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Sample records for dynamic transpedicular stabilisation

  1. Clinical outcomes after posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization with limited lumbar discectomy: Carragee classification system for lumbar disc herniations

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Tuncay; Sasani, Mehdi; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Cosar, Murat; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2010-01-01

    Background The observed rate of recurrent disc herniation after limited posterior lumbar discectomy is highest in patients with posterior wide annular defects, according to the Carragee classification of type II (fragment-defect) disc hernia. Although the recurrent herniation rate is lower in both type III (fragment-contained) and type IV (no fragment-contained) patients, recurrent persistent sciatica is observed in both groups. A higher rate of recurrent disc herniation and sciatica was observed in all 3 groups in comparison to patients with type I (fragment-fissure) disc hernia. Methods In total, 40 single-level lumbar disc herniation cases were treated with limited posterior lumbar microdiscectomy and posterior dynamic stabilization. The mean follow-up period was 32.75 months. Cases were selected after preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative observation. We used the Carragee classification system in this study and excluded Carragee type I (fragment-fissure) disc herniations. Clinical results were evaluated with visual analog scale scores and Oswestry scores. Patients’ reherniation rates and clinical results were evaluated and recorded at 3, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Results The most common herniation type in our study was type III (fragment-contained), with 45% frequency. The frequency of fragment-defects was 25%, and the frequency of no fragment-contained defects was 30%. The perioperative complications observed were as follows: 1 patient had bladder retention that required catheterization, 1 patient had a superficial wound infection, and 1 patient had a malpositioned transpedicular screw. The malpositioned screw was corrected with a second operation, performed 1 month after the first. Recurrent disc herniation was not observed during the follow-up period. Conclusions We observed that performing discectomy with posterior dynamic stabilization decreased the risk of recurrent disc herniations in Carragee type II, III, and IV groups

  2. Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization versus Total Disc Replacement in the Treatment of Lumbar Painful Degenerative Disc Disease: A Comparison of Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Oktenoglu, Tunc; Ozer, Ali Fahir; Sasani, Mehdi; Ataker, Yaprak; Gomleksiz, Cengiz; Celebi, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Prospective clinical study. Objective. This study compares the clinical results of anterior lumbar total disc replacement and posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization in the treatment of degenerative disc disease. Summary and Background Data. Over the last two decades, both techniques have emerged as alternative treatment options to fusion surgery. Methods. This study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 with a total of 50 patients (25 in each group). The mean age of the patients in total disc prosthesis group was 37,32 years. The mean age of the patients in posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization was 43,08. Clinical (VAS and Oswestry) and radiological evaluations (lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis angles) of the patients were carried out prior to the operation and 3, 12, and 24 months after the operation. We compared the average duration of surgery, blood loss during the surgery and the length of hospital stay of both groups. Results. Both techniques offered significant improvements in clinical parameters. There was no significant change in radiologic evaluations after the surgery for both techniques. Conclusion. Both dynamic systems provided spine stability. However, the posterior dynamic system had a slight advantage over anterior disc prosthesis because of its convenient application and fewer possible complications. PMID:23401784

  3. Dynamic quantised feedback stabilisation of discrete-time linear system with white noise input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Mingming; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we mainly focus on the problem of quantised feedback stabilisation of a stochastic discrete-time linear system with white noise input. The dynamic quantiser is used here. The stability of the system under state quantisation and input quantisation is analysed in detail, respectively. Both the convergence of the state's mean and the boundedness of the state's covariance matrix norm should be considered when analysing its stability. It is shown that for the two situations of the state quantisation and the input quantisation, if the system without noise input can be stabilised by a linear feedback law, it must be stabilised by the dynamic quantised feedback control policy. The sufficient conditions that the dynamic quantiser should satisfy are given. Using the results obtained in this paper, one can test whether the stochastic system is stabilisable or not. Numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the results.

  4. Global stabilisation for a class of uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems by dynamic state and output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Lin; Qian, Chunjiang

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the design problem of constructing the state and output feedback stabilisation controller for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems subject to time-delay. First, a dynamic linear state feedback control law with an adaptive strategy is developed to globally stabilise the uncertain nonlinear time-delay system under a lower-triangular higher-order growth condition. Then, one more challenging problem of the adaptive output feedback stabilisation is addressed, which can globally stabilise the time-delay system when the unmeasurable states linearly grow with rate functions consisting of higher-order output.

  5. Evolution stabilises the synchronising dynamics of poikilotherm life cycles.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, C A; Powell, J A

    2011-05-01

    Temperature is the most significant factor controlling developmental timing of most temperate poikilotherms. In the face of climate change, a crucial question is how will poikilothermic organisms evolve when faced with changing thermal environments? In this paper, we integrate models for developmental timing and quantitative genetics. A simple model for determining developmental milestones (emergence times, egg hatch) is introduced, and the general quantitative genetic recursion for the mean value of developmental parameters presented. Evolutionary steps proportional to the difference between current median parameters and parameters currently selected for depend on the fitness, which is assumed to depend on emergence density. Asymptotic states of the joint model are determined, which turn out to be neutrally stable (marginal) fixed points in the developmental model by itself, and an associated stable emergence distribution is also described. An asymptotic convergence analysis is presented for idealized circumstances, indicating basic stability criteria. Numerical studies show that the stability analysis is quite conservative, with basins of attraction to the asymptotic states that are much larger than expected. It is shown that frequency-dependent selection drives oscillatory dynamics and that the asymptotic states balance the asymmetry of the emergence distribution and the fitness function.

  6. Acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence and shapes intrinsic dynamics of an intraguild predator and its prey.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Holly V; Peltomaa, Elina; Johnson, Matthew D; Neubert, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    In marine ecosystems, acquired phototrophs - organisms that obtain their photosynthetic ability by hosting endosymbionts or stealing plastids from their prey - are omnipresent. Such taxa function as intraguild predators yet depend on their prey to periodically obtain chloroplasts. We present a new theory for the effects of acquired phototrophy on community dynamics by analysing a mathematical model of this predator-prey interaction and experimentally verifying its predictions with a laboratory model system. We show that acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence, but that the nature of this coexistence exhibits a 'paradox of enrichment': as light increases, the coexistence between the acquired phototroph and its prey transitions from a stable equilibrium to boom-bust cycles whose amplitude increases with light availability. In contrast, heterotrophs and mixotrophic acquired phototrophs (that obtain < 30% of their carbon from photosynthesis) do not exhibit such cycles. This prediction matches field observations, in which only strict ( > 95% of carbon from photosynthesis) acquired phototrophs form blooms.

  7. Acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence and shapes intrinsic dynamics of an intraguild predator and its prey.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Holly V; Peltomaa, Elina; Johnson, Matthew D; Neubert, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    In marine ecosystems, acquired phototrophs - organisms that obtain their photosynthetic ability by hosting endosymbionts or stealing plastids from their prey - are omnipresent. Such taxa function as intraguild predators yet depend on their prey to periodically obtain chloroplasts. We present a new theory for the effects of acquired phototrophy on community dynamics by analysing a mathematical model of this predator-prey interaction and experimentally verifying its predictions with a laboratory model system. We show that acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence, but that the nature of this coexistence exhibits a 'paradox of enrichment': as light increases, the coexistence between the acquired phototroph and its prey transitions from a stable equilibrium to boom-bust cycles whose amplitude increases with light availability. In contrast, heterotrophs and mixotrophic acquired phototrophs (that obtain < 30% of their carbon from photosynthesis) do not exhibit such cycles. This prediction matches field observations, in which only strict ( > 95% of carbon from photosynthesis) acquired phototrophs form blooms. PMID:26833622

  8. Dynamic variation of supernatant quality in a dairy shed waste stabilisation pond system.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, J; Sivakumar, M; Hagare, D; Jenkins, A

    2007-01-01

    An intensive monitoring program of a standard two-stage dairy shed waste stabilisation pond system was undertaken to determine the incidence and extent of spatial and temporal variation of basic physio-chemical parameters, and to shed light on the longer term dynamic nature of in-pond conditions. The anaerobic-facultative pond system, located in a remote rural area, treats wastewater from the hosing down and hydraulic flushing of the milking parlour and holding yard at the farm dairy shed. A number of multi-parameter water quality field monitoring probes were permanently deployed at various locations within the two ponds to enable continuous measurement of temperature, pH, conductivity and dissolved oxygen. In addition, profiling of the supernatant of both ponds was undertaken at different times of the year to examine vertical variation of the same parameters. Continuous monitoring revealed spatial homogeneity in EC and pH levels in the upper metre of both ponds. Physio-chemical parameters also appear to change uniformly across the ponds in response to external stimuli such as rainfall. Neither pond, however, exhibits homogeneity down the profile of the supernatant. Seasonal stratification is prevalent in the facultative pond suggesting poor vertical mixing, while the anaerobic pond is notably affected by sludge accumulation. A long-term pattern of rising conductivity in both ponds indicated accumulation of dissolved salt species in the system due to recirculation of reclaimed effluent for hydraulic flushing of the dairy shed. In the facultative pond, diurnal fluctuations in dissolved oxygen, oxidation-reduction potential and turbidity during warmer months of the year closely followed temperature swings. The extensive data collected in this study provides a detailed picture of the physio-chemical dynamics of two-stage stabilisation pond systems treating dairy shed wastewater.

  9. Adaptive robust stabilisation for a class of uncertain nonlinear time-delay dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hansheng

    2013-02-01

    The problem of adaptive robust stabilisation is considered for a class of uncertain nonlinear dynamical systems with multiple time-varying delays. It is assumed that the upper bounds of the nonlinear delayed state perturbations are unknown and that the time-varying delays are any non-negative continuous and bounded functions which do not require that their derivatives have to be less than one. In particular, it is only required that the nonlinear uncertainties, which can also include time-varying delays, are bounded in any non-negative nonlinear functions which are not required to be known for the system designer. For such a class of uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems, a new method is presented whereby a class of continuous memoryless adaptive robust state feedback controllers with a rather simpler structure is proposed. It is also shown that the solutions of uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems can be guaranteed to be uniformly exponentially convergent towards a ball which can be as small as desired. Finally, as an application, an uncertain nonlinear time-delay ecosystem with two competing species is given to demonstrate the validity of the results.

  10. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. E.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present.

  11. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ross, A E; McKenzie, D R

    2016-01-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present.

  12. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A. E.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present. PMID:27046237

  13. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas.

    PubMed

    Ross, A E; McKenzie, D R

    2016-01-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present. PMID:27046237

  14. Cyanobacterial and microcystins dynamics following the application of hydrogen peroxide to waste stabilisation ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrington, D. J.; Ghadouani, A.; Ivey, G. N.

    2013-06-01

    Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are a risk to human and ecological health, and a hindrance to biological wastewater treatment. This study investigated the use of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the removal of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins from within waste stabilization ponds (WSPs). The daily dynamics of cyanobacteria and microcystins (commonly occurring cyanotoxins) were examined following the addition of H2O2 to wastewater within both the laboratory and at the full scale within a maturation WSP, the final pond in a wastewater treatment plant. Hydrogen peroxide treatment at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg H2O2 μg-1 total phytoplankton chlorophyll a led to the lysis of cyanobacteria, in turn releasing intracellular microcystins to the dissolved state. In the full-scale trial, dissolved microcystins were then degraded to negligible concentrations by H2O2 and environmental processes within five days. A shift in the phytoplankton assemblage towards beneficial Chlorophyta species was also observed within days of H2O2 addition. However, within weeks, the Chlorophyta population was significantly reduced by the re-establishment of toxic cyanobacterial species. This re-establishment was likely due to the inflow of cyanobacteria from ponds earlier in the treatment train, suggesting that whilst H2O2 may be a suitable short-term management technique, it must be coupled with control over inflows if it is to improve WSP performance in the longer term.

  15. Cyclodextrin stabilised emulsions and cyclodextrinosomes.

    PubMed

    Mathapa, Baghali G; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2013-11-01

    We report the preparation of o/w emulsions stabilised by microcrystals of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes. The inclusion complexes are formed by threading cyclodextrins from the aqueous phase on n-tetradecane or silicone oil molecules from the emulsion drop surface which grow further into microrods and microplatelets depending on the type of cyclodextrin (CD) used. These microcrystals remain attached on the surface of the emulsion drops and form densely packed layers which resemble Pickering emulsions. The novelty of this emulsion stabilisation mechanism is that molecularly dissolved cyclodextrin from the continuous aqueous phase is assembled into colloid particles directly onto the emulsion drop surface, i.e. molecular adsorption leads to effective Pickering stabilisation. The β-CD stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were so stable that we used this system as a template for preparation of cyclodextrinosomes. These structures were produced solely through formation of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes and their assembly into a crystalline phase on the drop surface retained its stability after the removal of the core oil. The structures of CD-stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were characterised using optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, cross-polarised light microscopy and WETSEM while the cyclodextrinosomes were characterised by SEM. We also report the preparation of CD-stabilised emulsions with a range of other oils, including tricaprylin, silicone oil, isopropyl myristate and sunflower oil. We studied the effect of the salt concentration in the aqueous phase, the type of CD and the oil volume fraction on the type of emulsion formed. The CD-stabilised emulsions can be applied in a range of surfactant-free formulations with possible applications in cosmetics, home and personal care. Cyclodextrinosomes could find applications in pharmaceutical formulations as microencapsulation and drug delivery vehicles. PMID:24043288

  16. Stabilising Springs for Fixed Lingual Retainer

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, M.K.; Ramachandraprabhakar; Saravanan, R.; Rajvikram, N.; Kuppuchamy

    2013-01-01

    Most treated malocclusion needs fixed lingual retention. To stabilise fixed lingual retainer in the exact location needs proper stabilisation. Proper stabilization requires a holding spring. This Stabilising Spring should be easy to fabricate and help the clinician to stabilise the retainer quickly and save the chair side time. More over it should not irritate the mucosa and should be easy to insert and remove. PMID:24392431

  17. Quadratic stabilisability of multi-agent systems under switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yongqiang; Ji, Zhijian; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Long

    2014-12-01

    This paper addresses the stabilisability of multi-agent systems (MASs) under switching topologies. Necessary and/or sufficient conditions are presented in terms of graph topology. These conditions explicitly reveal how the intrinsic dynamics of the agents, the communication topology and the external control input affect stabilisability jointly. With the appropriate selection of some agents to which the external inputs are applied and the suitable design of neighbour-interaction rules via a switching topology, an MAS is proved to be stabilisable even if so is not for each of uncertain subsystem. In addition, a method is proposed to constructively design a switching rule for MASs with norm-bounded time-varying uncertainties. The switching rules designed via this method do not rely on uncertainties, and the switched MAS is quadratically stabilisable via decentralised external self-feedback for all uncertainties. With respect to applications of the stabilisability results, the formation control and the cooperative tracking control are addressed. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  18. Percutaneous Transpedicular Fixation: Technical tips and Pitfalls of Sextant and Pathfinder Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed Salah Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The efficacy of the operative techniques, possible benefits as well as pitfalls and limitations of the techniques are discussed. Potential drawbacks are also detected. Purpose This study aims to report indications, techniques, and our experience with the use of the Sextant and PathFinder percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation systems. Overview of Literature Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion is a novel technique. Successful percutaneous placement of pedicle screws requires surgical skill and experience because of lack of anatomic surface landmarks. Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous placement of pedicle screws is effective. Many systems are now available. Methods We conducted a prospective operative and postoperative analysis of 40 patients with absolute indication for thoracic or lumbar instability between January 2009 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with the Sextant (group A) and PathFinder (group B) systems under fluoroscopic guidance. Operative techniques are discussed and the results compared. Results Percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation minimizes the morbidity associated with open techniques without compromising the quality of fixation. A total of 190 screws were inserted. There was no additional morbidity. Postoperative computed tomography images and plain X-rays were analyzed. Reduction of visual analog scale scores of back pain was evident. Conclusions Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous pedicular screws are feasible and can be safely done. Current systems allow multi-segmental fixation with significantly less difficulties. The described techniques have acceptable intra- and postoperative complication rates, and overall sufficient pain control with early mobilization of patients. PMID:26949466

  19. Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation for lumbar stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Xiaoqing; Yao, Yu

    2011-03-01

    Few reports have described the combined use of unilateral pedicle screw fixation and interbody fusion for lumbar stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed 79 patients with lumbar stenosis. The rationale and effectiveness of unilateral pedicle screw fixation were studied from biomechanical and clinical perspectives, aiming to reduce stiffness of the implant. All patients were operated with posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage in combination with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation and had reached the 3-year follow-up interval after operation. The mean operating time was 115 minutes (range=95-150 min) and the mean estimated blood loss was 150 mL (range=100-200 mL). The mean duration of hospital stay was 10 days (range=7-15 days). Clinical outcomes were assessed prior to surgery and reassessed at intervals using Denis' pain and work scales. Fusion status was determined from X-rays and CT scans. At the final follow-up, the clinical results were satisfactory and patients showed significantly improved scores (p<0.01) either on the pain or the work scale. Successful fusion was achieved in all patients. There were no new postoperative radiculopathies, or instances of malpositioned or fractured hardware. Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular fixation is an effective treatment for decompressive surgery for lumbar stenosis.

  20. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Ko; Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11-12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11-12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11-12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  1. Mycorrhizal aspects in slope stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Frank

    2016-04-01

    In order to re-colonise and stabilise slopes affected by superficial soil failure with plants essential requirements have to be met: the plants must grow the plants must survive sustainably plant succession must start and continuously develop These requirements, however, are anything but easy given, particularly under the often hostile environmental conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. Mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, are said to improve the plants' ability to overcome periods governed by strongly (growth) limiting factors. Subsequently, results of investigations are presented of mycorrhizal effects on different plant and soil functions related to eco-engineering in general and soil and slope stabilisation in particular. Generally, inoculation yielded higher biomass of the host plants above as well as below ground. Furthermore, the survival rate was higher for mycorrhized compared to non-mycorrhized plants, particularly under extreme environmental conditions. However, the scale of the mycorrhizal impact may be species specific of both the plant host as well as the fungal partner(s) and often becomes evident only after a certain time lag. Depending on the plant-fungus combination the root length per soil volume was found to be between 0 and 2.5 times higher for inoculated compared to non-inoculated specimens. On an alpine graded ski slope the survival of inoculated compared to non-treated Salix herbacea cuttings was significant after one vegetation period only for one of the three added mycorrhizal fungus species. However, after three years all of the inoculated plantlets performed significantly better than the non-inoculated controls. The analysis of the potential for producing and stabilising soil aggregates of five different ectomycorrhizal fungi showed high variation and, for the species Inocybe lacera, no significant difference compared to untreated soil. Furthermore, inoculation of Salix

  2. Role of Transpedicular Percutaneous Vertebral Biopsy for Diagnosis of Pathology in Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Sunil; Hardikar, Sharad Moreshwar; Hardikar, Madan Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective observational study. Purpose To identify the role of percutaneous vertebral biopsy in histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures and to identify the frequency of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fractures. Overview of Literature Vertebral compression fractures are common in the Indian population. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear imaging have some limitations in the diagnosis of definitive pathology of vertebral compression fractures. Therefore, histological confirmation is necessary for definitive diagnosis and to plan appropriate management for patient. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted involving 84 patients who underwent percutaneous vertebral biopsy between 2010 and 2014. We performed C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular core vertebral biopsy of vertebral compression fractures under combination of local anesthesia and intravenous conscious sedation. Results Sufficient biopsy material was obtained in 79 of the 84 cases. In the other five cases, biopsy material was not sufficient for reporting. Out of the 79 cases, osteoporotic pathology was detected in 69 patients, malignancy was detected in 8 patients and no pathology was found in 2 patients. Two patients with distant metastases to vertebra were identified. Primary spinal malignancy was detected in 6 patients (1 unsuspected plasmacytoma, 5 diagnosed malignancy preoperatively). So, the frequency of unsuspected malignancy of this study was 1.19% (1/84). None of the patients had any complications. Conclusions C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular vertebral biopsy is useful in obtaining definitive histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures, especially in differentiating malignant and non-malignant vertebral compression fractures and helping plan appropriate management of patients. The rate of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fracture was 1.19%. PMID:27790322

  3. Preliminary stabilisation of stormwater biofilters and loss of filter material.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, D N; Mather, P B

    2016-01-01

    Stabilisation affects performance of stormwater biofilters operating under intermittent wetting and drying, mainly due to wash-off of filter material. Understanding the dynamics of solids wash-off is crucial in designing stormwater biofilters. The current study analysed the dynamics of solids wash-off in stormwater biofilters and quantified the loss of solids from the filter. Four Perspex™ bioretention columns (94 mm internal diameter) were fabricated with a filter layer that contained 8% organic material and were fed with tap water with different numbers of antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow and tested for particle size distribution and total solids and turbidity. Solids of particle size less than 50 microns were washed off from the filter during the stabilisation period, indicating that no sand particles were washed off. The very first event after commissioning the filter resulted in the highest wash-off of solids (approximately 75 g of fines) while a significant drop in wash-off followed from the second event. An empirical model fitted to the data showed that preliminary stabilisation of a filter occurs in the first three events, during which almost 25% of fines are lost from the filter. PMID:27533853

  4. Preliminary stabilisation of stormwater biofilters and loss of filter material.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, D N; Mather, P B

    2016-01-01

    Stabilisation affects performance of stormwater biofilters operating under intermittent wetting and drying, mainly due to wash-off of filter material. Understanding the dynamics of solids wash-off is crucial in designing stormwater biofilters. The current study analysed the dynamics of solids wash-off in stormwater biofilters and quantified the loss of solids from the filter. Four Perspex™ bioretention columns (94 mm internal diameter) were fabricated with a filter layer that contained 8% organic material and were fed with tap water with different numbers of antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow and tested for particle size distribution and total solids and turbidity. Solids of particle size less than 50 microns were washed off from the filter during the stabilisation period, indicating that no sand particles were washed off. The very first event after commissioning the filter resulted in the highest wash-off of solids (approximately 75 g of fines) while a significant drop in wash-off followed from the second event. An empirical model fitted to the data showed that preliminary stabilisation of a filter occurs in the first three events, during which almost 25% of fines are lost from the filter.

  5. Enzymatically activated emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanofibre networks.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Inês P; Sasselli, Ivan Ramos; Cannon, Daniel A; Hughes, Meghan; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Tuttle, Tell; Ulijn, Rein V

    2016-03-01

    We report on-demand formation of emulsions stabilised by interfacial nanoscale networks. These are formed through biocatalytic dephosphorylation and self-assembly of Fmoc(9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl)dipeptide amphiphiles in aqueous/organic mixtures. This is achieved by using alkaline phosphatase which transforms surfactant-like phosphorylated precursors into self-assembling aromatic peptide amphiphiles (Fmoc-tyrosine-leucine, Fmoc-YL) that form nanofibrous networks. In biphasic organic/aqueous systems, these networks form preferentially at the interface thus providing a means of emulsion stabilisation. We demonstrate on-demand emulsification by enzyme addition, even after storage of the biphasic mixture for several weeks. Experimental (Fluorescence, FTIR spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy) and computational techniques (atomistic molecular dynamics) are used to characterise the interfacial self-assembly process. PMID:26905042

  6. Mean square stabilisation of complex oscillatory regimes in nonlinear stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev

    2016-04-01

    A problem of stabilisation of the randomly forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes for nonlinear dynamic systems is considered. For this problem solution, we propose a new theoretical approach to consider these modes as invariant manifolds of the stochastic differential equations with control. The aim of the control is to provide the exponential mean square (EMS) stability for these manifolds. A general method of the stabilisation based on the algebraic criterion of the EMS-stability is elaborated. A constructive technique for the design of the feedback regulators stabilising various types of oscillatory regimes is proposed. A detailed parametric analysis of the problem of the stabilisation for stochastically forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes is given. An illustrative example of stochastic Hopf system is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  7. Reset stabilisation of positive linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Yunfei; Shen, Jun

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the problems of reset stabilisation for positive linear systems (PLSs) are investigated. Some properties relating to reset control of PLSs are first revealed. It is shown that these properties are different from the corresponding ones of general linear systems. Second, a class of periodic reset scheme is designed to exponentially stabilise an unstable PLS with a prescribed decay rate. Then, for a given PLS with reset control, some discussions on the upper bound of its decay rate are presented. Meanwhile, the reset stabilisation for PLSs in a special case is probed as well. Finally, two numerical examples are used to demonstrate the correctness and effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results.

  8. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw/rod fixation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Hou, Tiesheng; Wang, Xinwei; Ma, Shengzhong

    2003-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using threaded cages has gained wide popularity for lumbosacral spinal disease. Our biomechanical tests showed that PLIF using a single diagonal cage with unilateral facetectomy does add a little to spinal stability and provides equal or even higher postoperative stability than PLIF using two posterior cages with bilateral facetectomy. Studies also demonstrated that cages placed using a posterior approach did not cause the same increase in spinal stiffness seen with pedicle screw instrumentation, and we concluded that cages should not be used posteriorly without other forms of fixation. On the other hand, placement of two cages using a posterior approach does have the disadvantage of risk to the bilateral nerve roots. We therefore performed a prospective study to determine whether PLIF can be accomplished by utilizing a single diagonal fusion cage with the application of supplemental transpedicular screw/rod instrumentation. Twenty-seven patients underwent a PLIF using one single fusion cage (BAK, Sulzer Spine-Tech, Minneapolis, MN, USA) inserted posterolaterally and oriented anteromedially on the symptomatic side with unilateral facetectomy and at the same level supplemental fixation with a transpedicular screw/rod system. The internal fixation systems included 12 SOCON spinal systems (Aesculap AG, Germany) and 15 TSRH spinal systems (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, USA). The inclusion criteria were grade 1 to 2 lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis, lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and recurrent lumbar disc herniations with instability. Patients had at least 1 year of low back pain and/or unilateral sciatica and a severely restricted functional ability in individuals aged 28-55 years. Patients with more than grade 2 spondylolisthesis or adjacent-level degeneration were excluded from the study. Patients were clinically assessed prior to surgery by an independent assessor; they were then reassessed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24

  9. Late vertebral body fracture after lumbar transpedicular fixation. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Missori, Paolo; Ramieri, Alessandro; Costanzo, Giuseppe; Peschillo, Simone; Paolini, Sergio; Miscusi, Massimo; D'Andrea, Giancarlo; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    Late-onset vertebral body (VB) fracture after lumbar transpedicular fixation has not been previously described in the literature. The authors present three cases in which VB fracture occurred several months after posterolateral fixation in patients with degenerative disease or traumatic injury. The authors suggest that postoperative osteopenia, modified load-sharing function, and intravertebral clefts were responsible for the fractures. Two women and one man were evaluated at a mean follow-up interval of 3 months. Two patients suffered recurrent lumbar pain. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fracture of some of the instrumentation-treated VBs. These two patients underwent surgical superior or inferior extension of instrumentation. The third, an asymptomatic patient, received conservative management. The two patients who underwent reoperation made complete recoveries, and there was no evidence of further bone collapse in any case. The authors speculate that alterations in the VBs may occur following application of spinal instrumentation. In rare cases, the device can fracture and consequently lead to recurrent lumbar back pain. Recovery can be achieved by extending the instrumentation in the appropriate direction.

  10. Bioconjugation and stabilisation of biomolecules in biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Guido A.

    2016-01-01

    Suitable bioconjugation strategies and stabilisation of biomolecules on electrodes is essential for the development of novel and commercially viable biosensors. In the present review, the functional groups that comprise the selectable targets for practical bioconjugation methods are discussed. We focus on describing the most common immobilisation techniques used in biosensor construction, which are classified into irreversible and reversible methods. Concerning the stability of proteins, the two main types of stability may be defined as (i) storage or shelf stability, and (ii) operational stability. Both types of stability are explained, as well as the introduction of an electrophoretic technique for predicting protein–polymer interactions. In addition, solution and dry stabilisation as well as stabilisation using the covalent immobilisation of proteins are discussed including possible factors that influence stability. Finally, the integration of nanomaterials, such as magnetic particles, with protein immobilisation is discussed in relation to protein stability studies. PMID:27365036

  11. Bioconjugation and stabilisation of biomolecules in biosensors.

    PubMed

    Liébana, Susana; Drago, Guido A

    2016-06-30

    Suitable bioconjugation strategies and stabilisation of biomolecules on electrodes is essential for the development of novel and commercially viable biosensors. In the present review, the functional groups that comprise the selectable targets for practical bioconjugation methods are discussed. We focus on describing the most common immobilisation techniques used in biosensor construction, which are classified into irreversible and reversible methods. Concerning the stability of proteins, the two main types of stability may be defined as (i) storage or shelf stability, and (ii) operational stability. Both types of stability are explained, as well as the introduction of an electrophoretic technique for predicting protein-polymer interactions. In addition, solution and dry stabilisation as well as stabilisation using the covalent immobilisation of proteins are discussed including possible factors that influence stability. Finally, the integration of nanomaterials, such as magnetic particles, with protein immobilisation is discussed in relation to protein stability studies. PMID:27365036

  12. Finite-time stabilisation of simple mechanical systems using continuous feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Amit K.; Bohn, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Stabilisation of simple mechanical systems in finite time with continuous state feedback is considered here. The dynamics are represented by generalised (local) coordinates. A general methodology to construct control Lyapunov functions that are Hölder continuous and that can be used to show finite-time stability of the feedback controlled system, is presented. This construction also gives the feedback control law, and results in the feedback system being Hölder continuous as well. Unlike Lipschitz continuous feedback control systems, the feedback control scheme given here converges to the desired equilibrium in finite time. Moreover, unlike discontinuous and hybrid control schemes, the feedback control law does not lead to chattering in the presence of measurement noise, does not excite unmodelled high-frequency dynamics, and can be implemented with actuators that can only deliver continuous control inputs. The advantages of continuous finite-time stabilisation over continuous asymptotic stabilisation of mechanical systems, has been described in some prior research on finite-time stabilisation of the double integrator. The finite-time stabilisation scheme given here generalises this prior research to multiple degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. A numerical comparison is carried out through numerical simulations on two example systems that are representative of a broad class of simple mechanical systems.

  13. Partial stability and stabilisation of Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Wei; Sun, Liang-Jie; Liu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of Boolean networks and the stabilisation of Boolean control networks with respect to part of the system's states. First, an algebraic expression of the Boolean (control) network is derived by the semi-tensor product of matrices. Then, some necessary and sufficient conditions for partial stability of Boolean networks are given. Finally, the stabilisation of Boolean control networks by a free control sequence and a state-feedback control is investigated and the respective necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained. Examples are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  14. Effects of electron beam irradiation on the property behaviour of poly(ether-block-amide) blended with various stabilisers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Kieran A.; Kennedy, James E.; Barron, Valerie; McEvoy, Brian; Vrain, Olivier; Ryan, Damien; Cowman, Richard; Higginbotham, Clement L.

    2015-05-01

    Radiosterilisation can induce modifications and/or degradation to transpire in poly(ether-block-amide) (PEBA) following irradiation. The current investigation utilises combined synergistic mixtures of stabilisers to minimise these effects, by melt blending them with the PEBA material. Hindered amine stabilisers (HAS), primary antioxidants and secondary antioxidants were the stabilisers incorporate to reduce/eliminate the effects of 50 kGy electron beam irradiation dose on the material. Results were discussed by comparing the stabilising efficiency of mixtures on the PEBA material in contrast to the control sample. Dynamic frequency sweeps demonstrated the formation of crosslinks, where the degree of crosslinking was dependent on the combination of stabilisers mixed in the base material (PEBA). The storage modulus displayed that PEBA blended with Irganox 565 had very slight changes in contrast to all other samples following irradiation. However, since this sample is a phenol containing system, severe discolouration was observed in comparison to other samples due to the oxidation of the hindered phenol. Overall, this study provides compelling evidence that a combined synergistic mixture of Irganox 565 (multifunctional phenolic antioxidant) and Tinuvin 783 (hindered amide light stabiliser) with PEBA, resulted in the best radiation stability.

  15. Polycarboxylate ethers: The key towards non-toxic TiO2 nanoparticle stabilisation in physiological solutions.

    PubMed

    Koch, S; Kessler, M; Mandel, K; Dembski, S; Heuzé, K; Hackenberg, S

    2016-07-01

    Stable, non-agglomerated TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) dispersions are a crucial requirement for an accurate NP dosing in in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this study self-synthesised TiO2 NPs were stabilised in three different cell culture media (DMEM, RPMI, BEGM) with the help of stabilising agents. Cell culture tested stabilisers (bovine serum albumin, fetal bovine serum) were compared to non-tested commercial products which are commonly utilized in the cement industry (Melflux(®) 4930 F, Melpers(®) 4343, Sika(®) ViscoCrete(®)-10110178). For a quantitative evaluation and comparison of the degree of stabilisation, a sedimentation study using UV absorbance spectroscopy was carried out and the agglomerate size was measured via dynamic light scattering. The cytotoxicity of the novel surfactants and stabilised NPs was examined in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma-derived FaDu cell line and in human mesenchymal stem cells. We successfully stabilised TiO2 NPs with Melflux(®) 4930 F in each cell culture medium, achieving perfect stability over at least one day and agglomerate sizes of less than 100nm, while the cytotoxicity of the NPs was not affected. PMID:26998862

  16. Foam stabilisation using surfactant exfoliated graphene.

    PubMed

    Sham, Alison Y W; Notley, Shannon M

    2016-05-01

    Liquid-air foams have been stabilised using a suspension of graphene particles at very low particle loadings. The suspension was prepared through the liquid phase exfoliation of graphite in the presence of the non-ionic tri-block surfactant, Pluronic® F108. The graphene particles possess an extremely high aspect ratio, with lateral dimensions of between 0.1 and 1.3 μm as evidenced by TEM imaging. The particles were shown to exhibit a number of other properties known to favour stabilisation of foam structures. Particle surface activity was confirmed through surface tension measurements, suggesting the particles favour adsorption at the air-water interface. The evolution of bubble size distributions over time indicated the presence of particles yielded improvements to foam stability due to a reduction in disproportionation. Foam stability measurements showed a non-linear relationship between foam half-life and graphene concentration, indicative of the rate at which particles adsorb at bubble surfaces. The wettability of the graphene particles was altered upon addition of alkali metal chlorides, with the stability of the foams being enhanced according to the series Na(+)>Li(+)>K(+)>Cs(+). This effect is indicative of the relative hydration capacity of each salt with respect to the surfactant, which is adsorbed along the graphene plane as a result of the exfoliation process. Thus, surfactant exfoliated graphene particles exhibit a number of different features that demonstrate efficient application of high-aspect ratio particles in the customisation and enhancement of foams.

  17. [Functional Outcome after Chest Wall Stabilisation].

    PubMed

    Kyriss, T; Lenz, U; Friedel, G

    2016-09-01

    This overview reviews the current literature to compare the functional results after surgical and conservative treatment of patients with flail chest and multiple rib fractures. Regarding functional aspects, patients in the early phase after a thoracic trauma are those that benefit most from the stabilisation of the chest wall by internal fixation of the ribs. Patients recover faster from restrictive respiratory disorders, have less pain and return to the workplace earlier after an operation compared with those that receive conservative treatment. In the medium term, however, patients that are treated conservatively also achieve normal pulmonary function values and become free of pain. The period of convalescence after blunt thoracic trauma is generally underestimated. Future studies of the functional outcome after severe chest injuries should take this into account and the development of functional parameters should be monitored for at least 24 months. A prospective data collection of early and long-term surgical results in registries would be suitable to evaluate benefits and indications of chest wall stabilisation. PMID:27607891

  18. Aqueous foams stabilised solely by nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Dominique

    2011-03-01

    Particles are being increasingly used to stabilise foams and emulsions, the corresponding emulsions being known as ``Pickering'' emulsions. One of the peculiarities of these systems is the absence of Ostwald ripening: since the bubbles or drops do not grow (coalescence seems also suppressed) both foams and emulsions are stable over extremely long periods of time (months). These features make particles very interesting surface active agents as compared to standard surfactants or polymers/proteins. The origin of the suppression of ripening can be traced to the unusual behaviour of the interfacial layers made by these particles. The layers are solid-like and the usual characterisation methods (surface tension, surface rheology) are not straightforward to use. In this presentation, we will illustrate these difficulties with experiments made with partially hydrophobic silica nanoparticles. We will also discuss the relevance of foam characterisations methods such as multiple light scattering and X-ray tomography.

  19. Impact on Neurological Recovery of Transforaminal Debridement and Interbody Fusion versus Transpedicular Decompression in Combination with Pedicle Screw Instrumentation for Treating Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Choovongkomol, Kongtush; Piyapromdee, Urawit; Leownorasate, Manoon

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare the neurological outcome of transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion with transpedicular decompression for treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis. Overview of Literature Few articles have addressed the impact of neurological recovery in patients with tuberculosis who were treated by two different operative methods via the posterior-only approach. Methods Clinical and radiographic results of one-stage posterior instrumented spinal fusion for treatment of tuberculous spondylodiscitis with neurological deficits were reviewed and analyzed from 2009 to 2013. The extensive (E) group consisted of patients who received transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion, whereas transpedicular decompression was performed on limited (L) group. Rapid recovery was improvement of at least one Frankel grade within 6 weeks after operation. Otherwise, it was slow recovery. Results All 39 patients had improved neurological signs. The median follow-up period was 24 months. Proportionately younger patients (under 65 years of age) received extensive surgery (15 of 18, 83.3% vs. 11 of 21, 52.4%; p=0.04). The mean operative time and blood loss in the group E were higher than in the group L (both p<0.01). With regard to type of procedure, especially at thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, patients who underwent extensive surgery had rapid neurological recovery significantly different from those of limited surgery (p=0.01; Relative Risk, 3.06; 95% Confidence Interval, 1.13 to 8.29). Conclusions Transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion provides more rapid neurological recovery in patients with thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis compared to transpedicular decompression. PMID:27340536

  20. Environmental behaviour of stabilised foundry sludge.

    PubMed

    Coz, Alberto; Andrés, Ana; Soriano, Sonia; Irabien, Angel

    2004-06-18

    Environmental characterisation of foundry sludge (FS) and the stabilised/solidified (S/S) derived products has been performed according to the leaching behaviour. Portland cement and lime have been used as binders and foundry sand fines, activated carbon and black carbon have been used as additives in the S/S processes. The results of the characterisation show that the behaviour of the waste in acid media is mainly influenced by the inorganic components of the waste, while the organic matter only has an influence in the redox potential of the leachates. Due to the complexity of the waste, a computer modelling of equilibrium (MINTEQ) has been used in order to compare the experimental extractability with the simulated curves of the metallic species. The zinc content in the leachate is close related to the theoretical curves in the waste and all S/S products, while the rest of the metals do not show a coherent behaviour with the hydroxides evolution. The results of compliance testing allow to obtain the best S/S formulations using activated and black carbon as sorbents. The comparison between different leaching procedures leads to equivalent results depending only on the pH. PMID:15177750

  1. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  2. High-performance electronic image stabilisation for shift and rotation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Steve C. J.; Hickman, D. L.; Wu, F.

    2014-06-01

    A novel low size, weight and power (SWaP) video stabiliser called HALO™ is presented that uses a SoC to combine the high processing bandwidth of an FPGA, with the signal processing flexibility of a CPU. An image based architecture is presented that can adapt the tiling of frames to cope with changing scene dynamics. A real-time implementation is then discussed that can generate several hundred optical flow vectors per video frame, to accurately calculate the unwanted rigid body translation and rotation of camera shake. The performance of the HALO™ stabiliser is comprehensively benchmarked against the respected Deshaker 3.0 off-line stabiliser plugin to VirtualDub. Eight different videos are used for benchmarking, simulating: battlefield, surveillance, security and low-level flight applications in both visible and IR wavebands. The results show that HALO™ rivals the performance of Deshaker within its operating envelope. Furthermore, HALO™ may be easily reconfigured to adapt to changing operating conditions or requirements; and can be used to host other video processing functionality like image distortion correction, fusion and contrast enhancement.

  3. Pavement thickness and stabilised foundation layer assessment using ground-coupled GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinhui; Vennapusa, Pavana K. R.; White, David J.; Beresnev, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Experimental results from field and laboratory investigations using a ground-coupled ground penetrating radar (GPR), dielectric measurement, magnetic imaging tomography (MIT) and dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP) tests are presented. Dielectric properties of asphalt pavement and stabilised and unstabilised pavement foundation materials were evaluated in the laboratory in frozen and unfrozen conditions. Laboratory test results showed that dielectric properties of materials back-calculated from GPR in comparison to dielectric gauge measurements are strongly correlated and repeatable. For chemically stabilised materials, curing time affected the dielectric properties of the materials. Field tests were conducted on asphalt pavement test sections with different foundation materials (stabilised and unstabilised layers), drainage conditions and layer thicknesses. GPR and MIT results were used to determine asphalt layer thicknesses and were compared with measured core thicknesses, while GPR and DCP were used to assess foundation layer profiles. Asphalt thicknesses estimated from GPR showed an average error of about 11% using the dielectric gauge values as input. The average error reduced to about 4% when calibrated with cores thicknesses. MIT results showed thicknesses that are about 9% higher than estimated using GPR. Foundation layer thicknesses could not be measured using GPR due to variations in moisture conditions between the test sections, which is partly attributed to variations in gradation and drainage characteristics of the subbase layer.

  4. Embolization by Direct Puncture with a Transpedicular Approach Using an Isocenter Puncture (ISOP) Method in a Patient with a Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Yukihisa Hamaguchi, Shingo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kon, Yuri; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Sakurai, Yuka; Murakami, Kenji; Arai, Yasunori; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-06-15

    BackgroundEndovascular aortic repair (EVAR) requires further intervention in 20-30 % of cases, often due to type II endoleak (T2EL). Management options for T2EL include transarterial embolization, direct puncture (DP), or transcaval embolization. We report the case of an 80-year-old man with T2EL who successfully underwent DP embolization.MethodsEmbolization by DP was performed with a transpedicular approach using an isocenter puncture (ISOP) method. An isocenter marker (ICM) was placed at a site corresponding to the aneurysm sac on fluoroscopy in two directions (frontal and lateral views). A vertebroplasty needle was inserted tangentially to the ICM under fluoroscopy and advanced to the anterior wall of the vertebral body. A 20 cm-length, 20-G-PTCD needle was inserted through the outer needle of the 13-G needle and advanced to the ICM. Sac embolization using 25 % N-buty-2-cyanoacrylate diluted with Lipiodol was performed. After complete embolization, rotational DA confirmed good filling of the sac with Lipiodol. The outer cannula and 13-G needle were removed and the procedure was completed.ResultsThe patient was discharged the next day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 and 8 months later showed no Lipiodol washout in the aneurysm sac, no endoleak recurrence, and no expansion of the excluded aneurysm.ConclusionDP with a transpedicular approach using ISOP may be useful when translumbar and transabdominal approaches prove difficult.

  5. Transpedicular wedge osteotomy for treatment of kyphosis after L1 fracture using intraoperative, full rotation, three-dimensional image (O-arm)-based navigation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yijie; Li, Xuefeng; Sun, Han; Yang, Huilin; Jiang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    There has been a large series in the literature reporting on results of osteotomy for the correction of kyphotic deformity secondary to post-traumatic thoracolumbar fracture. However, there are few reports on using intraoperative, full rotation, three dimensional image (O-arm)-based navigation, transpedicular wedge osteotomy for the correction of kyphotic deformity in old thoracolumbar fracture. A 45-year-old woman with L1 old fracture, presented to us with a Cobb angle of 45 degrees. The preoperative standard anteroposterior, lateral views and computed tomography (CT) reconstructions revealed kyphotic deformity. After attaching the reference arc of the 3D-imaging system, the thoracolumbar spine was screened using an O-arm without anatomical registration. The location, angle and depth of osteotomy, as well as screw fixation were performed using a guide tube while referring to the reconstructed 3D-anatomical views. The surgery was successful without nervous and vascular injuries. Using intraoperative, full rotation, three dimensional image (O-arm)-based navigation, the transpedicular wedge osteotomy is a safe and effective treatment for kyphosis after the thoracolumbar fracture, which can insert the pedicular screw accurately, trace the real-time wedge osteotomy and reduce the loss of correction of kyphotic deformity. PMID:26770513

  6. Stabilisation patterns of hourly urban sound levels.

    PubMed

    Prieto Gajardo, Carlos; Barrigón Morillas, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the stabilisation times for all 24 h of the day are analysed for 12 measurement stations located in the Spanish town of Malaga and throughout 5 years (2007-2011) of sampling environmental noise levels. For the results to be generalised to sound level measurements made in other streets or cities where there have been no long-term measurements, this study was developed for different road types and urban shapes. This distinction was made according to the types of roads indicated in other studies in which a statistically significant relationship was found between noise levels and the road type. The final objective of the study is to determine the capacity to estimate and approximate the real equivalent hourly noise level (L Aeq,1h) from the integration of a number of consecutive minutes (short-term measurements) less than 60 (L Aeq,1h ≈ L Aeq,T being T ≤ 60 min). Clearly, this strategy would save time and resources by making measurements of reduced duration. In summary and according to this analysis, a short-time measurement of 15 min is adequate to work with 90% confidence levels and errors of ±2 dB, with 80% confidence levels and errors of ±1 dB, and 50% confidence levels and errors of ±0.5 dB. However, it is necessary to consider the measurement hour period to achieve these levels of confidence due to the high variability throughout the day. PMID:25407987

  7. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  8. Stabilisation of microalgae: Iodine mobilisation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Clarke, William; Pratt, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Mobilisation of iodine during microalgae stabilisation was investigated, with the view of assessing the potential of stabilised microalgae as an iodine-rich fertiliser. An iodine-rich waste microalgae (0.35 ± 0.05 mg I g(-1) VS(added)) was stabilised under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Iodine mobilisation was linearly correlated with carbon emission, indicating iodine was in the form of organoiodine. Comparison between iodine and nitrogen mobilisation relative to carbon emission indicated that these elements were, at least in part, housed separately within the cells. After stabilisation, there were 0.22 ± 0.05 and 0.19 ± 0.01 mg g(-1) VS(added) iodine remaining in the solid in the aerobic and anaerobic processed material respectively, meaning 38 ± 5.0% (aerobic) and 50 ± 8.6% (anaerobic) of the iodine were mobilised, and consequently lost from the material. The iodine content of the stabilised material is comparable to the iodine content of some seaweed fertilisers, and potentially satisfies an efficient I-fertilisation dose.

  9. Minimally invasive spine stabilisation with long implants

    PubMed Central

    Logroscino, Carlo Ambrogio; Proietti, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Originally aimed at treating degenerative syndromes of the lumbar spine, percutaneous minimally invasive posterior fixation is nowadays even more frequently used to treat some thoracolumbar fractures. According to the modern principles of saving segment of motion, a short implant (one level above and one level below the injured vertebra) is generally used to stabilise the injured spine. Although the authors generally use a short percutaneous fixation in treating thoracolumbar fractures with good results, they observed some cases in which the high fragmentation of the vertebral body and the presence of other associated diseases (co-morbidities) did not recommend the use of a short construct. The authors identified nine cases, in which a long implant (two levels above and two levels below the injured vertebra) was performed by a percutaneous minimally invasive approach. Seven patients (five males/two females) were affected by thoracolumbar fractures. T12 vertebra was involved in three cases, L1 in two cases, T10 and L2 in one case, respectively. Two fractures were classified as type A 3.1, two as A 3.2, two as A 3.3 and one as B 2.3, according to Magerl. In the present series, there were also two patients affected by a severe osteolysis of the spine (T9 and T12) due to tumoral localisation. All patients operated on with long instrumentation had a good outcome with prompt and uneventful clinical recovery. At the 1-year follow-up, all patients except one, who died 11 months after the operation, did not show any radiologic signs of mobilisation or failure of the implant. Based on the results of the present series, the long percutaneous fixation seems to represent an effective and safe system to treat particular cases of vertebral lesions. In conclusion, the authors believe that a long implant might be an alternative surgical method compared to more aggressive or demanding procedures, which in a few patients could represent an overtreatment. PMID:19399530

  10. The effects of stabilisation on humanitarian action in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Muggah, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Haiti is routinely characterised as an archetypical fragile state. In spite of considerable donor investment in security promotion, real and perceived safety have proven frustratingly elusive. In the years before the devastating earthquake of 12 January 2010, the country's capital, Port-au-Prince, was also the site of considerable experimentation to promote security and stability. T his paper reviews the discourse, practice and outcomes associated with three parallel stabilisation initiatives undertaken in Haiti between 2007 and 2009. Although they shared many similar objectives, the paper describes how these separate interventions mobilised very different approaches. The specific focus is on United States, United Nations and combined Brazilian, Canadian and Norwegian stabilisation efforts and their implications for humanitarian actors, including the International Committee of the Red Cross and Médecins Sans Frontières. The paper concludes with some reflections on the implications of stabilisation before and after the country's most recent natural disaster.

  11. Food-grade Pickering emulsions stabilised with solid lipid particles.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Aleksandra; Kurukji, Daniel; Norton, Ian; Spyropoulos, Fotis

    2016-06-15

    Aqueous dispersions of tripalmitin particles (with a minimum size of 130 nm) were produced, via a hot sonication method, with and without the addition of food-grade emulsifiers. Depending on their relative size and chemistry, the emulsifiers altered the properties of the fat particles (e.g. crystal form, dispersion state and surface properties) by two proposed mechanisms. Firstly, emulsifiers modify the rate and/or extent of polymorphic transitions, resulting in the formation of fat crystals with a range of polarities. Secondly, the adsorption of emulsifiers at the particle interface modifies crystal surface properties. Such emulsifier-modified fat particles were then used to stabilise emulsions. As the behaviour of these particles was predisposed by the kind of emulsifier employed for their manufacture, the resulting particles showed different preferences to which of the emulsion phases (oil or water) became the continuous one. The polarity of the fat particles decreased as follows: Whey Protein Isolate > Soy Lecithin > Soy Lecithin + Tween 20 > Tween 20 > Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate > no emulsifier. Consequently, particles stabilised with WPI formed oil-in-water emulsions (O/W); particles stabilised solely with lecithin produced a highly unstable W/O emulsion; and particles stabilised with a mixture of lecithin and Tween 20 gave a stable W/O emulsion with drop size up to 30 μm. Coalescence stable, oil-continuous emulsions (W/O) with drop sizes between 5 and 15 μm were produced when the tripalmitin particles were stabilised with solely with Tween 20, solely with polyglycerol polyricinoleate, or with no emulsifier at all. It is proposed that the stability of the latter three emulsions was additionally enhanced by sintering of fat particles at the oil-water interface, providing a mechanical barrier against coalescence. PMID:27198879

  12. A new methodology for studying nanoparticle interactions in biological systems: Dispersing titania in biocompatible media using chemical stabilisers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Garcia, Sonia; Chen, Lan; Morris, Michael A.; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2011-11-01

    We report here a highly successful and original protocol for the dispersion of nanoparticles in biocompatible fluids for in vitro and in vivo studies of the nanoparticle-biology interaction. Titania is chosen as a suitable model as it is one of the priority materials listed by the OECD and small particles of the anatase structure are extensively used as e.g. photocatalysts in solar cells. Consequently, its delivery into the environment and its interaction with biological organisms is unavoidable. Therefore, its biological effect needs to be understood. In this work, we prepared stable nanoparticle dispersions of anatase aggregates using citrate stabilisations between 45 and 55 nm at concentrations of up to 10 mg mL-1. The optimum pH for this type of suspension was 7, resulting in ζ-potentials of approximately -50 mV. The stabilised aggregates were the subject of dialysis to produce stable dispersions without the chemical stabiliser, thus allowing studies in the absence of potentially toxic chemicals. Different sizing techniques such as Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA) and Differential Centrifuge Sedimentation (DCS) were used to characterise the different suspensions. The results obtained with each of these techniques are compared and a critical analysis of the suitability of each technique is given.We report here a highly successful and original protocol for the dispersion of nanoparticles in biocompatible fluids for in vitro and in vivo studies of the nanoparticle-biology interaction. Titania is chosen as a suitable model as it is one of the priority materials listed by the OECD and small particles of the anatase structure are extensively used as e.g. photocatalysts in solar cells. Consequently, its delivery into the environment and its interaction with biological organisms is unavoidable. Therefore, its biological effect needs to be understood. In this work, we prepared stable nanoparticle dispersions of anatase aggregates

  13. Use of Reinforced Lightweight Clay Aggregates for Landslide Stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Herle, Vitezslav

    2008-07-08

    In spring 2006 a large landslide combined with rock fall closed a highway tunnel near Svitavy in NE part of Czech Republic and cut the main highway connecting Bohemia with Moravia regions. Stabilisation work was complicated by steep mountainous terrain and large inflow of surface and underground water. The solution was based on formation of a stabilisation fill made of reinforced free draining aggregates at the toe of the slope with overlying lightweight fill up to 10 m high reinforced with PET geogrid and steel mesh protecting soft easily degrading sandstone against weathering. Extensive monitoring made possible to compare the FEM analysis with real values. The finished work fits very well in the environment and was awarded a special prize in the 2007 transport structures contest.

  14. Gas gain stabilisation in the ATLAS TRT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonov, A.; Arslan, O.; Baker, O. K.; Banas, E.; Bault, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Bendotti, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bertelsen, H.; Bingul, A.; Bocci, A.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Brock, I.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Catinaccio, A.; Celebi, E.; Cetin, S. A.; Choi, K.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Davis, D.; Degeorge, C.; Derendarz, D.; Desch, K.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dittus, F.; Dixon, N.; Dressnandt, N.; Dubinin, F. A.; Evans, H.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Froidevaux, D.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gecse, Z.; Godlewski, J.; Grefe, C.; Gurbuz, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, P. H.; Hawkins, A. D.; Heim, S.; Holway, K.; Kantserov, V. A.; Katounine, S.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kisielewski, B.; Klopov, N. V.; Konovalov, S. P.; Koperny, S.; Korotkova, N. A.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kramarenko, V.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Kruse, M.; Kudin, L. G.; Lichard, P.; Loginov, A.; Martinez, N. Lorenzo; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lytken, E.; Maleev, V. P.; Maevskiy, A. S.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mashinistov, R. Y.; Meyer, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mistry, K.; Mitsou, V. A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Newcomer, F. M.; Novodvorski, E. G.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Ostrowicz, W.; Palacino, G.; Patrichev, S.; Penwell, J.; Perez-Gomez, F.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; RØhne, O.; Reilly, M. B.; Rembser, C.; Ricken, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Ryjov, V.; Sasmaz, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Shmeleva, A. P.; Shulga, E.; Sivoklokov, S.; Smirnov, S.; Smirnov, Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Soldatov, E.; Sulin, V. V.; Tartarelli, G.; Taylor, W.; Thomson, E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tipton, P.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Vasquez, J.; Vasilyeva, L. F.; Vlazlo, O.; Weinert, B.; Williams, H. H.; Wong, V.; Zhukov, K. I.; Zieminska, D.

    2016-04-01

    The ATLAS (one of two general purpose detectors at the LHC) Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three tracking subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector. It is a large straw-based detector and contains about 350,000 electronics channels. The performance of the TRT as tracking and particularly particle identification detector strongly depends on stability of the operation parameters with most important parameter being the gas gain which must be kept constant across the detector volume. The gas gain in the straws can vary significantly with atmospheric pressure, temperature, and gas mixture composition changes. This paper presents a concept of the gas gain stabilisation in the TRT and describes in detail the Gas Gain Stabilisation System (GGSS) integrated into the Detector Control System (DCS). Operation stability of the GGSS during Run-1 is demonstrated.

  15. Oxidation behaviour of uranium and neptunium in stabilised zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Marcus; Somers, Joseph; Bouëxière, Daniel; Gaczyński, Piotr; Brendebach, Boris

    2009-12-01

    Yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) based (Zr,Y,U)O 2-x and (Zr,Y,Np)O 2-x solid solutions with 6 and 20 mol% actinide were prepared with Y/Zr ratios ranging from 0.2 to 2.0 to investigate uranium and neptunium oxidation behaviour depending on the oxygen vacancies in the defect fluorite lattice. Sintering at 1600 °C in Ar/H 2 yields a cubic, fluorite-type structure with U(IV) and Np(IV). Annealing (Zr,Y,U)O 2-x with Y/Zr=0.2 at 800 °C in air results in a tetragonal phase, whereas (Zr,Y,U)O 2-x with higher Y/Zr ratios and (Zr,Y,Np)O 2-x retain the cubic structure. XANES and O/ M measurements indicate mixed U(V)-U(VI) and Np(IV)-Np(V) oxidation states after oxidation. Based on X-ray diffraction, O/ M and EXAFS measurements, different oxidation mechanisms are identified for U- and Np-doped stabilised zirconia. In contrast to U, excess oxygen vacancies are needed to oxidise Np in (Zr,Y,Np)O 2-x as the oxidation process competes with Zr for oxygen vacancies. As a consequence, U(VI) and Np(V) can only be obtained in stabilised zirconia with Y/Zr=1 but not in YSZ with Y/Zr=0.2.

  16. Specific stabilisation exercise for spinal and pelvic pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Paulo H; Ferreira, Manuela L; Maher, Christopher G; Herbert, Robert D; Refshauge, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the efficacy of specific stabilisation exercise for spinal and pelvic pain. Randomised clinical trials evaluating specific stabilisation exercise were identified and retrieved. Outcomes were disability, pain, return to work, number of episodes, global perceived effect, or health-related quality of life. A single trial reported that specific stabilisation exercise was more effective than no treatment but not more effective than spinal manipulative therapy for the management of cervicogenic headache and associated neck pain. Single trials reported that specific stabilisation exercise was effective for pelvic pain and for prevention of recurrence after an acute episode of low back pain but not to reduce pain or disability associated with acute low back pain. Pooled analyses revealed that, for chronic low back pain, specific stabilisation exercise was superior to usual medical care and education but not to manipulative therapy, and no additional effect was found when specific stabilisation exercise was added to a conventional physiotherapy program. A single trial reported that specific stabilisation exercise and a surgical procedure to reduce pain and disability in chronic low back pain were equally effective. The available evidence suggests that specific stabilisation exercise is effective in reducing pain and disability in chronic but not acute low back pain. Single trials indicate that specific stabilisation exercise can be helpful in the treatment of cervicogenic headache and associated neck pain, pelvic pain, and in reducing recurrence after acute low back pain. PMID:16764545

  17. Experimental annular stratified flames characterisation stabilised by weak swirl

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaldo, A.; Kelman, J.B.

    2009-04-15

    A burner for the investigation of lean stratified premixed flames propagating in intense isotropic turbulence has been developed. Lean pre-mixtures of methane at different equivalence ratios were divided between two concentric co-flows to obtain annular stratification. Turbulence generators were used to control the level of turbulence intensity in the oncoming flow. A third annular weakly swirling airflow provided the flame stabilisation mechanism. A fundamental characteristic was that flame stabilisation did not rely on flow recirculation. The flames were maintained at a position where the local mass flux balanced the burning rate, resulting in a freely propagating turbulent flame front. The absence of physical surfaces in the vicinity of the flame provided free access for laser diagnostics. Stereoscopic Planar Image Velocimetry (SPIV) was applied to obtain the three components of the instantaneous velocity vectors on a vertical plane above the burner at the point of flame stabilisation. The instantaneous temperature fields were determined through Laser Induced Rayleigh (LIRay) scattering. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of acetone was used to calculate the average equivalence ratio distributions. Instantaneous turbulent burning velocities were extracted from SPIV results, while flame curvature and flame thermal thickness were calculated using the instantaneous temperature fields. The PDFs of these quantities were analysed to consider the separate influence of equivalence ratio stratification and turbulence. Increased levels of turbulence resulted in the expected higher turbulent burning velocities and flame front wrinkling. Flames characterised by higher fuel gradients showed higher turbulent burning velocities. Increased fuel concentration gradients gave rise to increased flame wrinkling, particularly when associated with positive small radius of curvature. (author)

  18. Oil-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by solid particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2016-01-21

    A brief review of the stabilisation of emulsions of two immiscible oils is given. We then describe the use of fumed silica particles coated with either hydrocarbon or fluorocarbon groups in acting as sole stabilisers of emulsions of various vegetable oils with linear silicone oils (PDMS) of different viscosity. Transitional phase inversion of emulsions, containing equal volumes of the two oils, from silicone-in-vegetable (S/V) to vegetable-in-silicone (V/S) occurs upon increasing the hydrophobicity of the particles. Close to inversion, emulsions are stable to coalescence and gravity-induced separation for at least one year. Increasing the viscosity of the silicone oil enables stable S/V emulsions to be prepared even with relatively hydrophilic particles. Predictions of emulsion type from calculated contact angles of a silica particle at the oil-oil interface are in agreement with experiment provided a small polar contribution to the surface energy of the oils is included. We also show that stable multiple emulsions of V/S/V can be prepared in a two-step procedure using two particle types of different hydrophobicity. At fixed particle concentration, catastrophic phase inversion of emulsions from V/S to S/V can be effected by increasing the volume fraction of vegetable oil. Finally, in the case of sunflower oil + 20 cS PDMS, the study is extended to particles other than silica which differ in chemical type, particle size and particle shape. Consistent with the above findings, we find that only sufficiently hydrophobic particles (clay, zinc oxide, silicone, calcium carbonate) can act as efficient V/S emulsion stabilisers.

  19. Stabilised electromagnetic levitation at 2-13 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danley, T. J.; Schiffman, R. A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Krishnan, S.; Rey, C. A.; Bruno, P. A.; Nordine, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    SEL, the Stabilised Electromagnetic Levitator, has been developed to exploit the unique design opportunities available in containerless microgravity experiments. Efficiency and versatility are obtained with multiple coils driven by individual broadband amplifiers whose phase and frequency are controlled. The heating and positioning fields are decoupled. Specimen translation, spin, and for liquids, shape may be adjusted. An open coil structure provides access for optical and diagnostic probes. Results of experiments with a prototype device are discussed. Levitating and heating materials on earth were demonstrated at frequencies up to 13 MHz.

