: the Noether symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity and the Lie symmetry leads to the Noether conserved quantity if the infinitesimal transformations satisfy the structure equation. As the new application of result, at end of the article, we give a simple example of Noether symmetry and Lie symmetry on time scales.

  8. South Polar Textures

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-10-07

    While yesterday image showed a texture of oval depressions swiss cheese, this image from NASA 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows a linear surface texture of the south polar cap. This texture is described as looking like a thumbprint.

  9. Sill Emplacement Dynamics: Experimental Textural Modeling of a Pulsing, Cooling, Particle-laden Magma as Applied to the Basement Sill, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, A. D.; Marsh, B. D.

    2005-12-01

    similar to eruption repose times. We have previously suggested that the combined processes of heat loss through the boundaries and pulsing flow regimes are responsible for producing the step-like patterns (EOS Sp. '04). This explanation has its basis in fluid and particle dynamic models, and in heat-loss models. Here we attempt to experimentally recreate these modal variations in a laboratory setting using a solidifying, viscous, particle-laden flow whose parameters scale appropriately. The solidifying fluid component used in the lab is a paraffin wax, whose melting temperature is ~63OC, and the particles used in the experiment are wax beads of another type, which have a higher melting temperature than the paraffin and so maintain their solid state throughout the experiment. The experiments are scaled to the actual process by matching as close as possible the following non-dimensional parameters: flow Reynolds number, particle Reynolds number, and Prandtl number. The experiments consist of forming a series of flows intruding into trough-like and sill-like structures using particle-laden paraffin. Upon solidification, the flows are dissected and the vertical and horizontal modal abundance of the particles is related to the rate, duration and periodicity of the flow. Although there is a certain amount of ambiguity in the results, the emerging patterns do support the initial hypothesis. Moreover, this technique promises to be of significant value in modeling magma-phenocryst flows in a host of emplacement regimes.

  10. Multiple time scale based reduction scheme for nonlinear chemical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, D.; Ray, D. S.

    2013-07-01

    A chemical reaction is often characterized by multiple time scales governing the kinetics of reactants, products and intermediates. We eliminate the fast relaxing intermediates in autocatalytic reaction by transforming the original system into a new one in which the linearized part is diagonal. This allows us to reduce the dynamical system by identifying the associated time scales and subsequent adiabatic elimination of the fast modes. It has been shown that the reduced system sustains the robust qualitative signatures of the original system and at times the generic form of the return map for the chaotic system from which complex dynamics stems out in the original system can be identified. We illustrate the scheme for a three-variable cubic autocatalytic reaction and four-variable peroxidase-oxidase reaction.

  11. Consistent scaling of thermal fluctuations in smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Ellero, Marco; Español, Pep

    2009-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as a model of fluid particles suffers from the problem that it has no physical scale associated with the particles. Therefore, a DPD simulation requires an ambiguous fine-tuning of the model parameters with the physical parameters. A corrected version of DPD that does not suffer from this problem is smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)]. SDPD is, in fact, a version of the well-known smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, albeit with the proper inclusion of thermal fluctuations. Here, we show that SDPD produces the proper scaling of the fluctuations as the resolution of the simulation is varied. This is investigated in two problems: the Brownian motion of a spherical colloidal particle and a polymer molecule in suspension.

  12. Consistent scaling of thermal fluctuations in smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Ellero, Marco; Español, Pep

    2009-01-21

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as a model of fluid particles suffers from the problem that it has no physical scale associated with the particles. Therefore, a DPD simulation requires an ambiguous fine-tuning of the model parameters with the physical parameters. A corrected version of DPD that does not suffer from this problem is smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Espanol and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)]. SDPD is, in fact, a version of the well-known smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, albeit with the proper inclusion of thermal fluctuations. Here, we show that SDPD produces the proper scaling of the fluctuations as the resolution of the simulation is varied. This is investigated in two problems: the Brownian motion of a spherical colloidal particle and a polymer molecule in suspension.

  13. Unveiling Bacterial Interactions through Multidimensional Scaling and Dynamics Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dorado-Morales, Pedro; Vilanova, Cristina; P. Garay, Carlos; Martí, Jose Manuel; Porcar, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new strategy to identify and visualize bacterial consortia by conducting replicated culturing of environmental samples coupled with high-throughput sequencing and multidimensional scaling analysis, followed by identification of bacteria-bacteria correlations and interactions. We conducted a proof of concept assay with pine-tree resin-based media in ten replicates, which allowed detecting and visualizing dynamical bacterial associations in the form of statistically significant and yet biologically relevant bacterial consortia. PMID:26671778

  14. Dynamically Scaled Glottal Flow Through Symmetrically Oscillating Vocal Fold Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halvorson, Lori; Baitinger, Andrew; Sherman, Erica; Krane, Michael; Zhang, Lucy; Wei, Timothy

    2011-11-01

    Experimental results derived from DPIV measurements in a scaled up dynamic human vocal fold model are presented. The 10x scale vocal fold model is a new design that incorporates key features of vocal fold oscillatory motion. This includes coupling of down/upstream rocking as well as the oscillatory open/close motions. Experiments were dynamically scaled to examine a range of frequencies, 100 - 200 Hz, corresponding to the male and female voice. By using water as the working fluid, very high resolution, both spatial and temporal resolution, was achieved. Time resolved movies of flow through symmetrically oscillating vocal folds will be presented. Both individual realizations as well as phase-averaged data will be shown. Key features, such as randomness and development time of the Coanda effect, vortex shedding, and volume flow rate data will be shown. In this talk, effects associated with paralysis of one vocal fold will be discussed. This talk provides the baseline fluid dynamics for the vocal fold paralysis study presented in Sherman, et al. Supported by the NIH.

  15. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel A. J.; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting or drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high-speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time and length scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  16. Dynamic Leidenfrost Effect: Relevant Time and Length Scales.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Minori; van Limbeek, Michiel A J; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-02-12

    When a liquid droplet impacts a hot solid surface, enough vapor may be generated under it to prevent its contact with the solid. The minimum solid temperature for this so-called Leidenfrost effect to occur is termed the Leidenfrost temperature, or the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature when the droplet velocity is non-negligible. We observe the wetting or drying and the levitation dynamics of the droplet impacting on an (isothermal) smooth sapphire surface using high-speed total internal reflection imaging, which enables us to observe the droplet base up to about 100 nm above the substrate surface. By this method we are able to reveal the processes responsible for the transitional regime between the fully wetting and the fully levitated droplet as the solid temperature increases, thus shedding light on the characteristic time and length scales setting the dynamic Leidenfrost temperature for droplet impact on an isothermal substrate.

  17. The dynamics of large-scale arrays of coupled resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borra, Chaitanya; Pyles, Conor S.; Wetherton, Blake A.; Quinn, D. Dane; Rhoads, Jeffrey F.

    2017-03-01

    This work describes an analytical framework suitable for the analysis of large-scale arrays of coupled resonators, including those which feature amplitude and phase dynamics, inherent element-level parameter variation, nonlinearity, and/or noise. In particular, this analysis allows for the consideration of coupled systems in which the number of individual resonators is large, extending as far as the continuum limit corresponding to an infinite number of resonators. Moreover, this framework permits analytical predictions for the amplitude and phase dynamics of such systems. The utility of this analytical methodology is explored through the analysis of a system of N non-identical resonators with global coupling, including both reactive and dissipative components, physically motivated by an electromagnetically-transduced microresonator array. In addition to the amplitude and phase dynamics, the behavior of the system as the number of resonators varies is investigated and the convergence of the discrete system to the infinite-N limit is characterized.

  18. Decay of surface nanostructures via long-time-scale dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.; Stanciu, N.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have developed a new approach for extending the time scale of molecular dynamics simulations. For infrequent-event systems, the category that includes most diffusive events in the solid phase, this hyperdynamics method can extend the simulation time by a few orders of magnitude compared to direct molecular dynamics. The trajectory is run on a potential surface that has been biased to raise the energy in the potential basins without affecting the transition state region. The method is described and applied to surface and bulk diffusion processes, achieving microsecond and millisecond simulation times. The authors have also developed a new parallel computing method that is efficient for small system sizes. The combination of the hyperdynamics with this parallel replica dynamics looks promising as a general materials simulation tool.

  19. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  20. Integrated process studies and dynamical upscaling from the observation scale to the catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, E.; Schröder, B.; Lee, H.; Sivapalan, M.

    2005-05-01

    A cardinal problem in hydrology is what we call the "scale gap" in understanding. We urgently need representative data on dynamics of surface and subsurface state variables at the catchment scale, for e.g., as additional performance measures for validating meso-scale models. However, due to the known shortcomings of geophysical measurement techniques such as time domain reflectometry (TDR), ground penetrating radar (GPR) or geo electrics, our observations, and therefore also our process understanding, are restricted to the point or small field scale. Common ways to assess e.g. information on the space-time pattern of soil moisture at larger scales is to perform a distributed set of point observations either using mobile sensors, such as the "green machine", or a fixed set of TDR stations distributed in a catchment. The first approach is restricted to field campaigns and does not yield continuous information in time. The latter suffers from the fact that the correlation structure of soil moisture depends on the saturation state of the catchment. Hence, especially in dry states the network might be too coarse for explaining spatial variability of soil moisture in a geo-statistical sense. Whatever measurement approach is employed, there is no easy way to scale the information from the distributed set of small scale observations to the catchment scale because of non-linear process dynamics and strong sub-catchment heterogeneity of soils and vegetation. Geostatistical interpolation including updating approaches suffer from the fact that they either assume stationary relations between drift parameters and soil moisture or the sampling is not sufficient to obtain useful posterior probability distributions of soil moisture within different classes of available soft information. In this study we present an approach for integrated process studies in catchments by comparing principles from landscape ecology such as the pattern process paradigm with physical reasoning

  1. Dynamic scaling of the critical binary mixture methanol-hexane.

    PubMed

    Iwanowski, I; Sattarow, A; Behrends, R; Mirzaev, S Z; Kaatze, U

    2006-04-14

    Acoustical attenuation spectrometry, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity, density, and heat capacity measurements of the methanol/n-hexane mixture of critical composition have been performed. The critical part in the sonic attenuation coefficients nicely fits to the empirical scaling function of the Bhattacharjee-Ferrell [Phys. Rev. A 24, 1643 (1981)] dynamic scaling model if the theoretically predicted scaled half-attenuation frequency Omega(12) (BF)=2.1 is used. The relaxation rates of order parameter fluctuations, as resulting from the acoustical spectra, within the limits of experimental error agree with those from a combined evaluation of the light scattering and shear viscosity measurements. Both series of data display power law with amplitude Gamma(0)=44x10(9) s(-1). The amplitude of the fluctuation correlation length follows as xi(0)=0.33 nm from the light scattering data and as xi(0)=0.32 nm from the amplitude of the singular part of the heat capacity if the two-scale factor universality relation is used. The adiabatic coupling constant g=0.11 results from the amplitude of the critical contribution to the acoustical spectrum near the critical point, in conformity with g=0.12 as following from the variation of the critical temperature with pressure along the critical line and the thermal expansion coefficient.

  2. Scale-invariant model of marine population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Capitán, José A; Delius, Gustav W

    2010-06-01

    A striking feature of the marine ecosystem is the regularity in its size spectrum: the abundance of organisms as a function of their weight approximately follows a power law over almost ten orders of magnitude. We interpret this as evidence that the population dynamics in the ocean is approximately scale-invariant. We use this invariance in the construction and solution of a size-structured dynamical population model. Starting from a Markov model encoding the basic processes of predation, reproduction, maintenance respiration, and intrinsic mortality, we derive a partial integro-differential equation describing the dependence of abundance on weight and time. Our model represents an extension of the jump-growth model and hence also of earlier models based on the McKendrick-von Foerster equation. The model is scale-invariant provided the rate functions of the stochastic processes have certain scaling properties. We determine the steady-state power-law solution, whose exponent is determined by the relative scaling between the rates of the density-dependent processes (predation) and the rates of the density-independent processes (reproduction, maintenance, and mortality). We study the stability of the steady-state against small perturbations and find that inclusion of maintenance respiration and reproduction in the model has a strong stabilizing effect. Furthermore, the steady state is unstable against a change in the overall population density unless the reproduction rate exceeds a certain threshold.

  3. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-31

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI. If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than HI/2π, CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehow does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Lastly, avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.

  4. High-scale axions without isocurvature from inflationary dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, John; Orlofsky, Nicholas; Pierce, Aaron

    2016-05-31

    Observable primordial tensor modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) would point to a high scale of inflation HI. If the scale of Peccei-Quinn (PQ) breaking fa is greater than HI/2π, CMB constraints on isocurvature naively rule out QCD axion dark matter. This assumes the potential of the axion is unmodified during inflation. We revisit models where inflationary dynamics modify the axion potential and discuss how isocurvature bounds can be relaxed. We find that models that rely solely on a larger PQ-breaking scale during inflation fI require either late-time dilution of the axion abundance or highly super-Planckian fI that somehow does not dominate the inflationary energy density. Models that have enhanced explicit breaking of the PQ symmetry during inflation may allow fa close to the Planck scale. Lastly, avoiding disruption of inflationary dynamics provides important limits on the parameter space.

  5. Validation of Bubble Dynamics Equation for a Nano-scale Bubble via Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, S.; Hyodo, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-12-01

    For a validation of the application of conventional bubble dynamics to a nano-scale bubble behaviour, we simulated a nano-scale bubble collapsing or vibration by Molecular Dynamics (MD) method and compared the result with the solution of Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation and that of Confined RP (CRP) equation, whose boundary condition was corrected to be consistent with that of MD simulation. As a result, a good coincidence was obtained between MD, RP, and CRP in the case of one-component fluid. In addition, also a good correspondence was obtained particularly in the comparison between MD and CRP in the case of two-component fluid containing non-condensable gas. The present results indicate that conventional bubble dynamics equation can be applied even to a nano-scale tiny bubble.

  6. Responses of Cloud Type Distributions to the Large-Scale Dynamical Circulation: Water Budget-Related Dynamical Phase Space and Dynamical Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Sun; Del Genio, Anthony; Wang, Tao; Kahn, Brian; Fetzer, Eric J.; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.

    2015-01-01

    Goals: Water budget-related dynamical phase space; Connect large-scale dynamical conditions to atmospheric water budget (including precipitation); Connect atmospheric water budget to cloud type distributions.

  7. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi

    2010-01-01

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  8. Hyperelasticity governs dynamic fracture at a critical length scale.

    PubMed

    Buehler, Markus J; Abraham, Farid F; Gao, Huajian

    2003-11-13

    The elasticity of a solid can vary depending on its state of deformation. For example, metals will soften and polymers may stiffen as they are deformed to levels approaching failure. It is only when the deformation is infinitesimally small that elastic moduli can be considered constant, and hence the elasticity linear. Yet, many existing theories model fracture using linear elasticity, despite the fact that materials will experience extreme deformations at crack tips. Here we show by large-scale atomistic simulations that the elastic behaviour observed at large strains--hyperelasticity--can play a governing role in the dynamics of fracture, and that linear theory is incapable of fully capturing all fracture phenomena. We introduce the concept of a characteristic length scale for the energy flux near the crack tip, and demonstrate that the local hyperelastic wave speed governs the crack speed when the hyperelastic zone approaches this energy length scale.

  9. A study of dynamic finite size scaling behavior of the scaling functions—calculation of dynamic critical index of Wolff algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüç, Semra; Dilaver, Mehmet; Aydın, Meral; Gündüç, Yiğit

    2005-02-01

    In this work we have studied the dynamic scaling behavior of two scaling functions and we have shown that scaling functions obey the dynamic finite size scaling rules. Dynamic finite size scaling of scaling functions opens possibilities for a wide range of applications. As an application we have calculated the dynamic critical exponent (z) of Wolff's cluster algorithm for 2-, 3- and 4-dimensional Ising models. Configurations with vanishing initial magnetization are chosen in order to avoid complications due to initial magnetization. The observed dynamic finite size scaling behavior during early stages of the Monte Carlo simulation yields z for Wolff's cluster algorithm for 2-, 3- and 4-dimensional Ising models with vanishing values which are consistent with the values obtained from the autocorrelations. Especially, the vanishing dynamic critical exponent we obtained for d=3 implies that the Wolff algorithm is more efficient in eliminating critical slowing down in Monte Carlo simulations than previously reported.

  10. Texturing problems in nanotechnology: Texture control

    SciTech Connect

    Maksimov, S. K. Maksimov, K. S.

    2008-12-15

    An analysis of the data on nanomaterial texturing showed that textures arise even when there are no apparent causes of their formation. It was noted that the texturing problem is particularly urgent for medical and biological applications. The correlation of texturing with nanocrystal shaping was indicated. It was emphasized that the effect of the size factor on nanocrystal morphology is especially pronounced for crystals with linear sizes smaller than 10 nm. It was proposed to control textures of such crystals by the OTED method implemented in the electron microscope column.

  11. Dynamics of Polystylen (PS) Melts: Multi-Scale Molecular Dynamic(MD) Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Bo; Harmandaris, Vagelis; Fritz, Dominik; Kremer, Kurt

    2009-03-01

    Multi-scale approaches provide a systematic way to simulate much longer time and bigger systems, which allows us to study both large space and time scale problems. Dynamics of entangled polymer melts is one of those problems since it is always related to long time scales and large system sizes. Coarse- grained potentials of PS are obtained by multi-scale (atomistic to coarse-grained) MD approach. Time mapping (connection between atomistic and coarse-grained time units) is performed via matching mean square displacements of chain center of mass from both atomistic and coarse-grained simulations. One of interesting dynamic properties is stress autocorrelation functions (SAF) since they are directly related to physical properties of entangled polymer melts such as moduli, viscosities and entanglement lengths. SAF's of PS melts are evaluated by MD simulations. In order to reduce strong noise in SAF, we use time-averaged stresses, where averaging time is small enough to capture local chain relaxations.

  12. Probabilistic multi-scale modeling of pathogen dynamics in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.; Drummond, J. D.; Aubeneau, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Most parameterizations of microbial dynamics and pathogen transport in surface waters rely on classic assumptions of advection-diffusion behavior in the water column and limited interactions between the water column and sediments. However, recent studies have shown that strong surface-subsurface interactions produce a wide range of transport timescales in rivers, and greatly the opportunity for long-term retention of pathogens in sediment beds and benthic biofilms. We present a stochastic model for pathogen dynamics, based on continuous-time random walk theory, that properly accounts for such diverse transport timescales, along with the remobilization and inactivation of pathogens in storage reservoirs. By representing pathogen dynamics probabilistically, the model framework enables diverse local-scale processes to be incorporated in system-scale models. We illustrate the application of the model to microbial dynamics in rivers based on the results of a tracer injection experiment. In-stream transport and surface-subsurface interactions are parameterized based on observations of conservative tracer transport, while E. coli retention and inactivation in sediments is parameterized based on direct local-scale experiments. The results indicate that sediments are an important reservoir of enteric organisms in rivers, and slow remobilization from sediments represents a long-term source of bacteria to streams. Current capability, potential advances, and limitations of this model framework for assessing pathogen transmission risks will be discussed. Because the transport model is probabilistic, it is amenable to incorporation into risk models, but a lack of characterization of key microbial processes in sediments and benthic biofilms hinders current application.

  13. Spatial Anisotropies and Temporal Fluctuations in Extracellular Matrix Network Texture during Early Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Potetz, Brian R.; Rongish, Brenda J.; Little, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Early stages of vertebrate embryogenesis are characterized by a remarkable series of shape changes. The resulting morphological complexity is driven by molecular, cellular, and tissue-scale biophysical alterations. Operating at the cellular level, extracellular matrix (ECM) networks facilitate cell motility. At the tissue level, ECM networks provide material properties required to accommodate the large-scale deformations and forces that shape amniote embryos. In other words, the primordial biomaterial from which reptilian, avian, and mammalian embryos are molded is a dynamic composite comprised of cells and ECM. Despite its central importance during early morphogenesis we know little about the intrinsic micrometer-scale surface properties of primordial ECM networks. Here we computed, using avian embryos, five textural properties of fluorescently tagged ECM networks — (a) inertia, (b) correlation, (c) uniformity, (d) homogeneity, and (e) entropy. We analyzed fibronectin and fibrillin-2 as examples of fibrous ECM constituents. Our quantitative data demonstrated differences in the surface texture between the fibronectin and fibrillin-2 network in Day 1 (gastrulating) embryos, with the fibronectin network being relatively coarse compared to the fibrillin-2 network. Stage-specific regional anisotropy in fibronectin texture was also discovered. Relatively smooth fibronectin texture was exhibited in medial regions adjoining the primitive streak (PS) compared with the fibronectin network investing the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM), at embryonic stage 5. However, the texture differences had changed by embryonic stage 6, with the LPM fibronectin network exhibiting a relatively smooth texture compared with the medial PS-oriented network. Our data identify, and partially characterize, stage-specific regional anisotropy of fibronectin texture within tissues of a warm-blooded embryo. The data suggest that changes in ECM textural properties reflect orderly time

  14. Multiple time scale behaviors and network dynamics in liquid methanol.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ruchi; Chakravarty, Charusita; Milotti, Edoardo

    2008-07-31

    Canonical ensemble molecular dynamics simulations of liquid methanol, modeled using a rigid-body, pair-additive potential, are used to compute static distributions and temporal correlations of tagged molecule potential energies as a means of characterizing the liquid state dynamics. The static distribution of tagged molecule potential energies shows a clear multimodal structure with three distinct peaks, similar to those observed previously in water and liquid silica. The multimodality is shown to originate from electrostatic effects, but not from local, hydrogen bond interactions. An interesting outcome of this study is the remarkable similarity in the tagged potential energy power spectra of methanol, water, and silica, despite the differences in the underlying interactions and the dimensionality of the network. All three liquids show a distinct multiple time scale (MTS) regime with a 1/ f (alpha) dependence with a clear positive correlation between the scaling exponent alpha and the diffusivity. The low-frequency limit of the MTS regime is determined by the frequency of crossover to white noise behavior which occurs at approximately 0.1 cm (-1) in the case of methanol under standard temperature and pressure conditions. The power spectral regime above 200 cm (-1) in all three systems is dominated by resonances due to localized vibrations, such as librations. The correlation between alpha and the diffusivity in all three liquids appears to be related to the strength of the coupling between the localized motions and the larger length/time scale network reorganizations. Thus, the time scales associated with network reorganization dynamics appear to be qualitatively similar in these systems, despite the fact that water and silica both display diffusional anomalies but methanol does not.

  15. Simulation of all-scale atmospheric dynamics on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Szmelter, Joanna; Xiao, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The advance of massively parallel computing in the nineteen nineties and beyond encouraged finer grid intervals in numerical weather-prediction models. This has improved resolution of weather systems and enhanced the accuracy of forecasts, while setting the trend for development of unified all-scale atmospheric models. This paper first outlines the historical background to a wide range of numerical methods advanced in the process. Next, the trend is illustrated with a technical review of a versatile nonoscillatory forward-in-time finite-volume (NFTFV) approach, proven effective in simulations of atmospheric flows from small-scale dynamics to global circulations and climate. The outlined approach exploits the synergy of two specific ingredients: the MPDATA methods for the simulation of fluid flows based on the sign-preserving properties of upstream differencing; and the flexible finite-volume median-dual unstructured-mesh discretisation of the spatial differential operators comprising PDEs of atmospheric dynamics. The paper consolidates the concepts leading to a family of generalised nonhydrostatic NFTFV flow solvers that include soundproof PDEs of incompressible Boussinesq, anelastic and pseudo-incompressible systems, common in large-eddy simulation of small- and meso-scale dynamics, as well as all-scale compressible Euler equations. Such a framework naturally extends predictive skills of large-eddy simulation to the global atmosphere, providing a bottom-up alternative to the reverse approach pursued in the weather-prediction models. Theoretical considerations are substantiated by calculations attesting to the versatility and efficacy of the NFTFV approach. Some prospective developments are also discussed.

  16. Large Scale Airflow Perturbations and Resultant Dune Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alexander B.; Jackson, Derek W. T.; Cooper, J. Andrew G.; Beyers, Meiring

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale atmospheric turbulence can have a large impact on the regional wind regime effecting dune environments. Depending on the incident angle of mesoscale airflow, local topographic steering can also alter wind conditions and subsequent aeolian dynamics. This research analyses the influence of large-scale airflow perturbations occurring at the Maspalomas dunefield located on the southern coast of Gran Canaria, Spain. These perturbations in turn significantly influence the morphometry and migration rates of barchan dunes, monitored at the study site through time. The main meteorological station on Gran Canaria records highly uni-modal NNE wind conditions; however, simultaneously measured winds are highly variable around the island, showing a high degree of steering. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) were used to identify large-scale airflow perturbations around the island of Gran Canaria during NNE, N, and NNW incident flow directions. Results indicate that approaching surface airflow bifurcates around the island's coastline before converging at the lee coast. Winds in areas located around the islands lateral coast are controlled by these diverging flow patterns, whereas lee-side areas are influenced primarily by the islands upwind canyon topography leading to highly turbulent flow. Characteristic turbulent eddies show a complex wind environment at Maspalomas with winds diverging-converging up to 180° between the eastern and western sections of the dunefield. Multi-directional flow conditions lead to highly altered dune dynamics including the production of temporary slip faces on the stoss slopes, rapid reduction in crest height and slope length, and development of bi-crested dunes. This indicates a distinct bi-modality of airflow conditions that control the geomorphic evolution of the dunefield. Variability in wind conditions is not evident in the long-term meteorological records on the island, indicating the significance of large scale atmospheric steering on

  17. Human dynamics scaling characteristics for aerial inbound logistics operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing; Guo, Jin-Li

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, the study of power-law scaling characteristics of real-life networks has attracted much interest from scholars; it deviates from the Poisson process. In this paper, we take the whole process of aerial inbound operation in a logistics company as the empirical object. The main aim of this work is to study the statistical scaling characteristics of the task-restricted work patterns. We found that the statistical variables have the scaling characteristics of unimodal distribution with a power-law tail in five statistical distributions - that is to say, there obviously exists a peak in each distribution, the shape of the left part closes to a Poisson distribution, and the right part has a heavy-tailed scaling statistics. Furthermore, to our surprise, there is only one distribution where the right parts can be approximated by the power-law form with exponent α=1.50. Others are bigger than 1.50 (three of four are about 2.50, one of four is about 3.00). We then obtain two inferences based on these empirical results: first, the human behaviors probably both close to the Poisson statistics and power-law distributions on certain levels, and the human-computer interaction behaviors may be the most common in the logistics operational areas, even in the whole task-restricted work pattern areas. Second, the hypothesis in Vázquez et al. (2006) [A. Vázquez, J. G. Oliveira, Z. Dezsö, K.-I. Goh, I. Kondor, A.-L. Barabási. Modeling burst and heavy tails in human dynamics, Phys. Rev. E 73 (2006) 036127] is probably not sufficient; it claimed that human dynamics can be classified as two discrete university classes. There may be a new human dynamics mechanism that is different from the classical Barabási models.

