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Sample records for dynamic transpedicular stabilisation

  1. A Novel Approach to the Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniations: Indications of Simple Discectomy and Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization Based on Carragee Classification

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, A. F.; Keskin, F.; Oktenoglu, T.; Suzer, T.; Ataker, Y.; Gomleksiz, C.; Sasani, M.

    2013-01-01

    Surgery of lumbar disc herniation is still a problem since Mixter and Barr. Main trouble is dissatisfaction after the operation. Today there is a debate on surgical or conservative treatment despite spending great effort to provide patients with satisfaction. The main problem is segmental instability, and the minimally invasive approach via microscope or endoscope is not necessarily appropriate solution for all cases. Microsurgery or endoscopy would be appropriate for the treatment of Carragee type I and type III herniations. On the other hand in Carragee type II and type IV herniations that are prone to develop recurrent disc herniation and segmental instability, the minimal invasive techniques might be insufficient to achieve satisfactory results. The posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization method might be a good solution to prevent or diminish the recurrent disc herniation and development of segmental instability. In this study we present our experience in the surgical treatment of disc herniations. PMID:23653862

  2. Dynamic quantised feedback stabilisation of discrete-time linear system with white noise input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Mingming; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we mainly focus on the problem of quantised feedback stabilisation of a stochastic discrete-time linear system with white noise input. The dynamic quantiser is used here. The stability of the system under state quantisation and input quantisation is analysed in detail, respectively. Both the convergence of the state's mean and the boundedness of the state's covariance matrix norm should be considered when analysing its stability. It is shown that for the two situations of the state quantisation and the input quantisation, if the system without noise input can be stabilised by a linear feedback law, it must be stabilised by the dynamic quantised feedback control policy. The sufficient conditions that the dynamic quantiser should satisfy are given. Using the results obtained in this paper, one can test whether the stochastic system is stabilisable or not. Numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the results.

  3. Global stabilisation for a class of uncertain nonlinear time-delay systems by dynamic state and output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Lin; Qian, Chunjiang

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the design problem of constructing the state and output feedback stabilisation controller for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems subject to time-delay. First, a dynamic linear state feedback control law with an adaptive strategy is developed to globally stabilise the uncertain nonlinear time-delay system under a lower-triangular higher-order growth condition. Then, one more challenging problem of the adaptive output feedback stabilisation is addressed, which can globally stabilise the time-delay system when the unmeasurable states linearly grow with rate functions consisting of higher-order output.

  4. Pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilisation of the lumbar spine: in vitro cadaver investigation and a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Oktenoglu, T; Erbulut, D U; Kiapour, A; Ozer, A F; Lazoglu, I; Kaner, T; Sasani, M; Goel, V K

    2015-08-01

    Pedicle screw-based dynamic constructs either benefit from a dynamic (flexible) interconnecting rod or a dynamic (hinged) screw. Both types of systems have been reported in the literature. However, reports where the dynamic system is composed of two dynamic components, i.e. a dynamic (hinged) screw and a dynamic rod, are sparse. In this study, the biomechanical characteristics of a novel pedicle screw-based dynamic stabilisation system were investigated and compared with equivalent rigid and semi-rigid systems using in vitro testing and finite element modelling analysis. All stabilisation systems restored stability after decompression. A significant decrease in the range of motion was observed for the rigid system in all loadings. In the semi-rigid construct the range of motion was significantly less than the intact in extension, lateral bending and axial rotation loadings. There were no significant differences in motion between the intact spine and the spine treated with the dynamic system (P>0.05). The peak stress in screws was decreased when the stabilisation construct was equipped with dynamic rod and/or dynamic screws.

  5. Acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence and shapes intrinsic dynamics of an intraguild predator and its prey.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Holly V; Peltomaa, Elina; Johnson, Matthew D; Neubert, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    In marine ecosystems, acquired phototrophs - organisms that obtain their photosynthetic ability by hosting endosymbionts or stealing plastids from their prey - are omnipresent. Such taxa function as intraguild predators yet depend on their prey to periodically obtain chloroplasts. We present a new theory for the effects of acquired phototrophy on community dynamics by analysing a mathematical model of this predator-prey interaction and experimentally verifying its predictions with a laboratory model system. We show that acquired phototrophy stabilises coexistence, but that the nature of this coexistence exhibits a 'paradox of enrichment': as light increases, the coexistence between the acquired phototroph and its prey transitions from a stable equilibrium to boom-bust cycles whose amplitude increases with light availability. In contrast, heterotrophs and mixotrophic acquired phototrophs (that obtain < 30% of their carbon from photosynthesis) do not exhibit such cycles. This prediction matches field observations, in which only strict ( > 95% of carbon from photosynthesis) acquired phototrophs form blooms.

  6. Robust gain-scheduling energy-to-peak control of vehicle lateral dynamics stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xinjie; Wang, Junmin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the vehicle lateral dynamics stabilisation problem to enhance vehicle handling by considering time-varying longitudinal velocity. The longitudinal velocity is described by a polytope with finite vertices and a novel technique is proposed to reduce the number of vertices. Since the tyre dynamics is nonlinear, the cornering stiffness is represented via the norm-bounded uncertainty. Concerning the time-varying velocity and the nonlinear tyre model, a linear parameter-varying vehicle model is obtained. As the velocity and the states are measurable, a gain-scheduling state-feedback controller is introduced. In the lateral control, the sideslip angle is required to be as small as possible and the yaw rate is constrained to a certain level. Thus, the control objective is to minimise the sideslip angle while the yaw rate is under a prescribed level or constrain both the sideslip angle and the yaw rate to prescribed levels. To consider the transient response of the closed-loop system, the ?-stability is also employed in the energy-to-peak control. The optimal controller can be obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. A nonlinear vehicle model is utilised to illustrate the design procedure and the effectiveness of the proposed design method. Finally, simulations and comparisons are carried out to show the significant advantage of the designed controller. Compared to the open-loop system, the closed-loop system with the designed controller can achieve much smaller sideslip angle and the yaw rate is closer to the desired yaw rate from a reference model. Therefore, the vehicle safety and the handling are both improved in our simulation cases.

  7. Characterization and stabilising dynamic phase fluctuations in large mode area fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. C.; Scott, A. M.

    2007-02-01

    Fibre amplifiers exhibit rapid time dependent phase fluctuations due to the environment and to thermal and other effects associated with the pumping and lasing processes. We characterise these effects in a large mode area fibre amplifier having an output power of 260W limited only by pump power. The amplifier retains its coherence even at the highest available output power with negligible linewidth broadening. Phase fluctuations are characterised by a low-amplitude power-independent jitter superimposed on a power-dependent drift due to heating. We also measure the phase fluctuations in a COTS fibre preamplifier and find they are predominantly large amplitude periodic oscillations at 110Hz, probably induced by pump power fluctuations. The two amplifiers were combined in series to give a high gain amplifier chain and actively phase stabilised to high precision (~λ/37 rms) using a piezo-ceramic fibre stretcher incorporated into a PC-based feedback loop.

  8. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A. E.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-04-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present.

  9. Predator-prey dynamics stabilised by nonlinearity explain oscillations in dust-forming plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A. E.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    Dust-forming plasmas are ionised gases that generate particles from a precursor. In nature, dust-forming plasmas are found in flames, the interstellar medium and comet tails. In the laboratory, they are valuable in generating nanoparticles for medicine and electronics. Dust-forming plasmas exhibit a bizarre, even puzzling behaviour in which they oscillate with timescales of seconds to minutes. Here we show how the problem of understanding these oscillations may be cast as a predator-prey problem, with electrons as prey and particles as predators. The addition of a nonlinear loss term to the classic Lotka-Volterra equations used for describing the predator-prey problem in ecology not only stabilises the oscillations in the solutions for the populations of electrons and particles in the plasma but also explains the behaviour in more detail. The model explains the relative phase difference of the two populations, the way in which the frequency of the oscillations varies with the concentration of the precursor gas, and the oscillations of the light emission, determined by the populations of both species. Our results demonstrate the value of adopting an approach to a complex physical science problem that has been found successful in ecology, where complexity is always present. PMID:27046237

  10. Cyanobacterial and microcystins dynamics following the application of hydrogen peroxide to waste stabilisation ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrington, D. J.; Ghadouani, A.; Ivey, G. N.

    2013-02-01

    Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are a risk to human and ecological health, and a hindrance to biological wastewater treatment. This study investigated the use of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the removal of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins from within waste stabilization ponds (WSPs). The daily dynamics of cyanobacteria and microcystins (a commonly occurring cyanotoxin) were examined following the addition of H2O2 to wastewater within both the laboratory and at the full-scale within a WSP. Hydrogen peroxide treatment at concentrations ≥ 10-4 g H2O2 μg-1 of total phytoplankton chlorophyll a led to the death of cyanobacteria, in turn releasing intracellular microcystins to the dissolved state. In the full-scale trial, dissolved microcystins were then degraded to negligible concentrations by H2O2 and environmental processes within five days. A shift in the phytoplankton assemblage towards beneficial chlorophyta species was also observed within days of H2O2 addition. However, within weeks, the chlorophyta population was significantly reduced by the re-establishment of toxic cyanobacterial species. This re-establishment was likely due to the inflow of cyanobacteria from ponds earlier in the treatment train, suggesting that whilst H2O2 may be a suitable short-term management technique, it must be coupled with control over inflows if it is to improve WSP performance in the longer term.