  20. Self stabilisation and inition of motion at steep channel gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Betzler, Dimitri; Hübl, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    For the prediction of bedload transport rates knowledge about the initiation of motion is required. Self-stabilisation by the formation of bed structures increases the resistance against erosion and is regarded as the main stabilization process in steep open channels. A laboratory flume for bedload transport experiments at the Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna is available. The flume is 6 m long, 0.25 m wide and the inclination can be varied up to 25 %. A systematic study on self-stabilisation has been carried out. To generate a typical grain size distribution for torrents 55 pebble counts were analysed and a typical grain size distribution with a physical scale of 1:10 is generated. To increase the existing database on the development of natural bed structures the following experimental setup is used: Flume experiments are carried out at channel gradients varying from 9 to 21 %. Therefore the bed sediment mixture is built into the flume with a constant height of 0.25 m. Then a discharge close to incipient motion conditions is applied until the bedload transport decreases. Then the discharge is increased stepwise. This is repeated until typical bed structures like step-pool sequences develop and a constant discharge is applied until the bedload transport decreases towards zero. A typical duration of the experiment is about 12 hours. A laserscan device mounted above the flume is used to produce high resolution elevation models of the channel bed before and after the experiment. Finally the discharge is increased until the bed structures are destroyed. In order to collect information of transport rates and selective bedload transport, grains size analyses are performed at the channel outlet with high temporal resolution during the self-stabilisation and destruction phase of the experiment. Finally the channel bed is scanned again to identify immobile bed structures and determine the channel slope

  1. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  2. Stabilising emulsion-based colloidal structures with mixed food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Eric

    2013-03-15

    The physical scientist views food as a complex form of soft matter. The complexity has its origin in the numerous ingredients that are typically mixed together and the subtle variations in microstructure and texture induced by thermal and mechanical processing. The colloid science approach to food product formulation is based on the assumption that the major product attributes such as appearance, rheology and physical stability are determined by the spatial distribution and interactions of a small number of generic structural entities (biopolymers, particles, droplets, bubbles, crystals) organised in various kinds of structural arrangements (layers, complexes, aggregates, networks). This review describes some recent advances in this field with reference to three discrete classes of dispersed systems: particle-stabilised emulsions, emulsion gels and aerated emulsions. Particular attention is directed towards explaining the crucial role of the macromolecular ingredients (proteins and polysaccharides) in controlling the formation and stabilisation of the colloidal structures. The ultimate objective of this research is to provide the basic physicochemical insight required for the reliable manufacture of novel structured foods with an appealing taste and texture, whilst incorporating a more healthy set of ingredients than those found in many existing traditional products.

  3. Intraoperative computed tomography navigation for transpedicular screw fixation to treat unstable thoracic and lumbar spine fractures: clinical analysis of a case series (CARE-compliant).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures.From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C.In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2-3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws.The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  4. Stabilisation effects of superparamagnetic nanoparticles on clustering in nanocomposite microparticles and on magnetic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, K.; Hutter, F.; Gellermann, C.; Sextl, G.

    2013-04-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles of magnetite were coprecipitated from iron salts, dispersed with nitric acid and stabilised either by lactic acid (LA) or by a polycarboxylate-ether polymer (MELPERS4343, MP). The differently stabilised nanoparticles were incorporated into a silica matrix to form nanocomposite microparticles. The silica matrix was prepared either from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) or from an aqueous sodium silicate (water glass) solution. Stabilisation of nanoparticles had a crucial influence on microparticle texture and nanoparticle distribution in the silica matrix. Magnetic measurements in combination with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations suggest a uniform magnetic interaction of nanoparticles in case of LA stabilisation and magnetically interacting nanoparticle clusters of different sizes in case of MP stabilisation. Splitting of blocking temperature (TB) and irreversible temperature (Tir) in zero field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) measurements is discussed in terms of nanoparticle clustering.

  5. Stabilising compensators for linear time-varying differential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a constructive test to decide whether a given linear time-varying (LTV) differential system admits a stabilising compensator for the control tasks of tracking, disturbance rejection or model matching and construct and parametrise all of them if at least one exists. In analogy to the linear time-invariant (LTI) case, the ring of stable rational functions, noncommutative in the LTV situation, and the Kučera-Youla parametrisation play prominent parts in the theory. We transfer Blumthaler's thesis from the LTI to the LTV case and sharpen, complete and simplify the corresponding results in the book 'Linear Time-Varying Systems' by Bourlès and Marinescu.

  6. Uniform Star Formation Efficiencies Are Due To Stabilised Galactic Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurer, Gerhardt R.; Wong, Ivy; Zheng, Zheng

    2015-08-01

    We present measurements of the star formation efficiencies (SFE here defined as SFR/M(HI)) of an HI selected sample of galaxies spanning four dex in HI mass. The sample covers a wide range of size, surface brightness, and star formation intensity, and yet a constant SFE with a scatter of 0.3 dex. We show that a model based on star formation in a constant stability disk, combined with other well known disk scaling relations, is able to successfully model the level and flatness of SFE as a function of halo circular velocity. This implies the properties of galaxies along the "main-sequence" of star forming galaxies is driven by the stabilisation galaxy disks within self-similar dark matter dominated halos.

  7. Steady-state droplet size in montmorillonite stabilised emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ganley, William J; van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S

    2016-08-14

    The formation of hexadecane-in-water emulsions stabilised by montmorillonite platelets was studied. In this system the platelets form a monolayer around the droplets and the droplet size decreases with increasing platelet volume fraction. However, the number of platelets present exceeds that required for monolayer coverage. The kinetics of emulsification were investigated and coalescence of droplets during turbulent mixing was found to continue even after the droplets had reached their ultimate size. Non-spherical droplets, resulting from arrested coalescence, were not observed suggesting that particles may be desorbing from the interface during the turbulent flow. A kinetic model based on a competition between droplet break-up and coalescence, mediated by particle adsorption and desorption, reproduces experimental trends in droplet diameter. The model can be used to predict the most efficient formulation to minimise droplet diameters for given materials and mixing conditions and sheds light on the processes occurring during emulsification in this system. PMID:27407026

  8. Ammonia volatilisation in waste stabilisation ponds: a cascade of misinterpretations?

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia volatilisation has generally been reported as, or assumed to be, the main nitrogen removal mechanism in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). Nitrogen removal via ammonia volatilisation is based on two observations: (a) in-pond pH values can reach high values (>9, even >10), so increasing the proportion of the total ammonia present as the un-ionized form or free ammonia (NH(3)); and (b) in-pond temperatures can also be high, so improving the mass transfer rate of free ammonia to the atmosphere. Consequently, one of the most widely accepted models for ammonia removal in WSP is that reported by Pano & Middlebrooks in 1982, which was developed to reflect the occurrence of these two observations. This work reports how simple mathematical models for ammonia volatilisation in WSP, in spite of the possibility of their giving good predictions, may not accurately describe the main pathways and mechanisms involved in ammonia removal in WSP.

  9. Ammonia volatilisation in waste stabilisation ponds: a cascade of misinterpretations?

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia volatilisation has generally been reported as, or assumed to be, the main nitrogen removal mechanism in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). Nitrogen removal via ammonia volatilisation is based on two observations: (a) in-pond pH values can reach high values (>9, even >10), so increasing the proportion of the total ammonia present as the un-ionized form or free ammonia (NH(3)); and (b) in-pond temperatures can also be high, so improving the mass transfer rate of free ammonia to the atmosphere. Consequently, one of the most widely accepted models for ammonia removal in WSP is that reported by Pano & Middlebrooks in 1982, which was developed to reflect the occurrence of these two observations. This work reports how simple mathematical models for ammonia volatilisation in WSP, in spite of the possibility of their giving good predictions, may not accurately describe the main pathways and mechanisms involved in ammonia removal in WSP. PMID:20150690

  10. Synthetic use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in hydrogen atom transfer 2: generation of captodatively stabilised radicals.

    PubMed

    Wood, Mark E; Bissiriou, Sabine; Lowe, Christopher; Windeatt, Kim M

    2013-04-28

    Using C-3 di-deuterated morpholin-2-ones bearing N-2-iodobenzyl and N-3-bromobut-3-enyl radical generating groups, only products derived from the more stabilised C-3, rather than the less stabilised C-5 translocated radicals, were formed after intramolecular 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer, suggesting that any kinetic isotope effect present was not sufficient to offset captodative stabilisation.

  11. Recycling vs. stabilisation of soil sugars - a long-term laboratory incubation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-06-01

    Independent of its chemical structure carbon (C) persists in soil for several decades, controlled by stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the importance of the two factors on the turnover dynamics of soil sugars, an important compound of soil organic matter (SOM), a three year incubation experiment was conducted on a silty loam soil under different types of land use (arable land, grassland and forest) by adding 13C-labeled glucose. The compound specific isotope analysis of soil sugars was used to examine the dynamics of different sugars during incubation. Sugar dynamics were dominated by a pool of high mean residence times (MRT) indicating that recycling plays an important role for sugars. However, this was not substantially affected by soil C content. Six months after label addition the contribution of the label was much higher for microbial biomass than for CO2 production for all examined soils, corroborating that substrate recycling was very effective within the microbial biomass. Two different patterns of tracer dynamics could be identified for different sugars: while fucose (fuc) and mannose (man) showed highest label contribution at the beginning of the incubation with a subsequent slow decline, galactose (gal) and rhamnose (rha) were characterised by slow label incorporation with subsequently constant levels, which indicates that recycling is dominating the dynamics of these sugars. This may correspond to (a) different microbial growing strategies (r and K-strategist) or (b) location within or outside the cell membrane (lipopolysaccharides vs. exopolysaccharides) and thus be subject of different re-use within the microbial food web. Our results show how the microbial community recycles substrate very effectively and that high losses of substrate only occur during initial stages after substrate addition.

  12. Strong stabilisation of a wind turbine tower model in the plane of the turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Weiss, George

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the strong stabilisation of a wind turbine tower model in the plane of the turbine blades, which comprises a nonuniform NASA Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) system and a two-mass drive-train model (with gearbox). The control input is the torque created by the electrical generator. Using a strong stabilisation theorem for a class of impedance passive linear systems with bounded control and observation operators, we show that the wind turbine tower model can be strongly stabilised. The control is by static output feedback from the angular velocities of the nacelle and the generator rotor.

  13. Stabilised DNA secondary structures with increasing transcription localise hypermutable bases for somatic hypermutation in IGHV3-23.

    PubMed

    Duvvuri, Bhargavi; Duvvuri, Venkata R; Wu, Jianhong; Wu, Gillian E

    2012-07-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a transcription-coupled mechanism most responsible for generating high affinity antibodies. An issue remaining enigmatic in SHM is how AID is preferentially targeted during transcription to hypermutable bases in its substrates (WRC motifs) on both DNA strands. AID targets only single stranded DNA. By modelling the dynamical behaviour of IGHV3-23 DNA, a commonly used human variable gene segment, we observed that hypermutable bases on the non-transcribed strand are paired whereas those on transcribed strand are mostly unpaired. Hypermutable bases (both paired and unpaired) are made accessible to AID in stabilised secondary structures formed with increasing transcription levels. This observation provides a rationale for the hypermutable bases on both the strands of DNA being targeted to a similar extent despite having differences in unpairedness. We propose that increasing transcription and RNAP II stalling resulting in the formation and stabilisation of stem-loop structures with AID hotspots in negatively supercoiled region can localise the hypermutable bases of both strands of DNA, to AID-mediated SHM.

  14. CO2 dissociation in vortex-stabilised microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welzel, S.; Bongers, W. A.; Graswinckel, M. F.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Plasma-assisted gas conversion techniques are widely considered as efficient building blocks in a future energy infrastructure which will be based on intermittent, renewable electricity sources. CO2 dissociation in high-frequency plasmas is of particular interest in carbon capture and utilisation process chains for the production of CO2-neutral fuels. In order to achieve efficient plasma processes of high throughput specifically designed gas flow and power injection regimes are required. In this contribution vortex-stabilised microwave plasmas in undiluted CO2 were studied in a pressure range from 170 to 1000 mbar at up to 1 kW (forward) injected power, respectively. The CO2 depletion was measured downstream, e.g. by means of mass spectrometry. Although the system configuration was entirely not optimised, energy efficiencies of nearly 40%, i.e. close to the thermal dissociation limit, and conversion efficiencies of up to 23% were achieved. Additionally, spatially-resolved emission spectroscopy was applied to map the axial and radial distribution of excited atomic (C, O) and molecular (CO, C2) species along with their rotational temperatures. Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbox 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven.

  15. Interplay between toroidal rotation and flow shear in turbulence stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Manas, P.; Peeters, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    The interplay between toroidal rotation u, parallel flow shear u', and perpendicular flow shear γE in the stabilisation of tokamak turbulence is investigated in non-linear flux-tube gyrokinetic simulations. The simulations are performed for a reference L-mode DIII-D plasma (the so-called shortfall case) at r /a =0.8 , varying the flow parameters around their nominal values. Depending on the respective signs of u, u', and γE, turbulence is found to be enhanced, reduced, or unchanged. When the coupling is favorable, the overall effect on the non-linear heat fluxes can be very large, even at moderate flow values. The ion heat flux is, for instance, decreased by a factor of 3 when the direction of the parallel flow shear is reversed with respect to its nominal value. Even more surprising, keeping u' and γE at their nominal values, the ion heat flux decreases by more than 50% when the toroidal flow is reversed. The relevance of this mechanism in the experiments which depends on the ability to decouple u, u', and γE is discussed. The interplay between u and u' observed in the non-linear simulations qualitatively follows the linear stability results and is interpreted in the frame of a simple fluid model.

  16. Moduli stabilisation with nilpotent goldstino: vacuum structure and SUSY breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparicio, Luis; Quevedo, Fernando; Valandro, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    We study the effective field theory of KKLT and LVS moduli stabilisation scenarios coupled to an anti-D3-brane at the tip of a warped throat. We describe the presence of the anti-brane in terms of a nilpotent goldstino superfield in a supersymmetric effective field theory. The introduction of this superfield produces a term that can lead to a de Sitter minimum. We fix the Kähler moduli dependence of the nilpotent field couplings by matching this term with the anti-D3-brane uplifting contribution. The main result of this paper is the computation, within this EFT, of the soft supersymmetry breaking terms in both KKLT and LVS for matter living on D3-brane (leaving the D7-brane analysis to an appendix). A handful of distinct phenomenological scenarios emerge that could have low energy implications, most of them having a split spectrum of soft masses. Some cosmological and phenomenological properties of these models are discussed. We also check that the attraction between the D3-brane and the anti-D3-brane does not affect the leading contribution to the soft masses and does not destabilise the system.

  17. Impediments to replication fork movement: stabilisation, reactivation and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sarah; Carr, Antony M

    2013-03-01

    Maintaining genome stability is essential for the accurate transmission of genetic material. Genetic instability is associated with human genome disorders and is a near-universal hallmark of cancer cells. Genetic variation is also the driving force of evolution, and a genome must therefore display adequate plasticity to evolve while remaining sufficiently stable to prevent mutations and chromosome rearrangements leading to a fitness disadvantage. A primary source of genome instability are errors that occur during chromosome replication. More specifically, obstacles to the movement of replication forks are known to underlie many of the gross chromosomal rearrangements seen both in human cells and in model organisms. Obstacles to replication fork progression destabilize the replisome (replication protein complex) and impact on the integrity of forked DNA structures. Therefore, to ensure the successful progression of a replication fork along with its associated replisome, several distinct strategies have evolved. First, there are well-orchestrated mechanisms that promote continued movement of forks through potential obstacles. Second, dedicated replisome and fork DNA stabilization pathways prevent the dysfunction of the replisome if its progress is halted. Third, should stabilisation fail, there are mechanisms to ensure damaged forks are accurately fused with a converging fork or, when necessary, re-associated with the replication proteins to continue replication. Here, we review what is known about potential barriers to replication fork progression, how these are tolerated and their impact on genome instability.

  18. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  19. Simultaneously stabilising controllers for time-varying linear systems within the framework of nest algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongzhu; Yu, Tianqiu; Xiao, Jinmei

    2016-08-01

    From the perspective of strong transitivity, a controller design method is provided to simultaneously stabilise a collection of time-varying linear systems within the framework of nest algebras. In particular, all simultaneously stabilising controllers for a class of linear plants are characterised based on the doubly coprime factorisations. These results hold as well in the time-invariant case. An illustrative example is given to demonstrate the validity of the method.

  20. Development of guidelines for improved hydraulic design of waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    Shilton, A; Harrison, J

    2003-01-01

    Pond hydraulic behaviour is influenced by the inlet/outlet configuration, baffles and wind, but design information relating to these factors is still very limited. This paper reviews the development of "Guidelines for the Improved Hydraulic Design of Waste Stabilisation Ponds" and summarises some of the key findings and recommendations. This work was based on review of previous research, laboratory experimentation, field studies and mathematical modelling using computational fluid dynamics. The inlet design can have a significant influence on the flow regime in a pond. Poorly considered positioning of the inlet and the outlet can create hydraulic short-circuiting problems. As an example of the nature of the work undertaken in this project, the use of a small horizontal inlet pipe was compared against a vertical inlet design. A practical method of assessing the relative significance of wind versus inlet power input was presented. The application of this analysis may allow engineers to size inlet pipes to help control the flow patterns in ponds for efficient performance. Extensive testing has been undertaken on a wide range of baffle configurations. An example of this research showed how short stub baffles could provide similar improvements to longer "traditional" baffle designs, potentially offering significant savings in construction costs. For traditional baffle designs a minimum of two baffles is recommended. For the pond modelled in this work, it was found that any more than four baffles gave only marginal improvements.

  1. Nonlinear hydrodynamic and thermoacoustic oscillations of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin Yik; Li, Larry Kin Bong; Juniper, Matthew P.; Cant, Robert Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flames often experience thermoacoustic instabilities when the combustion heat release rate is in phase with acoustic pressure fluctuations. Linear methods often assume a priori that oscillations are periodic and occur at a dominant frequency with a fixed amplitude. Such assumptions are not made when using nonlinear analysis. When an oscillation is fully saturated, nonlinear analysis can serve as a useful avenue to reveal flame behaviour far more elaborate than period-one limit cycles, including quasi-periodicity and chaos in hydrodynamically or thermoacoustically self-excited system. In this paper, the behaviour of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed propane/air flame in a model jet-engine afterburner configuration is investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach is found to be appropriate. Combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic closure for the flame surface density. The results are validated by comparison with existing experimental data and with large eddy simulation, and the observed self-excited oscillations in pressure and heat release are studied using methods derived from dynamical systems theory. A systematic analysis is carried out by increasing the equivalence ratio of the reactant stream supplied to the premixed flame. A strong variation in the global flame structure is observed. The flame exhibits a self-excited hydrodynamic oscillation at low equivalence ratios, becomes steady as the equivalence ratio is increased to intermediate values, and again exhibits a self-excited thermoacoustic oscillation at higher equivalence ratios. Rich nonlinear behaviour is observed and the investigation demonstrates that turbulent premixed flames can exhibit complex dynamical behaviour including quasiperiodicity, limit cycles and period-two limit cycles due to the interactions of various

  2. The challenge of sample-stabilisation in the era of multi-residue analytical methods: a practical guideline for the stabilisation of 46 organic micropollutants in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Olav; Musallam, Shadha; Scherer, Laura; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias

    2013-06-01

    Water sample storage and stabilisation may affect data quality, if samples are managed improperly. In this study three stabilising strategies are evaluated for 46 relevant organic micro-pollutants: addition of the biocides (i) copper sulphate and (ii) sodium azide to water samples directly after sampling with subsequent sample storage as liquid phase and (iii) direct solid phase extraction (SPE), stabilising the samples by reducing the activity of water. River water and treated effluent were chosen as commonly investigated matrices with a high potential of biotransformation activity. Analyses were carried out for sample storage temperatures of 4 and 28°C for water samples stored as liquid phase and for sample storage temperatures of 4, 20 and 40°C for SPE cartridges. Cooling of water samples alone was not sufficient for longer storage times (>24h). While copper sulphate caused detrimental interferences with nitrogen containing heterocyclic compounds, sodium azide proved to be a suitable stabilising agent. The best results could be obtained for SPE cartridges stored cool. Recommendations for samples preservation are provided. PMID:23562683

  3. The methylated N-terminal tail of RCC1 is required for stabilisation of its interaction with chromatin by Ran in live cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) is the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ran GTPase. Localised generation of Ran-GTP by RCC1 on chromatin is critical for nucleocytoplasmic transport, mitotic spindle assembly and nuclear envelope formation. Both the N-terminal tail of RCC1 and its association with Ran are important for its interaction with chromatin in cells. In vitro, the association of Ran with RCC1 induces a conformational change in the N-terminal tail that promotes its interaction with DNA. Results We have investigated the mechanism of the dynamic interaction of the α isoform of human RCC1 (RCC1α) with chromatin in live cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions. We show that the N-terminal tail stabilises the interaction of RCC1α with chromatin and this function can be partially replaced by another lysine-rich nuclear localisation signal. Removal of the tail prevents the interaction of RCC1α with chromatin from being stabilised by RanT24N, a mutant that binds stably to RCC1α. The interaction of RCC1α with chromatin is destabilised by mutation of lysine 4 (K4Q), which abolishes α-N-terminal methylation, and this interaction is no longer stabilised by RanT24N. However, α-N-terminal methylation of RCC1α is not regulated by the binding of RanT24N. Conversely, the association of Ran with precipitated RCC1α does not require the N-terminal tail of RCC1α or its methylation. The mobility of RCC1α on chromatin is increased by mutation of aspartate 182 (D182A), which inhibits guanine-nucleotide exchange activity, but RCC1αD182A can still bind nucleotide-free Ran and its interaction with chromatin is stabilised by RanT24N. Conclusions These results show that the stabilisation of the dynamic interaction of RCC1α with chromatin by Ran in live cells requires the N-terminal tail of RCC1α. α-N-methylation is not regulated by formation of the binary complex with Ran, but

  4. Robust scalable stabilisability conditions for large-scale heterogeneous multi-agent systems with uncertain nonlinear interactions: towards a distributed computing architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, Sabato

    2016-06-01

    Large-scale dynamic systems are becoming highly pervasive in their occurrence with applications ranging from system biology, environment monitoring, sensor networks, and power systems. They are characterised by high dimensionality, complexity, and uncertainty in the node dynamic/interactions that require more and more computational demanding methods for their analysis and control design, as well as the network size and node system/interaction complexity increase. Therefore, it is a challenging problem to find scalable computational method for distributed control design of large-scale networks. In this paper, we investigate the robust distributed stabilisation problem of large-scale nonlinear multi-agent systems (briefly MASs) composed of non-identical (heterogeneous) linear dynamical systems coupled by uncertain nonlinear time-varying interconnections. By employing Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique, new conditions are given for the distributed control design of large-scale MASs that can be easily solved by the toolbox of MATLAB. The stabilisability of each node dynamic is a sufficient assumption to design a global stabilising distributed control. The proposed approach improves some of the existing LMI-based results on MAS by both overcoming their computational limits and extending the applicative scenario to large-scale nonlinear heterogeneous MASs. Additionally, the proposed LMI conditions are further reduced in terms of computational requirement in the case of weakly heterogeneous MASs, which is a common scenario in real application where the network nodes and links are affected by parameter uncertainties. One of the main advantages of the proposed approach is to allow to move from a centralised towards a distributed computing architecture so that the expensive computation workload spent to solve LMIs may be shared among processors located at the networked nodes, thus increasing the scalability of the approach than the network

  5. Decentralised robust stabilisation of uncertain large-scale interconnected time-delay systems with unknown upper bounds of uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hansheng

    2016-09-01

    The problem of decentralised robust stabilisation is considered for a class of uncertain large-scale time-delay interconnected dynamical systems. In the paper, the upper bounds of delayed state perturbations, uncertainties, interconnection terms, and external disturbances are assumed to be completely unknown, and the delays are assumed to be any non-negative constants. For such a class of uncertain large-scale time-delay interconnected systems, a new method is presented whereby a class of adaptation-free decentralised local robust state feedback controllers can be constructed. In addition, it is also shown that the solutions of uncertain large-scale time-delay interconnected systems can be guaranteed to be uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, as an application to the practical mechanical systems, some simulations of a numerical example are provided to demonstrate the validity of the theoretical results.

  6. Cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation (ATPS)—Part II. Accuracy of manual insertion and pull-out strength of ATPS

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Fox, Michael; Martin, Hudelmaier; Forstner, Rosmarie; Augat, Peter; Penzkofer, Rainer; Pirich, Christian; Kässmann, H.; Resch, Herbert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction after multilevel decompression of the cervical spine, especially in the weakened osteoporotic, neoplastic or infectious spine often requires circumferential stabilization and fusion. To avoid the additional posterior surgery in these cases while increasing rigidity of anterior-only screw-plate constructs, the authors introduce the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility as well as its indications in a previous study in Part I of our project. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to assess the ex vivo accuracy of placing ATPS into the cervical vertebra as well as the biomechanical performance of ATPS in comparison to traditional vertebral body screws (VBS) in terms of pull-out strength (POS). Twenty-three ATPS were inserted alternately to two screws into the pedicles and vertebral bodies, respectively, of six cadaveric specimens from C3–T1. For insertion of ATPS, a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique was used. Pre- and post insertional CT-scans were used to assess accuracy of ATPS insertion in the axial and sagittal planes. A newly designed grading system and accuracy score were used to delineate accuracy of ATPS insertion. Following insertion of screws, 23 ATPS and 22 VBS were subjected to pull-out testing (POT). The bone mineral density (BMD) of each specimen was assessed prior to POT. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of correctly placed screws and non-critical pedicles breaches in axial plane was 78.3%, and 95.7% in sagittal plane. Hence, according to our definition of “critical” pedicle breach that exposes neurovascular structures at risk, 21.7% (n = 5) of all ATPS inserted showed a critical pedicle breach in axial plane. Notably, no critical pedicle perforation occurred at the C6 to T1 levels. Pull-out testing of ATPS and VBS revealed that pull-out resistance of ATPS was 2.5-fold that of VBS. Mean POS of 23 ATPS with a mean BMD of 0.566

  7. SDP-based approximation of stabilising solutions for periodic matrix Riccati differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Sergei V.; Shiriaev, Anton S.; Freidovich, Leonid B.

    2016-07-01

    Numerically finding stabilising feedback control laws for linear systems of periodic differential equations is a nontrivial task with no known reliable solutions. The most successful method requires solving matrix differential Riccati equations with periodic coefficients. All previously proposed techniques for solving such equations involve numerical integration of unstable differential equations and consequently fail whenever the period is too large or the coefficients vary too much. Here, a new method for numerical computation of stabilising solutions for matrix differential Riccati equations with periodic coefficients is proposed. Our approach does not involve numerical solution of any differential equations. The approximation for a stabilising solution is found in the form of a trigonometric polynomial, matrix coefficients of which are found solving a specially constructed finite-dimensional semidefinite programming (SDP) problem. This problem is obtained using maximality property of the stabilising solution of the Riccati equation for the associated Riccati inequality and sampling technique. Our previously published numerical comparisons with other methods shows that for a class of problems only this technique provides a working solution. Asymptotic convergence of the computed approximations to the stabilising solution is proved below under the assumption that certain combinations of the key parameters are sufficiently large. Although the rate of convergence is not analysed, it appeared to be exponential in our numerical studies.

  8. Stabilisation of health as the centre point of a health psychology of ageing.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Urte; König, Claudia; Eicher, Stefanie; Martin, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Current health psychological theories and research mainly cover improvement of health, recovery from illness or maintenance of health. With this theoretical manuscript, we argue that in ageing societies in which chronic illness and multimorbidity become the norm rather than the exception, this focus of health psychology is no longer sufficient. Instead, in line with a recent conceptualisation of health as "the ability to adapt and to self-manage", we suggest that the centre point of a health psychology of ageing needs to be the stabilisation of health. Current theories of lifespan development, such as the model of selection, optimisation and compensation, the motivational theory of life span development, the two-process model of assimilative and accommodative coping and the recently introduced functional quality of life model are described with regard to their assumptions and related research focussing on stabilisation. All of these models explicitly comprise stabilisation as an important process of successful, healthy ageing. So far, however, the empirical research examining these models does not take stabilisation into account. Implications for research methods and practise of health stabilisation are discussed.

  9. Effect of particle adsorption rates on the disproportionation process in pickering stabilised bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ettelaie, Rammile; Murray, Brent

    2014-05-28

    The degree of shrinkage of particle stabilised bubbles of various sizes, in a polydisperse bubble dispersion, has been investigated in the light of the finite adsorption times for the particles and the disproportionation kinetics of the bubbles. For the case where the system contains an abundance of particles we find a threshold radius, above which bubbles are stabilised without any significant reduction in their size. Bubbles with an initial radius below this threshold on the other hand undergo a large degree of shrinkage prior to stabilisation. As the ratio of the available particles to the bubbles is reduced, it is shown that the final bubble size, for the larger bubbles in the distribution, becomes increasingly governed by the number of particles, rather than their adsorption time per se. For systems with "adsorption controlled" shrinkage ratio, the final bubble distribution is found to be wider than the initial one, while for a "particle number controlled" case it is actually narrower. Starting from a unimodal bubble size distribution, we predict that at intermediate times, prior to the full stabilisation of all bubbles, the distribution breaks up into a bimodal one. However, the effect is transient and a unimodal final bubble size distribution is recovered, when all the bubbles are stabilised by the particles.

  10. Early Spin-Stabilised Rockets - the Rockets of Bergrat Heinrich Gottlob Kuhn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, H.-D.

    19th century's war rockets were at first stabilised by sticks, but these sticks produced a very uncertain flight path and it often happened that rockets changed their direction and even flew back to their firing position. So very many early inventors in Europe, America, and British-India tried to stabilise the rocket's flight in a better way. They tried fins and even rotation but they did not succeed. It is said in history that William Hale was the first who succeeded in constructing a spin stabilised (i.e. rotating) rocket which worked. But before him, in the thirties of that century, a German amateur rocket inventor succeeded as well and secretly proved his stickless rotating rockets in trials for Prussian officers and some years later officially for Saxon artillery officers. His invention was then bought by the kingdom of Saxony, but these were never use in the field because of lack of money.

  11. Delay-dependent stability and stabilisation of continuous 2D delayed systems with saturating control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmamed, Abdelaziz; Kririm, Said; Benzaouia, Abdellah; Tadeo, Fernando

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the stabilisation problem of continuous two-dimensional (2D) delayed systems, in the presence of saturations on the control signals. For this, a new delay decomposition approach is proposed to deal with the stability and stabilisation issues. The idea is that the range of variation of each delay is divided into segments, and a specific Lyapunov- Krasovskii functional is used that contains different weight matrices in each segment. Then, based on this approach, new delay-dependent stability and stabilisation criteria for continuous 2D delayed systems are derived. These criteria are less conservative and include some existing results as special cases. Some numerical examples are provided to show that a significant improvement is achieved using the proposed approach.

  12. Stabilising a victor's peace? Humanitarian action and reconstruction in eastern Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Goodhand, Jonathan

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on the 'Sri Lankan model' of counter-insurgency and stabilisation and its implications for humanitarian and development actors. The Sri Lanka case shows that discourses, policies and practices associated with 'stabilisation' are not confined to 'fragile state' contexts in which there is heavy (and often militarised) international engagement--even though exemplars such as Afghanistan and Iraq have tended to dominate debates on this issue. Rather than being a single template, the 'stabilisation agenda' takes on very different guises in different contexts, presenting quite specific challenges to humanitarian and development actors. This is particularly true in settings like Sri Lanka, where there is a strong state, which seeks to make aid 'coherent' with its own vision of a militarily imposed political settlement. Working in such environments involves navigating a highly-charged domestic political arena, shaped by concerns about sovereignty, nationalism and struggles for legitimacy. PMID:20846349

  13. Solidification/stabilisation of liquid oil waste in metakaolin-based geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarel, V.; Nouaille, F.; Rooses, A.; Lambertin, D.; Poulesquen, A.; Frizon, F.

    2015-09-01

    The solidification/stabilisation of liquid oil waste in metakaolin based geopolymer was studied in the present work. The process consists of obtaining a stabilised emulsion of oil in a water-glass solution and then adding metakaolin to engage the setting of a geopolymer block with an oil emulsion stabilised in the material. Geopolymer/oil composites have been made with various oil fraction (7, 14 and 20 vol.%). The rigidity and the good mechanical properties have been demonstrated with compressive strength tests. Leaching tests evidenced the release of oil from the composite material is very limited whereas the constitutive components of the geopolymer (Na, Si and OH-) are involved into diffusion process.

  14. The role of mood stabilisers in the treatment of the depressive facet of bipolar disorders.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Prica, Corina

    2007-01-01

    It was previously shown that available mood stabilisers are used to treat bipolar depression. As part of the natural course of illness, patients with bipolar disorder often suffer from episodes of depression more frequently and for longer durations than mania. A major challenge in the treatment of bipolar depression is the tendency for antidepressant medications, particularly tricyclic antidepressants, to precipitate episodes of mania, or to increase cycle frequency or symptom intensity. Thus, exploring the utility of mood stabilisers as monotherapy for bipolar depression is important. The aim of this review it to collate data involving the effects of some mood stabilisers like lithium, carbamazepine, valproate and lamotrigine in depressive aspects of bipolar disorder, but as well using an animal model of depression, to understand their mechanism of action.

  15. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content.

  16. Stabilisation for switched linear systems with time-varying delay and input saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonggang; Fei, Shumin; Zhang, Kanjian

    2014-03-01

    This article investigates the stabilisation problems for continuous-time and discrete-time switched systems with time-varying delay and saturated control input. Based on dwell time switching signals and multiple Lyapunov functional method, stabilisation conditions are well obtained in the context of linear matrix inequalities. To estimate attractive regions as large as possible, the feasibility problems are translated into optimisation problems. In addition, the corresponding results are presented for linear time-delay systems and switched delay-free systems, which improve and supplement some existing ones in the literature. Finally, numerical examples and simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness and values of the proposed results.

  17. Robust stabilisation and L2 -gain analysis for switched systems with actuator saturation under asynchronous switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Robust stabilisation and L2-gain analysis for a class of switched systems with actuator saturation are studied in this paper. The switching signal of the controllers lags behind that of the system modes, which leads to the asynchronous switching between the candidate controllers and the subsystems. By combining the piecewise Lyapunov function method with the convex hull technique, sufficient conditions in terms of LMIs for the solvability of the robust stabilisation and weighted L2-gain problems are presented respectively under the dwell time scheme. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  18. Response diversity to land use occurs but does not consistently stabilise ecosystem services provided by native pollinators.

    PubMed

    Cariveau, Daniel P; Williams, Neal M; Benjamin, Faye E; Winfree, Rachael

    2013-07-01

    More diverse biological communities may provide ecosystem services that are less variable over space or time. However, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are rarely investigated empirically in real-world ecosystems. Here, we investigate how a potentially important stabilising mechanism, response diversity, the differential response to environmental change among species, stabilises pollination services against land-use change. We measured crop pollination services provided by native bees across land-use gradients in three crop systems. We found that bee species responded differentially to increasing agricultural land cover in all three systems, demonstrating that response diversity occurs. Similarly, we found response diversity in pollination services in two of the systems. However, there was no evidence that response diversity, in general, stabilised ecosystem services. Our results suggest that either response diversity is not the primary stabilising mechanism in our system, or that new measures of response diversity are needed that better capture the stabilising effects it provides.

  19. Environmental Controls and Eco-geomorphic Interactions of the Barchan-to-parabolic Dune Stabilisation and the Parabolic-to-barchan Dune Reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Na; Baas, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Parabolic dunes are one of a few common aeolian landforms which are highly controlled by eco-geomorphic interactions. Parabolic dunes, on the one hand, can be developed from highly mobile dune landforms, barchans for instance, in an ameliorated vegetation condition; or on the other hand, they can be reactivated and transformed back into mobile dunes due to vegetation deterioration. The fundamental mechanisms and eco-geomorphic interactions controlling both dune transformations remain poorly understood. To bridge the gap between complex processes involved in dune transformations on a relatively long temporal scale and real world monitoring records on a very limited temporal scale, this research has extended the DECAL model to incorporate 'dynamic' growth functions and the different 'growth' of perennial shrubs between growing and non-growing seasons, informed by field measurements and remote sensing analysis, to explore environmental controls and eco-geomorphic interactions of both types of dune transformation. A non-dimensional 'dune stabilising index' is proposed to capture the interactions between environmental controls (i.e. the capabilities of vegetation to withstand wind erosion and sand burial, the sandy substratum thickness, the height of the initial dune, and the sand transport potential), and establish the linkage between these controls and the geometry of a stabilising dune. An example demonstrates how to use the power-law relationship between the dune stabilising index and the normalised migration distance to assist in extrapolating the historical trajectories of transforming dunes. The modelling results also show that a slight increase in vegetation cover of an initial parabolic dune can significantly increase the reactivation threshold of climatic impact (both drought stress and wind strength) required to reactivate a stabilising parabolic dune into a barchan. Four eco-geomorphic interaction zones that govern a barchan-to-parabolic dune transformation

  20. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, P.; Brooks, I. M.; Brooks, B. J.; Moat, B. I.; Prytherch, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-09-01

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This holds particularly within the planetary boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of winds with a random error below 0.2 m s-1, comparable to the measurement error of standard radiosondes. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  1. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, P.; Brooks, I. M.; Brooks, B. J.; Moat, B. I.; Prytherch, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-11-01

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne Doppler measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This held true particularly within the atmospheric boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of vertical winds with a random error below 0.2 m s-1. The comparison of lidar-measured wind and radio soundings gives a mean bias of 0.3 m s-1 (2°) and a mean standard deviation of 1.1 m s-1 (12°) for wind speed (wind direction). The agreement for wind direction degrades with height. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  2. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions. PMID:27381752

  3. Arsenic and copper stabilisation in a contaminated soil by coal fly ash and green waste compost.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Yip, Alex C K; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    In situ metal stabilisation by amendments has been demonstrated as an appealing low-cost remediation strategy for contaminated soil. This study investigated the short-term leaching behaviour and long-term stability of As and Cu in soil amended with coal fly ash and/or green waste compost. Locally abundant inorganic (limestone and bentonite) and carbonaceous (lignite) resources were also studied for comparison. Column leaching experiments revealed that coal fly ash outperformed limestone and bentonite amendments for As stabilisation. It also maintained the As stability under continuous leaching of acidic solution, which was potentially attributed to high-affinity adsorption, co-precipitation, and pozzolanic reaction of coal fly ash. However, Cu leaching in the column experiments could not be mitigated by any of these inorganic amendments, suggesting the need for co-addition of carbonaceous materials that provides strong chelation with oxygen-containing functional groups for Cu stabilisation. Green waste compost suppressed the Cu leaching more effectively than lignite due to the difference in chemical composition and dissolved organic matter. After 9-month soil incubation, coal fly ash was able to minimise the concentrations of As and Cu in the soil solution without the addition of carbonaceous materials. Nevertheless, leachability tests suggested that the provision of green waste compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of As and Cu leachability in a fairly aggressive leaching environment. These results highlight the importance of assessing stability and remobilisation of sequestered metals under varying environmental conditions for ensuring a plausible and enduring soil stabilisation.

  4. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions.

  5. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions. PMID:27381752

  6. Stabilisation of proteins via mixtures of amino acids during spray drying.

    PubMed

    Ajmera, Ankur; Scherließ, Regina

    2014-03-10

    Biologicals are often formulated as solids in an effort to preserve stability which generally requires stabilising excipients for proper drying. The purpose of this study was to screen amino acids and their combinations for their stabilising effect on proteins during spray drying. Catalase, as model protein, was spray dried in 1+1 or 1+2 ratios with amino acids. Some amino acids namely arginine, glycine and histidine showed good retention of catalase functionality after spray drying and subsequent storage stress. A 1+1 combination of arginine and glycine in a 1+2 ratio with catalase resulted in a tremendously good stabilising effect. Storage at high temperature/humidity also showed beneficial effects of this combination. To evaluate whether this was a general principle, these findings were transferred to an antigenic protein of comparable size and supramolecular structure (haemagglutinin) as well as to a smaller enzyme (lysozyme). Upon spray drying with the combination of amino acids it could be shown that both proteins remain more stable especially after storage compared to the unprotected protein. The combination of arginine and glycine is tailored to the needs of protein stabilisation during spray drying and may hence be utilised in dry powder formulation of biomolecules with superior stability characteristics. PMID:24412336

  7. A numerical procedure to compute the stabilising solution of game theoretic Riccati equations of stochastic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragan, Vasile; Ivanov, Ivan

    2011-04-01

    In this article, the problem of the numerical computation of the stabilising solution of the game theoretic algebraic Riccati equation is investigated. The Riccati equation under consideration occurs in connection with the solution of the H ∞ control problem for a class of stochastic systems affected by state-dependent and control-dependent white noise and subjected to Markovian jumping. The stabilising solution of the considered game theoretic Riccati equation is obtained as a limit of a sequence of approximations constructed based on stabilising solutions of a sequence of algebraic Riccati equations of stochastic control with definite sign of the quadratic part. The proposed algorithm extends to this general framework the method proposed in Lanzon, Feng, Anderson, and Rotkowitz (Lanzon, A., Feng, Y., Anderson, B.D.O., and Rotkowitz, M. (2008), 'Computing the Positive Stabilizing Solution to Algebraic Riccati Equations with an Indefinite Quadratic Term Viaa Recursive Method,' IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 53, pp. 2280-2291). In the proof of the convergence of the proposed algorithm different concepts associated the generalised Lyapunov operators as stability, stabilisability and detectability are widely involved. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by several numerical experiments.

  8. Towards 12% stabilised efficiency in single junction polymorphous silicon solar cells: experimental developments and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolmasov, Sergey; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Chatterjee, Parsathi

    2016-01-01

    We have combined recent experimental developments in our laboratory with modelling to devise ways of maximising the stabilised efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) PIN solar cells. The cells were fabricated using the conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique at various temperatures, pressures and gas flow ratios. A detailed electrical-optical simulator was used to examine the effect of using wide band gap P-and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers, as well as a MgF2 anti-reflection coating (ARC) on cell performance. We find that with the best quality a-Si:H so far produced in our laboratory and optimised deposition parameters for the corresponding solar cell, we could not attain a 10% stabilised efficiency due to the high stabilised defect density of a-Si:H, although this landmark has been achieved in some laboratories. On the other hand, a close cousin of a-Si:H, hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H), a nano-structured silicon thin film produced by PECVD under conditions close to powder formation, has been developed in our laboratory. This material has been shown to have a lower initial and stabilised defect density as well as higher hole mobility than a-Si:H. Modelling indicates that it is possible to attain stabilised efficiencies of 12% when pm-Si:H is incorporated in a solar cell, deposited in a NIP configuration to reduce the P/I interface defects and combined with P- and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers and a MgF2 ARC.

  9. The time taken for the regional distribution of ventilation to stabilise: an investigation using electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Caruana, L; Paratz, J D; Chang, A; Barnett, A G; Fraser, J F

    2015-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is a novel technology capable of quantifying ventilation distribution in the lung in real time during various therapeutic manoeuvres. The technique requires changes to the patient's position to place the electrical impedance tomography electrodes circumferentially around the thorax. The impact of these position changes on the time taken to stabilise the regional distribution of ventilation determined by electrical impedance tomography is unknown. This study aimed to determine the time taken for the regional distribution of ventilation determined by electrical impedance tomography to stabilise after changing position. Eight healthy, male volunteers were connected to electrical impedance tomography and a pneumotachometer. After 30 minutes stabilisation supine, participants were moved into 60 degrees Fowler's position and then returned to supine. Thirty minutes was spent in each position. Concurrent readings of ventilation distribution and tidal volumes were taken every five minutes. A mixed regression model with a random intercept was used to compare the positions and changes over time. The anterior-posterior distribution stabilised after ten minutes in Fowler's position and ten minutes after returning to supine. Left-right stabilisation was achieved after 15 minutes in Fowler's position and supine. A minimum of 15 minutes of stabilisation should be allowed for spontaneously breathing individuals when assessing ventilation distribution. This time allows stabilisation to occur in the anterior-posterior direction as well as the left-right direction.

  10. Bathymetry mapping using a GPS-sonar equipped remote control boat: Application in waste stabilisation ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Liah; Ghadouani, Anas; Ghisalberti, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, bathymetry mapping of ponds, lakes and rivers have used techniques which are low in spatial resolution, sometimes subjective in terms of precision and accuracy, labour intensive, and that require a high level of safety precautions. In waste stabilisation ponds (WSP) in particular, sludge heights, and thus sludge volume, are commonly measured using a sludge judge (a clear plastic pipe with length markings). A remote control boat fitted with a GPS-equipped sonar unit can improve the resolution of depth measurements, and reduce safety and labour requirements. Sonar devices equipped with GPS technology, also known as fish finders, are readily available and widely used by people in boating. Through the use of GPS technology in conjunction with sonar, the location and depth can be recorded electronically onto a memory card. However, despite its high applicability to the field, this technology has so far been underutilised. In the case of WSP, the sonar can measure the water depth to the top of the sludge layer, which can then be used to develop contour maps of sludge distribution and to determine sludge volume. The coupling of sonar technology with a remotely operative vehicle has several advantages of traditional measurement techniques, particularly in removing human subjectivity of readings, and the sonar being able to collect more data points in a shorter period of time, and continuously, with a much higher spatial resolution. The GPS-sonar equipped remote control boat has been tested on in excess of 50 WSP within Western Australia, and has shown a very strong correlation (R2 = 0.98) between spot readings taken with the sonar compared to a sludge judge. This has shown that the remote control boat with GPS-sonar device is capable of providing sludge bathymetry with greatly increased spatial resolution, while greatly reducing profiling time. Remotely operated vehicles, such as the one built in this study, are useful for not only determining sludge

  11. High pressure hydrogen stabilised by quantum nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needs, Richard; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Pickard, Chris

    Hydrogen under extreme pressures is of fundamental interest, as it might exhibit exotic physical phenomena, and of practical interest, as it is a major component of many astrophysical objects. Structure searches have been successful at identifying promising candidates for the known phases of high pressure hydrogen. However, these searches have so far been restricted to the location of minima of the potential energy landscape. In this talk, we will describe a new structure searching method, ``saddle-point ab initio random structure searching'' (sp-AIRSS), that allows us to identify structures associated with saddle points of the potential energy landscape. Using sp-AIRSS, we find two new high-pressure hydrogen structures that exhibit a harmonic dynamical instability, but quantum and thermal anharmonic motion render them dynamically stable. These structures are formed by mixed layers of strongly and softly bound hydrogen molecules, and become thermodynamically competitive at the highest pressures reached in experiment. The experimental implications of these new structures will also be discussed. BM is supported by Robinson College, Cambridge, and the Cambridge Philosophical Society. RJN and CJP are supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) of the UK.

  12. Resisting regime-shifts: the stabilising effect of compensatory processes.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sean D; Ghedini, Giulia

    2015-09-01

    Ecologists seem predisposed to studying change because we are intuitively interested in dynamic systems, including their vulnerability to human disturbance. We contrast this disposition with the value of studying processes that work against change. Although powerful, processes that counter disturbance often go unexplored because they yield no observable community change. This stability results from compensatory processes which are initiated by disturbance; these adjust in proportion to the strength of the disturbance to prevent community change. By recognising such buffering processes, we might also learn to recognise the early warning signals of community shifts which are notoriously difficult to predict because communities often show little to no change before their tipping point is reached. PMID:26190138

  13. Observer-based stabilisation of a class of nonlinear systems in the presence of measurement delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Liu, Jinkun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the stabilising control problem for a class of nonlinear system in the presence of measurement delay is addressed. A full-order observer is designed to eliminate the effect of variable output time delay, which is bounded and known. Then, the estimated states are utilised for the state feedback control law to stabilise the considered control system. Lyapunov-Razumikhin approach is employed to analyse the stability of the closed-loop system. Unlike the previous work, the exponential convergence of the estimation error is ensured, rather than asymptotic convergence, by designing a delay-dependent gain of the observer. Moreover, comparison with similar work is also made in simulation to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  14. Steady-state entanglement of distant transmons, stabilised against high transmission loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motzoi, Felix; Halperin, Eli; Wang, Xiaoting; Whaley, Birgitta; Schirmer, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    Being able to stabilise entanglement over long distances and long times provides numerous advantages over pulsed experiments (avoiding variability, synchronisation, and calibration issues) while providing an important resource on-demand, which can then be potentially distilled and used to construct a quantum network. We show how existing superconducting technologies can be entangled over distances of tens of meters providing resilient stabilisation even in the presence of high inefficiency of the transmission channel. This can be achieved both in the dispersive and near-resonant cavity regimes using simple protocols that employ correlated environmental interactions and symmetry breaking. These require only a single-frequency drive that interacts sequentially with each cavity-qubit system. The dispersive regime protocol uses feedback while the near-resonant regime protocol is autonomous.

  15. Robust stabilisation of time-varying delay systems with probabilistic uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning; Xiong, Junlin; Lam, James

    2016-09-01

    For robust stabilisation of time-varying delay systems, only sufficient conditions are available to date. A natural question is as follows: if the existing sufficient conditions are not satisfied, and hence no controllers can be found, what can one do to improve the stability performance of time-varying delay systems? This question is addressed in this paper when there is a probabilistic structure on the parameter uncertainty set. A randomised algorithm is proposed to design a state-feedback controller, which stabilises the system over the uncertainty domain in a probabilistic sense. The capability of the designed controller is quantified by the probability of stability of the resulting closed-loop system. The accuracy of the solution obtained from the randomised algorithm is also analysed. Finally, numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the developed controller design approach.

  16. Preconditioning of Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models for Stabilisation of Variance-Covariance Matrix Computations.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yasunori; Nordgren, Rikard; Hooker, Andrew C

    2016-03-01

    As the importance of pharmacometric analysis increases, more and more complex mathematical models are introduced and computational error resulting from computational instability starts to become a bottleneck in the analysis. We propose a preconditioning method for non-linear mixed effects models used in pharmacometric analyses to stabilise the computation of the variance-covariance matrix. Roughly speaking, the method reparameterises the model with a linear combination of the original model parameters so that the Hessian matrix of the likelihood of the reparameterised model becomes close to an identity matrix. This approach will reduce the influence of computational error, for example rounding error, to the final computational result. We present numerical experiments demonstrating that the stabilisation of the computation using the proposed method can recover failed variance-covariance matrix computations, and reveal non-identifiability of the model parameters.

  17. Global stabilisation of the PVTOL aircraft with lateral force coupling and bounded inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Araujo, D. J.; Zavala-Río, A.; Fantoni, I.; Salazar, S.; Lozano, R.

    2010-07-01

    This work is devoted to prove that the nonlinear control scheme previously proposed by Zavala-Río, Fantoni and Lozano for the global stabilisation of the planar vertical take-off and landing (PVTOL) aircraft with bounded inputs neglecting the lateral force coupling is robust with respect to the parameter characterising such a lateral force coupling, ɛ, as long as such a parameter takes small enough values. In other words, global stabilisation is achieved even if ɛ > 0, provided that such a parameter be sufficiently small. As far as the authors are aware, such a property has not been proved in other existing control schemes when the value of ɛ is not known. The presented methodology is based on the use of embedded saturation functions. Furthermore, experimental results of the control algorithm implemented on a real prototype are presented.

  18. Accessible Mannitol-Based Amphiphiles (MNAs) for Membrane Protein Solubilisation and Stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Hazrat; Du, Yang; Scull, Nicola J; Mortensen, Jonas S; Tarrasch, Jeffrey; Bae, Hyoung Eun; Loland, Claus J; Byrne, Bernadette; Kobilka, Brian K; Chae, Pil Seok

    2016-05-17

    Integral membrane proteins are amphipathic molecules crucial for all cellular life. The structural study of these macromolecules starts with protein extraction from the native membranes, followed by purification and crystallisation. Detergents are essential tools for these processes, but detergent-solubilised membrane proteins often denature and aggregate, resulting in loss of both structure and function. In this study, a novel class of agents, designated mannitol-based amphiphiles (MNAs), were prepared and characterised for their ability to solubilise and stabilise membrane proteins. Some of MNAs conferred enhanced stability to four membrane proteins including a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2 AR), compared to both n-dodecyl-d-maltoside (DDM) and the other MNAs. These agents were also better than DDM for electron microscopy analysis of the β2 AR. The ease of preparation together with the enhanced membrane protein stabilisation efficacy demonstrates the value of these agents for future membrane protein research. PMID:27072057

  19. Global output feedback stabilisation of high-order nonlinear systems with multiple time-varying delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangzheng; Wu, Yuqiang; Yuan, Fushun

    2016-07-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global output feedback stabilisation for a class of high-order nonlinear systems with multiple time-varying delays. By using backstepping recursive technique and the homogeneous domination approach, a continuous output feedback controller is successfully designed, and the global asymptotic stability of the resulting closed-loop system is proven with the help of an appropriate Lyapunov- Krasovskii functional. Two simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  20. Arsenic and copper stabilisation in a contaminated soil by coal fly ash and green waste compost.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Yip, Alex C K; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    In situ metal stabilisation by amendments has been demonstrated as an appealing low-cost remediation strategy for contaminated soil. This study investigated the short-term leaching behaviour and long-term stability of As and Cu in soil amended with coal fly ash and/or green waste compost. Locally abundant inorganic (limestone and bentonite) and carbonaceous (lignite) resources were also studied for comparison. Column leaching experiments revealed that coal fly ash outperformed limestone and bentonite amendments for As stabilisation. It also maintained the As stability under continuous leaching of acidic solution, which was potentially attributed to high-affinity adsorption, co-precipitation, and pozzolanic reaction of coal fly ash. However, Cu leaching in the column experiments could not be mitigated by any of these inorganic amendments, suggesting the need for co-addition of carbonaceous materials that provides strong chelation with oxygen-containing functional groups for Cu stabilisation. Green waste compost suppressed the Cu leaching more effectively than lignite due to the difference in chemical composition and dissolved organic matter. After 9-month soil incubation, coal fly ash was able to minimise the concentrations of As and Cu in the soil solution without the addition of carbonaceous materials. Nevertheless, leachability tests suggested that the provision of green waste compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of As and Cu leachability in a fairly aggressive leaching environment. These results highlight the importance of assessing stability and remobilisation of sequestered metals under varying environmental conditions for ensuring a plausible and enduring soil stabilisation. PMID:24859701

  1. The Stabilisation Potential of Individual and Mixed Assemblages of Natural Bacteria and Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Lubarsky, Helen V.; Hubas, Cédric; Chocholek, Melanie; Larson, Fredrik; Manz, Werner; Paterson, David M.; Gerbersdorf, Sabine U.

    2010-01-01

    It is recognized that microorganisms inhabiting natural sediments significantly mediate the erosive response of the bed (“ecosystem engineers”) through the secretion of naturally adhesive organic material (EPS: extracellular polymeric substances). However, little is known about the individual engineering capability of the main biofilm components (heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic microalgae) in terms of their individual contribution to the EPS pool and their relative functional contribution to substratum stabilisation. This paper investigates the engineering effects on a non-cohesive test bed as the surface was colonised by natural benthic assemblages (prokaryotic, eukaryotic and mixed cultures) of bacteria and microalgae. MagPI (Magnetic Particle Induction) and CSM (Cohesive Strength Meter) respectively determined the adhesive capacity and the cohesive strength of the culture surface. Stabilisation was significantly higher for the bacterial assemblages (up to a factor of 2) than for axenic microalgal assemblages. The EPS concentration and the EPS composition (carbohydrates and proteins) were both important in determining stabilisation. The peak of engineering effect was significantly greater in the mixed assemblage as compared to the bacterial (x 1.2) and axenic diatom (x 1.7) cultures. The possibility of synergistic effects between the bacterial and algal cultures in terms of stability was examined and rejected although the concentration of EPS did show a synergistic elevation in mixed culture. The rapid development and overall stabilisation potential of the various assemblages was impressive (x 7.5 and ×9.5, for MagPI and CSM, respectively, as compared to controls). We confirmed the important role of heterotrophic bacteria in “biostabilisation” and highlighted the interactions between autotrophic and heterotrophic biofilm consortia. This information contributes to the conceptual understanding of the microbial sediment engineering that represents an

  2. Finite-time state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear feedforward systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Xing-Hui; Zhang, Kemei

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the finite-time state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear feedforward systems. Based on the stochastic Lyapunov theorem on finite-time stability, by using the homogeneous domination method, the adding one power integrator and sign function method, constructing a ? Lyapunov function and verifying the existence and uniqueness of solution, a continuous state feedback controller is designed to guarantee the closed-loop system finite-time stable in probability.

  3. Stabilisation of groundwater samples for the quantification of organic trace pollutants.

    PubMed

    Becker, Roland; Dorgerloh, Ute; Theissen, Hubert; Nehls, Irene

    2013-12-01

    The concentration of contaminants in groundwater samples can be decreased by degradation in the time course between field sampling and quantification in the laboratory, especially in samples from sites where degradation activity is enhanced by remediation measures. The sampling sites covered a variety of priority organic pollutants such as volatile aromatic and chlorinated compounds, phenols and petroleum hydrocarbons and different remediation strategies such as anaerobic and aerobic microbial in situ degradation, in situ chemical oxidation, and on-site purification with biological treatment. The stability of the contaminants' concentration was investigated over a time range of several hours without cooling in the autosampler of the analytical equipment (short term) and over several days of storage until analysis (long term). A number of stabilisation techniques suggested in international standards ISO 5667-3:2013 and ASTM D6517:2000 were compared both with regard to short term and long term stabilisation of the contaminants and their practicability for field sampling campaigns. Long term storage turned out to be problematic for most compound groups even under cooling. Short term stability was problematic also for volatiles such as benzenic aromates, naphthalene and volatile organic halogenated compounds to be analysed by headspace gas chromatography. Acidification (pH <2) was sufficient to prevent degradation of benzenic aromates, naphthalene, phenols and petrol hydrocarbons for up to seven days. The use of acids was not applicable to stabilise volatiles in waters rich in carbonates and sulphides due to stripping of the volatiles with the liberated gases. The addition of sodium azide was successfully used for stabilisation of volatile organic halogenated compounds.

  4. Frequency stabilisation of a fibre-laser comb using a novel microstructured fibre.

    PubMed

    Locke, C R; Ivanov, E N; Light, P S; Benabid, F; Luiten, A N

    2009-03-30

    There is great interest in developing high performance optical frequency metrology based around mode-locked fibre lasers because of their low cost, small size and long-term turnkey operation when compared to the solid-state alternative. We present a method for stabilising the offset frequency of a fibre-based laser comb using a 2 f - 3 f technique based around a unique fibre that exhibits strong resonant dispersive wave emission. This fibre requires lower power than conventional highly non-linear fibre to generate a suitable signal for offset frequency stabilisation and this in turn avoids the complexity of additional nonlinear steps. We generate an offset frequency signal from the mixing of a wavelength-shifted second harmonic comb with a third harmonic of the comb. Additionally, we have stabilised the repetition rate of the laser to a level better than 10(-14)/ radicaltau , limited by the measurement system noise floor.We present the means for complete and precise measurement of the transfer function of the laser frequency controls.

  5. Cold laser machining of nickel-yttrium stabilised zirconia cermets: Composition dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, D.

    2009-09-15

    Cold laser micromachining efficiency in nickel-yttrium stabilised zirconia cermets was studied as a function of cermet composition. Nickel oxide-yttrium stabilised zirconia ceramic plates obtained via tape casting technique were machined using 8-25 ns pulses of a Nd: YAG laser at the fixed wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m and a frequency of 1 kHz. The morphology of the holes, etched volume, drill diameter, shape and depth were evaluated as a function of the processing parameters such as pulse irradiance and of the initial composition. The laser drilling mechanism was evaluated in terms of laser-material interaction parameters such as beam absorptivity, material spallation and the impact on the overall process discussed. By varying the nickel oxide content of the composite the optical absorption (-value is greatly modified and significantly affected the drilling efficiency of the green state ceramic substrates and the morphology of the holes. Higher depth values and improved drilled volume upto 0.2 mm{sup 3} per pulse were obtained for substrates with higher optical transparency (lower optical absorption value). In addition, a laser beam self-focussing effect is observed for the compositions with less nickel oxide content. Holes with average diameter from 60 {mu}m to 110 {mu}m and upto 1 mm in depth were drilled with a high rate of 40 ms per hole while the final microstructure of the cermet obtained by reduction of the nickel oxide-yttrium stabilised zirconia composites remained unchanged.