  18. Morphodynamic length scale and long term river meandering dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzoni, S.; Frascati, A.

    2009-12-01

    The fully nonlinear simulation of the lateral migration of meandering channels, combined with an analytical description of the linearized flow field, gives a powerful and yet computationally accessible tool to investigate short and long term evolution of alluvial rivers. In the present contribution we focus on the long term behavior of meandering rivers. This class of dynamical systems is driven by the coexistence of various intrinsically nonlinear mechanisms which determine the possible occurrence of two different morphodynamic regimes: the sub-resonant and the super-resonant regime. Investigating the full range of morphodynamic conditions, we end up with a new morphodynamic length scale associated with spatially oscillating disturbances, accounting for both curvature-forced variations in velocity and depth and alternate bars. Once normalized with this length scale, the relevant morphologic features of the simulated long term patterns (i.e. the probability density function of the local channel curvature and the geometric characteristics of the oxbow lakes) tend to collapse on two distinct behaviors, depending on the dominant morphologic regime. The long term river meandering dynamics is then investigated. The occurrence of cutoff events is a key mechanism in the dynamics of these systems. They introduce a strong source of nonlinearity in the evolution of river meandering, which strongly contributes to the formation of the complex planform patterns usually observed in nature. To detect the possible signatures of a chaotic behavior or a self-organized criticality state triggered in river meandering dynamics by the repeated occurrence of cutoffs, some robust nonlinear methodologies have been applied to both the spatial series of local curvatures and the time series of long term channel sinuosity. The temporal distribution of cutoff inter-arrivals is also investigated. The results are consistent and show that, at least from a modelling point of view, no evidence of

  19. Insights into eruption dynamics from textural analysis: the case of the May, 2008, Chaitén eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfano, Fabrizio; Bonadonna, Costanza; Gurioli, Lucia

    2012-11-01

    The May, 2008, Chaitén (southern Chile) eruption was characterized by several explosive events, each associated with plumes which reached up to about 19 km above sea level on May 6. A study of the textural and physical features of the juvenile clasts erupted during the climactic phase of the 2008 eruption of Chaitén is presented. Pumice clasts show unimodal density distribution (main mode at 600 kg/m3), average vesicularity of about 69 %, a glassy groundmass with no microcrystals, and vesicles with dimension between ˜1 μm and ˜2 mm. They also show a unimodal vesicle size distribution with most frequent vesicle size in the range 0.05-0.08 mm and an estimated vesicle number density of 1.3 ± 0.5 × 105 mm-3 related to a rapid nucleation event produced during the late phases of magma rise. This is confirmed by the absence of microcrystals that could otherwise have delayed vesicle formation and allowed the magma to maintain a low viscosity and a supersaturation in volatiles. Vesiculation and fragmentation were triggered by a sudden decompression of the melt associated with the opening of the volcanic conduit (˜10 MPa s-1).

  20. Multiple Scale Analysis of the Dynamic State Index (DSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A.; Névir, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Dynamic State Index (DSI) is a novel parameter that indicates local deviations of the atmospheric flow field from a stationary, inviscid and adiabatic solution of the primitive equations of fluid mechanics. This is in contrast to classical methods, which often diagnose deviations from temporal or spatial mean states. We show some applications of the DSI to atmospheric flow phenomena on different scales. The DSI is derived from the Energy-Vorticity-Theory (EVT) which is based on two global conserved quantities, the total energy and Ertel's potential enstrophy. Locally, these global quantities lead to the Bernoulli function and the PV building together with the potential temperature the DSI.If the Bernoulli function and the PV are balanced, the DSI vanishes and the basic state is obtained. Deviations from the basic state provide an indication of diabatic and non-stationary weather events. Therefore, the DSI offers a tool to diagnose and even prognose different atmospheric events on different scales.On synoptic scale, the DSI can help to diagnose storms and hurricanes, where also the dipole structure of the DSI plays an important role. In the scope of the collaborative research center "Scaling Cascades in Complex Systems" we show high correlations between the DSI and precipitation on convective scale. Moreover, we compare the results with reduced models and different spatial resolutions.

  1. Dynamics of Undisturbed Midlatitude Atmospheric Electricity: From Observations to Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, S. V.; Afinogenov, K. V.; Shikhova, N. M.

    2014-04-01

    Long-term dynamics of the electric field of the midlatitude near-surface atmosphere in a wide range of temporal scales is analyzed according to multiyear observatory and seasonal field observations. It is found that the daily dynamics of the aeroelectric field at mid-latitudes most authentically repeats a diurnal variation for the winter months. It is stated that short-period pulsations of the electric field have a self-similar power-law spectrum. Spatio-temporal scales of the self-similarity interval are estimated and the nature of the generalized diffusive process of the aeroelectric pulsation generation is defined. Characteristics of the turbulent ΔE pulsations are analyzed. Estimates of interrelation between the dynamic (fractal dimensions, intermittency indices) and power (degrees of spectral index and structure function) ΔE characteristics are obtained. Mutual correlations between atmospheric electric field variations, vertical atmospheric electrical current density, space charge density, and atmospheric electrical conductivity are studied. It is shown that variations of the light atmospheric ion number density and space charge density are related with variations of the Radon-222 emanations. Spectral analysis of the space charge density variations is carried out. It is shown that the electrodynamic state of the surface atmosphere depends on the convective state of the atmospheric boundary layer.

  2. The dynamics of rapid fracture: instabilities, nonlinearities and length scales.

    PubMed

    Bouchbinder, Eran; Goldman, Tamar; Fineberg, Jay

    2014-04-01

    The failure of materials and interfaces is mediated by cracks, almost singular dissipative structures that propagate at velocities approaching the speed of sound. Crack initiation and subsequent propagation-the dynamic process of fracture-couples a wide range of time and length scales. Crack dynamics challenge our understanding of the fundamental physics processes that take place in the extreme conditions within the almost singular region where material failure occurs. Here, we first briefly review the classic approach to dynamic fracture, namely linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), and discuss its successes and limitations. We show how, on the one hand, recent experiments performed on straight cracks propagating in soft brittle materials have quantitatively confirmed the predictions of this theory to an unprecedented degree. On the other hand, these experiments show how LEFM breaks down as the singular region at the tip of a crack is approached. This breakdown naturally leads to a new theoretical framework coined 'weakly nonlinear fracture mechanics', where weak elastic nonlinearities are incorporated. The stronger singularity predicted by this theory gives rise to a new and intrinsic length scale, ℓnl. These predictions are verified in detail through direct measurements. We then theoretically and experimentally review how the emergence of ℓnl is linked to a new equation for crack motion, which predicts the existence of a high-speed oscillatory crack instability whose wavelength is determined by ℓnl. We conclude by delineating outstanding challenges in the field.

  3. A physical scaling model for aggregation and disaggregation of field-scale surface soil moisture dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Richa; Govindaraju, Rao S

    2015-07-01

    Scaling relationships are needed as measurements and desired predictions are often not available at concurrent spatial support volumes or temporal discretizations. Surface soil moisture values of interest to hydrologic studies are estimated using ground based measurement techniques or utilizing remote sensing platforms. Remote sensing based techniques estimate field-scale surface soil moisture values, but are unable to provide the local-scale soil moisture information that is obtained from local measurements. Further, obtaining field-scale surface moisture values using ground-based measurements is exhaustive and time consuming. To bridge this scale mismatch, we develop analytical expressions for surface soil moisture based on sharp-front approximation of the Richards equation and assumed log-normal distribution of the spatial surface saturated hydraulic conductivity field. Analytical expressions for field-scale evolution of surface soil moisture to rainfall events are utilized to obtain aggregated and disaggregated response of surface soil moisture evolution with knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The utility of the analytical model is demonstrated through numerical experiments involving 3-D simulations of soil moisture and Monte-Carlo simulations for 1-D renderings-with soil moisture dynamics being represented by the Richards equation in each instance. Results show that the analytical expressions developed here show promise for a principled way of scaling surface soil moisture.

  4. Spontaneous Neural Dynamics and Multi-scale Network Organization

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Brett L.; He, Biyu J.; Honey, Christopher J.; Jerbi, Karim; Maier, Alexander; Saalmann, Yuri B.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous neural activity has historically been viewed as task-irrelevant noise that should be controlled for via experimental design, and removed through data analysis. However, electrophysiology and functional MRI studies of spontaneous activity patterns, which have greatly increased in number over the past decade, have revealed a close correspondence between these intrinsic patterns and the structural network architecture of functional brain circuits. In particular, by analyzing the large-scale covariation of spontaneous hemodynamics, researchers are able to reliably identify functional networks in the human brain. Subsequent work has sought to identify the corresponding neural signatures via electrophysiological measurements, as this would elucidate the neural origin of spontaneous hemodynamics and would reveal the temporal dynamics of these processes across slower and faster timescales. Here we survey common approaches to quantifying spontaneous neural activity, reviewing their empirical success, and their correspondence with the findings of neuroimaging. We emphasize invasive electrophysiological measurements, which are amenable to amplitude- and phase-based analyses, and which can report variations in connectivity with high spatiotemporal precision. After summarizing key findings from the human brain, we survey work in animal models that display similar multi-scale properties. We highlight that, across many spatiotemporal scales, the covariance structure of spontaneous neural activity reflects structural properties of neural networks and dynamically tracks their functional repertoire. PMID:26903823

  5. 3D Flow Visualization Using Texture Advection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Zhang, Bing; Kim, Kwansik; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Texture advection is an effective tool for animating and investigating 2D flows. In this paper, we discuss how this technique can be extended to 3D flows. In particular, we examine the use of 3D and 4D textures on 3D synthetic and computational fluid dynamics flow fields.

  6. Local dynamic subgrid-scale models in channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabot, William H.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model has given good results in the large-eddy simulation (LES) of homogeneous isotropic or shear flow, and in the LES of channel flow, using averaging in two or three homogeneous directions (the DA model). In order to simulate flows in general, complex geometries (with few or no homogeneous directions), the dynamic SGS model needs to be applied at a local level in a numerically stable way. Channel flow, which is inhomogeneous and wall-bounded flow in only one direction, provides a good initial test for local SGS models. Tests of the dynamic localization model were performed previously in channel flow using a pseudospectral code and good results were obtained. Numerical instability due to persistently negative eddy viscosity was avoided by either constraining the eddy viscosity to be positive or by limiting the time that eddy viscosities could remain negative by co-evolving the SGS kinetic energy (the DLk model). The DLk model, however, was too expensive to run in the pseudospectral code due to a large near-wall term in the auxiliary SGS kinetic energy (k) equation. One objective was then to implement the DLk model in a second-order central finite difference channel code, in which the auxiliary k equation could be integrated implicitly in time at great reduction in cost, and to assess its performance in comparison with the plane-averaged dynamic model or with no model at all, and with direct numerical simulation (DNS) and/or experimental data. Other local dynamic SGS models have been proposed recently, e.g., constrained dynamic models with random backscatter, and with eddy viscosity terms that are averaged in time over material path lines rather than in space. Another objective was to incorporate and test these models in channel flow.

  7. Efficient Schmidt number scaling in dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan C.; García, Angel E.

    2015-12-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics is a widely used mesoscale technique for the simulation of hydrodynamics (as well as immersed particles) utilizing coarse-grained molecular dynamics. While the method is capable of describing any fluid, the typical choice of the friction coefficient γ and dissipative force cutoff rc yields an unacceptably low Schmidt number Sc for the simulation of liquid water at standard temperature and pressure. There are a variety of ways to raise Sc, such as increasing γ and rc, but the relative cost of modifying each parameter (and the concomitant impact on numerical accuracy) has heretofore remained undetermined. We perform a detailed search over the parameter space, identifying the optimal strategy for the efficient and accuracy-preserving scaling of Sc, using both numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The composite results recommend a parameter choice that leads to a speed improvement of a factor of three versus previously utilized strategies.

  8. Efficient Schmidt number scaling in dissipative particle dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Krafnick, Ryan C.; García, Angel E.

    2015-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics is a widely used mesoscale technique for the simulation of hydrodynamics (as well as immersed particles) utilizing coarse-grained molecular dynamics. While the method is capable of describing any fluid, the typical choice of the friction coefficient γ and dissipative force cutoff rc yields an unacceptably low Schmidt number Sc for the simulation of liquid water at standard temperature and pressure. There are a variety of ways to raise Sc, such as increasing γ and rc, but the relative cost of modifying each parameter (and the concomitant impact on numerical accuracy) has heretofore remained undetermined. We perform a detailed search over the parameter space, identifying the optimal strategy for the efficient and accuracy-preserving scaling of Sc, using both numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The composite results recommend a parameter choice that leads to a speed improvement of a factor of three versus previously utilized strategies. PMID:26723591

  9. Efficient Schmidt number scaling in dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Krafnick, Ryan C; García, Angel E

    2015-12-28

    Dissipative particle dynamics is a widely used mesoscale technique for the simulation of hydrodynamics (as well as immersed particles) utilizing coarse-grained molecular dynamics. While the method is capable of describing any fluid, the typical choice of the friction coefficient γ and dissipative force cutoff rc yields an unacceptably low Schmidt number Sc for the simulation of liquid water at standard temperature and pressure. There are a variety of ways to raise Sc, such as increasing γ and rc, but the relative cost of modifying each parameter (and the concomitant impact on numerical accuracy) has heretofore remained undetermined. We perform a detailed search over the parameter space, identifying the optimal strategy for the efficient and accuracy-preserving scaling of Sc, using both numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The composite results recommend a parameter choice that leads to a speed improvement of a factor of three versus previously utilized strategies.

  10. Capturing atomic-scale carrier dynamics with electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Peter; Krausz, Ferenc

    2017-09-01

    Light-driven electronic motion unfolds on times as short as the cycle period of light and on length scales as small as the distance between two neighboring atoms in a molecule. Visualizing fundamental light-matter interactions therefore requires access to attosecond and picometer dimensions. Here we report on a potential unification of electron diffraction and microscopy with attosecond technology, which could provide a full space-time access to elementary electronic processes in matter and materials. We review recent progress in ultrafast diffraction and microscopy towards temporal resolutions approaching 10 fs by use of state-of-the-art microwave technology and discuss our latest findings on all-optical compression approaches for reaching sub-femtosecond, sub-optical-cycle resolution. Four-dimensional electron diffraction with attosecond-picometer resolution will access all dynamics outside the atomic core, offering an all-embracing insight into fundamental electron-nuclear dynamics of complex materials.

  11. Ultrafast cooling reveals microsecond-scale biomolecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Polinkovsky, Mark E; Gambin, Yann; Banerjee, Priya R; Erickstad, Michael J; Groisman, Alex; Deniz, Ashok A

    2014-12-17

    The temperature-jump technique, in which the sample is rapidly heated by a powerful laser pulse, has been widely used to probe the fast dynamics of folding of proteins and nucleic acids. However, the existing temperature-jump setups tend to involve sophisticated and expensive instrumentation, while providing only modest temperature changes of ~10-15 °C, and the temperature changes are only rapid for heating, but not cooling. Here we present a setup comprising a thermally conductive sapphire substrate with light-absorptive nano-coating, a microfluidic device and a rapidly switched moderate-power infrared laser with the laser beam focused on the nano-coating, enabling heating and cooling of aqueous solutions by ~50 °C on a 1-μs time scale. The setup is used to probe folding and unfolding dynamics of DNA hairpins after direct and inverse temperature jumps, revealing low-pass filter behaviour during periodic temperature variations.

  12. Dynamics of proteins aggregation. I. Universal scaling in unbounded media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Size; Javidpour, Leili; Shing, Katherine S.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    It is well understood that in some cases proteins do not fold correctly and, depending on their environment, even properly-folded proteins change their conformation spontaneously, taking on a misfolded state that leads to protein aggregation and formation of large aggregates. An important factor that contributes to the aggregation is the interactions between the misfolded proteins. Depending on the aggregation environment, the aggregates may take on various shapes forming larger structures, such as protein plaques that are often toxic. Their deposition in tissues is a major contributing factor to many neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion. This paper represents the first part in a series devoted to molecular simulation of protein aggregation. We use the PRIME, a meso-scale model of proteins, together with extensive discontinuous molecular dynamics simulation to study the aggregation process in an unbounded fluid system, as the first step toward MD simulation of the same phenomenon in crowded cellular environments. Various properties of the aggregates have been computed, including dynamic evolution of aggregate-size distribution, mean aggregate size, number of peptides that contribute to the formation of β sheets, number of various types of hydrogen bonds formed in the system, radius of gyration of the aggregates, and the aggregates' diffusivity. We show that many of such quantities follow dynamic scaling, similar to those for aggregation of colloidal clusters. In particular, at long times the mean aggregate size S(t) grows with time as, S(t) ˜ tz, where z is the dynamic exponent. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the qualitative similarity between aggregation of proteins and colloidal aggregates has been pointed out.

  13. Thermodynamic scaling of glassy dynamics and dynamic heterogeneities in metallic glass-forming liquid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan-Chao; Shang, Bao-Shuang; Guan, Peng-Fei; Yang, Yong; Bai, Hai-Yang; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2016-09-14

    A ternary metallic glass-forming liquid is found to be not strongly correlating thermodynamically, but its average dynamics, dynamic heterogeneities including the high order dynamic correlation length, and static structure are still well described by thermodynamic scaling with the same scaling exponent γ. This may indicate that the metallic liquid could be treated as a single-parameter liquid. As an intrinsic material constant stemming from the fundamental interatomic interactions, γ is theoretically predicted from the thermodynamic fluctuations of the potential energy and the virial. Although γ is conventionally understood merely from the repulsive part of the inter-particle potentials, the strong correlation between γ and the Grüneisen parameter up to the accuracy of the Dulong-Petit approximation demonstrates the important roles of anharmonicity and attractive force of the interatomic potential in governing glass transition of metallic glassformers. These findings may shed light on how to understand metallic glass formation from the fundamental interatomic interactions.

  14. Examining a scaled dynamical system of telomere shortening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrenne, Benoit M.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2015-02-01

    A model of telomere dynamics is proposed and examined. Our model, which extends a previously introduced model that incorporates stem cells as progenitors of new cells, imposes the Hayflick limit, the maximum number of cell divisions that are possible. This new model leads to cell populations for which the average telomere length is not necessarily a monotonically decreasing function of time, in contrast to previously published models. We provide a phase diagram indicating where such results would be expected via the introduction of scaled populations, rate constants and time. The application of this model to available leukocyte baboon data is discussed.

  15. Time scales and relaxation dynamics in quantum-dot lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Erneux, Thomas; Viktorov, Evgeny A.; Mandel, Paul

    2007-08-15

    We analyze a three-variable rate equation model that takes into account carrier capture and Pauli blocking in quantum dot semiconductor lasers. The exponential decay of the relaxation oscillations is analyzed from the linearized equations in terms of three key parameters that control the time scales of the laser. Depending on their relative values, we determine two distinct two-variable reductions of the rate equations in the limit of large capture rates. The first case leads to the rate equations for quantum well lasers, exhibiting relaxation oscillations dynamics. The second case corresponds to dots nearly saturated by the carriers and is characterized by the absence of relaxation oscillations.

  16. Small-Scale Tropopause Dynamics and TOMS Total Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, John L.

    2002-01-01

    This project used Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) along-track ozone retrievals, in conjunction with ancillary meteorological fields and modeling studies, for high resolution investigations of upper troposphere and lower stratosphere dynamics. Specifically, high resolution along-track (Level 2) EP TOMS data were used to investigate the beautiful fine-scale structure in constituent and meteorological fields prominent in the evolution of highly non-linear baroclinic storm systems. Comparison was made with high resolution meteorological models. The analyses provide internal consistency checks and validation of the EP TOMS data which are vital for monitoring ozone depletion in both polar and midlatitude regions.

  17. Dynamical Scaling and Phase Coexistence in Topologically Constrained DNA Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosado, Y. A. G.; Michieletto, D.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2017-09-01

    There is a long-standing experimental observation that the melting of topologically constrained DNA, such as circular closed plasmids, is less abrupt than that of linear molecules. This finding points to an important role of topology in the physics of DNA denaturation, which is, however, poorly understood. Here, we shed light on this issue by combining large-scale Brownian dynamics simulations with an analytically solvable phenomenological Landau mean field theory. We find that the competition between melting and supercoiling leads to phase coexistence of denatured and intact phases at the single-molecule level. This coexistence occurs in a wide temperature range, thereby accounting for the broadening of the transition. Finally, our simulations show an intriguing topology-dependent scaling law governing the growth of denaturation bubbles in supercoiled plasmids, which can be understood within the proposed mean field theory.

  18. Investigations of Static and Dynamic Scaling Phenomena in Polymeric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Iksoo

    In this dissertation we study two aspects of polymer physics, namely polymer statics and polymer dynamics. Particularly we investigate the tricritical collapse transition of trails in two dimensions and the dynamics of an entangled linear polymer in a fixed network. In order to clarify whether tricritical trails belong to the same universality class of the self-avoiding walk (SAW) at the Theta- and Theta^'-temperatures, we systematically investigate the asymptotic scaling behavior of different properties of tricritical trials. Using numerical methods such as exact series enumeration on a triangular lattice and the scanning simulation method on a square lattice, we estimate accurately the tricritical temperature T_ t, size exponent nu _ t, partition function exponent gamma_ t, connectivity constant mu_ t, crossover exponent phi_ t, specific heat exponent alpha_ t, universal ratio < G^2>/ < R^2>, winding angle distribution P_ N(theta), and surface partition function exponents gamma _{1t}, gamma_ {11t} for tricritical trails. We provide analytic bounds for T_ t, gamma_ t and mu_ t. We also study the tricritical collapse transition of trails as well as other lattice walks on a two dimensional Sierpinski gasket using real space renormalization group. Comparison of our results with those of the SAW at the Theta - and Theta^' -temperatures suggests that tricritical trails may not belong to the same universality class as that of the SAW at the Theta- and Theta^ '-temperatures. We investigate the dynamics of an entangled linear polymer in a fixed network on the basis of the recently proposed repton model. We put a special emphasis on resolving the discrepancies between the reptation theory and experiments. First we examine the scaling of the disengagement time tau_ d, Rouse time tau _ R, and a mean square displacement of a single repton phi(t) for the whole hierarchy of characteristic time scales. The scaling of these quantities agree with Doi's theory. We examine the

  19. Advantage of topological texture measures derived from Minkowski functionals (MF) and scaling index method (SIM) in comparison with biomechanical finite elements method (FEM) for the prediction of osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Irina; Bauer, Jan; Monetti, Roberto; Mueller, Dirk; Rummeny, Ernst; Eckstein, Felix; Raeth, Christoph

    2010-03-01

    The assessment of trabecular bone microarchitecture by numerical analysis of high resolution magnetic resonance (HRMR) images provides global and local structural characteristics, which improve the understanding of the progression of osteoporosis and its diagnosis. In the present work we apply the finite elements method (FEM), which models the biomechanical behaviour of the bone, the scaling index method (SIM), which describes the topology of the structure on a local level, and Minkowski Functionals (MF), which are global topological characteristics, for analysing 3D HRMR images of 48 distal radius specimens in vitro. Diagnostic performance of texture measures derived from the numerical methods is compared with regard to the prevalence of vertebral fractures. Both topological methods show significantly better results than those obtained using bone mineral density (BMD) measurement and the failure load estimated by FEM. The receiver operating characteristic analysis for differentiating subjects with and without fractures reveals area under the curve of 0.63 for BMD, 0.66 for maximum compressive strength as determined in a biomechanical test, 0.72 for critical load estimated by FEM, 0.79 for MF4 and 0.86 for SIM, i.e. local topological characteristics derived by SIM suit best for diagnosing osteoporosis. The combination of FEM and SIM on tissue level shows that in both weak and strong bones the plate-like substructure of the trabecular network are the main load bearing part of the inner bone and that the relative amount of plates to rods is the most important characteristic for the prediction of bone strength.

  20. Measurement of skin texture through polarization imaging.

    PubMed

    Bargo, P R; Kollias, N

    2010-04-01

    Determination of skin surface texture is of particular importance in the field of dermatology as such measurements can be used for skin diagnostics and evaluation of therapeutic or cosmetic treatments. Profilometry of skin replicas, three-dimensional imaging and computer vision have been successfully used to measure and document skin texture. Nevertheless, the development of a simpler and faster technique may prove to be advantageous in a clinical setting. We propose the use of polarization imaging with high angles of incidence as a simple alternative to measure/document skin texture/roughness. A system based on digital photography and polarization optics was developed to acquire and compute texture images. Optimization of the system configuration was conducted to enhance the contrast for measuring skin roughness. The method was validated against roughness standards and tested in clinical studies. Measurements were made in subjects aged from 9 to 70 years and image analysis was used to evaluate texture. The developed texture scale was shown to correlate closely to the results from clinical assessment and from roughness standards. Frequency domain analysis showed a significantly different power spectrum for the texture images of young subjects when compared with older subjects. The evaluation of texture as a function of age showed that facial skin roughness increased linearly from teenage to 40 years followed by a plateau thereafter. The system proved to be a useful clinical tool for assessing skin texture. The age-related results may indicate that some skin texture features are formed before the age of 40 years.

  1. BHQ revisited (2): Texture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilian, Rüdiger; Heilbronner, Renée

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) is mostly used to derive the kinematics of flow or conditions and processes of deformation. Observations from naturally and experimentally deformed rocks indicate that specific texture types might relate to deformation conditions or flow laws - with a number of variables being based on assumptions that are not fully tested. For example, the activity of certain slip systems is interpreted from pole figure geometries assuming that grains are oriented such that the shear stress is minimized, thus enforcing specific c-axis and a-xis directions, so-called "easy glide" orientations. Black Hills Quartzite (BHQ) deformed experimentally in the dislocation creep regime reveals a CPO development that depends on finite strain (Heilbronner & Tullis, 2006). In that study the CPO development was tracked through the analysis of optically derived C-axis pole figures and corresponding orientation maps indicating a transition from a girdle distribution to a single maximum around the kinematic y-axis with increasing strain. In this contribution, we re-measure the same samples using EBSD. The availability of the full crystal orientations in combination with novel techniques of orientation and misorientation mapping and combinations of fabric and texture data allow us to analyze the texture development in more detail. Special emphasis is on (a) the ratio of glide to dynamic recrystallization, (b) the relation of grain scale strain to bulk strain and (c) the development of intragranular misorientations with increasing recrystallization and strain. One interesting result of our analysis concerns the inference of "easy glide" grains based on their c-axis direction. As it turns out, the alignment of -directions at the periphery of the pole figure is more rapidly attained than the clustering of the c-axis about the y-axis (classical interpretation for prism glide) or at the periphery (classical interpretation for basal glide). It

  2. Ice Surface Classification using Geo-Statistical Texture-Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, B. F.; Herzfeld, U. C.