  11. Cyanobacterial and microcystins dynamics following the application of hydrogen peroxide to waste stabilisation ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrington, D. J.; Ghadouani, A.; Ivey, G. N.

    2013-06-01

    Cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins are a risk to human and ecological health, and a hindrance to biological wastewater treatment. This study investigated the use of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the removal of cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins from within waste stabilization ponds (WSPs). The daily dynamics of cyanobacteria and microcystins (commonly occurring cyanotoxins) were examined following the addition of H2O2 to wastewater within both the laboratory and at the full scale within a maturation WSP, the final pond in a wastewater treatment plant. Hydrogen peroxide treatment at concentrations ≥ 0.1 mg H2O2 μg-1 total phytoplankton chlorophyll a led to the lysis of cyanobacteria, in turn releasing intracellular microcystins to the dissolved state. In the full-scale trial, dissolved microcystins were then degraded to negligible concentrations by H2O2 and environmental processes within five days. A shift in the phytoplankton assemblage towards beneficial Chlorophyta species was also observed within days of H2O2 addition. However, within weeks, the Chlorophyta population was significantly reduced by the re-establishment of toxic cyanobacterial species. This re-establishment was likely due to the inflow of cyanobacteria from ponds earlier in the treatment train, suggesting that whilst H2O2 may be a suitable short-term management technique, it must be coupled with control over inflows if it is to improve WSP performance in the longer term.

  12. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Tunable frequency-stabilised laser for studying the cooling dynamics of Rb atoms in a magnetooptical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarovitsky, Alexander V.; Prudnikov, O. N.; Vasil'ev, V. V.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Razin, Oleg A.; Sherstov, Ivan V.; Taichenachev, Aleksei V.; Yudin, Valerii I.

    2004-04-01

    A system is developed which allows one to stabilise the diode laser frequency at any point in the vicinity of the cyclic D2-line transition in Rb in the interval from +40 to -150 MHz and to switch the laser frequency within this interval for ~1 ms. A method is proposed and realised for increasing the contrast of the reference sub-Doppler resonance observed in circularly polarised fields. The ultimate contrast of the resonance is estimated. This system can be used to study the anomalous light pressure force acting on atoms in an optical molasses. A magnetooptical trap for Rb atoms is described.

  13. Cyclodextrin stabilised emulsions and cyclodextrinosomes.

    PubMed

    Mathapa, Baghali G; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2013-11-07

    We report the preparation of o/w emulsions stabilised by microcrystals of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes. The inclusion complexes are formed by threading cyclodextrins from the aqueous phase on n-tetradecane or silicone oil molecules from the emulsion drop surface which grow further into microrods and microplatelets depending on the type of cyclodextrin (CD) used. These microcrystals remain attached on the surface of the emulsion drops and form densely packed layers which resemble Pickering emulsions. The novelty of this emulsion stabilisation mechanism is that molecularly dissolved cyclodextrin from the continuous aqueous phase is assembled into colloid particles directly onto the emulsion drop surface, i.e. molecular adsorption leads to effective Pickering stabilisation. The β-CD stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were so stable that we used this system as a template for preparation of cyclodextrinosomes. These structures were produced solely through formation of cyclodextrin-oil inclusion complexes and their assembly into a crystalline phase on the drop surface retained its stability after the removal of the core oil. The structures of CD-stabilised tetradecane-in-water emulsions were characterised using optical microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, cross-polarised light microscopy and WETSEM while the cyclodextrinosomes were characterised by SEM. We also report the preparation of CD-stabilised emulsions with a range of other oils, including tricaprylin, silicone oil, isopropyl myristate and sunflower oil. We studied the effect of the salt concentration in the aqueous phase, the type of CD and the oil volume fraction on the type of emulsion formed. The CD-stabilised emulsions can be applied in a range of surfactant-free formulations with possible applications in cosmetics, home and personal care. Cyclodextrinosomes could find applications in pharmaceutical formulations as microencapsulation and drug delivery vehicles.

  14. Dynamical properties of α-amylase in the folded and unfolded state: the role of thermal equilibrium fluctuations for conformational entropy and protein stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitter, J.; Herrmann, R.; Hauß, T.; Lechner, R. E.; Dencher, N. A.

    2001-07-01

    A comparative analysis of thermal equilibrium fluctuations occurring in a mesophilic and in a thermophilic α-amylase was performed to study the effect of structural fluctuations on thermostability. The thermal fluctuations determining the conformational entropy of both enzymes have been characterised for the folded (at 30°C and 60°C) and for the unfolded state by applying neutron spectroscopy (at 30°C). The folded state shows a higher structural flexibility for the thermophilic protein as compared to the mesophilic homologue. In contrast, the unfolded state of both enzymes is rather similar with respect to the structural fluctuations. On the basis of this result, a mechanism characterised by entropic stabilisation (i.e., smaller Δ S for the unfolding transition of thermophilic α-amylase) can be assumed to be responsible for the higher thermostability of the thermophilic enzyme.

  15. Evaluation of Outcome of Transpedicular Decompression and Instrumented Fusion in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, R.K.; Kiyawat, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose We evaluated the functional, neurological, and radiological outcome in patients with thoracic and thoracolumbar tuberculosis operated through the transpedicular approach. Overview of Literature For surgical treatment of thoracic and thoracolumbar tuberculosis, the anterior approach has been the most popular because it allows direct access to the infected tissue, thereby providing good decompression. However, anterior fixation is not strong, and graft failure and loss of correction are frequent complications. The transpedicular approach allows circumferential decompression of neural elements along with three-column fixation attained via pedicle screws by the same approach. Methods A total of 47 patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis of the thoracic or thoracolumbar region from August 2012 to August 2013. Of these, 28 patients had progressive neurological deterioration or increasing back pain despite conservative measures and underwent transpedicular decompression and pedicle screw fixation with posterior fusion. Antituberculosis therapy was given till signs of radiological healing were evident (9–16 months). Functional outcome (visual analog scale [VAS] score for back pain), neurological recovery (Frankel grading), and radiological improvement were evaluated preoperatively, immediate postoperatively, and at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. Results Mean VAS score for back pain improved from 8.7 preoperatively to 1.1 at 1 year follow-up. Frankel grading preoperatively was grade B in 7, grade C in 11, and Grade D in 10 patients, which improved to grade D in 6 and grade E in 22 patients at the last follow-up. Radiological healing was evident in the form of reappearance of trabeculae formation, resolution of pus, fatty marrow replacement, and bony fusion in all patients. Mean correction of segmental kyphosis postoperatively was 10.5°. Mean loss of correction at final follow-up was 4.1°. Conclusions Transpedicular

  16. Global asymptotic stabilisation for switched planar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Han, Zhengzhi; Huang, Jun

    2015-04-01

    This paper studies the stabilisation problem of a class of switched planar systems. The present method is different from the existing one designing directly controllers for the underlying systems. The controllers are constructed through two steps. Firstly, by means of the backstepping approach, homogeneous controllers stabilising the nominal systems are obtained. Secondly, the controllers stabilising the planar subsystems are attained by modifying the obtained homogeneous controllers. The controllers depend on perturbations of the switched systems. Finally, by using the multiple Lyapunov functions approach, a sufficient condition of the stabilisation for switched planar systems is given. The conclusions are extended to multiple dimensional switched systems. An illustrative example verifies the validity of the design.

  17. Microtubule stabilising peptides rescue tau phenotypes in-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Quraishe, Shmma; Sealey, Megan; Cranfield, Louise; Mudher, Amritpal

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton is a highly dynamic, filamentous network underpinning cellular structure and function. In Alzheimer’s disease, the microtubule cytoskeleton is compromised, leading to neuronal dysfunction and eventually cell death. There are currently no disease-modifying therapies to slow down or halt disease progression. However, microtubule stabilisation is a promising therapeutic strategy that is being explored. We previously investigated the disease-modifying potential of a microtubule-stabilising peptide NAP (NAPVSIPQ) in a well-established Drosophila model of tauopathy characterised by microtubule breakdown and axonal transport deficits. NAP prevented as well as reversed these phenotypes even after they had become established. In this study, we investigate the neuroprotective capabilities of an analogous peptide SAL (SALLRSIPA). We found that SAL mimicked NAP’s protective effects, by preventing axonal transport disruption and improving behavioural deficits, suggesting both NAP and SAL may act via a common mechanism. Both peptides contain a putative ‘SIP’ (Ser-Ile-Pro) domain that is important for interactions with microtubule end-binding proteins. Our data suggests this domain may be central to the microtubule stabilising function of both peptides and the mechanism by which they rescue phenotypes in this model of tauopathy. Our observations support microtubule stabilisation as a promising disease-modifying therapeutic strategy for tauopathies like Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:27910888