  6. Polarographic study on the evolution of the diphenylamine as stabiliser of the solid propellants.

    PubMed

    de Diego Martínez, A Pérez; Tascón, M L; Vázquez, M D; Sánchez Batanero, P

    2004-01-01

    Differential pulse polarography (DPP) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) were investigated, in order to know the stability of solid propellants which contain diphenylamine. The simultaneous determination of N-nitrousdiphenylamine (NnDPA), 2-nitrodiphenylamine (2nDPA), 4-nitrodiphenylamine (4nDPA) and 2,4-dinitrodiphenylamine (2,4dnDPA) by DPP and SWV was proposed due to these nitro-derivatives appear during the stabilisation process from degradation of diphenylamine (DPA) used as stabiliser in propellant compositions. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the simple base solid propellant (with nitrocellulose as the only active component), with its stabiliser DPA. In all cases and with both the techniques, detection limits

  7. Leachability and heavy metal speciation of 17-year old stabilised/solidified contaminated site soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hailing; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2014-08-15

    The long-term leachability, heavy metal speciation transformation and binding mechanisms in a field stabilised/solidified contaminated soil (made ground) from West Drayton site were recently investigated following in situ auger mixing treatment with a number of cement-based binders back in 1996. Two batch leaching tests (TCLP and BS EN 12457) and a modified five step sequential extraction procedure along with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses were employed for the testing of the 17-year-old field soil. The results of batch leaching tests show that the treatment employed remained effective at 17 years of service time, with all BS EN 12457 test samples and most of TCLP test samples satisfied drinking water standards. Sequential extraction results illustrate that the leaching of Cu, Ni, Zn, Pb and Cd in all mixes mainly occurred at the Fe/Mn phase, ranging from 43% to 83%. Amongst the five metals tested, Ni was the most stable with around 40% remained in the residual phase for all the different cement-based binder stabilised/solidified samples. XRD and SEM analyses show that the hydration process has been fully completed and further carbonation took place. In summary, this study confirms that such cement-based stabilisation/solidification (S/S) treatment can achieve satisfactory durability and thus is a reliable technique for long-term remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. PMID:24956579

  8. Global stabilisation of a class of generalised cascaded systems by homogeneous method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shihong; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2016-04-01

    This paper considers the problem of global stabilisation of a class of generalised cascaded systems. By using the extended adding a power integrator technique, a global controller is first constructed for the driving subsystem. Then based on the homogeneous properties and polynomial assumption, it is shown that the stabilisation of the driving subsystem implies the stabilisation of the overall cascaded system. Meanwhile, by properly choosing some control parameters, the global finite-time stability of the closed-loop cascaded system is also established. The proposed control method has several new features. First, the nonlinear cascaded systems considered in the paper are more general than the conventional ones, since the powers in the nominal part of the driving subsystem are not required to be restricted to ratios of positive odd numbers. Second, the proposed method has some flexible parameters which provide the possibility for designing continuously differentiable controllers for cascaded systems, while the existing designed controllers for such kind of cascaded systems are only continuous. Third, the homogenous and polynomial conditions adopted for the driven subsystem are easier to verify when compared with the matching conditions that are widely used previously. Furthermore, the efficiency of the proposed control method is validated by its application to finite-time tracking control of non-holonomic wheeled mobile robot.

  9. Interfacial behaviour of sodium stearoyllactylate (SSL) as an oil-in-water pickering emulsion stabiliser.

    PubMed

    Kurukji, D; Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2013-11-01

    The ability of a food ingredient, sodium stearoyllactylate (SSL), to stabilise oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions against coalescence was investigated, and closely linked to its capacity to act as a Pickering stabiliser. Results showed that emulsion stability could be achieved with a relatively low SSL concentration (≥0.1 wt%), and cryogenic-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) visualisation of emulsion structure revealed the presence of colloidal SSL aggregates adsorbed at the oil-water interface. Surface properties of SSL could be modified by altering the size of these aggregates in water; a faster decrease in surface tension was observed when SSL dispersions were subjected to high pressure homogenisation (HPH). The rate of SSL adsorption at the sunflower oil-water interface also increased after HPH, and a higher interfacial tension (IFT) was observed with increasing SSL concentration. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) enabled a comparison of the thermal behaviour of SSL in aqueous dispersions with SSL-stabilised O/W emulsions. SSL melting enthalpy depended on emulsion interfacial area and the corresponding DSC data was used to determine the amount of SSL adsorbed at the oil-water interface. An idealised theoretical interfacial coverage calculation based on Pickering emulsion theory was in general agreement with the mass of SSL adsorbed as predicted by DSC.

  10. Stabilisation of Na,K-ATPase structure by the cardiotonic steroid ouabain

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Andrew J.; Fedosova, Natalya U.; Hoffmann, Søren V.; Wallace, B.A.; Esmann, Mikael

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •Ouabain binding to pig and shark Na,K-ATPase enhances thermal stability. •Ouabain stabilises both membrane-bound and solubilised Na,K-ATPase. •Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism is used for structure determination. •Secondary structure in general is not affected by ouabain binding. •Stabilisation is due to re-arrangement of tertiary structure. -- Abstract: Cardiotonic steroids such as ouabain bind with high affinity to the membrane-bound cation-transporting P-type Na,K-ATPase, leading to complete inhibition of the enzyme. Using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy we show that the enzyme-ouabain complex is less susceptible to thermal denaturation (unfolding) than the ouabain-free enzyme, and this protection is observed with Na,K-ATPase purified from pig kidney as well as from shark rectal glands. It is also shown that detergent-solubilised preparations of Na,K-ATPase are stabilised by ouabain, which could account for the successful crystallisation of Na,K-ATPase in the ouabain-bound form. The secondary structure is not significantly affected by the binding of ouabain. Ouabain appears however, to induce a reorganization of the tertiary structure towards a more compact protein structure which is less prone to unfolding; recent crystal structures of the two enzymes are consistent with this interpretation. These circular dichroism spectroscopic studies in solution therefore provide complementary information to that provided by crystallography.

  11. Integrated waste management as a climate change stabilisation wedge for the Maltese islands.

    PubMed

    Falzon, Clyde; Fabri, Simon G; Frysinger, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The continuous increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions occurring since the Industrial Revolution is offering significant ecological challenges to Earth. These emissions are leading to climate changes which bring about extensive damage to communities, ecosystems and resources. The analysis in this article is focussed on the waste sector within the Maltese islands, which is the largest greenhouse gas emitter in the archipelago following the energy and transportation sectors. This work shows how integrated waste management, based on a life cycle assessment methodology, acts as an effective stabilisation wedge strategy for climate change. Ten different scenarios applicable to the Maltese municipal solid waste management sector are analysed. It is shown that the scenario that is most coherent with the stabilisation wedges strategy for the Maltese islands consists of 50% landfilling, 30% mechanical biological treatment and 20% recyclable waste export for recycling. It is calculated that 16.6 Mt less CO2-e gases would be emitted over 50 years by means of this integrated waste management stabilisation wedge when compared to the business-as-usual scenario. These scientific results provide evidence in support of policy development in Malta that is implemented through legislation, economic instruments and other applicable tools.

  12. The distribution and stabilisation of dissolved Fe in deep-sea hydrothermal plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sarah A.; Achterberg, Eric P.; Connelly, Douglas P.; Statham, Peter J.; Fones, Gary R.; German, Christopher R.

    2008-06-01

    We have conducted a study of hydrothermal plumes overlying the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 5° S to investigate whether there is a significant export flux of dissolved Fe from hydrothermal venting to the oceans. Our study combined measurements of plume-height Fe concentrations from a series of 6 CTD stations together with studies of dissolved Fe speciation in a subset of those samples. At 2.5 km down plume from the nearest known vent site dissolved Fe concentrations were ˜ 20 nM. This is much higher than would be predicted from a combination of plume dilution and dissolved Fe(II) oxidation rates, but consistent with stabilisation due to the presence of organic Fe complexes and Fe colloids. Using Competitive Ligand Exchange-Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (CLE-CSV), stabilised dissolved Fe complexes were detected within the dissolved Fe fraction on the edges of one non-buoyant hydrothermal plume with observed ligand concentrations high enough to account for stabilisation of ˜ 4% of the total Fe emitted from the 5° S vent sites. If these results were representative of all hydrothermal systems, submarine venting could provide 12-22% of the global deep-ocean dissolved Fe budget.

  13. α' Inflation: moduli stabilisation and observable tensors from higher derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Ciupke, David; de Alwis, Senarath; Muia, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The leading order dynamics of the type IIB Large Volume Scenario is characterised by the interplay between α' and non-perturbative effects which fix the overall volume and all local blow-up modes leaving (in general) several flat directions. In this paper we show that, in an arbitrary Calabi-Yau with at least one blow-up mode resolving a point-like singularity, any remaining flat directions can be lifted at subleading order by the inclusions of higher derivative α' corrections. We then focus on simple fibred cases with one remaining flat direction which can behave as an inflaton if its potential is generated by both higher derivative α' and winding loop corrections. Natural values of the underlying parameters give a spectral index in agreement with observational data and a tensor-to-scalar ratio of order r = 0 .01 which could be observed by forthcoming CMB experiments. Dangerous corrections from higher dimensional operators are suppressed due to the presence of an approximate non-compact shift symmetry.

  14. Can a total knee arthroplasty be both rotationally unconstrained and anteroposteriorly stabilised?

    PubMed Central

    Imam, M. A.; Eifert, A.; Freeman, M. A. R.; Pinskerova, V.; Field, R. E.; Skinner, J.; Banks, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Throughout the 20th Century, it has been postulated that the knee moves on the basis of a four-bar link mechanism composed of the cruciate ligaments, the femur and the tibia. As a consequence, the femur has been thought to roll back with flexion, and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) prostheses have been designed on this basis. Recent work, however, has proposed that at a position of between 0° and 120° the medial femoral condyle does not move anteroposteriorly whereas the lateral femoral condyle tends, but is not obliged, to roll back – a combination of movements which equates to tibial internal/ femoral external rotation with flexion. The aim of this paper was to assess if the articular geometry of the GMK Sphere TKA could recreate the natural knee movements in situ/in vivo. Methods The pattern of knee movement was studied in 15 patients (six male: nine female; one male with bilateral TKAs) with 16 GMK Sphere implants, at a mean age of 66 years (53 to 76) with a mean BMI of 30 kg/m2 (20 to 35). The motions of all 16 knees were observed using pulsed fluoroscopy during a number of weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing static and dynamic activities. Results During maximally flexed kneeling and lunging activities, the mean tibial internal rotation was 8° (standard deviation (sd) 6). At a mean 112° flexion (sd 16) during lunging, the medial and lateral condyles were a mean of 2 mm (sd 3) and 8 mm (sd 4) posterior to a transverse line passing through the centre of the medial tibial concavity. With a mean flexion of 117° (sd 14) during kneeling, the medial and lateral condyles were a mean of 1 mm (sd 4) anterior and 6 mm (sd 4) posterior to the same line. During dynamic stair and pivoting activities, there was a mean anteroposterior translation of 0 mm to 2 mm of the medial femoral condyle. Backward lateral condylar translation occurred and was linearly related to tibial rotation. Conclusion The GMK Sphere TKA in our study group shows movements similar in

  15. A 10-year follow-up of transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or intervertebral B-Twin system in failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spine surgeons have been combining anterior and posterolateral fusion (circumferential fusion) as the final solution to treat spinal disorders and many have been using it to treat failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). In present study, we analyzed and compared the clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral B-Twin system for FBSS with a follow-up period of 10 years after the surgery. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective case study performed on 55 patients with FBSS. Clinical and radiological changes were compared between the two groups of patients on the basis of improvement of back pain, radicular pain, and work capacity. Outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year from before surgery until 2012. We analyzed the evolution of 55 cases of FBSS those underwent segmental circumferential posterior fusions from June 2001 to February 2003, operated by a single surgeon and followed up during 10 years until February 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: In 25 patients, posterolateral fusions with Legacy™ (Medtronic, Inc. NYSE: MDT) screws and intersomatic autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft was performed, and, in 30 patients, posterolateral fusions with the same screws and intersomatic fusion B-Twin (Biomet Spain Orthopaedics, S.L.) system was performed. In all cases, we used posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for intervertebral graft, and the artrodesis was supplemented at intertransverse level with Autologus Growth Factor (AGF-MBA INCORPORADO, S.A.). The outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year and compared

  16. Test method selection, validation against field data, and predictive modelling for impact evaluation of stabilised waste disposal.

    PubMed

    van der Sloot, Hans A; van Zomeren, Andre; Meeussen, Johannes C L; Seignette, Paul; Bleijerveld, Rob

    2007-03-15

    In setting criteria for landfill classes in Annex II of the EU Landfill Directive, it proved to be impossible to derive criteria for stabilised monolithic waste due to the lack of information on release and release controlling factors in stabilised waste monofills. In this study, we present a scientific basis, which enables a realistic description of the environmental impact of stabilised waste landfills. The work in progress involves laboratory testing of different stabilisation recipes, pilot scale studies on site and evaluation of field leachate from a full-scale stabilisation landfill. We found that the pHs in run-off and in percolate water from the pilot experiment are both around neutral. The neutral pH in run-off is apparently caused by the rapid atmospheric carbonation of those alkaline constituents that are released. The soil, used as a liner protection layer, controls the release to the subsurface below the landfill. This soil layer buffers pH and binds metals. The modelling results show that the chemistry is understood rather well. Differences between predicted and actual leaching might then be attributed to discrepancies in the description of sorption processes, complexation to organic matter and/or kinetic effects in the leaching tests. We conclude that this approach resulted in a new scientific basis for environmental impact assessment of stabilised waste landfills. The integrated approach has already resulted in a number of very valuable observations, which can be used to develop a sustainable landfill for monolithic waste and to provide guidance for the management of waste to be stabilised (e.g. improved waste mix design).

  17. Phase stabilisation of hexagonal barium titanate doped with transition metals: A computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J.A.; Freeman, C.L.; Harding, J.H.; Sinclair, D.C.

    2013-04-15

    Interatomic potentials recently developed for the modelling of BaTiO{sub 3} have been used to explore the stabilisation of the hexagonal polymorph of BaTiO{sub 3} by doping with transition metals (namely Mn, Co, Fe and Ni) at the Ti-site. Classical simulations have been completed on both the cubic and hexagonal polymorphs to investigate the energetic consequences of transition metal doping on each polymorph. Ti-site charge compensation mechanisms have been used for the multi-valent transition metal ions and cluster binding energies have been considered. Simulations show a significant energetic gain when doping occurs at Ti sites in the face sharing dimers (Ti{sub 2} sites) of the hexagonal polymorph compared with the doping of the cubic polymorph. This energetic difference between the two polymorphs is true for all transition metals tested and all charge states and in the case of tri- and tetra-valent dopants negative solution energies are found for the hexagonal polymorph suggesting actual polymorph stabilisation occurs with the incorporation of these ions as observed experimentally. Oxidation during incorporation of Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions has also been considered. - Graphical abstract: The representation of the strongest binding energy clusters for tri-valent dopants—(a) Ti{sub 2}/O{sub 1} cluster and (b) Ti{sub 2}/O{sub 2} cluster. Highlights: ► Classical simulations show a significant energetic gain when doping occurs at Ti sites in the face sharing dimers (Ti2 sites) of the hexagonal polymorph compared with the doping of the cubic polymorph. ► This energetic difference between the two polymorphs is true for all transition metals tested and all charge states. ► In the case of tri- and tetra- valent dopants negative solution energies are found for the hexagonal polymorph suggesting actual polymorph stabilisation occurs with the incorporation of these ions.

  18. Stabilisation of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) anthocyanins by different pectins.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Speth, M; Kammerer, D R; Carle, R

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different pectins on strawberry anthocyanins in viscous model solutions at pH 3.0. For this purpose, low esterified amidated, low and high methyl esterified citrus and apple pectins, and a sugar beet pectin (SBP), respectively, were added to strawberry extracts. The latter were predominantly composed of pelargonidin-glycosides, containing either reduced (E-1) or original amounts of non-anthocyanin phenolics (E-2). Model systems were stored for 18 weeks at 20±0.5 °C protected from light, and anthocyanins were quantitated in regular intervals by HPLC-DAD analyses. Half-life (t1/2) and destruction (D) values were calculated based on first-order kinetics. Generally, significant differences in pigment retention could be ascribed to differing pectin sources, while variation in the degree of esterification and amidation, respectively, had negligible effects. Compared to systems without added pectin, apple pectins and SPB enhanced anthocyanin stability moderately, while stabilising effects of citrus pectins were poor or even imperceptible. Generally, the amount of non-anthocyanin phenolics and the addition of citrate did not markedly affect anthocyanin stability. However, pectins had no influence on total phenolic contents (Folin-Ciocalteu assay) and antioxidant capacities (FRAP and TEAC assay) of strawberry phenolics over time. For pelargonidin-3-glucoside and -rutinoside largely consistent stabilities were found in all model systems. In contrast, pelargonidin-3-malonylglucoside was less stable in the blank, and stabilisation by pectins was always negligible. The findings of the present study are contrary to results reported previously for the stabilisation of cyanidin- and delphinidin-glycosides in similar model systems prepared with black currant extracts, indicating a high impact of the number of hydroxyl groups in the anthocyanin B-ring.

  19. Effect of duckweed cover on greenhouse gas emissions and odour release from waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, N P; Nakiboneka, P; Mangalika, L; Ferrer, A V M; Gijzen, H J

    2003-01-01

    Treatment of wastewater in stabilisation pond systems prevents the negative environmental impact of uncontrolled disposal of sewage. However, even a natural treatment system may generate secondary negative environmental impacts in terms of energy consumption, emission of greenhouse gases and emission of odorous compounds. Whereas natural systems have an advantage over electro-mechanical systems in that they use less hardware and less energy, it is not yet known whether secondary environmental effects in the form of greenhouse gas emissions are lower for these systems. This research intends to be a first step in the direction of answering this question by assessing gas emissions from two types of natural systems, namely algae-based and duckweed-based stabilisation ponds. The H2S volatilisation from laboratory scale pond-reactors has been determined by drawing the air above the water surface continuously through a solution of 1 M NaOH for absorption of sulphide. The amount of H2S that volatilised from the algae pond-reactor, and was trapped in the NaOH trap, was found to be 2.5-86 mg/m2/day. The H2S volatilisation from the duckweed pond-reactor was found to be negligible, even though the sulphide concentration was 9.7 mg/l S(2-). The duckweed cover was a physical barrier for volatilisation, since bubbles were trapped in the cover. In addition the duckweed layer was found to be afavourable environment for both aerobic sulphide oxidisers (Beggiatoa gigantae) as well as for photosynthetic purple sulphur bacteria belonging to the genus Chromatium. These may also have contributed to the prevention of H2S volatilisation. Results on methane emissions were not conclusive so far, but the same mechanisms that prevent H2S volatilisation may also prevent methane volatilisation. Therefore it was concluded that duckweed covers on stabilisation ponds may reduce the emission of both odorous and greenhouse gases.

  20. Formulation, characterisation and stabilisation of buccal films for paediatric drug delivery of omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sajjad; Boateng, Joshua S; Mitchell, John; Trivedi, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to develop films for potential delivery of omeprazole (OME) via the buccal mucosa of paediatric patients. Films were prepared using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), methylcellulose (MC), sodium alginate (SA), carrageenan (CA) and metolose (MET) with polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) as plasticiser, OME (model drug) and L-arg (stabiliser). Gels (1% w/w) were prepared at 40°C using water and ethanol with PEG 400 (0-1% w/w) and dried in an oven (40°C). Optimised formulations containing OME and L-arg (1:1, 1:2 and 1:3) were prepared to investigate the stabilisation of the drug. Tensile properties (Texture analysis, TA), physical form (differential scanning calorimetry, DSC; X-ray diffraction, XRD; thermogravimetric analysis, TGA) and surface topography (scanning electron microscopy, SEM) were investigated. Based on the TA results, SA and MET films were chosen for OME loading and stabilisation studies as they showed a good balance between flexibility and toughness. Plasticised MET films were uniform and smooth whilst unplasticised films demonstrated rough lumpy surfaces. SA films prepared from aqueous gels showed some lumps on the surface, whereas SA films prepared from ethanolic gels were smooth and uniform. Drug-loaded gels showed that OME was unstable and therefore required addition of L-arg. The DSC and XRD suggested molecular dispersion of drug within the polymeric matrix. Plasticised (0.5% w/w PEG 400) MET films prepared from ethanolic (20% v/v) gels and containing OME: L-arg 1:2 showed the most ideal characteristics (transparency, ease of peeling and flexibility) and was selected for further investigation.

  1. Arm-length stabilisation for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors using frequency-doubled auxiliary lasers.

    PubMed

    Mullavey, Adam J; Slagmolen, Bram J J; Miller, John; Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Sigg, Daniel; Waldman, Sam J; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E

    2012-01-01

    Residual motion of the arm cavity mirrors is expected to prove one of the principal impediments to systematic lock acquisition in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. We present a technique which overcomes this problem by employing auxiliary lasers at twice the fundamental measurement frequency to pre-stabilise the arm cavities' lengths. Applying this approach, we reduce the apparent length noise of a 1.3 m long, independently suspended Fabry-Perot cavity to 30 pm rms and successfully transfer longitudinal control of the system from the auxiliary laser to the measurement laser.

  2. Asymptotic stabilisation for a class of feedforward input-delay systems with ratios of odd integers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian; Chen, Weisheng; Miao, Qiguang

    2013-11-01

    This article addresses the stabilisation problem by state-feedback for a class of feedforward input-delay nonlinear systems with ratios of odd integer powers. The designed controller achieves the global asymptotic stability. Based on the appropriate state transformation of time-delay systems and the Lyapunov method, the problem of controller design can be converted into the problem of finding a parameter which can be obtained by appraising the nonlinear terms of the systems. Finally, three simulation examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the control algorithm proposed in this article.

  3. Spectroscopic properties of erbium-doped yttria-stabilised zirconia crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabochkina, P A; Sidorova, N V; Ushakov, S N; Lomonova, E E

    2014-02-28

    Yttria-stabilised zirconia crystals ZrO{sub 2} – Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (6 mol %) – Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5.85 mol %) are grown by directional crystallisation in a cold container using direct RF melting. The spectral and luminescent properties of these crystals are studied in order to use them as active media of solid state lasers emitting in the wavelength range 1.5 – 1.7 μm. (active media)

  4. Chemical, Physical, and Biological Approaches to the Creation of Stabilised Enzyme Catalysts for Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozhaev, V. V.; Martinek, K.; Berezin, Ilya V.

    1987-10-01

    The problem of the inter-relation between the structure and stability of proteins includes two main questions: firstly, how can we discover the molecular characteristics of the structure of proteins which are responsible for their stability? Secondly, how, knowing the general molecular causes of stability, can we alter the structure of a specific protein in order to increase its stability, i.e. to stabilise it? In the present review an attempt is made to present the current state of both the first (fundamental) and second (applied) aspects of this problem. The bibliography includes 250 references.

  5. On asymptotic stabilisation of a chain of integrators with nonlinearity and an uncertain input delay by output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Ho-Lim

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we provide an output feedback solution over one given by Choi and Lim [Systems & Control Letters, 59(6), 374-379 (2010)] under more generalised system set-up. More specifically, we consider a stabilisation problem of a chain of integrators that has nonlinearity and an uncertain delay in the input by output feedback. The nonlinearity is classified into four types. Then, we propose a memoryless output feedback controller which contains a gain-scaling factor to adjust controller gains depending on the given nonlinearity type. Our stability analysis shows that the controlled system has unique stabilisation result associated with each type of nonlinearity. Our result provides a new aspect to the stabilisation problem of nonlinear time-delay systems and broadens the existing control results of time-delay systems. Two examples are given for illustration.

  6. Integration of vehicle yaw stabilisation and rollover prevention through nonlinear hierarchical control allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberding, Matthäus B.; Tjønnås, Johannes; Johansen, Tor A.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents an approach to rollover prevention that takes advantage of the modular structure and optimisation properties of the control allocation paradigm. It eliminates the need for a stabilising roll controller by introducing rollover prevention as a constraint on the control allocation problem. The major advantage of this approach is the control authority margin that remains with a high-level controller even during interventions for rollover prevention. In this work, the high-level control is assigned to a yaw stabilising controller. It could be replaced by any other controller. The constraint for rollover prevention could be replaced by or extended to different control objectives. This work uses differential braking for actuation. The use of additional or different actuators is possible. The developed control algorithm is computationally efficient and suitable for low-cost automotive electronic control units. The predictive design of the rollover prevention constraint does not require any sensor equipment in addition to the yaw controller. The method is validated using an industrial multi-body vehicle simulation environment.

  7. Influence of the stabilisation of organic materials on their biopesticide effect in soils.

    PubMed

    Garcia, C; Pascual, J A; Mena, E; Hernández, T

    2004-11-01

    Some organic materials have shown a suppressive effect on several diseases induced by soilborne plant pathogens. We have carried out a laboratory experiment (microcosm) to ascertain the influence of the stabilisation process of sewage sludge on it biopesticide effect when Pythium ultimum or Phytophthora sp. were introduced to soil as pathogens for pea or pepper. When P. ultimum was introduced there was a 63.8% reduction in the weight of the stems grown in the control, 47.6% in the presence of sewage sludge, but only 24.7% with compost. The same biopesticide effect was evident from the weight of the roots. The biopesticide effect was also strong when compost was used as organic amendment in the presence of Phytophthora, as could be seen from stem and shoot weight and length. The data showed that the degree of stabilisation of the organic material (compost) had a positive influence on it biopesticide effect. The changes undergone by a soil after the addition of organic materials helped to explain the biopesticide effect of the amendment. The organic treatments reduced P. ultimum and Phytophthora sp. populations. PMID:15246447

  8. Immobilised native plant cysteine proteases: packed-bed reactor for white wine protein stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Ilaria; Lombardelli, Claudio; Liburdi, Katia; Acciaro, Giuseppe; Zappino, Matteo; Esti, Marco

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a feasibility study of using a continuous packed-bed reactor (PBR), containing immobilised native plant cysteine proteases, as a specific and mild alternative technique relative to the usual bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation. The operational parameters for a PBR containing immobilised bromelain (PBR-br) or immobilised papain (PBR-pa) were optimised using model wine fortified with synthetic substrate (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-pNA). The effectiveness of PBR-br, both in terms of hazing potential and total protein decrease, was significantly higher than PBR-pa, in all the seven unfined, white wines used. Among the wines tested, Sauvignon Blanc, given its total protein content as well as its very high intrinsic instability, was selected as a control wine to evaluate the effect of the treatment on wine as to its soluble protein profile, phenolic composition, mineral component, and sensory properties. The treatment in a PBR containing immobilised bromelain appeared effective in decreasing both wine hazing potential and total protein amount, while it did not significantly affect the phenol compounds, the mineral component nor the sensory quality of wine. The enzymatic treatment in PBR was shown to be a specific and mild technique for use as an alternative to bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation. PMID:27162393

  9. Chemistry of guanidinate-stabilised diboranes: transition-metal-catalysed dehydrocoupling and hydride abstraction.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Arne; Litters, Sebastian; Elias, Jana; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-09-22

    Herein, we analyse the catalytic boron-boron dehydrocoupling reaction that leads from the base-stabilised diborane(6) [H2 B(hpp)]2 (hpp=1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidinate) to the base-stabilised diborane(4) [H2 B(hpp)]2 . A number of potential transition-metal precatalysts was studied, including transition-metal complexes of the product diborane(4). The synthesis and structural characterisation of two further examples of such complexes is presented. The best results for the dehydrocoupling reactions were obtained with precatalysts of Group 9 metals in the oxidation state of +I. The active catalyst is formed in situ through a multistep process that involves reduction of the precatalyst by the substrate [H2 B(hpp)]2 , and mechanistic investigations indicate that both heterogeneous and (slower) homogeneous reaction pathways play a role in the dehydrocoupling reaction. In addition, hydride abstraction from [H2 B(hpp)]2 and related diboranes is analysed and the possibility for subsequent deprotonation is discussed by probing the protic character of the cationic boron-hydrogen compounds with NMR spectroscopic analysis. PMID:25168516

  10. Immobilised native plant cysteine proteases: packed-bed reactor for white wine protein stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Ilaria; Lombardelli, Claudio; Liburdi, Katia; Acciaro, Giuseppe; Zappino, Matteo; Esti, Marco

    2016-02-01

    This research presents a feasibility study of using a continuous packed-bed reactor (PBR), containing immobilised native plant cysteine proteases, as a specific and mild alternative technique relative to the usual bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation. The operational parameters for a PBR containing immobilised bromelain (PBR-br) or immobilised papain (PBR-pa) were optimised using model wine fortified with synthetic substrate (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-pNA). The effectiveness of PBR-br, both in terms of hazing potential and total protein decrease, was significantly higher than PBR-pa, in all the seven unfined, white wines used. Among the wines tested, Sauvignon Blanc, given its total protein content as well as its very high intrinsic instability, was selected as a control wine to evaluate the effect of the treatment on wine as to its soluble protein profile, phenolic composition, mineral component, and sensory properties. The treatment in a PBR containing immobilised bromelain appeared effective in decreasing both wine hazing potential and total protein amount, while it did not significantly affect the phenol compounds, the mineral component nor the sensory quality of wine. The enzymatic treatment in PBR was shown to be a specific and mild technique for use as an alternative to bentonite fining for white wine protein stabilisation.

  11. The source of microbial C has little impact on soil organic matter stabilisation in forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Heather M; Bird, Jeffrey A; Dane, Laura; Firestone, Mary K; Horwath, William R

    2012-11-01

    The source of microbial C is thought to impact its stability in soil due to variations in cellular biochemistry. It has been hypothesised that a fungal-dominated community stabilises more C than a bacterial-dominated community, in part due to chemical recalcitrance of their non-living biomass, particularly cell wall components and pigments. We compared the turnover of (13)C-labelled (99.9 atom %) temperate and tropical microbial isolates [i.e. fungi, Gram-positive bacteria (including actinobacteria) and Gram-negative bacteria] in temperate (California) and tropical (Puerto Rico) forest soils. While significant differences in (13)C recovery and mean residence times occurred among some microbial additions, similar turnover rates were observed, and in general, results do not support the view that microbial biochemistry affects soil C maintenance. Different effects by microbial necromass additions in California and Puerto Rico suggest that ecosystem-specific effects may be as important to microbial C stabilisation as its macromolecular composition and recalcitrance. PMID:22897121

  12. A TACC3/ch-TOG/clathrin complex stabilises kinetochore fibres by inter-microtubule bridging

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Daniel G; Hood, Fiona E; Prior, Ian A; Royle, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Kinetochore fibres (K-fibres) of the spindle apparatus move chromosomes during mitosis. These fibres are discrete bundles of parallel microtubules (MTs) that are crosslinked by inter-MT ‘bridges' that are thought to improve fibre stability during chromosomal movement. The identity of these bridges is unknown. Clathrin is a multimeric protein that has been shown to stabilise K-fibres during early mitosis by a mechanism independent of its role in membrane trafficking. In this study, we show that clathrin at the mitotic spindle is in a transforming acidic colied-coil protein 3 (TACC3)/colonic, hepatic tumour overexpressed gene (ch-TOG)/clathrin complex. The complex is anchored to the spindle by TACC3 and ch-TOG. Ultrastructural analysis of clathrin-depleted K-fibres revealed a selective loss of a population of short inter-MT bridges and a general loss of MTs. A similar loss of short inter-MT bridges was observed in TACC3-depleted K-fibres. Finally, immunogold labelling confirmed that inter-MT bridges in K-fibres contain clathrin. Our results suggest that the TACC3/ch-TOG/clathrin complex is an inter-MT bridge that stabilises K-fibres by physical crosslinking and by reducing rates of MT catastrophe. PMID:21297582

  13. Comparisons of operating envelopes for contaminated soil stabilised/solidified with different cementitious binders.

    PubMed

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Al-Tabbaa, Abir; Stegemann, Julia A

    2014-03-01

    This work initiated the development of operating envelopes for stabilised/solidified contaminated soils. The operating envelopes define the range of operating variables for acceptable performance of the treated soils. The study employed a soil spiked with 3,000 mg/kg each of Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn, and 10,000 mg/kg of diesel. The binders used for treatment involved Portland cement (CEMI), pulverised fuel ash (PFA), ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) and hydrated lime (hlime). The specific binder formulations were CEMI, CEMI/PFA = 1:4, CEMI/GGBS = 1:9 and hlime/GGBS = 1:4. The water contents employed ranged from 13 % to 21 % (dry weight), while binder dosages ranged from 5 % to 20 % (w/w). We monitored the stabilised/solidified soils for up to 84 days using different performance tests. The tests include unconfined compressive strength (UCS), hydraulic conductivity, acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) and pH-dependent leachability of contaminants. The water content range resulted in adequate workability of the mixes but had no significant effect on leachability of contaminants. We produced design charts, representing operating envelopes, from the results generated. The charts establish relationships between water content, binder dosage and UCS; and binder dosage, leachant pH and leachability of contaminants. The work also highlights the strengths and weaknesses of the different binder formulations. PMID:24243092

  14. Stabilisation of amorphous furosemide increases the oral drug bioavailability in rats.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette

    2015-07-25

    A glass solution of the amorphous sodium salt of furosemide (ASSF) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) (80:20 w/w%) was prepared by spray drying. It was investigated if PVP was able to stabilise ASSF during storage and dissolution and whether this influenced the in vivo performance of the glass solution after oral dosing to rats. The glass solution had a glass transition temperature of 121.3 ± 0.5°C, which was significantly higher than that of the pure drug (101.2°C). ASSF in the glass solution was stable for at least 168 days when stored at 20°C and 0% relative humidity. The glass solution exhibited fast dissolution in simulated intestinal medium, pH 6.5; the intrinsic dissolution rate was found to be 10.1 ± 0.6 mg/cm(2)/min, which was significantly faster than the pure ASSF. When investigating the stability during dissolution in stimulated intestinal medium at pH 6.5, the ASSF in the glass solution showed signs of crystallinity after 1 min of dissolution, but crystallised to a lesser extent than pure ASSF. The stabilising effect of PVP on ASSF, led to improved relative oral bioavailability in rats of 263%, when compared to the pure ASSF. PMID:26026252

  15. Stabilised finite-element methods for solving the level set equation with mass conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabirou Touré, Mamadou; Fahsi, Adil; Soulaïmani, Azzeddine

    2016-01-01

    Finite-element methods are studied for solving moving interface flow problems using the level set approach and a stabilised variational formulation proposed in Touré and Soulaïmani (2012; Touré and Soulaïmani To appear in 2016), coupled with a level set correction method. The level set correction is intended to enhance the mass conservation satisfaction property. The stabilised variational formulation (Touré and Soulaïmani 2012; Touré and Soulaïmani, To appear in 2016) constrains the level set function to remain close to the signed distance function, while the mass conservation is a correction step which enforces the mass balance. The eXtended finite-element method (XFEM) is used to take into account the discontinuities of the properties within an element. XFEM is applied to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase flows. The numerical methods are numerically evaluated on several test cases such as time-reversed vortex flow, a rigid-body rotation of Zalesak's disc, sloshing flow in a tank, a dam-break over a bed, and a rising bubble subjected to buoyancy. The numerical results show the importance of satisfying global mass conservation to accurately capture the interface position.

  16. Lipid oxidation in minced beef meat with added Krebs cycle substrates to stabilise colour.

    PubMed

    Yi, G; Grabež, V; Bjelanovic, M; Slinde, E; Olsen, K; Langsrud, O; Phung, V T; Haug, A; Oostindjer, M; Egelandsdal, B

    2015-11-15

    Krebs cycle substrates (KCS) can stabilise the colour of packaged meat by oxygen reduction. This study tested whether this reduction releases reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid oxidation in minced meat under two different storage conditions. KCS combinations of succinate and glutamate increased peroxide forming potential (PFP, 1.18-1.32 mmol peroxides/kg mince) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, 0.30-0.38 mg malondialdehyde (MDA) equivalents/kg mince) under low oxygen storage conditions. Both succinate and glutamate were metabolised. Moreover, under high oxygen (75%) storage conditions, KCS combinations of glutamate, citrate and malate increased PFP (from 1.22 to 1.29 mmol peroxides/kg) and TBARS (from 0.37 to 0.40 mg MDA equivalents/kg mince). Only glutamate was metabolised. The KCS combinations that were added to stabilise colour were metabolised during storage, and acted as pro-oxidants that promoted lipid oxidation in both high and low oxygen conditions.

  17. Screening tests for assessing treatability of inorganic industrial wastes by stabilisation/solidification with cement.

    PubMed

    Stegemann, J A; Zhou, Q

    2009-01-15

    Stabilisation/solidification with cementitious or pozzolanic binders (S/S) is an option for reducing leachability of contaminants from residual, predominantly inorganic, industrial wastes and contaminated soils before disposal or reuse. Treatment by S/S is complicated by the fact that the presence of impurities, such as the contaminants and bulk matrix components present in industrial wastes, can have deleterious effects on cements. Therefore, careful laboratory development and testing of S/S formulations are required prior to full-scale application, to avoid technology failures, including problems with handling and contaminant retention. An understanding of cement chemistry and contaminant immobilisation mechanisms has been used to propose a series of test methods and performance thresholds for use in efficient evaluation of the treatability of industrial wastes by S/S, and optimising S/S formulations: measurement of stabilised/solidified product workability, bleeding and setting time (for flowable mixtures) or Proctor compaction (for compactable mixtures), together with unconfined compressive strength, leachability in a batch extraction with distilled water, and hydraulic conductivity.

  18. Electrical in-situ characterisation of interface stabilised organic thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Striedinger, Bernd; Fian, Alexander; Petritz, Andreas; Lassnig, Roman; Winkler, Adolf; Stadlober, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We report on the electrical in-situ characterisation of organic thin film transistors under high vacuum conditions. Model devices in a bottom-gate/bottom-contact (coplanar) configuration are electrically characterised in-situ, monolayer by monolayer (ML), while the organic semiconductor (OSC) is evaporated by organic molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE). Thermal SiO2 with an optional polymer interface stabilisation layer serves as the gate dielectric and pentacene is chosen as the organic semiconductor. The evolution of transistor parameters is studied on a bi-layer dielectric of a 150 nm of SiO2 and 20 nm of poly((±)endo,exo-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, diphenylester) (PNDPE) and compared to the behaviour on a pure SiO2 dielectric. The thin layer of PNDPE, which is an intrinsically photo-patternable organic dielectric, shows an excellent stabilisation performance, significantly reducing the calculated interface trap density at the OSC/dielectric interface up to two orders of magnitude, and thus remarkably improving the transistor performance. PMID:26457122

  19. The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-04-01

    The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions. The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment. The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant. Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in

  20. The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-04-01

    The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions. The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment. The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant. Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in

  1. The use of biogas plant fermentation residue for the stabilisation of toxic metals in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geršl, Milan; Šotnar, Martin; Mareček, Jan; Vítěz, Tomáš; Koutný, Tomáš; Kleinová, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Our department has been paying attention to different methods of soil decontamination, including the in situ stabilisation. Possible reagents to control the toxic metals mobility in soils include a fermentation residue (FR) from a biogas plant. Referred to as digestate, it is a product of anaerobic decomposition taking place in such facilities. The fermentation residue is applied to soils as a fertiliser. A new way of its use is the in situ stabilisation of toxic metals in soils. Testing the stabilisation of toxic metals made use of real soil samples sourced from five agriculturally used areas of the Czech Republic with 3 soil samples taken from sites contaminated with Cu, Pb and Zn and 2 samples collected at sites of natural occurrence of Cu, Pb and Zn ores. All the samples were analysed using the sequential extraction procedure (BCR) (determine the type of Cu, Pb and Zn bonds). Stabilisation of toxic metals was tested in five soil samples by adding reagents as follows: dolomite, slaked lime, goethite, compost and fermentation residue. A single reagent was added at three different concentrations. In the wet state with the added reagents, the samples were left for seven days, shaken twice per day. After seven days, metal extraction was carried out: samples of 10 g soil were shaken for 2 h in a solution of 0.1M NH4NO3 at a 1:2.5 (g.ml-1), centrifuged for 15 min at 5,000 rpm and then filtered through PTFE 0.45 μm mesh filters. The extracts were analysed by ICP-OES. Copper The best reduction of Cu concentration in the extract was obtained at each of the tested sites by adding dolomite (10 g soil + 0.3 g dolomite). The concentration of Cu in the leachate decreased to 2.1-18.4% compare with the leachate without addition. Similar results were also shown for the addition of fermentation residue (10 g soil + 1 g FR). The Cu concentration in the leachate decreased to 16.7-26.8% compared with the leachate without addition. Lead The best results were achieved by adding

  2. Feedbacks and landscape-level vegetation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David M J S; Perry, George L W; Marston, J B

    2015-05-01

    Alternative stable-state theory (ASS) is widely accepted as explaining landscape-level vegetation dynamics, such as switches between forest and grassland. This theory argues that webs of feedbacks stabilise vegetation composition and structure, and that abrupt state shifts can occur if stabilising feedbacks are weakened. However, it is difficult to identify stabilising feedback loops and the disturbance thresholds beyond which state changes occur. Here, we argue that doing this requires a synthetic approach blending observation, experimentation, simulation, conceptual models, and narratives. Using forest boundaries and large mammal extinctions, we illustrate how a multifaceted research program can advance understanding of feedback-driven ecosystem change. Our integrative approach has applicability to other complex macroecological systems controlled by numerous feedbacks where controlled experimentation is impossible.

  3. A novel stabilisation model for ruthenium nanoparticles in imidazolium ionic liquids: in situ spectroscopic and labelling evidence.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Paul S; Santini, Catherine C; Bouchu, Denis; Fenet, Bernard; Philippot, Karine; Chaudret, Bruno; Pádua, Agílio A H; Chauvin, Yves

    2010-04-28

    In situ labelling and spectroscopic experiments are used to explain the key points in the stabilisation of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) generated in imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) by decomposition of (eta(4)-1,5-cyclooctadiene)(eta(6)-1,3,5-cyclooctatriene)ruthenium(0), Ru(COD)(COT), under dihydrogen. These are found to be: (1) the presence of hydrides at the RuNP surface and, (2) the confinement of RuNPs in the non-polar domains of the structured IL, induced by the rigid 3-D organisation. These results lead to a novel stabilisation model for NPs in ionic liquids. PMID:20379515

  4. Finite-time observer-based output-feedback control for the global stabilisation of the PVTOL aircraft with bounded inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Río, A.; Fantoni, I.; Sanahuja, G.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, an output-feedback scheme for the global stabilisation of the planar vertical take-off and landing aircraft with bounded inputs is developed taking into account the positive nature of the thrust. The global stabilisation objective is proven to be achieved avoiding input saturation and by exclusively considering the system positions in the feedback. To cope with the lack of velocity measurements, the proposed algorithm involves a finite-time observer. The generalised versions of the involved finite-time stabilisers have not only permitted to solve the output-feedback stabilisation problem avoiding input saturation, but also provide additional flexibility in the control design that may be used in aid of performance improvements. With respect to previous approaches, the developed finite-time observer-based scheme guarantees the global stabilisation objective disregarding velocity measurements in a bounded input context. Simulation tests corroborate the analytical developments. The study includes further experimental results on an actual flying device.

  5. Freshwater dispersion stability of PAA-stabilised cerium oxide nanoparticles and toxicity towards Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Booth, Andy; Størseth, Trond; Altin, Dag; Fornara, Andrea; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Jungnickel, Harald; Laux, Peter; Luch, Andreas; Sørensen, Lisbet

    2015-02-01

    An aqueous dispersion of poly (acrylic acid)-stabilised cerium oxide (CeO₂) nanoparticles (PAA-CeO₂) was evaluated for its stability in a range of freshwater ecotoxicity media (MHRW, TG 201 and M7), with and without natural organic matter (NOM). In a 15 day dispersion stability study, PAA-CeO₂ did not undergo significant aggregation in any media type. Zeta potential varied between media types and was influenced by PAA-CeO₂ concentration, but remained constant over 15 days. NOM had no influence on PAA-CeO₂ aggregation or zeta potential. The ecotoxicity of the PAA-CeO₂ dispersion was investigated in 72 h algal growth inhibition tests using the freshwater microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. PAA-CeO₂ EC₅₀ values for growth inhibition (GI; 0.024 mg/L) were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than pristine CeO₂ EC₅₀ values reported in the literature. The concentration of dissolved cerium (Ce(3+)/Ce(4+)) in PAA-CeO₂ exposure suspensions was very low, ranging between 0.5 and 5.6 μg/L. Free PAA concentration in the exposure solutions (0.0096-0.0384 mg/L) was significantly lower than the EC10 growth inhibition (47.7 mg/L) value of pure PAA, indicating that free PAA did not contribute to the observed toxicity. Elemental analysis indicated that up to 38% of the total Cerium becomes directly associated with the algal cells during the 72 h exposure. TOF-SIMS analysis of algal cell wall compounds indicated three different modes of action, including a significant oxidative stress response to PAA-CeO₂ exposure. In contrast to pristine CeO₂ nanoparticles, which rapidly aggregate in standard ecotoxicity media, PAA-stabilised CeO₂ nanoparticles remain dispersed and available to water column species. Interaction of PAA with cell wall components, which could be responsible for the observed biomarker alterations, could not be excluded. This study indicates that the increased dispersion stability of PAA-CeO₂ leads to an increase in toxicity compared to

  6. Anisotropic modulus stabilisation: strings at LHC scales with micron-sized extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, M.; Burgess, C. P.; Quevedo, F.

    2011-10-01

    We construct flux-stabilised Type IIB string compactifications whose extra dimensions have very different sizes, and use these to describe several types of vacua with a TeV string scale. Because we can access regimes where two dimensions are hierarchically larger than the other four, we find examples where two dimensions are micron-sized while the other four are at the weak scale in addition to more standard examples with all six extra dimensions equally large. Besides providing ultraviolet completeness, the phenomenology of these models is richer than vanilla large-dimensional models in several generic ways: ( i) they are supersymmetric, with supersymmetry broken at sub-eV scales in the bulk but only nonlinearly realised in the Standard Model sector, leading to no MSSM superpartners for ordinary particles and many more bulk missing-energy channels, as in supersymmetric large extra dimensions (SLED); ( ii) small cycles in the more complicated extra-dimensional geometry allow some KK states to reside at TeV scales even if all six extra dimensions are nominally much larger; ( iii) a rich spectrum of string and KK states at TeV scales; and ( iv) an equally rich spectrum of very light moduli exist having unusually small (but technically natural) masses, with potentially interesting implications for cosmology and astrophysics that nonetheless evade new-force constraints. The hierarchy problem is solved in these models because the extra-dimensional volume is naturally stabilised at exponentially large values: the extra dimensions are Calabi-Yau geometries with a 4D K3 or T 4-fibration over a 2D base, with moduli stabilised within the well-established LARGE-Volume scenario. The new technical step is the use of poly-instanton corrections to the superpotential (which, unlike for simpler models, are likely to be present on K3 or T 4-fibered Calabi-Yau compactifications) to obtain a large hierarchy between the sizes of different dimensions. For several scenarios we identify

  7. Global finite-time stabilisation of a class of switched nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying-Jiu; Ma, Ruicheng; Wang, Min; Fu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the global finite-time stabilisation problem for a class of switched nonlinear systems under arbitrary switchings. All subsystems of the studied switched system under consideration are in lower triangular form. Based on the adding one power integrator technique, both a class of non-Lipschitz continuous state feedback controllers and a common Lyapunov function are simultaneously constructed such that the closed-loop switched system is global finite-time stable under arbitrary switchings. In the controller design process, a common coordinate transformation of all subsystems is exploited to avoid using individual coordinate transformations for subsystems. Finally, two examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Comparing and validating models of driver steering behaviour in collision avoidance and vehicle stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkula, G.; Benderius, O.; Wahde, M.

    2014-12-01

    A number of driver models were fitted to a large data set of human truck driving, from a simulated near-crash, low-friction scenario, yielding two main insights: steering to avoid a collision was best described as an open-loop manoeuvre of predetermined duration, but with situation-adapted amplitude, and subsequent vehicle stabilisation could to a large extent be accounted for by a simple yaw rate nulling control law. These two phenomena, which could be hypothesised to generalise to passenger car driving, were found to determine the ability of four driver models adopted from the literature to fit the human data. Based on the obtained results, it is argued that the concept of internal vehicle models may be less valuable when modelling driver behaviour in non-routine situations such as near-crashes, where behaviour may be better described as direct responses to salient perceptual cues. Some methodological issues in comparing and validating driver models are also discussed.

  9. Global ?-exponential stabilisation of a class of nonlinear networked control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Daoyuan; Huang, Yuehua; Liu, Yungang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate global ?-exponential stabilisation of a class of nonlinear networked control systems. The network-induced delays are assumed to be random and significantly smaller than the sampling period. First, sufficient conditions are presented to ensure global ?-exponential stability for a class of hybrid systems with time delay. Then, the networked control systems are modelled as the hybrid systems with time delay. By the techniques of adding a power integrator and a recursive argument, a sampled-data state feedback control law is presented. Sufficient conditions are given to ensure global ?-exponential stability of the closed-loop system by constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii function. Finally, a numerical example is presented to show the validity of the new methods.

  10. Evaluation of biocompatible stabilised gelled soya bean oil nanoparticles as new hydrophobic reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Boudier, Ariane; Kirilov, Plamen; Franceschi-Messant, Sophie; Belkhelfa, Haouaria; Hadioui, Laila; Roques, Christine; Perez, Emile; Rico-Lattes, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Based on the organogel concept, in which an oil is trapped in a network of low-molecular-mass organic gelator fibres creating a gel, a formulation of gelled soya bean oil nanoparticles was evaluated for its capacity to form biocompatible hydrophobic reservoirs. The aqueous dispersions of nanoparticles were prepared by hot emulsification (T° > Tgel) and cooling at room temperature in the presence of polyethyleneimine (PEI). The dispersions were stabilised by the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged amino groups of the PEI and the negatively charged carboxylates of the gelator fibres present at the surface of the particles. The aqueous dispersions were highly stable (several months) and the gelled particles were able to entrap a hydrophobic fluorescent model molecule (Nile red), allowing testing in cells. The gelled oil nanoparticles were found to be biocompatible with the tested cells (keratinocytes) and had the ability to become rapidly internalised. Thus, organogel-based nanoparticles are a promising hydrophobic drug delivery system.

  11. Laser plume spectroscopy. 2. Graphite yttrium-stabilised and zirconium oxide targets

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V V; Solomonov, V I; Platonov, V V; Snigireva, O A; Ivanov, M G; Lisenkov, V V

    2005-07-31

    Spectral and kinetic properties of a plume formed in the vicinity of a graphite and a pressed yttrium-stabilised zirconium oxide (YSZ) powder targets irradiated in air by a 10.6-{mu}m pulsed CO{sub 2} laser with a peak power of 1.5-9 kW at room temperature are studied. The plume propagated at right angles to the target surface and at an angle of 45{sup 0} to the laser radiation. The spectral and kinetic characteristics of its luminescence were measured discretely along the entire length of the plume. It is shown that the YSZ plume as well as the graphite plume is a flux of nonequilibrium gaseous plasma at a temperature of about 4.7-3.1 kK, in which a luminescence of YO and ZrO radicals is excited. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  12. Investigation of 4-year-old stabilised/solidified and accelerated carbonated contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Antemir, A; Hills, C D; Carey, P J; Magnié, M-C; Polettini, A

    2010-09-15

    The investigation of the pilot-scale application of two different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) techniques was carried out at a former fireworks and low explosives manufacturing site in SE England. Cores and granular samples were recovered from uncovered accelerated carbonated (ACT) and cement-treated soils (S/S) after 4 years to evaluate field-performance with time. Samples were prepared for microstructural examination and leaching testing. The results indicated that the cement-treated soil was progressively carbonated over time, whereas the mineralogy of the carbonated soil remained essentially unchanged. Distinct microstructures were developed in the two soils. Although Pb, Zn and Cu leached less from the carbonated soil, these metals were adequately immobilised by both treatments. Geochemical modeling of pH-dependent leaching data suggested that the retention of trace metals resulted from different immobilisation mechanisms operating in the two soils examined. PMID:20579807

  13. Investigation of 4-year-old stabilised/solidified and accelerated carbonated contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Antemir, A; Hills, C D; Carey, P J; Magnié, M-C; Polettini, A

    2010-09-15

    The investigation of the pilot-scale application of two different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) techniques was carried out at a former fireworks and low explosives manufacturing site in SE England. Cores and granular samples were recovered from uncovered accelerated carbonated (ACT) and cement-treated soils (S/S) after 4 years to evaluate field-performance with time. Samples were prepared for microstructural examination and leaching testing. The results indicated that the cement-treated soil was progressively carbonated over time, whereas the mineralogy of the carbonated soil remained essentially unchanged. Distinct microstructures were developed in the two soils. Although Pb, Zn and Cu leached less from the carbonated soil, these metals were adequately immobilised by both treatments. Geochemical modeling of pH-dependent leaching data suggested that the retention of trace metals resulted from different immobilisation mechanisms operating in the two soils examined.

  14. Influence of interface stabilisers and surrounding aqueous phases on nematic liquid crystal shells.

    PubMed

    Noh, JungHyun; Reguengo De Sousa, Kevin; Lagerwall, Jan P F

    2016-01-14

    We investigate the nematic-isotropic (N-I) transition in shells of the liquid crystal 5CB, surrounded by aqueous phases that conventionally are considered to be immiscible with 5CB. The aqueous phases contain either sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as stabiliser, the former additionally promoting homeotropic director alignment. For all shell configurations we find a depression of the clearing point compared to pure 5CB, indicating that a non-negligible fraction of the constituents of the surrounding phases enter the shell, predominantly water. In hybrid-aligned shells, with planar outer and homeotropic inner boundary (or vice versa), the N-I transition splits into two steps, with a consequent three-step textural transformation. We explain this as a result of the order-enhancing effect of a monolayer of radially aligned SDS molecules adsorbed at the homeotropic interface. PMID:26512764

  15. Synthesis of dense yttrium-stabilised hafnia pellets for nuclear applications by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrpekl, Vaclav; Holzhäuser, Michael; Hein, Herwin; Vigier, Jean-Francois; Somers, Joseph; Svora, Petr

    2014-11-01

    Dense yttrium-stabilised hafnia pellets (91.35 wt.% HfO2 and 8.65 wt.% Y2O3) were prepared by spark plasma sintering consolidation of micro-beads synthesised by the “external gelation” sol-gel technique. This technique allows a preparation of HfO2-Y2O3 beads with homogenous yttria-hafnia solid solution. A sintering time of 5 min at 1600 °C was sufficient to produce high density pellets (over 90% of the theoretical density) with significant reproducibility. The pellets have been machined in a lathe to the correct dimensions for use as neutron absorbers in an experimental test irradiation in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, Holland, in order to investigate the safety of americium based nuclear fuels.

  16. Remediation by in-situ solidification/stabilisation of Ardeer landfill, Scotland

    SciTech Connect

    Wyllie, M.; Esnault, A.; Barker, P.

    1997-12-31

    The Ardeer Landfill site at ICI Explosives factory on the west coast of Scotland had been a repository for waste from the site for 40 years. In order to safeguard the local environment ICI Explosives, with approval of Local Authorities and the Clyde River Purification Board put into action a programme of investigation and planning which culminated in the in-situ treatment of 10,000 m3 of waste within the landfill by a deep mixing method using the {open_quotes}Colmix{close_quotes} system. The paper describes in varying degrees of detail the remediation from investigation to the execution of the in-situ stabilisation and presents the post construction monitoring results.

  17. Post-/γ-irradiation reactions in vitamin E stabilised and unstabilised HDPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallégol, J.; Carlsson, D. J.; Deschênes, L.

    2001-12-01

    The oxidation of high density polyethylene (HDPE), both unstabilised and vitamin E stabilised, has been studied by infrared (IR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies in the period following γ-irradiation at doses from 1 to 60 kGy (range of food sterilisation). Derivatisation by reaction with sulphur tetrafluoride was used to identify macro-ketone and carboxylic acid components of the overlapped IR carbonyl region. Oxidation continued for several hundred hours after the cessation of irradiation as shown by the increase in hydroxyl, ketone and acid groups. Carboxylic acid groups are particularly important as a direct indication of backbone scission. Vitamin E, although an effective antioxidant during γ-irradiation, was less effective in reducing the post-irradiation changes, which are probably driven by migration of radical sites along the polymer backbone from within the crystalline phase to the amorphous/crystalline inter-phase, where they become oxygen accessible.

  18. Inacessible Andean sites reveal land-use induced stabilisation of soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitkamp, Felix; Maqsood, Shafique; Sylvester, Steven; Kessler, Michael; Jungkunst, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Human activity affects properties and development of ecosystems across the globe to such a degree that it is challenging to get baseline values for undisturbed ecosystems. This is especially true for soils, which are affected by land-use history and hold a legacy of past human interventions. Therefore, it is still largely unknown how soil would have developed "naturally" and if processes of organic matter stabilisation would be different in comparison to managed soils. Here, we show undisturbed soil development, i.e., the processes of weathering and accumulation of soil organic carbon (SOC), by comparing pristine with grazed sites in the high Andes (4500 m) of southern Peru. We located study plots on a large ledge (0.2 km²) that is only accessible with mountaineering equipment. Plots with pristine vegetation were compared to rangeland plots that were constantly under grazing management for at least four millennia. All "state factors"; climate, potential biota, topography, parent material and time; besides "land-use" were, therefore, identical. Vegetation change, induced by grazing management, led to lower vegetation cover of the soil, thereby increasing soil surface temperatures and soil acidification. Both factors increased weathering in rangeland soils, as indicated by the presence of pedogenic oxides, especially amorphous Al-(oxy)hydroxides (oxalate-extractable Al). Higher losses of base cations (K, Na, Ca) and lower pH-values were related to a low base saturation of exchange sites in rangelands. Therefore, rangeland soils were classified as Umbrisol, whereas soils under pristine vegetation were classified as Phaeozeme. All profiles were rich in SOC (100 to 126 g kg-1) with no significant differences in concentrations or stocks. SOC of rangeland soils was, however, less available for microorganisms (proportion of microbial C on SOC: 1.8 vs. 0.6% in pristine and rangeland soils, respectively) and showed higher stability against thermal degradation. Reasons for

  19. Input-output finite-time stabilisation of nonlinear stochastic system with missing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun; Niu, Yugang; Jia, Tinggang

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the problem of the input-output finite-time stabilisation for a class of nonlinear stochastic system with state-dependent noise. The phenomenon of the missing measurements may occur when state signals are transmitted via communication networks. An estimating method is proposed to compensate the lost state information. And then, a compensator-based controller is designed to ensure the input-output finite-time stochastic stability (IO-FTSS) of the closed-loop system. Some parameters-dependent sufficient conditions are derived and the corresponding solving approach is given. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed IO-FTSS scheme.

  20. Dry oil powders and oil foams stabilised by fluorinated clay platelet particles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Sekine, Tomoko; Tyowua, Andrew T

    2014-01-28

    A series of platelet sericite particles coated to different extents with a fluorinating agent has been characterised and their behaviour in mixtures with air and oil studied. The material which forms by vigorous shaking depends on both the surface tension of the oil and the surface energy of the particles which control their degree of wetting. Oil dispersions are formed in liquids of relatively low tension (<22 mN m(-1)), e.g. hexane and cyclomethicone, for all particles. Particle-stabilised air-in-oil foams form in liquids of higher tension, e.g. dodecane and phenyl silicone, where the advancing three-phase contact angle θ, measured on a planar substrate composed of the particles into the liquid, lies between ca. 65° and 120°. For oils of tension above 27 mN m(-1) like squalane and liquid paraffin with particles for which θ > 70°, we have discovered that dry oil powders in which oil drops stabilised by particles dispersed in air (oil-in-air) can be prepared by gentle mixing up to a critical oil : particle ratio (COPR) and do not leak oil. These powders, containing up to 80 wt% oil, release the encapsulated oil when sheared on a substrate. For many of the systems forming oil powders, stable liquid oil marbles can also be prepared. Above the COPR, catastrophic phase inversion occurs yielding an ultra-stable air-in-oil foam. We thus demonstrate the ability to disperse oil drops or air bubbles coated with particles within novel materials.

  1. Emulsions stabilised by whey protein microgel particles: towards food-grade Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Destribats, Mathieu; Rouvet, Martine; Gehin-Delval, Cécile; Schmitt, Christophe; Binks, Bernard P

    2014-09-28

    We have investigated a new class of food-grade particles, whey protein microgels, as stabilisers of triglyceride-water emulsions. The sub-micron particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at all pH with and without salt. All emulsions creamed but exhibited exceptional resistance to coalescence. Clear correlations exist between the properties of the microgels in aqueous dispersion and the resulting emulsion characteristics. For conditions in which the particles were uncharged, fluid emulsions with relatively large drops were stabilised, whereas emulsions stabilized by charged particles contained smaller flocculated drops. A combination of optical microscopy of the drops and spectrophotometry of the resolved aqueous phase allowed us to estimate the interfacial adsorption densities of the particles using the phenomenon of limited coalescence. We deduce two classes of particle arrangement. Complete adsorption of the particles was obtained when they were neutral or when their charges were screened by salt resulting in at least one particle monolayer at the interface. By contrast, only around 50% of the particles adsorbed when they were charged with emulsion drops being covered by less than half a monolayer. These findings were supported by direct visualization of drop interfaces using cryo-scanning electron microscopy. Uncharged particles were highly aggregated and formed a continuous 2-D network at the interface. Otherwise particles organized as individual aggregates separated by particle-free regions. In this case, we suggest that some particles spread at the interface leading to the formation of a continuous protein membrane. Charged particles displayed the ability to bridge opposing interfaces of neighbouring drops to form dense particle disks protecting drops against coalescence; this is the main reason for the flocculation and stability of emulsions containing sparsely covered drops.

  2. Dynamic postural stability for double-leg drop landing.

    PubMed

    Niu, Wenxin; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yubo; Zhao, Qinping

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic postural stability has been widely studied for single-leg landing, but seldom considered for double-leg landing. This study aimed to evaluate the dynamic postural stability and the influence mechanism of muscle activities during double-leg drop landing. Eight recreationally active males and eight recreationally active females participated in this study and dropped individually from three heights (0.32 m, 0.52 m, and 0.72 m). Ground reaction force was recorded to calculate the time to stabilisation. Electromyographic activities were recorded for selected lower-extremity muscles. A multivariate analysis of variance was carried out and no significant influence was found in time to stabilisation between genders or limb laterals (P > 0.05). With increasing drop height, time to stabilisation decreased significantly in two horizontal directions and the lower-extremity muscle activities were enhanced. Vertical time to stabilisation was not significantly influenced by drop height. Dynamic postural stability improved by neuromuscular change more than that required due to the increase of drop height. Double-leg landing on level ground is a stable movement, and the body would often be injured before dynamic postural stability is impaired. It is understandable to protect tissues from mechanical injuries by the sacrifice of certain dynamic postural stability in the design of protective devices or athlete training.