    2009-12-01

    The morphological features of ice surfaces contain valuable information on the state of morphogenetic, environmental, and dynamic processes that the ice has experienced. To effectively use this information, however, the scale and rapid evolution of earth's cryospheric systems necessitate intermediate processing and abstraction as vital tools. We demonstrate methods for automated detection of ice surface classes using robust geostatistical texture parameters and several clustering/classification techniques. By measuring texture parameters as aggregates of regional spatial point distributions, a great variety of surface types can be characterized and detected, at the expense of computational complexity. Unsupervised clustering algorithms such as OPTICS identify numerically distinct sets of values which then seed segmentation algorithms. The results of the methods applied to several data-sets are presented, including RADARSAT, ATM, and ICESAT observations over both land and sea-ice. The surface roughness characteristics are analyzed at the various scales covered by the data-sets.

  3. Magma dynamics within a basaltic conduit revealed by textural and compositional features of erupted ash: the December 2015 Mt. Etna paroxysms.

    PubMed

    Pompilio, Massimo; Bertagnini, Antonella; Del Carlo, Paola; Di Roberto, Alessio

    2017-07-06

    In December 2015, four violent explosive episodes from Mt. Etna's oldest summit crater, the Voragine, produced eruptive columns extending up to 15 km a.s.l. and significant fallout of tephra up to a hundred km from the vent. A combined textural and compositional study was carried out on pyroclasts from three of the four tephra deposits sampled on the volcano at 6 to 14 km from the crater. Ash fractions (Φ = 1-2) were investigated because these grain sizes preserve the magma properties unmodified by post- emplacement processes. Results were used to identify processes occurring in the conduit during each single paroxysm and to understand how they evolve throughout the eruptive period. Results indicate that the magmatic column is strongly heterogeneous, mainly with respect to microlite, vescicle content and melt composition. During each episode, the heterogeneities can develop at time scales as short as a few tens of hours, and differences between distinct episodes indicate that the time scale for completely refilling the system and renewing magma is in the same order of magnitude. Our data also confirm that the number and shape of microlites, together with melt composition, have a strong control on rheological properties and fragmentation style.

  4. Multi-Scale Modeling of Global of Magnetospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Rastatter, L.; Toth, G.; DeZeeuw, D.; Gombosi, T.

    2010-01-01

    To understand the role of magnetic reconnection in global evolution of magnetosphere and to place spacecraft observations into global context it is essential to perform global simulations with physically motivated model of dissipation that is capable to reproduce reconnection rates predicted by kinetic models. In our efforts to bridge the gap between small scale kinetic modeling and global simulations we introduced an approach that allows to quantify the interaction between large-scale global magnetospheric dynamics and microphysical processes in diffusion regions near reconnection sites. We utilized the high resolution global MHD code BATSRUS and incorporate primary mechanism controlling the dissipation in the vicinity of reconnection sites in terms of kinetic corrections to induction and energy equations. One of the key elements of the multiscale modeling of magnetic reconnection is identification of reconnection sites and boundaries of surrounding diffusion regions where non-MHD corrections are required. Reconnection site search in the equatorial plane implemented in our previous studies is extended to cusp and magnetopause reconnection, as well as for magnetotail reconnection in realistic asymmetric configurations. The role of feedback between the non-ideal effects in diffusion regions and global magnetosphere structure and dynamics will be discussed.

  5. Complex Processes from Dynamical Architectures with Time-Scale Hierarchy

    PubMed Central

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes. PMID:21347363

  6. Complex processes from dynamical architectures with time-scale hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Perdikis, Dionysios; Huys, Raoul; Jirsa, Viktor

    2011-02-10

    The idea that complex motor, perceptual, and cognitive behaviors are composed of smaller units, which are somehow brought into a meaningful relation, permeates the biological and life sciences. However, no principled framework defining the constituent elementary processes has been developed to this date. Consequently, functional configurations (or architectures) relating elementary processes and external influences are mostly piecemeal formulations suitable to particular instances only. Here, we develop a general dynamical framework for distinct functional architectures characterized by the time-scale separation of their constituents and evaluate their efficiency. Thereto, we build on the (phase) flow of a system, which prescribes the temporal evolution of its state variables. The phase flow topology allows for the unambiguous classification of qualitatively distinct processes, which we consider to represent the functional units or modes within the dynamical architecture. Using the example of a composite movement we illustrate how different architectures can be characterized by their degree of time scale separation between the internal elements of the architecture (i.e. the functional modes) and external interventions. We reveal a tradeoff of the interactions between internal and external influences, which offers a theoretical justification for the efficient composition of complex processes out of non-trivial elementary processes or functional modes.

  7. Development of a Family Dynamic Environment Scale for Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Sil; Kim, Hun-Soo

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a short and reliable Family Dynamic Environment Scale (FDES) that would better serve the needs of mental health professionals in detecting the potential for delinquent behavior in Korean adolescents related to a dysfunctional family dynamic environment. Semi-structured interviews with 30 adolescents were initially conducted to generate a set of items, after which, 44 participants were included in method test-retest reliability test. Finally, 544 participants recruited by proportional stratified random sampling were included in a factor analysis. The original version of the FDES had 60 items in 7 categories; the final version included 42 items grouped into 5 factors. Both test-retest reliability and Cronbach's alpha coefficient were high for the final version of the scale. As a result of factor analysis, five factors were extracted: family psychological climate, parent-child relationship, paternal parenting attitude, family cohesion, and maternal parenting attitude. These contributed 50.3% of the variance in the item scores. All 42 items loaded above .35 on their respective factors. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients for internal consistency were .95 for the total 42 items and .92, .81, .82, .78, and .71, respectively, for each of the 5 factors.

  8. Dynamics in entangled polyethylene melts [Multi time scale dynamics in entangled polyethylene melts

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, K. Michael; Agrawal, Anupriya; Peters, Brandon L.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-10-10

    Polymer dynamics creates distinctive viscoelastic behavior as a result of a coupled interplay of motion at the atomic length scale and motion of the entire macromolecule. Capturing the broad time and length scales of polymeric motion however, remains a challenge. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, we probe the effects of the degree of coarse graining on polymer dynamics. Coarse-grained (CG) potentials are derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion with λ methylene groups per CG bead (denoted CGλ) with λ = 2,3,4 and 6 from a fully-atomistic polyethylene melt simulation. By rescaling time in the CG models by a factor α, the chain mobility for the atomistic and CG models match. We show that independent of the degree of coarse graining, all measured static and dynamic properties are essentially the same once the dynamic scaling factor α and a non-crossing constraint for the CG6 model are included. The speedup of the CG4 model is about 3 times that of the CG3 model and is comparable to that of the CG6 model. Furthermore, using these CG models we were able to reach times of over 500 μs, allowing us to measure a number of quantities, including the stress relaxation function, plateau modulus and shear viscosity, and compare directly to experiment.

  9. Dynamics in entangled polyethylene melts [Multi time scale dynamics in entangled polyethylene melts

    DOE PAGES

    Salerno, K. Michael; Agrawal, Anupriya; Peters, Brandon L.; ...

    2016-10-10

    Polymer dynamics creates distinctive viscoelastic behavior as a result of a coupled interplay of motion at the atomic length scale and motion of the entire macromolecule. Capturing the broad time and length scales of polymeric motion however, remains a challenge. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, we probe the effects of the degree of coarse graining on polymer dynamics. Coarse-grained (CG) potentials are derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion with λ methylene groups per CG bead (denoted CGλ) with λ = 2,3,4 and 6 from a fully-atomistic polyethylene melt simulation. By rescaling time in the CG models by a factormore » α, the chain mobility for the atomistic and CG models match. We show that independent of the degree of coarse graining, all measured static and dynamic properties are essentially the same once the dynamic scaling factor α and a non-crossing constraint for the CG6 model are included. The speedup of the CG4 model is about 3 times that of the CG3 model and is comparable to that of the CG6 model. Furthermore, using these CG models we were able to reach times of over 500 μs, allowing us to measure a number of quantities, including the stress relaxation function, plateau modulus and shear viscosity, and compare directly to experiment.« less

  10. Dynamics in entangled polyethylene melts [Multi time scale dynamics in entangled polyethylene melts

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, K. Michael; Agrawal, Anupriya; Peters, Brandon L.; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2016-10-10

    Polymer dynamics creates distinctive viscoelastic behavior as a result of a coupled interplay of motion at the atomic length scale and motion of the entire macromolecule. Capturing the broad time and length scales of polymeric motion however, remains a challenge. Using linear polyethylene as a model system, we probe the effects of the degree of coarse graining on polymer dynamics. Coarse-grained (CG) potentials are derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion with λ methylene groups per CG bead (denoted CGλ) with λ = 2,3,4 and 6 from a fully-atomistic polyethylene melt simulation. By rescaling time in the CG models by a factor α, the chain mobility for the atomistic and CG models match. We show that independent of the degree of coarse graining, all measured static and dynamic properties are essentially the same once the dynamic scaling factor α and a non-crossing constraint for the CG6 model are included. The speedup of the CG4 model is about 3 times that of the CG3 model and is comparable to that of the CG6 model. Furthermore, using these CG models we were able to reach times of over 500 μs, allowing us to measure a number of quantities, including the stress relaxation function, plateau modulus and shear viscosity, and compare directly to experiment.

  11. Forest fragmentation and bird community dynamics: inference at regional scales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boulinier, T.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.; Sauer, J.R.; Flather, C.H.; Pollock, K.H.

    2001-01-01

    With increasing fragmentation of natural areas and a dramatic reduction of forest cover in several parts of the world, quantifying the impact of such changes on species richness and community dynamics has been a subject of much concern. Here, we tested whether in more fragmented landscapes there was a lower number of area-sensitive species and higher local extinction and turnover rates, which could explain higher temporal variability in species richness. To investigate such potential landscape effects at a regional scale, we merged two independent, large-scale monitoring efforts: the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) and the Land Use and Land Cover Classification data from the U.S. Geological Survey. We used methods that accounted for heterogeneity in the probability of detecting species to estimate species richness and temporal changes in the bird communities for BBS routes in three mid-Atlantic U.S. states. Forest breeding bird species were grouped prior to the analyses into area-sensitive and non-area-sensitive species according to previous studies. We tested predictions relating measures of forest structure at one point in time (1974) to species richness at that time and to parameters of forest bird community change over the following 22-yr-period (1975-1996). We used the mean size of forest patches to characterize landscape structure, as high correlations among landscape variables did not allow us to disentangle the relative roles of habitat fragmentation per se and habitat loss. As predicted, together with lower species richness for area-sensitive species on routes surrounded by landscapes with lower mean forest-patch size, we found higher mean year-to-year rates of local extinction. Moreover, the mean year-to-year rates of local turnover (proportion of locally new species) for area-sensitive species were also higher in landscapes with lower mean forest-patch size. These associations were not observed for the non-area-sensitive species group. These

  12. Generation time and temporal scaling of bird population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saether, Bernt-Erik; Lande, Russell; Engen, Steinar; Weimerskirch, Henri; Lillegård, Magnar; Altwegg, Res; Becker, Peter H; Bregnballe, Thomas; Brommer, Jon E; McCleery, Robin H; Merilä, Juha; Nyholm, Erik; Rendell, Wallace; Robertson, Raleigh R; Tryjanowski, Piotr; Visser, Marcel E

    2005-07-07

    Theoretical studies have shown that variation in density regulation strongly influences population dynamics, yet our understanding of factors influencing the strength of density dependence in natural populations still is limited. Consequently, few general hypotheses have been advanced to explain the large differences between species in the magnitude of population fluctuations. One reason for this is that the detection of density regulation in population time series is complicated by time lags induced by the life history of species that make it difficult to separate the relative contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the population dynamics. Here we use population time series for 23 bird species to estimate parameters of a stochastic density-dependent age-structured model. We show that both the strength of total density dependence in the life history and the magnitude of environmental stochasticity, including transient fluctuations in age structure, increase with generation time. These results indicate that the relationships between demographic and life-history traits in birds translate into distinct population dynamical patterns that are apparent only on a scale of generations.

  13. Fracture-induced softening for large-scale ice dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, T.; Levermann, A.

    2014-04-01

    Floating ice shelves can exert a retentive and hence stabilizing force onto the inland ice sheet of Antarctica. However, this effect has been observed to diminish by the dynamic effects of fracture processes within the protective ice shelves, leading to accelerated ice flow and hence to a sea-level contribution. In order to account for the macroscopic effect of fracture processes on large-scale viscous ice dynamics (i.e., ice-shelf scale) we apply a continuum representation of fractures and related fracture growth into the prognostic Parallel Ice Sheet Model (PISM) and compare the results to observations. To this end we introduce a higher order accuracy advection scheme for the transport of the two-dimensional fracture density across the regular computational grid. Dynamic coupling of fractures and ice flow is attained by a reduction of effective ice viscosity proportional to the inferred fracture density. This formulation implies the possibility of non-linear threshold behavior due to self-amplified fracturing in shear regions triggered by small variations in the fracture-initiation threshold. As a result of prognostic flow simulations, sharp across-flow velocity gradients appear in fracture-weakened regions. These modeled gradients compare well in magnitude and location with those in observed flow patterns. This model framework is in principle expandable to grounded ice streams and provides simple means of investigating climate-induced effects on fracturing (e.g., hydro fracturing) and hence on the ice flow. It further constitutes a physically sound basis for an enhanced fracture-based calving parameterization.

  14. Micromagnetic simulations of spin-torque driven magnetization dynamics with spatially resolved spin transport and magnetization texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlenghi, Simone; Mahani, M. R.; Fangohr, Hans; Franchin, M.; Delin, Anna; Fransson, Jonas

    2017-09-01

    We present a simple and fast method to simulate spin-torque driven magnetization dynamics in nanopillar spin-valve structures. The approach is based on the coupling between a spin transport code based on random matrix theory and a micromagnetics finite-elements software. In this way the spatial dependence of both spin transport and magnetization dynamics is properly taken into account. Our results are compared with experiments. The excitation of the spin-wave modes, including the threshold current for steady-state magnetization precession and the nonlinear frequency shift of the modes are reproduced correctly. The giant magneto resistance effect and the magnetization switching also agree with experiment. The similarities with recently described spin-caloritronics devices are also discussed.

  15. In vivo Protein Dynamics on the Nanometer Length Scale and Nanosecond Time Scale.

    PubMed

    Anunciado, Divina B; Nguyen, Vyncent P; Hurst, Gregory Blake; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Urban, Volker S; Langan, Paul; Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh M

    2017-04-07

    Selectively-labeled GroEL protein was produced in living deuterated bacterial cells to enhance its neutron scattering signal above that of the intra-cellular milieu. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering shows that the in-cell diffusion coefficient of GroEL was (0.047 ± 0.003)10-10 m2/s, a factor of 4 slower than its diffusion coefficient in buffer solution. Internal protein dynamics showed a relaxation time of (65 ± 6) ps, a factor of 2 slower compared to the protein in solution. Comparison to literature suggests that the effective diffusivity of proteins depends on the length scale being probed. Retardation of in-cell diffusion compared to the buffer becomes more significant with the increasing probe length scale suggesting that intra-cellular diffusion of biomolecules is non-uniform over the cellular volume. The approach outlined here enables investigation of protein dynamics within living cells to open up new lines of research using "in-cell neutron scattering" to study the dynamics of complex biomolecular systems.

  16. In Vivo Protein Dynamics on the Nanometer Length Scale and Nanosecond Time Scale

    DOE PAGES

    Anunciado, Divina B.; Nyugen, Vyncent P.; Hurst, Gregory B.; ...

    2017-04-07

    Selectively labeled GroEL protein was produced in living deuterated bacterial cells to enhance its neutron scattering signal above that of the intracellular milieu. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering shows that the in-cell diffusion coefficient of GroEL was (4.7 ± 0.3) × 10–12 m2/s, a factor of 4 slower than its diffusion coefficient in buffer solution. Furthermore, for internal protein dynamics we see a relaxation time of (65 ± 6) ps, a factor of 2 slower compared to the protein in solution. Comparison to the literature suggests that the effective diffusivity of proteins depends on the length and time scale being probed. Retardationmore » of in-cell diffusion compared to the buffer becomes more significant with the increasing probe length scale, suggesting that intracellular diffusion of biomolecules is nonuniform over the cellular volume. This approach outlined here enables investigation of protein dynamics within living cells to open up new lines of research using “in-cell neutron scattering” to study the dynamics of complex biomolecular systems.« less

  17. Reconnection layer dynamics in the Reconnection Scaling Experiment at LANL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furno, Ivo; Intrator, Thomas; Hemsing, Erik; Hsu, Scott; Lapenta, Giovanni; Ricci, Paolo

    2003-10-01

    Using the Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we are studying quasi-2D magnetic reconnection in a 3D linear geometry. RSX is a linear plasma device that relies on plasma gun technology to generate high density (>10^14 cm-3), high current (J 200A/cm^2) ohmically heated (Te 15eV) hydrogen plasma channels ( 2 cm radius). In RSX, magnetic reconnection is induced during the current ramp-up between two axially directed parallel current channels generating a reconnection magnetic field, B_rec, up to 40 Gauss. A set of 12 magnet coils induces an axial guide magnetic field Bz of up to 0.1 T allowing the reconnection field B_rec to be independently scaled from the guiding field B_z. Plasma collisionality can also be independently scaled by varying the plasma gun fill pressure. The formation and dynamics of the current sheet is studied using time and space resolved magnetic field measurements. To date, preliminary experiments in the collisional regime and in the presence of a strong guide magnetic field (B_z/B_rec>10) show the formation of a Sweet-Parker like Y-shaped current sheet. The axial electric field, as inferred from the measured magnetic flux annihilation rate, is also consistent with Sweet-Parker magnetic reconnection. In future experiments, more collisionless regimes will be explored, and the influence of the guide magnetic field on the dynamics of the current sheet and the reconnection rate will be investigated in truly 3D geometry.

  18. Intrinsic Multi-Scale Dynamic Behaviors of Complex Financial Systems.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Fang-Yan; Zheng, Bo; Jiang, Xiong-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The empirical mode decomposition is applied to analyze the intrinsic multi-scale dynamic behaviors of complex financial systems. In this approach, the time series of the price returns of each stock is decomposed into a small number of intrinsic mode functions, which represent the price motion from high frequency to low frequency. These intrinsic mode functions are then grouped into three modes, i.e., the fast mode, medium mode and slow mode. The probability distribution of returns and auto-correlation of volatilities for the fast and medium modes exhibit similar behaviors as those of the full time series, i.e., these characteristics are rather robust in multi time scale. However, the cross-correlation between individual stocks and the return-volatility correlation are time scale dependent. The structure of business sectors is mainly governed by the fast mode when returns are sampled at a couple of days, while by the medium mode when returns are sampled at dozens of days. More importantly, the leverage and anti-leverage effects are dominated by the medium mode.

  19. Intrinsic Multi-Scale Dynamic Behaviors of Complex Financial Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Fang-Yan; Zheng, Bo; Jiang, Xiong-Fei

    2015-01-01

    The empirical mode decomposition is applied to analyze the intrinsic multi-scale dynamic behaviors of complex financial systems. In this approach, the time series of the price returns of each stock is decomposed into a small number of intrinsic mode functions, which represent the price motion from high frequency to low frequency. These intrinsic mode functions are then grouped into three modes, i.e., the fast mode, medium mode and slow mode. The probability distribution of returns and auto-correlation of volatilities for the fast and medium modes exhibit similar behaviors as those of the full time series, i.e., these characteristics are rather robust in multi time scale. However, the cross-correlation between individual stocks and the return-volatility correlation are time scale dependent. The structure of business sectors is mainly governed by the fast mode when returns are sampled at a couple of days, while by the medium mode when returns are sampled at dozens of days. More importantly, the leverage and anti-leverage effects are dominated by the medium mode. PMID:26427063

  20. A dynamic subgrid-scale eddy viscosity model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germano, Massimo; Piomelli, Ugo; Moin, Parviz; Cabot, William H.

    1990-01-01

    One major drawback of the eddy viscosity subgrid-scale stress models used in large-eddy simulations is their inability to represent correctly with a single universal constant different turbulent field in rotating or sheared flows, near solid walls, or in transitional regimes. In the present work, a new eddy viscosity model is presented which alleviates many of these drawbacks. The model coefficient is computed dynamically as the calculation progresses rather than input a priori. The model is based on an algebraic identity (Germano 1990) between the subgrid-scale stresses at two different filtered levels and the resolved turbulent stresses. The subgrid-scale stresses obtained using the proposed model vanish in laminar flow and at a solid boundary, and have the correct asymptotic behavior in the near-wall region of a turbulent boundary layer. The results of large-eddy simulations of transitional and turbulent channel flow that use the proposed model are in good agreement with the direct simulation data.

  1. Coherent ecological dynamics induced by large-scale disturbance.

    PubMed

    Keitt, Timothy H

    2008-07-17

    Aggregate community-level response to disturbance is a principle concern in ecology because post-disturbance dynamics are integral to the ability of ecosystems to maintain function in an uncertain world. Community-level responses to disturbance can be arrayed along a spectrum ranging from synchronous oscillations where all species rise and fall together, to compensatory dynamics where total biomass remains relatively constant despite fluctuations in the densities of individual species. An important recent insight is that patterns of synchrony and compensation can vary with the timescale of analysis and that spectral time series methods can enable detection of coherent dynamics that would otherwise be obscured by opposing patterns occurring at different scales. Here I show that application of wavelet analysis to experimentally manipulated plankton communities reveals strong synchrony after disturbance. The result is paradoxical because it is well established that these communities contain both disturbance-sensitive and disturbance-tolerant species leading to compensation within functional groups. Theory predicts that compensatory substitution of functionally equivalent species should stabilize ecological communities, yet I found at the whole-community level a large increase in seasonal biomass variation. Resolution of the paradox hinges on patterns of seasonality among species. The compensatory shift in community composition after disturbance resulted in a loss of cold-season dominants, which before disturbance had served to stabilize biomass throughout the year. Species dominating the disturbed community peaked coherently during the warm season, explaining the observed synchrony and increase in seasonal biomass variation. These results suggest that theory relating compensatory dynamics to ecological stability needs to consider not only complementarity in species responses to environmental change, but also seasonal complementarity among disturbance-tolerant and

  2. Simulating Field-Scale Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics Using EPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Causarano, Hector J.; Shaw, Joey N.; Franzluebbers, A. J.; reeves, D. W.; Raper, Randy L.; Balkcom, Kipling S.; Norfleet, M. L.; Izaurralde, R Cesar

    2007-07-01

    Simulation models integrate our knowledge of soil organic C (SOC) dynamics and are useful tools for evaluating impacts of crop management on soil C sequestration; yet, they require local calibration. Our objectives were to calibrate the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model, and evaluate its performance for simulating SOC fractions as affected by soil landscape and management. An automated parameter optimization procedure was used to calibrate the model for a site-specific experiment in the Coastal Plain of central Alabama. The ability of EPIC to predict corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yields and SOC dynamics on different soil landscape positions (summit, sideslope and drainageway) during the initial period of conservation tillage adoption (5 years) was evaluated using regression and mean squared deviations. Simulated yield explained 88% of measured yield variation, with greatest disagreement on the sideslope position and highest agreement in the drainageway. Simulations explained approximately 1, 34 and 40% of the total variation in microbial biomass C (MBC), particulate organic C (POC) and total organic C (TOC), respectively. Lowest errors on TOC simulations (0-20 cm) were found on the sideslope and summit. We conclude that the automated parameterization was generally successful, although further work is needed to refine the MBC and POC fractions, and to improve EPIC predictions of SOC dynamics with depth. Overall, EPIC was sensitive to spatial differences in C fractions that resulted from differing soil landscape positions. The model needs additional refinement for accurate simulations of field-scale SOC dynamics affected by short-term management decisions.

  3. On the Dynamics of Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, T. E.; Title, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    We report on the dynamics of the small-scale solar magnetic field, based on analysis of very high resolution images of the solar photosphere obtained at the Swedish Vacuum Solar Telescope. The data sets are movies from 1 to 4 hr in length, taken in several wavelength bands with a typical time between frames of 20 s. The primary method of tracking small-scale magnetic elements is with very high contrast images of photospheric bright points, taken through a 12 A bandpass filter centered at 4305 A in the Fraunhofer 'G band.' Previous studies have established that such bright points are unambiguously associated with sites of small-scale magnetic flux in the photosphere, although the details of the mechanism responsible for the brightening of the flux elements remain uncertain. The G band bright points move in the intergranular lanes at speeds from 0.5 to 5 km/s. The motions appear to be constrained to the intergranular lanes and are primarily driven by the evolution of the local granular convection flow field. Continual fragmentation and merging of flux is the fundamental evolutionary mode of small-scale magnetic structures in the solar photosphere. Rotation and folding of chains or groups of bright points are also observed. The timescale for magnetic flux evolution in active region plage is on the order of the correlation time of granulation (typically 6-8 minutes), but significant morphological changes can occur on timescales as short as 100 S. Smaller fragments are occasionally seen to fade beyond observable contrast. The concept of a stable, isolated subarcsecond magnetic 'flux tube' in the solar photosphere is inconsistent with the observations presented here.