  18. Mycorrhizal aspects in slope stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Frank

    2016-04-01

    In order to re-colonise and stabilise slopes affected by superficial soil failure with plants essential requirements have to be met: the plants must grow the plants must survive sustainably plant succession must start and continuously develop These requirements, however, are anything but easy given, particularly under the often hostile environmental conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. Mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, are said to improve the plants' ability to overcome periods governed by strongly (growth) limiting factors. Subsequently, results of investigations are presented of mycorrhizal effects on different plant and soil functions related to eco-engineering in general and soil and slope stabilisation in particular. Generally, inoculation yielded higher biomass of the host plants above as well as below ground. Furthermore, the survival rate was higher for mycorrhized compared to non-mycorrhized plants, particularly under extreme environmental conditions. However, the scale of the mycorrhizal impact may be species specific of both the plant host as well as the fungal partner(s) and often becomes evident only after a certain time lag. Depending on the plant-fungus combination the root length per soil volume was found to be between 0 and 2.5 times higher for inoculated compared to non-inoculated specimens. On an alpine graded ski slope the survival of inoculated compared to non-treated Salix herbacea cuttings was significant after one vegetation period only for one of the three added mycorrhizal fungus species. However, after three years all of the inoculated plantlets performed significantly better than the non-inoculated controls. The analysis of the potential for producing and stabilising soil aggregates of five different ectomycorrhizal fungi showed high variation and, for the species Inocybe lacera, no significant difference compared to untreated soil. Furthermore, inoculation of Salix

  19. Percutaneous Transpedicular Fixation: Technical tips and Pitfalls of Sextant and Pathfinder Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed Salah Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The efficacy of the operative techniques, possible benefits as well as pitfalls and limitations of the techniques are discussed. Potential drawbacks are also detected. Purpose This study aims to report indications, techniques, and our experience with the use of the Sextant and PathFinder percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation systems. Overview of Literature Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion is a novel technique. Successful percutaneous placement of pedicle screws requires surgical skill and experience because of lack of anatomic surface landmarks. Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous placement of pedicle screws is effective. Many systems are now available. Methods We conducted a prospective operative and postoperative analysis of 40 patients with absolute indication for thoracic or lumbar instability between January 2009 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with the Sextant (group A) and PathFinder (group B) systems under fluoroscopic guidance. Operative techniques are discussed and the results compared. Results Percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation minimizes the morbidity associated with open techniques without compromising the quality of fixation. A total of 190 screws were inserted. There was no additional morbidity. Postoperative computed tomography images and plain X-rays were analyzed. Reduction of visual analog scale scores of back pain was evident. Conclusions Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous pedicular screws are feasible and can be safely done. Current systems allow multi-segmental fixation with significantly less difficulties. The described techniques have acceptable intra- and postoperative complication rates, and overall sufficient pain control with early mobilization of patients. PMID:26949466

  20. Transpedicular endoscopic surgery for lumbar spinal synovial cyst—report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Krzok, Guntram; Wagner, Ralf; Iprenburg, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar facet cysts are a benign, degenerative, and fairly uncommon cause for lumbar radiculopathy. The standard surgical treatment for lumbar facet cysts often requires a laminectomy and medial facetectomy which can further destabilize a pathological motion segment. The authors present here a novel technique for transpedicular endoscopic access to the pathology that obviates the need to violate the lamina or facet. Methods Two patient cases are described where the lumbar 4–5 facet cysts arise medial to the pedicle. Percutaneous access to the cysts was established by drilling through the adjacent pedicle creating a 7-mm corridor to establish access for the endoscopic tubular retractor and the working channel endoscope. Straight and bendable forceps were used to remove the cysts under direct visualization. Results Following surgery, the patients’ symptoms showed immediate regression with complete relief of one patient’s foot drop by 6 months. Conclusions Transpedicular endoscopic access is described as novel minimally invasive surgical option in the awake patient for lumbar facet cysts adjacent to the Lumbar 4 or 5 pedicle. PMID:28097248

  1. Assessment: Monitoring & Evaluation in a Stabilisation Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-15

    promote political processes and governance structures. This should enable a political settlement that institutionalises non-violent contests for power...of a political settlement , amenable to UK interests, between this triumvirate of actors. The Stabilisation Unit perspective is similar stating that...peaceful political settlement to produce a legitimate indigenous government, which can better serve its people. 102. Stabilisation will invariably sit

  2. Preliminary stabilisation of stormwater biofilters and loss of filter material.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, D N; Mather, P B

    Stabilisation affects performance of stormwater biofilters operating under intermittent wetting and drying, mainly due to wash-off of filter material. Understanding the dynamics of solids wash-off is crucial in designing stormwater biofilters. The current study analysed the dynamics of solids wash-off in stormwater biofilters and quantified the loss of solids from the filter. Four Perspex™ bioretention columns (94 mm internal diameter) were fabricated with a filter layer that contained 8% organic material and were fed with tap water with different numbers of antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow and tested for particle size distribution and total solids and turbidity. Solids of particle size less than 50 microns were washed off from the filter during the stabilisation period, indicating that no sand particles were washed off. The very first event after commissioning the filter resulted in the highest wash-off of solids (approximately 75 g of fines) while a significant drop in wash-off followed from the second event. An empirical model fitted to the data showed that preliminary stabilisation of a filter occurs in the first three events, during which almost 25% of fines are lost from the filter.

  3. Mean square stabilisation of complex oscillatory regimes in nonlinear stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkirtseva, Irina; Ryashko, Lev

    2016-04-01

    A problem of stabilisation of the randomly forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes for nonlinear dynamic systems is considered. For this problem solution, we propose a new theoretical approach to consider these modes as invariant manifolds of the stochastic differential equations with control. The aim of the control is to provide the exponential mean square (EMS) stability for these manifolds. A general method of the stabilisation based on the algebraic criterion of the EMS-stability is elaborated. A constructive technique for the design of the feedback regulators stabilising various types of oscillatory regimes is proposed. A detailed parametric analysis of the problem of the stabilisation for stochastically forced periodic and quasiperiodic modes is given. An illustrative example of stochastic Hopf system is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  4. Role of Transpedicular Percutaneous Vertebral Biopsy for Diagnosis of Pathology in Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Sunil; Hardikar, Sharad Moreshwar; Hardikar, Madan Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective observational study. Purpose To identify the role of percutaneous vertebral biopsy in histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures and to identify the frequency of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fractures. Overview of Literature Vertebral compression fractures are common in the Indian population. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear imaging have some limitations in the diagnosis of definitive pathology of vertebral compression fractures. Therefore, histological confirmation is necessary for definitive diagnosis and to plan appropriate management for patient. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted involving 84 patients who underwent percutaneous vertebral biopsy between 2010 and 2014. We performed C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular core vertebral biopsy of vertebral compression fractures under combination of local anesthesia and intravenous conscious sedation. Results Sufficient biopsy material was obtained in 79 of the 84 cases. In the other five cases, biopsy material was not sufficient for reporting. Out of the 79 cases, osteoporotic pathology was detected in 69 patients, malignancy was detected in 8 patients and no pathology was found in 2 patients. Two patients with distant metastases to vertebra were identified. Primary spinal malignancy was detected in 6 patients (1 unsuspected plasmacytoma, 5 diagnosed malignancy preoperatively). So, the frequency of unsuspected malignancy of this study was 1.19% (1/84). None of the patients had any complications. Conclusions C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular vertebral biopsy is useful in obtaining definitive histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures, especially in differentiating malignant and non-malignant vertebral compression fractures and helping plan appropriate management of patients. The rate of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fracture was 1.19%. PMID:27790322

  5. Transpedicular surgery for dorsolumbar junction disc prolapse: anatomic and biomechanical considerations of a minimally invasive approach.

    PubMed

    Bhatoe, H S

    2005-10-01

    The dorsal spine is the least affected region of the spine for intervertebral disc prolapse. The majority of cases of thoracic disc prolapse affect the lower dorsal spine, probably due to the increased mobility of that region. The dorsolumbar junction (DLJ) comprises D10 to L1 together with the intervening discs. Over a period of nine years, we have operated on thirty-two DLJ disc prolapses using a transpedicular approach in thirty patients. There were eight cases of D10/D11 disc prolapse, ten of D11/D12, and twelve of D12/L1 prolapse. Two patients had more than 1 level involvement. Back ache was the predominant symptom in patients with DLJ disc prolapse, seen in 92 % of cases. Presentation was in the form of conus/cauda equina syndrome with D11, D12 and L1 radiculopathy. All the patients were evaluated by MRI. Disc prolapse was eccentric in 10 and diffuse central in 22 levels. There was a distinct neurological improvement in all patients after surgery, pain relief being the most prominent feature. The dorsolumbar region differs from the dorsal spine in terms of mobility, anatomic and biomechanical features. It is a transition zone between the relatively fixed dorsal spine and the mobile lumbar region. These differences account for the higher incidence of disc prolapse in the region as compared to the dorsal spine cranial to D10. The transpedicular approach appears to be most suitable for discectomy for DLJ disc prolapse. The approach is minimally invasive considering the size of the incision, minimal bone removal and avoidance of vital structures. Postoperative pain is minimal and ambulation can be begun within 24 hours of surgery.