  3. Mechanisms of flame stabilisation at low lifted height in a turbulent lifted slot-jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    Karami, Shahram; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Talei, Mohsen; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-23

    A turbulent lifted slot-jet flame is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A one-step chemistry model is employed with a mixture-fraction-dependent activation energy which can reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the laminar burning rate on the equivalence ratio that is typical of hydrocarbon fuels. The basic structure of the flame base is first examined and discussed in the context of earlier experimental studies of lifted flames. Several features previously observed in experiments are noted and clarified. Some other unobserved features are also noted. Comparison with previous DNS modelling of hydrogen flames reveals significant structural differences. The statistics of flow and relative edge-flame propagation velocity components conditioned on the leading edge locations are then examined. The results show that, on average, the streamwise flame propagation and streamwise flow balance, thus demonstrating that edge-flame propagation is the basic stabilisation mechanism. Fluctuations of the edge locations and net edge velocities are, however, significant. It is demonstrated that the edges tend to move in an essentially two-dimensional (2D) elliptical pattern (laterally outwards towards the oxidiser, then upstream, then inwards towards the fuel, then downstream again). It is proposed that this is due to the passage of large eddies, as outlined in Suet al.(Combust. Flame, vol. 144 (3), 2006, pp. 494–512). However, the mechanism is not entirely 2D, and out-of-plane motion is needed to explain how flames escape the high-velocity inner region of the jet. Finally, the time-averaged structure is examined. A budget of terms in the transport equation for the product mass fraction is used to understand the stabilisation from a time-averaged perspective. The result of this analysis is found to be consistent with the instantaneous perspective. The budget reveals a fundamentally 2D structure, involving transport in both

  4. Mechanisms of flame stabilisation at low lifted height in a turbulent lifted slot-jet flame

    DOE PAGES

    Karami, Shahram; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Talei, Mohsen; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-23

    A turbulent lifted slot-jet flame is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A one-step chemistry model is employed with a mixture-fraction-dependent activation energy which can reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the laminar burning rate on the equivalence ratio that is typical of hydrocarbon fuels. The basic structure of the flame base is first examined and discussed in the context of earlier experimental studies of lifted flames. Several features previously observed in experiments are noted and clarified. Some other unobserved features are also noted. Comparison with previous DNS modelling of hydrogen flames reveals significant structural differences. The statistics of flow andmore » relative edge-flame propagation velocity components conditioned on the leading edge locations are then examined. The results show that, on average, the streamwise flame propagation and streamwise flow balance, thus demonstrating that edge-flame propagation is the basic stabilisation mechanism. Fluctuations of the edge locations and net edge velocities are, however, significant. It is demonstrated that the edges tend to move in an essentially two-dimensional (2D) elliptical pattern (laterally outwards towards the oxidiser, then upstream, then inwards towards the fuel, then downstream again). It is proposed that this is due to the passage of large eddies, as outlined in Suet al.(Combust. Flame, vol. 144 (3), 2006, pp. 494–512). However, the mechanism is not entirely 2D, and out-of-plane motion is needed to explain how flames escape the high-velocity inner region of the jet. Finally, the time-averaged structure is examined. A budget of terms in the transport equation for the product mass fraction is used to understand the stabilisation from a time-averaged perspective. The result of this analysis is found to be consistent with the instantaneous perspective. The budget reveals a fundamentally 2D structure, involving transport in both the streamwise and transverse

  5. Cerium reduction at the interface between ceria and yttria-stabilised zirconia and implications for interfacial oxygen non-stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kepeng; Schmid, Herbert; Srot, Vesna; Aken, Peter A. van; Gilardi, Elisa; Gregori, Giuliano; Maier, Joachim; Du, Kui

    2014-03-01

    Epitaxial CeO{sub 2} films with different thickness were grown on Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} stabilised Zirconia substrates. Reduction of cerium ions at the interface between CeO{sub 2} films and yttria stabilised zirconia substrates is demonstrated using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy. It is revealed that most of the Ce ions were reduced from Ce{sup 4+} to Ce{sup 3+} at the interface region with a decay of several nanometers. Several possibilities of charge compensations are discussed. Irrespective of the details, such local non-stoichiometries are crucial not only for understanding charge transport in such hetero-structures but also for understanding ceria catalytic properties.

  6. Influence of stabilising agents and pH on the size of SnO2 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Suchorska-Woźniak, Patrycja; Fiedot, Marta; Teterycz, Helena

    2014-01-01

    Summary According to recent research, the use of nanoparticles as a gas-sensitive material increases the selectivity and sensitivity and shortens the response time of a sensor. However, the synthesis of SnO2 nanoparticles presents many difficulties. The following article presents a simple and inexpensive method for the synthesis of SnO2 nanoparticles. The influence of the surfactant and polymer choice on the size of the resulting nanoparticles was investigated and a mechanism describing their interaction was proposed. It was found that stable colloids of SnO2 nanoparticles are formed in the presence of both PEI and Triton X-100 surfactants as stabilising agents. However, an additional factor essential for good stabilisation of the nanoparticles was an appropriate acidity level of the solution. Under optimal conditions, nanoparticles having an average diameter of about 10 nm are reproducibly formed. PMID:25551047

  7. Correction: Unexpected higher stabilisation of two classical antiaromatic frameworks with a ruthenium fragment compared to the osmium counterpart: origin probed by DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingjing; Hao, Yulei; An, Ke; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-25

    Correction for 'Unexpected higher stabilisation of two classical antiaromatic frameworks with a ruthenium fragment compared to the osmium counterpart: origin probed by DFT calculations' by Jingjing Wu et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 272-275. PMID:26699929

  8. Effect of human and simulated gastric juices on the digestion of whey proteins and carboxymethylcellulose-stabilised O/W emulsions.

    PubMed

    Malinauskytė, Ernesta; Ramanauskaitė, Jovita; Leskauskaitė, Daiva; Devold, Tove G; Schüller, Reidar B; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we analysed the impact of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on lipid digestion and physicochemical properties of whey proteins (WP)-stabilised emulsions during in vitro digestion with either artificial or human gastrointestinal juices. The emulsions were made by adsorbing WP on the fat droplets and subsequently adding CMC, which does not interact with the adsorbed proteins. The limited hydrolysis of lipids and their higher physical stability was recorded for WP-stabilised emulsions in the presence of CMC under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The possible mechanism by which CMC lowers the digestion of WP-stabilised emulsions is related to the limited interaction of fat droplets with gastrointestinal fluids due to the extended thickening network formed by CMC in the continuous phase. The digestion of WP- and CMC-stabilised emulsions in the in vitro model with human gastric fluids led to greater lipid hydrolysis, although the enzymatic activity in both in vitro models was observed at the same level. PMID:25038655

  9. Aeolian deposition and its effect on soil and vegetation changes on stabilised desert dunes in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fearnehough, W.; Fullen, M. A.; Mitchell, D. J.; Trueman, I. C.; Zhang, J.

    1998-06-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of aeolian deposition at Shapotou, northern China, were studied on a chronosequence (0, 12, 29 and 37 years) of stabilised desert dunes. Aeolian deposition markedly influenced soil and vegetation changes on the dunes. The spatial pattern of aeolian deposition was studied using dust traps and measurements of the depth of aeolian accumulation. Mean deposition from August 1993 to July 1994 was 372 g/m 2, and showed a complex spatial pattern, determined by prevailing wind direction, topography and shrub distribution. Contrasts between the topographic pattern of aeolian deposition (trap data) and accumulation (thickness of aeolian deposits) indicate that the measured pattern of aeolian deposition alone is insufficient to explain the pattern of accumulation. An accretionary surface soil or `grey sand' (containing much aeolian-derived particles) is developing on the stabilised dunes at a mean rate of 1.6 mm/year. Rapid accumulation of aeolian particles significantly changed the surface environment. Increased moisture retention by the finer `grey sand' resulted in decreased moisture penetration and subsequent desiccation of the deeper dune sands. This has led to vegetation changes, with the deep-rooted, planted xerophytic shrubs declining from 12 to only 3% cover after 37 years of stabilisation. The shrubs were replaced by a widespread microphytic crust and later by shallow-rooted annual species, which increased from 0 to approximately 12% cover over the same period. The implications of projected increases in the dustiness of arid regions on the stability of desert dunes and vegetated desert margins are discussed. Stabilised dunes may become increasingly vulnerable to deflation with the progressive decline in shrub cover.

  10. Re-use of stabilised flue gas ashes from solid waste incineration in cement-treated base layers for pavements.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zuansi; Jensen, Dorthe L; Christensen, Thomas H; Bager, Dirch H

    2003-02-01

    Fly ash from coal-burning power plants has been used extensively as a pozzolan and fine filler in concrete for many years. Laboratory experiments were performed investigating the effect of substituting the coal-based fly ash with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes (FGA) from waste incineration. Two types of FGA were treated by the Ferrox-process, which removes the majority of the easily soluble salts in the FGA and provides binding sites for heavy metals in terms of ferrihydrite. Cubes of cement treated base layer materials containing 5% stabilised FGA were cast, sealed and cured for two weeks. Cylinders (diameter 100 mm, length 150 mm) were drilled from these cubes for tank leaching experiments. Duplicate specimens were subject to compression strength testing and to tank leaching experiments. The compressive strength of the CTB fulfilled the Danish requirements for CTB, i.e. strength more than 5 MPa after 7 days. The tank leaching tests revealed that leaching of heavy metals was not significantly affected by the use of chemically stabilised flue gas ashes from waste incineration. Assuming that diffusion controls the leaching process it was calculated that less than 1% of the metals would leach during a 100-year period from a 0.5 m thick concrete slab exposed to water on one side. Leaching of the common ions Ca, Cl, Na and SO4 was increased 3-20 times from the specimens with chemically stabilised flue gas ashes from waste incineration. However, the quantities leached were still modest. These experiments suggest that FGA from waste incineration after Ferrox-treatment could be re-used in CTB without compromising the strength and leaching from the base layer.

  11. Stabilisation of phytosterols by natural and synthetic antioxidants in high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Kmiecik, Dominik; Korczak, Józef; Rudzińska, Magdalena; Gramza-Michałowska, Anna; Hęś, Marzanna; Kobus-Cisowska, Joanna

    2015-04-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the potential applicability of natural antioxidants in the stabilisation of phytosterols. A mixture of β-sitosterol and campesterol was incorporated into triacylglycerols (TAGs). The following antioxidants were added to the prepared matrix: green tea extract, rosemary extract, a mix of tocopherols from rapeseed oil, a mix of synthetic tocopherols, phenolic compounds extracted from rapeseed meal, sinapic acid and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Samples were heated at a temperature of 180 °C for 4 h. After the completion of heating, the losses of phytosterols were analysed, as well as the contents of β-sitosterol and campesterol oxidation products. The total content of phytosterol oxidation products in samples ranged from 96.69 to 268.35 μg/g of oil. The effectiveness of antioxidants decreased in the following order: phenolic compounds from rapeseed meal>rosemary extract>mix of tocopherols from rapeseed oil>mix of synthetic tocopherols>green tea extract>sinapic acid>BHT.

  12. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erasmus, Jennifer C.; Welsh, Natalie J.; Braga, Vania M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  13. UV-Enhanced Sacrificial Layer Stabilised Graphene Oxide Hollow Fibre Membranes for Nanofiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, J. Y.; Aba, N. F. D.; Wang, B.; Mattevi, C.; Li, K.

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have demonstrated great potential in gas separation and liquid filtration. For upscale applications, GO membranes in a hollow fibre geometry are of particular interest due to the high-efficiency and easy-assembly features at module level. However, GO membranes were found unstable in dry state on ceramic hollow fibre substrates, mainly due to the drying-related shrinkage, which has limited the applications and post-treatments of GO membranes. We demonstrate here that GO hollow fibre membranes can be stabilised by using a porous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sacrificial layer, which creates a space between the hollow fibre substrate and the GO membrane thus allowing stress-free shrinkage. Defect-free GO hollow fibre membrane was successfully determined and the membrane was stable in a long term (1200 hours) gas-tight stability test. Post-treatment of the GO membranes with UV light was also successfully accomplished in air, which induced the creation of controlled microstructural defects in the membrane and increased the roughness factor of the membrane surface. The permeability of the UV-treated GO membranes was greatly enhanced from 0.07 to 2.8 L m-2 h-1 bar-1 for water, and 0.14 to 7.5 L m-2 h-1 bar-1 for acetone, with an unchanged low molecular weight cut off (~250 Da).

  14. Stabilisation/solidification of APC residues from MSW incineration with hydraulic binders and chemical additives.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Bordado, João C M; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2014-01-15

    This study focuses on the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) treatment of air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration. Six formulations (T1-T6) were tested based on different cements as binders, for the immobilisation of pollutants and to prevent their entering into the environment at unacceptable rates. Soluble phosphates and silicates were considered in some cases to fix heavy metals. The performance of T1-T6 products was measured in terms of initial and final setting times, mechanical strength, total availability and leaching from S/S products. Two monolithic leaching tests were used to estimate emissions of pollutants over 48h and 64 days. The results showed that the setting time was reduced when soluble phosphates were used. Moreover, although all the treatments have met the threshold of 1MPa for unconfined compressive strength, this parameter was significantly reduced due to matrix dissolution during immersion. After three cycles of leaching, the limit of 10% for solubilisation was exceeded for all treatments with the exception of T5 (with phosphates). This study demonstrated that the S/S treatment used at the industrial level can be improved with respect to toxic heavy metals, by using soluble silicates or phosphates, but not regarding soluble salts.

  15. Three strategies to stabilise nearly monodispersed silver nanoparticles in aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are extensively used due to their chemical and physical properties and promising applications in areas such as medicine and electronics. Controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles remains a major challenge due to the difficulty in producing long-term stable particles of the same size and shape in aqueous solution. To address this problem, we examine three strategies to stabilise aqueous solutions of 15 nm citrate-reduced silver nanoparticles using organic polymeric capping, bimetallic core-shell and bimetallic alloying. Our results show that these strategies drastically improve nanoparticle stability by distinct mechanisms. Additionally, we report a new role of polymer functionalisation in preventing further uncontrolled nanoparticle growth. For bimetallic nanoparticles, we attribute the presence of a higher valence metal on the surface of the nanoparticle as one of the key factors for improving their long-term stability. Stable silver-based nanoparticles, free of organic solvents, will have great potential for accelerating further environmental and nanotoxicity studies. PACS: 81.07.-b; 81.16.Be; 82.70.Dd. PMID:22356679

  16. Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs): High density polyethylene and hydrocarbon waxes

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Mulan E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk; Basheer, P. A. M. E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk; Bai, Yun; McNally, Tony

    2014-05-15

    Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE) with high (HPW, T{sub m}=56-58 °C) and low (L-PW, T{sub m}=18-23 °C) melting point waxes were prepared by melt-mixing in a twin-screw extruder and their potential in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications for housing assessed. The structure and morphology of these blends were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both H-PW and L-PW were uniformly distributed throughout the HDPE matrix. The melting point and latent heat of the SSPCMs were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results demonstrated that both H-PW and L-PW have a plasticisation effect on the HDPE matrix. The tensile and flexural properties of the samples were measured at room temperature (RT, 20±2 °C) and 70 °C, respectively. All mechanical properties of HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends decreased from RT to 70 °C. In all instances at RT, modulus and stress, irrespective of the mode of deformation was greater for the HDPE/H-PW blends. However, at 70 °C, there was no significant difference in mechanical properties between the HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends.

  17. Effects of temperature on water-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by wax microparticles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Rocher, Anaïs

    2009-07-01

    The possibility of stabilising oil-water mixtures using wax particles alone is reported. As judged from contact angle measurements, wax particles are hydrophobic and act as effective emulsifiers of water-in-squalane emulsions. Specific differences exist depending on the chemical composition of the particles. The effect of temperature on emulsion stability has been explored in detail. If particles are pre-adsorbed to water drop interfaces by emulsification at room temperature, subsequent increase of temperature leads to a progressive increase in sedimentation and coalescence as particles melt and desorb from interfaces. The temperature range over which this occurs is similar to that of the melting range of the particles alone. If however the particles are melted prior to emulsification, surface-active long chain ester or acid molecules adsorb to freshly created interfaces giving rise to excellent stability to coalescence at high temperatures. Rapid cooling of these latter emulsions enhances their long-term stability as solidification of the molten wax leads to a thickening of the continuous oil phase. PMID:19406414

  18. Phase inversion of particle-stabilised perfume oil-water emulsions: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Fletcher, Paul D I; Holt, Benjamin L; Beaussoubre, Pascal; Wong, Kenneth

    2010-10-14

    Phase inversion of fumed silica particle-stabilised emulsions of water and perfume oil can be effected in three ways. The transitional inversion from water-in-oil (w/o) to oil-in-water (o/w) occurs upon increasing the particle hydrophilicity for 9 oils of different polarity and structure. Results are compared for systems in which particles are pre-dispersed in one of the bulk phases and for those in which a novel powdered particle method is used. Using a simple theory involving the surface energies of the various interfaces, the contact angle θ of a particle with the oil-water interface is calculated as a function of the particle hydrophilicity. Assuming phase inversion occurs at θ = 90°, very good agreement is obtained for all oils between the calculated and experimental particle hydrophilicity required for inversion in the case of the powdered particle method. Inversion from o/w to w/o induced by simply increasing the particle concentration is shown to be as a result of changes in the aggregation state of the particles influencing their wettability. Finally, catastrophic phase inversion from w/o to o/w is achieved by increasing the volume fraction of water, and multiple emulsions form around inversion in a system containing only one particle type. Results of the latter two inversion routes are combined to develop an emulsion compositional map allowing a variety of emulsions with different characteristics to be described by varying the relative amounts of the three components.

  19. Effects of temperature on water-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by wax microparticles.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Rocher, Anaïs

    2009-07-01

    The possibility of stabilising oil-water mixtures using wax particles alone is reported. As judged from contact angle measurements, wax particles are hydrophobic and act as effective emulsifiers of water-in-squalane emulsions. Specific differences exist depending on the chemical composition of the particles. The effect of temperature on emulsion stability has been explored in detail. If particles are pre-adsorbed to water drop interfaces by emulsification at room temperature, subsequent increase of temperature leads to a progressive increase in sedimentation and coalescence as particles melt and desorb from interfaces. The temperature range over which this occurs is similar to that of the melting range of the particles alone. If however the particles are melted prior to emulsification, surface-active long chain ester or acid molecules adsorb to freshly created interfaces giving rise to excellent stability to coalescence at high temperatures. Rapid cooling of these latter emulsions enhances their long-term stability as solidification of the molten wax leads to a thickening of the continuous oil phase.

  20. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi; Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-12-15

    Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3-9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants. PMID:26150282

  1. Metal concentrations in lime stabilised, thermally dried and anaerobically digested sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; Fenton, O; Forrestal, P J; Danaher, M; Brennan, R B; Morrison, L

    2016-02-01

    Cognisant of the negative debate and public sentiment about the land application of treated sewage sludges ('biosolids'), it is important to characterise such wastes beyond current regulated parameters. Concerns may be warranted, as many priority metal pollutants may be present in biosolids. This study represents the first time that extensive use was made of a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyser to characterise metals in sludges, having undergone treatment by thermal drying, lime stabilisation, or anaerobic digestion, in 16 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Ireland. The concentrations of metals, expressed as mgkg(-1) dry solids (DS), which are currently regulated in the European Union, ranged from 11 (cadmium, anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids) to 1273mgkg(-1) (zinc, AD biosolids), and with the exception of lead in one WWTP (which had a concentration of 3696mgkg(-1)), all metals were within EU regulatory limits. Two potentially hazardous metals, antimony (Sb) and tin (Sn), for which no legislation currently exists, were much higher than their baseline concentrations in soils (17-20mgSbkg(-1) and 23-55mgSnkg(-1)), meaning that potentially large amounts of these elements may be applied to the soil without regulation. This study recommends that the regulations governing the values for metal concentrations in sludges for reuse in agriculture are extended to include Sb and Sn. PMID:26611400

  2. UV-Enhanced Sacrificial Layer Stabilised Graphene Oxide Hollow Fibre Membranes for Nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Chong, J Y; Aba, N F D; Wang, B; Mattevi, C; Li, K

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have demonstrated great potential in gas separation and liquid filtration. For upscale applications, GO membranes in a hollow fibre geometry are of particular interest due to the high-efficiency and easy-assembly features at module level. However, GO membranes were found unstable in dry state on ceramic hollow fibre substrates, mainly due to the drying-related shrinkage, which has limited the applications and post-treatments of GO membranes. We demonstrate here that GO hollow fibre membranes can be stabilised by using a porous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sacrificial layer, which creates a space between the hollow fibre substrate and the GO membrane thus allowing stress-free shrinkage. Defect-free GO hollow fibre membrane was successfully determined and the membrane was stable in a long term (1200 hours) gas-tight stability test. Post-treatment of the GO membranes with UV light was also successfully accomplished in air, which induced the creation of controlled microstructural defects in the membrane and increased the roughness factor of the membrane surface. The permeability of the UV-treated GO membranes was greatly enhanced from 0.07 to 2.8 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for water, and 0.14 to 7.5 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for acetone, with an unchanged low molecular weight cut off (~250 Da). PMID:26527173

  3. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi; Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-12-15

    Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3-9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants.

  4. Effects of heat conduction and radical quenching on premixed stagnation flame stabilised by a wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huangwei; Chen, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    The premixed stagnation flame stabilised by a wall is analysed theoretically considering thermally sensitive intermediate kinetics. We consider the limit case of infinitely large activation energy of the chain-branching reaction, in which the radical is produced infinitely fast once the cross-over temperature is reached. Under the assumptions of potential flow field and constant density, the correlation for flame position and stretch rate of the premixed stagnation flame is derived. Based on this correlation, the effects of heat conduction and radical quenching on the wall surface are examined. The wall temperature is shown to have great impact on flame bifurcation and extinction, especially when the flame is close to the wall. Different flame structures are observed for near-wall normal flame, weak flame, and critically quenched flame. The fuel and radical Lewis numbers are found to have opposite effects on the extinction stretch rate. Moreover, it is also demonstrated that only when the flame is close to the wall does the radical quenching strongly influence the flame bifurcation and extinction. The extinction stretch rate is shown to decrease with the amount of radical quenching for different fuel and radical Lewis numbers. Besides, the coupling between the wall heat conduction and radical quenching is found to greatly influence the bifurcation and extinction of the premixed stagnation flame.

  5. UV-Enhanced Sacrificial Layer Stabilised Graphene Oxide Hollow Fibre Membranes for Nanofiltration

    PubMed Central

    Chong, J. Y.; Aba, N. F. D.; Wang, B.; Mattevi, C.; Li, K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have demonstrated great potential in gas separation and liquid filtration. For upscale applications, GO membranes in a hollow fibre geometry are of particular interest due to the high-efficiency and easy-assembly features at module level. However, GO membranes were found unstable in dry state on ceramic hollow fibre substrates, mainly due to the drying-related shrinkage, which has limited the applications and post-treatments of GO membranes. We demonstrate here that GO hollow fibre membranes can be stabilised by using a porous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sacrificial layer, which creates a space between the hollow fibre substrate and the GO membrane thus allowing stress-free shrinkage. Defect-free GO hollow fibre membrane was successfully determined and the membrane was stable in a long term (1200 hours) gas-tight stability test. Post-treatment of the GO membranes with UV light was also successfully accomplished in air, which induced the creation of controlled microstructural defects in the membrane and increased the roughness factor of the membrane surface. The permeability of the UV-treated GO membranes was greatly enhanced from 0.07 to 2.8 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 for water, and 0.14 to 7.5 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 for acetone, with an unchanged low molecular weight cut off (~250 Da). PMID:26527173

  6. Metal concentrations in lime stabilised, thermally dried and anaerobically digested sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; Fenton, O; Forrestal, P J; Danaher, M; Brennan, R B; Morrison, L

    2016-02-01

    Cognisant of the negative debate and public sentiment about the land application of treated sewage sludges ('biosolids'), it is important to characterise such wastes beyond current regulated parameters. Concerns may be warranted, as many priority metal pollutants may be present in biosolids. This study represents the first time that extensive use was made of a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyser to characterise metals in sludges, having undergone treatment by thermal drying, lime stabilisation, or anaerobic digestion, in 16 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Ireland. The concentrations of metals, expressed as mgkg(-1) dry solids (DS), which are currently regulated in the European Union, ranged from 11 (cadmium, anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids) to 1273mgkg(-1) (zinc, AD biosolids), and with the exception of lead in one WWTP (which had a concentration of 3696mgkg(-1)), all metals were within EU regulatory limits. Two potentially hazardous metals, antimony (Sb) and tin (Sn), for which no legislation currently exists, were much higher than their baseline concentrations in soils (17-20mgSbkg(-1) and 23-55mgSnkg(-1)), meaning that potentially large amounts of these elements may be applied to the soil without regulation. This study recommends that the regulations governing the values for metal concentrations in sludges for reuse in agriculture are extended to include Sb and Sn.

  7. Cooperation of distinct Rac-dependent pathways to stabilise E-cadherin adhesion.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, Jennifer C; Welsh, Natalie J; Braga, Vania M M

    2015-09-01

    The precise mechanisms via which Rac1 is activated by cadherin junctions are not fully known. In keratinocytes Rac1 activation by cadherin junctions requires EGFR signalling, but how EGFR does so is unclear. To address which activator could mediate E-cadherin signalling to Rac1, we investigated EGFR and two Rac1 GEFs, SOS1 and DOCK180. EGFR RNAi prevented junction-induced Rac1 activation and led to fragmented localization of E-cadherin at cadherin contacts. In contrast, depletion of another EGFR family member, ErbB3, did not interfere with either process. DOCK180 RNAi, but not SOS1, prevented E-cadherin-induced Rac1 activation. However, in a strong divergence from EGFR RNAi phenotype, DOCK180 depletion did not perturb actin recruitment or cadherin localisation at junctions. Rather, reduced DOCK180 levels impaired the resistance to mechanical stress of pre-formed cell aggregates. Thus, within the same cell type, EGFR and DOCK180 regulate Rac1 activation by newly-formed contacts, but control separate cellular events that cooperate to stabilise junctions. PMID:25957131

  8. Stabilising lamellar stacks of lipid bilayers with soft confinement and steric effects.

    PubMed

    Bougis, K; Leite Rubim, R; Ziane, N; Peyencet, J; Bentaleb, A; Février, A; Oliveira, C L P; Andreoli de Oliveira, E; Navailles, L; Nallet, F

    2015-07-01

    Structure and interactions stabilising the lamellar stack of mixed lipid bilayers in their fluid state are investigated by means of small-angle X-ray scattering. The (electrically neutral) bilayers are composed of a mixtures of lecithin, a zwitterionic phospholipid, and Simulsol, a non-ionic cosurfactant with an ethoxylated polar head. The soft confinement of the bilayer hydrophilic components is varied by changing hydration and bilayer composition, as well as the length of the cosurfactant polar head. Structural transitions are observed at low hydration, in the stacking order for the longer cosurfactant, and in the mixed bilayers for the shorter one. At higher hydration, the swelling of the lamellar stacks occurs with a significant, but continuous evolution in the mixed bilayer structure. The bilayer structural changes are discussed in analogy with the so-called "brush-to-mushroom" transition induced by lateral confinement, relevant for long linear polymers grafted onto rigid surfaces, taking also into account the role of vertical confinement.

  9. Linear viscoelastic behaviour of oil-in-water food emulsions stabilised by tuna-protein isolates.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Márquez, D; Partal, P; Franco, Jm; Gallegos, C

    2013-02-01

    This work deals with the manufacture of oil-in-water food emulsions stabilised by tuna proteins. The influence of protein and oil concentrations on the linear viscoelastic properties and microstructure of these emulsions was analysed. Stable emulsions with suitable linear viscoelastic response and microstructural characteristics were formulated with 70 wt.% oil and, at least, 0.25 wt.% tuna protein. Similarly, emulsions with oil concentrations between 45 and 70 wt.% were prepared using 0.50 wt.% protein. All these emulsions showed a predominantly elastic response in the linear viscoelastic region and a well-developed plateau region in its mechanical spectrum. Rheological and droplet size distribution results pointed out an extensive droplet flocculation, due to interactions among emulsifier molecules located at the oil-water interface of adjacent droplets. As a result, the linear viscoelastic behaviour was controlled by protein-protein interactions, allowing the use of the plateau modulus to successfully normalise both the storage and loss moduli as a function of frequency onto a master curve, irrespective of the selected emulsion formulation. PMID:23239763

  10. Membrane stabilisation: a possible anti-inflammatory mechanism for the extracts and compounds from Spathodea campanulata.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Pone Kamdem; Verma, Surjeet; Shukla, Aparna; Khan, Feroz; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Pal, Anirban

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficiency of extract, fractions and pure molecules from Spathodea campanulata (SC) towards inflammation. Polarity-based extracts of SC were found active in stabilising red blood cell (RBC) membrane indicating anti-inflammatory potential. Bioactivity-guided isolation of SC produced 1-O-(E)-caffeoyl-β-gentiobiose and (2S)-1,2-di-O-[(9Z,12Z,15Z)-octadeca-9,12,15-trienoyl]-3-O-[α-d-galctopyranosyl-(1″ → 6')-O-β-d-galactopyranosyl] glycerol as the active constituents with 65.91% and 67.41% of membrane stability, respectively. Activity of the third compound (verminoside) could not be ascertained owing to extremely low recoverability. Furthermore, the isolated compounds were subjected to in silico studies. The compounds showed good binding affinity towards cyclooxygenase-2. Absorption, distribution, metabolism & excretion (ADME)-toxicity studies illustrated that the isolated compounds are free of toxicity. These observations help us to conclude that SC might exert its anti-inflammatory activity by soothing the RBC membrane as it is the case for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs towards lysozomal membranes. Therefore, SC might be considered as a potential candidate for development of anti-inflammatory drugs.

  11. Spatial and vacancy effects on the stabilising mechanisms of two-dimensional free growth.

    PubMed

    el-Messiery, M A

    1990-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo simulation technique is introduced to study the spatial considerations of cellular distribution that affect the overall asynchronous process of population growth. The stochastic nature of cellular characteristics such as mitotic time, loss rate and direction of growth is considered. The fluctuation of these values from one generation to the next and from one cell to the other, is illustrated. Cells are assumed to grow in a two-dimensional honeycomb-like network such that a central cell is always surrounded with six equally distant sites. The modes of cellular growth are controlled mainly and simply by the existence of a definite number of neighbouring vacancies. An IBM-compatible PC-AT computer was used and a program written in Pascal is employed to simulate and follow up the growth of a single stem cell in a 40,000-sites network. The results of the proposed stochastic model illustrate the importance of the spatial interaction among growing cellular modes such that vacancies act as local sensors for a negative feedback mechanism regulating the overall growth pattern. The role of the resting mode (G0) in stabilising the overall growth pattern is discussed.

  12. Room-temperature single-electron tunnelling in surfactant stabilised iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. G. C.; Evans, S. D.; Shen, T.; Hodson, C. E. C.

    2001-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been synthesised by the reduction of FeCl 3·6H 2O and FeCl 2·4H 2O (mass ratio 2:1) in propan-2-ol. The particles were stabilised by the addition of lauric acid and the resultant particles could be readily dispersed in chloroform. Room-temperature single-electron tunnelling through these iron oxide particles has been achieved (to our knowledge) for the first time, using an STM tip-particle-substrate double junction. Characterisation of the particles by XPS and FTIR show that they are Fe 2O 3, or possibly Fe 3O 4 with an outer layer of Fe 2O 3, coated with a carboxylic acid monolayer. The particle diameter given by TEM is of the order of 5.0±0.9 nm. From the Coulomb staircase behaviour observed in the I- V curves, we estimate a nanoparticle capacitance of 6.7×10 -19 F which is in agreement with that expected for particles of this size.

  13. Delay-dependent resilient-robust stabilisation of uncertain networked control systems with variable sampling intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feisheng; Zhang, Huaguang; Liu, Zhenwei; Li, Ranran

    2014-03-01

    This work is concerned with the robust resilient control problem for uncertain networked control systems (NCSs) with variable sampling intervals, variant-induced delays and possible data dropouts, which is seldom considered in current literature. It is mainly based on the continuous time-varying-delay system approach. Followed by the nominal case, delay-dependent resilient robust stabilising conditions for the closed-loop NCS against controller gain variations are derived by employing a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional which makes good use of the information of both lower and upper bounds on the varying input delay, and the upper bound on the variable sampling interval as well. A feasible solution of the obtained criterion formulated as linear matrix inequalities can be gotten. A tighter bounding technique is presented for acquiring the time derivative of the functional so as to utilise many more useful elements, meanwhile neither slack variable nor correlated augmented item is introduced to reduce overall computational burden. Two examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Global adaptive stabilisation for nonlinear systems with unknown control directions and input disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yongchao; Liu, Yungang

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses the global adaptive stabilisation via switching and learning strategies for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. Remarkably, the systems in question simultaneously have unknown control directions, unknown input disturbance and unknown growth rate, which makes the problem in question challenging to solve and essentially different from those in the existing literature. To solve the problem, an adaptive scheme via switching and learning is proposed by skilfully integrating the techniques of backstepping design, adaptive learning and adaptive switching. One key point in the design scheme is the introduction of the learning mechanism, in order to compensate the unknown input disturbance, and the other one is the design of the switching mechanism, through tuning the design parameters online to deal with the unknown control directions, unknown bound and period of input disturbance and unknown growth rate. The designed controller guarantees that all the signals of the resulting closed-loop systems are bounded, and furthermore, the closed-loop system states globally converge to zero.

  15. Dual effects of β-cyclodextrin-stabilised silver nanoparticles: enhanced biofilm inhibition and reduced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Swarna; Bhattacharya, Kunal; McHale, Patrick; Duffy, Brendan

    2015-01-01

    The composition and mode of synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) can affect interaction with bacterial and human cells differently. The present work describes the ability of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) capped silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) to inhibit biofilm growth and reduce cytotoxicity. Biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis CSF 41498 was quantified by a crystal violet assay in the presence of native and capped AgNPs (Ag-10CD and Ag-20CD), and the morphology of the biofilm was observed by scanning electron microscope. The cytotoxicity of the AgNPs against HaCat cells was determined by measuring the increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species and change in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Results indicated that capping AgNPs with β-CD improved their efficacy against S. epidermidis CSF 41498, reduced biofilm formation and their cytotoxicity. The study concluded that β-CD is an effective capping and stabilising agent that reduces toxicity of AgNPs against the mammalian cell while enhancing their antibiofilm activity. PMID:25596861

  16. Novel RAFT amphiphilic brush copolymer steric stabilisers for cubosomes: poly(octadecyl acrylate)-block-poly(polyethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate).

    PubMed

    Chong, Josephine Y T; Mulet, Xavier; Postma, Almar; Keddie, Daniel J; Waddington, Lynne J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2014-09-21

    Copolymers, particularly Pluronics®, are typically used to sterically stabilise colloidal nanostructured particles composed of a lyotropic liquid crystalline bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes). There is a need to design and assess new functionalisable stabilisers for these colloidal drug delivery systems. Six amphiphilic brush copolymers, poly(octadecyl acrylate)-block-poly(polyethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate) (P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe)), synthesised by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT), were assessed as novel steric stabilisers for cubosomes. It was found that increasing the density of PEG on the nanostructured particle surface by incorporating a PEG brush design (i.e., brush copolymer), provided comparable and/or increased stabilisation effectiveness compared to a linear PEG structure, Pluronic® F127, which is extensively used for steric stabilisation of cubosomes. Assessment was conducted both prior to and following the removal of the dodecyl trithiocarbonate end-group, by free radical-induced reduction. The reduced (P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe) copolymers were more effective steric stabilisers for phytantriol and monoolein colloidal particle dispersions than their non-reduced analogues. High throughput characterisation methodologies, including an accelerated stability assay (ASA) and synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), were implemented in this study for the rapid assessment of steric stabiliser effectiveness and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase identification. Phytantriol cubosomes stabilised with P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe) copolymers exhibited a double diamond cubic phase (Q(2)(D)), whilst monoolein cubosomes exhibited a primitive cubic phase (Q(2)(P)), analogous to those formed using Pluronic® F127. PMID:25058647

  17. Three-year performance of in-situ mass stabilised contaminated site soils using MgO-bearing binders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Jin, Fei; Shen, Zhengtao; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2016-11-15

    This paper provides physical and chemical performances of mass stabilised organic and inorganic contaminated site soils using a new group of MgO-bearing binders over 3 years and evaluated the time-dependent performance during the 3 years. This study took place at a contaminated site in Castleford, UK in 2011, where MgO, ground granulated blastfurnace slag (GGBS) and Portland cement (PC) were mixed with the contaminated soils in a dry form using the ALLU mass mixing equipment. Soil cores were retrieved 40-day, 1-year and 3-year after the treatment. The core quality, strength, and the leaching properties were determined via physical observation, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and batch leaching tests. After 3-year treatment, the UCS values of ALLU mixes were in the range of 50-250kPa; the leachate concentrations of Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn (except Ni) in all mixes were lower than their drinking water standards; and the leachability of total organics was in the range of 10-105mg/L. No apparent degradation of the mass stabilised materials after 3 years' exposure to the field conditions was found. MgO-GGBS blends were found able to provide higher strength and less leachability of contaminants compared to PC and MgO-only mixes in mass stabilised soils. PMID:27427896

  18. Sorption of selenate on soils and pure phases: kinetic parameters and stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Loffredo, N; Mounier, S; Thiry, Y; Coppin, F

    2011-09-01

    This study was conducted to identify the principle selenate carrier phases for two selected soils, by comparing their reactivity with selenate to that of pure phases of the solids. Silica, calcium carbonate, aluminium hydroxide, goethite, bentonite and humic acid were selected as the main soil carrier phases. Comparisons were made first on the parameter values obtained with the best fit of a kinetic sorption model which can discriminate instantaneous sorption from kinetically limited sorption. Then comparisons were made of the ability for each solid to stabilise selenate by measuring the ratio of the partition coefficient for sorption (Kd(sorption)) over that of the desorption (Kd(desorption)). Kinetics and stabilisation were used to help elucidate the nature of interactions with the test solid phases for a large range of selenate concentrations. The experiments were conducted over 165 h in batch reactors, the solid being isolated from the solution by dialysis tubing, at two pH (5.4 and 8) and three selenate concentrations (1 × 10(-3), 1 × 10(-6) and 1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1)). The results obtained showed that only aluminium hydroxide can sorb selenate throughout the studied pH range (pH 5.4 to 8.0). The sorption capacity on this mineral was high (Kd(sorption) > 100 to 1 × 10(4) L kg(-1)) and the selenate was mainly stabilized by the formation of inner sphere complexes. The sorption on goethite occurred at pH 5.4 (Kd(sorption) 52 L kg(-1)), mainly as outer sphere complexes, and was null at pH 8. On silica, a weak sorption was observed only at pH 5.4 and at 165 h (Kd(sorption) 4 L kg(-1)). On bentonite, calcium carbonate and humic acid no significant sorption was observed. Concerning the two soils studied, different behaviours were observed for selenate. For soil Ro (pH 5.4), Kd(sorption) was low (8 L kg(-1)) compared to soil Bu (pH 8) (70 L kg(-1)). The sorption behaviour of selenate on soil Ro was mainly due to outer sphere complexes, as for

  19. Solidification/stabilisation of electric arc furnace waste using low grade MgO.

    PubMed

    Cubukcuoglu, B; Ouki, S K

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the potential of low grade MgO (LGMgO) for the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) of heavy metals in steel electric arc furnace wastes. Relevant characteristics such as setting time, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and leaching behaviour assessed by acid neutralisation capacity (ANC), monolithic and granular leaching tests were examined in light of the UK landfill Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for disposal. The results demonstrated that all studied mix designs with Portland cement type 1 (CEM1) and LGMgO, CEM1-LGMgO 1:2 and 1:4 at 40% and 70% waste addition met the WAC requirements by means of UCS, initial and final setting times and consistence. Most of the ANC results met the WAC limits where the threshold pH values without acid additions were stable and between 11.9 and 12.2 at 28d. Granular leaching results indicate fixation of most of the metals at all mix ratios. An optimum ratio was obtained at CEM1-LGMgO 1:4 at 40% waste additions where none of the metals leaching exceeded the WAC limits and hence may be considered for landfill disposal. The monolithic leaching test results showed that LGMgO performed satisfactorily with respect to S/S of Zn, as the metal component present at the highest concentration level in the waste exhibited very little leaching and passed the leaching test requirement at all mix ratios studied. However, its performance with respect to Pb, Cd and Cr was less effective in reducing their leaching suggesting a higher cumulative rate under those leaching regimes.

  20. Soil stabilisation using AMD sludge, compost and lignite: TCLP leachability and continuous acid leaching.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A; Yip, Alex C K

    2013-11-01

    Utilising locally available industrial by-products for in situ metal stabilisation presents a low-cost remediation approach for contaminated soil. This study explored the potential use of inorganic (acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge and zero-valent iron) and carbonaceous materials (green waste compost, manure compost, and lignite) for minimising the environmental risks of As and Cu at a timber treatment site. After 9-month soil incubation, significant sequestration of As and Cu in soil solution was accomplished by AMD sludge, on which adsorption and co-precipitation could take place. The efficacy of AMD sludge was comparable to that of zero-valent iron. There was marginal benefit of adding carbonaceous materials. However, in a moderately aggressive environment (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure), AMD sludge only suppressed the leachability of As but not Cu. Therefore, the provision of compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of Cu leachability, probably via surface complexation with oxygen-containing functional groups. Under continuous acid leaching in column experiments, combined application of AMD sludge with compost proved more effective than AMD sludge with lignite. This was possibly attributed to the larger amount of dissolved organic matter with aromatic moieties from lignite, which may enhance Cu and As mobility. Nevertheless, care should be taken to mitigate ecological impact associated with short-term substantial Ca release and continuous release of Al at a moderate level under acid leaching. This study also articulated the engineering implications and provided recommendations for field deployment, material processing, and assessment framework to ensure an environmentally sound application of reactive materials. PMID:24144464

  1. A stabilised nodal spectral element method for fully nonlinear water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engsig-Karup, A. P.; Eskilsson, C.; Bigoni, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present an arbitrary-order spectral element method for general-purpose simulation of non-overturning water waves, described by fully nonlinear potential theory. The method can be viewed as a high-order extension of the classical finite element method proposed by Cai et al. (1998) [5], although the numerical implementation differs greatly. Features of the proposed spectral element method include: nodal Lagrange basis functions, a general quadrature-free approach and gradient recovery using global L2 projections. The quartic nonlinear terms present in the Zakharov form of the free surface conditions can cause severe aliasing problems and consequently numerical instability for marginally resolved or very steep waves. We show how the scheme can be stabilised through a combination of over-integration of the Galerkin projections and a mild spectral filtering on a per element basis. This effectively removes any aliasing driven instabilities while retaining the high-order accuracy of the numerical scheme. The additional computational cost of the over-integration is found insignificant compared to the cost of solving the Laplace problem. The model is applied to several benchmark cases in two dimensions. The results confirm the high order accuracy of the model (exponential convergence), and demonstrate the potential for accuracy and speedup. The results of numerical experiments are in excellent agreement with both analytical and experimental results for strongly nonlinear and irregular dispersive wave propagation. The benefit of using a high-order - possibly adapted - spatial discretisation for accurate water wave propagation over long times and distances is particularly attractive for marine hydrodynamics applications.

  2. Phosphate release from waste stabilisation pond sludge: significance and fate of polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Powell, N; Shilton, A; Pratt, S; Chisti, Y

    2011-01-01

    Net phosphorus removal from waste stabilisation pond (WSP) systems is governed by the rate of phosphorus incorporation into the sludge layer and the rate of phosphorus release from this sludge back to the overlying wastewater. Luxury uptake of phosphorus by microalgae has been shown to occur under WSP conditions in the laboratory; however, the significance of this mechanism and the fate of polyphosphate contained in the settled solids have not previously been investigated. In this work the analysis of sludge samples from three WSP showed that up to 71% of the total phosphorus in the sludge was in the form of polyphosphate. This indicates that polyphosphate accumulation could potentially be an important mechanism for phosphorus sequestration in WSP and challenges the common view that chemical precipitation is the predominant phosphorus removal mechanism in these systems. The release of phosphate from WSP sludge samples was monitored in the laboratory. The samples from two different pond systems had release rates in the order of 4.3 microgP/gTSS.d. However, the third sample which was collected during an algal bloom had a release rate of 12.4 microgP/gTSS.d. Phosphate release from fresh microalgal sludge grown under laboratory conditions was also studied and was shown to have a release rate of 160 microgP/gTSS.d. Analysis of polyphosphate during the experiments on laboratory grown microalgal sludge showed that polyphosphate was indeed degraded resulting in phosphate release. Interestingly, after the initial release phase phosphorus was assimilated by the biomass and some polyphosphate was reformed. It is likely that this is due to bacterial growth in the sludge. PMID:21866769

  3. Complexation of bovine serum albumin and sugar beet pectin: stabilising oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyang; Fang, Yapeng; Al-Assaf, Saphwan; Phillips, Glyn O; Jiang, Fatang

    2012-12-15

    In a previous study (Langmuir 28 (2012) 10164-10176.), we investigated the complexation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with sugar beet pectin (SBP). A pH-composition phase diagram was established and structural transitions in relation to the phase diagram during complexation were identified. The present study examines the implications of these interactions on the emulsifying performance of BSA/SBP mixtures. Middle-chain triglycerides (MCTs) in water emulsions were prepared using conditions corresponding to different regions of the phase diagram. At high pHs and in the stable region of mixed individual soluble polymers where complexation is absent, there is no improved emulsifying performance, compared with the individual protein and polysaccharide. For these mixtures, the emulsion characteristics are controlled by the major component in the solutions, as determined by the competitive adsorption of the two components at the oil-water interface. At low pHs and low BSA/SBP ratios, and so mainly within the stable region of intramolecular soluble complexes, BSA/SBP mixtures greatly improve the stability of emulsions. Here, stabilisation is controlled by the cooperative adsorption of the two components at the oil-water interface. Through electrostatic complexation BSA promotes the adsorption of SBP on to interfaces to form a thick steric layer around emulsion droplets and thus providing better stability. At low pHs and high BSA/SBP ratios, that is, mainly within the unstable region of intermolecular insoluble complexes, emulsions prepared are extremely unstable due to bridging flocculation between emulsion droplets.

  4. Soil stabilisation using AMD sludge, compost and lignite: TCLP leachability and continuous acid leaching.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A; Yip, Alex C K

    2013-11-01

    Utilising locally available industrial by-products for in situ metal stabilisation presents a low-cost remediation approach for contaminated soil. This study explored the potential use of inorganic (acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge and zero-valent iron) and carbonaceous materials (green waste compost, manure compost, and lignite) for minimising the environmental risks of As and Cu at a timber treatment site. After 9-month soil incubation, significant sequestration of As and Cu in soil solution was accomplished by AMD sludge, on which adsorption and co-precipitation could take place. The efficacy of AMD sludge was comparable to that of zero-valent iron. There was marginal benefit of adding carbonaceous materials. However, in a moderately aggressive environment (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure), AMD sludge only suppressed the leachability of As but not Cu. Therefore, the provision of compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of Cu leachability, probably via surface complexation with oxygen-containing functional groups. Under continuous acid leaching in column experiments, combined application of AMD sludge with compost proved more effective than AMD sludge with lignite. This was possibly attributed to the larger amount of dissolved organic matter with aromatic moieties from lignite, which may enhance Cu and As mobility. Nevertheless, care should be taken to mitigate ecological impact associated with short-term substantial Ca release and continuous release of Al at a moderate level under acid leaching. This study also articulated the engineering implications and provided recommendations for field deployment, material processing, and assessment framework to ensure an environmentally sound application of reactive materials.

  5. Patient satisfaction with mini-implant stabilised full dentures. A 1-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, C; Idmyr, B-O; Wennström, J L

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient-centred outcomes with regard to function and comfort after placement of mini-implants for stabilisation of complete dentures. The trial was designed as a prospective cohort of 12-months duration and involved 21 subjects in the age of 50-90 years having a full denture in the maxilla or the mandible with poor stability during function. Flapless installation of 2-4 narrow-body Dentatus Atlas(®) implants was performed and retention for the existing denture was obtained by the use of a silicone-based soft lining material (Tuf-Link(®)). Patients' judgement of perceived satisfaction with function and comfort of the dentures was recorded at baseline, 1- and 12-months post-treatment using 10-centimetre visual analogue scales (VAS) and a questionnaire. Clinical examination of the conditions of the peri-implant soft tissues was performed at 12 months. Nineteen of the 21 patients were available for the 12-month follow-up examination. The two drop-out subjects lost all implants within 1 month and rejected retreatment. Further six subjects lost 1-2 implants, but were sucessfully retreated by insertion of new implants. Overall satisfaction, chewing and speaking comfort were all markedly improved from pre-treatment median VAS scores of around 4-5 to median scores of 9·0-10 (10 = optimal) at the final examination. The prevalence of positive answers to questions regarding stability/function of the denture increased significantly to almost 100% for all questions. Treatment involving maxillary dentures and the use of short implants (7-10 mm) was associated with an increased risk of implant failure. The results indicate that placement of mini-implants as retentive elements for full dentures with poor functional stability has a marked positive impact on the patients' perception of oral function and comfort as well as security in social life.

  6. Reducing the mobility of arsenic in brownfield soil using stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gil-Díaz, Mar; Alonso, Juan; Rodríguez-Valdés, Eduardo; Pinilla, Paloma; Lobo, Maria Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as a new tool for the treatment of polluted soils and groundwater has received considerable attention in recent years due to its high reactivity, in situ application and cost-effectiveness. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of using a commercial stabilised suspension of nZVI to immobilise As in brownfield soil and to investigate its impact on Fe availability in the treated soil. The phytotoxicities of the soil samples were also evaluated using a germination test with two plant species: barley (Hordeum vulgare L) and common vetch (Vicia sativa L). Two doses of the commercial nZVI suspension were studied, 1% and 10%, and two soil-nanoparticle interaction times, 72 h and 3 mo, were used to compare the stabilities of the soils treated with nZVI. The As availability was evaluated using a sequential extraction procedure and the toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) test. The application of nZVI significantly decreased the availability of As in the soil. The immobilisation of As was more effective and more stable over time with the 10% dose than with the 1% dose of the commercial nZVI suspension. The application of nZVI did not induce an important increase in Fe mobility because the Fe leachability was less than 2 mg L(-1) over the time period studied. The lower availability of As in the soil led to a decrease in the phytotoxicity of the soil to barley and vetch germination. Thus, the proposed nanotechnology could be a potential alternative for the in situ remediation of As-polluted soils and could be combined with remediation processes where plants are involved. PMID:25072767

  7. Ecosystem function in waste stabilisation ponds: Improving water quality through a better understanding of biophysical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadouani, Anas; Reichwaldt, Elke S.; Coggins, Liah X.; Ivey, Gregory N.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Zhou, Wenxu; Laurion, Isabelle; Chua, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Wastewater stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are highly productive systems designed to treat wastewater using only natural biological and chemical processes. Phytoplankton, microbial communities and hydraulics play important roles for ecosystem functionality of these pond systems. Although WSPs have been used for many decades, they are still considered as 'black box' systems as very little is known about the fundamental ecological processes which occur within them. However, a better understanding of how these highly productive ecosystems function is particularly important for hydrological processes, as treated wastewater is commonly discharged into streams, rivers, and oceans, and subject to strict water quality guidelines. WSPs are known to operate at different levels of efficiency, and treatment efficiency of WSPs is dependent on physical (flow characteristics and sludge accumulation and distribution) and biological (microbial and phytoplankton communities) characteristics. Thus, it is important to gain a better understanding of the role and influence of pond hydraulics and vital microbial communities on pond performance and WSP functional stability. The main aim of this study is to investigate the processes leading to differences in treatment performance of WSPs. This study uses a novel and innovative approach to understand these factors by combining flow cytometry and metabolomics to investigate various biochemical characteristics, including the metabolite composition and microbial community within WSPs. The results of these analyses will then be combined with results from the characterisation of pond hydrodynamics and hydraulic performance, which will be performed using advanced hydrodynamic modelling and advanced sludge profiling technology. By understanding how hydrodynamic and biological processes influence each other and ecosystem function and stability in WSPs, we will be able to propose ways to improve the quality of the treatment using natural processes, with

  8. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Lunt, A. J. G. Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Korsunsky, A. M.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J.; Neo, T. K.

    2014-08-07

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  9. Suitability of constructed wetlands and waste stabilisation ponds in wastewater treatment: nitrogen transformation and removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senzia, M. A.; Mashauri, D. A.; Mayo, A. W.

    It is estimated that 90% of sewage in cities in developing countries are today discharged untreated into water bodies. In Tanzania, pollution of rivers such as Karanga, Njoro and Rao in Moshi; Mirongo in Mwanza and Themi in Arusha is the cause of frequent disease outbreaks in communities downstreams. Solutions to effluent crisis can be found by its proper treatment and disposal. The principal objective of wastewater treatment is to allow effluents to be disposed without danger to human health or unacceptable damage to the ecology of receiving water bodies. Field investigations were made on pilot scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands (CW) units located downstream of waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). Six units filled with gravel of 6-25 mm diameters in equal proportion, which gave an initial hydraulic conductivity of 86 m/d were used. While four units covering surface area of 40.7 m 2 each, were located downstream of primary facultative pond, the other two units with surface area 15.9 m 2 each were located downstream of maturation pond. An attempt was made to compare the output of mathematical models for Phragmites and Typha macrophytes located downstream of primary facultative pond. Based on total inflow nitrogen of 1.457 gN/m 2 d, while Phragmites has shown a removal of 54%, Typha had a removal of 44.2%. Furthermore, while the system downstream of primary facultative pond has accretion as a major pathway, accounting for 19.1% of inflow nitrogen, the system downstream of maturation pond has denitrification as its major removal mechanism accounting for 20.5%. In this paper, a comparison of land required by CW and WSP based on the amount of water to be treated is made.

  10. Reducing the mobility of arsenic in brownfield soil using stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gil-Díaz, Mar; Alonso, Juan; Rodríguez-Valdés, Eduardo; Pinilla, Paloma; Lobo, Maria Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as a new tool for the treatment of polluted soils and groundwater has received considerable attention in recent years due to its high reactivity, in situ application and cost-effectiveness. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of using a commercial stabilised suspension of nZVI to immobilise As in brownfield soil and to investigate its impact on Fe availability in the treated soil. The phytotoxicities of the soil samples were also evaluated using a germination test with two plant species: barley (Hordeum vulgare L) and common vetch (Vicia sativa L). Two doses of the commercial nZVI suspension were studied, 1% and 10%, and two soil-nanoparticle interaction times, 72 h and 3 mo, were used to compare the stabilities of the soils treated with nZVI. The As availability was evaluated using a sequential extraction procedure and the toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) test. The application of nZVI significantly decreased the availability of As in the soil. The immobilisation of As was more effective and more stable over time with the 10% dose than with the 1% dose of the commercial nZVI suspension. The application of nZVI did not induce an important increase in Fe mobility because the Fe leachability was less than 2 mg L(-1) over the time period studied. The lower availability of As in the soil led to a decrease in the phytotoxicity of the soil to barley and vetch germination. Thus, the proposed nanotechnology could be a potential alternative for the in situ remediation of As-polluted soils and could be combined with remediation processes where plants are involved.

  11. Local structure in solid solutions of stabilised zirconia with actinide dioxides (UO{sub 2}, NpO{sub 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Marcus; Somers, Joseph; Bouexiere, Daniel; Rothe, Joerg

    2011-04-15

    The local structure of (Zr,Lu,U)O{sub 2-x} and (Zr,Y,Np)O{sub 2-x} solid solutions has been investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Samples were prepared by mixing reactive (Zr,Lu)O{sub 2-x} and (Zr,Y)O{sub 2-x} precursor materials with the actinide oxide powders, respectively. Sintering at 1600 {sup o}C in Ar/H{sub 2} yields a fluorite structure with U(IV) and Np(IV). As typical for stabilised zirconia the metal-oxygen and metal-metal distances are characteristic for the different metal ions. The bond lengths increase with actinide concentration, whereas highest adaptation to the bulk stabilised zirconia structure was observed for U---O and Np---O bonds. The Zr---O bond shows only a slight increase from 2.14 A at 6 mol% actinide to 2.18 A at infinite dilution in UO{sub 2} and NpO{sub 2}. The short interatomic distance between Zr and the surrounding oxygen and metal atoms indicate a low relaxation of Zr with respect to the bulk structure, i.e. a strong Pauling behaviour. -- Graphical abstract: Metal-oxygen bond distances in (Zr,Lu,U)O{sub 2-x} solid solutions with different oxygen vacancy concentrations (Lu/Zr=1 and Lu/Zr=0.5). Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} EXAFS indicates high U and Np adaption to the bulk structure of stabilised zirconia. {yields} Zr---O bond length is 2.18 A at infinite Zr dilution in UO{sub 2} and NpO{sub 2}. {yields} Low relaxation (strong Pauling behaviour) of Zr explains its low solubility in UO{sub 2}.

  12. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments. PMID:22616934

  13. Embolisation of pheochromocytoma to stabilise and wean a patient in cardiogenic shock from emergency extracorporeal life support.

    PubMed

    Vagner, Helle; Hey, Thomas Morris; Elle, Bo; Jensen, Marianne Kjær

    2015-03-03

    Pheochromocytoma is a catecholamine-secreting tumour associated with varying symptoms ranging from episodic headache, sweating, paroxysmal hypertension and tachycardia to intractable cardiogenic shock. Cardiogenic shock is rare but well-described and the timing of correct management is crucial since mortality is high. Fifty per cent of pheochromocytomas are diagnosed on autopsy. We report on a case of embolisation of the adrenal artery during ongoing extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in order to stabilise and wean the patient from ECLS as a bridge to final surgery.

  14. Electrically switchable polymer stabilised broadband infrared reflectors and their potential as smart windows for energy saving in buildings

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Hitesh; Loonen, Roel C. G. M.; Hensen, Jan L. M.; Debije, Michael G.; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Electrically switchable broadband infrared reflectors that are relatively transparent in the visible region have been fabricated using polymer stabilised cholesteric liquid crystals. The IR reflectors can change their reflection/transmission properties by applying a voltage in response to changes in environmental conditions. Simulations predict that a significant amount of energy can be saved on heating, cooling and lighting of buildings in places such as Madrid by using this switchable IR reflector. We have also fabricated a switchable IR reflector which can also generate electricity. These polymer based switchable IR reflectors are of high potential as windows of automobiles and buildings to control interior temperatures and save energy. PMID:26132328

  15. Stabilisation of crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE)-acetabular components with alpha-tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Wolf, C; Maninger, J; Lederer, K; Frühwirth-Smounig, H; Gamse, T; Marr, R

    2006-12-01

    A stabilisation of crosslinked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) with alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) used for endoprostheses can increase its resistance against oxidative degradation remarkably. However, the method used for conventional UHMW-PE of adding alpha-tocopherol to the UHMW-PE powder before processing can not be applied for crosslinked UHMW-PE, since the alpha-tocopherol hinders the crosslinking process, which would be accompanied by a heavy degradation of this vitamin. The alpha-tocopherol has therefore to be added after the crosslinking process. This paper presents two methods for a stabilisation of finished products with alpha-tocopherol. In method 1, UHMW-PE-cubes (20 x 20 x 20 mm3) were stored in pure alpha-tocopherol under inert atmosphere at temperatures from 100 degrees C to 150 degrees C resulting in a high mass fraction of alpha-tocopherol in the edge zones. For further homogenisation, the cubes were stored in inert atmosphere at temperatures from 160 degrees C to 200 degrees C. In method 2, supercritical CO2 was used to incorporate the vitamin into the UHMW-PE. In an autoclave vessel, the cubes were treated with alpha-tocopherol dissolved in supercritical CO2 for several hours at temperatures from 100 degrees C to 170 degrees C. In both cases, the mass fraction of alpha-tocopherol was detected with the help of a FTIR-microscope. Both methods are well suited to stabilise crosslinked UHMW-PE with alpha-tocopherol. A stabilisation of the sensitive edge layer as well as a nearly homogenous distribution with varying alpha-tocopherol content may be realised by varying the process parameters. Using method 2, standard hip cups were stabilized nearly homogeneously with varying mass fraction of alpha-tocopherol. No oxidation of the UHMW-PE could be detected by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and HPLC studies showed a very low degradation of the alpha-tocopherol for both processes. PMID:17143764

  16. Electrically switchable polymer stabilised broadband infrared reflectors and their potential as smart windows for energy saving in buildings.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Hitesh; Loonen, Roel C G M; Hensen, Jan L M; Debije, Michael G; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2015-01-01

    Electrically switchable broadband infrared reflectors that are relatively transparent in the visible region have been fabricated using polymer stabilised cholesteric liquid crystals. The IR reflectors can change their reflection/transmission properties by applying a voltage in response to changes in environmental conditions. Simulations predict that a significant amount of energy can be saved on heating, cooling and lighting of buildings in places such as Madrid by using this switchable IR reflector. We have also fabricated a switchable IR reflector which can also generate electricity. These polymer based switchable IR reflectors are of high potential as windows of automobiles and buildings to control interior temperatures and save energy. PMID:26132328

  17. Electrically switchable polymer stabilised broadband infrared reflectors and their potential as smart windows for energy saving in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Hitesh; Loonen, Roel C. G. M.; Hensen, Jan L. M.; Debije, Michael G.; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.