  4. Steady, dynamic, creep/recovery, and textural properties of yoghurt/molasses blends: Temperature sweep tests and applicability of Cox-Merz rule.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, Ali; Bayrambaş, Kadir; Eroglu, Zeynep; Toker, Omer S; Yilmaz, Mustafa T; Karaman, Safa; Dogan, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    In this study, physicochemical, rheological (steady, dynamic, and creep/recovery), and textural properties of yoghurt/molasses blends (0, 5, 10, and 15% molasses) were investigated. The blends showed shear thinning behavior, as described by Ostwald de Waele model (R(2) ( )≥ 0.955). Consistency coefficient value (K) of the blends decreased with increasing molasses concentration in the sample. Storage modulus (G') of blends was higher than loss modulus (G″), exhibiting weak gel-like behavior. Molasses addition decreased G' and G″ values. Temperature sweep tests indicated that blends followed Arrhenius relationship. A modified Cox-Merz rule was applicable using shift factors. Compliance values (J(t)) increased as molasses concentration increased, revealing that deformation stability and internal viscosity (η1) decreased with concentration. Creep behavior was characterized using Burger model. Obtained J data as a function of time could be satisfactorily fitted to Burger model (R(2) ( )≥ 0.994). The final percentage recovery of blends remarkably decreased with the increase of molasses concentration. Firmness, consistency, cohesiveness, and viscosity index values decreased with molasses addition. According to the results of the current study, molasses amount to be added to the yoghurt should be determined regarding rheological properties since resistance of the sample to deformation decreased with increase in molasses concentration. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. A Texture Thesaurus for Browsing Large Aerial Photographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Wei-Ying; Manjunath, B. S.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a texture-based image-retrieval system for browsing large-scale aerial photographs. System components include texture-feature extraction, image segmentation and grouping, learning-similarity measure, and a texture-thesaurus model for fast search and indexing. Testing has demonstrated the system's effectiveness in searching and selecting…

  6. A Texture Thesaurus for Browsing Large Aerial Photographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Wei-Ying; Manjunath, B. S.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a texture-based image-retrieval system for browsing large-scale aerial photographs. System components include texture-feature extraction, image segmentation and grouping, learning-similarity measure, and a texture-thesaurus model for fast search and indexing. Testing has demonstrated the system's effectiveness in searching and selecting…

  7. Lightweight computational steering of very large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Beazley, D.M.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    We present a computational steering approach for controlling, analyzing, and visualizing very large scale molecular dynamics simulations involving tens to hundreds of millions of atoms. Our approach relies on extensible scripting languages and an easy to use tool for building extensions and modules. The system is extremely easy to modify, works with existing C code, is memory efficient, and can be used from inexpensive workstations and networks. We demonstrate how we have used this system to manipulate data from production MD simulations involving as many as 104 million atoms running on the CM-5 and Cray T3D. We also show how this approach can be used to build systems that integrate common scripting languages (including Tcl/Tk, Perl, and Python), simulation code, user extensions, and commercial data analysis packages.

  8. Extended MPEG Video Format for Efficient Dynamic Voltage Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Kwanhu; Bang, Sung-Yong; Chung, Eui-Young

    We present an extended MPEG video format for efficient Dynamic Voltage Scaling (DVS). DVS technique has been widely researched, but the execution time variation of a periodic task (i. e. MPEG decoding) is still a challenge to be tackled. Unlike previous works, we focus on the data (video stream) rather than the execution code to overcome such limitation. The proposed video format provides the decoding costs of frames to help the precise prediction of their execution times at client machines. The experimental results show that the extended format only increases the data size less than 1% by adding about 10bits representing the decoding cost of each frame. Also, a DVS technique adjusted for the proposed format achieves 90% of efficiency compared to the oracle case, while keeping the run time overhead of the technique negligible.

  9. Millennial-scale dynamics of southern Amazonian rain forests.

    PubMed

    Mayle, F E; Burbridge, R; Killeen, T J

    2000-12-22

    Amazonian rain forest-savanna boundaries are highly sensitive to climatic change and may also play an important role in rain forest speciation. However, their dynamics over millennial time scales are poorly understood. Here, we present late Quaternary pollen records from the southern margin of Amazonia, which show that the humid evergreen rain forests of eastern Bolivia have been expanding southward over the past 3000 years and that their present-day limit represents the southernmost extent of Amazonian rain forest over at least the past 50,000 years. This rain forest expansion is attributed to increased seasonal latitudinal migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone, which can in turn be explained by Milankovitch astronomic forcing.

  10. Properties of transportation dynamics on scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jian-Feng; Gao, Zi-You; Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we study the statistical properties of transportation dynamics considering congestion effects, based on the standard Barabási-Albert scale-free model. In terms of user equilibrium (UE) condition, congestion effects can be described by cost function. Simulation results demonstrate that the cumulative load distribution exhibits a power-law behavior with Pl∼l, where l is the flow loaded on the node and γ≈2.7 which is much bigger than that obtained in many networks without considering congestion effects. That is, there exist fewer heavily loaded nodes in the network when considering congestion effects. Furthermore, by numerically investigating overload phenomenon of the heaviest loaded link removal in transportation networks, a phase-transition phenomenon is uncovered in terms of the key parameter characterizing the node capacity.

  11. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  12. Chip-scale spacecraft swarms: Dynamics, control, and exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Lorraine

    Chip-scale spacecraft (chipsats) swarms will open new avenues for space exploration, both near Earth and in interplanetary space. The ability to create distributed sensor networks through swarms of low-cost, low-mass spacecraft shall enable the exploration of asteroids, icy moons, and the Earths magnetosphere become more feasible. This research develops new techniques for analyzing swarm dynamics, both in the limited case of the Kepler problem, and in general gravity environments, investigates several techniques for providing chipsat propulsion, and develops possible mission strategies. This work applies the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS) transformation to the stochastic exploration presented by chipsat swarms. The contributions towards understanding swarm dynamics include analytical and numerical study of swarms in the purely Kepler problem as well as in general potential fields. A study of swarm evolution near an asteroid provides an example of the richness of behaviors that can be provided by chip-scale spacecraft swarms. Swarm actuation can be achieved through a number of means. This research presents a novel attitude control and propulsion system for chipsat swarms near Earth using a mutliple electrodynamic tethers. A numerical study of tether configurations for the greatest control authority is also presented. In addition, active solar sails are evaluated for swarm actuation beyond Earth, and a visualization of available control authority is presented. An example mission of swarm deployment near the Earth-Moon Lagrange point highlights the utility of swarm-based exploration. The candidate mission shows that a swarm with minimal actuation and a simple control scheme might provide distributed sensors in the region for a year or more, or dissipate quickly if uncontrolled. Such a chip-spacecraft mission would be a valuable precursor to further space development in these regions.

  13. Large scale molecular dynamics study of polymer-surfactant complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Monojoy; Sumpter, Bobby

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we study the self-assembly of cationic polyelectrolytes mediated by anionic surfactants in dilute or semi-dilute and gel states. The understanding of the dilute system is a requirement for the understanding of gel states. The importance of polyelectrolyte with oppositely charged colloidal particles can be found in biological systems, such as immobilization of enzymes in polyelectrolyte complexes or nonspecific association of DNA with protein. With the same understanding, interaction of surfactants with polyelectrolytes shows intriguing phenomena that are important for both in academic research as well as industrial applications. Many useful properties of PE surfactant complexes come from the highly ordered structures of surfactant self-assembly inside the PE aggregate. We do large scale molecular dynamics simulation using LAMMPS to understand the structure and dynamics of PE-surfactant systems. Our investigation shows highly ordered ring-string structures that have been observed experimentally in biological systems. We will investigate many different properties of PE-surfactant complexation which will be helpful for pharmaceutical, engineering and biological applications.

  14. Scale-free avalanche dynamics in crystal plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ispanovity, Pater Dusan; Laurson, Lasse; Zaiser, Michael; Zapperi, Stefano; Groma, Istvan; Alava, Mikko

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the properties of strain bursts (dislocation avalanches) occurring during plastic deformation of crystalline matter using two dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics (DDD). We perform quasistatic stress-controlled simulations with three DDD models differing in the spatiotemporal discretization and the mobility law assumed for individual dislocations. We find that each model exhibits identical avalanche dynamics with the following properties: (i) strain burst sizes follow a power law distribution characterized by an exponent τ ~ 1 . 0 and (ii) the distribution in truncated at a cutoff that diverges with increasing system size at any applied stress level. It has been proposed earlier that plastic yielding can be described in terms of a continuous phase transition of depinning type and its critical point is at the yield stress. We will demonstrate, however, that our results are inconsistent with cutoff scaling in depinning systems (like magnetic domain walls or earthquakes) and that the system behaves as critical at every stress level. We, therefore, conclude that in the models studied plastic yielding cannot be associated with a continuous phase transition. Financial supports of the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA) under Contract Numbers PD-105256 and K-105335 and of the European Commission under Grant Agreement No. CIG-321842 are acknowledged.

  15. Static and Dynamic Frequency Scaling on Multicore CPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Wenlei; Hong, Changwan; Chunduri, Sudheer; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Pouchet, Louis-Noël; Rastello, Fabrice; Sadayappan, P.

    2016-12-28

    Dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) adapts CPU power consumption by modifying a processor’s operating frequency (and the associated voltage). Typical approaches employing DVFS involve default strategies such as running at the lowest or the highest frequency, or observing the CPU’s runtime behavior and dynamically adapting the voltage/frequency configuration based on CPU usage. In this paper, we argue that many previous approaches suffer from inherent limitations, such as not account- ing for processor-specific impact of frequency changes on energy for different workload types. We first propose a lightweight runtime-based approach to automatically adapt the frequency based on the CPU workload, that is agnostic of the processor characteristics. We then show that further improvements can be achieved for affine kernels in the application, using a compile-time characterization instead of run-time monitoring to select the frequency and number of CPU cores to use. Our framework relies on a one-time energy characterization of CPU-specific DVFS profiles followed by a compile-time categorization of loop-based code segments in the application. These are combined to determine a priori of the frequency and the number of cores to use to execute the application so as to optimize energy or energy-delay product, outperforming runtime approach. Extensive evaluation on 60 benchmarks and five multi-core CPUs show that our approach systematically outperforms the powersave Linux governor, while improving overall performance.

  16. Monitoring Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics with Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S. M.; Best, J. L.; Keevil, G. M.; Oberg, K.; Czuba, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are routinely deployed to provide high-resolution bathymetric information in and range of environments. Modern data handling and storage technologies now facilitate the logging of the raw acoustic back-scatter information that was previously discarded by these systems. This paper describes methodologies that exploit this logging capability to quantify both the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport dynamics by imaging suspended sediment concentration, the associated flows and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. Results obtained a RESON 7125 MBES are presented from both well constrained dock-side testing and full field deployment over dune bedforms in the Mississippi. The capacity of the system to image suspended sediment structures is demonstrated and a novel methodology for estimating 2D flow velocities, based on frame cross-correlation methods, is introduced. The results demonstrate the capability of MBES systems to successfully map spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment concentration throughout a 2D swath and application of the velocity estimation algorithms allow real-time holistic monitoring of turbulent flow processes and suspended sediment fluxes at a scale previously unrealisable. Turbulent flow over a natural dune bedform on the Mississippi is used to highlight the process information provided and the insights that can be gleaned for this technical development.

  17. Local-scale dynamics and local drivers of bushmeat trade.

    PubMed

    Nyaki, Angela; Gray, Steven A; Lepczyk, Christopher A; Skibins, Jeffrey C; Rentsch, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    Bushmeat management policies are often developed outside the communities in which they are to be implemented. These policies are also routinely designed to be applied uniformly across communities with little regard for variation in social or ecological conditions. We used fuzzy-logic cognitive mapping, a form of participatory modeling, to compare the assumptions driving externally generated bushmeat management policies with perceptions of bushmeat trade dynamics collected from local community members who admitted to being recently engaged in bushmeat trading (e.g., hunters, sellers, consumers). Data were collected during 9 workshops in 4 Tanzanian villages bordering Serengeti National Park. Specifically, we evaluated 9 community-generated models for the presence of the central factors that comprise and drive the bushmeat trade and whether or not models included the same core concepts, relationships, and logical chains of reasoning on which bushmeat conservation policies are commonly based. Across local communities, there was agreement about the most central factors important to understanding the bushmeat trade (e.g., animal recruitment, low income, and scarcity of food crops). These matched policy assumptions. However, the factors perceived to drive social-ecological bushmeat trade dynamics were more diverse and varied considerably across communities (e.g., presence or absence of collaborative law enforcement, increasing human population, market demand, cultural preference). Sensitive conservation issues, such as the bushmeat trade, that require cooperation between communities and outside conservation organizations can benefit from participatory modeling approaches that make local-scale dynamics and conservation policy assumptions explicit. Further, communities' and conservation organizations' perceptions need to be aligned. This can improve success by allowing context appropriate policies to be developed, monitored, and appropriately adapted as new evidence is

  18. Whey Texturization for Snacks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Extrusion processing is used to modify the physical texture (texturization) of whey proteins, expanding their potential use in snack foods. Texturization changes the globular folding of proteins improving their interaction with other ingredients, and is the basis for creating new whey enriched snack...

  19. Hybrid texture generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kazunori; Nakajima, Masayuki

    1995-04-01

    A method is given for synthesizing a texture by using the interface of a conventional drawing tool. The majority of conventional texture generation methods are based on the procedural approach, and can generate a variety of textures that are adequate for generating a realistic image. But it is hard for a user to imagine what kind of texture will be generated simply by looking at its parameters. Furthermore, it is difficult to design a new texture freely without a knowledge of all the procedures for texture generation. Our method offers a solution to these problems, and has the following four merits: First, a variety of textures can be obtained by combining a set of feature lines and attribute functions. Second, data definitions are flexible. Third, the user can preview a texture together with its feature lines. Fourth, people can design their own textures interactively and freely by using the interface of a conventional drawing tool. For users who want to build this texture generation method into their own programs, we also give the language specifications for generating a texture. This method can interactively provide a variety of textures, and can also be used for typographic design.

  20. Intertidal population genetic dynamics at a microgeographic seascape scale.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zi-Min

    2013-06-01

    The intertidal community is among the most physically harsh niches on earth, with highly heterogeneous environmental and biological factors that impose strong habitat selection on population abundance, genetic connectivity and ecological adaptation of organisms in nature. However, most genetic studies to date have concentrated on the influence of basin-wide or regional marine environments (e.g. habitat discontinuities, oceanic currents and fronts, and geographic barriers) on spatiotemporal distribution and composition of intertidal invertebrates having planktonic stages or long-distance dispersal capability. Little is known about sessile marine organisms (e.g. seaweeds) in the context of topographic tidal gradients and reproductive traits at the microgeographic scale. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Krueger-Hadfield et al. () implemented an elaborate sampling strategy with red seaweed (Chondrus crispus) from a 90-m transect stand near Roscoff and comprehensively detected genome-scale genetic differentiation and biases in ploidy level. This study not only revealed that tidal height resulted in genetic differentiation between high- and low-shore stands and restricted the genetic exchange within the high-shore habitat, but also demonstrated that intergametophytic nonrandom fertilization in C. crispus can cause significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Such new genetic insights highlight the importance of microgeographic genetic dynamics and life history characteristics for better understanding the evolutionary processes of speciation and diversification of intertidal marine organisms.

  1. Social and Ecological Dynamics of Small-Scale Fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, K.; Kramer, D.; Frank, K.

    2012-12-01

    Globalization's reach is rapidly extending to touch some of the most remote communities of the world, but we have yet to understand its scale and impact. On Nicaragua's previously remote Miskitu Coast, the introduction of new markets and global demand for seafood has resulted in changes in fishermen's harvest behavior manifested within the local fishery. Small-scale fisheries are a significant component in sustaining global fish trade, ensuring food security, and alleviating poverty, but because the fishermen are disperse, numerous and located in remote areas, the social and ecological dynamics of the system are poorly understood. Previous work has indicated a decline in fish abundance as a result of connection to markets, yet fishermen's response to this decline and the resulting shift in harvest strategy requires further examination. I identify the ecological and social factors that explain changes in fishermen behavior and use an innovative application of social network analysis to understand these changes. I also use interviews with fishermen and fishery-dependent surveys to measure catch and release behavior and seasonal gear use. Results demonstrate multiple cliques within a community that mitigate the response of fishermen to changes in the fishery. This research applies techniques in social science to address challenges in sustainable management of fisheries. As fisheries managers consider implementing new regulations, such as seasonal restrictions on gear, it is essential to understand not just how this might impact fish abundance, but how and why human systems respond as they do.

  2. Relativistic Fluid Dynamics: Physics for Many Different Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Nils; Comer, Gregory L.

    2007-12-01

    The relativistic fluid is a highly successful model used to describe the dynamics of many-particle, relativistic systems. It takes as input basic physics from microscopic scales and yields as output predictions of bulk, macroscopic motion. By inverting the process, an understanding of bulk features can lead to insight into physics on the microscopic scale. Relativistic fluids have been used to model systems as “small” as heavy ions in collisions, and as large as the Universe itself, with “intermediate” sized objects like neutron stars being considered along the way. The purpose of this review is to discuss the mathematical and theoretical physics underpinnings of the relativistic (multiple) fluid model. We focus on the variational principle approach championed by Brandon Carter and his collaborators, in which a crucial element is to distinguish the momenta that are conjugate to the particle number density currents. This approach differs from the “standard” text-book derivation of the equations of motion from the divergence of the stress-energy tensor in that one explicitly obtains the relativistic Euler equation as an “integrability” condition on the relativistic vorticity. We discuss the conservation laws and the equations of motion in detail, and provide a number of (in our opinion) interesting and relevant applications of the general theory.

  3. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Florence, A. Paulin; Shanthi, V.; Simon, C. B. Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a “Pay as you go” basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption. PMID:27239551

  4. Energy Conservation Using Dynamic Voltage Frequency Scaling for Computational Cloud.

    PubMed

    Florence, A Paulin; Shanthi, V; Simon, C B Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing is a new technology which supports resource sharing on a "Pay as you go" basis around the world. It provides various services such as SaaS, IaaS, and PaaS. Computation is a part of IaaS and the entire computational requests are to be served efficiently with optimal power utilization in the cloud. Recently, various algorithms are developed to reduce power consumption and even Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS) scheme is also used in this perspective. In this paper we have devised methodology which analyzes the behavior of the given cloud request and identifies the associated type of algorithm. Once the type of algorithm is identified, using their asymptotic notations, its time complexity is calculated. Using best fit strategy the appropriate host is identified and the incoming job is allocated to the victimized host. Using the measured time complexity the required clock frequency of the host is measured. According to that CPU frequency is scaled up or down using DVFS scheme, enabling energy to be saved up to 55% of total Watts consumption.

  5. Macroscopic elastic properties of textured ZrN-AlN polycrystalline aggregates: From ab initio calculations to grain-scale interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holec, D.; Tasnádi, F.; Wagner, P.; Friák, M.; Neugebauer, J.; Mayrhofer, P. H.; Keckes, J.

    2014-11-01

    Despite the fast development of computational material modeling, the theoretical description of macroscopic elastic properties of textured polycrystalline aggregates starting from basic principles remains a challenging task. In this study we use a supercell-based approach to obtain the elastic properties of a random solid solution cubic Zr1 -xAlxN system as a function of the metallic sublattice composition and texture descriptors. The employed special quasirandom structures are optimized not only with respect to short-range-order parameters, but also to make the three cubic directions [1 0 0 ] , [0 1 0 ] , and [0 0 1 ] as similar as possible. In this way, only a small spread of elastic constant tensor components is achieved and an optimum trade-off between modeling of chemical disorder and computational limits regarding the supercell size and calculational time is proposed. The single-crystal elastic constants are shown to vary smoothly with composition, yielding x ≈0.5 an alloy constitution with an almost isotropic response. Consequently, polycrystals with this composition are suggested to have Young's modulus independent of the actual microstructure. This is indeed confirmed by explicit calculations of polycrystal elastic properties, both within the isotropic aggregate limit and with fiber textures with various orientations and sharpness. It turns out that for low AlN mole fractions, the spread of the possible Young's modulus data caused by the texture variation can be larger than 100 GPa. Consequently, our discussion of Young's modulus data of cubic Zr1 -xAlxN contains also the evaluation of the texture typical for thin films.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics of Extended Hydrologic Systems over long time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lall, Upmanu

    2014-05-01

    We often view our knowledge of hydrology and hence of nature as intransient, at least over the time scales over which we study processes we wish to predict and understand. Over the last few decades, this assumption has come under question, largely because of the vocal expression of a changing climate, but also the recurrent demonstration of significant land use change, both of which significantly affect the boundary conditions for terrestrial hydrology that is our forte. Most recently, the concepts of hydromorphology and social hydrology have entered the discussion, and the notion that climate and hydrology influence human action, which in turn shapes hydrology, is being recognized. Finally, as a field, we seem to be coming to the conclusion that the hydrologic system is an open system, whose boundaries evolve in time, and that the hydrologic system, at many scales, has a profound effect on the systems that drive it -- whether they be the ecological and climatic systems, or the social system. What a mess! Complexity! Unpredictability! At a certain level of abstraction, one can consider the evolution of these coupled systems with nonlinear feedbacks and ask what types of questions are relevant in terms of such a coupled evolution? What are their implications at the planetary scale? What are their implications for a subsistence farmer in an arid landscape who may under external influence achieve a new transient hydro-ecological equilibrium? What are the implications for the economy and power of nations? In this talk, I will try to raise some of these questions and also provide some examples with very simple dynamical systems that suggest ways of thinking about some practical issues of feedback across climate, hydrology and human behavior.

  7. Spatiotemporal dynamics of large-scale brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuman, Jeremy

    Understanding the dynamics of large-scale brain activity is a tough challenge. One reason for this is the presence of an incredible amount of complexity arising from having roughly 100 billion neurons connected via 100 trillion synapses. Because of the extremely high number of degrees of freedom in the nervous system, the question of how the brain manages to properly function and remain stable, yet also be adaptable, must be posed. Neuroscientists have identified many ways the nervous system makes this possible, of which synaptic plasticity is possibly the most notable one. On the other hand, it is vital to understand how the nervous system also loses stability, resulting in neuropathological diseases such as epilepsy, a disease which affects 1% of the population. In the following work, we seek to answer some of these questions from two different perspectives. The first uses mean-field theory applied to neuronal populations, where the variables of interest are the percentages of active excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a network, to consider how the nervous system responds to external stimuli, self-organizes and generates epileptiform activity. The second method uses statistical field theory, in the framework of single neurons on a lattice, to study the concept of criticality, an idea borrowed from physics which posits that in some regime the brain operates in a collectively stable or marginally stable manner. This will be examined in two different neuronal networks with self-organized criticality serving as the overarching theme for the union of both perspectives. One of the biggest problems in neuroscience is the question of to what extent certain details are significant to the functioning of the brain. These details give rise to various spatiotemporal properties that at the smallest of scales explain the interaction of single neurons and synapses and at the largest of scales describe, for example, behaviors and sensations. In what follows, we will shed some

  8. A linear systems analysis of the yaw dynamics of a dynamically scaled insect model.

    PubMed

    Dickson, William B; Polidoro, Peter; Tanner, Melissa M; Dickinson, Michael H

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that fruit flies use subtle changes to their wing motion to actively generate forces during aerial maneuvers. In addition, it has been estimated that the passive rotational damping caused by the flapping wings of an insect is around two orders of magnitude greater than that for the body alone. At present, however, the relationships between the active regulation of wing kinematics, passive damping produced by the flapping wings and the overall trajectory of the animal are still poorly understood. In this study, we use a dynamically scaled robotic model equipped with a torque feedback mechanism to study the dynamics of yaw turns in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Four plausible mechanisms for the active generation of yaw torque are examined. The mechanisms deform the wing kinematics of hovering in order to introduce asymmetry that results in the active production of yaw torque by the flapping wings. The results demonstrate that the stroke-averaged yaw torque is well approximated by a model that is linear with respect to both the yaw velocity and the magnitude of the kinematic deformations. Dynamic measurements, in which the yaw torque produced by the flapping wings was used in real-time to determine the rotation of the robot, suggest that a first-order linear model with stroke-average coefficients accurately captures the yaw dynamics of the system. Finally, an analysis of the stroke-average dynamics suggests that both damping and inertia will be important factors during rapid body saccades of a fruit fly.

  9. Texture of Tethys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This richly textured look at Saturn's moon Tethys shows the huge crater Odysseus and its central mountain in relief, as well as many smaller impact sites. Vertical relief on solid solar system bodies is often most easily visible near the terminator (the line between day and night). Tethys is 1,071 kilometers (665 miles) across.

    North on Tethys is up in this view. The lit portion of Tethys seen here is on the moon's leading hemisphere as it orbits Saturn.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on June 27, 2005, at a distance of approximately 490,000 kilometers (304,000 miles) from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 117 degrees. The image scale is 3 kilometers (2 miles) per pixel.

  10. Laser surface texturing of tool steel: textured surfaces quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šugár, Peter; Šugárová, Jana; Frnčík, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental investigation the laser surface texturing of tool steel of type 90MnCrV8 has been conducted. The 5-axis highly dynamic laser precision machining centre Lasertec 80 Shape equipped with the nano-second pulsed ytterbium fibre laser and CNC system Siemens 840 D was used. The planar and spherical surfaces first prepared by turning have been textured. The regular array of spherical and ellipsoidal dimples with a different dimensions and different surface density has been created. Laser surface texturing has been realized under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of ablated surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results show limited possibility of ns pulse fibre laser application to generate different surface structures for tribological modification of metallic materials. These structures were obtained by varying the processing conditions between surface ablation, to surface remelting. In all cases the areas of molten material and re-cast layers were observed on the bottom and walls of the dimples. Beside the influence of laser beam parameters on the machined surface quality during laser machining of regular hemispherical and elipsoidal dimple texture on parabolic and hemispherical surfaces has been studied.

  11. Quantitative textural analysis of phenocryst zoning patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niespolo, E.; Andrews, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    The textural complexity of phenocrysts has made quantitative analysis of large populations of crystals a challenging study. Because each phenocryst expresses a unique localized event in the volcanic interior, no single crystal necessarily records the complete pre-eruptive history of the magmatic system as a whole. Synthesizing the textural and compositional records of many crystals, however, should provide a more complete understanding of conditions prior to eruption. In this research, we present new techniques for quantitative analysis of individual crystals and across populations of crystals. We apply those techniques to back-scattered electron images of complexly zoned plagioclase from El Chichón volcano, Mexico. Analysis begins with Gaussian filtering to remove noise from the images and create more qualitatively distinct zoning patterns. Because pixel intensity is directly correlated with Anorthite content, compositional anisotropy is then calculated throughout each image by determining the distance from a grid point at which variation in pixel intensity exceeds a pre-determined standard deviation; both regular and adaptive grid spacings are used, and length scales are calculated in 8 directions. The resulting textural maps are analogous to a vector field and quantify 2-dimensional variation in texture. With both types of grid spacing, changes in magnitude and orientation of textural anisotropy and length scale indicate different crystal zones. The adaptive grid spacing, however, describes non-uniform textural variation more completely and has a higher measurement density in regions of high-frequency variation. In general, textural regions commonly described as clean or smooth show longer length scales and aligned anisotropies, whereas shorter length scales with variable anisotropies identify areas commonly described as patchy, dusty, or rough. The comparison and correlation of textural and compositional zoning help determine how different crystals record the

  12. Lava flow surface textures - SIR-B radar image texture, field observations, and terrain measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddis, Lisa R.; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Hayashi, Joan N.