  6. Global asymptotic stabilisation in probability of nonlinear stochastic systems via passivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florchinger, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a systematic method for global asymptotic stabilisation in probability of nonlinear control stochastic systems with stable in probability unforced dynamics. The method is based on the theory of passivity for nonaffine stochastic differential systems combined with the technique of Lyapunov asymptotic stability in probability for stochastic differential equations. In particular, we prove that a nonlinear stochastic differential system whose unforced dynamics are Lyapunov stable in probability is globally asymptotically stabilisable in probability provided some rank conditions involving the affine part of the system coefficients are satisfied. In this framework, we show that a stabilising smooth state feedback law can be designed explicitly. A dynamic output feedback compensator for a class of nonaffine stochastic systems is constructed as an application of our analysis.

  7. Global output feedback stabilisation of nonlinear systems with a unifying linear controller structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Lin, Yan

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the problem of global stabilisation by linear output feedback for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems with zero-dynamics. Compared with the previous works, new dilation-based assumptions are introduced that allow the system nonlinearities and its bounding functions to be coupled with all the states. The nonlinear systems of this paper can be considered as an extended form of some low triangular and feedforward systems. Dynamic gain scaling technique is applied to the controller design and stability analysis. It is proved that with a unifying linear controller structure and flexible adaptive laws for the observer gain, global stabilisation of the nonlinear systems can be achieved.

  8. Accuracy and complications of transpedicular C2 screw placement without the use of spinal navigation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christian-Andreas; Roesseler, Lukas; Podlogar, Martin; Kovacs, Attlila; Kristof, Rudolf Andreas

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the technique, accuracy of placement and complications of transpedicular C2 screw fixation without spinal navigation. Patients treated by C2 pedicle screw fixations were identified from the surgical log book of the department. Clinical data were extracted retrospectively from the patients' charts. Pedicle screw placement accuracy was assessed on postoperative CT scans according to Gertzbein and Robbins (GRGr). A total of 27 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 56 +/- 22.0 years; 51.9% of them were female. As much as 17 patients suffered from trauma, 5 of degenerative disease, 3 of inflammations and 2 of metastatic disease. A total of 47 C2 transpedicular screw fixations were performed. The canulated screws were inserted under visual control following the preparation of the superior surface of the isthmus and of the medial surface of the pedicles of the C2. Intraoperative fluoroscopy was additionally used. The postoperative CT findings showed in 55.3% GRGr 1, in 27.7% GRGr 2, in 10.6% GRGr 3, and in 6.3% GRGr 4 pedicle screw insertion accuracy. Screw insertions GRGr 5 were not observed. Screw malpositioning (i.e., GRGr 3 and 4) was significantly associated with thin (<5 mm) pedicle diameters and with surgery for C2 fractures. In the three patients with screw insertions GRGr 4, postoperative angiographies were performed to exclude vertebral artery affections. In one of these three cases, the screw caused a clinically asymptomatic vertebral artery compression. Hardware failures did not occur. In one patient, postoperative pneumonia resulted in the death of the patient. Careful patient selection and surgical technique is necessary to avoid vertebral artery injury in C2 pedicle screw fixation without spinal navigation. A slight opening of the vertebral artery canal (Gertzbein and Robbins grade < or =3) does not seem to put the artery at risk. However, the high rate of misplaced screws when

  9. Bioconjugation and stabilisation of biomolecules in biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Guido A.

    2016-01-01

    Suitable bioconjugation strategies and stabilisation of biomolecules on electrodes is essential for the development of novel and commercially viable biosensors. In the present review, the functional groups that comprise the selectable targets for practical bioconjugation methods are discussed. We focus on describing the most common immobilisation techniques used in biosensor construction, which are classified into irreversible and reversible methods. Concerning the stability of proteins, the two main types of stability may be defined as (i) storage or shelf stability, and (ii) operational stability. Both types of stability are explained, as well as the introduction of an electrophoretic technique for predicting protein–polymer interactions. In addition, solution and dry stabilisation as well as stabilisation using the covalent immobilisation of proteins are discussed including possible factors that influence stability. Finally, the integration of nanomaterials, such as magnetic particles, with protein immobilisation is discussed in relation to protein stability studies. PMID:27365036

  10. Partial stability and stabilisation of Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Wei; Sun, Liang-Jie; Liu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of Boolean networks and the stabilisation of Boolean control networks with respect to part of the system's states. First, an algebraic expression of the Boolean (control) network is derived by the semi-tensor product of matrices. Then, some necessary and sufficient conditions for partial stability of Boolean networks are given. Finally, the stabilisation of Boolean control networks by a free control sequence and a state-feedback control is investigated and the respective necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained. Examples are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  11. A Case of Koch's Spine Treated with Modified Transpedicular Vertebral Curettage and Posterior Fixation: A Novel Technique

    PubMed Central

    Golwala, Paresh; Shah, Malkesh; Merh, Aditya; Kansagra, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic granulomatous infection caused by acid-fast mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli. Spinal involvement occurs in less than one percent of TB. Spinal TB (Pott’s disease) accounts for 50% of skeletal TB. Though it most commonly affects the thoracolumbar junction, it can occur at any level of the spine. Early diagnosis and treatment is mandatory in order to avoid neurological complications and spinal deformity. We report a case of a young female with tuberculosis of D12-L1 who was treated with posterior decompression using a modified transpedicular approach and posterior instrumentation with a successful outcome. PMID:28083459

  12. Lumbar Transpedicular Implant Failure: A Clinical and Surgical Challenge and Its Radiological Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abdel Mohsen Arafa

    2014-01-01

    Study Design It is a multicenter, controlled case study review of a big scale of pedicle-screw procedures from January 2000 to June 2010. The outcomes were compared to those with no implant failure. Purpose The purpose of this study was to review retrospectively the outcome of 100 patients with implant failure in comparison to 100 control-patients, and to study the causes of failure and its prevention. Overview of Literature Transpedicular fixation is associated with risks of hardware failure, such as screw/rod breakage and/or loosening at the screw-rod interface and difficulties in the system assembly, which remain a significant clinical problem. Removal or revision of the spinal hardware is often required. Methods Two hundred patients (88 women, 112 men) were divided into 2 major groups, with 100 patients in group I (implant failure group G1) and 100 patients in group II (successful fusion, control group G2). We subdivided the study groups into two subgroups: subgroup a (single-level instrumented group) and subgroup b (multilevel instrumented group). The implant status was assessed based on intraoperative and follow-up radiographs. Results Implant failure in general was present in 36% in G1a, and in 64% in G1b, and types of implant failure included screw fracture (34%), rod fracture (24%), rod loosening (22%), screw loosening (16%), and failure of both rod and screw (4%). Most of the failures (90%) occurred within 6 months after surgery, with no reported cases 1 year postoperatively. Conclusions We tried to address the problem and study the causes of failure, and proposed solutions for its prevention. PMID:24967042

  13. Effects of electron beam irradiation on the property behaviour of poly(ether-block-amide) blended with various stabilisers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Kieran A.; Kennedy, James E.; Barron, Valerie; McEvoy, Brian; Vrain, Olivier; Ryan, Damien; Cowman, Richard; Higginbotham, Clement L.

    2015-05-01

    Radiosterilisation can induce modifications and/or degradation to transpire in poly(ether-block-amide) (PEBA) following irradiation. The current investigation utilises combined synergistic mixtures of stabilisers to minimise these effects, by melt blending them with the PEBA material. Hindered amine stabilisers (HAS), primary antioxidants and secondary antioxidants were the stabilisers incorporate to reduce/eliminate the effects of 50 kGy electron beam irradiation dose on the material. Results were discussed by comparing the stabilising efficiency of mixtures on the PEBA material in contrast to the control sample. Dynamic frequency sweeps demonstrated the formation of crosslinks, where the degree of crosslinking was dependent on the combination of stabilisers mixed in the base material (PEBA). The storage modulus displayed that PEBA blended with Irganox 565 had very slight changes in contrast to all other samples following irradiation. However, since this sample is a phenol containing system, severe discolouration was observed in comparison to other samples due to the oxidation of the hindered phenol. Overall, this study provides compelling evidence that a combined synergistic mixture of Irganox 565 (multifunctional phenolic antioxidant) and Tinuvin 783 (hindered amide light stabiliser) with PEBA, resulted in the best radiation stability.

  14. On stabilisability of nonlinear systems on time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartosiewicz, Zbigniew; Piotrowska, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    In this article, stabilisability of nonlinear finite-dimensional control systems on arbitrary time scales is studied. The classical results on stabilisation of nonlinear continuous-time and discrete-time systems are extended to systems on arbitrary time scales with bounded graininess function. It is shown that uniform exponential stability of the linear approximation of a nonlinear system implies uniform exponential stability of the nonlinear system. Then this result is used to show a similar implication for uniform exponential stabilisability.