    2015-07-01

    Electrically switchable broadband infrared reflectors that are relatively transparent in the visible region have been fabricated using polymer stabilised cholesteric liquid crystals. The IR reflectors can change their reflection/transmission properties by applying a voltage in response to changes in environmental conditions. Simulations predict that a significant amount of energy can be saved on heating, cooling and lighting of buildings in places such as Madrid by using this switchable IR reflector. We have also fabricated a switchable IR reflector which can also generate electricity. These polymer based switchable IR reflectors are of high potential as windows of automobiles and buildings to control interior temperatures and save energy.

  18. Anatase-stabilised AlxTi1-xO2 photoanodes containing uniform spherical particles for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshayesh, A. M.; Farajisafiloo, N.

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports a facile straightforward process for the deposition of uniform photoanode electrodes by a novel AlxTi1-xO2 gel for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) applications. Highly crystalline anatase-TiO2 phase is stabilised by aluminium chloride at 500 °C. The electrodes are composed of uniform spherical particles with diameter around 3 μm, containing small nanoparticles with the average grain size of 40 nm, deposited by dip coating method. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals that 0.5 at.% Al3+ was incorporated into titania crystal lattice and stabilised anatase phase by limiting the transformation from anatase to rutile phase. UV-vis spectra show that the stabilised-film has lower band gap energy than that of undoped-TiO2, extending the absorption of TiO2 into visible region. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) demonstrates that the anatase-stabilised DSC enjoys less recombination and internal resistances, improving the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The anatase-stabilised DSC has higher power conversion efficiency of 7.52% than that of unstabilised cell (6.40%).

  19. Effect of saliva stabilisers on detection of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in oral fluid by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Decorte, Inge; Van der Stede, Yves; Nauwynck, Hans; De Regge, Nick; Cay, Ann Brigitte

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of extraction-amplification methods, storage temperature and saliva stabilisers on detection of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) RNA by quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) in porcine oral fluid. The diagnostic performance of different extraction-amplification methods was examined using a dilution series of oral fluid spiked with PRRSV. To determine RNA stability, porcine oral fluid, with or without commercially available saliva stabilisers, was spiked with PRRSV, stored at 4°C or room temperature and tested for the presence of PRRSV RNA by qRT-PCR. PRRSV RNA could be detected in oral fluid using all extraction-amplification combinations, but the limit of detection varied amongst different combinations. Storage temperature and saliva stabilisers had an effect on the stability of PRRSV RNA, which could only be detected for 7 days when PRRSV spiked oral fluid was kept at 4°C or stabilised at room temperature with a commercial mRNA stabiliser.

  20. Ecotoxicity of chemically stabilised metal(loid)s in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2014-02-01

    Five chemical amendments (soft rock phosphate, lime, commercial phosphate amendment, red mud and magnesium oxide) were applied across four different shooting range soils to chemically stabilise metal(loid)s in the soils. Soils were contaminated with Pb between 2330 and 12,167 mg/kg, Sb from 7.4 to 325 mg/kg and soil pH ranged from 5.43 to 9.29. Amendments were tested for their ability to reduce the bioavailability of Pb, Sb, Zn, Ni, Cu and As in the soils to soil organisms after one year of aging, by measuring a series of ecotoxicological endpoints for earthworms and plants and soil microbial activity. Growth-based endpoints for earthworms and plants were not significantly affected by amendment addition, except in the most contaminated soil. Per cent survival and weight-loss reduction of earthworms was enhanced by amendment addition in only the most contaminated soil. Plant biomass and root elongation was not significantly affected by amendment addition (p=<0.05). Red mud and magnesium oxide appeared toxic to plants and earthworms, probably due to highly alkaline pH (9-12). Lead in soil organisms was relatively low despite the high concentrations of Pb in the soils, suggesting low bioavailability of Pb. Uptake of Pb by earthworms was reduced by between 40 and 96 per cent by amendments, but not across all soils. Amendments reduced Sb in earthworms in Townsville soil by up to 92 per cent. For lettuce the average uptake of Pb was reduced by 40 to 70 per cent with amendment addition in Townsville, Darwin and Perth soil. The effect of amendments on the uptake of Sb, Zn, Ni, Cu and As was variable between soils and amendments. Microbial activity was increased by greater than 50 per cent with amendments addition, with soft rock phosphate and lime being the most effective in Murray Bridge and TV soils and commercial phosphate and MgO being the most effective in Darwin and Perth soils.

  1. Ecotoxicity of chemically stabilised metal(loid)s in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2014-02-01

    Five chemical amendments (soft rock phosphate, lime, commercial phosphate amendment, red mud and magnesium oxide) were applied across four different shooting range soils to chemically stabilise metal(loid)s in the soils. Soils were contaminated with Pb between 2330 and 12,167 mg/kg, Sb from 7.4 to 325 mg/kg and soil pH ranged from 5.43 to 9.29. Amendments were tested for their ability to reduce the bioavailability of Pb, Sb, Zn, Ni, Cu and As in the soils to soil organisms after one year of aging, by measuring a series of ecotoxicological endpoints for earthworms and plants and soil microbial activity. Growth-based endpoints for earthworms and plants were not significantly affected by amendment addition, except in the most contaminated soil. Per cent survival and weight-loss reduction of earthworms was enhanced by amendment addition in only the most contaminated soil. Plant biomass and root elongation was not significantly affected by amendment addition (p=<0.05). Red mud and magnesium oxide appeared toxic to plants and earthworms, probably due to highly alkaline pH (9-12). Lead in soil organisms was relatively low despite the high concentrations of Pb in the soils, suggesting low bioavailability of Pb. Uptake of Pb by earthworms was reduced by between 40 and 96 per cent by amendments, but not across all soils. Amendments reduced Sb in earthworms in Townsville soil by up to 92 per cent. For lettuce the average uptake of Pb was reduced by 40 to 70 per cent with amendment addition in Townsville, Darwin and Perth soil. The effect of amendments on the uptake of Sb, Zn, Ni, Cu and As was variable between soils and amendments. Microbial activity was increased by greater than 50 per cent with amendments addition, with soft rock phosphate and lime being the most effective in Murray Bridge and TV soils and commercial phosphate and MgO being the most effective in Darwin and Perth soils. PMID:24287010

  2. Local curvature measurements of a lean, partially premixed swirl-stabilised flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Alan E.; Hardalupas, Yannis; Taylor, Alex M. K. P.

    2012-04-01

    A swirl-stabilised, lean, partially premixed combustor operating at atmospheric conditions has been used to investigate the local curvature distributions in lifted, stable and thermoacoustically oscillating CH4-air partially premixed flames for bulk cold-flow Reynolds numbers of 15,000 and 23,000. Single-shot OH planar laser-induced fluorescence has been used to capture instantaneous images of these three different flame types. Use of binary thresholding to identify the reactant and product regions in the OH planar laser-induced fluorescence images, in order to extract accurate flame-front locations, is shown to be unsatisfactory for the examined flames. The Canny-Deriche edge detection filter has also been examined and is seen to still leave an unacceptable quantity of artificial flame-fronts. A novel approach has been developed for image analysis where a combination of a non-linear diffusion filter, Sobel gradient and threshold-based curve elimination routines have been used to extract traces of the flame-front to obtain local curvature distributions. A visual comparison of the effectiveness of flame-front identification is made between the novel approach, the threshold binarisation filter and the Canny-Deriche filter. The novel approach appears to most accurately identify the flame-fronts. Example histograms of the curvature for six flame conditions and of the total image area are presented and are found to have a broader range of local flame curvatures for increasing bulk Reynolds numbers. Significantly positive values of mean curvature and marginally positive values of skewness of the histogram have been measured for one lifted flame case, but this is generally accounted for by the effect of flame brush curvature. The mean local flame-front curvature reduces with increasing axial distance from the burner exit plane for all flame types. These changes are more pronounced in the lifted flames but are marginal for the thermoacoustically oscillating flames. It is

  3. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  4. Seasonal influence of waste stabilisation pond effluent on DAF/F (dissolved air flotation/filtration) process operation.

    PubMed

    Buisine, F; Oemcke, D

    2003-01-01

    The Bolivar wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), North of Adelaide, South Australia encompasses the largest waste stabilisation pond (WSP) system in the Southern hemisphere. The wastewater effluent will ultimately be fully reused for agriculture irrigation. A dissolved air flotation/filtration (DAF/F) plant was installed for tertiary treatment downstream of the stabilisation lagoons for supply to the irrigation scheme. Chemical treatment in the form of coagulation and flocculation is required to assist the separation process. The DAF/F plant operation is highly dependent on the raw water algal population. Seasonal variations seem to be the main abiotic factors affecting the algal population growth. Significant doses of chemical can be required to respond to rapid changes of water quality. United Water International is currently assessing the appropriate chemical treatment for short-term response, and is also working with Flinders University of South Australia on determining ways to manage the lagoons and to control the water quality feeding the DAF/F plant in the long-term. This paper outlines the effect of seasonal variations of WSP effluent quality on the DAF/F process operation, the findings for an adapted chemical treatment, and the eventual possibilities for lagoon management.

  5. [Interactions between cyclodextrins and triglycerides: from emulsion stabilisation to the emergence of a new drug delivery system called "beads"].

    PubMed

    Hamoudi, M; Trichard, L; Grossiord, J-L; Chaminade, P; Duchêne, D; Le Bas, G; Fattal, E; Bochot, A

    2009-11-01

    Natural cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides which can be modified to obtain more water soluble or insoluble derivatives. The main interest of cyclodextrins results from their ability to form an inclusion complex with hydrophobic molecules. Inclusion constitutes a true molecular encapsulation. This property is employed in pharmaceutical industry to facilitate the formulation of poorly water soluble and/or fragile drugs. A more recent application of cyclodextrins consists in their use in the preparation of dispersed systems such as micro- and nanoparticles or even liposomes. When incorporated in dispersed systems, cyclodextrin can enhance drug solubility, drug stability and drug loading. Interestingly, cyclodextrins themselves can also be employed to form or stabilise dispersed systems (material or emulsifying agent). For example, the interactions between cyclodextrins with components of the vegetable oils (more especially with triglycerides) allow to stabilise simple or multiple emulsions but also to form particles called "beads". Very rich in oil, this novel lipid carrier presents an important potential for the encapsulation of highly lipophilic compounds and their delivery by topical and oral routes. These two applications are more particularly developed in the present paper.

  6. Comparative antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesised by biological and chemical routes with pluronic F68 as a stabilising agent.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carolina Alves Dos; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Ingle, Avinash P; Rai, Mahendra

    2016-08-01

    The authors report the comparative antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesised by biological (using Fusarium oxysporum) and chemical routes in the presence and absence of pluronic F68 as a stabilising agent. The production of silver nanoparticles was evidenced by UV-visible spectra, with absorbance at about 420 nm in the case of both biological and chemical synthesis. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the presence of face-centred cubic structure (FCC plane). The nanoparticles characterised by transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed spherical silver nanoparticles with size range of 5-40 and 10-70 nm in the case of biologically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles, respectively. Addition of pluronic F68 showed the stabilisation of silver nanoparticles. Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles demonstrated different inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Overall, biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles showed higher activity as compared with chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles synthesised in the presence of pluronic F68 by the chemical route exhibited synergism in antibacterial activity as compared with those synthesised without pluronic F68. On the contrary, biogenic silver nanoparticles without pluronic F68 showed higher antibacterial potential. PMID:27463790

  7. Wastewater stabilisation ponds: Sludge accumulation, technical and financial study on desludging and sludge disposal case studies in France.

    PubMed

    Picot, B; Sambuco, J P; Brouillet, J L; Riviere, Y

    2005-01-01

    Waste stabilisation pond treatment was widely developed during the 1980s in France, where there are now over 3,000 plants. Desludging the ponds has now become essential. In 19 primary facultative ponds, in operation for 12-24 years, the net average sludge accumulation rate was 19 mm/yr. The average per capita accumulation rates ranged from 0.04-0.148 m3/person.year (mean of 0.08 m3/person.year). In primary facultative ponds the volume of sludge represented 15-39% of the total volume of the basin. A filling rate above 30% necessitates desludging. In France, a desludging interval of 15 years is recommended for primary facultative ponds. The cost evaluation of desludging and landspreading showed differences according to the desludging technique used. Desludging after emptying the water had an average cost of 38 Euro/m3 of sludge with 10% dry solid (range from 20 to 83 Euro/m3). Under-water desludging was 50% more expensive. Although desludging is carried out only after several years of operation, its cost must be allowed for in the annual operation and maintenance costs of the process. It can be estimated to be 3 ł/person.year. Even with this additional cost, waste stabilisation pond treatment remains less expensive than other treatment processes.

  8. Physicochemical properties of whey protein, lactoferrin and Tween 20 stabilised nanoemulsions: Effect of temperature, pH and salt.

    PubMed

    Teo, Anges; Goh, Kelvin K T; Wen, Jingyuan; Oey, Indrawati; Ko, Sanghoon; Kwak, Hae-Soo; Lee, Sung Je

    2016-04-15

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation using whey protein isolate (WPI), lactoferrin and Tween 20 as emulsifiers. Protein-stabilised nanoemulsions showed a decrease in particle size with increasing protein concentration from 0.25% to 1% (w/w) level with Z-average diameter between 70 and 90 nm. However, larger droplets were produced by Tween 20 (120-450 nm) especially at concentration above 0.75% (w/w). The stability of nanoemulsions to temperature (30-90°C), pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-500 mM NaCl or 0-90 mM CaCl2) was also tested. Tween 20 nanoemulsions were unstable to heat treatment at 90°C for 15 min. WPI-stabilised nanoemulsions exhibited droplet aggregation near the isoelectric point at pH 4.5 and 5 and they were also unstable at salt concentration above 30 mM CaCl2. These results indicated that stable nanoemulsions can be prepared by careful selection of emulsifiers. PMID:26616953

  9. Comparison of the intubating laryngeal mask airway and laryngeal tube placement during manual in-line stabilisation of the neck.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, R; Nagata, O; Kamata, K; Yamagata, K; Sessler, D I; Ozaki, M

    2005-02-01

    We compared the placement of the laryngeal tube (LT) with the intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) in 51 patients whose necks were stabilised by manual in-line traction. Following induction of anaesthesia and neuromuscular blockade, the LT and ILMA were inserted consecutively in a randomised, crossover design. Using pressure-controlled ventilation (20 cmH(2)O inspiratory pressure), we measured insertion attempts, time to establish positive-pressure ventilation, tidal volume, gastric insufflation, and minimum airway pressure at which gas leaked around the cuff. Data were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests; p < 0.05 was considered significant. Insertion was found to be more difficult with the LT (successful at first attempt in 16 patients) than with the ILMA (successful at first attempt in 42 patients, p < 0.0001). Time required for insertion was longer for the LT (28 [23-35] s, median [interquartile range]) than for the ILMA (20 [15-25] s, p = 0.0009). Tidal volume was less for the LT (440 [290-670] ml) than for the ILMA (630 [440-750] ml, p = 0.013). Minimum airway pressure at which gas leak occurred and incidence of gastric insufflation were similar with two devices. In patients whose necks were stabilised with manual in-line traction, insertion of the ILMA was easier and quicker than insertion of the LT and tidal volume was greater with the ILMA than the LT.

  10. Physicochemical properties of whey protein, lactoferrin and Tween 20 stabilised nanoemulsions: Effect of temperature, pH and salt.

    PubMed

    Teo, Anges; Goh, Kelvin K T; Wen, Jingyuan; Oey, Indrawati; Ko, Sanghoon; Kwak, Hae-Soo; Lee, Sung Je

    2016-04-15

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation using whey protein isolate (WPI), lactoferrin and Tween 20 as emulsifiers. Protein-stabilised nanoemulsions showed a decrease in particle size with increasing protein concentration from 0.25% to 1% (w/w) level with Z-average diameter between 70 and 90 nm. However, larger droplets were produced by Tween 20 (120-450 nm) especially at concentration above 0.75% (w/w). The stability of nanoemulsions to temperature (30-90°C), pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-500 mM NaCl or 0-90 mM CaCl2) was also tested. Tween 20 nanoemulsions were unstable to heat treatment at 90°C for 15 min. WPI-stabilised nanoemulsions exhibited droplet aggregation near the isoelectric point at pH 4.5 and 5 and they were also unstable at salt concentration above 30 mM CaCl2. These results indicated that stable nanoemulsions can be prepared by careful selection of emulsifiers.

  11. Development and characterisation of ursolic acid nanocrystals without stabiliser having improved dissolution rate and in vitro anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju; Wang, Yancai; Song, Yuelin; Chan, Hokman; Bi, Chao; Yang, Xiao; Yan, Ru; Wang, Yitao; Zheng, Ying

    2014-02-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), which is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid, has the potential to be developed as an anticancer drug, whereas its poor aqueous solubility and dissolution rate limit its clinical application. The aim of the present study was to develop UA nanocrystals to enhance its aqueous dispersibility, dissolution rate and anticancer activity. Following the investigation on the effects of stabiliser, the ratio of organic phase to aqueous solution and drug concentration, the UA nanocrystals without stabiliser were successfully prepared by anti-solvent precipitation approach. The nanocrystals maintained similar crystallinity with particle size, polydispersion index and zeta potential values of 188.0 ± 4.4 nm, 0.154 ± 0.022, and -25.0 ± 5.9 mV, respectively. Compared with the raw material, the UA nanocrystals showed good aqueous dispensability and a higher dissolution rate, and they could be completely dissolved in 0.5% SDS solution within 120 min. Moreover, the suspension of UA nanocrystals was physically stable after storage at 4°C for 7 weeks. By inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, the UA nanocrystals significantly induced stronger cell growth inhibition activity against MCF-7 cells compared with free drug in vitro, although the uptake of free UA was approximately twice higher than that of the UA nanocrystals. The UA nanocrystals may be used as a potential delivery formulation for intravenous injection with enhanced dissolution velocity and anticancer activity. PMID:24022345

  12. Settlement analysis of fresh and partially stabilised municipal solid waste in simulated controlled dumps and bioreactor landfills.

    PubMed

    Swati, M; Joseph, Kurian

    2008-01-01

    The patterns of settlement of fresh as well as partially stabilised municipal solid waste (MSW), undergoing degradation in five different landfill lysimeters, were studied elaborately. The first two lysimeters, R1 and R2, contained fresh MSW while the other three lysimeters, R3, R4 and R5, contained partially stabilised MSW. R1 and R3 simulated conventional controlled dumps with fortnightly disposal of drained leachate. R2 and R4 simulated bioreactor landfills with leachate recirculation. Fortnightly water flushing was done in R5. Settlement of MSW, monitored over a period of 58 weeks, was correlated with the organic carbon content of leachate and residual volatile matter in the MSW to establish the relationship between settlement and organic destruction. Compressibility parameters such as modulus of elasticity and compression indices were determined and empirical equations were applied for the settlement data. Overall settlements up to 49% were observed in the case of landfill lysimeters, filled with fresh MSW. Landfill lysimeters with liquid addition, in the form of leachate or water, experienced lower primary settlements and higher secondary settlements than conventional fills, where no liquid addition was practised. Modified secondary compression indices for MSW in lysimeters with leachate recirculation and flushing were 30%-44% higher than that for lysimeters where no liquid addition was done. Secondary settlements in bioreactor landfills were found to vary exponentially with time. PMID:17881211

  13. Treatment effect on signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders--comparison between stabilisation splint and a new type of splint (NTI). A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Tomas; Adiels, Anne-Marie; Nilsson, Håkan L; Helkimo, Martti

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare the effect on signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) of two different interocclusal appliances. Thirty patients with signs and symptoms of TMD received either a stabilisation splint or a new kind of splint based on the concept of nociceptive trigeminal inhibition (NTI). A clinical examination was performed and subjective symptoms were registered before start of treatment and after 3 and 6 months. All participants were offered to change to the other type of splint at the 3-month follow-up in case of no improvement or impairment of their symptoms. One subject in each group was lost early during the investigation. The mean time for taking impressions, to make inter-occlusal recording and to adjust the stabilisation splints was 17 minutes. The mean time to fit and adjust the NTI splints was 27 minutes. At the 3-month follow-up, 4 patients that had received NTI splints accepted the offer to change to stabilisation splints due to no improvement or impairment of their symptoms. These treatments were judged as failures. No one in the stabilisation splint group utilised the offer to change treatment. At the 6-month follow-up, 7 of the remaining 10 subjects with NTI splints reported some (n = 1) or significant (n = 6) improvement, 2 reported no change and one reported impairment. All 14 who had been treated with a stabilisation splint reported some (n = 2) or significant (n = 12) improvement. For all variables registered, the results were in favour for the stabilisation splint. One subject treated with a NTI splint exhibited an impaired occlusion at the 6-month follow-up.

  14. Unexpected higher stabilisation of two classical antiaromatic frameworks with a ruthenium fragment compared to the osmium counterpart: origin probed by DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingjing; Hao, Yulei; An, Ke; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were carried out to investigate the stability and aromaticity of metallapentalocyclobutadienes. The results reveal unexpected higher stabilisation achieved with a 4d ruthenium fragment compared to the 5d [corrected] osmium counterpart. Moreover, direct 1-3 metal-carbon bonding in the metallabutadiene unit of these two complexes is negligible. PMID:26505956

  15. Decentralised adaptive output feedback stabilisation for stochastic time-delay systems via LaSalle-Yoshizawa-type theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Ticao; Xu, Shengyuan; Lu, Junwei; Wei, Yunliang; Zou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the decentralised output feedback stabilisation problem for a class of large-scale stochastic time-delay nonlinear systems. A general theorem is firstly given to guarantee the global existence and uniqueness of the solution for stochastic time-delay systems. In addition, a stochastic version of the well-known LaSalle-Yoshizawa theorem with time-varying delay is initially proposed for the controller design and stability analysis. Then, for a class of large-scale stochastic systems with time-varying delays, totally decentralised adaptive delay-dependent controllers are designed by using K-filter and backstepping approach. Via LaSalle-Yoshizawa-type theorem and constructing a general Lyapunov function, it is shown that all signals in the closed-loop system are bounded almost surely and the solution is almost surely asymptotically stable. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the results of this paper.

  16. Finite-time stability and stabilisation for a class of nonlinear systems with time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Shi, Peng; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Chadli, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the problems of finite-time stability (FTS) and finite-time stabilisation for a class of nonlinear systems with time-varying delay, which can be represented by Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy system. Some new delay-dependent FTS conditions are provided and applied to the design problem of finite-time fuzzy controllers. First, based on an integral inequality and a fuzzy Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, a delay-dependent FTS criterion is proposed for open-loop fuzzy system by introducing some free fuzzy weighting matrices, which are less conservative than other existing ones. Then, the parallel distributed compensation controller is designed to ensure FTS of the time-delay fuzzy system. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed design approach.

  17. Sewage sludge stabilisation and fertiliser value in a silvopastoral system developed with Eucalyptus nitens Maiden in Lugo (Spain).

    PubMed

    Mosquera-Losada, M R; Ferreiro-Domínguez, N; Daboussi, S; Rigueiro-Rodríguez, A

    2016-10-01

    Copper (Cu) is one of the heavy metals with highest proportion in sewage sludge. In Europe, sewage sludge should be stabilised before using it as a fertiliser in agriculture. Depending on the stabilisation process, sewage sludge has different Cu contents, and soil Cu incorporation rates. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of fertilisation with different types of sewage sludge (anaerobic, composted, and pelletised) on the concentration of total and available Cu in the soil, the tree growth, the pasture production, and the concentration of Cu in the pasture when compared with control treatments (i.e. no fertilisation and mineral fertilisation) in a silvopastoral system under Eucalyptus nitens Maiden. The results of this experiment show that an improvement of the soil pH increased the incorporation and the mineralisation of the sewage sludge and litter, and therefore, the release of Cu from the soil. Moreover, the concentration of Cu in the pasture and the levels of Cu extracted by the pasture improved when the soil organic matter decreased because the high levels of organic matter in the soil could have formed Cu complex. The composted sewage sludge (COM) increased a) the soil variables studied (pH, total Cu, and available Cu) and b) the Cu extracted by the pasture, both probably due to the higher inputs of cations made with it. In any case, the levels of Cu found in the soil never exceeded the maximums as set by Spanish regulations and did not cause harmful effects on the plants and animals. Therefore, the use of COM as an organic fertiliser should be promoted in silvopastoral systems established in edaphoclimatic conditions similar to this study because COM enhanced the productivity of the system from a viewpoint of the soil and the pasture, without causing any environmental damage.

  18. Three-year performance of in-situ solidified/stabilised soil using novel MgO-bearing binders.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fei; Wang, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2016-02-01

    A new group of MgO-bearing binders has been developed recently which showed improved sustainability and technical performance compared to Portland cement (PC). However, the application of these MgO-bearing binders in the Solidification/Stabilisation (S/S) techniques is very limited. This study investigates the three-year performance of a highly contaminated soil treated by in-situ S/S using MgO-bearing binders and PC. The core quality, strength, permeability and the leaching properties of the S/S materials were evaluated. The effects of binder composition, addition of inorgano-organo-clay (IOC) and the grout content on the properties of the 3-y S/S materials are discussed. It is found that although MgO alone provided negligible strength to the soil, it is superior in immobilising both inorganic and organic contaminants. Replacing MgO by ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) significantly enhanced the strength while also performed well in immobilising the contaminants. The improved pH buffering capacity was attributed to the low solubilities of brucite and hydrotalcite-like phases formed in the MgO-bearing binders, and was also the reason for the improved performance in stabilising contaminants. The addition of IOC slightly decreased the strength and the permeability of the S/S materials but inconsistent effect on the contaminant immobilisation was found depending on the binder composition. This study showed no degradation of the S/S materials after 3 y exposure to field conditions and has proved the applicability and the advantages of MgO-bearing binders over PC in S/S.

  19. Comparison of ammonia volatilisation rates in algae and duckweed-based waste stabilisation ponds treating domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zimmo, O R; van der Steen, N P; Gijzen, H J

    2003-11-01

    Quantification of ammonia volatilisation from wastewater stabilisation ponds is important in order to understand its significance for overall nitrogen removal in these widely applied low-cost treatment systems. Ammonia volatilisation rates were measured in pilot plant facilities consisting of one line of four algae-based ponds in series and a parallel line of four ponds with a floating mat of duckweed (Lemna gibba). Ammonia volatilisation was assessed during a period of one and a half years. The method applied is accurate, convenient and is proposed for analysis of a wide range of gasses emitted from stabilisation ponds and possibly other aquatic systems. The ammonia volatilisation rates in algae-based ponds (ABPs) were higher than in duckweed-based ponds (DBPs). This can be explained by the lower values of NH(3) in DBPs due to shading and lower pH values, since the volatilisation rate highly correlated with free ammonia concentration (NH(3)) in pond water. The duckweed cover appeared not to provide a physical barrier for volatilisation of unionised ammonia, because whenever NH(3) concentrations were equal in ABP and DBP also the volatilisation rates were equal. Volatilisation was in the range of 7.2-37.4 mg-Nm(-2)d(-1) and 6.4 -31.5 mg-Nm(-2)d(-1) in the ABPs and DBPs, respectively. Average influent and effluent ammonium nitrogen measurements showed that the ammonia volatilisation during the study period in any system did not exceed 1.5% of total ammonium nitrogen removal. Therefore this study confirmed results from simultaneous experimental work in our laboratory indicating that nitrification/denitrification, rather than ammonia volatilisation, is the most important mechanism for N removal in ABPs and DBPs. PMID:14568043

  20. Sewage sludge stabilisation and fertiliser value in a silvopastoral system developed with Eucalyptus nitens Maiden in Lugo (Spain).

    PubMed

    Mosquera-Losada, M R; Ferreiro-Domínguez, N; Daboussi, S; Rigueiro-Rodríguez, A

    2016-10-01

    Copper (Cu) is one of the heavy metals with highest proportion in sewage sludge. In Europe, sewage sludge should be stabilised before using it as a fertiliser in agriculture. Depending on the stabilisation process, sewage sludge has different Cu contents, and soil Cu incorporation rates. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of fertilisation with different types of sewage sludge (anaerobic, composted, and pelletised) on the concentration of total and available Cu in the soil, the tree growth, the pasture production, and the concentration of Cu in the pasture when compared with control treatments (i.e. no fertilisation and mineral fertilisation) in a silvopastoral system under Eucalyptus nitens Maiden. The results of this experiment show that an improvement of the soil pH increased the incorporation and the mineralisation of the sewage sludge and litter, and therefore, the release of Cu from the soil. Moreover, the concentration of Cu in the pasture and the levels of Cu extracted by the pasture improved when the soil organic matter decreased because the high levels of organic matter in the soil could have formed Cu complex. The composted sewage sludge (COM) increased a) the soil variables studied (pH, total Cu, and available Cu) and b) the Cu extracted by the pasture, both probably due to the higher inputs of cations made with it. In any case, the levels of Cu found in the soil never exceeded the maximums as set by Spanish regulations and did not cause harmful effects on the plants and animals. Therefore, the use of COM as an organic fertiliser should be promoted in silvopastoral systems established in edaphoclimatic conditions similar to this study because COM enhanced the productivity of the system from a viewpoint of the soil and the pasture, without causing any environmental damage. PMID:27243933

  1. Three-year performance of in-situ solidified/stabilised soil using novel MgO-bearing binders.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fei; Wang, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2016-02-01

    A new group of MgO-bearing binders has been developed recently which showed improved sustainability and technical performance compared to Portland cement (PC). However, the application of these MgO-bearing binders in the Solidification/Stabilisation (S/S) techniques is very limited. This study investigates the three-year performance of a highly contaminated soil treated by in-situ S/S using MgO-bearing binders and PC. The core quality, strength, permeability and the leaching properties of the S/S materials were evaluated. The effects of binder composition, addition of inorgano-organo-clay (IOC) and the grout content on the properties of the 3-y S/S materials are discussed. It is found that although MgO alone provided negligible strength to the soil, it is superior in immobilising both inorganic and organic contaminants. Replacing MgO by ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) significantly enhanced the strength while also performed well in immobilising the contaminants. The improved pH buffering capacity was attributed to the low solubilities of brucite and hydrotalcite-like phases formed in the MgO-bearing binders, and was also the reason for the improved performance in stabilising contaminants. The addition of IOC slightly decreased the strength and the permeability of the S/S materials but inconsistent effect on the contaminant immobilisation was found depending on the binder composition. This study showed no degradation of the S/S materials after 3 y exposure to field conditions and has proved the applicability and the advantages of MgO-bearing binders over PC in S/S. PMID:26408974

  2. Voluntary head stabilisation in space during oscillatory trunk movements in the frontal plane performed before, during and after a prolonged period of weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Amblard, B; Assaiante, C; Vaugoyeau, M; Baroni, G; Ferrigno, G; Pedotti, A

    2001-03-01

    The ability to voluntarily stabilise the head in space exhibited by two subjects during lateral rhythmic oscillations of the trunk has been investigated before, during and after a prolonged period of microgravity (microG) exposure. In flight acquisitions were performed onboard the Core Module of the Russian Space Station MIR as part of the T4 "Human Posture in Microgravity" experiment of the 179-days ESA-RKA mission EUROMIR-95. Data collection and kinematic analysis were performed by means of a space-qualified version of the automatic motion analyser ELITE. Head stabilisation in space strategy was estimated by means of the head anchoring index and cross-correlation analysis. Results show that head orientation may be well stabilised about the roll axis both with and without the presence of visual information. This was true despite the expected reduction in vestibular efficiency and muscular proprioception occurring in-flight. In one subject, however, vision was found to improve head stabilisation in space post-flight, presumably to recover from the postural deficiency induced by the long-term microG exposure. Head stability during trunk movements was achieved with either over-compensatory (out-of-phase), under-compensatory (in-phase) or mixed movement strategies, as was attested by the analysis of cross-correlation functions between head and shoulder movements. In weightlessness, vision occlusion seemed to influence the choice of the strategies to be used as well as the reduction of movement variability. The feedforward nature of compensatory head movements suggests that head stabilisation could be based in weightlessness on the internal postural body scheme, supposed to be adapted to the weightless environment within 5 months of microG exposure.

  3. Roll stabilisation of road vehicles using a variable stiffness suspension system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anubi, Olugbenga Moses; Crane, Carl D., III

    2013-12-01

    A variable stiffness architecture is used in the suspension system to counteract the body roll moment, thereby enhancing the roll stability of the vehicle. The variation of stiffness concept uses the 'reciprocal actuation' to effectively transfer energy between a vertical traditional strut and a horizontal oscillating control mass, thereby improving the energy dissipation of the overall suspension. The lateral dynamics of the system is developed using a bicycle model. The accompanying roll dynamics are also developed and validated using experimental data. The positions of the left and right control masses are sequentially allocated to reduce the effective body roll and roll rate. Simulation results show that the resulting variable stiffness suspension system has more than 50% improvement in roll response over the traditional constant stiffness counterparts. The simulation scenarios examined is the fishhook manoeuvre.

  4. Nitrification-denitrification in waste stabilisation ponds: a mechanism for permanent nitrogen removal in maturation ponds.

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Read, L F; Mara, D D; Newton, R J; Curtis, T P; Davenport, R J

    2010-01-01

    A pilot-scale primary maturation pond was spiked with (15)N-labelled ammonia ((15)NH(4)Cl) and (15)N-labelled nitrite (Na(15)NO(2)), in order to improve current understanding of the dynamics of inorganic nitrogen transformations and removal in WSP systems. Stable isotope analysis of delta(15)N showed that nitrification could be considered as an intermediate step in WSP, which is masked by simultaneous denitrification, under conditions of low algal activity. Molecular microbiology analysis showed that denitrification can be considered a feasible mechanism for permanent nitrogen removal in WSP, which may be supported either by ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) or by methanotrophs, in addition to nitrite-oxidising bacteria (NOB). However, the relative supremacy of the denitrification process over other nitrogen removal mechanisms (e.g., biological uptake) depends upon phytoplanktonic activity. PMID:20220235

  5. "Hummingbird" behaviour of N-heterocyclic carbenes stabilises out-of-plane bonding of AuCl and CuCl units.

    PubMed

    Teci, Matthieu; Brenner, Eric; Matt, Dominique; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Toupet, Loic

    2015-07-27

    An N-heterocyclic carbene substituted by two expanded 9-ethyl-9-fluorenyl groups was shown to bind an AuCl unit in an unusual manner, namely with the AuX rod sitting out of the plane defined by the heterocyclic carbene unit. As shown by X-ray studies and DFT calculations, the observed large pitch angle (21°) arises from an easy displacement of the gold(I) atom away from the carbene lone-pair axis, combined with the stabilisation provided by weak CH⋅⋅⋅Au interactions involving aliphatic and aromatic H atoms of the NHC wingtips. Weak, intermolecular Cl⋅⋅⋅H bonds are likely to cooperate with the H⋅⋅⋅Au interactions to stabilise the out-of-plane conformation. A general belief until now was that tilt angles in NHC complexes arise mainly from steric effects within the first coordination sphere.

  6. "Hummingbird" behaviour of N-heterocyclic carbenes stabilises out-of-plane bonding of AuCl and CuCl units.

    PubMed

    Teci, Matthieu; Brenner, Eric; Matt, Dominique; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Toupet, Loic

    2015-07-27

    An N-heterocyclic carbene substituted by two expanded 9-ethyl-9-fluorenyl groups was shown to bind an AuCl unit in an unusual manner, namely with the AuX rod sitting out of the plane defined by the heterocyclic carbene unit. As shown by X-ray studies and DFT calculations, the observed large pitch angle (21°) arises from an easy displacement of the gold(I) atom away from the carbene lone-pair axis, combined with the stabilisation provided by weak CH⋅⋅⋅Au interactions involving aliphatic and aromatic H atoms of the NHC wingtips. Weak, intermolecular Cl⋅⋅⋅H bonds are likely to cooperate with the H⋅⋅⋅Au interactions to stabilise the out-of-plane conformation. A general belief until now was that tilt angles in NHC complexes arise mainly from steric effects within the first coordination sphere. PMID:26130507

  7. p-Phosphonic acid calix[8]arene assisted dispersion and stabilisation of pea-pod C60@multi-walled carbon nanotubes in water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianjue; Gibson, Christopher T; Britton, Joshua; Eggers, Paul K; Wahid, M Haniff; Raston, Colin L

    2015-02-11

    A facile approach has been developed for non-covalently stabilising pristine C60 and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in water in the presence of p-phosphonic acid calix[8]arene, along with the formation of a 'pea-pod' encapsulation of the fullerene inside the MWCNTs. Aqueous dispersions of the different carbon nano-materials are readily decorated with palladium nanoparticles.

  8. Output feedback stabilisation of single-input single-output linear systems with I/O network-induced delays. An eigenvalue-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-Barrios, César-Fernando; Niculescu, Silviu-Iulian; Chen, Jie; Maya-Méndez, Mauro

    2014-02-01

    This work addresses the output feedback stabilisation problem for a class of linear single-input single-output systems subject to I/O network delays. More precisely, we are interested in the characterisation of the set of delay and gain parameters guaranteeing the stability of the closed-loop system. To perform such an analysis, we adopt an eigenvalue perturbation based approach. Various illustrative numerical examples complete the presentation.

  9. Diode-pumped Q-switched Nd{sup 3+} : YAG laser operating in a wide temperature range without thermal stabilisation of pump diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshenker, A E; Vilenskiy, A V; Kazakov, A A; Lysoy, B G; Mikhailov, L K; Pashkov, V A

    2013-02-28

    A model sample of a compact low-power-consumption Nd{sup 3+} : YAG laser emitting 20-mJ pulses with a pulse repetition rate up to 20 Hz (in cyclic duty) at a wavelength of 1064 nm is developed and studied. The laser is designed for operating at external temperatures from -40 to +50 deg C. This was achieved by using quasi-end diode pumping without thermal stabilisation of pump diodes. (laser optics 2012)

  10. Posturographic stabilisation of healthy subjects exposed to full-length mirror image is inversely related to body-image preoccupations.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Gian Maria; Monzani, Daniele; Gherpelli, Chiara; Covezzi, Roberta; Guaraldi, Gian Paolo

    2006-12-13

    Affective states, anxiety in particular, have been shown to negatively influence human postural control efficiency as measured by posturographic means, while exposure to a full-length mirror image of one's body exerts a stabilizing effect. We tested the hypothesis that body image concerns and preoccupations would relate negatively to this stabilising effect. Sixty-six healthy students, who screened negative for psychiatric disorders, completed rating scales for anxiety, depression and body image concerns. Posturography recordings of body sway were taken under three conditions: with eyes closed, looking at a vertical bar and looking at a full-length mirror. The Eyes Open/Mirror Stabilometric Quotient [EOMQ=(sway path with eyes closed/sway path looking at the mirror)x100], an index of how much postural control is stabilized by mirror feedback in comparison to the visual vertical bar condition, was significantly inversely related to body image concerns and preoccupations, and to trait anxiety. This finding confirms the impact of emotional factors on human postural control, which warrant further studies. If confirmed in clinical populations characterized by high levels of body image disturbances, e.g. eating disorders, it could lead to developments in the assessment and monitoring of these patients.

  11. Effect of antioxidants and light stabilisers on silver migration from nanosilver-polyethylene composite packaging films into food simulants.

    PubMed

    Su, Qi-Zhi; Lin, Qin-Bao; Chen, Chao-Fang; Wu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Li-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The effect of exposure time, temperature and food simulants, especially additives, on the release of silver from nanosilver-polyethylene composite films to food simulants was studied. Two different type of nanosilver-polyethylene composite films (with or without additives) were chosen to conduct the experiment with the aim of exploring the behaviour of silver migration. It was shown that the migration of silver into 50% ethanol at 40 and 70°C was much less than that into 3% acetic acid. With the increase of exposure time and temperature, the release of silver increased. The migration even continued after a long exposure time (14 days at 20°C, 10 days at 40°C, and 6 days at 70°C respectively). Only about 0.15‰ of silver migrated from composite films with the additives into 3% acetic acid after 6 days of exposure at 70°C, while about 1.3% of silver migrated from composite films that did not contain additives under the same conditions. This could be because the addition of the antioxidants and light stabilisers prevents silver from being oxidised, which is an important way for the release of silver.

  12. Application of X-ray microtomography for the characterisation of hollow polymer-stabilised spray dried amorphous dispersion particles.

    PubMed

    Gamble, John F; Terada, Masako; Holzner, Christian; Lavery, Leah; Nicholson, Sarah J; Timmins, Peter; Tobyn, Mike

    2016-08-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of X-ray microtomography to obtain information relating to powder characteristics such as wall thickness and solid volume fraction for hollow, polymer-stabilised spray dried dispersion (SDD) particles. SDDs of varying particle properties, with respect to shell wall thickness and degree of particle collapse, were utilised to assess the capability of the approach. The results demonstrate that the approach can provide insight into the morphological characteristics of these hollow particles, and thereby a means to understand/predict the processability and performance characteristics of the bulk material. Quantitative assessments of particle wall thickness, particle/void volume and thereby solid volume fraction were also demonstrated to be achievable. The analysis was also shown to be able to qualitatively assess the impact of the drying rate on the morphological nature of the particle surfaces, thus providing further insight into the final particle shape. The approach demonstrated a practical means to access potentially important particle characteristics for SDD materials which, in addition to the standard bulk powder measurements such as particle size and bulk density, may enable a better understanding of such materials, and their impact on downstream processability and dosage form performance.

  13. A review of the factors affecting sunlight inactivation of micro-organisms in waste stabilisation ponds: preliminary results for enterococci.

    PubMed

    Bolton, N F; Cromar, N J; Hallsworth, P; Fallowfield, H J

    2010-01-01

    Waste stabilisation ponds (WSP) are efficient, cost-effective methods of treating wastewater in rural and remote communities in Australia. It is recognised that sunlight plays a significant role in their disinfection, however, due to the poor penetration of light in turbid waters it has been hypothesised that other mechanisms may also contribute to disinfection in WSPs. To date, studies have reported various and conflicting results with regards to the relative contributions of UVA, UVB, PAR and environmental factors including pH, DO and photo-sensitisers on micro-organism disinfection. Initially we investigated the role of these environmental factors on the solar disinfection of enterococci in buffered distilled water to control for potential confounding factors within the wastewater. Die-off rate constants were measured, in sterile buffered distilled water at varying pH and dissolved oxygen concentrations, for enterococci irradiated with UVA and UVB. Enterococci were found to be predominantly inactivated by UVB (p<0.001), however, UVA was also observed to increase inactivation rates relative to the dark control (p<0.001). DO and pH were found to have no effect on inactivation rate when enterococci were irradiated with UVB (p>0.05), however, when irradiated with UVA, both DO and pH were observed to further increase inactivation rates (p<0.01). PMID:20182066

  14. A review of the factors affecting sunlight inactivation of micro-organisms in waste stabilisation ponds: preliminary results for enterococci.

    PubMed

    Bolton, N F; Cromar, N J; Hallsworth, P; Fallowfield, H J

    2010-01-01

    Waste stabilisation ponds (WSP) are efficient, cost-effective methods of treating wastewater in rural and remote communities in Australia. It is recognised that sunlight plays a significant role in their disinfection, however, due to the poor penetration of light in turbid waters it has been hypothesised that other mechanisms may also contribute to disinfection in WSPs. To date, studies have reported various and conflicting results with regards to the relative contributions of UVA, UVB, PAR and environmental factors including pH, DO and photo-sensitisers on micro-organism disinfection. Initially we investigated the role of these environmental factors on the solar disinfection of enterococci in buffered distilled water to control for potential confounding factors within the wastewater. Die-off rate constants were measured, in sterile buffered distilled water at varying pH and dissolved oxygen concentrations, for enterococci irradiated with UVA and UVB. Enterococci were found to be predominantly inactivated by UVB (p<0.001), however, UVA was also observed to increase inactivation rates relative to the dark control (p<0.001). DO and pH were found to have no effect on inactivation rate when enterococci were irradiated with UVB (p>0.05), however, when irradiated with UVA, both DO and pH were observed to further increase inactivation rates (p<0.01).

  15. Model-based operational guidelines of a bioprocess for biological nitrogen removal and complete stabilisation of anaerobically digested sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Morras, M; Larrea, L; García-Heras, J L

    2014-07-01

    The concept of one-stage reactor system for biological nitrogen removal over nitrite of ammonium high loaded sidestreams is going to be applied to remove nitrogen from anaerobically digested sewage sludge and to achieve its complete stabilisation. Dealing with sludge, the organic matter needed to denitrify is present in the inflow as particulate substrate, which requires a hydrolysis step. The latter implies high anoxic hydraulic retention time (HRT). During both aerobic and anoxic phases, ammonium is released which implies the need to enlarge aerobic HRT. Both effects lead to a total HRT higher than those for nitrification-denitrification of wastewater with soluble substrate. The purpose of this paper is to define, by computer simulation, a set of theoretical criteria, which will be applied later to the operation of a pilot-scale post-aeration reactor to be located in a Spanish WWTP. These criteria will be defined by simulating the reactor performance under different operating conditions. As a conclusion, some operation guidelines have been established for the above-mentioned scenario in terms of aerobic and anoxic retention time, dissolved oxygen concentration and effluent requirements (NH(4)(+), NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-)). PMID:24374969

  16. A group-based approach to stabilisation and symptom management in a phased treatment model for refugees and asylum seekers

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Mary E. A.; Blumberg, Jocelyn M.; Gratton, Jacqui L.; Walsh, Eileen G.; Kayal, Hamodi

    2013-01-01

    Background Traumatised asylum seekers and refugees may present with significant and complex mental health problems as a result of prolonged, extreme, and multiple traumatic events. This is further complicated by ongoing complex social circumstances. Concepts In our work at the Traumatic Stress Clinic (TSC), the understanding afforded by the concept of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) together with the related notion of a phased treatment model, provides a useful framework for organising our work with this population. Clinical Applications An explication of complex PTSD as it applies to our client group is presented, followed by a description of our phased treatment model and an outline of the core principles, which guide our clinical approach. Our symptom management and stabilisation groups have been developed and refined over time and draw on techniques from a variety of cognitive behavioural therapies. These are described in some detail with illustrative clinical case vignettes. Conclusion This paper concludes with some reflections on the challenges inherent to working with this complex client group. PMID:24371509

  17. Iterative algorithm to compute the maximal and stabilising solutions of a general class of discrete-time Riccati-type equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragan, Vasile; Morozan, Toader; Stoica, Adrian-Mihail

    2010-04-01

    In this article an iterative method to compute the maximal solution and the stabilising solution, respectively, of a wide class of discrete-time nonlinear equations on the linear space of symmetric matrices is proposed. The class of discrete-time nonlinear equations under consideration contains, as special cases, different types of discrete-time Riccati equations involved in various control problems for discrete-time stochastic systems. This article may be viewed as an addendum of the work of Dragan and Morozan (Dragan, V. and Morozan, T. (2009), 'A Class of Discrete Time Generalized Riccati Equations', Journal of Difference Equations and Applications, first published on 11 December 2009 (iFirst), doi: 10.1080/10236190802389381) where necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of the maximal solution and stabilising solution of this kind of discrete-time nonlinear equations are given. The aim of this article is to provide a procedure for numerical computation of the maximal solution and the stabilising solution, respectively, simpler than the method based on the Newton-Kantorovich algorithm.

  18. Soil acidity determines the effectiveness of an organic amendment and a native bacterium for increasing soil stabilisation in semiarid mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Roldán, A

    2009-01-01

    Unstable mine tailings are vulnerable to water and air erosion, so it is important to promote their surface stabilisation in order to avoid the spread of heavy metals. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste and inoculation with a native bacterium, Bacillus cereus, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two acidic, semiarid mine tailings, with different acidity degree, during watering and drying periods. Organic amendment raised the pH of both the moderately and highly acidic tailings, whereas the bacterial inoculation increased this parameter in the former. Only the amendment addition increased soil water-soluble carbon in both tailings compared with their controls, under either watering or drying conditions. Both the amendment and B. cereus enhanced water-soluble carbohydrates. Both treatments increased dehydrogenase activity and aggregate stability, particularly in the moderately acidic tailing under drying conditions. After soil drying, aggregate stability was increased by the amendment (about 66% higher than the control soil) and by the bacterium (about 45% higher than the control soil) in the moderately acidic tailing. The effectiveness of these treatments as structure-stabilisation methods for degraded, semiarid mine ecosystems appears to be restricted to tailings of moderate acidity. PMID:18954889

  19. Soil acidity determines the effectiveness of an organic amendment and a native bacterium for increasing soil stabilisation in semiarid mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Roldán, A

    2009-01-01

    Unstable mine tailings are vulnerable to water and air erosion, so it is important to promote their surface stabilisation in order to avoid the spread of heavy metals. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste and inoculation with a native bacterium, Bacillus cereus, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two acidic, semiarid mine tailings, with different acidity degree, during watering and drying periods. Organic amendment raised the pH of both the moderately and highly acidic tailings, whereas the bacterial inoculation increased this parameter in the former. Only the amendment addition increased soil water-soluble carbon in both tailings compared with their controls, under either watering or drying conditions. Both the amendment and B. cereus enhanced water-soluble carbohydrates. Both treatments increased dehydrogenase activity and aggregate stability, particularly in the moderately acidic tailing under drying conditions. After soil drying, aggregate stability was increased by the amendment (about 66% higher than the control soil) and by the bacterium (about 45% higher than the control soil) in the moderately acidic tailing. The effectiveness of these treatments as structure-stabilisation methods for degraded, semiarid mine ecosystems appears to be restricted to tailings of moderate acidity.

  20. Evaluation of a lime-mediated sewage sludge stabilisation process. Product characterisation and technological validation for its use in the cement industry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, N Husillos; Granados, R J; Blanco-Varela, M T; Cortina, J L; Martínez-Ramírez, S; Marsal, M; Guillem, M; Puig, J; Fos, C; Larrotcha, E; Flores, J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes an industrial process for stabilising sewage sludge (SS) with lime and evaluates the viability of the stabilised product, denominated Neutral, as a raw material for the cement industry. Lime not only stabilised the sludge, raised the temperature of the mix to 80-100°C, furthering water evaporation, portlandite formation and the partial oxidation of the organic matter present in the sludge. Process mass and energy balances were determined. Neutral, a white powder consisting of portlandite (49.8%), calcite (16.6%), inorganic oxides (13.4%) and organic matter and moisture (20.2%), proved to be technologically apt for inclusion as a component in cement raw mixes. In this study, it was used instead of limestone in raw mixes clinkerised at 1400, 1450 and 1500°C. These raw meals exhibited greater reactivity at high temperatures than the limestone product and their calcination at 1500°C yielded clinker containing over 75% calcium silicates, the key phases in Portland clinker. Finally, the two types of raw meal (Neutral and limestone) were observed to exhibit similar mineralogy and crystal size and distribution.

  1. Development of Tools and Techniques to Survey, Assess, Stabilise, Monitor and Preserve Underwater Archaeological Sites: SASMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    SASMAP's purpose is to develop new technologies and best practices in order to locate, assess and manage Europe's underwater cultural heritage in a more effective way than is possible today. SASMAP has taken an holistic- and process- based approach to investigating underwater environments and the archaeological sites contained therein. End user of the results of SASMAP are severalfold; i) to benefiet the SMEs involved in the project and development of their products for the offshore industry (not just for archaeological purposes) ii) a better understanding of the marine environment and its effect on archaeological materials iii) the collation of the results from the project into guidelines that can be used by cultural resource managers to better administer and optimise developer lead underwater archaeological project within Europe in accordance with European legislation (Treaty of Valetta (1992). Summarily the project has utilised a down scaling approach to localise archaeological sites at a large scale regional level. This has involved using innovative satellite imagery to obtain seamless topography maps over coastal areas and the seabed (accurate to a depth of 6m) as well as the development of a 3D sub bottom profiler to look within the seabed. Results obtained from the downscaling approach at the study areas in the project (Greece and Denmark) have enabled geological models to be developed inorder to work towards predictive modelling of where submerged prehistoric sites may be encountered. Once sites have been located an upscaling approach has been taken to assessing an individual site and the materials on and within it in order to better understand the state of preservation and dynamic conditions of a site and how it can best be preserved through in situ preservation or excavation. This has involved the development of equipment to monitor the seabed environment (open water and in sediments), equipment for sampling sediments and assessing the state of

  2. On the nature and origin of garnet in highly-refractory Archean lithosphere: implications for continent stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sally

    2014-05-01

    The nature and timescales of garnet formation in the Earth's subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) are important to our understanding of how this rigid outer shell has evolved and stabilised since the Archean. Nevertheless, the widespread occurrence of pyrope garnet in the sub-cratonic mantle remains one of the 'holy grails' of mantle petrology. The paradox is that garnet often occurs in mantle lithologies (dunites and harzburgites) which represent residues of major melting events (up to 40 %) whereas experimental studies on fertile peridotite suggest this phase should be exhausted by <20 % melting. Furthermore, garnets commonly found in mantle peridotite suites have diverse compositions that are typically in equilibrium with high-pressure, small-fraction, mantle melts suggesting they formed as a result of enrichment of the lithospheric mantle following cratonisation. This refertilisation -- which typically involves addition of Fe, incompatible trace elements and volatiles -- affects the lower 30 km of the lithosphere and potentially leads to negative buoyancy and destabilisation. Pyrope garnets found in mantle xenoliths from the eastern margin of the Tanzanian Craton (Lashaine) have diverse compositions and provide major constraints on how the underlying deep (120 to 160 km) mantle stabilised and evolved during the last 3 billion years. The garnets display systematic trends from ultra-depleted to enriched compositions that have not been recognised in peridotite suites from elsewhere (Gibson et al., 2013). Certain harzburgite members of the xenolith suite contain the first reported occurrence of pyrope garnets with rare-earth element (REE) patterns similar to hypothetical garnets proposed by Stachel et al. (2004) to have formed in the Earth's SCLM during the Archean, prior to metasomatism. These rare ultra-depleted low-Cr garnets occur in low temperature (~1050 oC) xenoliths derived from depths of ~120 km and coexist in chemical and textural equilibrium with

  3. Bathochromic and stabilising effects of sugar beet pectin and an isolated pectic fraction on anthocyanins exhibiting pyrogallol and catechol moieties.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2012-12-15

    The formation of anthocyanin-metal chelates, exhibiting intense blue colours was monitored over a period up to 10 weeks. Evaluating normalised absorption spectra in the range of 580-700 nm and their proportion of the total area under the curve (AUC), provided information about the blue colour hue, intensity and stability. Colour stability in model solutions containing commercial sugar beet pectin or an isolated pectic polysaccharide fraction (PPF) therefrom, both being naturally enriched in aluminium and ferric ions, was assessed in a pH range of 3.6-7.0. The pectic structures stabilised anthocyanin-metal chelates, and thus blue colours by efficiently preventing complex precipitation. Highest bathochromic shifts and most intense blue colours were observed in PPF model solutions containing delphinidin-3-glucoside (Dpd-3-glc), exhibiting a pyrogallol moiety in the flavylium B-ring, compared to cyanidin- (Cyd-3-glc) and petunidin-3-glucoside (Pet-3-glc), both carrying a catechol substituted B-ring. Hue and intensity of the blue colour at pH 5.0 were only insignificantly influenced by the buffer system except for citrate and phosphate buffers, which both annihilated anthocyanin-metal chelate formation. The blue colours faded following first order kinetics. Best stabilities as deduced from storage experiments performed at 20 ± 2°C in the dark were observed for Dpd-3-glc. In contrast, Cyd-3-glc displayed shortened half-life values, whereas blue Pet-3-glc chelates decomposed rapidly. These results demonstrate that the solubilisation of anthocyanin-metal chelates by pectic structures is a promising option for developing water soluble natural blue food colourants.

  4. Strontium- and calcium-containing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with prolonged degradation for orthopaedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Al Qaysi, Mustafa; Walters, Nick J; Foroutan, Farzad; Owens, Gareth J; Kim, Hae-Won; Shah, Rishma; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-09-01

    Strontium- and calcium-releasing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with a controlled degradation rate are currently under development for orthopaedic tissue engineering applications. Ca and/or Sr were incorporated at varying concentrations in quaternary phosphate-based glasses, in order to promote osteoinduction. Ti was incorporated at a fixed concentration in order to prolong degradation. Glasses of the general formula (P2O5)-(Na2O)-(TiO2)-(CaO)-(SrO) were prepared via the melt-quench technique. The materials were characterised by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis and density determination. The dissolution rate in distilled water was determined by measuring mass loss, ion release and pH change over a two-week period. In addition, the cytocompatibility and alkaline phosphatase activity of an osteoblast-like cell line cultured on the surface of glass discs was assessed. The glasses were shown to be amorphous and contained Q(1), Q(2) and Q(3) species. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed small changes in the glass structure as Ca was substituted with Sr and differential thermal analysis confirmed a decrease in crystallisation temperature with increasing Sr content. Degradation and ion release studies also showed that mass loss was positively correlated with Sr content. These results were attributed to the lower electronegativity of Sr in comparison to Ca favouring the formation of phosphate-based mineral phases. All compositions supported cell proliferation and survival and induced at least 2.3-fold alkaline phosphatase activity relative to the control. Glass containing 17.5 mol% Sr had 3.6-fold greater alkaline phosphatase activity than the control. The gradual release of Ca and Sr supported osteoinduction, indicating their potential suitability in orthopaedic tissue engineering applications.

  5. Mechanical and leaching behaviour of slag-cement and lime-activated slag stabilised/solidified contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2011-05-01

    Stabilisation/solidification (S/S) is an effective technique for reducing the leachability of contaminants in soils. Very few studies have investigated the use of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) for S/S treatment of contaminated soils, although it has been shown to be effective in ground improvement. This study sought to investigate the potential of GGBS activated by cement and lime for S/S treatment of a mixed contaminated soil. A sandy soil spiked with 3000mg/kg each of a cocktail of heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu and Pb) and 10,000mg/kg of diesel was treated with binder blends of one part hydrated lime to four parts GGBS (lime-slag), and one part cement to nine parts GGBS (slag-cement). Three binder dosages, 5, 10 and 20% (m/m) were used and contaminated soil-cement samples were compacted to their optimum water contents. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed using unconfined compressive strength (UCS), permeability and acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) tests with determination of contaminant leachability at the different acid additions. UCS values of up to 800kPa were recorded at 28days. The lowest coefficient of permeability recorded was 5×10(-9)m/s. With up to 20% binder dosage, the leachability of the contaminants was reduced to meet relevant environmental quality standards and landfill waste acceptance criteria. The pH-dependent leachability of the metals decreased over time. The results show that GGBS activated by cement and lime would be effective in reducing the leachability of contaminants in contaminated soils. PMID:21420148

  6. Stabilising metal(loid)s in soil with iron and aluminium-based products: microbial, biochemical and plant growth impact.

    PubMed

    Garau, Giovanni; Silvetti, Margherita; Castaldi, Paola; Mele, Elena; Deiana, Pietrino; Deiana, Salvatore

    2014-06-15

    Four iron and aluminium-based products, including red mud (RM), hematite (Fe2O3), an iron-rich water treatment residual (Fe-WTR) and amorphous Al hydroxide (Al-OH), were evaluated for their effectiveness at stabilising As and heavy metals (i.e. Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) in a circumneutral contaminated soil [As (2105 mg kg(-1)), Cd (18 mg kg(-1)), Cu (264 mg kg(-1)), Pb (710 mg kg(-1)), Zn (522 mg kg(-1))]. Treatment impacts on soil microbial and biochemical features (i.e. microbial biomass-C, microbial counts, 16S rRNA PCR-TTGE of culturable bacteria, dehydrogenase, urease and β-glucosidase activity, Biolog derived parameters-AWCD and richness) as well as bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum vulgare) growth were also assessed. After 6 months equilibration, all the amendments (application rate 3% w/w) but RM reduced labile As while only Al-OH reduced the concentration of water-soluble heavy metals. Despite the highest bioavailability of contaminants, most of the soil microbial and biochemical features monitored (i.e. microbial biomass-C, total bacterial counts, dehydrogenase activity and AWCD) were significantly higher in the RM-soil. Bean germination was completely inhibited in RM-soil while wheat growth was similar to that of the control. The Al-OH treatment was best overall, promoting microbial abundance, diversity and activity while increasing bean and wheat growth and reducing As accumulated in plant shoots. Results suggest that Al-OH is a suitable candidate for field evaluations while the use of RM in the remediation of circumneutral or subalkaline contaminated soils should be reconsidered. PMID:24685456

  7. Mechanical and leaching behaviour of slag-cement and lime-activated slag stabilised/solidified contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2011-05-01

    Stabilisation/solidification (S/S) is an effective technique for reducing the leachability of contaminants in soils. Very few studies have investigated the use of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) for S/S treatment of contaminated soils, although it has been shown to be effective in ground improvement. This study sought to investigate the potential of GGBS activated by cement and lime for S/S treatment of a mixed contaminated soil. A sandy soil spiked with 3000mg/kg each of a cocktail of heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu and Pb) and 10,000mg/kg of diesel was treated with binder blends of one part hydrated lime to four parts GGBS (lime-slag), and one part cement to nine parts GGBS (slag-cement). Three binder dosages, 5, 10 and 20% (m/m) were used and contaminated soil-cement samples were compacted to their optimum water contents. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed using unconfined compressive strength (UCS), permeability and acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) tests with determination of contaminant leachability at the different acid additions. UCS values of up to 800kPa were recorded at 28days. The lowest coefficient of permeability recorded was 5×10(-9)m/s. With up to 20% binder dosage, the leachability of the contaminants was reduced to meet relevant environmental quality standards and landfill waste acceptance criteria. The pH-dependent leachability of the metals decreased over time. The results show that GGBS activated by cement and lime would be effective in reducing the leachability of contaminants in contaminated soils.