    1990-01-01

    SIR-B images, field observations, and small-scale (cm) terrain measurements are used to study lave flow surface textures related to emplacement processes of a single Hawaiian lava flow. Although smooth pahoehoe textures are poorly characterized on the SIR-B data, rougher pahoehoe types and the a'a flow portion show image textures attributed to spatial variations in surface roughness. Field observations of six distinct lava flow textural units are described and used to interpret modes of emplacement. The radar smooth/rough boundary between pahoehoe and a'a occurs at a vertical relief of about 10 cm on this lava flow. While direct observation and measurement most readily yield information related to lava eruption and emplacement processes, analyses of remote sensing data such as those acquired by imaging radars and altimeters can provide a means of quantifying surface texture, identifying the size and distribution of flow components, and delineating textural unit boundaries.

  13. Structure and dynamics of DNA loops on nucleosomes studied with atomistic, microsecond-scale molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2016-01-01

    DNA loop formation on nucleosomes is strongly implicated in chromatin remodeling and occurs spontaneously in nucleosomes subjected to superhelical stress. The nature of such loops depends crucially on the balance between DNA deformation and DNA interaction with the nucleosome core. Currently, no high-resolution structural data on these loops exist. Although uniform rod models have been used to study loop size and shape, these models make assumptions concerning DNA mechanics and DNA–core binding. We present here atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations for two different loop sizes. The results point to the key role of localized DNA kinking within the loops. Kinks enable the relaxation of DNA bending strain to be coupled with improved DNA–core interactions. Kinks lead to small, irregularly shaped loops that are asymmetrically positioned with respect to the nucleosome core. We also find that loop position can influence the dynamics of the DNA segments at the extremities of the nucleosome. PMID:27098037

  14. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    DOE PAGES

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature ismore » roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.« less

  15. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multicomponent metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamical aspects of a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (self diffusion coefficient, self relaxation time, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx˜1300 K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs well above the melting point of the system (Tm˜900 K) in the equilibrium liquid state; and the crossover temperature Tx is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature of the system (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a nonparametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter α2 and the four-point correlation function χ4.

  16. Holographic Scaling and Dynamical Gauge Effects in Disordered Atomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Quantum systems with strong disorder, and those far from equilibrium or interacting with a thermal reservior, present unique challenges in a range of physical contexts, from non-relativistic condensed-matter settings, such as in study of localization phenomena, to relativistic cosmology and the study of fundamental interactions. Recently, two related concepts, that of the entropy of entanglement, and the controversial suggestion of entropic emergent gravity, have shed insight on several long-standing questions along these lines, suggesting that strongly disordered systems with causal barriers (either relativistic or those with Lieb-Robinson-like bounds) can be understood using holographic principles in combination with the equivalence between quantum vacuua thermal baths via the Unruh effect. I will discuss a range of experiments performed within a strong, topologically disordered medium for neutral atoms which simultaneously introduces quenched disorder for spin and mass transport, and provides simple mechanisms for open coupling to various types of dissipative baths. Under conditions in which a subset of quantum states are continuously decoupled from the thermal bath, dark state effects lead to slow light phenomena mimicking gravitational lensing in general relativity in a characterizable table-top disordered medium. Non-equilibrium steady-states are observed in direct analogy with the evaporation of gravitational singularities, and we observe scaling behaviors that can be directly connected to holographic measures of the information contained in disorder. Finally, I will show how a dynamic-gauge-field picture of this and similar systems can lead to a natural description of non-equilibrium and disordered phenomena, and how it provides some advantages over the Harris and Luck criteria for describing critical phenomena. Connections between out-of-equilibrium dynamics and some long-unresolved issues concerning the existence of a gauge-boson mass gap in certain Yang

  17. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. II - Prediction of full scale characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical extrapolations are made from experimental subscale dynamics to predict full scale characteristics of dynamic stall. The method proceeds by establishing analytic relationships between dynamic and static aerodynamic characteristics induced by viscous flow effects. The method is then validated by predicting dynamic test results on the basis of corresponding static test data obtained at the same subscale flow conditions, and the effect of Reynolds number on the static aerodynamic characteristics are determined from subscale to full scale flow conditions.

  18. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. II - Prediction of full scale characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical extrapolations are made from experimental subscale dynamics to predict full scale characteristics of dynamic stall. The method proceeds by establishing analytic relationships between dynamic and static aerodynamic characteristics induced by viscous flow effects. The method is then validated by predicting dynamic test results on the basis of corresponding static test data obtained at the same subscale flow conditions, and the effect of Reynolds number on the static aerodynamic characteristics are determined from subscale to full scale flow conditions.

  19. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of pollutant concentrations within roadway and building microenvironments is feasible using high performance computing. Unlike currently used regulatory air quality models, fine-scale CFD simulations are able to account rig...

  20. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine-scale Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of pollutant concentrations within roadway and building microenvironments is feasible using high performance computing. Unlike currently used regulatory air quality models, fine-scale CFD simulations are able to account rig...

  1. Dynamics of particle--turbulence interaction at the dissipative scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; JM Burgerscentrum Collaboration; COST Action, Particles in Turbulence Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present results of a novel phosphorescent tagging technique that is particularly suited to study particle-laden flows. Using phosphorescent droplets we probe the dynamics of particle-turbulence interaction at the dissipative length scales. We create a cloud of droplets within a chamber capable of generating homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with zero-mean flow. The droplets have Stokes number St ~ 1 , and the flow is intensely turbulent, with Reynolds number Reλ ~ 500 . Using a frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser, we can tag a variety of volumes, such as thin slabs or thin, pencil-like cylinders. The droplets in these volumes glow during a few Kolmogorov times. By tracking the fate of pencil-shaped clouds using a fast (5 kHz) camera, we come to the surprising conclusion that they disperse faster than fluid elements, with a spreading rate reaching a maximum at St ~ 2 . Sheets of tagged droplets display preferential concentration at work; we discuss statistical quantities that can capture these events. This project is funded by Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM).

  2. Large scale instabilities and dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Schindler, K.

    1986-01-01

    The stability properties of the magnetotail current sheet against large scale modes is reviewed in the framework of ideal MHD, resistive MHD, and collisionless Vlasov theory. It appears that the small deviations from a plane sheet pinch (in particular a magnetic field component normal to the sheet) are important to explain the transition of the tail from a quiet stable state to an unstable dynamic state. It is found that the tail is essentially stable in ideal MHD, but unstable in resistive MHD, while both stable and unstable configurations are found within collisionless theory. The results favor an interpretation where the onset of magnetotail dyanmics leading to a sudden thinning of the plasma sheet and the ejection of a plasmoid is caused by the onset of a collisionless instability that either directly leads to the growth of a collisionless tearing mode or via microscopic turbulence to the growth of a resistive mode. The actual onset conditions are not fully explored yet by rigorous methods. The onset may be triggered by local conditions as well as by boundary conditions at the ionosphere or at the magnetopause (resulting from solar wind conditions). 53 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Scale-free avalanche dynamics in the stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolozzi, M.; Leinweber, D. B.; Thomas, A. W.

    2006-10-01

    Self-organized criticality (SOC) has been claimed to play an important role in many natural and social systems. In the present work we empirically investigate the relevance of this theory to stock-market dynamics. Avalanches in stock-market indices are identified using a multi-scale wavelet-filtering analysis designed to remove Gaussian noise from the index. Here, new methods are developed to identify the optimal filtering parameters which maximize the noise removal. The filtered time series is reconstructed and compared with the original time series. A statistical analysis of both high-frequency Nasdaq E-mini Futures and daily Dow Jones data is performed. The results of this new analysis confirm earlier results revealing a robust power-law behaviour in the probability distribution function of the sizes, duration and laminar times between avalanches. This power-law behaviour holds the potential to be established as a stylized fact of stock market indices in general. While the memory process, implied by the power-law distribution of the laminar times, is not consistent with classical models for SOC, we note that a power-law distribution of the laminar times cannot be used to rule out self-organized critical behaviour.

  4. Geometrically-controlled drop evaporation: Dynamics and universal scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefiane, Khellil; Saenz, Pedro; Wray, Alexander; Che, Zhizhao; Matar, Omar; Valluri, Prashant; Kim, Jungho

    2016-11-01

    The evaporation of a liquid drop on a solid substrate is a remarkably common phenomenon. Yet, the complexity of the underlying mechanisms has constrained previous studies to spherically-symmetric configurations. Here we present an investigation of well-defined, non-spherical evaporating drops of pure liquids and binary mixtures. We deduce a new universal scaling law for the evaporation rate valid for any shape and demonstrate that more curved regions lead to preferential localized depositions in particle-laden drops. Furthermore, geometry induces well-defined flow structures within the drop that change according to the driving mechanism and spatially-dependent thresholds for thermocapillary instabilities. In the case of binary mixtures, geometry dictates the spatial segregation of the more volatile component as it is depleted. In the light of our results, we believe that the drop geometry can be exploited to facilitate precise local control over the particle deposition and evaporative dynamics of pure drops and the mixing characteristics of multicomponent drops. Memphis Multiphase (EPSRC EP/K003976/1) & ThermaPOWER (EU IRSESPIRSES GA-2011-294905).

  5. ISM and dynamical scaling relations in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortese, L.

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade we have seen a tremendous progress in our understanding of the life cycle of galaxies. Particularly powerful has been the synergy between representative surveys of cold gas, dust and metals and improved theoretical models able to follow the evolution of the different phases of the ISM in a self-consistent way. At the same time, the advent of optical integral field spectroscopic surveys is finally allowing us to quantify how the kinematical properties of gas and stars vary across the Hubble sequence. In this talk, I will review recent observational work aimed at providing a local benchmark for the study of the star formation cycle in galaxies and dynamical scaling relations in galaxies. By combining observations obtained as part the Herschel Reference Survey, the GALEX Arecibo SDSS survey, the ALFALFA survey and the SAMI Galaxy Survey, I will discuss what nearby galaxies can teach us about the interplay between kinematics, star formation, chemical enrichment and environmental effects in our neighbourhoods.

  6. Fast cartoon + texture image filters.

    PubMed

    Buades, Antoni; Le, Triet M; Morel, Jean-Michel; Vese, Luminita A

    2010-08-01

    Can images be decomposed into the sum of a geometric part and a textural part? In a theoretical breakthrough, [Y. Meyer, Oscillating Patterns in Image Processing and Nonlinear Evolution Equations. Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society, 2001] proposed variational models that force the geometric part into the space of functions with bounded variation, and the textural part into a space of oscillatory distributions. Meyer's models are simple minimization problems extending the famous total variation model. However, their numerical solution has proved challenging. It is the object of a literature rich in variants and numerical attempts. This paper starts with the linear model, which reduces to a low-pass/high-pass filter pair. A simple conversion of the linear filter pair into a nonlinear filter pair involving the total variation is introduced. This new-proposed nonlinear filter pair retains both the essential features of Meyer's models and the simplicity and rapidity of the linear model. It depends upon only one transparent parameter: the texture scale, measured in pixel mesh. Comparative experiments show a better and faster separation of cartoon from texture. One application is illustrated: edge detection.

  7. Texture analysis using Gabor wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghdy, Golshah A.; Wang, Jian; Ogunbona, Philip O.

    1996-04-01

    Receptive field profiles of simple cells in the visual cortex have been shown to resemble even- symmetric or odd-symmetric Gabor filters. Computational models employed in the analysis of textures have been motivated by two-dimensional Gabor functions arranged in a multi-channel architecture. More recently wavelets have emerged as a powerful tool for non-stationary signal analysis capable of encoding scale-space information efficiently. A multi-resolution implementation in the form of a dyadic decomposition of the signal of interest has been popularized by many researchers. In this paper, Gabor wavelet configured in a 'rosette' fashion is used as a multi-channel filter-bank feature extractor for texture classification. The 'rosette' spans 360 degrees of orientation and covers frequencies from dc. In the proposed algorithm, the texture images are decomposed by the Gabor wavelet configuration and the feature vectors corresponding to the mean of the outputs of the multi-channel filters extracted. A minimum distance classifier is used in the classification procedure. As a comparison the Gabor filter has been used to classify the same texture images from the Brodatz album and the results indicate the superior discriminatory characteristics of the Gabor wavelet. With the test images used it can be concluded that the Gabor wavelet model is a better approximation of the cortical cell receptive field profiles.

  8. Separation Surfaces in the Spectral TV Domain for Texture Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Horesh, Dikla; Gilboa, Guy

    2016-07-07

    In this paper we introduce a novel notion of separation surfaces for image decomposition. A surface is embedded in the spectral total-variation (TV) three dimensional domain and encodes a spatially-varying separation scale. The method allows good separation of textures with gradually varying pattern-size, pattern-contrast or illumination. The recently proposed total variation spectral framework is used to decompose the image into a continuum of textural scales. A desired texture, within a scale range, is found by fitting a surface to the local maximal responses in the spectral domain. A band above and below the surface, referred to as the Texture Stratum, defines for each pixel the adaptive scale-range of the texture. Based on the decomposition an application is proposed which can attenuate or enhance textures in the image in a very natural and visually convincing manner.

  9. Separation Surfaces in the Spectral TV Domain for Texture Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horesh, Dikla; Gilboa, Guy

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel notion of separation surfaces for image decomposition. A surface is embedded in the spectral total-variation (TV) three dimensional domain and encodes a spatially-varying separation scale. The method allows good separation of textures with gradually varying pattern-size, pattern-contrast or illumination. The recently proposed total variation spectral framework is used to decompose the image into a continuum of textural scales. A desired texture, within a scale range, is found by fitting a surface to the local maximal responses in the spectral domain. A band above and below the surface, referred to as the \\textit{Texture Stratum}, defines for each pixel the adaptive scale-range of the texture. Based on the decomposition an application is proposed which can attenuate or enhance textures in the image in a very natural and visually convincing manner.

  10. Atomic-scale dynamics of a model glass-forming metallic liquid: Dynamical crossover, dynamical decoupling, and dynamical clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Jaiswal, Abhishek; Egami, Takeshi; Zhang, Yang

    2015-04-01

    The phase behavior of multi-component metallic liquids is exceedingly complex because of the convoluted many-body and many-elemental interactions. Herein, we present systematic studies of the dynamic aspects of such a model ternary metallic liquid Cu40Zr51Al9 using molecular dynamics simulation with embedded atom method. We observed a dynamical crossover from Arrhenius to super-Arrhenius behavior in the transport properties (diffusion coefficient, relaxation times, and shear viscosity) bordered at Tx ~1300K. Unlike in many molecular and macromolecular liquids, this crossover phenomenon occurs in the equilibrium liquid state well above the melting temperature of the system (Tm ~ 900K), and the crossover temperature is roughly twice of the glass-transition temperature (Tg). Below Tx, we found the elemental dynamics decoupled and the Stokes-Einstein relation broke down, indicating the onset of heterogeneous spatially correlated dynamics in the system mediated by dynamic communications among local configurational excitations. To directly characterize and visualize the correlated dynamics, we employed a non-parametric, unsupervised machine learning technique and identified dynamical clusters of atoms with similar atomic mobility. The revealed average dynamical cluster size shows an accelerated increase below Tx and mimics the trend observed in other ensemble averaged quantities that are commonly used to quantify the spatially heterogeneous dynamics such as the non-Gaussian parameter and the four-point correlation function.

  11. Crystalline silicon solar cells with micro/nano texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrov, Dimitre Z.; Du, Chen-Hsun

    2013-02-01

    Crystalline silicon solar cells with two-scale texture consisting of random upright pyramids and surface nanotextured layer directly onto the pyramids are prepared and reflectance properties and I-V characteristics measured. Random pyramids texture is produced by etching in an alkaline solution. On top of the pyramids texture, a nanotexture is developed using an electroless oxidation/etching process. Solar cells with two-scale surface texturization are prepared following the standard screen-printing technology sequence. The micro/nano surface is found to lower considerably the light reflectance of silicon. The short wavelengths spectral response (blue response) improvement is observed in micro/nano textured solar cells compared to standard upright pyramids textured cells. An efficiency of 17.5% is measured for the best micro/nano textured c-Si solar cell. The efficiency improvement is found to be due to the gain in both Jsc and Voc.

  12. The Dynamics of Cuspate Spits at Geological Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchette, F.; Manna, M.; Camps, N.; Mohammadi, B.

    2016-12-01

    Zenkovitch (1959) first described cuspate spits as a limited category of shore-connected features that result from symmetrical wind/ wave forcings and/ or peculiar initial shore configuration. Later on, Asthon et al. (2001) and Asthon and Murray (2006) proned that cuspate spits, flying spits and other shoreline features derive from instabilities inherent in the relationship between alongshore sediment transport and local shoreline orientation. They exhibited a comprehensive weakly non-linear theory for cuspate and spit dynamics, and gave a striking numerical solutions to the problem. Recently, Bouchette et al. (2014) provided an alternative explicit formulation for the growth of cuspate spits through time. From this last formulation, it was demonstrated that there exists an exact relationship between the amplitude, the length of a cuspate on one side, and the longshore diffusivity and the time on the other side. In the present work, we explore how this relationship can be used to predict various coastal characteristics at decadal/geological time scales as soon as a cuspate develops in the area concerned. This formulation can be considered as a method for the datation of a cuspate spit. Alternatively, it can allow to estimate the mean fluxes of sediment trapped along the shore. The model is validated thanks to a comparison with observed cuspates. The cuspate law suggests that the length of the cuspate and its amplitude may be related through a power law (to the power of three). We demonstrate that this power law is not a simple mathematical result but does exist in the nature. The occurrence of a power law suggests also that more underlying physics remain to be analysed in the process of nucleation and growth of cuspate spits.Asthon, A., Murray, B., 2006. High-angle wave instability and emergent shoreline shapes: 1) modeling of sand waves, flying spits and capes. Journal of Geophysical Research, 111, F04011. Asthon, A., Murray, B., Arnault, O., 2001. Formation of

  13. Dynamic Scaling of Lipofuscin Deposition in Aging Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Family, Fereydoon; Mazzitello, K. I.; Arizmendi, C. M.; Grossniklaus, H. E.

    2011-07-01

    Lipofuscin is a membrane-bound cellular waste that can be neither degraded nor ejected from the cell but can only be diluted through cell division and subsequent growth. The fate of postmitotic (non-dividing) cells such as neurons, cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle fibers, and retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE) is to accumulate lipofuscin, which as an "aging pigment" has been considered a reliable biomarker for the age of cells. Environmental stress can accelerate the accumulation of lipofuscin. For example, accumulation in brain cells appears to be an important issue connected with heavy consumption of alcohol. Lipofuscin is made of free-radical-damaged protein and fat, whose abnormal accumulation is related to a range of disorders including Type IV mucolipidosis (ML4), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) which is the leading cause of blindness beyond the age of 50 years. The study of lipofuscin formation and growth is important, because of their association with cellular aging. We introduce a model of non-equilibrium cluster growth and aggregation that we have developed for studying the formation and growth of lipofuscin. As an example of lipofuscin deposit in a given kind of postmitotic cell, we study the kinetics of lipofuscin growth in a RPE cell. Our results agree with a linear growth of the number of lipofuscin granules with age. We apply the dynamic scaling approach to our model and find excellent data collapse for the cluster size distribution. An unusual feature of our model is that while small particles are removed from the cell the larger ones become fixed and grow by aggregation.

  14. Dynamics of Single Flux Rope in the Reconnection Scaling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Intrator, T.; Weber, T.; Swan, H.; Dunn, J. P.; Gao, K.; Chapdelaine, L.

    2013-12-01

    A magnetic flux tube threaded by current is a flux rope with helically twisted field lines. In the Reconnection Scaling Experiment (RSX) we use a plasma gun to generate a single flux rope with a choice of axial boundary conditions. If this flux rope is driven hard enough, i.e., when J●B /B2 is larger than the kink instability threshold, we measure a helically distorted kinked structure. Rather than exploding in an Alfvén time, this kink appears to saturate to a steady amplitude, helical, gyrating flux rope, which persists as long as the plasma gun sources the current. To understand it, we have experimentally measured three-dimensional (3D) profiles of various quantities of this flux rope. These quantities include magnetic field B, plasma density n and potential φ, ion flow velocity vi, so that current density J, electron flow velocity ve and electron pressure Pe can also be derived. Consequently we can analyze the single flux rope dynamics systematically in 3D. Besides gyrating (writhe), we also find the flux rope has a spin (twist) center, around which the J×B - ▽Pe ≠ 0 suggesting that there should be other forces for the radial balance. We also find that there is a reverse current moving around with the flux rope at some locations, i.e. there are local induced currents that are not at all apparent from measurements outside the 3D volume. Work supported by LANL-DOE, DOE Fusion Energy Sciences DE-AC52-06NA25396, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I Basic, CMSO, SULI, NUF.

  15. Texture of fermion mass matrices in partially unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, B. |; Nandi, S. |

    1996-12-31

    We investigate the texture of fermion mass matrices in theories with partial unification (for example, SU(2){sub L} {times} SU(2){sub R} {times} SU(4){sub c}) at a scale of {approximately} 10{sup 12} GeV. Starting with the low energy values of the masses and the mixing angles, we find only two viable textures with at most four texture zeros. One of these corresponds to a somewhat modified Fritzsch textures. A theoretical derivation of these textures leads to new interesting relations among the masses and the mixing angles. 13 refs.

  16. 1st- and 2nd-order motion and texture resolution in central and peripheral vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, J. A.; Sperling, G.

    1995-01-01

    STIMULI. The 1st-order stimuli are moving sine gratings. The 2nd-order stimuli are fields of static visual texture, whose contrasts are modulated by moving sine gratings. Neither the spatial slant (orientation) nor the direction of motion of these 2nd-order (microbalanced) stimuli can be detected by a Fourier analysis; they are invisible to Reichardt and motion-energy detectors. METHOD. For these dynamic stimuli, when presented both centrally and in an annular window extending from 8 to 10 deg in eccentricity, we measured the highest spatial frequency for which discrimination between +/- 45 deg texture slants and discrimination between opposite directions of motion were each possible. RESULTS. For sufficiently low spatial frequencies, slant and direction can be discriminated in both central and peripheral vision, for both 1st- and for 2nd-order stimuli. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, at both retinal locations, slant discrimination is possible at higher spatial frequencies than direction discrimination. For both 1st- and 2nd-order stimuli, motion resolution decreases 2-3 times more rapidly with eccentricity than does texture resolution. CONCLUSIONS. (1) 1st- and 2nd-order motion scale similarly with eccentricity. (2) 1st- and 2nd-order texture scale similarly with eccentricity. (3) The central/peripheral resolution fall-off is 2-3 times greater for motion than for texture.

  17. Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System for Large-scale HSCB Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-29

    Intelligent Automation Incorporated Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining...Page | 2 Intelligent Automation Incorporated Monthly Report No. 5 Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System Large-Scale HSCB...System for Large-scale HSCB Data Monthly Report No. 5 Reporting Period: July 20, 2016 – Aug 19, 2016 Contract No. N00014-16-P-3014

  18. Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System for Large-scale HSCB Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-27

    Warehousing and Mining System for Large-scale HSCB Data Progress Report No. 2 Reporting Period: April 22, 2016 – May 21, 2016 Contract No. N00014...www.i-a-i.com Page | 2 Progress Report No. 2 Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System Large-Scale HSCB Data ...Page | 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Intelligent Automation Incorporated Enhancements for a Dynamic Data

  19. Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System for Large-Scale HSCB Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-21

    Intelligent Automation Incorporated Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining ...Page | 2 Intelligent Automation Incorporated Progress Report No. 1 Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System Large-Scale...System for Large-scale HSCB Data Progress Report No. 1 Reporting Period: March 22, 2016 – April 21, 2016 Contract No. N00014-16-P-3014

  20. Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System for Large-scale HSCB Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-20

    Intelligent Automation Incorporated Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining ...Page | 2 Intelligent Automation Incorporated Progress Report No. 3 Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System Large-Scale...System for Large-scale HSCB Data Progress Report No. 3 Reporting Period: May 21, 2016 – June 20, 2016 Contract No. N00014-16-P-3014

  1. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations and approximate dynamic programming on time scales.

    PubMed

    Seiffertt, John; Sanyal, Suman; Wunsch, Donald C

    2008-08-01

    The time scales calculus is a key emerging area of mathematics due to its potential use in a wide variety of multidisciplinary applications. We extend this calculus to approximate dynamic programming (ADP). The core backward induction algorithm of dynamic programming is extended from its traditional discrete case to all isolated time scales. Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equations, the solution of which is the fundamental problem in the field of dynamic programming, are motivated and proven on time scales. By drawing together the calculus of time scales and the applied area of stochastic control via ADP, we have connected two major fields of research.

  2. Influences of large height differences and overhangs on the dynamic scaling behavior of discrete models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Zhi-Peng; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Yi-Li; Wu, Ling; Tang, Gang

    2017-04-01

    In order to investigate the influences of large height differences and overhangs on the dynamic scaling behavior of discrete models, meanwhile reducing the finite-size effects, the Etching model is modified to reduce large height differences, and the overhangs in Ballistic Deposition surfaces are removed under certain principles. Numerical simulations are carried out for the modified models, and the results show that the modified surfaces lead to good dynamic scaling behavior even on small system length scales. The values of the dynamic scaling exponents are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions of the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  3. Curvature perturbation and domain wall formation with pseudo scaling scalar dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ema, Yohei; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takimoto, Masahiro E-mail: kazunori@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2016-02-01

    Cosmological dynamics of scalar field with a monomial potential φ{sup n} with a general background equation of state is revisited. It is known that if n is smaller than a critical value, the scalar field exhibits a coherent oscillation and if n is larger it obeys a scaling solution without oscillation. We study in detail the case where n is equal to the critical value, and find a peculiar scalar dynamics which is neither oscillating nor scaling solution, and we call it a pseudo scaling solution. We also discuss cosmological implications of a pseudo scaling scalar dynamics, such as the curvature perturbation and the domain wall problem.

  4. Texture and electrical dynamics of micrometer and submicrometer bridges in misaligned Tl2 Ba2 CaCu2 O8 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbel, J.; Mans, M.; Schneidewind, H.; Kaiser, U.; Biskupek, J.; Schmidl, F.; Seidel, P.