  15. Aqueous foams stabilised solely by nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Dominique

    2011-03-01

    Particles are being increasingly used to stabilise foams and emulsions, the corresponding emulsions being known as ``Pickering'' emulsions. One of the peculiarities of these systems is the absence of Ostwald ripening: since the bubbles or drops do not grow (coalescence seems also suppressed) both foams and emulsions are stable over extremely long periods of time (months). These features make particles very interesting surface active agents as compared to standard surfactants or polymers/proteins. The origin of the suppression of ripening can be traced to the unusual behaviour of the interfacial layers made by these particles. The layers are solid-like and the usual characterisation methods (surface tension, surface rheology) are not straightforward to use. In this presentation, we will illustrate these difficulties with experiments made with partially hydrophobic silica nanoparticles. We will also discuss the relevance of foam characterisations methods such as multiple light scattering and X-ray tomography.

  16. [The posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cages (PLIF) and transpedicular stabilization].

    PubMed

    Diedrich, O; Kraft, C N; Perlick, L; Schmitt, O

    2001-01-01

    The development of intervertebral cages has significantly innovated the original technique of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). In this study we present the results of patients treated for degenerative or postoperative segmental spinal instabilities by PLIF with cages and pedicular stabilisation (360 degrees-instrumentation). Between 1992 and 1999 we implanted either CFRP-, PEEK- or Titanium-cages in 86 patients. 78 patients were adequately followed up over a period of at least 12 months (average 2,6 years). 5 patients were stabilised over 2 segments, so that ultimately 83 fused segments were evaluated.15% of all patients had an excellent, 51% a good, 28% a moderate and 5% an insufficient clinical result. Degenerative instabilities had a better outcome with 73% good or excellent clinical results, compared to postoperative instabilities (56%). Based on stringent radiographic fusion criteria we found true bony fusion in 52% of all segments after 12 months, 63% after 24 months, 72% after 36 months, and 78% after 48 months. In 21 segments cage packing was performed with autologous spongiosa, while in 62 segments a combination of cortical bone and spongiosa obtained from osseous structures at the operation-site were used as packing material. At the 24 month radiographic control we found a slightly higher fusion rate for those segments treated with autologous spongiosa obtained from the iliac crest. Neither for cages nor for pedicular screws was implant failure or material fatigue found. Serious entero-, pulmo-, cardio- or urological complications were not observed. Nonetheless the necessity for operative revision was 9%. A postoperative semiquantitative evaluation of segments neighbouring the fused vertebra revealed in 28% an increase in degenerative changes. Particularly after 360 degrees-instrumentation, interpretation of the fusion-status should be based on structural and not on functional criteria. The modification of PLIF with cages compared to the use of

  17. Interference stabilisation of Rydberg atoms in a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, Mikhail V

    1999-07-31

    A review is given of the published theoretical and experimental investigations of the interference stabilisation of Rydberg atoms by a strong optical field. The physical nature of the effect, the models used to describe it, the alternative stabilisation mechanisms, and the extent to which the theoretical results match the published experimental data are discussed. (this issue is dedicated to the memory of s a akhmanov)

  18. Globally uniformly asymptotical stabilisation of time-delay nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiushan; Han, Zhengzhi; Zhang, Wei

    2011-07-01

    Globally uniformly asymptotical stabilisation of nonlinear systems in feedback form with a delay arbitrarily large in the input is dealt with based on the backstepping approach in this article. The design strategy depends on the construction of a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. A continuously differentiable control law is obtained to globally uniformly asymptotically stabilise the closed-loop system. The simulation shows the effectiveness of the method.

  19. Finding a stabilising switching law for switching nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lendek, Zs.; Raica, P.; Lauber, J.; Guerra, T. M.

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the stabilisation of switching nonlinear models by switching between the subsystems. We assume that arbitrary switching between two subsystems is possible once a subsystem has been active for a predefined number of samples. We use a Takagi-Sugeno representation of the models and a switching Lyapunov function is employed to develop sufficient stability conditions. If the conditions are satisfied, we construct a switching law that stabilises the system. The application of the conditions is illustrated in several examples.

  20. Stabilisation of second-order nonlinear equations with variable delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezansky, Leonid; Braverman, Elena; Idels, Lev

    2015-08-01

    For a wide class of second-order nonlinear non-autonomous models, we illustrate that combining proportional state control with the feedback that is proportional to the derivative of the chaotic signal allows to stabilise unstable motions of the system. The delays are variable, which leads to more flexible controls permitting delay perturbations; only delay bounds are significant for stabilisation by a delayed control. The results are applied to the sunflower equation which has an infinite number of equilibrium points.

  1. High-performance electronic image stabilisation for shift and rotation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Steve C. J.; Hickman, D. L.; Wu, F.

    2014-06-01

    A novel low size, weight and power (SWaP) video stabiliser called HALO™ is presented that uses a SoC to combine the high processing bandwidth of an FPGA, with the signal processing flexibility of a CPU. An image based architecture is presented that can adapt the tiling of frames to cope with changing scene dynamics. A real-time implementation is then discussed that can generate several hundred optical flow vectors per video frame, to accurately calculate the unwanted rigid body translation and rotation of camera shake. The performance of the HALO™ stabiliser is comprehensively benchmarked against the respected Deshaker 3.0 off-line stabiliser plugin to VirtualDub. Eight different videos are used for benchmarking, simulating: battlefield, surveillance, security and low-level flight applications in both visible and IR wavebands. The results show that HALO™ rivals the performance of Deshaker within its operating envelope. Furthermore, HALO™ may be easily reconfigured to adapt to changing operating conditions or requirements; and can be used to host other video processing functionality like image distortion correction, fusion and contrast enhancement.

  2. Pavement thickness and stabilised foundation layer assessment using ground-coupled GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinhui; Vennapusa, Pavana K. R.; White, David J.; Beresnev, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Experimental results from field and laboratory investigations using a ground-coupled ground penetrating radar (GPR), dielectric measurement, magnetic imaging tomography (MIT) and dynamic cone penetrometer (DCP) tests are presented. Dielectric properties of asphalt pavement and stabilised and unstabilised pavement foundation materials were evaluated in the laboratory in frozen and unfrozen conditions. Laboratory test results showed that dielectric properties of materials back-calculated from GPR in comparison to dielectric gauge measurements are strongly correlated and repeatable. For chemically stabilised materials, curing time affected the dielectric properties of the materials. Field tests were conducted on asphalt pavement test sections with different foundation materials (stabilised and unstabilised layers), drainage conditions and layer thicknesses. GPR and MIT results were used to determine asphalt layer thicknesses and were compared with measured core thicknesses, while GPR and DCP were used to assess foundation layer profiles. Asphalt thicknesses estimated from GPR showed an average error of about 11% using the dielectric gauge values as input. The average error reduced to about 4% when calibrated with cores thicknesses. MIT results showed thicknesses that are about 9% higher than estimated using GPR. Foundation layer thicknesses could not be measured using GPR due to variations in moisture conditions between the test sections, which is partly attributed to variations in gradation and drainage characteristics of the subbase layer.

  3. Image stabilisation of the beating heart by local linear interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, Martin; Hirzinger, Gerd

    2006-03-01

    The stabilisation of motion on the beating heart is investigated in the context of minimally invasive robotic surgery. Although reduced by mechanical stabilisers, residual tissue motion makes safe surgery still difficult and time consuming. Compensation for this movement is therefore highly desirable. Motion can be captured by tracking natural landmarks on the heart surface recorded by a video endoscope. Stabilisation is achieved by transforming the images using a motion field calculated from captured local motion. Since the surface of the beating heart is distorted nonlinearly, compensating the occurring motion with a constant image correction factor is not sufficient. Therefore, heart motion is captured by several landmarks, the motion between which is interpolated such that locally appropriate motion correction values are obtained. To estimate the motion between the landmark positions, a triangulation is built and motion information in each triangle is approximated by linear interpolation. Motion compensation is evaluated by calculating the optical flow remaining in the stabilised images. The proposed linear interpolation model is able to reduce motion significantly and can also be implemented efficiently to stabilise images of the beating heart in realtime.

  4. Stabilisation of microalgae: Iodine mobilisation under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Han, Wei; Clarke, William; Pratt, Steven

    2015-10-01

    Mobilisation of iodine during microalgae stabilisation was investigated, with the view of assessing the potential of stabilised microalgae as an iodine-rich fertiliser. An iodine-rich waste microalgae (0.35 ± 0.05 mg I g(-1) VS(added)) was stabilised under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Iodine mobilisation was linearly correlated with carbon emission, indicating iodine was in the form of organoiodine. Comparison between iodine and nitrogen mobilisation relative to carbon emission indicated that these elements were, at least in part, housed separately within the cells. After stabilisation, there were 0.22 ± 0.05 and 0.19 ± 0.01 mg g(-1) VS(added) iodine remaining in the solid in the aerobic and anaerobic processed material respectively, meaning 38 ± 5.0% (aerobic) and 50 ± 8.6% (anaerobic) of the iodine were mobilised, and consequently lost from the material. The iodine content of the stabilised material is comparable to the iodine content of some seaweed fertilisers, and potentially satisfies an efficient I-fertilisation dose.