  8. Strontium- and calcium-containing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with prolonged degradation for orthopaedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Al Qaysi, Mustafa; Walters, Nick J; Foroutan, Farzad; Owens, Gareth J; Kim, Hae-Won; Shah, Rishma; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-09-01

    Strontium- and calcium-releasing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with a controlled degradation rate are currently under development for orthopaedic tissue engineering applications. Ca and/or Sr were incorporated at varying concentrations in quaternary phosphate-based glasses, in order to promote osteoinduction. Ti was incorporated at a fixed concentration in order to prolong degradation. Glasses of the general formula (P2O5)-(Na2O)-(TiO2)-(CaO)-(SrO) were prepared via the melt-quench technique. The materials were characterised by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis and density determination. The dissolution rate in distilled water was determined by measuring mass loss, ion release and pH change over a two-week period. In addition, the cytocompatibility and alkaline phosphatase activity of an osteoblast-like cell line cultured on the surface of glass discs was assessed. The glasses were shown to be amorphous and contained Q(1), Q(2) and Q(3) species. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed small changes in the glass structure as Ca was substituted with Sr and differential thermal analysis confirmed a decrease in crystallisation temperature with increasing Sr content. Degradation and ion release studies also showed that mass loss was positively correlated with Sr content. These results were attributed to the lower electronegativity of Sr in comparison to Ca favouring the formation of phosphate-based mineral phases. All compositions supported cell proliferation and survival and induced at least 2.3-fold alkaline phosphatase activity relative to the control. Glass containing 17.5 mol% Sr had 3.6-fold greater alkaline phosphatase activity than the control. The gradual release of Ca and Sr supported osteoinduction, indicating their potential suitability in orthopaedic tissue engineering applications

  9. Strontium- and calcium-containing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with prolonged degradation for orthopaedic tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Al Qaysi, Mustafa; Walters, Nick J; Foroutan, Farzad; Owens, Gareth J; Kim, Hae-Won; Shah, Rishma

    2015-01-01

    Strontium- and calcium-releasing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with a controlled degradation rate are currently under development for orthopaedic tissue engineering applications. Ca and/or Sr were incorporated at varying concentrations in quaternary phosphate-based glasses, in order to promote osteoinduction. Ti was incorporated at a fixed concentration in order to prolong degradation. Glasses of the general formula (P2O5)–(Na2O)–(TiO2)–(CaO)–(SrO) were prepared via the melt-quench technique. The materials were characterised by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis and density determination. The dissolution rate in distilled water was determined by measuring mass loss, ion release and pH change over a two-week period. In addition, the cytocompatibility and alkaline phosphatase activity of an osteoblast-like cell line cultured on the surface of glass discs was assessed. The glasses were shown to be amorphous and contained Q1, Q2 and Q3 species. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed small changes in the glass structure as Ca was substituted with Sr and differential thermal analysis confirmed a decrease in crystallisation temperature with increasing Sr content. Degradation and ion release studies also showed that mass loss was positively correlated with Sr content. These results were attributed to the lower electronegativity of Sr in comparison to Ca favouring the formation of phosphate-based mineral phases. All compositions supported cell proliferation and survival and induced at least 2.3-fold alkaline phosphatase activity relative to the control. Glass containing 17.5 mol% Sr had 3.6-fold greater alkaline phosphatase activity than the control. The gradual release of Ca and Sr supported osteoinduction, indicating their potential suitability in orthopaedic tissue engineering applications

  10. Anaerobic stabilisation and conversion of biopolymers in primary sludge--effect of temperature and sludge retention time.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Nidal; Zeeman, Grietje; Gijzen, Huub; Lettinga, Gatze

    2004-02-01

    The effect of sludge retention time (SRT) and process temperature on the hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis of primary sludge was investigated in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). The CSTRs were operated to maintain SRTs of 10, 15, 20 and 30 days at process temperatures of 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C. The rates of hydrolysis and the biodegradability of primary sludge were assessed in batch reactors incubated at 15 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C. The results revealed that the major amount of sludge stabilisation occurred between 0 and 10 days at 35 degrees C and 10 and 15 days at 25 degrees C. Hydrolysis was found to be the rate limiting-step of the overall digestion process, for the reactors operated at 35 degrees C and 25 degrees C, except for the reactor operated at 10 days and 25 degrees C. At the latter conditions, methanogenesis was the rate-limiting step of the overall digestion process. Proteins hydrolysis was limited to a maximum value of 39% at 30 days and 35 degrees C due to proteins availability in the form of biomass. The biodegradability of primary sludge was around 60%, and showed no temperature dependency. The hydrolysis of the main biopolymers and overall particulate COD of the primary sludge digested in CSTRs were well described by first-order kinetics, in case hydrolysis was the rate-limiting step. Similarly, the hydrolysis of the overall particulate COD of the primary sludge digested in batch reactors were described by first-order kinetics and revealed strong temperature dependency, which follows Arrhenius equation.

  11. Biotribology of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design--effect of motion restraint on wear, tibio-femoral kinematics and particles.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Thomas M; Schroeder, Christian; Kyun Kim, Tae; Miehlke, Rolf K; Fritz, Bernhard; Jansson, Volkmar; Utzschneider, Sandra

    2014-07-18

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of a biphaseal anterior-posterior (AP) and internal-external (IE) motion restraint system on the wear behaviour, tibio-femoral kinematics and particle release of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design in comparison to the widely used linear restraint. in vitro wear simulation was performed using a posterior stabilised total knee replacement with a mobile rotating platform gliding surface design to compare the standard ISO 14243-1:2002 (E) protocol with a linear AP and IE motion restraint and the new ISO 14243-1:2009 (E) protocol with a biphaseal AP and IE motion restraint. For the mobile gliding surfaces, an increase in wear rate by more than a magnitude was measured applying the biphaseal protocol (8.5±1.6 mg/million cycles) in a direct comparison to the linear protocol (0.33±0.07 mg/million cycles), with statistically significant difference. The amplitudes of AP displacement were 3.22±0.47 mm for the biphaseal test, compared to 1.97±0.22 mm in the linear test and the amplitudes of the IE rotation angle had mean values of 7.32°±0.91° under the biphaseal setup, compared to 1.97°±0.14° under linear motion restraint test conditions. From our observations, we conclude that the changes in AP translation and IE rotation motion restraints from ISO linear to ISO biphaseal test conditions highly impact the knee joint kinematics and wear behaviour of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design. PMID:24837220

  12. Electronic structure calculations and physicochemical experiments quantify the competitive liquid ion association and probe stabilisation effects for nitrobenzospiropyran in phosphonium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Damien; Coleman, Simon; Diamond, Dermot; Byrne, Robert

    2011-04-01

    Liquid ion association in ionic liquids (ILs) has been examined using a comprehensive series of electronic structure calculations that measure the relative extents of ion association and probe stabilisation for the photochromic dye nitrobenzospiropyran (BSP) in a range of ILs featuring both long-tailed phosphonium cations and short-tailed imidazolium cations, paired with both chloride and NTf(2) anions. New physicochemical experiments measured the photochromic properties of BSP in the phosphonium-based room temperature ILs. Taken together, the computed complexation energies and measured spectroscopic properties support recent Walden plots of unusual conductivity-viscosity behaviour obtained for the same ILs and reveal some new features in the atom-scale structure and energetics of local, ion-ion and ion-molecule interactions. Calculations show inter-ion interactions strengthened by between 0.4 and 0.7 eV as stronger constituent ions are used, which contributes to the longer range rigidity of the Cl-based IL structure as reflected in the doubled |zwitterion → closed| probe relaxation time measured for Cl(-)vs. NTf(2)(-) in phosphonium-based ILs. Calculations further reveal a similar, approximately 0.6-0.7 eV maximum "residual" IL headgroup-mediated probe stabilisation potentially available for the anion-probe-cation complexes via the stabilising interaction that remains following the "quenching" interaction between the IL anion and cation. This potential stabilisation, however, is offset by both longer-range charge networks, beyond the scope of the current purely quantum mechanical simulations, and also energetic penalties for disruption of the highly-interdigitated alkyl tail networks in the phosphonium-based ILs which may be estimated from known diffusion data. Overall the electronic calculations of local, individual ion-ion and ion-molecule interactions serve to clarify some of the measured physicochemical properties and provide new data for the development of

  13. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-04-30

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  14. Precise modulation of laser radiation by an acousto-optic modulator for stabilisation of the Nd : YAG laser on optical resonances in molecular iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, V. I.; Ignatovich, S. M.; Kvashnin, N. L.; Skvortsov, M. N.; Farnosov, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    A system of precise frequency modulation of laser radiation by an acousto-optic modulator, which makes it possible to stabilise the radiation power and simultaneously suppress the residual amplitude modulation to a level of 10-8 of the total laser power at the third harmonic of modulation frequency (~500 Hz), is presented. The use of this system for the Nd : YAG/I2 optical frequency standard and application of digital signal synthesis and processing methods provided a level of frequency standard instability as small as ~10-15 for ~6 × 104 s.

  15. Spinal segmental stabilisation exercises for chronic low back pain: programme adherence and its influence on clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Mannion, Anne F; Helbling, Daniel; Pulkovski, Natascha; Sprott, Haiko

    2009-12-01

    Exercise rehabilitation is one of the few evidence-based treatments for chronic non-specific low back pain (cLBP), but individual success is notoriously variable and may depend on the patient's adherence to the prescribed exercise regime. This prospective study examined factors associated with adherence and the relationship between adherence and outcome after a programme of physiotherapeutic spine stabilisation exercises. A total of 32/37 patients with cLBP completed the study (mean age, 44.0 (SD = 12.3) years; 11/32 (34%) male). Adherence to the 9-week programme was documented as: percent attendance at therapy, percent adherence to daily home exercises (patient diary) and percent commitment to rehabilitation (Sports Injury Rehabilitation Adherence Scale (SIRAS)). The average of these three measures formed a multidimensional adherence index (MAI). Psychological disturbance, fear-avoidance beliefs, catastrophising, exercise self-efficacy and health locus of control were measured by questionnaire; disability in everyday activities was scored with the Roland-Morris disability scale and back pain intensity with a 0-10 graphic rating scale. Overall, adherence to therapy was very good (average MAI score, 85%; median (IQR), 89 (15)%). The only psychological/beliefs variable showing a unique significant association with MAI was exercise self-efficacy (Rho = 0.36, P = 0.045). Pain intensity and self-rated disability decreased significantly after therapy (each P < 0.01). Adherence to home exercises showed a moderate, positive correlation with the reduction in average pain (Rho = 0.54, P = 0.003) and disability (Rho = 0.38, P = 0.036); higher MAI scores were associated with greater reductions in average pain (Rho = 0.48, P = 0.008) and a (n.s.) tendency for greater reductions in disability (Rho = 0.32, P = 0.07) Neither attendance at therapy nor SIRAS were significantly related to any of the outcomes. The benefits of rehabilitation depended to a large extent on the patient

  16. Stabilisation of matrix polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, R.

    2015-10-01

    A state feedback is proposed to analyse the stability of a matrix polynomial in closed loop. First, it is shown that a matrix polynomial is stable if and only if a state space realisation of a ladder form of certain transfer matrix is stable. Following the ideas of the Routh-Hurwitz stability procedure for scalar polynomials, certain continued-fraction expansions of polynomial matrices are carrying out by unimodular matrices to achieve the Euclid's division algorithm which leads to an extension of the well-known Routh-Hurwitz stability criteria but this time in terms of matrix coefficients. After that, stability of the closed-loop matrix polynomial is guaranteed based on a Corollary of a Lyapunov Theorem. The sufficient stability conditions are: (i) The matrices of one column of the presented array must be symmetric and positive definite and (ii) the matrices of the cascade realisation must satisfy a commutative condition. These stability conditions are also necessary for matrix polynomial of second order. The results are illustrated through examples.

  17. Effects of different crosslinking conditions on the chemical-physical properties of a novel bio-inspired composite scaffold stabilised with 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether (BDDGE).

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, A; Fiorini, M; Paolillo, J; Dolcini, L; Sandri, M; Pressato, D

    2013-01-01

    Serious cartilage lesions (Outerbridge III, IV) may be successfully treated with a three-layered gradient scaffold made by magnesium-doped hydroxyapatite and type I collagen, manufactured through a bio-inspired process and stabilised by a reactive bis-epoxy (1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, BDDGE). Each layer was analysed to elucidate the effects of crosslinking variables (concentration, temperature and pH). The chemical stabilisation led to an homogeneous and aligned collagenous matrix: the fibrous structures switched to a laminar foils-based arrangement and organic phases acquired an highly coordinated 3D-organization. These morphological features were strongly evident when crosslinking occurred in alkaline solution, with BDDGE concentration of at least 1 wt%. The optimised crosslinking conditions did not affect the apatite nano-crystals nucleated into self-assembling collagen fibres. The present work allowed to demonstrate that acting on BDDGE reaction parameters might be an useful tool to control the chemical-physical properties of bio-inspired scaffold suitable to heal wide osteochondral defects, even through arthroscopic procedure.

  18. Comparison between Long- and Short-Acting Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents in the Period Required for Haemoglobin Stabilisation in Treatment of Anaemia in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Matsushita, Ayako; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Nishibe, Seira; Noguchi, Ayaka; Kato, Rina; Toda, Takahiro; Tanaka, Junko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hiroki; Yuzawa, Yukio; Yamada, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    Comparative studies of the potency of long- and short-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (L-ESAs and S-ESAs) on erythropoietic activity in patients with chronic kidney disease without dialysis have not been performed, although L-ESAs are used in many countries. We performed a retrospective analysis of non-dialysis (ND) patients who had received L-ESA or S-ESA. More days were needed for the S-ESA-treated group (368 d) to reach the haemoglobin (Hb) reference range than for the L-ESA-treated group (126 d). Therefore, we investigated risk factors that influence the period until the Hb level reaches the reference range. Patients were classified into two groups by the period until the Hb level was stabilised within the reference range: the short- and long-term group. Two risk factors for delayed Hb stabilisation were identified: age ≥60 years; and administration of an S-ESA for initial treatment. These findings suggest that the Hb level should be carefully monitored during ESA therapy in elderly ND patients, and that the ESA dose should be increased or L-ESA therapy should be utilised to treat renal anaemia.

  19. The performance of blended conventional and novel binders in the in-situ stabilisation/solidification of a contaminated site soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hailing; Jin, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2015-03-21

    This paper presents an investigation of the effects of novel binders and pH values on the effectiveness of the in-situ stabilisation/solidification technique in treating heavy metals and organic contaminated soils after 1.5-year treatment. To evaluate the performance of different binders, made ground soils of SMiRT site, upto 5 m depth, were stabilised/solidified with the triple auger system and cores were taken for laboratory testing after treatment. Twenty four different binders were used including Portland cement (PC), ground granulated blastfurnace slag (GGBS), pulverised fuel ash (PFA), MgO and zeolite. Unconfined compressive strength (UCS), leachate pH and the leachability of heavy metals and total organics were applied to study the behaviours of binders in treating site soils. Under various contaminant level and binder level, the results show that UCS values were 22-3476 kPa, the leachability of the total organics was in the range of 22-241 mg/l and the heavy metals was in the range of 0.002-0.225 mg/l. In addition, the combination of GGBS and MgO at a ratio of 9:1 shows better immobilisation efficiency in treating heavy metals and organic contaminated soils after 1.5-year treatment, and the binding mechanisms under different binders were also discussed in this paper. PMID:25479144

  20. Effectiveness of chemical amendments for stabilisation of lead and antimony in risk-based land management of soils of shooting ranges.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to examine the effectiveness of amendments for risk-based land management of shooting range soils and to explore the effectiveness of amendments applied to sites with differing soil physiochemical parameters. A series of amendments with differing mechanisms for stabilisation were applied to four shooting range soils and aged for 1 year. Chemical stabilisation was monitored by pore water extraction, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) over 1 year. The performance of amendments when applied in conditions reflecting field application did not match the performance in the batch studies. Pore water-extractable metals were not greatly affected by amendment addition. TCLP-extractable Pb was reduced significantly by amendments, particularly lime and magnesium oxide. Antimony leaching was reduced by red mud but mobilised by some of the other amendments. Bioaccessible Pb measured by PBET shows that bioaccessible Pb increased with time after an initial decrease due to the presence of metallic fragments in the soil. Amendments were able to reduce bioaccessible Pb by up to 50 %. Bioaccessible Sb was not readily reduced by soil amendments. Soil amendments were not equally effective across the four soils. PMID:23807560

  1. Effectiveness of chemical amendments for stabilisation of lead and antimony in risk-based land management of soils of shooting ranges.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to examine the effectiveness of amendments for risk-based land management of shooting range soils and to explore the effectiveness of amendments applied to sites with differing soil physiochemical parameters. A series of amendments with differing mechanisms for stabilisation were applied to four shooting range soils and aged for 1 year. Chemical stabilisation was monitored by pore water extraction, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) over 1 year. The performance of amendments when applied in conditions reflecting field application did not match the performance in the batch studies. Pore water-extractable metals were not greatly affected by amendment addition. TCLP-extractable Pb was reduced significantly by amendments, particularly lime and magnesium oxide. Antimony leaching was reduced by red mud but mobilised by some of the other amendments. Bioaccessible Pb measured by PBET shows that bioaccessible Pb increased with time after an initial decrease due to the presence of metallic fragments in the soil. Amendments were able to reduce bioaccessible Pb by up to 50 %. Bioaccessible Sb was not readily reduced by soil amendments. Soil amendments were not equally effective across the four soils.

  2. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M.; Marincel, Daniel M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M.; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D.; Fraleigh, Robert D.; Ross, Ian M.; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Mark Rainforth, W.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)3+ Fe3+O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community. PMID:26272264

  3. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M; Marincel, Daniel M; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D; Fraleigh, Robert D; Ross, Ian M; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Rainforth, W Mark

    2015-08-14

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)(3+) Fe(3+)O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community.

  4. Bioaccumulation of metals in ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) following the application of lime stabilised, thermally dried and anaerobically digested sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; Ryan, P C; Fenton, O; Peyton, D P; Wall, D P; Morrison, L

    2016-08-01

    The uptake and accumulation of metals in plants is a potential pathway for the transfer of environmental contaminants in the food chain, and poses potential health and environmental risks. In light of increased population growth and urbanisation, the safe disposal of sewage sludge, which can contain significant levels of toxic contaminants, remains an environmental challenge globally. The aims of this experiment were to apply municipal sludge, having undergone treatment by thermal drying, anaerobic digestion, and lime stabilisation, to permanent grassland in order to assess the bioaccumulation of metals (B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Nb, Mo, Sb, Ba, W, Pb, Fe, Cd) by perennial ryegrass over a period of up to 18 weeks after application. The legislation currently prohibits use of grassland for fodder or grazing for at least three weeks after application of treated sewage sludge (biosolids). Five treatments were used: thermally dried (TD), anaerobically digested (AD) and lime stabilised (LS) sludge all from one wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), AD sludge from another WWTP, and a study control (grassland only, without application of biosolids). In general, there was no significant difference in metal content of the ryegrass between micro-plots that received treated municipal sludge and the control over the study duration. The metal content of the ryegrass was below the levels at which phytotoxicity occurs and below the maximum levels specified for animal feeds. PMID:27174047

  5. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M; Marincel, Daniel M; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D; Fraleigh, Robert D; Ross, Ian M; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Rainforth, W Mark

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)(3+) Fe(3+)O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community. PMID:26272264

  6. Bioaccumulation of metals in ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) following the application of lime stabilised, thermally dried and anaerobically digested sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; Ryan, P C; Fenton, O; Peyton, D P; Wall, D P; Morrison, L

    2016-08-01

    The uptake and accumulation of metals in plants is a potential pathway for the transfer of environmental contaminants in the food chain, and poses potential health and environmental risks. In light of increased population growth and urbanisation, the safe disposal of sewage sludge, which can contain significant levels of toxic contaminants, remains an environmental challenge globally. The aims of this experiment were to apply municipal sludge, having undergone treatment by thermal drying, anaerobic digestion, and lime stabilisation, to permanent grassland in order to assess the bioaccumulation of metals (B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Nb, Mo, Sb, Ba, W, Pb, Fe, Cd) by perennial ryegrass over a period of up to 18 weeks after application. The legislation currently prohibits use of grassland for fodder or grazing for at least three weeks after application of treated sewage sludge (biosolids). Five treatments were used: thermally dried (TD), anaerobically digested (AD) and lime stabilised (LS) sludge all from one wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), AD sludge from another WWTP, and a study control (grassland only, without application of biosolids). In general, there was no significant difference in metal content of the ryegrass between micro-plots that received treated municipal sludge and the control over the study duration. The metal content of the ryegrass was below the levels at which phytotoxicity occurs and below the maximum levels specified for animal feeds.

  7. Longitudinally diode-pumped 1.06-{mu}m Nd{sup 3+}:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} laser without pump-wavelength stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Subbotin, Kirill A; Ushakov, S N; Onishchenko, A M; Romanyuk, V A; Shestakov, A V

    2006-01-31

    The spectral and lasing characteristics of a Nd{sup 3+}:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal longitudinally diode-pumped without pump-wavelength stabilisation are studied. A variation in the output power did not exceed 30% when the pump wavelength was changed in the spectral region from 0.794 to 0.811 {mu}m. (lasers)

  8. On the use of the stabilised Q1P0 element for geodynamical simulations and why this is a bad choice for buyoancy-driven flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Many Finite Element geodynamical codes (Fullsack,1995; Zhong et al., 2000; Thieulot, 2011) are based on bi/tri­-linear velocity constant pressure element (commonly called Q1P0), because of its ease of programming and rather low memory footprint, despite the presence of (pressure) checker­board modes. However, it is long known that the Q1P0 is not inf­-sup stable and does not lend itself to the use of iterative solvers, which makes it a less­ than­ ideal candidate for high resolution 3D models. Other attempts were made more recently (Burstedde et al., 2013; Le Pourhiet et al., 2012) with the use of the stabilised Q1Q1 element (bi/tri­-linear velocity and pressure). This element, while also attractive from an implementation and memory standpoint, suffers a major drawback due to the artificial compressibility introduced by the polynomial projection stabilization. These observations have shifted part of the community towards the Finite Difference Method while the remaining part is now embracing inf­sup stable second­ order elements [May et al., 2015; Kronbichler,2012). Rather surprinsingly, a third option exists when it comes to first ­order elements in the form of the stabilised Q1P0 element, but virtually no literature exists concerning its use for geodynamical applications. I will then recall the specificity of the stabilisation and will carry out a series of benchmark experiments and geodynamical tests to assess its performance. While being shown to work as expected in benchmark experiments, the stabilised Q1P0 element turns out to introduce first-order numerical artefacts in the velocity and pressure solutions in the case of buoyancy-driven flows. Burstedde, C., Stadler, G., Alisic, L., Wilcox, L. C., Tan, E., Gurnis, M., & Ghattas, O. (2013). Large­scale adaptive mantle convection simulation. Geophysical Journal International, 192(3), 889­906. Fullsack, P. (1995). An arbitrary Lagrangian­Eulerian formulation for creeping flows and its application in

  9. Highly efficient stabilisation of meta-ethynylpyridine polymers with amide side chains in water by coordination of rare-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Makida, Hiroki; Abe, Hajime; Inouye, Masahiko

    2015-02-14

    An amphiphilic meta-ethynylpyridine polymer with chiral amide side chains was developed. The polymer was prepared by sequential Sonogashira reactions, and the product was soluble in polar and apolar solvents. The additive effects of metal salts on the polymer were examined in water and aqueous EtOH on the basis of UV-vis and CD spectra. The enhancement of the positive Cotton effect and hypochromism around 360 nm occurred by the addition of various metal salts, indicating the coordination of the cations to the amide side chains of the polymer to stabilise the helical structure. Among them, rare-earth metal salts, especially Sc(OTf)3 showed more efficient additive effects probably because of its strong coordination ability even in water. Positive cooperativity was observed for the coordination of Sc(OTf)3 to the polymer in aqueous EtOH.

  10. Treatments of pelvic girdle pain in pregnant women: adverse effects of standard treatment, acupuncture and stabilising exercises on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/neonate

    PubMed Central

    Elden, Helen; Ostgaard, Hans-Christian; Fagevik-Olsen, Monika; Ladfors, Lars; Hagberg, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous publications indicate that acupuncture is efficient for the treatment of pelvic girdle pain, PGP, in pregnant women. However, the use of acupuncture for PGP is rare due to insufficient documentation of adverse effects of this treatment in this specific condition. The aim of the present work was to assess adverse effects of acupuncture on the pregnancy, mother, delivery and the fetus/neonate in comparison with women that received stabilising exercises as adjunct to standard treatment or standard treatment alone. Methods In all, 386 women with PGP entered this controlled, single-blind trial. They were randomly assigned to standard treatment plus acupuncture (n = 125), standard treatment plus specific stabilising exercises (n = 131) or to standard treatment alone (n = 130) for 6 weeks. Acupuncture that may be considered strong was used and treatment was started as early as in the second trimester of pregnancy. Adverse effects were recorded during treatment and throughout the pregnancy. Influence on the fetus was measured with cardiotocography (CTG) before-during and after 43 acupuncture sessions in 43 women. A standardised computerized method to analyze the CTG reading numerically (Oxford 8000, Oxford, England) was used. After treatment, the women rated their overall experience of the treatment and listed adverse events if any in a questionnaire. Data of analgesia and oxytocin augmentation during labour, duration of labour, frequency of preterm birth, operative delivery, Apgar score, cord-blood gas/acid base balance and birth weight were also recorded. Results There were no serious adverse events after any of the treatments. Minor adverse events were common in the acupuncture group but women rated acupuncture favourably even despite this. The computerized or visually assessed CTG analyses of antenatal recordings in connection with acupuncture were all normal. Conclusion This study shows that acupuncture administered with a stimulation that may be

  11. Treatment of temporomandibular disorders with a combination of hard acrylic stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw. A retro- and prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Erik; Nilsson, Håkan; Helkimo, Martti; Magnusson, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment effect of a combined treatment with a stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw in patients refractory to previous TMD treatment. During a 5-year-period, 2001-2005, a total of 98 patients received the combined treatment at the Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, the Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden. Before the patients received the combined treatment, they had already been given several different TMD treatments during a long period of time, either before referral or at the specialist clinic, with only minor or no effect on their TMD symptoms. The patients were followed prospectively (n=10), or analysed retrospectively (n=88). The data registered were gender, age, main indication for TMD treatment, number of visits to the clinic before and after the introduction of the combined treatment, as well as according to a clinical (Di) and anamnestic (Ai) dysfunction index. The most common causes for treatment in the retrospective material were problems of muscular origin and problems of both muscular and TMJ origin. In the prospective material, most of the patients had mainly muscular symptoms. Both the clinical and anamnestic dysfunction index decreased statistically significantly in the retrospective material after the introduction of the combined treatment. There was a numerical improvement of both indices also in the prospective material. In conclusion, the present investigation showed that a combined treatment with a hard acrylic stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw seems to give a remarkable improvement of TMD signs and symptoms in apparently therapy resistant TMD patients. General conclusions should, however, be made with caution due to the fact that the study did not include any control group. There is an obvious need for randomized controlled studies concerning the efficacy and effectiveness of the combined treatment presented

  12. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-07-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilisation within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30 years old labelling experiment after a~wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilisation in plant and microbial derived sugars: while plant derived sugars are only affected by stabilisation processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (>2 g cm-3; Mineral)) of a~silty loam under long term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). While apparent mean residence times (MRT) of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugars in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, mean residence times of the mainly plant derived xylose (xyl) were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial derived sugars like galactose (gal), rhamnose (rha), fucose (fuc), indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics

  13. Dynamics of ionisation and entanglement in the 'atom + quantum electromagnetic field' system

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapova, P R; Tikhonova, O V

    2012-03-31

    The dynamics of a model Rydberg atom in a strong nonclassical electromagnetic field is investigated. The field-induced transitions to the continuum involving different numbers of photons (with intermediate states in the discrete spectrum) are taken into account and the specific features of ionisation in 'squeezed' field states are considered in comparison with the case of classical light. A significant decrease in the ionisation rate is found, which is caused by the interference stabilisation of the atomic system. The entanglement of the atomic and field subsystems, the temporal dynamics of the correlations found, and the possibility of measuring them are analysed.

  14. Influence of commercial and residual sorbents and silicates as additives on the stabilisation/solidification of organic and inorganic industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Coz, A; Andrés, A; Soriano, S; Viguri, J R; Ruiz, M C; Irabien, J A

    2009-05-30

    An environmental problem of the foundry activities is the management of industrial waste generated in different processes. The foundry sludge from gas wet cleaning treatment that contains organic and inorganic compounds and a high content of water is an interesting example. Due to their characteristics, they can be managed using different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) technologies prior to land disposal. The purpose of this work is to study S/S formulations in order to improve the control of the mobility of the pollutants and the ecotoxicity of the samples. Different mixtures of cement or lime as binders and additives (foundry sand, silica fume, sodium silicate, silicic acid, activated carbon and black carbon) have been used in order to reduce the mobility of the chemical and ecotoxicological regulated parameters and to compare the results for commercial and residual additives. The best results have been obtained with sorbents (activated carbon and black carbon) or sodium silicate. The results of the foundry sand ash as additive can conclude that it can be used as replacement in the cement products. However, silica fume in the samples with lime and siliceous resin sand as additives gives products that do not fulfil the regulated limits. Finally, some linear expressions between the chemical parameters and the quantity of material used in the samples have been obtained. PMID:18835094

  15. Effects of xanthan-locust bean gum mixtures on the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of whey protein stabilised oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khouryieh, Hanna; Puli, Goutham; Williams, Kevin; Aramouni, Fadi

    2015-01-15

    The effects of xanthan gum (XG)-locust bean gum (LBG) mixtures (0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5 wt%) on the physicochemical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) stabilised oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing 20% v/v menhaden oil was investigated. At higher concentrations, the apparent viscosity of the emulsions containing XG/LBG mixtures was significantly higher (p<0.05) than the emulsions containing either XG or LBG alone. Locust bean gum showed the greatest phase separation, followed by XG. Microstructure images showed depletion flocculation at lower biopolymer concentrations, and thus led to an increase in creaming instability and apparent viscosity of the emulsions. Addition of 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5 wt% XG/LBG mixtures greatly decreased the creaming of the emulsions. The rate of lipid oxidation for 8-week storage was significantly lower (p<0.05) in emulsions containing XG/LBG mixtures than in emulsions containing either of the biopolymer alone.

  16. The effect of light:dark cycles of medium frequency on photosynthesis by Chlorella vulgaris and the implications for waste stabilisation pond design and performance.

    PubMed

    Ratchford, I A J; Fallowfield, H J

    2003-01-01

    The effect of light/dark (L:D) cycle times on the recovery from photoinhibition of green micro-alga Chlorella vulgaris (CCAP211/11c) and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus (CCAP1479/5) was investigated using an irradiated, temperature controlled oxygen electrode. The onset of photoinhibition in both organisms occurred at irradiances > 300 micromol m(-2)s(-1) at temperatures >15 degrees C. Light/dark cycle times were controlled independently using a relay timer and shutter placed between the quartz iodide light source and the oxygen electrode chamber. Oxygen evolution decreased rapidly when cells were continuously irradiated at 300, 500 and 750 micromol m(-2)s(-1). However, Chlorella cells irradiated at 300, 500 and 750 micromol m(-2)s(-1)on a L:D cycle of 60s:20s, 30s:60s and 60s: 120s respectively, maintained a constant rate of oxygen evolution over a 24 h incubation period. Exposure time to a given incident irradiance rather than the total light dose received appeared to determine the effect of light/dark cycle times on photosynthesis. A relationship was established between L:D ratio required to maintain constant oxygen production and incident photon flux density. The results suggest that the adverse effects of high irradiances on algae near the surface of a stratified waste stabilisation pond might be ameliorated by controlled mixing of algal cells through the depth of the pond.

  17. Aluminium hydroxide stabilised MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as dual-modality contrasts agent for MRI and PET imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xianjin; Belo, Salome; Krüger, Dirk; Yan, Yong; de Rosales, Rafael T.M.; Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Ye, Haitao; Su, Shi; Mathe, Domokos; Kovács, Noémi; Horváth, Ildikó; Semjeni, Mariann; Sunassee, Kavitha; Szigeti, Krisztian; Green, Mark A.; Blower, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were stabilised by depositing an Al(OH)3 layer via a hydrolysis process. The particles displayed excellent colloidal stability in water and a high affinity to [18F]-fluoride and bisphosphonate groups. A high radiolabeling efficiency, 97% for 18F-fluoride and 100% for 64Cu-bisphosphonate conjugate, was achieved by simply incubating NPs with radioactivity solution at room temperature for 5 min. The properties of particles were strongly dependant on the thickness and hardness of the Al(OH)3 layer which could in turn be controlled by the hydrolysis method. The application of these Al(OH)3 coated magnetic NPs in molecular imaging has been further explored. The results demonstrated that these NPs are potential candidates as dual modal probes for MR and PET. In vivo PET imaging showed a slow release of 18F from NPs, but no sign of efflux of 64Cu. PMID:24768194

  18. Solidification/stabilisation of metals contaminated industrial soil from former Zn smelter in Celje, Slovenia, using cement as a hydraulic binder.

    PubMed

    Voglar, Grega E; Lestan, Domen

    2010-06-15

    In a laboratory study, Portland cement (15%, w/w) was used for solidification/stabilisation (S/S) of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni and As contaminated soils from the former industrial site. Soils formed solid monoliths with cement. S/S effectiveness was assessed by measuring the mechanical strength of the monoliths, concentrations of metals in deionised water and TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) soil extracts, and mass transfer of metals. Concentrations of Cd, Pb, Zn and Ni in water extracts from S/S soils generally decreased, concentrations of As remained unchanged, while concentrations of Cu increased. Concentrations of Cd, Pb, Zn and Ni in the TCLP extracts from S/S soils were lower than from original soils. Cu extractability was lower in most soil samples, while the extractability of As from S/S soils increased. Overall, the concentration of metals in deionised water and TCLP solution, obtained after extraction of the S/S soils, was below the regulatory limits. S/S greatly reduced the mass transfer of Cd (up to 83-times), Pb (up to 13.7-times) and Zn (up to 294-times). Mass transfer of Ni and As was generally also reduced, while that of Cu increased in some S/S soils. Based on the findings of mass-transfer mechanism analysis the predominant mechanism of release was surface wash-off of metals otherwise physically encapsulated within the cementous soil matrix. PMID:20207479

  19. Performance study and influence of radiation emission energy and soil contamination level on γ-radiation shielding of stabilised/solidified radionuclide-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Falciglia, Pietro P; Puccio, Valentina; Romano, Stefano; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses on the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) of radionuclide-polluted soils at different (232)Th levels using Portland cement alone and with barite aggregates. The potential of S/S was assessed applying a full testing protocol and calculating γ-radiation shielding (γRS) index, that included the measurement of soil radioactivity before and after the S/S as a function of the emission energy and soil contamination level. The results indicate that setting processes are strongly dependent on the contaminant concentration, and for contamination level higher than 5%, setting time values longer than 72 h. The addition of barite aggregates to the cement gout leads to a slight improvement of the S/S performance in terms of durability and contaminant leaching but reduces the mechanical resistance of the treated soils samples. Barite addition also causes an increase in the γ-rays shielding properties of the S/S treatment up to about 20%. Gamma-ray measurements show that γRS strongly depends on the energy, and that the radioactivity with the contamination level was governed by a linear trend, while, γRS index does not depend on the radionuclide concentration. Results allow the calculated γRS values and those available from other experiments to be applied to hazard radioactive soil contaminations. PMID:25710096

  20. Field trials to assess the use of iron-bearing industrial by-products for stabilisation of chromated copper arsenate-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lidelöw, Sofia; Ragnvaldsson, Daniel; Leffler, Per; Tesfalidet, Solomon; Maurice, Christian

    2007-11-15

    Two industrial by-products with high iron contents were tested for their effectiveness in the stabilisation of arsenic and trace metals in chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-contaminated soil. Steel abrasive (SA; 97% Fe(0)) and oxygen scarfing granulate (OSG; 69% Fe(3)O(4)) were applied at levels of 1% and 8% (w/w) respectively to two soils with different organic matter contents. Field lysimeter measurements indicated that SA and OSG treatments decreased the arsenic concentration in pore water by 68% and 92%, respectively, for the soil with low organic matter content, and by about 30% in pore water of soil with high organic matter content. At pH < or =6, the amended soil with low organic content contained elevated levels of manganese and nickel in their pore water, which were sufficient to induce cytotoxic effects in L-929 mouse fibroblast cells. The industrial by-products have significant potential for soil amendment at field-scale, but caution is required because of the potential release of their chemical contaminants and their reduced capacity for sorption of arsenic in organic-rich soils. PMID:17804040

  1. Changes in waste stabilisation pond performance resulting from the retrofit of activated sludge treatment upstream: part II--Management and operating issues.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, D G; O'Brien, M J; Cromar, N J; Fallowfield, H J

    2005-01-01

    Bolivar Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) was originally commissioned with trickling filter secondary treatment, followed by waste stabilisation pond (WSP) treatment and marine discharge. In 1999, a dissolved air flotation/filtration (DAFF) plant was commissioned to treat a portion of the WSP effluent for horticultural reuse. In 2001, the trickling filters were replaced with activated sludge treatment. A shift in WSP ecology became evident soon after this time, characterised by a statistically significant reduction in algal counts in the pond effluent, and increased variability in algal counts and occasional population crashes in the ponds. While the photosynthetic capacity of the WSPs has been reduced, the concomitant reduction in organic loading has meant that the WSPs have not become overloaded. As a result of the improvement in water quality leaving the ponds, significant cost savings and improved product water quality have been realised in the subsequent DAFF treatment stage. A number of operating issues have arisen from the change, however, including the re-emergence of a midge fly nuisance at the site. Control of midge flies using chemical spraying has negated the cost savings realised in the DAFF treatment stage. While biomanipulation of the WSP may provide a less aggressive method of midge control, this case demonstrates the difficulty of predicting in advance all ramifications of a retrospective process change.

  2. Natural ageing in the rat liver correlates with progressive stabilisation of DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and withdrawal of genes from the nuclear substructure.

    PubMed

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Gariglio, Patricio; Aranda-Anzaldo, Armando

    2005-01-01

    In the interphase nucleus, the DNA of higher eukaryotes is organised in supercoiled loops anchored to a nuclear matrix (NM). Replication, transcription and splicing seem to occur at macromolecular complexes organised upon the NM. Thus, the topological relationship between genes located in the loops and the NM appears to be very important for nuclear physiology. Here, we report that natural ageing in the rat liver correlates with a progressive strengthening of the NM framework and the stabilisation of the DNA loop-NM interactions, as well as with a progressive increase in the relative distance of genes to the NM. Both phenomena correlate with the gradual loss of proliferating potential and progression towards terminal differentiation in the hepatocytes, suggesting that wholesale modifications in the topological relationships within the cell nucleus are markers of tissue ageing and senescence, at least in the mammalian liver. We discuss the possible functional implications of such structural modifications that may underlie both terminal hepatocyte differentiation and their eventual replicative senescence. PMID:15888332

  3. Performance study and influence of radiation emission energy and soil contamination level on γ-radiation shielding of stabilised/solidified radionuclide-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Falciglia, Pietro P; Puccio, Valentina; Romano, Stefano; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses on the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) of radionuclide-polluted soils at different (232)Th levels using Portland cement alone and with barite aggregates. The potential of S/S was assessed applying a full testing protocol and calculating γ-radiation shielding (γRS) index, that included the measurement of soil radioactivity before and after the S/S as a function of the emission energy and soil contamination level. The results indicate that setting processes are strongly dependent on the contaminant concentration, and for contamination level higher than 5%, setting time values longer than 72 h. The addition of barite aggregates to the cement gout leads to a slight improvement of the S/S performance in terms of durability and contaminant leaching but reduces the mechanical resistance of the treated soils samples. Barite addition also causes an increase in the γ-rays shielding properties of the S/S treatment up to about 20%. Gamma-ray measurements show that γRS strongly depends on the energy, and that the radioactivity with the contamination level was governed by a linear trend, while, γRS index does not depend on the radionuclide concentration. Results allow the calculated γRS values and those available from other experiments to be applied to hazard radioactive soil contaminations.

  4. Field trials to assess the use of iron-bearing industrial by-products for stabilisation of chromated copper arsenate-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lidelöw, Sofia; Ragnvaldsson, Daniel; Leffler, Per; Tesfalidet, Solomon; Maurice, Christian

    2007-11-15

    Two industrial by-products with high iron contents were tested for their effectiveness in the stabilisation of arsenic and trace metals in chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-contaminated soil. Steel abrasive (SA; 97% Fe(0)) and oxygen scarfing granulate (OSG; 69% Fe(3)O(4)) were applied at levels of 1% and 8% (w/w) respectively to two soils with different organic matter contents. Field lysimeter measurements indicated that SA and OSG treatments decreased the arsenic concentration in pore water by 68% and 92%, respectively, for the soil with low organic matter content, and by about 30% in pore water of soil with high organic matter content. At pH < or =6, the amended soil with low organic content contained elevated levels of manganese and nickel in their pore water, which were sufficient to induce cytotoxic effects in L-929 mouse fibroblast cells. The industrial by-products have significant potential for soil amendment at field-scale, but caution is required because of the potential release of their chemical contaminants and their reduced capacity for sorption of arsenic in organic-rich soils.

  5. Effects of xanthan-locust bean gum mixtures on the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of whey protein stabilised oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khouryieh, Hanna; Puli, Goutham; Williams, Kevin; Aramouni, Fadi

    2015-01-15

    The effects of xanthan gum (XG)-locust bean gum (LBG) mixtures (0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5 wt%) on the physicochemical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) stabilised oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing 20% v/v menhaden oil was investigated. At higher concentrations, the apparent viscosity of the emulsions containing XG/LBG mixtures was significantly higher (p<0.05) than the emulsions containing either XG or LBG alone. Locust bean gum showed the greatest phase separation, followed by XG. Microstructure images showed depletion flocculation at lower biopolymer concentrations, and thus led to an increase in creaming instability and apparent viscosity of the emulsions. Addition of 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5 wt% XG/LBG mixtures greatly decreased the creaming of the emulsions. The rate of lipid oxidation for 8-week storage was significantly lower (p<0.05) in emulsions containing XG/LBG mixtures than in emulsions containing either of the biopolymer alone. PMID:25148996

  6. Animal experiments with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) stabilised with alpha-tocopherol used for articulating surfaces in joint endoprostheses.

    PubMed

    Wolf, C; Lederer, K; Bergmeister, H; Losert, U; Böck, P

    2006-12-01

    Numerous investigations proved the impressive suitability of alpha-tocopherol as a stabilizer for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) used for endoprostheses. Regarding the biocompatibility of this new biomaterial, in-vitro celltoxicity tests gave no hint for a cyto- or genotoxic activity. In this study, animal experiments are carried out to further ensure the biocompatibility of this biomaterial. Thin UHMW-PE-films (20 x 6 x 0.23 mm3) were implanted subcutaneously into rats. Morphology and reactivity of surrounding connective tissue against either pure UHMW-PE material or UHMW-PE containing alpha-tocopherol were studied at timed intervals (2 weeks, 3 month, and 6 month after operation) in 3 groups of animals, each group comprising 10 animals. Parallel to these tests, material changes were investigated in these 3 groups of 10 animals at the same intervals after operation with the help of infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Within the implantation time, no noteworthy oxidative degradation could be observed. The amount of lost alpha-tocopherol due to diffusion is low enough to ensure a lifetime stabilisation of the UHMW-PE. The implants were all well tolerated and definitely encapsulated already 2 weeks after operation. Presence or absence of alpha-tocopherol in the implants did not evince morphological differences. Therefore, negative consequences were not manifest in the presence of alpha-tocopherol. PMID:17143766

  7. Hydrodynamic impacts on biogenic stabilisation and the fate of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in mixed sediment bedforms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, J. A.; Aspden, R.; Schindler, R.; Parsons, D. R.; Ye, L.; Baas, J.; Paterson, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The stability and morphology of bedforms have traditionally been treated as a function of mean flow velocity/non-dimensional bed shear stress and sediment particle size, despite the known influence of key biological components such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). EPS is produced by microbial communities and can increase erosion thresholds by more than 300%. However, the mechanisms behind the influence of EPS on sediment transport and bedform dynamics is poorly understood, as is the fate of EPS and exchange of EPS between the sediment bed and water column during ripple formation. The exchange of EPS between the sediment bed and water column is dynamic, with important implications for a range of physical and geochemical processes, with the spatio-temporal variation in EPS content, from source to eventual fate, being extremely important for determining the behaviour and natural variability of sedimentary systems. This paper reports on a series of flume experiments where a tripartite mixture of sand, clay and model EPS (xanthan gum) was used to create a sediment substrate, which was subject to a unidirectional current (0.8 ms-1 for 10.5 hrs, n=6). For each run the spatio-temporal changes in concentration, distribution, and effect of EPS, on the evolving bed of mixed sediment was monitored throughout, with complete 3D bed morphology scans also acquired at ~360 s intervals. The various substrate mixtures produced bedforms varying from ripples to dunes and biochemical analysis of EPS concentration across the formed bedforms, suggest EPS is winnowed from the sediment - water interface, particularly at the bedform crests. The depth of winnowing in each run was found to be related to the bedform size, with variation in the stoss, crest and trough of the bedforms identified. The loss of EPS was also significantly correlated with the depth to which clay was winnowed, presumably due to a close association between the clay mineral and EPS fractions. The paper will

  8. The stability and activity of human neuroserpin are modulated by a salt bridge that stabilises the reactive centre loop.

    PubMed

    Noto, Rosina; Randazzo, Loredana; Raccosta, Samuele; Caccia, Sonia; Moriconi, Claudia; Miranda, Elena; Martorana, Vincenzo; Manno, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Neuroserpin (NS) is an inhibitory protein belonging to the serpin family and involved in several pathologies, including the dementia Familial Encephalopathy with Neuroserpin Inclusion Bodies (FENIB), a genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by accumulation of NS polymers. Our Molecular Dynamics simulations revealed the formation of a persistent salt bridge between Glu289 on strand s2C and Arg362 on the Reactive Centre Loop (RCL), a region important for the inhibitory activity of NS. Here, we validated this structural feature by simulating the Glu289Ala mutant, where the salt bridge is not present. Further, MD predictions were tested in vitro by purifying recombinant Glu289Ala NS from E. coli. The thermal and chemical stability along with the polymerisation propensity of both Wild Type and Glu289Ala NS were characterised by circular dichroism, emission spectroscopy and non-denaturant gel electrophoresis, respectively. The activity of both variants against the main target protease, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), was assessed by SDS-PAGE and chromogenic kinetic assay. Our results showed that deletion of the salt bridge leads to a moderate but clear reduction of the overall protein stability and activity. PMID:26329378

  9. The stability and activity of human neuroserpin are modulated by a salt bridge that stabilises the reactive centre loop.

    PubMed

    Noto, Rosina; Randazzo, Loredana; Raccosta, Samuele; Caccia, Sonia; Moriconi, Claudia; Miranda, Elena; Martorana, Vincenzo; Manno, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Neuroserpin (NS) is an inhibitory protein belonging to the serpin family and involved in several pathologies, including the dementia Familial Encephalopathy with Neuroserpin Inclusion Bodies (FENIB), a genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by accumulation of NS polymers. Our Molecular Dynamics simulations revealed the formation of a persistent salt bridge between Glu289 on strand s2C and Arg362 on the Reactive Centre Loop (RCL), a region important for the inhibitory activity of NS. Here, we validated this structural feature by simulating the Glu289Ala mutant, where the salt bridge is not present. Further, MD predictions were tested in vitro by purifying recombinant Glu289Ala NS from E. coli. The thermal and chemical stability along with the polymerisation propensity of both Wild Type and Glu289Ala NS were characterised by circular dichroism, emission spectroscopy and non-denaturant gel electrophoresis, respectively. The activity of both variants against the main target protease, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), was assessed by SDS-PAGE and chromogenic kinetic assay. Our results showed that deletion of the salt bridge leads to a moderate but clear reduction of the overall protein stability and activity.

  10. Eco-evolutionary dynamics in a coevolving host-virus system.

    PubMed

    Frickel, Jens; Sieber, Michael; Becks, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    Eco-evolutionary dynamics have been shown to be important for understanding population and community stability and their adaptive potential. However, coevolution in the framework of eco-evolutionary theory has not been addressed directly. Combining experiments with an algal host and its viral parasite, and mathematical model analyses we show eco-evolutionary dynamics in antagonistic coevolving populations. The interaction between antagonists initially resulted in arms race dynamics (ARD) with selective sweeps, causing oscillating host-virus population dynamics. However, ARD ended and populations stabilised after the evolution of a general resistant host, whereas a trade-off between host resistance and growth then maintained host diversity over time (trade-off driven dynamics). Most importantly, our study shows that the interaction between ecology and evolution had important consequences for the predictability of the mode and tempo of adaptive change and for the stability and adaptive potential of populations. PMID:26898162

  11. Stabilisation of SWNTs by alkyl-sulfate chitosan derivatives of different molecular weight: towards the preparation of hybrids with anticoagulant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatouros, Dimitrios G.; Power, Kieron; Kadir, Omar; Dékány, Imre; Yannopoulos, Spyros N.; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Antonijevic, Milan D.; Zouganelis, George D.; Roldo, Marta

    2011-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that chitosan derivative N-octyl-O-sulfate chitosan (NOSC), which presents important pharmacological properties, can suspend single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) up to 20 times more effectively than other chitosan derivatives in an aqueous environment. In an attempt to further investigate the impact of different molecular weights of chitosan to the solubilization and anticoagulant properties of these hybrids an array of NOSC derivatives varying their molecular weight (low, medium and high respectively) was synthesised and characterised by means of FT-IR spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Microwave and nitric acid purified SWNTs, characterised by FT-IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy, were colloidally stabilised by these polymers and their anticoagulant activity was assessed. The results revealed that the low molecular weight NOSC coated SWNTs exhibit the highest activity when 0.5 mg mL-1 NOSC solutions are used, activity which is similar to that of the free polymer. Preliminary studies by exposure of these hybrids to Brine Shrimp (Artemia) cysts revealed no effect on the viability of sub-adult Artemia. Our findings suggest the possibility of tailoring these nanomaterials to bear the required properties for application as biocompatible building blocks for nanodevices including biosensors and biomaterials.We have previously demonstrated that chitosan derivative N-octyl-O-sulfate chitosan (NOSC), which presents important pharmacological properties, can suspend single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) up to 20 times more effectively than other chitosan derivatives in an aqueous environment. In an attempt to further investigate the impact of different molecular weights of chitosan to the solubilization and anticoagulant properties of these hybrids an array of NOSC derivatives varying their molecular weight (low, medium and high respectively) was synthesised

  12. Acid test of joint technical and biological measures in slope stabilisation - Impact analysis of the heavy rainstorm event in August 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, F.; Böll, A.

    2009-04-01

    The persisting and heavy rainstorms from 20th to 22nd August in 2005 resulted in loss of human lives and tremendous damage on infrastructure all over Switzerland. Many of the measures taken hitherto to protect against such natural hazards were stressed to their limits or even beyond due to water saturation of the soils and extreme discharges of the torrents. This particular configuration offered the possibility to investigate the reliability of technical and biological measures taken within the scope of slope stabilisation, torrent and gully control. In the context of a joint project the ancient sliding area "Schwandrübi" in Dallenwil (Switzerland) providing joint technical and biological measures was chosen to address aspects concerning the reliability of technical supporting structures, the development of biological measures in the course of time and their performance under the extreme impact as well as the effects of biological measures on the stability of slopes. During 1981 and 1982 joint technical and biological measures had been taken on a large scale with minor follow-ups shortly after to stabilise the "Schwandrübi". The underlying strategy was based on several pilot surveys as thorough soil analysis, e.g. grain size distribution and determination of the angle of internal friction (Φ') related to the porosity (n) and the dry unit weight (γ), respectively. Basically, the spatial arrangement of the gabions was in accordance with the theoretical guidelines. However, based on the angle of internal friction (Φ') determined on the loose moraine soil material, it was not possible to meet the soil mechanical criterion of inclination between the constructions in all cases. Regardless of the extreme impact during the rainstorm (~100-year event), no serious damage occurred neither on the roughly 25-year old gabions nor on the torrent control structures. The recalculated peak discharge in the outlet channel was ~60 m3s-1 superimposed by high bed load

  13. Occurrence and removal of butyltin compounds in a waste stabilisation pond of a domestic waste water treatment plant of a rural French town.

    PubMed

    Sabah, A; Bancon-Montigny, C; Rodier, C; Marchand, P; Delpoux, S; Ijjaali, M; Tournoud, M-G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fate and behaviour of butyltin pollutants, including monobutyltin (MBT), dibutylin (DBT), and tributyltin (TBT), in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). The study was conducted as part of a baseline survey and included five sampling campaigns comprising bottom sludge and the water column from each pond from a typical WSP in France. Butyltins were detected in all raw wastewater and effluents, reflecting their widespread use. Our results revealed high affinity between butyltins and particulate matter and high accumulation of butyltins in the sludge taken from anaerobic ponds. The dissolved butyltins in the influent ranged from 21.5 to 28.1 ng(Sn).L(-1) and in the effluent, from 8.8 to 29.3 ng(Sn).L(-1). The butyltin concentrations in the sludge ranged from 45.1 to 164 and 3.6-8.1 ng(Sn).g(-1) respectively in the first and last ponds. Our results showed an average treatment efficiency of 71% for MBT, 47% for DBT, 55% for TBT. Laboratory sorption experiments enabled the calculation of a distribution coefficient (Kd = 75,000 L.kg-1) between TBT and particulate matter from the WSPs. The Kd explained the accumulation and persistence of the TBT in the sludge after settling of particulate matter. The continuous supply of contaminated raw wastewater and the sorption-desorption processes in the ponds led to incomplete bio- and photolytic degradation and to the persistence of butyltins in dissolved and particulate matrices throughout the survey period. It is thus recommended to use shallow ponds and to pay particular attention when sludge is used for soil amendment.

  14. Occurrence and removal of butyltin compounds in a waste stabilisation pond of a domestic waste water treatment plant of a rural French town.

    PubMed

    Sabah, A; Bancon-Montigny, C; Rodier, C; Marchand, P; Delpoux, S; Ijjaali, M; Tournoud, M-G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fate and behaviour of butyltin pollutants, including monobutyltin (MBT), dibutylin (DBT), and tributyltin (TBT), in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). The study was conducted as part of a baseline survey and included five sampling campaigns comprising bottom sludge and the water column from each pond from a typical WSP in France. Butyltins were detected in all raw wastewater and effluents, reflecting their widespread use. Our results revealed high affinity between butyltins and particulate matter and high accumulation of butyltins in the sludge taken from anaerobic ponds. The dissolved butyltins in the influent ranged from 21.5 to 28.1 ng(Sn).L(-1) and in the effluent, from 8.8 to 29.3 ng(Sn).L(-1). The butyltin concentrations in the sludge ranged from 45.1 to 164 and 3.6-8.1 ng(Sn).g(-1) respectively in the first and last ponds. Our results showed an average treatment efficiency of 71% for MBT, 47% for DBT, 55% for TBT. Laboratory sorption experiments enabled the calculation of a distribution coefficient (Kd = 75,000 L.kg-1) between TBT and particulate matter from the WSPs. The Kd explained the accumulation and persistence of the TBT in the sludge after settling of particulate matter. The continuous supply of contaminated raw wastewater and the sorption-desorption processes in the ponds led to incomplete bio- and photolytic degradation and to the persistence of butyltins in dissolved and particulate matrices throughout the survey period. It is thus recommended to use shallow ponds and to pay particular attention when sludge is used for soil amendment. PMID:26624956

  15. Platelet Adhesion to Podoplanin Under Flow is Mediated by the Receptor CLEC-2 and Stabilised by Src/Syk-Dependent Platelet Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pollitt, Alice Y.; Lowe, Kate; Latif, Arusa; Nash, Gerard B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet-specific deletion of CLEC-2, which signals through Src and Syk kinases, or global deletion of its ligand podoplanin results in blood-filled lymphatics during mouse development. Platelet-specific Syk deficiency phenocopies this defect, indicating that platelet activation is required for lymphatic development. In the present study, we investigated whether CLEC-2-podoplanin interactions could support platelet arrest from blood flow and whether platelet signalling is required for stable platelet adhesion to lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and recombinant podoplanin under flow. Perfusion of human or mouse blood over human LEC monolayers led to platelet adhesion and aggregation. Following αIIbβ3 blockade, individual platelets still adhered. Platelet binding occurred at venous but not arterial shear rates. There was no adhesion using CLEC-2-deficient blood or to vascular endothelial cells (which lack podoplanin). Perfusion of human blood over human Fc-podoplanin (hFcPDPN) in the presence of monoclonal antibody IV.3 to block FcγRIIA receptors led to platelet arrest at similar shear rates to those used on LECs. Src and Syk inhibitors significantly reduced global adhesion of human or mouse platelets to LECs and hFcPDPN. A similar result was seen using Syk-deficient mouse platelets. Reduced platelet adhesion was due to a decrease in the stability of binding. In conclusion, our data reveal that CLEC-2 is an adhesive receptor that supports platelet arrest to podoplanin under venous shear. Src/Syk-dependent signalling stabilises platelet adhesion to podoplanin, providing a possible molecular mechanism contributing to the lymphatic defects of Syk-deficient mice. PMID:25694214

  16. Stabilisation dynamique d'un winging scapula (à propos d'un cas avec revue de la littérature)

    PubMed Central

    Boukhris, Jalal; Boussouga, Mostapha; Jaafar, Abdelouahab; Bouslmame, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Décrit pour la première fois par Velpeau en 1937, le winging scapula reste une affection rare, encore peu connue aussi bien du grand public que des professionnels de santé. Il s'agit en fait de la paralysie isolée du nerf thoracique long, responsable de l'innervation unique du muscle serratus antérieur, laquelle paralysie génère un décollement du bord spinal et de la pointe de l'omoplate, particulièrement visible lors des mouvements d'abduction et d'antépulsion du bras. Evoluant habituellement vers la récupération spontanée, le diagnostic de cette affection est essentiellement clinique, l'exploration électromyographique, peut appuyer le diagnostic et surtout servir d’élément de surveillance. Le traitement est avant tout conservateur; la chirurgie n’étant envisagée que dans les formes chroniques qui ne répondent pas à la rééducation, le cas d'ailleurs de notre patient. Le choix du type d'intervention devra obéir à des critères précis. La stabilisation dynamique de la scapula est une intervention séduisante et donne entre des mains entraînées des résultats très satisfaisants, beaucoup de critiques sont faites sur la récupération de la force musculaire, ce qui en limite l'indication quand les exigences professionnelles des patients sont importantes. Néanmoins, certaines séries en font la méthode de choix avec des résultats excellents. PMID:25918571

  17. Dynamic modelling of a two-wheeled vehicle: Jourdain formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehaoua, L.; Arioui, H.; Seguy, N.; Mammar, S.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a motorcycle direct dynamic formulation by the Jourdain's principle approach. This vehicle is considered as an assembly of six rigid bodies and the resulting equation of motion allows to simulate 11 degrees of freedom. The vehicle geometry is described and a step-by-step procedure is introduced to evaluate the kinematics and the generalised efforts of the considered vehicle. In addition, to simulate the equation of motion, a Lyapunov-based stabilisation is developed to assess the vehicle behaviour in response to a propulsion/braking torque applied on the vehicle's wheels and a rider torque exerted on the motorcycle's handlebar. Simulation results reveal some dynamic features such as load transfer and counter-steering phenomena.

  18. Sliding mode-based lateral vehicle dynamics control using tyre force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnappillil Madhusudhanan, Anil; Corno, Matteo; Holweg, Edward

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a lateral vehicle dynamics control based on tyre force measurements is proposed. Most of the lateral vehicle dynamics control schemes are based on yaw rate whereas tyre forces are the most important variables in vehicle dynamics as tyres are the only contact points between the vehicle and road. In the proposed method, active front steering is employed to uniformly distribute the required lateral force among the front left and right tyres. The force distribution is quantified through the tyre utilisation coefficients. In order to address the nonlinearities and uncertainties of the vehicle model, a gain scheduling sliding-mode control technique is used. In addition to stabilising the lateral dynamics, the proposed controller is able to maintain maximum lateral acceleration. The proposed method is tested and validated on a multi-body vehicle simulator.

  19. [The ECMES [Centro-Medullary Elastic Stabilising Wiring) osteosynthesis method in limb fractures in children. Principle, application on the femur. Apropos of 250 fractures followed-up since 1979].

    PubMed

    Prévot, J; Lascombes, P; Ligier, J N

    The theoretical basis of this new technique were recalled: a closed operation respecting the conjugation cartilages. The material, composed of flexible wires of adequate diameter are bent and stabilised forming a non traumatic fixation which is inserted into the medullary canal of the fractured bone under fluoroscopic surveillance. The second part of this paper deals with the results of 250 fractures of the femur followed up since 1979. Late outcome in terms of complications and stimulation of the post-trauma growth, which is a problem in all forms of fractures in the child, especially of the femur, is presented. PMID:7729190

  20. Vegetation Control in the Long-term Self-stabilisation of the Liangzhou Oasis of the Upper Shiyang River Watershed of West-central Gansu, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Charles; Hassan, Quazi

    2010-05-01

    in this presentation are most likely the same mechanisms that promote self-support and long-term stabilisation of the chain of oases along the base of the Qilian Mountains.