    2004-09-01

    Different thin Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 layers were grown on 20° vicinal cut LaAlO3 substrates by means of a two-step process. SEM pictures showed that thin film layers with a thickness smaller than 150nm grow completely in the 20° misalignment given by the substrate but they also show few holes in the films. Thicker layers showed areas of c -axis growth beneath the expected misaligned texture whereas the allotment and numbers of c -axis islands depend on the layer thickness. TEM investigations in the selected area of misaligned growth showed a clear epitaxial relationship between the substrate and the film but they also revealed a domain like growth of the layers with plain Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 grains and stacking faults. Furthermore, the films had a rather high surface roughness depending on the layer thickness. Thin films with a thickness of 120nm were used to pattern micro- and sub-micrometer bridges. Because of the misaligned growth and the high anisotropy of the Tl2Ba2CaCu2O8 the bridges formed serial arrays of intrinsic Josephson junctions. Electrical measurements on these bridges revealed very complex dynamics within such devices. The current-voltage characteristics showed the well known branch structure of intrinsic Josephson junction arrays but with a statistical distribution of the transition currents from measurement to measurement. The temperature dependencies of the smallest critical currents generally deviated from the Ambegaokar-Baratoff theory. There was no complete suppression of the super current in an effective B-field up to 4.2T . The analysis of the current-voltage characteristics indicated a collective transition switching especially in the first few transitions. Those could be split up by the application of a magnetic field and by the irradiation of mm-waves but not by an increment of the operation temperature. Furthermore, distinct two level fluctuations and chaotic like behavior were observed.

  5. Scale-Free Neural and Physiological Dynamics in Naturalistic Stimuli Processing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Amy; Maniscalco, Brian; He, Biyu J

    2016-01-01

    Neural activity recorded at multiple spatiotemporal scales is dominated by arrhythmic fluctuations without a characteristic temporal periodicity. Such activity often exhibits a 1/f-type power spectrum, in which power falls off with increasing frequency following a power-law function: [Formula: see text], which is indicative of scale-free dynamics. Two extensively studied forms of scale-free neural dynamics in the human brain are slow cortical potentials (SCPs)-the low-frequency (<5 Hz) component of brain field potentials-and the amplitude fluctuations of α oscillations, both of which have been shown to carry important functional roles. In addition, scale-free dynamics characterize normal human physiology such as heartbeat dynamics. However, the exact relationships among these scale-free neural and physiological dynamics remain unclear. We recorded simultaneous magnetoencephalography and electrocardiography in healthy subjects in the resting state and while performing a discrimination task on scale-free dynamical auditory stimuli that followed different scale-free statistics. We observed that long-range temporal correlation (captured by the power-law exponent β) in SCPs positively correlated with that of heartbeat dynamics across time within an individual and negatively correlated with that of α-amplitude fluctuations across individuals. In addition, across individuals, long-range temporal correlation of both SCP and α-oscillation amplitude predicted subjects' discrimination performance in the auditory task, albeit through antagonistic relationships. These findings reveal interrelations among different scale-free neural and physiological dynamics and initial evidence for the involvement of scale-free neural dynamics in the processing of natural stimuli, which often exhibit scale-free dynamics.

  6. Scale-Free Neural and Physiological Dynamics in Naturalistic Stimuli Processing

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural activity recorded at multiple spatiotemporal scales is dominated by arrhythmic fluctuations without a characteristic temporal periodicity. Such activity often exhibits a 1/f-type power spectrum, in which power falls off with increasing frequency following a power-law function: P(f)∝1/fβ, which is indicative of scale-free dynamics. Two extensively studied forms of scale-free neural dynamics in the human brain are slow cortical potentials (SCPs)—the low-frequency (<5 Hz) component of brain field potentials—and the amplitude fluctuations of α oscillations, both of which have been shown to carry important functional roles. In addition, scale-free dynamics characterize normal human physiology such as heartbeat dynamics. However, the exact relationships among these scale-free neural and physiological dynamics remain unclear. We recorded simultaneous magnetoencephalography and electrocardiography in healthy subjects in the resting state and while performing a discrimination task on scale-free dynamical auditory stimuli that followed different scale-free statistics. We observed that long-range temporal correlation (captured by the power-law exponent β) in SCPs positively correlated with that of heartbeat dynamics across time within an individual and negatively correlated with that of α-amplitude fluctuations across individuals. In addition, across individuals, long-range temporal correlation of both SCP and α-oscillation amplitude predicted subjects’ discrimination performance in the auditory task, albeit through antagonistic relationships. These findings reveal interrelations among different scale-free neural and physiological dynamics and initial evidence for the involvement of scale-free neural dynamics in the processing of natural stimuli, which often exhibit scale-free dynamics. PMID:27822495

  7. Some aspects of control of a large-scale dynamic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aoki, M.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques of predicting and/or controlling the dynamic behavior of large scale systems are discussed in terms of decentralized decision making. Topics discussed include: (1) control of large scale systems by dynamic team with delayed information sharing; (2) dynamic resource allocation problems by a team (hierarchical structure with a coordinator); and (3) some problems related to the construction of a model of reduced dimension.

  8. Sparse Texture Active Contour

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yi; Bouix, Sylvain; Shenton, Martha; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    In image segmentation, we are often interested in using certain quantities to characterize the object, and perform the classification based on them: mean intensity, gradient magnitude, responses to certain predefined filters, etc. Unfortunately, in many cases such quantities are not adequate to model complex textured objects. Along a different line of research, the sparse characteristic of natural signals has been recognized and studied in recent years. Therefore, how such sparsity can be utilized, in a non-parametric way, to model the object texture and assist the textural image segmentation process is studied in this work, and a segmentation scheme based on the sparse representation of the texture information is proposed. More explicitly, the texture is encoded by the dictionaries constructed from the user initialization. Then, an active contour is evolved to optimize the fidelity of the representation provided by the dictionary of the target. In doing so, not only a non-parametric texture modeling technique is provided, but also the sparsity of the representation guarantees the computation efficiency. The experiments are carried out on the publicly available image data sets which contain a large variety of texture images, to analyze the user interaction, performance statistics, and to highlight the algorithm’s capability of robustly extracting textured regions from an image. PMID:23799695

  9. Measuring Meat Texture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to the complex and highly structured nature of muscle tissue, meat is an inherently tough and widely variable food product. In order to better predict and control meat tenderness issues, accurate measures of meat texture are needed. Unfortunately, the multifaceted characteristic of meat texture ...

  10. Texture in Biomedical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Maria

    An overview of texture analysis methods is given and the merits of each method for biomedical applications are discussed. Methods discussed include Markov random fields, Gibbs distributions, co-occurrence matrices, Gabor functions and wavelets, Karhunen-Loève basis images, and local symmetry and orientation from the monogenic signal. Some example applications of texture to medical image processing are reviewed.

  11. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  12. Advecting Procedural Textures for 2D Flow Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Pang, Alex; Moran, Pat (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of specially generated 3D procedural textures for visualizing steady state 2D flow fields. We use the flow field to advect and animate the texture over time. However, using standard texture advection techniques and arbitrary textures will introduce some undesirable effects such as: (a) expanding texture from a critical source point, (b) streaking pattern from the boundary of the flowfield, (c) crowding of advected textures near an attracting spiral or sink, and (d) absent or lack of textures in some regions of the flow. This paper proposes a number of strategies to solve these problems. We demonstrate how the technique works using both synthetic data and computational fluid dynamics data.

  13. Capillary rise on legs of a small animal and on artificially textured surfaces mimicking them.

    PubMed

    Tani, Marie; Ishii, Daisuke; Ito, Shuto; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Okumura, Ko

    2014-01-01

    The wharf roach Ligia exotica is a small animal that lives by the sea and absorbs water from the sea through its legs by virtue of a remarkable array of small blades of micron scale. We find that the imbibition dynamics on the legs is rather complex on a microscopic scale, but on a macroscopic scale the imbibition length seems to simply scale linearly with elapsed time. This unusual dynamics of imbibition, which usually slows down with time, is advantageous for long-distance water transport and results from repetition of unit dynamics. Inspired by the remarkable features, we study artificially textured surfaces mimicking the structure on the legs of the animal. Unlike the case of the wharf roach, the linear dynamics were not reproduced on the artificial surfaces, which may result from more subtle features on the real legs that are not faithfully reflected on the artificial surfaces. Instead, the nonlinear dynamics revealed that hybrid structures on the artificial surfaces speed up the water transport compared with non-hybrid ones. In addition, the dynamics on the artificial surfaces turn out to be well described by a composite theory developed here, with the theory giving useful guiding principles for designing hybrid textured surfaces for rapid imbibition and elucidating physical advantages of the microscopic design on the legs.

  14. Dynamic behavior of the water droplet impact on a textured hydrophobic/superhydrophobic surface: the effect of the remaining liquid film arising on the pillars' tops on the contact time.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiying; Ma, Xuehu; Lan, Zhong

    2010-04-06

    We have fabricated a series of textured silicon surfaces decorated by square arrays of pillars whose radius and pitch can be adjusted independently. These surfaces possessed a hydrophobic/superhydrophobic property after silanization. The dynamic behavior of water droplets impacting these structured surfaces was examined using a high-speed camera. Experimental results validated that the remaining liquid film on the pillars' tops gave rise to a wet surface instead of a dry surface as the water droplet began to recede away from the textured surfaces. Also, experimental results demonstrated that the difference in the contact time was subjected to the solid fraction referred to as the ratio of the actual area contacting with the liquid to its projected area on the textured surface. Because the mechanism by which the residual liquid film emerges on the pillars' tops can essentially be ascribed to the pinch-off of the liquid threads, we further addressed the changes in the contact time in terms of the characteristic time of pinch-off of an imaginary liquid cylinder whose radius is related to the solid fraction and the maximum contact area. The match of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results substantiates the assumption aforementioned.

  15. Pipe network model for scaling of dynamic interfaces in porous media

    PubMed

    Lam; Horvath

    2000-08-07

    We present a numerical study on the dynamics of imbibition fronts in porous media using a pipe network model. This model quantitatively reproduces the anomalous scaling behavior found in imbibition experiments [Phys. Rev. E 52, 5166 (1995)]. Using simple scaling arguments, we derive a new identity among the scaling exponents in agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Texture perception through direct and indirect touch: An analysis of perceptual space for tactile textures in two modes of exploration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, T.; Bensamaïa, S. J.; Craig, J. C.; Hsiao, S. S.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable information about the texture of objects can be perceived remotely through a probe. It is not clear, however, how texture perception with a probe compares with texture perception with the bare finger. Here we investigate the perception of a variety of textured surfaces encountered daily (e.g., corduroy, paper, and rubber) using the two scanning modes—direct touch through the finger and indirect touch through a probe held in the hand—in two tasks. In the first task, subjects rated the overall pair-wise dissimilarity of the textures. In the second task, subjects rated each texture along three continua, namely, perceived roughness, hardness, and stickiness of the surfaces, shown previously as the primary dimensions of texture perception in direct touch. From the dissimilarity judgment experiment, we found that the texture percept is similar though not identical in the two scanning modes. From the adjective rating experiments, we found that while roughness ratings are similar, hardness and stickiness ratings tend to differ between scanning conditions. These differences between the two modes of scanning are apparent in perceptual space for tactile textures based on multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis. Finally, we demonstrate that three physical quantities, vibratory power, compliance, and friction carry roughness, hardness, and stickiness information, predicting perceived dissimilarity of texture pairs with indirect touch. Given that different types of texture information are processed by separate groups of neurons across direct and indirect touch, we propose that the neural mechanisms underlying texture perception differ between scanning modes. PMID:17558923

  17. Texture analysis of clinical radiographs using radon transform on a local scale for differentiation between post-menopausal women with and without hip fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Holger F.; Körner, Markus; Baumert, Bernhard; Linsenmaier, Ulrich; Reiser, Maximilian

    2011-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a chronic condition characterized by demineralization and destruction of bone tissue. Fractures associated with the disease are becoming an increasingly relevant issue for public health institutions. Prediction of fracture risk is a major focus research and, over the years, has been approched by various methods. Still, bone mineral density (BMD) obtained by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) remains the clinical gold-standard for diagnosis and follow-up of osteoporosis. However, DXA is restricted to specialized diagnostic centers and there exists considerable overlap in BMD results between populations of individuals with and without fractures. Clinically far more available than DXA is conventional x-ray imaging depicting trabecular bone structure in great detail. In this paper, we demonstrate that bone structure depicted by clinical radiographs can be analysed quantitatively by parameters obtained from the Radon Transform (RT). RT is a global analysis-tool for detection of predefined, parameterized patterns, e.g. straight lines or struts, representing suitable approximations of trabecular bone texture. The proposed algorithm differentiates between patients with and without fractures of the hip by application of various texture-metrics based on the Radon-Transform to standard x-ray images of the proximal femur. We consider three different regions-of-interest in the proximal femur (femoral head, neck, and inter-trochanteric area), and conduct an analysis with respect to correct classification of the fracture status. Performance of the novel approach is compared to DXA. We draw the conclusion that performance of RT is comparable to DXA and may become a useful supplement to densitometry for the prediction of fracture risk.

  18. Conceptual design and analysis of a dynamic scale model of the Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. A.; Gronet, M. J.; Tan, M. K.; Thorne, J.

    1994-01-01

    This report documents the conceptual design study performed to evaluate design options for a subscale dynamic test model which could be used to investigate the expected on-orbit structural dynamic characteristics of the Space Station Freedom early build configurations. The baseline option was a 'near-replica' model of the SSF SC-7 pre-integrated truss configuration. The approach used to develop conceptual design options involved three sets of studies: evaluation of the full-scale design and analysis databases, conducting scale factor trade studies, and performing design sensitivity studies. The scale factor trade study was conducted to develop a fundamental understanding of the key scaling parameters that drive design, performance and cost of a SSF dynamic scale model. Four scale model options were estimated: 1/4, 1/5, 1/7, and 1/10 scale. Prototype hardware was fabricated to assess producibility issues. Based on the results of the study, a 1/4-scale size is recommended based on the increased model fidelity associated with a larger scale factor. A design sensitivity study was performed to identify critical hardware component properties that drive dynamic performance. A total of 118 component properties were identified which require high-fidelity replication. Lower fidelity dynamic similarity scaling can be used for non-critical components.

  19. Understanding the Complexity of Temperature Dynamics in Xinjiang, China, from Multitemporal Scale and Spatial Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yaning; Li, Weihong; Liu, Zuhan; Wei, Chunmeng; Tang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Based on the observed data from 51 meteorological stations during the period from 1958 to 2012 in Xinjiang, China, we investigated the complexity of temperature dynamics from the temporal and spatial perspectives by using a comprehensive approach including the correlation dimension (CD), classical statistics, and geostatistics. The main conclusions are as follows (1) The integer CD values indicate that the temperature dynamics are a complex and chaotic system, which is sensitive to the initial conditions. (2) The complexity of temperature dynamics decreases along with the increase of temporal scale. To describe the temperature dynamics, at least 3 independent variables are needed at daily scale, whereas at least 2 independent variables are needed at monthly, seasonal, and annual scales. (3) The spatial patterns of CD values at different temporal scales indicate that the complex temperature dynamics are derived from the complex landform. PMID:23843732

  20. Advances in region-based texture modeling for video compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Bull, David R.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a parametric video compression framework which exploits both texture warping and dynamic texture synthesis. A perspective motion model is employed to warp static textures and a dynamic texture model is used to synthesise time-varying textures. An artefact-based video quality metric (AVM) is proposed which prevents spatial and temporal artefacts and assesses the reconstructed video quality. This is validated using both the VQEG database and subjective assessment, and shows competitive performance on both non-synthetic and synthetic video content. Moreover, a local Rate-Quality Optimisation (RQO) strategy is developed based on AVM in order to make a decision between waveform coding and texture warping/synthesis. The proposed method has been integrated into an H.264 video coding framework with results offering significant bitrate savings for similar visual quality (based on both AVM and subjective scores).

  1. Preattentive texture discrimination with early vision mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Malik, J; Perona, P

    1990-05-01

    We present a model of human preattentive texture perception. This model consists of three stages: (1) convolution of the image with a bank of even-symmetric linear filters followed by half-wave rectification to give a set of responses modeling outputs of V1 simple cells, (2) inhibition, localized in space, within and among the neural-response profiles that results in the suppression of weak responses when there are strong responses at the same or nearby locations, and (3) texture-boundary detection by using wide odd-symmetric mechanisms. Our model can predict the salience of texture boundaries in any arbitrary gray-scale image. A computer implementation of this model has been tested on many of the classic stimuli from psychophysical literature. Quantitative predictions of the degree of discriminability of different texture pairs match well with experimental measurements of discriminability in human observers.

  2. Aesthetics by Numbers: Links between Perceived Texture Qualities and Computed Visual Texture Properties

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Richard H. A. H.; Haak, Koen V.; Thumfart, Stefan; Renken, Remco; Henson, Brian; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Our world is filled with texture. For the human visual system, this is an important source of information for assessing environmental and material properties. Indeed—and presumably for this reason—the human visual system has regions dedicated to processing textures. Despite their abundance and apparent relevance, only recently the relationships between texture features and high-level judgments have captured the interest of mainstream science, despite long-standing indications for such relationships. In this study, we explore such relationships, as these might be used to predict perceived texture qualities. This is relevant, not only from a psychological/neuroscience perspective, but also for more applied fields such as design, architecture, and the visual arts. In two separate experiments, observers judged various qualities of visual textures such as beauty, roughness, naturalness, elegance, and complexity. Based on factor analysis, we find that in both experiments, ~75% of the variability in the judgments could be explained by a two-dimensional space, with axes that are closely aligned to the beauty and roughness judgments. That a two-dimensional judgment space suffices to capture most of the variability in the perceived texture qualities suggests that observers use a relatively limited set of internal scales on which to base various judgments, including aesthetic ones. Finally, for both of these judgments, we determined the relationship with a large number of texture features computed for each of the texture stimuli. We find that the presence of lower spatial frequencies, oblique orientations, higher intensity variation, higher saturation, and redness correlates with higher beauty ratings. Features that captured image intensity and uniformity correlated with roughness ratings. Therefore, a number of computational texture features are predictive of these judgments. This suggests that perceived texture qualities—including the aesthetic appreciation

  3. Aesthetics by Numbers: Links between Perceived Texture Qualities and Computed Visual Texture Properties.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Richard H A H; Haak, Koen V; Thumfart, Stefan; Renken, Remco; Henson, Brian; Cornelissen, Frans W

    2016-01-01

    Our world is filled with texture. For the human visual system, this is an important source of information for assessing environmental and material properties. Indeed-and presumably for this reason-the human visual system has regions dedicated to processing textures. Despite their abundance and apparent relevance, only recently the relationships between texture features and high-level judgments have captured the interest of mainstream science, despite long-standing indications for such relationships. In this study, we explore such relationships, as these might be used to predict perceived texture qualities. This is relevant, not only from a psychological/neuroscience perspective, but also for more applied fields such as design, architecture, and the visual arts. In two separate experiments, observers judged various qualities of visual textures such as beauty, roughness, naturalness, elegance, and complexity. Based on factor analysis, we find that in both experiments, ~75% of the variability in the judgments could be explained by a two-dimensional space, with axes that are closely aligned to the beauty and roughness judgments. That a two-dimensional judgment space suffices to capture most of the variability in the perceived texture qualities suggests that observers use a relatively limited set of internal scales on which to base various judgments, including aesthetic ones. Finally, for both of these judgments, we determined the relationship with a large number of texture features computed for each of the texture stimuli. We find that the presence of lower spatial frequencies, oblique orientations, higher intensity variation, higher saturation, and redness correlates with higher beauty ratings. Features that captured image intensity and uniformity correlated with roughness ratings. Therefore, a number of computational texture features are predictive of these judgments. This suggests that perceived texture qualities-including the aesthetic appreciation-are sufficiently

  4. Scaling of Langevin and molecular dynamics persistence times of nonhomogeneous fluids.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Rivas, Wilmer; Colmenares, Pedro J

    2012-01-01

    The existing solution for the Langevin equation of an anisotropic fluid allowed the evaluation of the position-dependent perpendicular and parallel diffusion coefficients, using molecular dynamics data. However, the time scale of the Langevin dynamics and molecular dynamics are different and an ansatz for the persistence probability relaxation time was needed. Here we show how the solution for the average persistence probability obtained from the backward Smoluchowski-Fokker-Planck equation (SE), associated to the Langevin dynamics, scales with the corresponding molecular dynamics quantity. Our SE perpendicular persistence time is evaluated in terms of simple integrals over the equilibrium local density. When properly scaled by the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, it gives a good match with that obtained from molecular dynamics.

  5. Nonlinear Susceptibility and Dynamical Length Scale of Glassy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, K.; Biroli, G.; Bouchaud, J.-P.; Reichman, D. R.

    2008-02-21

    It is known that spatially heterogeneous dynamical structures are the cause of the drastic slowing down of atomic motion near the glass transition. Whereas tremendous progress has been made towards characterizing such structures by numerical and experimental studies, no microscopic theory has been developed for the multipoint correlation functions that characterize such behavior. We have extended the standard mode-coupling theory to the calculation of such quantities and succeeded in describing the growing dynamical structures.

  6. Local Shape from Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholtz, Ruth Ellen

    Human observers can judge the 3D shape and orientation of a surface from a number of different cues such as motion, binocular stereopsis, and texture. All of these cues are based on the information in two or more perspective views of the same surface in the scene. In structure from motion, the relative motion of the observer and the surface generates different views of the surface. In stereopsis, two eyes or cameras give slightly different views of the surface. One can think of shape from texture in this framework as well. Consider two textured patches of a surface in the scene. Even if the patches have the same texture pattern, in an image they will appear slightly different because of the slightly different orientation that they have with respect to the observer's eye or camera. Thus we effectively get multiple views in a single, monocular image. This framework suggests that we should treat the shape from texture problem as a two stage problem, as one would treat stereopsis or structure from motion: (1) Estimate the "texture distortion" from the image, and (2) Interpret the "texture distortion" to infer the shape and orientation of the surface. Here, measuring the "texture distortion" corresponds to finding the binocular disparity in stereopsis, or computing the optical flow in structure from motion. We assume that the texture has stationary second -order statistics on the surface in the scene. This assumption suggests that one measure the deviation from stationarity in the image, i.e., by estimating the local power spectrum and measuring its distortion from one part of the image to another. We model the texture distortion locally as an affine transformation between neighboring image patches. We demonstrate two related methods for measuring the local texture distortion. In the first of these methods, we use a differential method to find the affine transforms explicitly. The differential method bears strong resemblances to differential techniques for finding

  7. Dynamic DNA methylation controls glutamate receptor trafficking and synaptic scaling.

    PubMed

    Sweatt, J David

    2016-05-01

    Hebbian plasticity, including long-term potentiation and long-term depression, has long been regarded as important for local circuit refinement in the context of memory formation and stabilization. However, circuit development and stabilization additionally relies on non-Hebbian, homeostatic, forms of plasticity such as synaptic scaling. Synaptic scaling is induced by chronic increases or decreases in neuronal activity. Synaptic scaling is associated with cell-wide adjustments in postsynaptic receptor density, and can occur in a multiplicative manner resulting in preservation of relative synaptic strengths across the entire neuron's population of synapses. Both active DNA methylation and demethylation have been validated as crucial regulators of gene transcription during learning, and synaptic scaling is known to be transcriptionally dependent. However, it has been unclear whether homeostatic forms of plasticity such as synaptic scaling are regulated via epigenetic mechanisms. This review describes exciting recent work that has demonstrated a role for active changes in neuronal DNA methylation and demethylation as a controller of synaptic scaling and glutamate receptor trafficking. These findings bring together three major categories of memory-associated mechanisms that were previously largely considered separately: DNA methylation, homeostatic plasticity, and glutamate receptor trafficking. This review describes exciting recent work that has demonstrated a role for active changes in neuronal DNA methylation and demethylation as a controller of synaptic scaling and glutamate receptor trafficking. These findings bring together three major categories of memory-associated mechanisms that were previously considered separately: glutamate receptor trafficking, DNA methylation, and homeostatic plasticity.

  8. Crossover from antipersistent to persistent behavior in time series possessing the generalyzed dynamic scaling law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Morales Matamoros, Oswaldo; Gálvez M., Ernesto; Pérez A., Alfonso

    2004-03-01

    The behavior of crude oil price volatility is analyzed within a conceptual framework of kinetic roughening of growing interfaces. We find that the persistent long-horizon volatilities satisfy the Family-Viscek dynamic scaling ansatz, whereas the mean-reverting in time short horizon volatilities obey the generalized scaling law with continuously varying scaling exponents. Furthermore we find that the crossover from antipersistent to persistent behavior is accompanied by a change in the type of volatility distribution. These phenomena are attributed to the complex avalanche dynamics of crude oil markets and so a similar behavior may be observed in a wide variety of physical systems governed by avalanche dynamics.

  9. QCD dynamics in mesons at soft and hard scales

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.; Souchlas, N. A.; Tandy, P. C.

    2010-07-27

    Using a ladder-rainbow kernel previously established for the soft scale of light quark hadrons, we explore, within a Dyson-Schwinger approach, phenomena that mix soft and hard scales of QCD. The difference between vector and axial vector current correlators is examined to estimate the four quark chiral condensate and the leading distance scale for the onset of non-perturbative phenomena in QCD. The valence quark distributions, in the pion and kaon, defined in deep inelastic scattering, and measured in the Drell Yan process, are investigated with the same ladder-rainbow truncation of the Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations.

  10. Impact of Soil Texture on Soil Ciliate Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, J. F.; Brown, S.; Habtom, E.; Brinson, F.; Epps, M.; Scott, R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water content and connectivity strongly influence microbial activities in soil, controlling access to nutrients and electron acceptors, and mediating interactions between microbes within and between trophic levels. These interactions occur at or below the pore scale, and are influenced by soil texture and structure, which determine the microscale architecture of soil pores. Soil protozoa are relatively understudied, especially given the strong control they exert on bacterial communities through predation. Here, ciliate communities in soils of contrasting textures were investigated. Two ciliate-specific primer sets targeting the 18S rRNA gene were used to amplify DNA extracted from eight soil samples collected from Sumter National Forest in western South Carolina. Primer sets 121F-384F-1147R (semi-nested) and 315F-959R were used to amplify soil ciliate DNA via polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the resulting PCR products were analyzed by gel electrophoresis to obtain quantity and band size. Approximately two hundred ciliate 18S rRNA sequences were obtained were obtained from each of two contrasting soils. Sequences were aligned against the NCBI GenBank database for identification, and the taxonomic classification of best-matched sequences was determined. The ultimate goal of the work is to quantify changes in the ciliate community under short-timescale changes in hydrologic conditions for varying soil textures, elucidating dynamic responses to desiccation stress in major soil ciliate taxa.