  5. Southwick Osteotomy Stabilised with External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Grubor, Predrag; Mitkovic, Milorad; Grubor, Milan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Epiphysiolysis of the femoral head is the most common accident occurring towards the end of pre-puberty and puberty growth. Case report: The author describes the experience in the treatment of chronic epiphysiolysis in two patients treated by Southwick osteotomy. The site is accessed by way of a 15-cm long lateral skin incision and the trochanteric region is reached through the layers. The osteotomy angles prepared beforehand on a thin aluminium model are used to mark the Southwick osteotomy site on the anterior and lateral sides at the level of the lesser trochanter. Before performing the trochanteric osteotomy, two Mitković convergent pins type M20 are applied distally and proximally, above the planned osteotomy site. A tenotomy of the iliopsas muscle is performed, and then the previously marked bone triangle is redissected up to three quarters of the width of the femur. The distal part of the femur is rotated inwards, so that the patella is turned towards the ceiling. The osteotomised fragments of the femur are adapted, repositioned and fixated by installing an external fixator on the previously placed pins. Two more pins are placed, one proximally and one distally, with a view to adequately stabilising the femur. The patient was mobile from day two after the surgery. If, after the surgery, the lead surgeon realises that there is a requirement to make a correction of 5, 10 and 15 degrees of the valgus, varus, anteversion or retroversion deformity, the correction shall be performed without surgically opening the patient, using the fixator pins. Conclusion: After performing a Southwick osteotomy it is easier to adapt, reposition and fixate the osteotomised fragments of the femur using a fixator type M20. Adequate stability allows regaining mobility quickly, which in turn is the best prevention of chondrolysis of the hip. It is possible to make post-operative valgus, varus, anteversion and retroversion corrections of 5, 10 and 15 degrees

  6. Stabilisation of a class of 2-DOF underactuated mechanical systems via direct Lyapunov approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turker, Turker; Gorgun, Haluk; Cansever, Galip

    2013-06-01

    This paper represents an alternative stabilisation procedure for a class of two degree-of-freedom underactuated mechanical systems based on a set of transformations and a Lyapunov function. After simplifying dynamic equations of the system via partial feedback linearisation and coordinate changes, the stability of the system is provided with Lyapunov's direct method. Proposed control scheme is used on two different examples and asymptotic convergence for each system is proven by means of La Salle's invariance principle. The designed controller is successfully illustrated through numerical simulations for each example.

  7. Security for whom? Stabilisation and civilian protection in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Elhawary, Samir

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on three periods of stabilisation in Colombia: the Alliance for Progress (1961-73) that sought to stem the threat of communist revolution in Latin America; Plan Colombia and President Alvaro Uribe's 'democratic security' policy (2000-07) aimed at defeating the guerrillas and negotiating a settlement with the paramilitaries; and the current 'integrated approach', adopted from 2007, to consolidate more effectively the state's control of its territory.(1) The paper assesses the extent to which these stabilisation efforts have enhanced the protection of civilians and ultimately finds that in all three periods there has been a disconnect between the discourse and the practice of stabilisation. While they have all sought to enhance security, in actual fact, they have privileged the security of the state and its allies at the expense of the effective protection of the civilian population. This has not only led to widespread human rights abuses but also has undermined the long-term stability being pursued.

  8. Early metal bis(phosphorus-stabilised)carbene chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Stephen T; Mills, David P; Wooles, Ashley J

    2011-05-01

    Since the discovery of covalently-bound mid- and late-transition metal carbenes there has been a spectacular explosion of interest in their chemistry, but their early metal counterparts have lagged behind. In recent years, bis(phosphorus-stabilised)carbenes have emerged as valuable ligands for metals across the periodic table, and their use has in particular greatly expanded covalently-bound early metal carbene chemistry. In this tutorial review we introduce the reader to bis(phosphorus-stabilised)carbenes, and cover general preparative methods, structure and bonding features, and emerging reactivity studies of early metal derivatives (groups 1-4 and the f-elements).

  9. Bounded stabilisation of stochastic port-Hamiltonian systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Satoshi; Saeki, Masami

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a stochastic bounded stabilisation method for a class of stochastic port-Hamiltonian systems. Both full-actuated and underactuated mechanical systems in the presence of noise are considered in this class. The proposed method gives conditions for the controller gain and design parameters under which the state remains bounded in probability. The bounded region and achieving probability are both assignable, and a stochastic Lyapunov function is explicitly provided based on a Hamiltonian structure. Although many conventional stabilisation methods assume that the noise vanishes at the origin, the proposed method is applicable to systems under persistent disturbances.

  10. The active disturbance rejection control approach to stabilisation of coupled heat and ODE system subject to boundary control matched disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bao-Zhu; Liu, Jun-Jun; AL-Fhaid, A. S.; Younas, Arshad Mahmood M.; Asiri, Asim

    2015-08-01

    We consider stabilisation for a linear ordinary differential equation system with input dynamics governed by a heat equation, subject to boundary control matched disturbance. The active disturbance rejection control approach is applied to estimate, in real time, the disturbance with both constant high gain and time-varying high gain. The disturbance is cancelled in the feedback loop. The closed-loop systems with constant high gain and time-varying high gain are shown, respectively, to be practically stable and asymptotically stable.

  11. Embolization by Direct Puncture with a Transpedicular Approach Using an Isocenter Puncture (ISOP) Method in a Patient with a Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Yukihisa Hamaguchi, Shingo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kon, Yuri; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Sakurai, Yuka; Murakami, Kenji; Arai, Yasunori; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-06-15

    BackgroundEndovascular aortic repair (EVAR) requires further intervention in 20-30 % of cases, often due to type II endoleak (T2EL). Management options for T2EL include transarterial embolization, direct puncture (DP), or transcaval embolization. We report the case of an 80-year-old man with T2EL who successfully underwent DP embolization.MethodsEmbolization by DP was performed with a transpedicular approach using an isocenter puncture (ISOP) method. An isocenter marker (ICM) was placed at a site corresponding to the aneurysm sac on fluoroscopy in two directions (frontal and lateral views). A vertebroplasty needle was inserted tangentially to the ICM under fluoroscopy and advanced to the anterior wall of the vertebral body. A 20 cm-length, 20-G-PTCD needle was inserted through the outer needle of the 13-G needle and advanced to the ICM. Sac embolization using 25 % N-buty-2-cyanoacrylate diluted with Lipiodol was performed. After complete embolization, rotational DA confirmed good filling of the sac with Lipiodol. The outer cannula and 13-G needle were removed and the procedure was completed.ResultsThe patient was discharged the next day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 and 8 months later showed no Lipiodol washout in the aneurysm sac, no endoleak recurrence, and no expansion of the excluded aneurysm.ConclusionDP with a transpedicular approach using ISOP may be useful when translumbar and transabdominal approaches prove difficult.

  12. Feedback-bounded stabilisation of certain discrete Volterra systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsios, Stelios

    2016-06-01

    Throughout this paper, we present a method for designing feedback-laws which stabilise nonlinear discrete Volterra systems. Our method is based on a factorisation algorithm which decomposes the original system as a composition of a δ-polynomial and a linear series.

  13. Exponential passivity for output feedback stabilisation of nonlinear uncertain systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabdallah, Amel

    2010-11-01

    In this article, we address the problem of stabilisation by output feedback for a class of uncertain systems. We consider uncertain systems with a nominal part which is affine in the control and an uncertain part which is norm bounded by a known function. We propose an output feedback such that the closed loop system is globally exponentially stable.

  14. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  15. Evaluation of surgical strategy of conventional vs. percutaneous robot-assisted spinal trans-pedicular instrumentation in spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Keric, Naureen; Eum, David J; Afghanyar, Feroz; Rachwal-Czyzewicz, Izabela; Renovanz, Mirjam; Conrad, Jens; Wesp, Dominik M A; Kantelhardt, Sven R; Giese, Alf

    2017-03-01

    Robot-assisted percutaneous insertion of pedicle screws is a recent technique demonstrating high accuracy. The optimal treatment for spondylodiscitis is still a matter of debate. We performed a retrospective cohort study on surgical patients treated with pedicle screw/rod placement alone without the application of intervertebral cages. In this collective, we compare conventional open to a further minimalized percutaneous robot-assisted spinal instrumentation, avoiding a direct contact of implants and infectious focus. 90 records and CT scans of patients treated by dorsal transpedicular instrumentation of the infected segments with and without decompression and antibiotic therapy were analysed for clinical and radiological outcome parameters. 24 patients were treated by free-hand fluoroscopy-guided surgery (121 screws), and 66 patients were treated by percutaneous robot-assisted spinal instrumentation (341 screws). Accurate screw placement was confirmed in 90 % of robot-assisted and 73.5 % of free-hand placed screws. Implant revision due to misplacement was necessary in 4.95 % of the free-hand group compared to 0.58 % in the robot-assisted group. The average intraoperative X-ray exposure per case was 0.94 ± 1.04 min in the free-hand group vs. 0.4 ± 0.16 min in the percutaneous group (p = 0.000). Intraoperative adverse events were observed in 12.5 % of free-hand placed pedicle screws and 6.1 % of robot robot-assisted screws. The mean postoperative hospital stay in the free-hand group was 18.1 ± 12.9 days, and in percutaneous group, 13.8 ± 5.6 days (p = 0.012). This study demonstrates that the robot-guided insertion of pedicle screws is a safe and effective procedure in lumbar and thoracic spondylodiscitis with higher accuracy of implant placement, lower radiation dose, and decreased complication rates. Percutaneous spinal dorsal instrumentation seems to be sufficient to treat lumbar and thoracic spondylodiscitis.