  1. Kinetics of stabilised Criegee intermediates derived from alkene ozonolysis: reactions with SO2, H2O and decomposition under boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Newland, Mike J; Rickard, Andrew R; Alam, Mohammed S; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J

    2015-02-14

    The removal of SO2 in the presence of alkene-ozone systems has been studied for ethene, cis-but-2-ene, trans-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity for all four alkene-ozone systems confirming a significant reaction for stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) with H2O. The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with relative rate constants, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 3.3 (±1.1) × 10(-5) for CH2OO, 26 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, 33 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene, and 8.7 (±2.5) × 10(-5) for (CH3)2COO derived from 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene. The relative rate constants for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) are -2.3 (±3.5) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH2OO, 13 (±43) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, -14 (±31) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene and 63 (±14) × 10(11) cm(-3) for (CH3)2COO. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These values are derived following the approximation that a single SCI is present for each system; a more comprehensive interpretation, explicitly considering the differing reactivity for syn- and anti-SCI conformers, is also presented. This yields values of 3.5 (±3.1) × 10(-4) for k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2) of anti-CH3CHOO and 1.2 (±1.1) × 10(13) for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) of syn-CH3CHOO. The reaction of the water dimer with CH2OO is also considered, with a derived value for k(CH2OO + (H2O)2)/k(CH2OO + SO2) of 1.4 (±1.8) × 10(-2). The observed SO2 removal rate constants, which technically represent upper limits, are consistent with decomposition being a significant, structure dependent, sink in the atmosphere for syn-SCI.

  2. Kinetics of stabilised Criegee intermediates derived from alkene ozonolysis: reactions with SO2, H2O and decomposition under boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Newland, Mike J; Rickard, Andrew R; Alam, Mohammed S; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J

    2015-02-14

    The removal of SO2 in the presence of alkene-ozone systems has been studied for ethene, cis-but-2-ene, trans-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity for all four alkene-ozone systems confirming a significant reaction for stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) with H2O. The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with relative rate constants, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 3.3 (±1.1) × 10(-5) for CH2OO, 26 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, 33 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene, and 8.7 (±2.5) × 10(-5) for (CH3)2COO derived from 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene. The relative rate constants for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) are -2.3 (±3.5) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH2OO, 13 (±43) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, -14 (±31) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene and 63 (±14) × 10(11) cm(-3) for (CH3)2COO. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These values are derived following the approximation that a single SCI is present for each system; a more comprehensive interpretation, explicitly considering the differing reactivity for syn- and anti-SCI conformers, is also presented. This yields values of 3.5 (±3.1) × 10(-4) for k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2) of anti-CH3CHOO and 1.2 (±1.1) × 10(13) for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) of syn-CH3CHOO. The reaction of the water dimer with CH2OO is also considered, with a derived value for k(CH2OO + (H2O)2)/k(CH2OO + SO2) of 1.4 (±1.8) × 10(-2). The observed SO2 removal rate constants, which technically represent upper limits, are consistent with decomposition being a significant, structure dependent, sink in the atmosphere for syn-SCI. PMID:25562069

  3. Accelerated ageing experiments with crosslinked and conventional ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE) stabilised with alpha-tocopherol for total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wolf, C; Macho, C; Lederer, K

    2006-12-01

    Samples of untreated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), UHMW-PE sterilized with gamma-rays in nitrogen atmosphere (conventional UHMW-PE, widely used for articulating surfaces in endoprostheses) and UHMW-PE, which has been crosslinked by electron beam irradiation and annealed subsequently, were stabilized with alpha-tocopherol and aged in air at 120 degrees C as well as in 10% aqueous hydrogenperoxide with 0.04 mg/ml FeCl3 as catalyst at 50 degrees C. The oxidative degradation was monitored with the help of infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), solubility measurements and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and were compared to unstabilized samples. When aged in air at 120 degrees C, the crosslinked UHMW-PE showed a slightly slower increase of the carbonyl (CO)-number (according to DIN 53383) in FTIR than conventional UHMW-PE. A stabilisation with 0.4% w/w alpha-tocopherol resulted in an increase of lifetime by a factor of approx. 40 for all samples. Ageing in 10% aqueous H2O2 at 50 degrees C yielded similar results for all three unstabilised samples. The addition of the natural antioxidant alpha-tocopherol led to a prolongation of lifetime by a factor of approx. 2.5. A linear loss of alpha-tocopherol was detected during ageing. An increase of crystallinity as well as lamella thickness during ageing was observed with the help of DSC. The two-phase structure of crosslinked UHMW-PE with two melting endotherms at 114 degrees C and 137 degrees C was replaced very quickly by a single melting point at 130 degrees C. This effect was delayed with the stabilized samples. In the solubility and SEC measurements, a severe molecular degradation and drop of molar mass of all materials could be observed after ageing in H2O2, leading to a complete destruction and, in case of crosslinked UHMW-PE, to a serious damage of the molecular network, respectively. PMID:17143765

  4. Influence of pH, metal chelator, free radical scavenger and interfacial characteristics on the oxidative stability of β-carotene in conjugated whey protein-pectin stabilised emulsion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Duoxia; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yanxiang; McClements, D Julian; Decker, Eric A

    2013-08-15

    The influence of whey protein isolate (WPI)-beet pectin conjugates formed by dry-heating on the oxidative stability of β-carotene in O/W emulsions was studied. It was mainly focused on the influence of pH, metal chelator, free radical scavenger and interfacial characteristics on the degradation of β-carotene in the emulsion stabilised by conjugate. The conjugate increased the oxidative stability of β-carotene in the emulsion as compared to their unconjugated mixture at pH 7.0. The desferoxamine retarded β-carotene degradation at pH 4.0 more effectively than pH 7.0 and more effectively in the emulsion with the conjugate than the unconjugated mixture (p<0.05). The addition of 200 mg/kg α-tocopherol significantly improved the stability of β-carotene in the conjugate stabilised emulsion. The emulsions were washed to remove conjugate not absorbed to the emulsion droplet interface, indicating that unabsorbed emulsifiers could protect β-carotene. It suggested that WPI-pectin conjugate could be used to protect bioactive lipids in emulsions.

  5. A locally preferred structure characterises all dynamical regimes of a supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soklaski, Ryan; Tran, Vy; Nussinov, Zohar; Kelton, K. F.; Yang, Li

    2016-04-01

    Recent experimental results suggest that metallic liquids universally exhibit a high-temperature dynamical crossover, which is correlated with the glass transition temperature (?). We demonstrate, using molecular dynamics results for ?, that this temperature, ?, is linked with cooperative atomic rearrangements that produce domains of connected icosahedra. Supercooling to a new characteristic temperature, ?, is shown to produce higher order cooperative rearrangements amongst connected icosahedra, which manifests as the formation of large Zr-rich connected domains that possess macroscopic proportions of the liquid's icosahedra. This coincides with the decoupling of atomic diffusivities, large-scale domain fluctuations and the onset of glassy dynamics in the liquid. These extensive domains then abruptly stabilise above ? and eventually percolate before the glass is formed. All characteristic temperatures (?, ? and ?) are thus connected by successive manifestations of the structural cooperativity that begins at ?.

  6. Allowable sampling period for consensus control of multiple general linear dynamical agents in random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Tian, Yu-Ping

    2010-11-01

    This article studies the consensus problem for a group of sampled-data general linear dynamical agents over random communication networks. Dynamic output feedback protocols are applied to solve the consensus problem. When the sampling period is sufficiently small, it is shown that as long as the mean topology has globally reachable nodes, the mean square consensus can be achieved by selecting protocol parameters so that n - 1 specified subsystems are simultaneously stabilised. However, when the sampling period is comparatively large, it is revealed that differing from low-order integrator multi-agent systems the consensus problem may be unsolvable. By using the hybrid dynamical system theory, an allowable upper bound of sampling period is further proposed. Two approaches to designing protocols are also provided. Simulations are given to illustrate the validity of the proposed approaches.

  7. Conditional and unconditional Gaussian quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Lami, Ludovico; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-07-01

    This article focuses on the general theory of open quantum systems in the Gaussian regime and explores a number of diverse ramifications and consequences of the theory. We shall first introduce the Gaussian framework in its full generality, including a classification of Gaussian (also known as 'general-dyne') quantum measurements. In doing so, we will give a compact proof for the parametrisation of the most general Gaussian completely positive map, which we believe to be missing in the existing literature. We will then move on to consider the linear coupling with a white noise bath, and derive the diffusion equations that describe the evolution of Gaussian states under such circumstances. Starting from these equations, we outline a constructive method to derive general master equations that apply outside the Gaussian regime. Next, we include the general-dyne monitoring of the environmental degrees of freedom and recover the Riccati equation for the conditional evolution of Gaussian states. Our derivation relies exclusively on the standard quantum mechanical update of the system state, through the evaluation of Gaussian overlaps. The parametrisation of the conditional dynamics we obtain is novel and, at variance with existing alternatives, directly ties in to physical detection schemes. We conclude our study with two examples of conditional dynamics that can be dealt with conveniently through our formalism, demonstrating how monitoring can suppress the noise in optical parametric processes as well as stabilise systems subject to diffusive scattering.

  8. [Comparison of the Ender's nailing and Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS) fixation in the treatment of trochanteric fractures in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Sliwka, Andrzej; Zgoda, Marcin; Górski, Radosław; Purski, Karol; Wasilewski, Piotr; Górecki, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was an evaluation which operative method of treatment: stabilisation with the Dynamic Hip Screw or with Ender's nails is less invasive procedure in elderly patients with trochanteric fractures. 100 consecutive patients with trochanteric fracture were enrolled into the study, of which 53 patients (49 women, 4 men; mean age 89 years) were stabilised intramedullarily with the use of Ender's nails and 47 patients (26 women, 21 men; mean age 76 years) were treated operatively with the use of Dynamic Hip Screw. The factors compared the mean length of hospital stay, the mean duration of the surgery, post-operative blood loss, early local and general complication rate and mortality in both groups. We took into account their general health and coexisting illnesses according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, type of fracture according to AO and Evan's classifications and the surgeon's experience. The mean duration of the surgery was 27 minutes longer in the case of DHS stabilisation. The complication rate was higher and the mean length of postoperative hospital stay was longer after Ender nailing. The mean blood loss: the drop in Red Blood Cells (RBC), Haematocrit (Ht) and the Mean Haemoglobin Concentration (Hb) was also higher in patients treated with the use of Ender nails. The mean rate of blood units that had to be transfused postoperatively was also higher in "Ender" group. The difference was statistically significant, especially in the group of patients treated as emergency procedure at the day of admission (p < 0.05). The operative treatment of trochanteric fractures in elderly patients with the use of DHS device showed to be a less invasive procedure in comparison to Ender nailing. In conclusion, the indications for this method of trochanteric fractures' treatment should be expanded, especially in the case of unstable fractures. PMID:17455526

  9. Adaptive synchronised tracking control for multiple robotic manipulators with uncertain kinematics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongya; Li, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Quanmin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a new adaptive synchronised tracking control approach is developed for the operation of multiple robotic manipulators in the presence of uncertain kinematics and dynamics. In terms of the system synchronisation and adaptive control, the proposed approach can stabilise position tracking of each robotic manipulator while coordinating its motion with the other robotic manipulators. On the other hand, the developed approach can cope with kinematic and dynamic uncertainties. The corresponding stability analysis is presented to lay a foundation for theoretical understanding of the underlying issues as well as an assurance for safely operating real systems. Illustrative examples are bench tested to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. In addition, to face the challenging issues, this study provides an exemplary showcase with effectively to integrate several cross boundary theoretical results to formulate an interdisciplinary solution.

  10. Dynamic Effects of Anchor Positional Tolerance on Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Christopher; Pakrashi, Vikram; Murphy, Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    For water depths greater than 60m floating wind turbines will become the most economical option for generating offshore wind energy. Tension mooring stabilised units are one type of platform being considered by the offshore wind energy industry. The complex mooring arrangement used by this type of platform means that the dynamics are greatly effected by offsets in the positioning of the anchors. This paper examines the issue of tendon anchor position tolerances. The dynamic effects of three positional tolerances are analysed in survival state using the time domain FASTLink. The severe impact of worst case anchor positional offsets on platform and turbine survivability is shown. The worst anchor misposition combinations are highlighted and should be strongly avoided. Novel methods to mitigate this issue are presented.

  11. Bacteria distribution and dynamics in constructed wetlands based on modelling results.

    PubMed

    Samsó, Roger; García, Joan

    2013-09-01

    Bacteria communities growing in constructed wetlands play a major role on the removal of pollutants from wastewater and the presence of a stable community is a critical factor affecting their performance. With this work we aimed at finding how long it takes for bacterial communities to stabilise in constructed wetlands and at answering specific questions regarding their abundance, spatial distribution and their relative importance on the treatment processes. To this end the numerical model BIO_PORE was used to simulate the dynamics of 6 functional bacteria groups (heterotrophic, autotrophic nitrifying, fermenting, acetotrophic methanogenic, acetotrophic sulphate reducing and sulphide oxidising bacteria) within a wetland for a period of 3 years. Three indicators of bacterial stabilisation were used: 1) total biomass; b) effluent pollutant concentrations and c) Shannon's diversity index. Results indicate that aerobic bacteria dominated the wetland until the 80th day of operation. Anaerobic bacteria dominated the wetland from that moment and until the end of the studied period. Bacteria stability was reached between 400 and 700 days after starting operation. Once the wetland reached stability, sulphate reducing bacteria accounted for the highest biomass of all bacterial groups (46%). The distribution of bacterial communities obtained after bacterial stability is consistent with available experimental results, and was clearly controlled by dissolved oxygen (SO) concentrations and H2S toxicity. After stability, the progressive accumulation of inert solids pushed the location of the active bacteria zone towards the outlet section.

  12. Novel cardiac pacemaker-based human model of periodic breathing to develop real-time, pre-emptive technology for carbon dioxide stabilisation

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Resham; Giannoni, Alberto; Willson, Keith; Manisty, Charlotte H; Mebrate, Yoseph; Kyriacou, Andreas; Yadav, Hemang; Unsworth, Beth; Sutton, Richard; Mayet, Jamil; Hughes, Alun D; Francis, Darrel P

    2014-01-01

    Background Constant flow and concentration CO2 has previously been efficacious in attenuating ventilatory oscillations in periodic breathing (PB) where oscillations in CO2 drive ventilatory oscillations. However, it has the undesirable effect of increasing end-tidal CO2, and ventilation. We tested, in a model of PB, a dynamic CO2 therapy that aims to attenuate pacemaker-induced ventilatory oscillations while minimising CO2 dose. Methods First, pacemakers were manipulated in 12 pacemaker recipients, 6 with heart failure (ejection fraction (EF)=23.7±7.3%) and 6 without heart failure, to experimentally induce PB. Second, we applied a real-time algorithm of pre-emptive dynamic exogenous CO2 administration, and tested different timings. Results We found that cardiac output alternation using pacemakers successfully induced PB. Dynamic CO2 therapy, when delivered coincident with hyperventilation, attenuated 57% of the experimentally induced oscillations in end-tidal CO2: SD/mean 0.06±0.01 untreated versus 0.04±0.01 with treatment (p<0.0001) and 0.02±0.01 in baseline non-modified breathing. This translated to a 56% reduction in induced ventilatory oscillations: SD/mean 0.19±0.09 untreated versus 0.14±0.06 with treatment (p=0.001) and 0.10±0.03 at baseline. Of note, end-tidal CO2 did not significantly rise when dynamic CO2 was applied to the model (4.84±0.47 vs 4.91± 0.45 kPa, p=0.08). Furthermore, mean ventilation was also not significantly increased by dynamic CO2 compared with untreated (7.8±1.2 vs 8.4±1.2 L/min, p=0.17). Conclusions Cardiac pacemaker manipulation can be used to induce PB experimentally. In this induced PB, delivering CO2 coincident with hyperventilation, ventilatory oscillations can be substantially attenuated without a significant increase in end-tidal CO2 or ventilation. Dynamic CO2 administration might be developed into a clinical treatment for PB. Trial Registration number ISRCTN29344450. PMID:25332798

  13. An efficient model of drillstring dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butlin, T.; Langley, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    High amplitude vibration regimes can cause significant damage to oilwell drillstrings: torsional stick-slip oscillation, forward whirl and backward whirl are each associated with different kinds of damage. There is a need for models of drillstring dynamics that can predict this variety of phenomena that are: efficient enough to carry out parametric studies; simple enough to provide insight into the underlying physics, and which retain sufficient detail to correlate to real drillstrings. The modelling strategy presented in this paper attempts to balance these requirements. It includes the dynamics of the full length of the drillstring over a wide bandwidth but assumes that the main nonlinear effects are due to spatially localised regions of strong nonlinearity, for example at the drillbit cutting interface and at stabilisers where the borehole wall clearance is smallest. The equations of motion can be formed in terms of this reduced set of degrees of freedom, coupled to the nonlinear contact laws and solved by time-domain integration. Two implementations of this approach are presented, using (1) digital filters and (2) a finite element model to describe the linear dynamics. Choosing a sampling period that is less than the group delay between nonlinear degrees of freedom results in a decoupled set of equations that can be solved very efficiently. Several cases are presented which demonstrate a variety of phenomena, including stick-slip oscillation; forward whirl and backward whirl. Parametric studies are shown which reveal the conditions which lead to high amplitude vibration regimes, and an analytic regime boundary is derived for torsional stick-slip oscillation. The digital filter and finite element models are shown to be in good agreement and are similarly computationally efficient. The digital filter approach has the advantage of more intuitive interpretation, while the finite element model is more readily implemented using existing software packages.

  14. Vegetation dynamics--simulating responses to climatic change.

    PubMed

    Woodward, F I; Lomas, M R

    2004-08-01

    A modelling approach to simulating vegetation dynamics is described, incorporating critical processes of carbon sequestration, growth, mortality and distribution. The model has been developed to investigate the responses of vegetation to environmental change, at time scales from days to centuries and from the local to the global scale. The model is outlined and subsequent tests, against independent data sources, are relatively successful, from the small scale to the global scale. Tests against eddy covariance observations of carbon exchange by vegetation indicated significant differences between measured and simulated net ecosystem production (NEP). NEP is the net of large fluxes due to gross primary production and respiration, which are not directly measured and so there is some uncertainty in explaining differences between observations and simulations. In addition it was noted that closer agreement of fluxes was achieved for natural, or long-lived managed vegetation than for recently managed vegetation. The discrepancies appear to be most closely related to respiratory carbon losses from the soil, but this area needs further exploration. The differences do not scale up to the global scale, where simulated and measured global net biome production were similar, indicating that fluxes measured at the managed observed sites are not typical globally. The model (the Sheffield Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, SDGVM) has been applied to contemporary vegetation dynamics and indicates a significant CO2 fertilisation effect on the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. The terrestrial carbon sink for the 20th century is simulated to be widespread between latitudes 40 degrees S and 65 degrees N, but is greatest between 10 degrees S and 6 degrees N, excluding the effects of human deforestation. The mean maximum sink capacity over the 20th century is small, at 25 gC m(-2) year(-1), or approximately 1% of gross primary production. Simulations of vegetation dynamics under a scenario

  15. Dynamic stability of an aerodynamically efficient motorcycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Amrit; Limebeer, David J. N.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycles exhibit two potentially dangerous oscillatory modes known as 'wobble' and 'weave'. The former is reminiscent of supermarket castor shimmy, while the latter is a low frequency 'fish-tailing' motion that involves a combination of rolling, yawing, steering and side-slipping motions. These unwanted dynamic features, which can occur when two-wheeled vehicles are operated at speed, have been studied extensively. The aim of this paper is to use mathematical analysis to identify important stability trends in the on-going design of a novel aerodynamically efficient motorcycle known as the ECOSSE Spirit ES1. A mathematical model of the ES1 is developed using a multi-body dynamics software package called VehicleSim [Anon, VehicleSim Lisp Reference Manual Version 1.0, Mechanical Simulation Corporation, 2008. Available at http://www.carsim.com]. This high-fidelity motorcycle model includes realistic tyre-road contact geometry, a comprehensive tyre model, tyre relaxation and a flexible frame. A parameter set representative of a modern high-performance machine and rider is used. Local stability is investigated via the eigenvalues of the linearised models that are associated with equilibrium points of interest. A comprehensive study of the effects of frame flexibilities, acceleration, aerodynamics and tyre variations is presented, and an optimal passive steering compensator is derived. It is shown that the traditional steering damper cannot be used to stabilise the ES1 over its entire operating speed range. A simple passive compensator, involving an inerter is proposed. Flexibility can be introduced deliberately into various chassis components to change the stability characteristics of the vehicle; the implications of this idea are studied.

  16. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  17. No statistically significant kinematic difference found between a cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilised Triathlon knee arthroplasty: a laboratory study involving eight cadavers examining soft-tissue laxity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, N C; Ghosh, K M; Blain, A P; Rushton, S P; Longstaff, L M; Deehan, D J

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the maximum laxity conferred by the cruciate-retaining (CR) and posterior-stabilised (PS) Triathlon single-radius total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for anterior drawer, varus-valgus opening and rotation in eight cadaver knees through a defined arc of flexion (0º to 110º). The null hypothesis was that the limits of laxity of CR- and PS-TKAs are not significantly different. The investigation was undertaken in eight loaded cadaver knees undergoing subjective stress testing using a measurement rig. Firstly the native knee was tested prior to preparation for CR-TKA and subsequently for PS-TKA implantation. Surgical navigation was used to track maximal displacements/rotations at 0º, 30º, 60º, 90º and 110° of flexion. Mixed-effects modelling was used to define the behaviour of the TKAs. The laxity measured for the CR- and PS-TKAs revealed no statistically significant differences over the studied flexion arc for the two versions of TKA. Compared with the native knee both TKAs exhibited slightly increased anterior drawer and decreased varus-valgus and internal-external roational laxities. We believe further study is required to define the clinical states for which the additional constraint offered by a PS-TKA implant may be beneficial.

  18. The effects of nutrient limitation (nitrogen and phosphorus) on BOD removal from post-coagulated Pinus radiata sulfite pulp and paper mill wastewater in a baffled aerated stabilisation basin-laboratory pilot scale study.

    PubMed

    Dewi, R; Van Leeuwen, J A; Everson, A; Nothrop, S C; Chow, C W K

    2011-01-01

    The use of coagulation and flocculation for tertiary treatment of pulp and paper mill effluent was investigated, where the evaluation was based on the removal of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and BOD from post-coagulated wastewater. The study was undertaken on laboratory scale aerobic stabilisation basins (ASB). Two post coagulated (alum) wastewaters were studied, where the BOD:N:P ratios were 100:1.3:0.06 and 100:1.3:0.3. These wastewaters were treated in two identical concurrent simulations (A & B). The influent ratio for 'A' was selected representing the composition of actual coagulated Pinus radiata sulfite pulp effluent mixed with paper mill effluent. The input composition for 'B' represented a typical P concentration found in existing pulp and paper mill effluents. Unmodified sludge collected from a mill-pond was added at 4% v/v to each simulation replicating the treatment conditions at full-scale. Similar high percentage removals of BOD and COD occurred after 28 days (two HRTs) which were 94 and 67% respectively for 'A', and 98 and 70% respectively for 'B', where both remained at steady state during the third HRT. A statistical analysis of the data revealed that there was no significant difference in the sample variance of the BOD and COD results.

  19. Effects of CO2 laser irradiation on the surface properties of magnesia-partially stabilised zirconia (MgO-PSZ) bioceramic and the subsequent improvements in human osteoblast cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hao, L; Lawrence, J; Chian, K S

    2004-10-01

    In order to acquire the surface properties favouring osseo-integration at the implant and bone interface, human foetal osteoblast cells (hFOB) were used in an in vitro test to examine changes in cell adhesion on a magnesia-partially stabilised zirconia (MgO-PSZ) bioceramic after CO(2) laser treatment. The surface roughness, microstructure, crystal size and surface energy of untreated and CO(2) laser-treated MgO-PSZ were fully characterised. The in vitro cell evaluation revealed a more favourable cell response on the CO(2) laser-treated MgO-PSZ than on the untreated sample. After 24-h cell incubation, no cell was observed on the MgO-PSZ, whereas a few cells attached on the CO(2) laser-treated MgO-PSZandshowedwellspreadandgood attachment. Moreover, the cell coverage density indicating cell proliferation generally increases with CO(2) laser power densities applied in the experiments. The enhancement of the surface energy of the MgO-PSZ, especially its polar component caused by the CO(2) laser treatment, was found to play a significant role in the initial cell attaching, thus enhancing the cell growth. Moreover, the change in topography induced by the CO(2) laser treatment was identified as one of the factors influencing the hFOB cell response.

  20. Nafion-stabilised bimetallic Pt–Cr nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs)† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ra16025e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G.; Sharma, S.

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the unique combination of alloying (Pt with Cr) and Nafion stabilisation to reap the benefits of catalyst systems with enhanced catalytic activity and improved durability in PEMFCs. Pt–Cr alloy nanoparticles stabilised with Nafion were chosen in the current study owing to their higher stability in acidic and oxidising media at high temperatures compared to other Pt-transition metal alloys (e.g. Pt–Ni, Pt–Co). Two different precursor : reducing agent (1 : 10 and 1 : 20) ratios were used in order to prepare two different alloys, denoted as Pt–Cr 10 and Pt–Cr 20. The Pt–Cr 20 alloy system (with composition Pt80Cr20) demonstrated higher electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction compared to commercial Pt/C (TKK) catalysts. Accelerated stress tests and single cell tests revealed that Nafion stabilised alloy catalyst systems displayed significantly enhanced durability (only ∼20% loss of ECSA) compared with Pt/C (50% loss of ECSA) due to improved catalyst–ionomer interaction. Furthermore, the Pt–Cr 20 alloy system demonstrated a current density comparable to that of Pt/C making them promising potential electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. PMID:27774145

  1. Drosophila p120-catenin is crucial for endocytosis of the dynamic E-cadherin–Bazooka complex

    PubMed Central

    Bulgakova, Natalia A.; Brown, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intracellular functions of classical cadherins are mediated through the direct binding of two catenins: β-catenin and p120-catenin (also known as CTNND1 in vertebrates, and p120ctn in Drosophila). Whereas β-catenin is crucial for cadherin function, the role of p120-catenin is less clear and appears to vary between organisms. We show here that p120-catenin has a conserved role in regulating the endocytosis of cadherins, but that its ancestral role might have been to promote endocytosis, followed by the acquisition of a new inhibitory role in vertebrates. In Drosophila, p120-catenin facilitates endocytosis of the dynamic E-cadherin–Bazooka subcomplex, which is followed by its recycling. The absence of p120-catenin stabilises this subcomplex at the membrane, reducing the ability of cells to exchange neighbours in embryos and expanding cell–cell contacts in imaginal discs. PMID:26698216

  2. Persuasion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, Gérard; Deffuant, Guillaume; Amblard, Frédéric

    2005-08-01

    We here discuss a model of continuous opinion dynamics in which agents adjust continuous opinions as a result of random binary encounters whenever their difference in opinion is below a given threshold. We concentrate on the version of the model in the presence of few extremists which might drive the dynamics to generalized extremism. A network version of the dynamics is presented here, and its results are compared to those previously obtained for the full-mixing case. The same dynamical regimes are observed, but in rather different parameter regions. We here show that the combination of meso-scale features resulting from the first interaction steps determines the asymptotic state of the dynamics.

  3. Dynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We distinguish static and dynamic optimization of programs: whereas static optimization modifies a program before runtime and is based only on its syntactical structure, dynamic optimization is based on the statistical properties of the input source and examples of program execution. Explanation-based generalization is a commonly used dynamic optimization method, but its effectiveness as a speedup-learning method is limited, in part because it fails to separate the learning process from the program transformation process. This paper describes a dynamic optimization technique called a learn-optimize cycle that first uses a learning element to uncover predictable patterns in the program execution and then uses an optimization algorithm to map these patterns into beneficial transformations. The technique has been used successfully for dynamic optimization of pure Prolog.

  4. Dynamic triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  5. Prominence Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kucera, Terry; Kawashima, Rei; DeVore, C.; Karpen, Judy; Antiochos, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Fine structure prominence dynamics are visible in the majority of high-spatial resolution data from Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). We present the results of a study investigating the nature of these horizontal and vertical flows and discuss them in the context of ion-neutral coupling in a partially ionized prominence plasma. We also discuss how models can help in the interpretation of these observations.

  6. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  7. Forest dynamics.

    PubMed

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  8. Forest dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  9. Forest dynamics.

    PubMed

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  10. Partitioning dynamic electron correlation energy: Viewing Møller-Plesset correlation energies through Interacting Quantum Atom (IQA) energy partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonagh, James L.; Vincent, Mark A.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-10-01

    Here MP2, MP3 and MP4(SDQ) are energy-partitioned for the first time within the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) context, as proof-of-concept for H2, He2 and HF. Energies are decomposed into four primary energy contributions: (i) atomic self-energies, and atomic interaction energies comprising of (ii) Coulomb, (iii) exchange and (iv) dynamic election correlation terms. We generate and partition one- and two-particle density-matrices to obtain all atomic energy components. This work suggests that, in terms of Van der Waals dispersion, the correlation energies represent an atomic stabilisation, by proximity to other atoms, as opposed to direct interactions with other nearby atoms.

  11. System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morecroft, John

    System dynamics is an approach for thinking about and simulating situations and organisations of all kinds and sizes by visualising how the elements fit together, interact and change over time. This chapter, written by John Morecroft, describes modern system dynamics which retains the fundamentals developed in the 1950s by Jay W. Forrester of the MIT Sloan School of Management. It looks at feedback loops and time delays that affect system behaviour in a non-linear way, and illustrates how dynamic behaviour depends upon feedback loop structures. It also recognises improvements as part of the ongoing process of managing a situation in order to achieve goals. Significantly it recognises the importance of context, and practitioner skills. Feedback systems thinking views problems and solutions as being intertwined. The main concepts and tools: feedback structure and behaviour, causal loop diagrams, dynamics, are practically illustrated in a wide variety of contexts from a hot water shower through to a symphony orchestra and the practical application of the approach is described through several real examples of its use for strategic planning and evaluation.

  12. Dynamic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoel, Jim

    1998-01-01

    Adventure therapists are often asked to assess clients in a manner that differs from their therapeutic approach, resulting in assessment being perceived as burdensome. Project Adventure's Decision Tree combines assessment with activity selection to create a dynamic tool that is responsive to group, individual, and leader needs. Example focuses on…

  13. Characterising dynamic non-linearity in floating wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Fully coupled aero-hydro-control-elastic codes are being developed to cope with the new modelling challenges presented by floating wind turbines, but there is also a place for more efficient methods of analysis. One option is linearisation and analysis in the frequency domain. For this to be an effective method, the non-linearities in the system must be well understood. The present study focusses on understanding the dynamic response of the rotor to the overall platform motion, as would arise from wave loading, by using a simple model of a floating wind turbine with a rigid tower and flexible rotor (represented by hinged rigid blades). First, an equation of motion of the blade is derived and an approximate solution for the blade response is found using the perturbation method. Secondly, the full non-linear solution is found by time- domain simulation. The response is found to be linear at lower platform pitching frequencies, becoming non-linear at higher frequencies, with the approximate solution giving good results for weakly non-linear behaviour. Higher rotor speeds have a stabilising effect on the response. In the context of typical floating turbine parameters, it is concluded that the blade flapwise response is likely to be linear.

  14. Cyclostationary analysis with logarithmic variance stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, Pietro; Shahriar, Md Rifat

    2016-03-01

    Second order cyclostationary (CS2) components in vibration or acoustic emission signals are typical symptoms of a wide variety of faults in rotating and alternating mechanical systems. The square envelope spectrum (SES), obtained via Hilbert transform of the original signal, is at the basis of the most common indicators used for detection of CS2 components. It has been shown that the SES is equivalent to an autocorrelation of the signal's discrete Fourier transform, and that CS2 components are a cause of high correlations in the frequency domain of the signal, thus resulting in peaks in the SES. Statistical tests have been proposed to determine if peaks in the SES are likely to belong to a normal variability in the signal or if they are proper symptoms of CS2 components. Despite the need for automated fault recognition and the theoretical soundness of these tests, this approach to machine diagnostics has been mostly neglected in industrial applications. In fact, in a series of experimental applications, even with proper pre-whitening steps, it has been found that healthy machines might produce high spectral correlations and therefore result in a highly biased SES distribution which might cause a series of false positives. In this paper a new envelope spectrum is defined, with the theoretical intent of rendering the hypothesis test variance-free. This newly proposed indicator will prove unbiased in case of multiple CS2 sources of spectral correlation, thus reducing the risk of false alarms.

  15. Global projections and climate stabilisation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedlingstein, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    The Summary for policy makers of the 5th Assessment Report of the Working Group 1 of IPCC has a figure that has no equivalent in previous IPCC assessment reports. This new figure shows the change in global average surface temperature as a function of cumulative anthropogenic emissions of CO2. In this talk I will describe how the concept of transient climate response to cumulative emissions (TCRE) that supports that figure emerged from the literature over the recent years and what are the fundamental physical and biogeochemical processes that explain this relationship and its linearity. I will also explore the implication of TCRE for long-term climate change and mitigation strategies as well as the limitations of the concept of TCRE.

  16. Drop dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The drop dynamics module is a Spacelab-compatible acoustic positioning and control system for conducting drop dynamics experiments in space. It consists basically of a chamber, a drop injector system, an acoustic positioning system, and a data collection system. The principal means of collecting data is by a cinegraphic camera. The drop is positioned in the center of the chamber by forces created by standing acoustic waves generated in the nearly cubical chamber (about 12 cm on a side). The drop can be spun or oscillated up to fission by varying the phse and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The system is designed to perform its experiments unattended, except for start-up and shutdown events and other unique events that require the attention of the Spacelab payload specialist.

  17. Dynamic acoustothermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Belyaev, R. V.; Vilkov, V. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'D, A. D.; Sharakshané, A. S.

    2009-10-01

    Two- and three-dimensional dynamic acoustothermography is carried out in model experiments. The temperature of the model plasticine objects was determined from the measurements of their thermal acoustic radiation in the course of their heating and cooling. The measurements were performed with the use of a planar array of 14 acoustothermometers and two planar arrays perpendicular to each other with 7 acoustothermometers in each of them. The results of measurements were used to plot a dynamic map of the temperature of acoustic brightness and to reconstruct the dynamics of variations in the parameters of the temperature distribution: the spatial coordinates of the heated region, its characteristic size and, maximal temperature. The duration of one measurement cycle was 10 s, the error in determining the position of the center and the size of the heated region did not exceed 1 mm, and the accuracy of the temperature’s calculation was about 1 degree. The results of the study may be used for controlling the temperature in the course of medical procedures that include heating of internal tissues in human patients.

  18. Modelling and analysis of dynamics of viral infection of cells and of interferon resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getto, Ph.; Kimmel, M.; Marciniak-Czochra, A.

    2008-08-01

    Interferons are active biomolecules, which help fight viral infections by spreading from infected to uninfected cells and activate effector molecules, which confer resistance from the virus on cells. We propose a new model of dynamics of viral infection, including endocytosis, cell death, production of interferon and development of resistance. The novel element is a specific biologically justified mechanism of interferon action, which results in dynamics different from other infection models. The model reflects conditions prevailing in liquid cultures (ideal mixing), and the absence of cells or virus influx from outside. The basic model is a nonlinear system of five ordinary differential equations. For this variant, it is possible to characterise global behaviour, using a conservation law. Analytic results are supplemented by computational studies. The second variant of the model includes age-of-infection structure of infected cells, which is described by a transport-type partial differential equation for infected cells. The conclusions are: (i) If virus mortality is included, the virus becomes eventually extinct and subpopulations of uninfected and resistant cells are established. (ii) If virus mortality is not included, the dynamics may lead to extinction of uninfected cells. (iii) Switching off the interferon defense results in a decrease of the sum total of uninfected and resistant cells. (iv) Infection-age structure of infected cells may result in stabilisation or destabilisation of the system, depending on detailed assumptions. Our work seems to constitute the first comprehensive mathematical analysis of the cell-virus-interferon system based on biologically plausible hypotheses.

  19. Leidenfrost Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéré, David

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses how drops can levitate on a cushion of vapor when brought in contact with a hot solid. This is the so-called Leidenfrost phenomenon, a dynamical and transient effect, as vapor is injected below the liquid and pressed by the drop weight. The absence of solid/liquid contact provides unique mobility for the levitating liquid, contrasting with the usual situations in which contact lines induce adhesion and enhanced friction: hence a frictionless motion, and the possibility of bouncing after impact. All these characteristics can be combined to create devices in which self-propulsion is obtained, using asymmetric textures on the hot solid surface.

  20. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  1. Dynamic Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, B. N.; Parker, Foreword by E. N.

    2007-07-01

    Foreword E. N. Parker; 1. Dynamic Sun: an introduction B. N. Dwivedi; 2. Solar models: structure, neutrinos and helioseismological properties J. N. Bahcall, S. Basu and M. H. Pinsonneault; 3. Seismic Sun S. M. Chitre and H. M. Antia; 4. Rotation of the solar interior J. Christensen-Dalsgaard and M. J. Thompson; 5. Helioseismic tomography A. G. Kosovichev; 6. The solar dynamo as a model of the solar cycle A. R. Choudhuri; 7. Spectro-polarimetry J. O. Stenflo; 8. Solar photosphere and convection Å. Nordlund; 9. The dynamics of the quiet solar chromosphere W. Kalkofen, S. S. Hasan and P. Ulmschneider; 10. Heating of the solar chromosphere P. Ulmschneider and W. Kalkofen; 11. The solar transition region O. Kjeldseth-Moe; 12. Solar magnetohydrodynamics E. R. Priest; 13. Solar activity Z. Švestka; 14. Particle acceleration A. G. Emslie and J. A. Miller; 15. Radio observations of explosive energy releases on the Sun M. R. Kundu and S. M. White; 16. Coronal oscillations V. M. Nakariakov; 17. Probing the Sun's hot corona K. J. H. Phillips and B. N. Dwivedi; 18. Vacuum-ultraviolet emission line diagnostics for solar plasmas B. N. Dwivedi, A. Mohan and K. Wilhelm; 19. Solar wind E. Marsch, W. I. Axford and J. F. McKenzie; 20. Solar observing facilities B. Fleck and C. U. Keller; Index.

  2. Dynamic flight stability in the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2003-08-01

    Here we provide the first formal quantitative analysis of dynamic stability in a flying animal. By measuring the longitudinal static stability derivatives and mass distribution of desert locusts Schistocerca gregaria, we find that their static stability and static control responses are insufficient to provide asymptotic longitudinal dynamic stability unless they are sensitive to pitch attitude (measured with respect to an inertial or earth-fixed frame) as well as aerodynamic incidence (measured relative to the direction of flight). We find no evidence for a 'constant-lift reaction', previously supposed to keep lift production constant over a range of body angles, and show that such a reaction would be inconsequential because locusts can potentially correct for pitch disturbances within a single wingbeat. The static stability derivatives identify three natural longitudinal modes of motion: one stable subsidence mode, one unstable divergence mode, and one stable oscillatory mode (which is present with or without pitch attitude control). The latter is identified with the short period mode of aircraft, and shown to consist of rapid pitch oscillations with negligible changes in forward speed. The frequency of the short period mode (approx. 10 Hz) is only half the wingbeat frequency (approx. 22 Hz), so the mode would become coupled with the flapping cycle without adequate damping. Pitch rate damping is shown to be highly effective for this purpose - especially at the small scales associated with insect flight - and may be essential in stabilising locust flight. Although having a short period mode frequency close to the wingbeat frequency risks coupling, it is essential for control inputs made at the level of a single wingbeat to be effective. This is identified as a general constraint on flight control in flying animals.

  3. No effect of dynamic loading on bone graft healing in femoral segmental defect reconstructions in the goat.

    PubMed

    Bullens, Pieter H J; Hannink, Gerjon; Verdonschot, Nico; Buma, Pieter

    2010-12-01

    We studied if a static or dynamic mode of nail fixation influenced the healing of segmental defect reconstructions in long bones. Defects in the femur of goats were reconstructed using a cage filled with firmly impacted morsellised allograft mixed with a hydroxyapatite paste (Ostim). All reconstructions were stabilised with an intramedullary nail. In one group (n=6) the intramedullary nail was statically locked, in the second group (n=6) a dynamic mode of nail fixation was applied. We hypothesised that dynamisation of the nail would load, and by that stimulate the healing of the bone graft. Mechanical torsion strength of the reconstructions of the femur with the static and dynamic mode of nail fixation appeared to be 74.8±17.5% and 73.0±13.4%, respectively as compared with the contralateral femurs after 6 months. In all reconstructions, the grafts united radiographically and histologically to the host bone, and remodelled into a new vital bone structure. No large differences were found between newly formed bone areas inside and outside the mesh of the two groups. The area of callus outside the mesh in the dynamic mode of fixation group was smaller (p=0.042), whilst the percentage of bone outside the mesh was larger (p=0.049), as compared to the static mode of fixation group. The data suggest that healing of these defects with impacted morsellised graft in a cage is not significantly influenced by the mode of fixation of the nail in this model.

  4. Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, John

    2004-12-01

    In his book, John Green presents a unique personal insight into the fundamentals of fluid mechanics and atmospheric dynamics. Generations of students have benefited from his lectures, and this book, many years in the making, is the result of his wide teaching and research experience. The theory of fluid flow has developed to such an extent that very complex mathematics and models are currently used to describe it, but many of the fundamental results follow from relatively simple considerations: these classic principles are derived here in a novel, distinctive, and at times even idiosyncratic, way. The book is an introduction to fluid mechanics in the atmosphere for students and researchers that are already familiar with the subject, but who wish to extend their knowledge and philosophy beyond the currently popular development of conventional undergraduate instruction.

  5. Sunspot dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this research was the understanding of the various oscillatory, transient, and quasi-steady motions in sunspots and the basic structure of a sunspot. The research involved both theoretical modeling (based on thermohydrodynamic theory) and observations of dynamical phenomena in sunspots. The principal topics of the research were sunspot seismology (the interaction of solar p-modes with a sunspot as a probe of the subsurface structure of a sunspot); three minute umbral oscillations and their relation to the structure of the umbral atmosphere; siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes and their relation to the photospheric Evershed flow and to intense magnetic elements outside of sunspots; and more general theoretical work on magneto-atmospheric waves. Here, a summary of results is given.

  6. Sunspot dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes recent results of our theoretical and observational work on dynamical phenomena in sunspots. The overall goal of this research has been a better understanding of the various oscillatory, transient, and steady motions in a sunspot and their relation to the basic structure of the sunspot. The principal topics of the research reported here are the following: (1) sunspot seismology, i.e., the study of the interaction of solar p-modes with a sunspot as a probe of the subsurface structure of a sunspot; (2) local sources of acoustic waves in the solar photosphere; and (3) siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes and their relation to the photospheric Evershed flow and to intense magnetic elements outside of sunspots.

  7. Molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaolin; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation holds the promise of revealing the mechanisms of biological processes in their ultimate detail. It is carried out by computing the interaction forces acting on each atom and then propagating the velocities and positions of the atoms by numerical integration of Newton's equations of motion. In this review, we present an overview of how the MD simulation can be conducted to address computational toxicity problems. The study cases will cover a standard MD simulation performed to investigate the overall flexibility of a cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme and a set of more advanced MD simulations to examine the barrier to ion conduction in a human α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR).

  8. Group dynamics.

    PubMed

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  9. Robust delay-dependent feedforward control of neutral time-delay systems via dynamic IQCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ucun, L.; Küçükdemiral, I. B.

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the design problem of delay-dependent ? based robust and optimal feedforward controller design for a class of time-delay control systems having state, control and neutral type delays which are subject to norm-bounded uncertainties and ? type measurable or observable disturbance signals. Two independent loops which include state-feedback and dynamic feedforward controller form the basis of the proposed control scheme in this study. State-feedback controller is generally used in stabilisation of the nominal delay-free system, whereas the feedforward controller is used for improving disturbance attenuation performance of the overall system. In order to obtain less conservative results, the delay and parametric uncertainty effects are treated in operator view point and represented by frequency-dependent (dynamic) integral quadratic constraints (IQCs). Moreover, sufficient delay-dependent criterion is developed in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) such that the time-delay system having parametric uncertainties is guaranteed to be asymptotically stable with minimum achievable disturbance attenuation level. Plenty of numerical examples are provided at the end, in order to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed technique. The achieved results on minimum achievable disturbance attenuation level and maximum allowable delay bounds are exhibited to be less conservative in comparison to those of controllers having only feedback loop.

  10. NuSAP modulates the dynamics of kinetochore microtubules by attenuating MCAK depolymerisation activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenyu; Zhang, Yajun; Yang, Qiaoyun; Ye, Fan; Sun, Stella Ying; Chen, Ee Sin; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar and spindle-associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-associated protein that functions as a microtubule stabiliser. Depletion of NuSAP leads to severe mitotic defects, however the mechanism by which NuSAP regulates mitosis remains elusive. In this study, we identify the microtubule depolymeriser, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK), as a novel binding partner of NuSAP. We show that NuSAP regulates the dynamics and depolymerisation activity of MCAK. Phosphorylation of MCAK by Aurora B kinase, a component of the chromosomal passenger complex, significantly enhances the interaction of NuSAP with MCAK and modulates the effects of NuSAP on the depolymerisation activity of MCAK. Our results reveal an underlying mechanism by which NuSAP controls kinetochore microtubule dynamics spatially and temporally by modulating the depolymerisation function of MCAK in an Aurora B kinase-dependent manner. Hence, this study provides new insights into the function of NuSAP in spindle formation during mitosis. PMID:26733216

  11. Internet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  12. Dynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingshirn, C.

    The purpose of this chapter is to present the results of the dynamics of exciton (polariton)s or more generally of electron-hole pairs. For a recent review of this topic concentrating on quantum wells, see Davies and Jagadish (Laser Photon. Rev. 3(1), 1(2008)). We neither consider the dynamics of carriers, for example, their relaxation time entering in Hall mobility or electrical conductivity, nor the dynamics of phonons or spins, respectively. We give here only a very small selection of references to these topics (Baxter and Schmuttenmaer, J. Phys. Chem. B, 110:25229, 2006; Queiroz et al. Superlattice Microstruct. 42:270, 2007; Niehaus and Schwarz, Superlattice Microstruct. 42:299, 2007; Lee et al., J. Appl. Phys. 93:4939, 2003; A. K Azad, J. Han, W. Zhang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 88:021103, 2006; Janssen et al., QELS 2008 IEEE 2; D. Lagarde et al., Phys. Stat. Sol. C 4:472, 2007; S. Gosh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86:232507, 2005; W. K. Liu et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 98:186804, 2007). The main characteristic time constants relevant to optical properties close to the fundamental absorption edge are the dephasing time T 2, (i.e. the time after which the polarization amplitude of the optically excited electron-hole pair loses the coherence with the driving light field), the intra band or inter sub band relaxation times T 3 (i.e. the time it takes for the electron-hole pairs to relax from their initial state of excitation to a certain other state e.g. to a thermal distribution with a temperature equal to or possibly still above lattice temperature) and finally the lifetime T 1 (i.e. the time until the electron-hole pairs recombine). The characteristic time constants T 2 and T 1 are also known as transverse and longitudinal relaxation times, respectively. Their inverses are the corresponding rate constants. T 2 is inversely proportional to the homogeneous width Γ, and T 1 includes both the radiative and the generally dominating non-radiative recombination (Hauser et al., Appl

  13. Dynamic refractometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A refractometer computer controls the rotation of a rotary plate upon which are mounted a prism optically coupled via an optical window to a spectroscopic cell holding a resin exhibiting a dynamic refractive index during photocuring. The computer system positions the prism and spectroscopic cell relative to a visible light laser which illuminates the prism-resin interface at selected incidence angles. A photodetector mounted on the plate generates a signal to the computer proportional to intensity of an internally reflected light beam. A curing light is selectively transmitted through the prism and into the photocurable resin. The refractometer determines the intensity of the internally reflected beam a selected incidence angles and determines the effective refractive index curve of the resin at an uncured state and, optionally, at a completely cured state. Next, an amount of uncured resin and selected optical components to be joined by the resin is placed in the spectroscopic cell and irradiated with the UV light. The refractometer is fixed at a selected incidence angle and measures the intensity of an internally reflected light beam of light throughout the cure cycle. The refractometer determines the resin's refractive index of the polymeric mixture by means of extrapolation of a horizontal shift in the effective refractive index curve of the resin from an uncured state to a selected point in the cure cycle.

  14. Void Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Nelson D.; Paz, Dante; Lares, Marcelo; Ceccarelli, Laura; Lambas, Diego Garcí A.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic voids are becoming key players in testing the physics of our Universe.Here we concentrate on the abundances and the dynamics of voids as these are among the best candidatesto provide information on cosmological parameters. Cai, Padilla & Li (2014)use the abundance of voids to tell apart Hu & Sawicki f(R) models from General Relativity. An interestingresult is that even though, as expected, voids in the dark matter field are emptier in f(R) gravity due to the fifth force expellingaway from the void centres, this result is reversed when haloes are used to find voids. The abundance of voids in this casebecomes even lower in f(R) compared to GR for large voids. Still, the differences are significant and thisprovides a way to tell apart these models. The velocity field differences between f(R) and GR, on the other hand, arethe same for halo voids and for dark matter voids.Paz et al. (2013), concentrate on the velocity profiles around voids. First they show the necessityof four parameters to describe the density profiles around voids given two distinct voidpopulations, voids-in-voids and voids-in-clouds. This profile is used to predict peculiar velocities around voids,and the combination of the latter with void density profiles allows the construction of modelvoid-galaxy cross-correlation functions with redshift space distortions. When these modelsare tuned to fit the measured correlation functions for voids and galaxies in the SloanDigital Sky Survey, small voids are found to be of the void-in-cloud type, whereas largerones are consistent with being void-in-void. This is a novel result that is obtaineddirectly from redshift space data around voids. These profiles can be used toremove systematics on void-galaxy Alcock-Pacinsky tests coming from redshift-space distortions.

  15. Bed and flow dynamics leading to sediment-wave initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, S. E.; Nikora, V. I.

    2009-04-01

    New PIV-based experiments show that the nascent seed waves from which both ripples and dunes develop are generated on planar mobile sediment beds in a two-stage process. The first stage comprises the motion of random sediment patches that reflect the passage of sediment-transport events caused by attached eddies. These eddy-transport events propagate at speeds that are proportional to their size and less than overhead eddy convection velocities, but potentially larger than local average fluid and sediment velocities. In the second stage, interactions of the moving patches result in a bed disturbance that exceeds a critical height and interrupts the bed-load layer. Quasi-regular seed waves are then generated successively downstream of this stabilised growing disturbance via a scour-deposition wave that arises from the requirement of sediment mass conservation and the sediment-transport and bed-stress distributions downstream of a bed perturbation. Seed waves are thereby of preferred lengths that scale with the grain size, i.e. length = O(130) grain diameters, agreeing with compiled measurements. This two-stage generation mechanism is valid for fully-turbulent hydraulically-smooth and rough-bed flows of small to large sediment transport rates. It is furthermore valid for laminar flows, although the critical disturbances leading to seed-wave generation arise through bed discontinuities, and not eddy-based sediment-transport events. The identified generation mechanism, which accounts for turbulence effects, explains the observed similar scaling of alluvial, closed-conduit and lightweight-sediment seed waves. The present measurements highlight further aspects of the flow dynamics preceding seed-wave generation, including: decreases in von Kármán's constant due to bed mobility, near-bed eddy convection speeds in excess of local double-averaged (in time and space) streamwise velocities, and the validity of the four-range spectral scaling model for open-channel flows

  16. Structural and Dynamic Requirements for Optimal Activity of the Essential Bacterial Enzyme Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, C. F.; Porebski, B. T.; Griffin, M. D. W.; Dobson, R. C. J.; Perugini, M. A.; Gerrard, J. A.; Buckle, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) is an essential enzyme involved in the lysine biosynthesis pathway. DHDPS from E. coli is a homotetramer consisting of a ‘dimer of dimers’, with the catalytic residues found at the tight-dimer interface. Crystallographic and biophysical evidence suggest that the dimers associate to stabilise the active site configuration, and mutation of a central dimer-dimer interface residue destabilises the tetramer, thus increasing the flexibility and reducing catalytic efficiency and substrate specificity. This has led to the hypothesis that the tetramer evolved to optimise the dynamics within the tight-dimer. In order to gain insights into DHDPS flexibility and its relationship to quaternary structure and function, we performed comparative Molecular Dynamics simulation studies of native tetrameric and dimeric forms of DHDPS from E. coli and also the native dimeric form from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These reveal a striking contrast between the dynamics of tetrameric and dimeric forms. Whereas the E. coli DHDPS tetramer is relatively rigid, both the E. coli and MRSA DHDPS dimers display high flexibility, resulting in monomer reorientation within the dimer and increased flexibility at the tight-dimer interface. The mutant E. coli DHDPS dimer exhibits disorder within its active site with deformation of critical catalytic residues and removal of key hydrogen bonds that render it inactive, whereas the similarly flexible MRSA DHDPS dimer maintains its catalytic geometry and is thus fully functional. Our data support the hypothesis that in both bacterial species optimal activity is achieved by fine tuning protein dynamics in different ways: E. coli DHDPS buttresses together two dimers, whereas MRSA dampens the motion using an extended tight-dimer interface. PMID:22685390

  17. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  18. Motorcycle dynamics by multibody dynamics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Imaizumi, Hirohide; Fujioka, Takehiko

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to construct simulation models of a motorcycle with a rider by use of multibody dynamics analysis (MDA). Three types of MDA models are developed for evaluation of the effectiveness of MDA for motorcycle dynamics. Impulse responses with parameter study and lane change maneuvers are calculated. The results of simulations agree with that of experiments well and effectiveness of MDA to the motorcycle dynamics field is shown.

  19. Effects of a solar wind dynamic pressure increase in the magnetosphere and in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juusola, L.; Andréeová, K.; Amm, O.; Kauristie, K.; Milan, S. E.; Palmroth, M.; Partamies, N.

    2010-10-01

    On 17 July 2005, an earthward bound north-south oriented magnetic cloud and its sheath were observed by the ACE, SoHO, and Wind solar wind monitors. A steplike increase of the solar wind dynamic pressure during northward interplanetary magnetic field conditions was related to the leading edge of the sheath. A timing analysis between the three spacecraft revealed that this front was not aligned with the GSE y-axis, but had a normal (-0.58,0.82,0). Hence, the first contact with the magnetosphere occurred on the dawnside rather than at the subsolar point. Fortunately, Cluster, Double Star 1, and Geotail happened to be distributed close to the magnetopause in this region, which made it possible to closely monitor the motion of the magnetopause. After the pressure front had impacted the magnetosphere, the magnetopause was perceived first to move inward and then immediately to correct the overshoot by slightly expanding again such that it ended up between the Cluster constellation with Double Star 1 inside the magnetosphere and Geotail in the magnetosheath. Coinciding with the inward and subsequent outward motion, the ground-based magnetic field at low latitudes was observed to first strengthen and then weaken. As the magnetopause position stabilised, so did the ground-based magnetic field intensity, settling at a level slightly higher than before the pressure increase. Altogether the magnetopause was moving for about 15 min after its first contact with the front. The high latitude ionospheric signature consisted of two parts: a shorter (few minutes) and less intense preliminary part comprised a decrease of AL and a negative variation of PC. A longer (about ten minutes) and more intense main part of the signature comprised an increase of AU and a positive variation of PC. Measurements from several ground-based magnetometer networks (210 MM CPMN, CANMOS, CARISMA, GIMA, IMAGE, MACCS, SuperMAG, THEMIS, TGO) were used to obtain information on the ionospheric E×B drift

  20. Investigations into crazing in glassy amorphous polymers through molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, Sudarkodi; Basu, Sumit

    2015-04-01

    In many glassy amorphous polymers, localisation of deformation during loading leads to crazes. Crazes are crack like features whose faces are bridged either by fibrils or a cellular network of voids and fibrils. While formation of crazes is aided by the presence of surface imperfections and embedded dust particles, in this work, we focus on intrinsic crazes that form spontaneously in the volume of the material. We perform carefully designed molecular dynamics simulations on well equilibrated samples of a model polymer with a view to gaining insights into certain incompletely understood aspects of the crazing process. These include genesis of the early nanovoids leading to craze nucleation, mechanisms of stabilising the cellular or fibrillar structure and the competition between chain scission and chain disentanglement in causing the final breakdown of the craze. Additionally, we identify and enumerate clusters of entanglement points with high functionality as effective topological constraints on macromolecular chains. We show that regions with low density of entanglement clusters serve as sites for nanovoid nucleation under high mean stress. Growth occurs by the repeated triggering of cavitation instabilities above a growing void. The growth of the void is aided by disentanglement in and flow of entanglements away from the cavitating region. Finally, for the chain lengths chosen, scission serves to supply short chains to the growing craze but breakdown occurs by complete disentanglement of the chains. In fact, most of the energy supplied to the material seems to be used in causing disentanglements and very little energy is required to create a stable fibril.

  1. Substrate-dependent dynamics of the multidrug efflux transporter AcrB of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tamai, Rei; Yamazaki, Megumi; Inaba, Takehiko; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-01-01

    The resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type xenobiotic efflux system plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of gram-negative bacteria. The only constitutively expressed RND system of Escherichia coli consists of the inner membrane transporter AcrB, the membrane fusion protein AcrA, and the outer membrane channel TolC. The latter two components are shared with another RND-type transporter AcrD, whose expression is induced by environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate how RND-type ternary complexes, which span two membranes and the cell wall, form in vivo. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy revealed that most fluorescent foci formed by AcrB fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) were stationary in the presence of TolC but showed lateral displacements when tolC was deleted. The fraction of stationary AcrB-GFP foci decreased with increasing levels of AcrD. We propose that the AcrB-containing complex becomes unstable upon the induction of AcrD, which presumably replaces AcrB, a process we call “transporter exchange.” This instability is suppressed by AcrB-specific substrates, suggesting that the ternary complex is stabilised when it is in action. These results suggest that the assembly of the RND-type efflux system is dynamically regulated in response to external stimuli, shedding new light on the adaptive antibiotic resistance of bacteria. PMID:26916090

  2. An upwind vertex centred Finite Volume solver for Lagrangian solid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Miquel; Gil, Antonio J.; Bonet, Javier; Lee, Chun Hean

    2015-11-01

    A vertex centred Jameson-Schmidt-Turkel (JST) finite volume algorithm was recently introduced by the authors (Aguirre et al., 2014 [1]) in the context of fast solid isothermal dynamics. The spatial discretisation scheme was constructed upon a Lagrangian two-field mixed (linear momentum and the deformation gradient) formulation presented as a system of conservation laws [2-4]. In this paper, the formulation is further enhanced by introducing a novel upwind vertex centred finite volume algorithm with three key novelties. First, a conservation law for the volume map is incorporated into the existing two-field system to extend the range of applications towards the incompressibility limit (Gil et al., 2014 [5]). Second, the use of a linearised Riemann solver and reconstruction limiters is derived for the stabilisation of the scheme together with an efficient edge-based implementation. Third, the treatment of thermo-mechanical processes through a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state is incorporated in the proposed formulation. For completeness, the study of the eigenvalue structure of the resulting system of conservation laws is carried out to demonstrate hyperbolicity and obtain the correct time step bounds for non-isothermal processes. A series of numerical examples are presented in order to assess the robustness of the proposed methodology. The overall scheme shows excellent behaviour in shock and bending dominated nearly incompressible scenarios without spurious pressure oscillations, yielding second order of convergence for both velocities and stresses.

  3. Dynamic Frames in Java Dynamic Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Peter H.; Ulbrich, Mattias; Weiß, Benjamin

    In this paper we present a realisation of the concept of dynamic frames in a dynamic logic for verifying Java programs. This is achieved by treating sets of heap locations as first class citizens in the logic. Syntax and formal semantics of the logic are presented, along with sound proof rules for modularly reasoning about method calls and heap dependent symbols using specification contracts.

  4. Dynamical systems theory for music dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Jean Pierre; Decroly, Olivier

    1995-09-01

    We show that, when music pieces are cast in the form of time series of pitch variations, the concepts and tools of dynamical systems theory can be applied to the analysis of temporal dynamics in music. (i) Phase space portraits are constructed from the time series wherefrom the dimensionality is evaluated as a measure of the global dynamics of each piece. (ii) Spectral analysis of the time series yields power spectra (˜f-ν) close to red noise (ν˜2) in the low frequency range. (iii) We define an information entropy which provides a measure of the local dynamics in the musical piece; the entropy can be interpreted as an evaluation of the degree of complexity in the music, but there is no evidence of an analytical relation between local and global dynamics. These findings are based on computations performed on eighty sequences sampled in the music literature from the 18th to the 20th century.

  5. Planning a dynamic kill

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article discusses the methodology, design philosophy, and guidelines for planning a dynamic-kill operation for a wild well. The topics covered are two methods of computer analysis for designing dynamic-kill requirements, the design process, determining the pumping spread, and the pitfalls that a designer faces in planning a dynamic kill.

  6. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  7. Dynamics of Anisotropic Universes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Jérôme

    2006-11-01

    We present a general study of the dynamical properties of Anisotropic Bianchi Universes in the context of Einstein General Relativity. Integrability results using Kovalevskaya exponents are reported and connected to general knowledge about Bianchi dynamics. Finally, dynamics toward singularity in Bianchi type VIII and IX universes are showed to be equivalent in some precise sence.