  11. Discrete scale invariant quantum dynamics and universal quantum beats in Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, J.; Jiang, S. J.; Zhou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We study the signature of classical scale invariance in the far-from-equilibrium quantum dynamics of two-dimensional Bose gases. We show that the density profile displays a scale invariant logarithmic singularity near the center. In addition, the density oscillates due to quantum beats with universal structures. Namely, the frequencies of the beats can be connected with one another by a universal discrete scale transformation induced by the classical scale invariance. The experimental applicability of these results is then discussed.

  12. Throughput scaling by spatial beam shaping and dynamic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumkar, M.; Kaiser, M.; Kleiner, J.; Flamm, D.; Grossmann, D.; Bergner, K.; Zimmermann, F.; Nolte, S.

    2017-02-01

    With availability of high power ultra short pulsed lasers, one prerequisite towards throughput scaling demanded for industrial ultrafast laser processing was recently achieved. We will present different scaling approaches for ultrafast machining, including raster and vector based concepts. The main attention is on beam shaping for enlarged, tailored processed volume per pulse. Some aspects on vector based machining using beam shaping are discussed. With engraving of steel and full thickness modification of transparent materials, two different approaches for throughput scaling by confined interaction volume, avoiding detrimental heat accumulation, are exemplified. In Contrast, welding of transparent materials based on nonlinear absorption benefits from ultra short pulse processing in heat accumulation regime. Results on in-situ stress birefringence microscopy demonstrate the complex interplay of processing parameters on heat accumulation. With respect to process development, the potential of in-in-situ diagnostics, extended to high power ultrafast lasers and diagnostics allowing for multi-scale resolution in space and time is addressed.

  13. Large-scale analysis of the dynamics of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tobi, Dror

    2013-11-01

    Protein enzymes enable the cell to execute chemical reactions in short time by accelerating the rate of the reactions in a selective manner. The motions or dynamics of the enzymes are essential for their function. Comparison of the dynamics of a set of 1247 nonhomologous enzymes was performed. For each enzyme, the slowest modes of motion are calculated using the Gaussian network model (GNM) and they are globally aligned. Alignment is done using the dynamic programming algorithm of Needleman and Wunsch, commonly used for sequence alignment. Only 96 pairs of proteins were identified to have three similar GNM slow modes with 63 of them having a similar structure. The most frequent slowest mode of motion describes a two domains anticorrelated motion that characterizes at least 23% of the enzymes. Therefore, dynamics uniqueness cannot be accounted for by the slowest mode itself but rather by the combination of several slow modes. Different quaternary structure packing can restrain the motion of enzyme subunits differently and may serve as another mechanism that increases the dynamics uniqueness. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Scales of water retention dynamics observed in eroded Luvisols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, Horst H.; Herbrich, Marcus

    2017-04-01

    Soil pore structure is known to change dynamically due to swelling and shrinkage, wetting and drying or tillage operations. For erosion-affected soils with truncated profiles and due to soil management changes, the water retention dynamics could be even more complex. The objective was to separate shorter-term hysteretic from longer-term seasonal dynamics in field-measured water retention data of eroded Luvisols. Tensiometers and TDR sensors were installed in 10, 30, and 50 cm depths of six lysimeter soil monoliths from two field sites. The water content and suction data of three years (2012-2014) allowed identifying drying and wetting periods for which separate parameters of the van Genuchten (VG) retention function were fitted. The water retention curves of the initial or main drying in spring were generally steeper than those obtained in the lab. During intra-seasonal wet/dry cycles, steepness increased and the saturated VG parameter successively decreased; these data indicated a limitation in re-wetting with dry/wet cycles. The water retention of an annual maximum drying curve increased in the three years with the pH-values due to changes in the soil management. When dealing with soils of cultivated arable landscapes, water flow modelling should consider management-induced gradual changes in hydraulic properties in addition to hysteresis and seasonal dynamics. The disentangling of dry/wet cycles from highly-resolved time series' may help identifying processes responsible for retention dynamics.

  15. Dynamic DNA Methylation Controls Glutamate Receptor Trafficking and Synaptic Scaling

    PubMed Central

    Sweatt, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Hebbian plasticity, including LTP and LTD, has long been regarded as important for local circuit refinement in the context of memory formation and stabilization. However, circuit development and stabilization additionally relies on non-Hebbian, homoeostatic, forms of plasticity such as synaptic scaling. Synaptic scaling is induced by chronic increases or decreases in neuronal activity. Synaptic scaling is associated with cell-wide adjustments in postsynaptic receptor density, and can occur in a multiplicative manner resulting in preservation of relative synaptic strengths across the entire neuron's population of synapses. Both active DNA methylation and de-methylation have been validated as crucial regulators of gene transcription during learning, and synaptic scaling is known to be transcriptionally dependent. However, it has been unclear whether homeostatic forms of plasticity such as synaptic scaling are regulated via epigenetic mechanisms. This review describes exciting recent work that has demonstrated a role for active changes in neuronal DNA methylation and demethylation as a controller of synaptic scaling and glutamate receptor trafficking. These findings bring together three major categories of memory-associated mechanisms that were previously largely considered separately: DNA methylation, homeostatic plasticity, and glutamate receptor trafficking. PMID:26849493

  16. The role of large-scale, extratropical dynamics in climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, T.G.

    1994-02-01

    The climate modeling community has focused recently on improving our understanding of certain processes, such as cloud feedbacks and ocean circulation, that are deemed critical to climate-change prediction. Although attention to such processes is warranted, emphasis on these areas has diminished a general appreciation of the role played by the large-scale dynamics of the extratropical atmosphere. Lack of interest in extratropical dynamics may reflect the assumption that these dynamical processes are a non-problem as far as climate modeling is concerned, since general circulation models (GCMs) calculate motions on this scale from first principles. Nevertheless, serious shortcomings in our ability to understand and simulate large-scale dynamics exist. Partly due to a paucity of standard GCM diagnostic calculations of large-scale motions and their transports of heat, momentum, potential vorticity, and moisture, a comprehensive understanding of the role of large-scale dynamics in GCM climate simulations has not been developed. Uncertainties remain in our understanding and simulation of large-scale extratropical dynamics and their interaction with other climatic processes, such as cloud feedbacks, large-scale ocean circulation, moist convection, air-sea interaction and land-surface processes. To address some of these issues, the 17th Stanstead Seminar was convened at Bishop`s University in Lennoxville, Quebec. The purpose of the Seminar was to promote discussion of the role of large-scale extratropical dynamics in global climate change. Abstracts of the talks are included in this volume. On the basis of these talks, several key issues emerged concerning large-scale extratropical dynamics and their climatic role. Individual records are indexed separately for the database.

  17. Renormalization of Collective Modes in Large-Scale Neural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moirogiannis, Dimitrios; Piro, Oreste; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2017-03-01

    The bulk of studies of coupled oscillators use, as is appropriate in Physics, a global coupling constant controlling all individual interactions. However, because as the coupling is increased, the number of relevant degrees of freedom also increases, this setting conflates the strength of the coupling with the effective dimensionality of the resulting dynamics. We propose a coupling more appropriate to neural circuitry, where synaptic strengths are under biological, activity-dependent control and where the coupling strength and the dimensionality can be controlled separately. Here we study a set of N→ ∞ strongly- and nonsymmetrically-coupled, dissipative, powered, rotational dynamical systems, and derive the equations of motion of the reduced system for dimensions 2 and 4. Our setting highlights the statistical structure of the eigenvectors of the connectivity matrix as the fundamental determinant of collective behavior, inheriting from this structure symmetries and singularities absent from the original microscopic dynamics.

  18. Renormalization of Collective Modes in Large-Scale Neural Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moirogiannis, Dimitrios; Piro, Oreste; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2017-05-01

    The bulk of studies of coupled oscillators use, as is appropriate in Physics, a global coupling constant controlling all individual interactions. However, because as the coupling is increased, the number of relevant degrees of freedom also increases, this setting conflates the strength of the coupling with the effective dimensionality of the resulting dynamics. We propose a coupling more appropriate to neural circuitry, where synaptic strengths are under biological, activity-dependent control and where the coupling strength and the dimensionality can be controlled separately. Here we study a set of N→ ∞ strongly- and nonsymmetrically-coupled, dissipative, powered, rotational dynamical systems, and derive the equations of motion of the reduced system for dimensions 2 and 4. Our setting highlights the statistical structure of the eigenvectors of the connectivity matrix as the fundamental determinant of collective behavior, inheriting from this structure symmetries and singularities absent from the original microscopic dynamics.

  19. Multiple-Scale Asymptotics for Oceanic Fluid Dynamics: Coupled Planetary- and Quasi-Geostrophic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, Ian; Julien, Keith; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2010-11-01

    The planetary geostrophic (PG) equations for large-scale oceanic flow are linked to the quasigeostrophic (QG) equations for mesoscale flow in a multiple-scales asymptotic expansion. The model describes the coupling of planetary-scale and mesoscale dynamics: eddy kinetic energy is generated by baroclinic instability of the planetary flow, and the resulting eddy buoyancy fluxes feed back on the planetary flow. Anisotropy of the planetary flow is seen to play a key role in allowing the two-way coupling. The resulting equations are amenable to theoretical and computational investigation of the interaction of mesoscale and planetary scale dynamics.

  20. Development of low friction snake-inspired deterministic textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuervo, P.; López, D. A.; Cano, J. P.; Sánchez, J. C.; Rudas, S.; Estupiñán, H.; Toro, A.; Abdel-Aal, H. A.

    2016-06-01

    The use of surface texturization to reduce friction in sliding interfaces has proved successful in some tribological applications. However, it is still difficult to achieve robust surface texturing with controlled designer-functionalities. This is because the current existing gap between enabling texturization technologies and surface design paradigms. Surface engineering, however, is advanced in natural surface constructs especially within legless reptiles. Many intriguing features facilitate the tribology of such animals so that it is feasible to discover the essence of their surface construction. In this work, we report on the tribological behavior of a novel class of surfaces of which the spatial dimensions of the textural patterns originate from micro-scale features present within the ventral scales of pre-selected snake species. Mask lithography was used to produce implement elliptical texturizing patterns on the surface of titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) pins. To study the tribological behavior of the texturized pins, pin-on-disc tests were carried out with the pins sliding against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene discs with no lubrication. For comparison, two non-texturized samples were also tested under the same conditions. The results show the feasibility of the texturization technique based on the coefficient of friction of the textured surfaces to be consistently lower than that of the non-texturized samples.

  1. A Variable Order Fractional Differential-Based Texture Enhancement Algorithm with Application in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Vegh, Viktor; Liu, Fawang; Turner, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Texture enhancement is one of the most important techniques in digital image processing and plays an essential role in medical imaging since textures discriminate information. Most image texture enhancement techniques use classical integral order differential mask operators or fractional differential mask operators using fixed fractional order. These masks can produce excessive enhancement of low spatial frequency content, insufficient enhancement of large spatial frequency content, and retention of high spatial frequency noise. To improve upon existing approaches of texture enhancement, we derive an improved Variable Order Fractional Centered Difference (VOFCD) scheme which dynamically adjusts the fractional differential order instead of fixing it. The new VOFCD technique is based on the second order Riesz fractional differential operator using a Lagrange 3-point interpolation formula, for both grey scale and colour image enhancement. We then use this method to enhance photographs and a set of medical images related to patients with stroke and Parkinson's disease. The experiments show that our improved fractional differential mask has a higher signal to noise ratio value than the other fractional differential mask operators. Based on the corresponding quantitative analysis we conclude that the new method offers a superior texture enhancement over existing methods.

  2. A Variable Order Fractional Differential-Based Texture Enhancement Algorithm with Application in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiang; Vegh, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Texture enhancement is one of the most important techniques in digital image processing and plays an essential role in medical imaging since textures discriminate information. Most image texture enhancement techniques use classical integral order differential mask operators or fractional differential mask operators using fixed fractional order. These masks can produce excessive enhancement of low spatial frequency content, insufficient enhancement of large spatial frequency content, and retention of high spatial frequency noise. To improve upon existing approaches of texture enhancement, we derive an improved Variable Order Fractional Centered Difference (VOFCD) scheme which dynamically adjusts the fractional differential order instead of fixing it. The new VOFCD technique is based on the second order Riesz fractional differential operator using a Lagrange 3-point interpolation formula, for both grey scale and colour image enhancement. We then use this method to enhance photographs and a set of medical images related to patients with stroke and Parkinson’s disease. The experiments show that our improved fractional differential mask has a higher signal to noise ratio value than the other fractional differential mask operators. Based on the corresponding quantitative analysis we conclude that the new method offers a superior texture enhancement over existing methods. PMID:26186221

  3. Particle-scale modelling of financial price dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, David

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes a particle-based computational framework for modeling of financial price dynamics, which is an extension of the recent empirical work of Financial Brownian Particle (FBP), and discretizes and solves the Langevin equation that is the continuum representation of a financial market. The framework enables us to simulate the limit order book of the USD/JPY exchange rates. The research yields results that are in good agreement with the published empirical results. Our framework of modelling financial prices is of multidisciplinary nature, and can bridge the fields of empirical studies of financial order books, particle dynamics simulation, and modelling of financial market.

  4. Textured catalysts and methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong; Zacher, Alan H.

    2007-03-06

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  5. Revealing sub-μm and μm-scale textures in H2O ice at megabar pressures by time-domain Brillouin scattering

    PubMed Central

    Nikitin, Sergey M.; Chigarev, Nikolay; Tournat, Vincent; Bulou, Alain; Gasteau, Damien; Castagnede, Bernard; Zerr, Andreas; Gusev, Vitalyi E.

    2015-01-01

    The time-domain Brillouin scattering technique, also known as picosecond ultrasonic interferometry, allows monitoring of the propagation of coherent acoustic pulses, having lengths ranging from nanometres to fractions of a micrometre, in samples with dimension of less than a micrometre to tens of micrometres. In this study, we applied this technique to depth-profiling of a polycrystalline aggregate of ice compressed in a diamond anvil cell to megabar pressures. The method allowed examination of the characteristic dimensions of ice texturing in the direction normal to the diamond anvil surfaces with sub-micrometre spatial resolution via time-resolved measurements of the propagation velocity of the acoustic pulses travelling in the compressed sample. The achieved imaging of ice in depth and in one of the lateral directions indicates the feasibility of three-dimensional imaging and quantitative characterisation of the acoustical, optical and acousto-optical properties of transparent polycrystalline aggregates in a diamond anvil cell with tens of nanometres in-depth resolution and a lateral spatial resolution controlled by pump laser pulses focusing, which could approach hundreds of nanometres. PMID:25790808

  6. Texture and nano-scale internal microstructure of otoliths in the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana: a high-resolution EBSD study.

    PubMed

    Schulz-Mirbach, T; Götz, A; Griesshaber, E; Plath, M; Schmahl, W W

    2013-08-01

    Otoliths of modern bony fishes are massive polycrystalline structures consisting mainly of calcium carbonate (primarily aragonite), and 1-10% organic residuals. Unlike other biomineralisates like shells, teeth and bones, they are not optimized for mechanical loads but serve the senses of hearing and balance in the inner ear. We examined internal structural variation of otoliths through microstructural and texture analyses. Our study applied the electron backscattered diffraction technique (EBSD) to whole sections of saccular otoliths on cave- and surface-dwelling fish. Application of high spatial resolution EBSD on otoliths of the livebearing fish Poecilia mexicana allowed for an investigation of crystal orientation despite the small size (<150 nm) of aragonite crystallites. Crystallites at the rims of otoliths had a higher structural organization than those situated near the center, where no dominant orientation pattern was discernible. Moreover, the medial (sulcal) face of otoliths, which makes contact with the sensory epithelium, was more structured than the lateral (antisulcal) face. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Texture of Frozen Food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wani, Kohmei

    Quantitative determination of textural quality of frozen food due to freezing and storage conditions is complicated,since the texture is consisted of multi-dimensiona1 factors. The author reviewed the importance of texture in food quality and the factors which is proposed by a priori estimation. New classification of expression words of textural properties by subjective evaluation and an application of four elements mechanical model for analysis of physical characteristics was studied on frozen meat patties. Combination of freezing-thawing condition on the subjective properties and physiochemical characteristics of beef lean meat and hamachi fish (Yellow-tail) meat was studied. Change of the plasticity and the deformability of these samples differed by freezing-thawing rate and cooking procedure. Also optimum freezing-thawing condition was differed from specimens.

  8. Surface texturing of fluoropolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method is disclosed for improving surface texture for adhesive bonding, metal bonding, substrate plating, decal substrate preparation, and biomedical implant applications. The surface to be bonded is dusted in a controlled fashion to produce a disbursed layer of fine mesh particles which serve as masks. The surface texture is produced by impinging gas ions on the masked surface. The textured surface takes the form of pillars or cones. The bonding material, such as a liquid epoxy, flows between the pillars which results in a bond having increased strength. For bonding metals a thin film of metal is vapor or sputter deposited onto the textured surface. Electroplating or electroless plating is then used to increase the metal thickness in the desired amount.

  9. The multiple time scales of sleep dynamics as a challenge for modelling the sleeping brain.

    PubMed

    Olbrich, Eckehard; Claussen, Jens Christian; Achermann, Peter

    2011-10-13

    A particular property of the sleeping brain is that it exhibits dynamics on very different time scales ranging from the typical sleep oscillations such as sleep spindles and slow waves that can be observed in electroencephalogram (EEG) segments of several seconds duration over the transitions between the different sleep stages on a time scale of minutes to the dynamical processes involved in sleep regulation with typical time constants in the range of hours. There is an increasing body of work on mathematical and computational models addressing these different dynamics, however, usually considering only processes on a single time scale. In this paper, we review and present a new analysis of the dynamics of human sleep EEG at the different time scales and relate the findings to recent modelling efforts pointing out both the achievements and remaining challenges.

  10. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  11. Heating and Large Scale Dynamics of the Solar Corona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2000-01-01

    The effort was concentrated in the areas: coronal heating mechanism, unstructured adaptive grid algorithms, numerical modeling of magnetic reconnection in the MRX experiment: effect of toroidal magnetic field and finite pressure, effect of OHMIC heating and vertical magnetic field, effect of dynamic MESH adaption.

  12. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  13. Forest fragmentation and bird community dynamics: inference at regional scales

    Treesearch

    Thierry Boulinier; James D. Nichols; James E. Hines; John R. Sauer; Curtis H. Flather; Kenneth H. Pollock

    2001-01-01

    With increasing fragmentation of natural areas and a dramatic reduction of forest cover in several parts of the world, quantifying the impact of such changes on species richness and community dynamics has been a subject of much concern. Here, we tested whether in more fragmented landscapes there was a lower number of area-sensitive species and higher local extinction...

  14. Geometry of Dynamic Large Networks: A Scaling and Renormalization Group Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-11

    Geometry of Dynamic Large Networks - A Scaling and Renormalization Group Approach IRAJ SANIEE LUCENT TECHNOLOGIES INC 12/11/2013 Final Report...Z39.18 Final Performance Report Grant Title: Geometry of Dynamic Large Networks: A Scaling and Renormalization Group Approach Grant Award Number...prototypical synthetic and real -life large graphs, congestion metrics and analytical estimation of these metrics for such graphs. In our earlier

  15. Identification and sorting of regular textures according to their similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Mesa, Pilar; Anastasiadis, Johannes; Puente León, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    Regardless whether mosaics, material surfaces or skin surfaces are inspected their texture plays an important role. Texture is a property which is hard to describe using words but it can easily be described in pictures. Furthermore, a huge amount of digital images containing a visual description of textures already exists. However, this information becomes useless if there are no appropriate methods to browse the data. In addition, depending on the given task some properties like scale, rotation or intensity invariance are desired. In this paper we propose to analyze texture images according to their characteristic pattern. First a classification approach is proposed to separate regular from non-regular textures. The second stage will focus on regular textures suggesting a method to sort them according to their similarity. Different features will be extracted from the texture in order to describe its scale, orientation, texel and the texel's relative position. Depending on the desired invariance of the visual characteristics (like the texture's scale or the texel's form invariance) the comparison of the features between images will be weighted and combined to define the degree of similarity between them. Tuning the weighting parameters allows this search algorithm to be easily adapted to the requirements of the desired task. Not only the total invariance of desired parameters can be adjusted, the weighting of the parameters may also be modified to adapt to an application-specific type of similarity. This search method has been evaluated using different textures and similarity criteria achieving very promising results.

  16. Texture Evolution During Wire Drawing of Mg-RE Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterton, Mark; Robson, Joseph; Henry, Dominic

    Additions of rare-earth (RE) elements to extruded magnesium alloys can lead to a weaker texture and the emergence of a new "RE-texture" component. Understanding the formation of this component after extrusion is difficult because the final microstructure is often either partly or fully dynamically recrystallized.

  17. Dynamic properties of small-scale solar wind plasma fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Riazantseva, M O; Budaev, V P; Zelenyi, L M; Zastenker, G N; Pavlos, G P; Safrankova, J; Nemecek, Z; Prech, L; Nemec, F

    2015-05-13

    The paper presents the latest results of the studies of small-scale fluctuations in a turbulent flow of solar wind (SW) using measurements with extremely high temporal resolution (up to 0.03 s) of the bright monitor of SW (BMSW) plasma spectrometer operating on astrophysical SPECTR-R spacecraft at distances up to 350,000 km from the Earth. The spectra of SW ion flux fluctuations in the range of scales between 0.03 and 100 s are systematically analysed. The difference of slopes in low- and high-frequency parts of spectra and the frequency of the break point between these two characteristic slopes was analysed for different conditions in the SW. The statistical properties of the SW ion flux fluctuations were thoroughly analysed on scales less than 10 s. A high level of intermittency is demonstrated. The extended self-similarity of SW ion flux turbulent flow is constantly observed. The approximation of non-Gaussian probability distribution function of ion flux fluctuations by the Tsallis statistics shows the non-extensive character of SW fluctuations. Statistical characteristics of ion flux fluctuations are compared with the predictions of a log-Poisson model. The log-Poisson parametrization of the structure function scaling has shown that well-defined filament-like plasma structures are, as a rule, observed in the turbulent SW flows.

  18. Comprehensive lake dynamics mapping at continental scales using Landsat 8

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inland lakes, important water resources, play a crucial role in the global water cycle and are sensitive to global warming and human activities. There clearly is a pressing need to understand temporal and spatial variations of lakes at global and continental scales. The recent operation of Landsat...

  19. Methods of making textured catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  20. Unique Testing Capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, an Exercise in Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) is the world's most capable aeroelastic test facility. Its large size, transonic speed range, variable pressure capability, and use of either air or R-134a heavy gas as a test medium enable unparalleled manipulation of flow-dependent scaling quantities. Matching these scaling quantities enables dynamic similitude of a full-scale vehicle with a sub-scale model, a requirement for proper characterization of any dynamic phenomenon, and many static elastic phenomena. Select scaling parameters are presented in order to quantify the scaling advantages of TDT and the consequence of testing in other facilities. In addition to dynamic testing, the TDT is uniquely well-suited for high risk testing or for those tests that require unusual model mount or support systems. Examples of recently conducted dynamic tests requiring unusual model support are presented. In addition to its unique dynamic test capabilities, the TDT is also evaluated in its capability to conduct aerodynamic performance tests as a result of its flow quality. Results of flow quality studies and a comparison to a many other transonic facilities are presented. Finally, the ability of the TDT to support future NASA research thrusts and likely vehicle designs is discussed.

  1. Dynamic perspective cues enhance depth perception from motion parallax.

    PubMed

    Buckthought, Athena; Yoonessi, Ahmad; Baker, Curtis L

    2017-01-01

    Motion parallax, the perception of depth resulting from an observer's self-movement, has almost always been studied with random dot textures in simplified orthographic rendering. Here we examine depth from motion parallax in more naturalistic conditions using textures with an overall 1/f spectrum and dynamic perspective rendering. We compared depth perception for orthographic and perspective rendering, using textures composed of two types of elements: random dots and Gabor micropatterns. Relative texture motion (shearing) with square wave corrugation patterns was synchronized to horizontal head movement. Four observers performed a two-alternative forced choice depth ordering task with monocular viewing, in which they reported which part of the texture appeared in front of the other. For both textures, depth perception was better with dynamic perspective than with orthographic rendering, particularly at larger depths. Depth ordering performance with naturalistic 1/f textures was slightly lower than with the random dots; however, with depth-related size scaling of the micropatterns, performance was comparable to that with random dots. We also examined the effects of removing each of the three cues that distinguish dynamic perspective from orthographic rendering: (a) small vertical displacements, (b) lateral gradients of speed across the corrugations, and (c) speed differences in rendered near versus far surfaces. Removal of any of the three cues impaired performance. In conclusion, depth ordering performance is enhanced by all of the dynamic perspective cues but not by using more naturalistic 1/f textures.

  2. Deployment dynamics and control of large-scale flexible solar array system with deployable mast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Quan; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Shao-Jing; Cai, Guo-Ping

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, deployment dynamics and control of large-scale flexible solar array system with deployable mast are investigated. The adopted solar array system is introduced firstly, including system configuration, deployable mast and solar arrays with several mechanisms. Then dynamic equation of the solar array system is established by the Jourdain velocity variation principle and a method for dynamics with topology changes is introduced. In addition, a PD controller with disturbance estimation is designed to eliminate the drift of spacecraft mainbody. Finally the validity of the dynamic model is verified through a comparison with ADAMS software and the deployment process and dynamic behavior of the system are studied in detail. Simulation results indicate that the proposed model is effective to describe the deployment dynamics of the large-scale flexible solar arrays and the proposed controller is practical to eliminate the drift of spacecraft mainbody.

  3. Tension dynamics in semiflexible polymers. II. Scaling solutions and applications.

    PubMed

    Hallatschek, Oskar; Frey, Erwin; Kroy, Klaus

    2007-03-01

    In part I [O. Hallatschek, preceding paper, Phys. Rev. E 75, 031905 (2007)] of this contribution, a systematic coarse-grained description of the dynamics of a weakly bending semiflexible polymer was developed. Here, we discuss analytical solutions of the established deterministic partial integro-differential equation for the spatiotemporal relaxation of the backbone tension. For prototypal experimental situations, such as the sudden application or release of a strong external pulling force, it is demonstrated that the tensile dynamics reflects the self-affine conformational fluctuation spectrum in a variety of intermediate asymptotic power laws. Detailed and explicit analytical predictions for the tension propagation and relaxation and corresponding results for common observables, such as the end-to-end distance, are obtained.

  4. Scaling behavior in the dynamics of citations to scientific journals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoli, S., Jr.; Mendes, R. S.; Malacarne, L. C.; Lenzi, E. K.