  16. Gas gain stabilisation in the ATLAS TRT detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindur, B.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonov, A.; Arslan, O.; Baker, O. K.; Banas, E.; Bault, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Bendotti, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bertelsen, H.; Bingul, A.; Bocci, A.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Brock, I.; Capeáns Garrido, M.; Catinaccio, A.; Celebi, E.; Cetin, S. A.; Choi, K.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.; Davis, D.; Degeorge, C.; Derendarz, D.; Desch, K.; Di Girolamo, B.; Dittus, F.; Dixon, N.; Dressnandt, N.; Dubinin, F. A.; Evans, H.; Farthouat, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Froidevaux, D.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gecse, Z.; Godlewski, J.; Grefe, C.; Gurbuz, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, P. H.; Hawkins, A. D.; Heim, S.; Holway, K.; Kantserov, V. A.; Katounine, S.; Kayumov, F.; Keener, P. T.; Kisielewski, B.; Klopov, N. V.; Konovalov, S. P.; Koperny, S.; Korotkova, N. A.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kramarenko, V.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Kruse, M.; Kudin, L. G.; Lichard, P.; Loginov, A.; Martinez, N. Lorenzo; Lucotte, A.; Luehring, F.; Lytken, E.; Maleev, V. P.; Maevskiy, A. S.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mashinistov, R. Y.; Meyer, C.; Mialkovski, V.; Mistry, K.; Mitsou, V. A.; Nadtochi, A. V.; Newcomer, F. M.; Novodvorski, E. G.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Oleshko, S. B.; Olszowska, J.; Ostrowicz, W.; Palacino, G.; Patrichev, S.; Penwell, J.; Perez-Gomez, F.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; RØhne, O.; Reilly, M. B.; Rembser, C.; Ricken, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Ryjov, V.; Sasmaz, U.; Schaepe, S.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Shmeleva, A. P.; Shulga, E.; Sivoklokov, S.; Smirnov, S.; Smirnov, Yu.; Smirnova, L. N.; Soldatov, E.; Sulin, V. V.; Tartarelli, G.; Taylor, W.; Thomson, E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tipton, P.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Berg, R.; Vasquez, J.; Vasilyeva, L. F.; Vlazlo, O.; Weinert, B.; Williams, H. H.; Wong, V.; Zhukov, K. I.; Zieminska, D.

    2016-04-01

    The ATLAS (one of two general purpose detectors at the LHC) Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three tracking subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector. It is a large straw-based detector and contains about 350,000 electronics channels. The performance of the TRT as tracking and particularly particle identification detector strongly depends on stability of the operation parameters with most important parameter being the gas gain which must be kept constant across the detector volume. The gas gain in the straws can vary significantly with atmospheric pressure, temperature, and gas mixture composition changes. This paper presents a concept of the gas gain stabilisation in the TRT and describes in detail the Gas Gain Stabilisation System (GGSS) integrated into the Detector Control System (DCS). Operation stability of the GGSS during Run-1 is demonstrated.

  17. Use of Reinforced Lightweight Clay Aggregates for Landslide Stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Herle, Vitezslav

    2008-07-08

    In spring 2006 a large landslide combined with rock fall closed a highway tunnel near Svitavy in NE part of Czech Republic and cut the main highway connecting Bohemia with Moravia regions. Stabilisation work was complicated by steep mountainous terrain and large inflow of surface and underground water. The solution was based on formation of a stabilisation fill made of reinforced free draining aggregates at the toe of the slope with overlying lightweight fill up to 10 m high reinforced with PET geogrid and steel mesh protecting soft easily degrading sandstone against weathering. Extensive monitoring made possible to compare the FEM analysis with real values. The finished work fits very well in the environment and was awarded a special prize in the 2007 transport structures contest.

  18. [A difficult stabilisation. Chlorpromazine in the fifties in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Majerus, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Through a Belgian case study the article tries to trace the gradual stabilisation of chlorpromazine as an antipsychotic in the 1950s. By varying ranges and angles of approach it shows the heterogeneity of actors involved and the semantic bricolage that accompany the marketing of the first antipsychotic. Far from being a revolution, the presence of Largactil in psychiatric practice is rather characterised by integration into a wider range of medicines and sinuous searching to give sense to this new drug.

  19. Stabilisation of scoliosis in two koi (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Govett, P D; Olby, N J; Marcellin-Little, D J; Rotstein, D S; Reynolds, T L; Lewbart, G A

    2004-07-24

    Two koi (Cyprinus carpio) from the same pond developed similar lesions of scoliosis. Radiographic examinations showed that their spines had become malaligned as a result of vertebral compression fractures involving T14 to T16. The vertebrae in both fish were stabilised with screws, k-wire and polymethylmethacrylate. They both appeared to improve after surgery, but they began to decline and died within three months. A postmortem examination revealed multi-organ inflammation that was not associated with the surgical implants.

  20. Results of Single-Staged Posterior Decompression and Circumferential Fusion Using a Transpedicular Approach to Correct a Kyphotic Deformity due to Thoracolumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Jayprakash; Soman, Shardul; Patel, Harshil; Dhanani, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This is a prospective study. Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the results of single-staged posterior decompression and circumferential fusion using a transpedicular approach to correct a kyphotic deformity due to thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis. Overview of Literature Surgical management is frequently an imperative choice to achieve spinal decompression and deformity correction due to tuberculosis to relieve pain, improve neurology, and reconstruct the spine stability. Since the time anterior radical debridement and noninstrumented fusion was described, it has become apparent that even anterior debridement and bone grafting was often unsatisfactory in correcting or preventing the progression of kyphosis deformity. With the advent of modern segmental spinal instrumentation systems, isolated posterior instrumentation; combined anterior and posterior fusion; and single-staged posterior decompression and circumferential fusion have been described by many authors for correcting angular deformity and stabilizing the spine; however, there is a lack of consensus regarding the most effective means of correcting the deformity due to thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis. Methods This is a prospective study of 20 patients with thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis who underwent surgery at our institute. Results Twenty patients who were started on antituberculosis treatment underwent surgery using a single-staged posterior approach involving fixation, decompression, and kyphosis correction. Preoperatively, all patients had varying degrees of neurological deficit and a 27.45° average kyphotic angle, which improved. At the 1-year follow-up, correction was maintained at 6.9°, and 55% of patients showed neurological improvement. None of the patients experienced neurological deterioration. Two patients with lumbar spine tuberculosis underwent revision surgery because of nonunion. Conclusions The procedure of posterior decompression, fixation, and

  1. The design of suboptimal asymptotic stabilising controllers for nonlinear slowly varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binazadeh, T.; Shafiei, M. H.

    2014-04-01

    The design of asymptotic stabilising controllers for slowly varying nonlinear systems is considered in this paper. The designed control law is based on finding a slowly varying control Lyapunov function. Also, consideration of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation showed that the proposed controller is a suboptimal controller and the response of the system may be very close to its optimal solution. The maximum admissible rate of changes of the system dynamic is also evaluated. This technique is first applied to a created example and then to a practical example (optimal autopilot design for an air vehicle). The air vehicle is modelled as a nonlinear slowly varying system and the efficiency of the designed autopilot in terms of transient responses, control signals and the values of cost function are shown by numerical simulations.

  2. Stability and stabilisation of linear multidimensional discrete systems in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lizhen; Xu, Li; Lin, Zhiping

    2013-11-01

    This paper gives a reasonably detailed review of advances in stability and stabilisation of linear multidimensional (N-D) discrete systems in the frequency domain. The emphasis is on the recent progress, especially in the past decade. The discussion will focus on two topics: (i) stability test. Determination of whether a given N-D (N ≥ 2) system is stable; (ii) stabilisation. Parameterisation of all stabilising compensators for a stabilisable N-D system. After reviewing the progress and several state of the art methods in these two topics with illustrative examples, some related issues are also briefly mentioned at the end.