  8. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting

  9. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  10. Dynamics at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  11. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetto, Antonio; Bingham, Richard J.; Ballone, Pietro

    2015-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]+) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]+ into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]+ and of POPC. The [bmim]+ absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (DPOPC) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since DPOPC increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF6] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  12. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, Antonio; Bingham, Richard J.; Ballone, Pietro

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF{sub 6}]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]{sup +}) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]{sup +} into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]{sup +} and of POPC. The [bmim]{sup +} absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D{sub POPC}) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D{sub POPC} increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF{sub 6}] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  13. Modelling the effects of Zostera noltei meadows on sediment dynamics: application to the Arcachon lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kombiadou, Katerina; Ganthy, Florian; Verney, Romaric; Plus, Martin; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2014-10-01

    A three-dimensional model has been modified to describe the complex interactions between hydrodynamics, sediment dynamics and biological parameters in the presence of Zostera noltei. The model treats seagrass leafs as flexible blades that bend under hydrodynamic forcing and alter the local momentum and turbulence fluxes and, therefore, the benthic shear conditions; these changes cause related changes to the mass balance at the boundary of the bed, in turn affecting the suspended matter in the column and ultimately primary productivity and the growth of the dwarf-grass. Modelling parameters related to the impact of Z. noltei to the local flow and to erosion and deposition rates were calibrated using flume experimental measurements; results from the calibration of the model are presented and discussed. The coupled model is applied in the Arcachon Bay, an area with high environmental significance and large abundance of dwarf-grass meadows. In the present paper, results from preliminary applications of the model are presented and discussed; the effectiveness of the coupled model is assessed comparing modelling results with available field measurements of suspended sediment concentrations and seagrass growth parameters. The model generally reproduces sediment dynamics and dwarf-grass seasonal growth in the domain efficiently. Investigations regarding the effects of the vegetation to the near-bed hydrodynamics and to the sediment suspension in the domain show that dwarf-grass meadows play an important part to velocity attenuation and to sediment stabilisation, with flow and suspended sediment concentrations damping, compared to an unvegetated state, to reach 35-50 and 65 %, respectively, at peak seagrass growth.

  14. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Benedetto, Antonio; Bingham, Richard J; Ballone, Pietro

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim](+)) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim](+) into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim](+) and of POPC. The [bmim](+) absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (DPOPC) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since DPOPC increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF6] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers. PMID:25833602

  15. Dynamic recurrent neural networks: a dynamical analysis.

    PubMed

    Draye, J S; Pavisic, D A; Cheron, G A; Libert, G A

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the dynamical features of a neural network model which presents two types of adaptative parameters: the classical weights between the units and the time constants associated with each artificial neuron. The purpose of this study is to provide a strong theoretical basis for modeling and simulating dynamic recurrent neural networks. In order to achieve this, we study the effect of the statistical distribution of the weights and of the time constants on the network dynamics and we make a statistical analysis of the neural transformation. We examine the network power spectra (to draw some conclusions over the frequential behaviour of the network) and we compute the stability regions to explore the stability of the model. We show that the network is sensitive to the variations of the mean values of the weights and the time constants (because of the temporal aspects of the learned tasks). Nevertheless, our results highlight the improvements in the network dynamics due to the introduction of adaptative time constants and indicate that dynamic recurrent neural networks can bring new powerful features in the field of neural computing.

  16. Dynamical systems theory for music dynamics.

    PubMed

    Boon, Jean Pierre; Decroly, Olivier

    1995-09-01

    We show that, when music pieces are cast in the form of time series of pitch variations, the concepts and tools of dynamical systems theory can be applied to the analysis of temporal dynamics in music. (i) Phase space portraits are constructed from the time series wherefrom the dimensionality is evaluated as a measure of the global dynamics of each piece. (ii) Spectral analysis of the time series yields power spectra ( approximately f(-nu)) close to red noise (nu approximately 2) in the low frequency range. (iii) We define an information entropy which provides a measure of the local dynamics in the musical piece; the entropy can be interpreted as an evaluation of the degree of complexity in the music, but there is no evidence of an analytical relation between local and global dynamics. These findings are based on computations performed on eighty sequences sampled in the music literature from the 18th to the 20th century. (c) 1995 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12780206

  17. Dynamic fracture toughness determined using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, J. G.; Baskes, M. I.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of fracture in crystalline silicon are conducted in order to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. The MD simulations show how the potential energy released during fracture is partitioned into surface energy, energy stored in defects and kinetic energy. First, the MD fracture simulations are shown to produce brittle fracture and be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. Then dynamic hcture toughness is calculated as the sum of the surface energy and the energy stored as defects directly from the MD models. Models oriented to produce fracture on either (111) or (101) planes are used. For the (101) fracture orientation, equilibrium crack speeds of greater than 80% of the Rayleigh wave speed are obtained. Crack speeds initially show a steep increase with increasing energy release rate followed by a much more gradual increase. No plateau in crack speed is observed for static energy release rates up to 20 J/m{sup 2}. At the point where the change in crack speed behavior occur, the dynamic fracture toughness (J{sub d}) is still within 10% of two times the surface energy (2{gamma}{sub 0}) and changing very slowly. From these MD simulations, it appears that the change in crack speed behavior is due to a change in the kinetic energy generation during dynamic fracture. In addition, MD simulations of facture in silicon with defects were conducted. The addition of defects increases the inelastic dissipation and the energy stored in defects.

  18. Dynamical principles in neuroscience

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Varona, Pablo; Selverston, Allen I.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2006-10-15

    Dynamical modeling of neural systems and brain functions has a history of success over the last half century. This includes, for example, the explanation and prediction of some features of neural rhythmic behaviors. Many interesting dynamical models of learning and memory based on physiological experiments have been suggested over the last two decades. Dynamical models even of consciousness now exist. Usually these models and results are based on traditional approaches and paradigms of nonlinear dynamics including dynamical chaos. Neural systems are, however, an unusual subject for nonlinear dynamics for several reasons: (i) Even the simplest neural network, with only a few neurons and synaptic connections, has an enormous number of variables and control parameters. These make neural systems adaptive and flexible, and are critical to their biological function. (ii) In contrast to traditional physical systems described by well-known basic principles, first principles governing the dynamics of neural systems are unknown. (iii) Many different neural systems exhibit similar dynamics despite having different architectures and different levels of complexity. (iv) The network architecture and connection strengths are usually not known in detail and therefore the dynamical analysis must, in some sense, be probabilistic. (v) Since nervous systems are able to organize behavior based on sensory inputs, the dynamical modeling of these systems has to explain the transformation of temporal information into combinatorial or combinatorial-temporal codes, and vice versa, for memory and recognition. In this review these problems are discussed in the context of addressing the stimulating questions: What can neuroscience learn from nonlinear dynamics, and what can nonlinear dynamics learn from neuroscience?.

  19. Dynamical Constraints on Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, Jonti; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Tinney, Chris; Hinse, Tobias C.; Marshall, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamical studies of new exoplanet systems are a critical component of the discovery and characterisation process. Such studies can provide firmer constraints on the parameters of the newly discovered planets, and may even reveal that the proposed planets do not stand up to dynamical scrutiny. Here, we demonstrate how dynamical studies can assist the characterisation of such systems through two examples: QS Virginis and HD 73526.

  20. Differential dynamic microscopy for anisotropic colloidal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reufer, Mathias; Martinez, Vincent A; Schurtenberger, Peter; Poon, Wilson C K

    2012-03-13

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is a low-cost, high-throughput technique recently developed for characterizing the isotropic diffusion of spherical colloids using white-light optical microscopy. (1) We develop the theory for applying DDM to probe the dynamics of anisotropic colloidal samples such as various ordered phases, or particles interacting with an external field. The q-dependent dynamics can be measured in any direction in the image plane. We demonstrate the method on a dilute aqueous dispersion of anisotropic magnetic particles (hematite) aligned in a magnetic field. The measured diffusion coefficients parallel and perpendicular to the field direction are in good agreement with theoretical values. We show how these measurements allow us to extract the orientational order parameter S(2) of the system.

  1. Wind Turbine Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop on wind turbine structural dynamics was held to review and document current United States work on the dynamic behavior of large wind turbines, primarily of the horizontal-axis type, and to identify and discuss other wind turbine configurations that may have lower cost and weight. Information was exchanged on the following topics: (1) Methods for calculating dynamic loads; (2) Aeroelasticity stability (3) Wind loads, both steady and transient; (4) Critical design conditions; (5) Drive train dynamics; and (6) Behavior of operating wind turbines.

  2. Dynamical collapse of trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemond, J. J. Benjamin; de Moura, Alessandro P. S.; Grebogi, Celso; van de Wouw, Nathan; Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-04-01

    Friction induces unexpected dynamical behaviour. In the paradigmatic pendulum and double-well systems with friction, modelled with differential inclusions, distinct trajectories can collapse onto a single point. Transversal homoclinic orbits display collapse and generate chaotic saddles with forward dynamics that is qualitatively different from the backward dynamics. The space of initial conditions converging to the chaotic saddle is fractal, but the set of points diverging from it is not: friction destroys the complexity of the forward dynamics by generating a unique horseshoe-like topology.

  3. A molecular dynamics study of CaCO3 nanoparticles in a hydrophobic solvent with a stearate co-surfactant.

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, Michael S; Heyes, David M; Breakspear, Angela; Chahine, Samir; Dini, Daniele

    2015-05-28

    Stearates containing overbased detergent nanoparticles (NPs) are used as acid neutralising additives in automotive and marine engine oils. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the self-assembly of calcium carbonate, calcium stearate as a co-surfactant and stabilising surfactants of such NPs in a model explicit molecular hydrophobic solvent have been carried out using a methodology described first by Bodnarchuk et al. [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2014, 118, 21092]. The cores and particles as a whole become more elongated with stearate, and the surfactant molecules are more spaced out in this geometry than in their stearate-free counterparts. The rod dimensions are found to be largely independent of the surfactant type for a given amount of CaCO3. The corresponding particles without stearate were more spherical, the precise shape depending to a greater extent on the chemical architecture of the surfactant molecule. The rod-shaped stearate containing nanoparticles penetrated a model water droplet to a greater depth than the corresponding near-spherical particle, which is possibly facilitated by the dissociation of nanoparticle surfactant molecules onto the surface of the water in this process. These simulations are the first to corroborate the nanoparticle-water penetration mechanism proposed previously by experimental groups investigating the NP acid neutralisation characteristics.

  4. Dynamic EKG Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    The use of the dynamic EKG study as a part of periodic health examination is considered to be a valuable complement to other forms of stress testing with its ability to detect abnormal heart responses to stress stimuli. It is believed that statistical correlations of dynamic EKG findings with physical examination results contribute greatly to the understanding of cardiac abnormalities.

  5. Dynamic defense workshop :

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  6. Dynamic Speaking Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kent; Sabet, Mehran

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an attempt to adopt dynamic assessment (DA) methods in classroom speaking assessments. The study reported in this article focused on four particular applications of dynamic speaking assessment (DSA). The first, "mediated assistance" (MA), involves interaction between an assistor and a learner to reveal problems in spoken…

  7. Friction and nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manini, N.; Braun, O. M.; Tosatti, E.; Guerra, R.; Vanossi, A.

    2016-07-01

    The nonlinear dynamics associated with sliding friction forms a broad interdisciplinary research field that involves complex dynamical processes and patterns covering a broad range of time and length scales. Progress in experimental techniques and computational resources has stimulated the development of more refined and accurate mathematical and numerical models, capable of capturing many of the essentially nonlinear phenomena involved in friction.

  8. Capturing the dynamic epigenome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Traditional methods for epigenomic analysis provide a static picture of chromatin, which is actually a highly dynamic assemblage. Recent approaches have allowed direct measurements of chromatin dynamics, providing deeper insights into processes such as transcription, DNA replication and epigenetic inheritance. PMID:20959022

  9. Dynamic Calorimetry for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A student experiment on dynamic calorimetry is described. Dynamic calorimetry is a powerful technique for calorimetric studies, especially at high temperatures and pressures. A low-power incandescent lamp serves as the sample. The ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with DataStudio software from PASCO Scientific displays the results of the…

  10. Dynamics of Parental Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Eugene; Schlater, Theodore L.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of the various categories of parental abuse are examined with special emphasis on abuse by adult offspring living in the same household or adults acting as caretakers or legal guardians for their elderly parents. Society's role in the dynamics of parental abuse is examined.

  11. Vehicle dynamics control of four in-wheel motor drive electric vehicle using gain scheduling based on tyre cornering stiffness estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Lu; Yu, Zhuoping; Wang, Yang; Yang, Chen; Meng, Yufeng

    2012-06-01

    This paper focuses on the vehicle dynamic control system for a four in-wheel motor drive electric vehicle, aiming at improving vehicle stability under critical driving conditions. The vehicle dynamics controller is composed of three modules, i.e. motion following control, control allocation and vehicle state estimation. Considering the strong nonlinearity of the tyres under critical driving conditions, the yaw motion of the vehicle is regulated by gain scheduling control based on the linear quadratic regulator theory. The feed-forward and feedback gains of the controller are updated in real-time by online estimation of the tyre cornering stiffness, so as to ensure the control robustness against environmental disturbances as well as parameter uncertainty. The control allocation module allocates the calculated generalised force requirements to each in-wheel motor based on quadratic programming theory while taking the tyre longitudinal/lateral force coupling characteristic into consideration. Simulations under a variety of driving conditions are carried out to verify the control algorithm. Simulation results indicate that the proposed vehicle stability controller can effectively stabilise the vehicle motion under critical driving conditions.

  12. Dynamics of Multibody Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabana, Ahmed A.

    2005-05-01

    Dynamics of Multibody Systems introduces multibody dynamics, with an emphasis on flexible body dynamics. Many common mechanisms such as automobiles, space structures, robots, and micro machines have mechanical and structural systems that consist of interconnected rigid and deformable components. The dynamics of these large-scale, multibody systems are highly nonlinear, presenting complex problems that in most cases can only be solved with computer-based techniques. The book begins with a review of the basic ideas of kinematics and the dynamics of rigid and deformable bodies before moving on to more advanced topics and computer implementation. This new edition includes important new developments relating to the problem of large deformations and numerical algorithms as applied to flexible multibody systems. The book's wealth of examples and practical applications will be useful to graduate students, researchers, and practicing engineers working on a wide variety of flexible multibody systems.

  13. Methods of applied dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.; Wilson, H. B.

    1991-01-01

    The monograph was prepared to give the practicing engineer a clear understanding of dynamics with special consideration given to the dynamic analysis of aerospace systems. It is conceived to be both a desk-top reference and a refresher for aerospace engineers in government and industry. It could also be used as a supplement to standard texts for in-house training courses on the subject. Beginning with the basic concepts of kinematics and dynamics, the discussion proceeds to treat the dynamics of a system of particles. Both classical and modern formulations of the Lagrange equations, including constraints, are discussed and applied to the dynamic modeling of aerospace structures using the modal synthesis technique.

  14. Nonlinear Dynamics in Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of many cardiac arrhythmias, as well as the nature of transitions between different heart rhythms, have long been considered evidence of nonlinear phenomena playing a direct role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. In most types of cardiac disease, the pathology develops slowly and gradually, often over many years. In contrast, arrhythmias often occur suddenly. In nonlinear systems, sudden changes in qualitative dynamics can, counter-intuitively, result from a gradual change in a system parameter –this is known as a bifurcation. Here, we review how nonlinearities in cardiac electrophysiology influence normal and abnormal rhythms and how bifurcations change the dynamics. In particular, we focus on the many recent developments in computational modeling at the cellular level focused on intracellular calcium dynamics. We discuss two areas where recent experimental and modeling work have suggested the importance of nonlinearities in calcium dynamics: repolarization alternans and pacemaker cell automaticity. PMID:22524390

  15. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  16. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  17. From molecular dynamics to Brownian dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Erban, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Three coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) models are investigated with the aim of developing and analysing multi-scale methods which use MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations in the remainder of the domain. The first MD model is formulated in one spatial dimension. It is based on elastic collisions of heavy molecules (e.g. proteins) with light point particles (e.g. water molecules). Two three-dimensional MD models are then investigated. The obtained results are applied to a simplified model of protein binding to receptors on the cellular membrane. It is shown that modern BD simulators of intracellular processes can be used in the bulk and accurately coupled with a (more detailed) MD model of protein binding which is used close to the membrane. PMID:25002825

  18. Dynamic Elastic Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Jack; Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    This is an exploration of dynamic tides on elastic bodies. The body is thought of as a dynamical system described by its modes of oscillation. The dynamics of these modes are governed by differential equations that depend on the rheology. The modes are damped by dissipation. Tidal friction occurs as exterior bodies excite the modes and the modes act back on the tide raising body. The whole process is governed by a closed set of differential equations. Standard results from tidal theory are recovered in a two-timescale approximation to the solution of these differential equations.

  19. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  20. Discrete Dynamics Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuensche, Andrew

    DDLab is interactive graphics software for creating, visualizing, and analyzing many aspects of Cellular Automata, Random Boolean Networks, and Discrete Dynamical Networks in general and studying their behavior, both from the time-series perspective — space-time patterns, and from the state-space perspective — attractor basins. DDLab is relevant to research, applications, and education in the fields of complexity, self-organization, emergent phenomena, chaos, collision-based computing, neural networks, content addressable memory, genetic regulatory networks, dynamical encryption, generative art and music, and the study of the abstract mathematical/physical/dynamical phenomena in their own right.

  1. Dynamic foldamer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Le Bailly, Bryden A F; Clayden, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Foldamers can be made more than pieces of static, conformationally uniform molecular architecture by designing into their structure the conformational dynamism characteristic of functional molecular machines. We show that these dynamic foldamers display biomimetic properties reminiscent of allosteric proteins and receptor molecules. They can translate chemical signals into conformational changes, and hence into chemical outputs such as control of reactivity and selectivity. Future developments could see dynamic foldamers operating in the membrane phase providing artificial mechanisms for communication and control that integrate synthetic chemistry into synthetic biology. PMID:26955864

  2. Cortical dynamics revisited.

    PubMed

    Singer, Wolf

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries on the organisation of the cortical connectome together with novel data on the dynamics of neuronal interactions require an extension of classical concepts on information processing in the cerebral cortex. These new insights justify considering the brain as a complex, self-organised system with nonlinear dynamics in which principles of distributed, parallel processing coexist with serial operations within highly interconnected networks. The observed dynamics suggest that cortical networks are capable of providing an extremely high-dimensional state space in which a large amount of evolutionary and ontogenetically acquired information can coexist and be accessible to rapid parallel search.

  3. Dynamic Elastic Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisdom, Jack; Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    This is an exploration of dynamic tides on elastic bodies. The body is thought of as a dynamical system described by its modes of oscillation. The dynamics of these modes are governed by differential equations that depend on the rheology. The modes are damped by dissipation. Tidal friction occurs as exterior bodies excite the modes and the modes act back on the tide raising body. The whole process is governed by a closed set of differential equations. Standard results from tidal theory are recovered in a two-timescale approximation to the solution of these differential equations.

  4. Dynamics of ocean tides

    SciTech Connect

    Maarchuk, G.I.; Kagan, B.A. )

    1989-01-01

    Ocean tide information can solve vital problems in oceanology and geophysics. Elastic properties of the Earth's crust, tidal gravity variations and deviations in trajectories of artificial satellites can be studied from the dynamics of ocean tides. This book contains mathematical models and applications on several problems related to ocean tide dynamics. The first part serves as an introduction to studies of tidal dynamics equations and the application in experimental studies. Specific problems like free oscillations and forced tidal oscillations in the oceans and the ocean-shelf system are discussed. The book deals with tidal flow in the bottom boundary layer. Data and models are presented and experimental and theoretical results are compared.

  5. Relativistic nuclear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Coester, F.

    1985-01-01

    A review is presented of three distinct approaches to the construction of relativistic dynamical models: (1) Relativistic canonical quantum mechanics. (The Hilbert space of states is independent of the interactions, which are introduced by modifying the energy operator.) (2) Hilbert spaces of manifestly covariant wave functions. (The interactions modify the metric of the Hilbert space.) (3) Covariant Green functions. In each of the three approaches the focus is on the formulation of the two-body dynamics, and problems in the construction of the corresponding many-body dynamics are discussed briefly. 21 refs.

  6. Affective Dynamics in Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Trull, Timothy J.; Lane, Sean P.; Koval, Peter; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss three varieties of affective dynamics (affective instability, emotional inertia, and emotional differentiation). In each case, we suggest how these affective dynamics should be operationalized and measured in daily life using time-intensive methods, like ecological momentary assessment or ambulatory assessment, and recommend time-sensitive analyses that take into account not only the variability but also the temporal dependency of reports. Studies that explore how these affective dynamics are associated with psychological disorders and symptoms are reviewed, and we emphasize that these affective processes are within a nexus of other components of emotion regulation.

  7. Orbiting dynamic compression laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Kasiraj, P.; Frisch, B.

    1984-01-01

    In order to examine the feasibility of carrying out dynamic compression experiments on a space station, the possibility of using explosive gun launchers is studied. The question of whether powders of a refractory metal (molybdenum) and a metallic glass could be well considered by dynamic compression is examined. In both cases extremely good bonds are obtained between grains of metal and metallic glass at 180 and 80 kb, respectively. When the oxide surface is reduced and the dynamic consolidation is carried out in vacuum, in the case of molybdenum, tensile tests of the recovered samples demonstrated beneficial ultimate tensile strengths.

  8. The binding landscape of plasmepsin V and the implications for flap dynamics.

    PubMed

    L, McGillewie; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2016-04-26

    Plasmepsin V belongs to the plasmepsin family of aspartic proteases. PlmV is unique compared to other plasmepsins, as this membrane bound aspartic protease resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and is responsible for the cleavage of PEXEL tagged proteins destined for export outside of the host red blood cell. Plasmepsin V is highly conserved throughout the Plasmodium species, and is essential to the survival of the parasite. Recently, two potent inhibitors of Plmv have been identified, WEHI-916 and WEHI-842. Of these inhibitors, WEHI-842 has a higher binding affinity for P. vivax PlmV, and a crystal structure of PlmV in complex with WEHI-842 has recently been resolved (). The structure of PlmV is unique compared to other plasmepsins; it is stabilised internally by seven disulfide bonds, a NAP1 insert/fold is associated with the movement of the flap covering the active site and a highly conserved helix-turn-helix is situated towards the C-terminus. Flap motion and dynamics play an important role in enzyme selectivity and function. To better understand the impact of ligand binding on the flap dynamics, molecular dynamic simulations and post-dynamic analysis were employed in the present study on PlmV in complex with WEHI-842. Previously defined parameters, which accurately accounted for the opening and closing of the active site, were used to assess the conformational changes induced in the absence and presence of WEHI-842. From the simulations it can be seen that inhibitor binding significantly reduces the flexibility and mobility of not only the flap and flexible loop but areas outside of the active site. Ligand binding leads to the formation of a more stable compact structure. This being said, there is a possibility of reducing the flexibility even further with potentially more lethal effects on the plasmodium parasite. We believe that results presented herein would assist researchers in the discovery of potent PlmV inhibitors as potential antimalarial therapies

  9. Dynamics and dynamical transitions in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vurnal, Derya

    Neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations are the most effective tools to explore the dynamics of hydrogen in proteins. The mean square displacement (MSD) of hydrogen (H) in proteins has been extensively measured using neutron scattering and calculated using molecular dynamics simulations. A small MSD is observed at low temperatures and the slope of the MSD significantly increases at a specific temperature TD. This increase in the slope of the MSD is identified as a dynamical transition, and the temperature it takes place at a specific temperature which is denoted a dynamical transition temperature T D. The observed MSD in neutron scattering experiments depend on the energy resolution of the instrument. In this thesis, we first focus on the resolution dependent of the observed MSD exp in neutron scattering experiments. We propose a method for obtaining the intrinsic MSD exp of H, which is independent of the resolution of the instrument employed, in proteins. The intrinsic MSD is defined as the infinite time value of MSD which appears in the well-known Debye-Waller factor. In this method, a model of the resolution broadened elastic incoherent dynamic structure factor SR(Q, o = 0) is developed to extract the intrinsic MSD from the resolution dependent data. The model contains the intrinsic MSD, the instrument resolution width and a relaxation frequency characterizing the motions of H in proteins. The model of SR(Q, o = 0) is fitted to the resolution broadened DSF data already published in the recent literature and the intrinsic MSD in three proteins was successfully obtained. Later, we constructed a model for the incoherent intermediate scattering function I(Q, t) to obtain the intrinsic, long-time MSD of H in proteins from finite time molecular dynamics simulations. In the literature, the simulated MSD increases with increasing time and does not reach a certain limiting value at even 10 ns. The infinite time MSD, , is the long

  10. Dynamics of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, David K.

    1991-01-01

    Papers on the following subjects are presented: (1) multivariable flight control synthesis and literal robustness analysis for an aeroelastic vehicles; (2) numerical and literal aeroelastic-vehicle-model reduction for feedback control synthesis; and (3) dynamics of aerospace vehicles.

  11. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  12. Dynamics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.

    1996-01-01

    Granular materials exhibit a rich variety of dynamical behavior, much of which is poorly understood. Fractal-like stress chains, convection, a variety of wave dynamics, including waves which resemble capillary waves, l/f noise, and fractional Brownian motion provide examples. Work beginning at Duke will focus on gravity driven convection, mixing and gravitational collapse. Although granular materials consist of collections of interacting particles, there are important differences between the dynamics of a collections of grains and the dynamics of a collections of molecules. In particular, the ergodic hypothesis is generally invalid for granular materials, so that ordinary statistical physics does not apply. In the absence of a steady energy input, granular materials undergo a rapid collapse which is strongly influenced by the presence of gravity. Fluctuations on laboratory scales in such quantities as the stress can be very large-as much as an order of magnitude greater than the mean.

  13. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  14. Dynamic Boolean Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic mathematical environments allow users to reify mathematical concepts through multiple representations, transform mathematical relations and organically explore mathematical properties, investigate integrated mathematics, and develop conceptual understanding. Herein, we integrate Boolean algebra, the functionalities of a dynamic…

  15. Liquid Sloshing Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Raouf A.

    2005-06-01

    The problem of liquid sloshing in moving or stationary containers remains of great concern to aerospace, civil, and nuclear engineers; physicists; designers of road tankers and ship tankers; and mathematicians. Beginning with the fundamentals of liquid sloshing theory, this book takes the reader systematically from basic theory to advanced analytical and experimental results in a self-contained and coherent format. The book is divided into four sections. Part I deals with the theory of linear liquid sloshing dynamics; Part II addresses the nonlinear theory of liquid sloshing dynamics, Faraday waves, and sloshing impacts; Part III presents the problem of linear and nonlinear interaction of liquid sloshing dynamics with elastic containers and supported structures; and Part IV considers the fluid dynamics in spinning containers and microgravity sloshing. This book will be invaluable to researchers and graduate students in mechanical and aeronautical engineering, designers of liquid containers, and applied mathematicians.

  16. Ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Laasonen, Kari

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, an introduction to ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) has been given. Many of the basic concepts, like the Hellman-Feynman forces, the difference between the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and AIMD, have been explained. Also a very versatile AIMD code, the CP2K, has been introduced. On the application, the emphasis was on the aqueous systems and chemical reactions. The biochemical applications have not been discussed in depth.

  17. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  18. Multipulsed dynamic moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.

    1991-01-01

    An improved dynamic moire interferometer comprised of a lasing medium providing a plurality of beams of coherent light, a multiple q-switch producing multiple trains of 100,000 or more pulses per second, a combining means collimating multiple trains of pulses into substantially a single train and directing beams to specimen gratings affixed to a test material, and a controller, triggering and sequencing the emission of the pulses with the occurrence and recording of a dynamic loading event.

  19. Distributed replica dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Chill, Samuel T.; Henkelman, Graeme

    2015-11-01

    A distributed replica dynamics (DRD) method is proposed to calculate rare-event molecular dynamics using distributed computational resources. Similar to Voter's parallel replica dynamics (PRD) method, the dynamics of independent replicas of the system are calculated on different computational clients. In DRD, each replica runs molecular dynamics from an initial state for a fixed simulation time and then reports information about the trajectory back to the server. A simulation clock on the server accumulates the simulation time of each replica until one reports a transition to a new state. Subsequent calculations are initiated from within this new state and the process is repeated to follow the state-to-state evolution of the system. DRD is designed to work with asynchronous and distributed computing resources in which the clients may not be able to communicate with each other. Additionally, clients can be added or removed from the simulation at any point in the calculation. Even with heterogeneous computing clients, we prove that the DRD method reproduces the correct probability distribution of escape times. We also show this correspondence numerically; molecular dynamics simulations of Al(100) adatom diffusion using PRD and DRD give consistent exponential distributions of escape times. Finally, we discuss guidelines for choosing the optimal number of replicas and replica trajectory length for the DRD method.

  20. Amide hydrogen exchange and internal dynamics in the chemotactic protein CheY from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, E; Bruix, M; López-Hernández, E; Serrano, L; Rico, M

    1997-08-22

    The backbone internal dynamics of the wild-type 129 amino acid alpha/beta parallel protein CheY and its double mutant F14N/P110G are analysed here by the hydrogen-exchange method. The F14N mutation is known to stabilise the protein and to accelerate refolding while P110G is destabilising and accelerates unfolding. We first assigned and characterised the double mutant by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), to try and discover any possible conformational change induced by the two mutations. The main difference between the two proteins is a favourable N-capping interaction of the newly introduced Asn14 side-chain at the beginning of the first alpha-helix (alpha-helix A). Second, we have measured the exchange rates in the wild-type and mutant CheY. In the first case the observed protection factors are slightly dispersed around an average value. According to their distribution in the structure, protein stability is highest on one face of the central beta-sheet, in the surroundings of the main hydrophobic core formed by side-chains of residues in beta-strands I, II and III and helices A and E. The mutations in the double mutant protein affect two distinct subdomains differently (from beta-strand I to III and from alpha-helix C to the end). In the second subdomain the number of protected protons is reduced with respect to those in the wild-type. This differential behaviour can be explained by a selective decrease in stability of the second folding subdomain produced by the P110G mutation and the opposite effect in the first subdomain, produced by the F14N mutation. alpha-Helix A, which is involved together with beta-strands I and III in the folding nucleus of CheY, shows the largest protection factors in both proteins.

  1. Uncertainty analysis as essential step in the establishment of the dynamic Design Space of primary drying during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Corver, Jos; Nopens, Ingmar; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Large molecules, such as biopharmaceuticals, are considered the key driver of growth for the pharmaceutical industry. Freeze-drying is the preferred way to stabilise these products when needed. However, it is an expensive, inefficient, time- and energy-consuming process. During freeze-drying, there are only two main process variables to be set, i.e. the shelf temperature and the chamber pressure, however preferably in a dynamic way. This manuscript focuses on the essential use of uncertainty analysis for the determination and experimental verification of the dynamic primary drying Design Space for pharmaceutical freeze-drying. Traditionally, the chamber pressure and shelf temperature are kept constant during primary drying, leading to less optimal process conditions. In this paper it is demonstrated how a mechanistic model of the primary drying step gives the opportunity to determine the optimal dynamic values for both process variables during processing, resulting in a dynamic Design Space with a well-known risk of failure. This allows running the primary drying process step as time efficient as possible, hereby guaranteeing that the temperature at the sublimation front does not exceed the collapse temperature. The Design Space is the multidimensional combination and interaction of input variables and process parameters leading to the expected product specifications with a controlled (i.e., high) probability. Therefore, inclusion of parameter uncertainty is an essential part in the definition of the Design Space, although it is often neglected. To quantitatively assess the inherent uncertainty on the parameters of the mechanistic model, an uncertainty analysis was performed to establish the borders of the dynamic Design Space, i.e. a time-varying shelf temperature and chamber pressure, associated with a specific risk of failure. A risk of failure acceptance level of 0.01%, i.e. a 'zero-failure' situation, results in an increased primary drying process time

  2. Uncertainty analysis as essential step in the establishment of the dynamic Design Space of primary drying during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Corver, Jos; Nopens, Ingmar; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Large molecules, such as biopharmaceuticals, are considered the key driver of growth for the pharmaceutical industry. Freeze-drying is the preferred way to stabilise these products when needed. However, it is an expensive, inefficient, time- and energy-consuming process. During freeze-drying, there are only two main process variables to be set, i.e. the shelf temperature and the chamber pressure, however preferably in a dynamic way. This manuscript focuses on the essential use of uncertainty analysis for the determination and experimental verification of the dynamic primary drying Design Space for pharmaceutical freeze-drying. Traditionally, the chamber pressure and shelf temperature are kept constant during primary drying, leading to less optimal process conditions. In this paper it is demonstrated how a mechanistic model of the primary drying step gives the opportunity to determine the optimal dynamic values for both process variables during processing, resulting in a dynamic Design Space with a well-known risk of failure. This allows running the primary drying process step as time efficient as possible, hereby guaranteeing that the temperature at the sublimation front does not exceed the collapse temperature. The Design Space is the multidimensional combination and interaction of input variables and process parameters leading to the expected product specifications with a controlled (i.e., high) probability. Therefore, inclusion of parameter uncertainty is an essential part in the definition of the Design Space, although it is often neglected. To quantitatively assess the inherent uncertainty on the parameters of the mechanistic model, an uncertainty analysis was performed to establish the borders of the dynamic Design Space, i.e. a time-varying shelf temperature and chamber pressure, associated with a specific risk of failure. A risk of failure acceptance level of 0.01%, i.e. a 'zero-failure' situation, results in an increased primary drying process time

  3. Dynamic characterization of Galfenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidler, Justin J.; Asnani, Vivake M.; Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2015-04-01

    A novel and precise characterization of the constitutive behavior of solid and laminated research-grade, polycrystalline Galfenol (Fe81:6Ga18:4) under under quasi-static (1 Hz) and dynamic (4 to 1000 Hz) stress loadings was recently conducted by the authors. This paper summarizes the characterization by focusing on the experimental design and the dynamic sensing response of the solid Galfenol specimen. Mechanical loads are applied using a high frequency load frame. The dynamic stress amplitude for minor and major loops is 2.88 and 31.4 MPa, respectively. Dynamic minor and major loops are measured for the bias condition resulting in maximum, quasi-static sensitivity. Three key sources of error in the dynamic measurements are accounted for: (1) electromagnetic noise in strain signals due to Galfenol's magnetic response, (2) error in load signals due to the inertial force of fixturing, and (3) time delays imposed by conditioning electronics. For dynamic characterization, strain error is kept below 1.2 % of full scale by wiring two collocated gauges in series (noise cancellation) and through lead wire weaving. Inertial force error is kept below 0.41 % by measuring the dynamic force in the specimen using a nearly collocated piezoelectric load washer. The phase response of all conditioning electronics is explicitly measured and corrected for. In general, as frequency increases, the sensing response becomes more linear due to an increase in eddy currents. The location of positive and negative saturation is the same at all frequencies. As frequency increases above about 100 Hz, the elbow in the strain versus stress response disappears as the active (soft) regime stiffens toward the passive (hard) regime.

  4. Dynamic Characterization of Galfenol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin; Asnani, Vivake M.; Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel and precise characterization of the constitutive behavior of solid and laminated research-grade, polycrystalline Galfenol (Fe81:6Ga18:4) under under quasi-static (1 Hz) and dynamic (4 to 1000 Hz) stress loadings was recently conducted by the authors. This paper summarizes the characterization by focusing on the experimental design and the dynamic sensing response of the solid Galfenol specimen. Mechanical loads are applied using a high frequency load frame. The dynamic stress amplitude for minor and major loops is 2.88 and 31.4 MPa, respectively. Dynamic minor and major loops are measured for the bias condition resulting in maximum, quasi-static sensitivity. Three key sources of error in the dynamic measurements are accounted for: (1) electromagnetic noise in strain signals due to Galfenol's magnetic response, (2) error in load signals due to the inertial force of fixturing, and (3) time delays imposed by conditioning electronics. For dynamic characterization, strain error is kept below 1.2 % of full scale by wiring two collocated gauges in series (noise cancellation) and through lead wire weaving. Inertial force error is kept below 0.41 % by measuring the dynamic force in the specimen using a nearly collocated piezoelectric load washer. The phase response of all conditioning electronics is explicitly measured and corrected for. In general, as frequency increases, the sensing response becomes more linear due to an increase in eddy currents. The location of positive and negative saturation is the same at all frequencies. As frequency increases above about 100 Hz, the elbow in the strain versus stress response disappears as the active (soft) regime stiffens toward the passive (hard) regime.

  5. The ethics of dynamic pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Faruqui, Ahmad

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic pricing has garnered much interest among regulators and utilities, since it has the potential for lowering energy costs for society. But the deployment of dynamic pricing has been remarkably tepid. The underlying premise is that dynamic pricing is unfair. But the presumption of unfairness in dynamic pricing rests on an assumption of fairness in today's tariffs. (author)

  6. Semipredictable dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    A new class of deterministic dynamical systems, termed semipredictable dynamical systems, is presented. The spatiotemporal evolution of these systems have both predictable and unpredictable traits, as found in natural complex systems. We prove a general result: The dynamics of any deterministic nonlinear cellular automaton (CA) with p possible dynamical states can be decomposed at each instant of time in a superposition of N layers involving p0, p1, …, pN - 1 dynamical states each, where the pk ∈ N , k ∈ [ 0 , N - 1 ] are divisors of p. If the divisors coincide with the prime factors of p this decomposition is unique. Conversely, we also prove that N CA working on symbols p0, p1, …, pN - 1 can be composed to create a graded CA rule with N different layers. We then show that, even when the full spatiotemporal evolution can be unpredictable, certain traits (layers) can exactly be predicted. We present explicit examples of such systems involving compositions of Wolfram's 256 elementary CA and a more complex CA rule acting on a neighborhood of two sites and 12 symbols and whose rule table corresponds to the smallest Moufang loop M12(S3, 2).

  7. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  8. Dynamic Stall Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Phillip; Babbitt, Ashli; Magstadt, Andrew; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Naughton, Jonathan; Jonathan Naughton Team

    2014-11-01

    The performance of helicopter and wind turbine blades is affected by dynamic stall. Dynamic stall has received considerable attention, but it is still difficult to simulate and not fully understood. Over the past seven years, many airfoils for helicopter and wind turbine use ranging from 9.5 to 30% thick have been experimentally tested and simulated while dynamically pitching to further characterize dynamic stall. Tests have been run at chord Reynolds number between 225,000-440,000 for various reduced frequencies, mean angles of attack, and oscillation amplitudes. Characterization of stall has been accomplished using data from previous studies as well as the unsteady pressure and flow-field data available from our own work. Where available, combined surface and flow-field data allow for clear identification of the types of stall observed and the flow structure associated with them. The results indicate that thin airfoil stall, leading edge stall, and trailing edge stall are observed in the oscillating airfoil experiments and simulations. These three main stall types are further divided into subcategories. By improving our understanding of the features of dynamic stall, it is expected that physics-based simulations can be improved. Work supported by DOE and a gift from BP.

  9. Dynamical Transition in polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunfen; Markelz, Andrea

    2008-03-01

    Two of the possible causes for the so called dynamical transition (the rapid increase in flexibility for biomolecules at ˜ 200 K) are: thermally activated side chain diffusive motions with hydration dependent activation energies; or a glass transition in the biological water directly adjacent to the biomolecule. If the transition is strictly due to side chain activation, it should not depend on protein structure. Previously we demonstrated that the dynamical transition remains after tertiary structure was removed using THz time domain dielectric spectroscopy (0.2 -2.0 THz, 0.5-5ps). Here measurements on polyalanine as a function of chain length show that the dynamical transition does not occur for peptide length shorter than 5. However, the transition is observed for 5 mer and higher. Structural and simulation studies indicate that the 5 mer transiently occupies structured forms [1,2]. These results suggest that A) the dynamical transition is not due to thermally activated side chain motion and B) secondary structure is necessary for the dynamical transition. Secondary structure possibly induces sufficient ordering in the adjacent water to result in a fragile to strong glass transition resulting in increased protein flexibility [3]. [1] KAH Wildman et al. Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 24 (2003) 94-109. [2] Yuguang Mu,et al. Proteins 58, (2005) 45-52. [3] S.H. Chen et al. PNAS (2006) 9012--9016.

  10. From 1D to 2D via 3D: dynamics of surface motion segmentation for ocular tracking in primates.

    PubMed

    Masson, Guillaume S

    2004-01-01

    In primates, tracking eye movements help vision by stabilising onto the retinas the images of a moving object of interest. This sensorimotor transformation involves several stages of motion processing, from the local measurement of one-dimensional luminance changes up to the integration of first and higher-order local motion cues into a global two-dimensional motion immune to antagonistic motions arising from the surrounding. The dynamics of this surface motion segmentation is reflected into the various components of the tracking responses and its underlying neural mechanisms can be correlated with behaviour at both single-cell and population levels. I review a series of behavioural studies which demonstrate that the neural representation driving eye movements evolves over time from a fast vector average of the outputs of linear and non-linear spatio-temporal filtering to a progressive and slower accurate solution for global motion. Because of the sensitivity of earliest ocular following to binocular disparity, antagonistic visual motion from surfaces located at different depths are filtered out. Thus, global motion integration is restricted within the depth plane of the object to be tracked. Similar dynamics were found at the level of monkey extra-striate areas MT and MST and I suggest that several parallel pathways along the motion stream are involved albeit with different latencies to build-up this accurate surface motion representation. After 200-300 ms, most of the computational problems of early motion processing (aperture problem, motion integration, motion segmentation) are solved and the eye velocity matches the global object velocity to maintain a clear and steady retinal image. PMID:15477021

  11. Computational fluid dynamic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Tom T.; Deabreu-Garcia, Alex

    1989-01-01

    A general technique is presented for modeling fluid, or gas, dynamic systems specifically for the development of control systems. The numerical methods which are generally used in computational fluid dynamics are borrowed to create either continuous-time or discrete-time models of the particular fluid system. The resulting equations can be either left in a nonlinear form, or easily linearized about an operating point. As there are typically very many states in these systems, the usual linear model reduction methods can be used on them to allow a low-order controller to be designed. A simple example is given which typifies many internal flow control problems. The resulting control is termed computational fluid dynamic control.

  12. Dynamics of Paroxysmal Tachycardia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Leon

    2004-03-01

    Parosxysmal tachycardia refers to abnormally fast cardiac arrhythmias that suddenly start and stop. Paroxysmal tachycardias can occur in many regions of the heart and may be associated with many different mechanisms. In order to study paroxysmal tachycardias, we have analyzed tissue cultures of cells from embryonic chick heart that are imaged using calcium and voltage sensitive dyes. This model system displays a number of different types of dynamics including dynamics originating from pacemakers, triggered dynamics in which an excitation leads to the initiation of a sequence of waves originating from a single source, and spontaneously iniitiating and terminating rotating spiral waves. Theoretical models that include heterogeneity, spontaneous pacemaker activity, and fatigue or reduced excitability arising as a consequence of rapid excitation can be used to account for these behaviors.

  13. Dynamic features of combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic features of combustion are discussed for four important cases: ignition, inflammation, explosion, and detonation. Ignition, the initiation of a self-sustained exothermic process, is considered in the simplest case of a closed thermodynamic system and its stochastic distribution. Inflammation, the initiation and propagation of self-sustained flames, is presented for turbulent flow. Explosion, the dynamic effects caused by the deposition of exothermic energy in a compressible medium, is illustrated by self-similar blast waves with energy deposition at the front and the adiabatic non-self-similar wave. Detonation, the most comprehensive illustration of all the dynamic effects of combustion, is discussed with a phenomenological account of the development and structure of the wave.

  14. Dynamic effects of combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic effects of combustion are due to the evolution of exothermic energy and its deposition in the compressible medium where the process takes place. The paper examines the dynamics of combustion phenomena, including ignition, turbulent flame propagation (inflammation), explosion, and detonation, with emphasis on their exothermic characteristics. Ignition and explosion are treated as problems of nonlinear mechanics, and their dynamic behavior is described in terms of phase space models and cinematographic laser shear interferograms. The results of a numerical random vortex model of turbulent flame propagation are confirmed in a combustion tunnel experiment, where it was observed that a fresh mixture of burnt and unburnt gases can sustain combustion with a relatively small expenditure of overall mass flow, due to the increasing specific volume of burnt gases inside the flame front. An isentropic pressure wave is found to precede the accelerating flame in the process of detonation, and components of this presssure wave are shown to propagate at local sonic velocities.

  15. Dynamics of aerospace vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, David K.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this research was to address the modeling, including model reduction, of flexible aerospace vehicles, with special emphasis on models used in dynamic analysis and/or guidance and control system design. In the modeling, it is critical that the key aspects of the system being modeled be captured in the model. In this work, therefore, aspects of the vehicle dynamics critical to control design were important. In this regard, fundamental contributions were made in the areas of stability robustness analysis techniques, model reduction techniques, and literal approximations for key dynamic characteristics of flexible vehicles. All these areas are related. In the development of a model, approximations are always involved, so control systems designed using these models must be robust against uncertainties in these models.

  16. Mercury radar speckle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holin, Igor V.

    2010-06-01

    Current data reveal that Mercury is a dynamic system with a core which has not yet solidified completely and is at least partially decoupled from the mantle. Radar speckle displacement experiments have demonstrated that the accuracy in spin-dynamics determination for Earth-like planets can approach 10 -5. The extended analysis of space-time correlation properties of radar echoes shows that the behavior of speckles does not prevent estimation of Mercury's instantaneous spin-vector components to accuracy of a few parts in 10 7. This limit can be reached with more powerful radar facilities and leads to constraining the interior in more detail from effects of spin dynamics, e.g., from observation of the core-mantle interplay through high precision monitoring of the 88-day spin-variation of Mercury's crust.

  17. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution.

  18. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  19. Dynamic Scattering Mode LCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadur, Birendra

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * CELL DESIGNING * EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS IN NEMATICS RELATED WITH DYNAMIC SCATTERING * Experimental Observations at D.C. Field and Electrode Effects * Experimental Observation at Low Frequency A.C. Fields * Homogeneously Aligned Nematic Regime * Williams Domains * Dynamic Scattering * Experimental Observation at High Frequency A.C. Field * Other Experimental Observations * THEORETICAL INTERPRETATIONS * Felici Model * Carr-Helfrich Model * D.C. Excitation * Dubois-Violette, de Gennes and Parodi Model * Low Freqency or Conductive Regime * High Frequency or Dielectric Regime * DYNAMIC SCATTERING IN SMECRIC A PHASE * ELECTRO-OPTICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND LIMITATIONS * Contrast Ratio vs. Voltage, Viewing Angle, Cell Gap, Wavelength and Temperature * Display Current vs. Voltage, Cell Gap and Temperature * Switching Time * Effect of Alignment * Effect of Conductivity, Temperature and Frequency * Addressing of DSM LCDs * Limitations of DSM LCDs * ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS * REFERENCES

  20. Stochastic ice stream dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution. PMID:27457960

  1. Space Suit Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Anthony B.; Nair, Satish S.; Miles, John B.; Iovine, John V.; Lin, Chin H.

    1998-01-01

    The present NASA space suit (the Shuttle EMU) is a self-contained environmental control system, providing life support, environmental protection, earth-like mobility, and communications. This study considers the thermal dynamics of the space suit as they relate to astronaut thermal comfort control. A detailed dynamic lumped capacitance thermal model of the present space suit is used to analyze the thermal dynamics of the suit with observations verified using experimental and flight data. Prior to using the model to define performance characteristics and limitations for the space suit, the model is first evaluated and improved. This evaluation includes determining the effect of various model parameters on model performance and quantifying various temperature prediction errors in terms of heat transfer and heat storage. The observations from this study are being utilized in two future design efforts, automatic thermal comfort control design for the present space suit and design of future space suit systems for Space Station, Lunar, and Martian missions.

  2. Dynamically stabilized magnetic skyrmions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Iacocca, E.; Awad, A. A.; Dumas, R. K.; Zhang, F. C.; Braun, H. B.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically non-trivial spin textures that manifest themselves as quasiparticles in ferromagnetic thin films or noncentrosymmetric bulk materials. So far attention has focused on skyrmions stabilized either by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) or by dipolar interaction, where in the latter case the excitations are known as bubble skyrmions. Here we demonstrate the existence of a dynamically stabilized skyrmion, which exists even when dipolar interactions and DMI are absent. We establish how such dynamic skyrmions can be nucleated, sustained and manipulated in an effectively lossless medium under a nanocontact. As quasiparticles, they can be transported between two nanocontacts in a nanowire, even in complete absence of DMI. Conversely, in the presence of DMI, we observe that the dynamical skyrmion experiences strong breathing. All of this points towards a wide range of skyrmion manipulation, which can be studied in a much wider class of materials than considered so far. PMID:26351104

  3. Dynamical symmetries for fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model (FDSM). The analytical symmetry limits of the model are then applied to the calculation of physical quantities such as ground-state masses and B(E{sub 2}) values in heavy nuclei. These comparisons with data provide strong support for a new principle of collective motion, the Dynamical Pauli Effect, and suggest that dynamical symmetries which properly account for the pauli principle are much more persistent in nuclear structure than the corresponding boson symmetries. Finally, we present an assessment of criticisms which have been voiced concerning the FDSM, and a discussion of new phenomena and exotic spectroscopy'' which may be suggested by the model. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Rotorcraft Dynamics 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In the conference proceedings are 24 presented papers, their discussions, and material given in two panels. The presented papers address the general areas of the dynamics of rotorcraft or helicopters. Specific topics include the stability of rotors in hover and forward flight, the stability of coupled rotor-fuselage systems in hover, the loads on a rotor in forward flight including new developments in rotor loads calculations, and the calculation of rotorcraft vibration and means for its control or suppression. Material in the first panel deals with the successful application of dynamics technology to engineering development of flight vehicles. Material in the second panel is concerned with large data bases in the area of rotorocraft dynamics and how they are developed, managed, and used.

  5. Terminal Model Of Newtonian Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1994-01-01

    Paper presents study of theory of Newtonian dynamics of terminal attractors and repellers, focusing on issues of reversibility vs. irreversibility and deterministic evolution vs. probabilistic or chaotic evolution of dynamic systems. Theory developed called "terminal dynamics" emphasizes difference between it and classical Newtonian dynamics. Also holds promise for explaining irreversibility, unpredictability, probabilistic behavior, and chaos in turbulent flows, in thermodynamic phenomena, and in other dynamic phenomena and systems.

  6. Generator voltage stabilisation for series-hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P; Gladwin, D; Stewart, J; Cowley, R

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a controller for use in speed control of an internal combustion engine for series-hybrid electric vehicle applications. Particular reference is made to the stability of the rectified DC link voltage under load disturbance. In the system under consideration, the primary power source is a four-cylinder normally aspirated gasoline internal combustion engine, which is mechanically coupled to a three-phase permanent magnet AC generator. The generated AC voltage is subsequently rectified to supply a lead-acid battery, and permanent magnet traction motors via three-phase full bridge power electronic inverters. Two complementary performance objectives exist. Firstly to maintain the internal combustion engine at its optimal operating point, and secondly to supply a stable 42 V supply to the traction drive inverters. Achievement of these goals minimises the transient energy storage requirements at the DC link, with a consequent reduction in both weight and cost. These objectives imply constant velocity operation of the internal combustion engine under external load disturbances and changes in both operating conditions and vehicle speed set-points. An electronically operated throttle allows closed loop engine velocity control. System time delays and nonlinearities render closed loop control design extremely problematic. A model-based controller is designed and shown to be effective in controlling the DC link voltage, resulting in the well-conditioned operation of the hybrid vehicle. PMID:18262528

  7. Stabilisation of distal radius fractures: Lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Horst, Taylor A; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of the diagnosis and management of distal radius fractures has been a long developed over centuries. There has been a shift in treatment of these very common injuries from closed reduction and casting to internal fixation. The answer to the best method of treatment has yet to be found. Today, we have a multitude of treatment options available with varying degrees of evidence to support their use. This review helps to illustrate the lessons we have learned and future directions for treatment.

  8. Impacts on foam stabilised composite structures: Experimental and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivallant, S.; Ferrero, J. F.; Barrau, J. J.

    2003-09-01

    A dropweight tester is used to make low velocity tests on specific sandwich type structures. Sandwich are made of glass-epoxy skin and polyurethane foam core. The skins can be straight or little curved, and impact direction is the global skin direction. The aim of these tests is to study the initiation of rupture in such structures: local buckling of skin and foam core rupture. Experimental results are given. They show the evolution of buckling critical stress in the skin when impact velocity increases. The rupture mode in curved skin specimen is also studied: rupture is no more provoked by buckling. A numerical analysis is proposed to model the behaviour of the structure and the rupture initiation. Finally, a method is developed, in order to predict the propagation of skin debonding during impact: an element layer under the skin is damaged with a specific law to simulate debonding.

  9. Stabilisation of Laryngeal AL Amyloidosis with Long Term Curcumin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) represent a spectrum of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL) falls within the spectrum of these diseases and has a mortality rate of more than 80% within 2 years of diagnosis. Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs. In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins. We thus administered curcumin to a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis and smoldering myeloma and found that the patient has shown a lack of progression of his disease for a period of five years. This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. We recommend further evaluation of curcumin in patients with primary AL amyloidosis. PMID:26199769

  10. Stabilisation of Laryngeal AL Amyloidosis with Long Term Curcumin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H.; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) represent a spectrum of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL) falls within the spectrum of these diseases and has a mortality rate of more than 80% within 2 years of diagnosis. Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs. In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins. We thus administered curcumin to a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis and smoldering myeloma and found that the patient has shown a lack of progression of his disease for a period of five years. This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. We recommend further evaluation of curcumin in patients with primary AL amyloidosis. PMID:26199769

  11. Generator voltage stabilisation for series-hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P; Gladwin, D; Stewart, J; Cowley, R

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a controller for use in speed control of an internal combustion engine for series-hybrid electric vehicle applications. Particular reference is made to the stability of the rectified DC link voltage under load disturbance. In the system under consideration, the primary power source is a four-cylinder normally aspirated gasoline internal combustion engine, which is mechanically coupled to a three-phase permanent magnet AC generator. The generated AC voltage is subsequently rectified to supply a lead-acid battery, and permanent magnet traction motors via three-phase full bridge power electronic inverters. Two complementary performance objectives exist. Firstly to maintain the internal combustion engine at its optimal operating point, and secondly to supply a stable 42 V supply to the traction drive inverters. Achievement of these goals minimises the transient energy storage requirements at the DC link, with a consequent reduction in both weight and cost. These objectives imply constant velocity operation of the internal combustion engine under external load disturbances and changes in both operating conditions and vehicle speed set-points. An electronically operated throttle allows closed loop engine velocity control. System time delays and nonlinearities render closed loop control design extremely problematic. A model-based controller is designed and shown to be effective in controlling the DC link voltage, resulting in the well-conditioned operation of the hybrid vehicle.

  12. Molecularly stabilised ultrasmall gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifert, Annika; Pan-Bartnek, Yu; Simon, Ulrich; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2013-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely used as contrast agents in electron microscopy as well as for diagnostic tests. Due to their unique optical and electrical properties and their small size, there is also a growing field of potential applications in medical fields of imaging and therapy, for example as drug carriers or as active compounds in thermotherapy. Besides their intrinsic optical properties, facile surface decoration with (bio)functional ligands renders AuNPs ideally suited for many industrial and medical applications. However, novel AuNPs may have toxicological profiles differing from bulk and therefore a thorough analysis of the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is required. Several mechanisms are proposed that cause adverse effects of nanoparticles in biological systems. Catalytic generation of reactive species due to the large and chemically active surface area of nanomaterials is well established. Because nanoparticles approach the size of biological molecules and subcellular structures, they may overcome natural barriers by active or passive uptake. Ultrasmall AuNPs with sizes of 2 nm or less may even behave as molecular ligands. These types of potential interactions would imply a size and ligand-dependent behaviour of any nanomaterial towards biological systems. Thus, to fully understand their QSAR, AuNPs bioactivity should be analysed in biological systems of increasing complexity ranging from cell culture to whole animal studies.

  13. Stabilisation of difference equations with noisy prediction-based control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braverman, E.; Kelly, C.; Rodkina, A.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the influence of stochastic perturbations on stability of a unique positive equilibrium of a difference equation subject to prediction-based control. These perturbations may be multiplicative We begin by relaxing the control parameter in the deterministic equation, and deriving a range of values for the parameter over which all solutions eventually enter an invariant interval. Then, by allowing the variation to be stochastic, we derive sufficient conditions (less restrictive than known ones for the unperturbed equation) under which the positive equilibrium will be globally a.s. asymptotically stable: i.e. the presence of noise improves the known effectiveness of prediction-based control. Finally, we show that systemic noise has a "blurring" effect on the positive equilibrium, which can be made arbitrarily small by controlling the noise intensity. Numerical examples illustrate our results.

  14. Direct observation of OH formation from stabilised Criegee intermediates.

    PubMed

    Novelli, A; Vereecken, L; Lelieveld, J; Harder, H

    2014-10-01

    The syn-CH3CHOO Criegee intermediate formed from the ozonolysis of propene and (E)-2-butene was detected via unimolecular decomposition and subsequent detection of OH radicals by a LIF-FAGE instrument. An observed time dependent OH concentration profile was analysed using a detailed model focusing on the speciated chemistry of Criegee intermediates based on the recent literature. The absolute OH concentration was found to depend on the steady state concentration of syn-CH3CHOO at the injection point while the time dependence of the OH concentration profile was influenced by the sum of the rates of unimolecular decomposition of syn-CH3CHOO and wall loss. By varying the most relevant parameters influencing the SCI chemistry in the model and based on the temporal OH concentration profile, the unimolecular decomposition rate k (293 K) of syn-CH3CHOO was shown to lie within the range 3-30 s(-1), where a value of 20 ± 10 s(-1) yields the best agreement with the CI chemistry literature. PMID:25119645

  15. Vitamin C for stabilising biological lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Ajoy K.; Mackenzie, Mark D.; Cialowicz, Katarzyna I.; Saleeb, Rebecca S.; Duncan, Rory R.

    2016-04-01

    We report on efforts to improve the lifetime of biological lasers through the use of ascorbic acid (also commonly known as vitamin C). Fluorescent proteins and dyes, used in biological lasers, suffer from photobleaching due to the build-up of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which causes damage leading to a decrease in emission over time. This is an issue both for laser lifetime and cell health. It has previously been shown that ascorbic acid can be effective in reducing ROS levels in a variety of applications. For our experiments human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), containing the fluorescent dye Calcein AM, were placed between two dielectric plane mirrors to form a laser cavity. The cells were pumped using the output of a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond OPO system, frequency doubled twice in BBO crystals, giving an output of 474 nm. Initial results have shown an increase in laser lifetime when ascorbic acid is added to cells indicating a reduction in the build-up of ROS.

  16. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods.

    PubMed

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK(®)-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA(®) polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  17. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  18. On natural inflation and moduli stabilisation in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palti, Eran

    2015-10-01

    Natural inflation relies on the existence of an axion decay constant which is super-Planckian. In string theory only sub-Planckian axion decay constants have been found in any controlled regime. However in field theory it is possible to generate an enhanced super-Planckian decay constant by an appropriate aligned mixing between axions with individual sub-Planckian decay constants. We study the possibility of such a mechanism in string theory. In particular we construct a new realisation of an alignment scenario in type IIA string theory compactifications on a Calabi-Yau where the alignment is induced through fluxes. Within field theory the original decay constants are taken to be independent of the parameters which induce the alignment. In string theory however they are moduli dependent quantities and so interact gravitationally with the physics responsible for the mixing. We show that this gravitational effect of the fluxes on the moduli can precisely cancel any enhancement of the effective decay constant. This censorship of an effective super-Planckian decay constant depends on detailed properties of Calabi-Yau moduli spaces and occurs for all the examples and classes that we study. We expand these results to a general superpotential assuming only that the axion superpartners are fixed supersymmetrically and are able to show for a large class of Calabi-Yau manifolds, but not all, that the cancellation effect occurs and is independent of the superpotential. We also study simple models where the moduli are fixed non-supersymmetrically and find that similar cancellation behaviour can emerge. Finally we make some comments on a possible generalisation to axion monodromy inflation models.

  19. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  20. Dynamic dune management, integrating objectives of nature development and coastal safety: Examples from the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arens, Sebastiaan M.; Mulder, Jan P. M.; Slings, Quirinus L.; Geelen, Luc H. W. T.; Damsma, Petra

    2013-10-01

    This paper discusses and compares results of management interventions to remobilise dunes and obtain more autonomous changes in foredunes resulting from a change in coastal defence policy. In recent decades, nature conservation managers tried to restore aeolian dynamics and dune mobility landward of foredunes to maintain threatened, rare pioneer species. Results indicate that destabilisation activities yielded an important increase of blowing sand and its effects on ecology but with a limited effect on the desired integral remobilization of dunes. Roots remaining in the sand after removal of vegetation and soil is one of the main problems. Follow up removal of roots for 3 to 5 years seems to be essential, but it is not clear whether the dunes will remain mobile in the long term. In 1990 the Dutch government decided to maintain the position of the coastline by artificial sand nourishment. An intensive management of the foredunes was no longer required. Consequently, natural processes in the foredunes revived, and the sediment budget of the beach-dune system changed. Two main types of responses are visible. In some areas, increased input of sand resulted in the development of embryonic dunes seaward of the former foredunes, leading to increased stabilisation of the former foredunes. In other areas, development of embryonic dunes was insignificant despite the increased sand input, but wind erosion features developed in the foredunes, and the environment was more dynamic. The reasons for the differences are not clear, and the interaction between shoreface, beach and dunes is still poorly understood. Until now, attempts to mobilise the inner dunes were independent of changes made to the foredunes. We argue that an integrated, dynamic approach to coastal management, taking account of all relevant functions (including safety and natural values) and the dune-beach system as a whole, may provide new and durable solutions. An integrated approach would ideally provide fresh