    2006-08-01

    We analyze a database comprising the impact factor (citations per recent items published) of scientific journals for a 13-year period (1992 2004). We find that i) the distribution of impact factors follows asymptotic power law behavior, ii) the distribution of annual logarithmic growth rates has an exponential form, and iii) the width of this distribution decays with the impact factor as a power law with exponent β simeq 0.22. The results ii) and iii) are surprising similar to those observed in the growth dynamics of organizations with complex internal structure suggesting the existence of common mechanisms underlying the dynamics of these systems. We propose a general model for such systems, an extension of the simplest model for firm growth, and compare their predictions with our empirical results.

  5. Dynamics of Phononic Dissipation at the Atomic Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Mukhopadhay, Soma; Tugrul Senger, R.; Ciraci, Salim

    2007-03-01

    Dynamics of dissipation of a local phonon distribution to the bulk is a key issue in boundary lubrication and friction between sliding surfaces. We consider a highly excited molecule which interacts weakly with the substrate surface. We study different types of coupling and substrates having different types of dimensionality and phonon densities of states. We propose three different methods to solve the dynamics of the combined system, namely the equation of mation technique, Fano-Anderson method and the Green's function method. Using this theoretical framework we present an analysis of transient properties of energy dissipation via phonon discharge at the microscopic level. The methods allow the theoretical calculations to be extended to include any density of states for the substrate including experimental ones and any type of molecule that represent the lubricant or the asperity.

  6. Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System for Large-scale HSCB Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-20

    Intelligent Automation Incorporated Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining ...Page | 2 Intelligent Automation Incorporated Monthly Report No. 4 Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System Large-Scale HSCB...including Top Videos, Top Users, Top Words, and Top Languages, and also applied NER to the text associated with YouTube posts. We have also developed UI for

  7. Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System for Large-Scale HSCB Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-20

    Intelligent Automation Incorporated Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining ...Page | 2 Intelligent Automation Incorporated Monthly Report No. 4 Enhancements for a Dynamic Data Warehousing and Mining System Large-Scale HSCB...including Top Videos, Top Users, Top Words, and Top Languages, and also applied NER to the text associated with YouTube posts. We have also developed UI for

  8. On why dynamic subgrid-scale models work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, J.

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic subgrid models have proved to be remarkably successful in predicting the behavior of turbulent flows. Part of the reasons for their success are well understood. Since they are constructed to generate an effective viscosity which is proportional to some measure of the turbulent energy at the high wavenumber end of the spectrum, their eddy viscosity vanishes as the flow becomes laminar. This alone would justify their use over simpler models. But beyond this obvious advantage, which is confined to inhomogeneous and evolving flows, the reason why they also work better in simpler homogeneous cases, and how they do it without any obvious adjustable parameter, is not clear. This lack of understanding of the internal mechanisms of a useful tool is disturbing, not only as an intellectual challenge, but because it raises the doubt of whether it will work in all cases. This note is an attempt to clarify those mechanisms. We will see why dynamic models are robust and how they can get away with even comparatively gross errors in their formulations. This will suggest that they are only particular cases of a larger family of robust models, all of which would be relatively insensitive to large simplifications in the physics of the flow. We will also construct some such models, although mostly as research tools. It will turn out, however, that the standard dynamic formulation is not only robust to errors, but also behaves as if it were substantially well formulated. The details of why this is so will still not be clear at the end of this note, specially since it will be shown that the 'a priori' testing of the stresses gives, as is usual in most subgrid models, very poor results. But it will be argued that the basic reason is that the dynamic formulation mimics the condition that the total dissipation is approximately equal to the production measured at the test filter level.

  9. Surface water connectivity dynamics of a large scale extreme flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigg, Mark A.; Michaelides, Katerina; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Bates, Paul D.

    2013-11-01

    Uses the MODIS surface water product observations of the 2011 Bangkok flood.A data gap filling method is developed to better preserve the dynamics of the event.We quantify surface water connectivity geostatistically to give new flood insights.There is a clear structure to the connectivity of the event through time and space.Changes and thresholds in the connectivity are linked to major flood mechanisms.

  10. Influence of Small Scale Yielding on Dynamic Fracture.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    MAT-16. 10 10. CHEVERTON, R.D. and ISKANDER, S.K., "Application of Static and Dynamic Crack Arrest Theory to Thermal Shock Experiment TSE-4," NUREG /CR...0767, ORNL/ NUREG -57, June 1979. 11. KANNINEN, M.P., MUKHERJEE, A.K., ROSENFIELD, A.R. and HAHN, G.T., "The Speed of Ductile-Crack Propagation and the

  11. Dynamics of large-scale electrophysiological networks: A technical review.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, George C; Tewarie, Prejaas; Vidaurre, Diego; Liuzzi, Lucrezia; Woolrich, Mark W; Brookes, Matthew J

    2017-10-04

    For several years it has been argued that neural synchronisation is crucial for cognition. The idea that synchronised temporal patterns between different neural groups carries information above and beyond the isolated activity of these groups has inspired a shift in focus in the field of functional neuroimaging. Specifically, investigation into the activation elicited within certain regions by some stimulus or task has, in part, given way to analysis of patterns of co-activation or functional connectivity between distal regions. Recently, the functional connectivity community has been looking beyond the assumptions of stationarity that earlier work was based on, and has introduced methods to incorporate temporal dynamics into the analysis of connectivity. In particular, non-invasive electrophysiological data (magnetoencephalography/electroencephalography (MEG/EEG)), which provides direct measurement of whole-brain activity and rich temporal information, offers an exceptional window into such (potentially fast) brain dynamics. In this review, we discuss challenges, solutions, and a collection of analysis tools that have been developed in recent years to facilitate the investigation of dynamic functional connectivity using these imaging modalities. Further, we discuss the applications of these approaches in the study of cognition and neuropsychiatric disorders. Finally, we review some existing developments that, by using realistic computational models, pursue a deeper understanding of the underlying causes of non-stationary connectivity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Neurofeedback Tunes Scale-Free Dynamics in Spontaneous Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Ros, T; Frewen, P; Théberge, J; Michela, A; Kluetsch, R; Mueller, A; Candrian, G; Jetly, R; Vuilleumier, P; Lanius, R A

    2017-10-01

    Brain oscillations exhibit long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs), which reflect the regularity of their fluctuations: low values representing more random (decorrelated) while high values more persistent (correlated) dynamics. LRTCs constitute supporting evidence that the brain operates near criticality, a state where neuronal activities are balanced between order and randomness. Here, healthy adults used closed-loop brain training (neurofeedback, NFB) to reduce the amplitude of alpha oscillations, producing a significant increase in spontaneous LRTCs post-training. This effect was reproduced in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, where abnormally random dynamics were reversed by NFB, correlating with significant improvements in hyperarousal. Notably, regions manifesting abnormally low LRTCs (i.e., excessive randomness) normalized toward healthy population levels, consistent with theoretical predictions about self-organized criticality. Hence, when exposed to appropriate training, spontaneous cortical activity reveals a residual capacity for "self-tuning" its own temporal complexity, despite manifesting the abnormal dynamics seen in individuals with psychiatric disorder. Lastly, we observed an inverse-U relationship between strength of LRTC and oscillation amplitude, suggesting a breakdown of long-range dependence at high/low synchronization extremes, in line with recent computational models. Together, our findings offer a broader mechanistic framework for motivating research and clinical applications of NFB, encompassing disorders with perturbed LRTCs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Neuronal long-range temporal correlations and avalanche dynamics are correlated with behavioral scaling laws.

    PubMed

    Palva, J Matias; Zhigalov, Alexander; Hirvonen, Jonni; Korhonen, Onerva; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus; Palva, Satu

    2013-02-26

    Scale-free fluctuations are ubiquitous in behavioral performance and neuronal activity. In time scales from seconds to hundreds of seconds, psychophysical dynamics and the amplitude fluctuations of neuronal oscillations are governed by power-law-form long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs). In millisecond time scales, neuronal activity comprises cascade-like neuronal avalanches that exhibit power-law size and lifetime distributions. However, it remains unknown whether these neuronal scaling laws are correlated with those characterizing behavioral performance or whether neuronal LRTCs and avalanches are related. Here, we show that the neuronal scaling laws are strongly correlated both with each other and with behavioral scaling laws. We used source reconstructed magneto- and electroencephalographic recordings to characterize the dynamics of ongoing cortical activity. We found robust power-law scaling in neuronal LRTCs and avalanches in resting-state data and during the performance of audiovisual threshold stimulus detection tasks. The LRTC scaling exponents of the behavioral performance fluctuations were correlated with those of concurrent neuronal avalanches and LRTCs in anatomically identified brain systems. The behavioral exponents also were correlated with neuronal scaling laws derived from a resting-state condition and with a similar anatomical topography. Finally, despite the difference in time scales, the scaling exponents of neuronal LRTCs and avalanches were strongly correlated during both rest and task performance. Thus, long and short time-scale neuronal dynamics are related and functionally significant at the behavioral level. These data suggest that the temporal structures of human cognitive fluctuations and behavioral variability stem from the scaling laws of individual and intrinsic brain dynamics.

  14. Controls on scaling relationships of dynamic headwater stream networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godsey, S.; Kirchner, J. W.; Whiting, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    Stream networks expand and contract within their channel network, particularly within their headwaters. Along their length, especially during drought periods, it is not unusual to encounter dry reaches of varying lengths. Controls on the length and location of those dry reaches include: large woody debris, upstream sediment loading, hydraulic properties of the subsurface/hyporheic zone, and the catchment hydroclimate and morphology. Here we examine patterns in the length of discontinuous reaches, their location, and the length of the overall drainage network. We find that drainage networks expand with discharge as a power-law relationship with a slope of ~0.25, contradicting recent theoretical suggestions in the literature that this scaling exponent should be close to 1.0. We discuss physical limitations on the range of potential scaling relationships, and link stream responses to groundwater and evapotranspiration sources and sinks.

  15. Scaling laws in the dynamics of crime growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Luiz G. A.; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Mendes, Renio S.

    2013-06-01

    The increasing number of crimes in areas with large concentrations of people have made cities one of the main sources of violence. Understanding characteristics of how crime rate expands and its relations with the cities size goes beyond an academic question, being a central issue for contemporary society. Here, we characterize and analyze quantitative aspects of murders in the period from 1980 to 2009 in Brazilian cities. We find that the distribution of the annual, biannual and triannual logarithmic homicide growth rates exhibit the same functional form for distinct scales, that is, a scale invariant behavior. We also identify asymptotic power-law decay relations between the standard deviations of these three growth rates and the initial size. Further, we discuss similarities with complex organizations.

  16. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses a framework for fine-scale CFD modeling that may be developed to complement the present Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system which itself is a computational fluid dynamics model. A goal of this presentation is to stimulate discussions on w...

  17. On the spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture at the field scale

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this paper, we review the state of the art of characterizing and analyzing spatio-temporal dynamics of soil moisture content at the field scale. We discuss measurement techniques that have become available in recent years and that provide unique opportunities to characterize field scale soil mois...

  18. A FRAMEWORK FOR FINE-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS AIR QUALITY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses a framework for fine-scale CFD modeling that may be developed to complement the present Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system which itself is a computational fluid dynamics model. A goal of this presentation is to stimulate discussions on w...

  19. Parachute Dynamics Investigations Using a Sensor Package Airdropped from a Small-Scale Airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jessica; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2005-01-01

    We explore the utility of various sensors by recovering parachute-probe dynamics information from a package released from a small-scale, remote-controlled airplane. The airdrops aid in the development of datasets for the exploration of planetary probe trajectory recovery algorithms, supplementing data collected from instrumented, full-scale tests and computer models.

  20. The Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS): A Dynamic Predictor of Juvenile Recidivism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quist, Ryan M.; Matshazi, Dumiso G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Tests the degree to which the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale, a mental health assessment tool, predicts recidivism among juvenile offenders. It was found that the scale was significantly related to recidivism. The practical application of the results as well as the value of emphasizing research on dynamic predictors that enable…

  1. Advanced Dynamically Adaptive Algorithms for Stochastic Simulations on Extreme Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Xiu, Dongbin

    2016-06-21

    The focus of the project is the development of mathematical methods and high-performance com- putational tools for stochastic simulations, with a particular emphasis on computations on extreme scales. The core of the project revolves around the design of highly e cient and scalable numer- ical algorithms that can adaptively and accurately, in high dimensional spaces, resolve stochastic problems with limited smoothness, even containing discontinuities.

  2. Experimental Research on Rail Vehicle Safety Using Dynamically Scaled Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    June 28, 1977) includes: (1) the design and fabrication of a scale model track, single wheelset , test carriage, and associated instrumentation; (2...measurement of wheelset displacement-force characteristics at steady velocity; (3) measurements of wheel-climb phenomenon; and (4) comparison of...34V* d) Detailed design of wheelset , idler carriage, linkage, and instrumen- tation systems. The linkage system, shown schematically in Figure :mi

  3. Interplay between Functional Connectivity and Scale-Free Dynamics in Intrinsic fMRI Networks

    PubMed Central

    Ciuciu, Philippe; Abry, Patrice; He, Biyu J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies employing functional connectivity-type analyses have established that spontaneous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals are organized within large-scale brain networks. Meanwhile, fMRI signals have been shown to exhibit 1/f-type power spectra – a hallmark of scale-free dynamics. We studied the interplay between functional connectivity and scale-free dynamics in fMRI signals, utilizing the fractal connectivity framework – a multivariate extension of the univariate fractional Gaussian noise model, which relies on a wavelet formulation for robust parameter estimation. We applied this framework to fMRI data acquired from healthy young adults at rest and performing a visual detection task. First, we found that scale-invariance existed beyond univariate dynamics, being present also in bivariate cross-temporal dynamics. Second, we observed that frequencies within the scale-free range do not contribute evenly to inter-regional connectivity, with a systematically stronger contribution of the lowest frequencies, both at rest and during task. Third, in addition to a decrease of the Hurst exponent and inter-regional correlations, task performance modified cross-temporal dynamics, inducing a larger contribution of the highest frequencies within the scale-free range to global correlation. Lastly, we found that across individuals, a weaker task modulation of the frequency contribution to inter-regional connectivity was associated with better task performance manifesting as shorter and less variable reaction times. These findings bring together two related fields that have hitherto been studied separately – resting-state networks and scale-free dynamics, and show that scale-free dynamics of human brain activity manifest in cross-regional interactions as well. PMID:24675649

  4. Interplay between functional connectivity and scale-free dynamics in intrinsic fMRI networks.

    PubMed

    Ciuciu, Philippe; Abry, Patrice; He, Biyu J

    2014-07-15

    Studies employing functional connectivity-type analyses have established that spontaneous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals are organized within large-scale brain networks. Meanwhile, fMRI signals have been shown to exhibit 1/f-type power spectra - a hallmark of scale-free dynamics. We studied the interplay between functional connectivity and scale-free dynamics in fMRI signals, utilizing the fractal connectivity framework - a multivariate extension of the univariate fractional Gaussian noise model, which relies on a wavelet formulation for robust parameter estimation. We applied this framework to fMRI data acquired from healthy young adults at rest and while performing a visual detection task. First, we found that scale-invariance existed beyond univariate dynamics, being present also in bivariate cross-temporal dynamics. Second, we observed that frequencies within the scale-free range do not contribute evenly to inter-regional connectivity, with a systematically stronger contribution of the lowest frequencies, both at rest and during task. Third, in addition to a decrease of the Hurst exponent and inter-regional correlations, task performance modified cross-temporal dynamics, inducing a larger contribution of the highest frequencies within the scale-free range to global correlation. Lastly, we found that across individuals, a weaker task modulation of the frequency contribution to inter-regional connectivity was associated with better task performance manifesting as shorter and less variable reaction times. These findings bring together two related fields that have hitherto been studied separately - resting-state networks and scale-free dynamics, and show that scale-free dynamics of human brain activity manifest in cross-regional interactions as well.

  5. Intrinsic magnetization of antiferromagnetic textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveten, Erlend G.; Müller, Tristan; Linder, Jacob; Brataas, Arne

    2016-03-01

    Antiferromagnets (AFMs) exhibit intrinsic magnetization when the order parameter spatially varies. This intrinsic spin is present even at equilibrium and can be interpreted as a twisting of the homogeneous AFM into a state with a finite spin. Because magnetic moments couple directly to external magnetic fields, the intrinsic magnetization can alter the dynamics of antiferromagnetic textures under such influence. Starting from the discrete Heisenberg model, we derive the continuum limit of the free energy of AFMs in the exchange approximation and explicitly rederive that the spatial variation of the antiferromagnetic order parameter is associated with an intrinsic magnetization density. We calculate the magnetization profile of a domain wall and discuss how the intrinsic magnetization reacts to external forces. We show conclusively, both analytically and numerically, that a spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field can move and control the position of domain walls in AFMs. By comparing our model to a commonly used alternative parametrization procedure for the continuum fields, we show that the physical interpretations of these fields depend critically on the choice of parametrization procedure for the discrete-to-continuous transition. This can explain why a significant amount of recent studies of the dynamics of AFMs, including effective models that describe the motion of antiferromagnetic domain walls, have neglected the intrinsic spin of the textured order parameter.

  6. Time scales of the stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nachiketa; Parida, Nigam Chandra; Raha, Soumyendu

    2015-01-01

    The stick–slip dynamics of the peeling of an adhesive tape is characterized by bifurcations that have been experimentally well studied. In this work, we investigate the time scale in which the the stick–slips happen leading to the bifurcations. This is fundamental to understanding the triboluminescence and acoustic emissions associated with the bifurcations. We establish a relationship between the time scale of the bifurcations and the inherent mathematical structure of the peeling dynamics by studying a characteristic time quantity associated with the dynamics. PMID:25663802

  7. Numerical continuation methods for large-scale dissipative dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbría, Juan Sánchez; Net, Marta

    2016-11-01

    A tutorial on continuation and bifurcation methods for the analysis of truncated dissipative partial differential equations is presented. It focuses on the computation of equilibria, periodic orbits, their loci of codimension-one bifurcations, and invariant tori. To make it more self-contained, it includes some definitions of basic concepts of dynamical systems, and some preliminaries on the general underlying techniques used to solve non-linear systems of equations by inexact Newton methods, and eigenvalue problems by means of subspace or Arnoldi iterations.

  8. Firms growth dynamics, competition and power-law scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Hari M.; Campanha, José R.

    2003-05-01

    We study the growth dynamics of the size of manufacturing firms considering competition and normal distribution of competency. We start with the fact that all components of the system struggle with each other for growth as happened in real competitive business world. The detailed quantitative agreement of the theory with empirical results of firms growth based on a large economic database spanning over 20 years is good with a single set of the parameters for all the curves. Further, the empirical data of the variation of the standard deviation of the growth rate with the size of the firm are in accordance with the present theory rather than a simple power law.

  9. Scaling and optimization of the radiation temperature in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; LASH,JOEL S.; VESEY,ROGER A.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; NASH,THOMAS J.; DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-04-13

    The authors have constructed a quasi-analytic model of the dynamic hohlraum. Solutions only require a numerical root solve, which can be done very quickly. Results of the model are compared to both experiments and full numerical simulations with good agreement. The computational simplicity of the model allows one to find the behavior of the hohlraum temperature as a function the various parameters of the system and thus find optimum parameters as a function of the driving current. The model is used to investigate the benefits of ablative standoff and axial convergence.

  10. Scanning Angle Interference Microscopy Reveals Cell Dynamics at the Nano-scale

    PubMed Central

    Paszek, Matthew J.; DuFort, Christopher C.; Rubashkin, Matthew G.; Davidson, Mike W.; Thorn, Kurt S.; Liphardt, Jan T.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2012-01-01

    Emerging questions in cell biology necessitate nanometer-scale imaging in live cells. Here we present scanning angle interference microscopy, capable of localizing fluorescent objects with nanometer-scale precision along the optical axis in motile cellular structures. We use this approach to resolve nano-topographical features of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton, as well as the temporal evolution, three-dimensional architecture, and nano-scale dynamics of focal adhesion complexes. PMID:22751201

  11. Imaging multi-scale dynamics in vivo with spiral volumetric optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. Luís.; Fehm, Thomas F.; Ford, Steven J.; Gottschalk, Sven; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Imaging dynamics in living organisms is essential for the understanding of biological complexity. While multiple imaging modalities are often required to cover both microscopic and macroscopic spatial scales, dynamic phenomena may also extend over different temporal scales, necessitating the use of different imaging technologies based on the trade-off between temporal resolution and effective field of view. Optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging has been shown to offer the exclusive capability to link multiple spatial scales ranging from organelles to entire organs of small animals. Yet, efficient visualization of multi-scale dynamics remained difficult with state-of-the-art systems due to inefficient trade-offs between image acquisition and effective field of view. Herein, we introduce a spiral volumetric optoacoustic tomography (SVOT) technique that provides spectrally-enriched high-resolution optical absorption contrast across multiple spatio-temporal scales. We demonstrate that SVOT can be used to monitor various in vivo dynamics, from video-rate volumetric visualization of cardiac-associated motion in whole organs to high-resolution imaging of pharmacokinetics in larger regions. The multi-scale dynamic imaging capability thus emerges as a powerful and unique feature of the optoacoustic technology that adds to the multiple advantages of this technology for structural, functional and molecular imaging.

  12. Dynamics of decoherence: Universal scaling of the decoherence factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Sei; Nag, Tanay; Dutta, Amit

    2016-01-01

    We study the time dependence of the decoherence factor (DF) of a qubit globally coupled to an environmental spin system (ESS) which is driven across the quantum critical point (QCP) by varying a parameter of its Hamiltonian in time t as 1 -t /τ or -t /τ , to which the qubit is coupled starting at the time t →-∞ ; here τ denotes the inverse quenching rate. In the limit of weak coupling we analyze the time evolution of the DF in the vicinity of the QCP (chosen to be at t =0 ) and define three quantities, namely, the generalized fidelity susceptibility χF(τ ) (defined right at the QCP), and the decay constants α1(τ ) and α2(τ ) which dictate the decay of the DF at a small but finite t (>0 ). Using a dimensional analysis argument based on the Kibble-Zurek healing length, we show that χF(τ ) as well as α1(τ ) and α2(τ ) indeed satisfy universal power-law scaling relations with τ and the exponents are solely determined by the spatial dimensionality of the ESS and the exponents associated with its QCP. Remarkably, using the numerical t-DMRG method, these scaling relations are shown to be valid in both the situations when the ESS is integrable and nonintegrable and also for both linear and nonlinear variation of the parameter. Furthermore, when an integrable ESS is quenched far away from the QCP, there is a predominant Gaussian decay of the DF with a decay constant which also satisfies a universal scaling relation.

  13. Anomalous Metapopulation Dynamics on Scale-Free Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, Sergei; Stage, Helena

    2017-03-01

    We model transport of individuals across a heterogeneous scale-free network where a few weakly connected nodes exhibit heavy-tailed residence times. Using the empirical law of the axiom of cumulative inertia and fractional analysis, we show that "anomalous cumulative inertia" overpowers highly connected nodes in attracting network individuals. This fundamentally challenges the classical result that individuals tend to accumulate in high-order nodes. The derived residence time distribution has a nontrivial U shape which we encounter empirically across human residence and employment times.

  14. From Single-Cell Dynamics to Scaling Laws in Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignola, Roberto; Sega, Michela; Stella, Sabrina; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Milotti, Edoardo

    We are developing a biophysical model of tumor biology. We follow a strictly quantitative approach where each step of model development is validated by comparing simulation outputs with experimental data. While this strategy may slow down our advancements, at the same time it provides an invaluable reward: we can trust simulation outputs and use the model to explore territories of cancer biology where current experimental techniques fail. Here, we review our multi-scale biophysical modeling approach and show how a description of cancer at the cellular level has led us to general laws obeyed by both in vitro and in vivo tumors.

  15. Scaling and gender behavior of road accidental dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian; Zou, Xiang-Xiang; Chen, Guang; Jiang, Xiong-Fei; Zhong, Li-Xin

    2014-12-01

    The probability distribution of the time intervals between two consecutive accidents is investigated, based on the road accidental records of the Great Britain. A universal description is obtained for different roads, by rescaling the probability distribution and time intervals. The scaling curve is found to deviate from the Gaussian distribution, but it is well fitted by a stretched exponential function. Long-range time correlation is revealed for the interevent series. Moreover, gender similarity is found for the small accidental intervals, while for the large intervals, the female drivers are observed to present a higher probability than the male drivers.

  16. Experimental Research on Rail Vehicle Safety Using Dynamically Scaled Models.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-01-01

    the first year of the program (June 29, 1976- June 28, 1977) includes: (1) the design and fabrication of a scale model track, single wheelset , test...carriage, and associated instrumentation; (2) measurement of wheelset displacement-force characteristics at steady velocity; (3) measurement of wheel...8217 •—" ’ * • -""* •• ’ ••’ ’ "• •— .•••»-.-»— •- •- - - - c) Design of wheelset carriage, linkage, and instrumentation systems. Various

  17. FOOD TEXTURE DESCRIPTORS BASED ON FRACTAL AND LOCAL GRADIENT INFORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Marc; Zhu, Fengqing; Khanna, Nitin; Boushey, Carol J.; Delp, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    This work is motivated by the desire to use image analysis methods to identify and characterize images of food items to aid in dietary assessment. This paper introduces three texture descriptors for texture classification that can be used to classify images of food. Two are based on the multifractal analysis, namely, entropy-based categorization and fractal dimension estimation (EFD), and a Gabor-based image decomposition and fractal dimension estimation (GFD). Our third texture descriptor is based on the spatial relationship of gradient orientations (GOSDM), by obtaining the occurrence rate of pairs of gradient orientations at different neighborhood scales. The proposed methods are evaluated in texture classification and food categorization tasks using the entire Brodatz database and a customized food dataset with a wide variety of textures. Results show that for food categorization our methods consistently outperform several widely used techniques for both texture and object categorization. PMID:28573086

  18. Texture Development in Friction Stir Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    distor- tion). Friction stir welding was initially developed for aluminium alloys, but has since been demonstrated for copper, iron, titanium and...textures. The predominant mode of deformation, particularly in regions near the tool, is simple shear, as confirmed in previous FSW studies of aluminium ...alloys.3–8 It has been demonstrated that continuous dynamic recrystallisation, i.e. the concurrent processes of deformation and dynamic recovery, is

  19. Scaling in driven dynamics starting in the vicinity of a quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuai; Lo, Chung-Yu; Chen, Pochung

    2016-08-01

    Driven dyn