  3. Interplay between body stabilisation and quadriceps muscle activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Bampouras, Theodoros M; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2017-03-22

    The study aimed to distinguish the effect of stabilisation and muscle activation on quadriceps maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) torque generation. Nine subjects performed (a) an MVC with restrained leg and pelvis (Typical MVC), (b) a Typical MVC with handgrip (Handgrip MVC), (c) an MVC focusing on contracting the knee extensors only (Isolated knee extension MVC), and (d) an MVC with unrestrained leg and pelvis (Unrestrained MVC). Torque and activation capacity between conditions were compared with repeated measures ANOVA and dependent t-tests. EMG (from eleven remote muscles) was compared using Friedman's and Wilcoxon. Typical MVC (277.2±49.6Nm) and Handgrip MVC (261.0±55.4Nm) were higher than Isolated knee extension MVC (210.2±48.3Nm, p<0.05) and Unrestrained MVC (195.2±49.7Nm, p<0.05) torque. Typical MVC (83.1±15.9%) activation was higher than Isolated knee extension MVC (68.9±24.3%, p<0.05), and both Typical MVC and Handgrip MVC (81.8±17.4%) were higher than Unrestrained MVC (64.9±16.2%, p<0.05). Only flexor carpi radialis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii and external oblique muscles showed EMG differences, with Isolated knee extension MVC consistently lower than Typical MVC or Handgrip MVC. Stabilisation of the involved segments is the prime concern allowing fuller activation of the muscle, reinforcing the need for close attention to stabilisation during dynamometry-based knee joint functional assessment.

  4. Stabilised dG-FEM for incompressible natural convection flows with boundary and moving interior layers on non-adapted meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Philipp W.; Lube, Gert

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents heavily grad-div and pressure jump stabilised, equal- and mixed-order discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for non-isothermal incompressible flows based on the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. In this framework, the enthalpy-porosity model for multiphase flow in melting and solidification problems can be employed. By considering the differentially heated cavity and the melting of pure gallium in a rectangular enclosure, it is shown that both boundary layers and sharp moving interior layers can be handled naturally by the proposed class of non-conforming methods. Due to the stabilising effect of the grad-div term and the robustness of discontinuous Galerkin methods, it is possible to solve the underlying problems accurately on coarse, non-adapted meshes. The interaction of heavy grad-div stabilisation and discontinuous Galerkin methods significantly improves the mass conservation properties and the overall accuracy of the numerical scheme which is observed for the first time. Hence, it is inferred that stabilised discontinuous Galerkin methods are highly robust as well as computationally efficient numerical methods to deal with natural convection problems arising in incompressible computational thermo-fluid dynamics.

  5. Thermal Decomposition and Stabilisation of Poly(vinyl Chloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskii, B. B.; Troitskaya, L. S.

    1985-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dehydrochlorination of poly(vinyl chloride) and low-molecular-weight chlorohydrocarbons which model various fragments of the polymer molecule, are discussed. Studies designed to determine the qualitative and quantitative compositions of the unstable fragments in poly(vinyl chloride) macromolecules by 13C NMR are examined. Attention is concentrated on the consideration of the mechanism of the action of the most effective thermostabilisers for the polymer - organotin compounds. The principal features of synergism in the stabilisation of poly(vinyl chloride) and the mechanism of the action of synergistic mixtures are analysed. The bibliography includes 107 references.

  6. Stabilised electromagnetic levitation at 2-13 MHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danley, T. J.; Schiffman, R. A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Krishnan, S.; Rey, C. A.; Bruno, P. A.; Nordine, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    SEL, the Stabilised Electromagnetic Levitator, has been developed to exploit the unique design opportunities available in containerless microgravity experiments. Efficiency and versatility are obtained with multiple coils driven by individual broadband amplifiers whose phase and frequency are controlled. The heating and positioning fields are decoupled. Specimen translation, spin, and for liquids, shape may be adjusted. An open coil structure provides access for optical and diagnostic probes. Results of experiments with a prototype device are discussed. Levitating and heating materials on earth were demonstrated at frequencies up to 13 MHz.

  7. Stabilising emulsion-based colloidal structures with mixed food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Eric

    2013-03-15

    The physical scientist views food as a complex form of soft matter. The complexity has its origin in the numerous ingredients that are typically mixed together and the subtle variations in microstructure and texture induced by thermal and mechanical processing. The colloid science approach to food product formulation is based on the assumption that the major product attributes such as appearance, rheology and physical stability are determined by the spatial distribution and interactions of a small number of generic structural entities (biopolymers, particles, droplets, bubbles, crystals) organised in various kinds of structural arrangements (layers, complexes, aggregates, networks). This review describes some recent advances in this field with reference to three discrete classes of dispersed systems: particle-stabilised emulsions, emulsion gels and aerated emulsions. Particular attention is directed towards explaining the crucial role of the macromolecular ingredients (proteins and polysaccharides) in controlling the formation and stabilisation of the colloidal structures. The ultimate objective of this research is to provide the basic physicochemical insight required for the reliable manufacture of novel structured foods with an appealing taste and texture, whilst incorporating a more healthy set of ingredients than those found in many existing traditional products.

  8. On the reliable decentralised stabilisation of n MIMO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befekadu, Getachew K.; Gupta, Vijay; Antsaklis, Panos J.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of reliable decentralised stabilisation for n multi-input multi-output (MIMO) systems when some of the shared controllers among these systems are faulty, in the sense that they fail to operate properly due to subsystem (module) failures that may occur in actuators, sensors or controllers. Specifically, we present a design framework using a dilated linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) technique for deriving reliable stabilising state-feedback gains for all n MIMO systems; while a set of decentralised unknown disturbance observers (UDOs) that are shared by all n MIMO systems is used for extending the result to the output-feedback case. Moreover, a sufficient condition for the solvability of the set of decentralised UDOs is given in terms of a minimum-phase condition of each subsystem and a lower-bounding condition on the number of outputs of each channel. We also present a numerical example that illustrates the applicability of the proposed technique.

  9. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  10. Determination of Stabiliser Contents in Advanced Gun Propellants by Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY N"m A.R. TURNER AND A. WHITE...TO biEPROOU.; AND SELL THIS REPORT Determination of Stabiliser Contents in Advanced Gun Propellants by Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography A.R...8217/......... .. Availability Cooes Dist Avaiardlo A-i Determination of Stabiliser Contents in Advanced Gun Propellants by Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography

  11. Stabilisation of liquid-air surfaces by particles of low surface energy.

    PubMed

    Binks, Bernard P; Rocher, Anaïs

    2010-08-28

    We describe the stabilisation of liquid-air surfaces by microparticles of a low surface energy solid. By varying the surface tension of the liquid, various particle-stabilised materials from oil dispersions to air-in-oil foams to dry water can be prepared.

  12. Quantifying lingual coarticulation using ultrasound imaging data collected with and without head stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Zharkova, Natalia; Gibbon, Fiona E; Hardcastle, William J

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies reporting the use of ultrasound tongue imaging with clinical populations have generally provided qualitative information on tongue movement. Meaningful quantitative measures for use in the clinic typically require the speaker's head to be stabilised in relation to a transducer, which may be uncomfortable, and unsuitable for young children. The objective of this study was to explore the applicability of quantitative measurements of stabilisation-free tongue movement data, by comparing ultrasound data collected from 10 adolescents, with and without head stabilisation. Several measures of tongue shape were used to quantify coarticulatory influence from two contrasting vowels on four different consonants. Only one of the measures was completely unaffected by the stabilisation condition for all the consonants. The study also reported cross-consonant differences in vowel-related coarticulatory effects. The implications of the findings for the theory of coarticulation and for potential applications of stabilisation-free tongue curve measurements in clinical studies are discussed.

  13. Formation and stabilisation of triclosan colloidal suspensions using supersaturated systems.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, S L; Schuessel, K; Davis, A; Hadgraft, J

    2003-08-11

    The aim of this paper is to prepare and stabilise, in situ, colloidal microsuspensions of triclosan using the polymer, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC). The suspensions were prepared from supersaturated solutions of triclosan. The cosolvent technique was used to create supersaturation. Propylene glycol and water were used as the cosolvents. The triclosan particles had a large needle-shaped morphology, when grown in the absence of the polymer. Moreover, the particles grew rapidly to sizes greater than 5 micrometer over a period of 7h. When HPMC was added, the particle sizes were in the range 90-250 nm depending on the amount of polymer present in the solutions. The stability of the solutions was evaluated over a period of 40 days during which the particle sizes did not vary. The results were consistent with the mechanism proposed by Raghavan et al. [Int. J. Pharm. 212 (2001b) 213].

  14. Ammonia volatilisation in waste stabilisation ponds: a cascade of misinterpretations?

    PubMed

    Camargo Valero, M A; Mara, D D

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia volatilisation has generally been reported as, or assumed to be, the main nitrogen removal mechanism in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). Nitrogen removal via ammonia volatilisation is based on two observations: (a) in-pond pH values can reach high values (>9, even >10), so increasing the proportion of the total ammonia present as the un-ionized form or free ammonia (NH(3)); and (b) in-pond temperatures can also be high, so improving the mass transfer rate of free ammonia to the atmosphere. Consequently, one of the most widely accepted models for ammonia removal in WSP is that reported by Pano & Middlebrooks in 1982, which was developed to reflect the occurrence of these two observations. This work reports how simple mathematical models for ammonia volatilisation in WSP, in spite of the possibility of their giving good predictions, may not accurately describe the main pathways and mechanisms involved in ammonia removal in WSP.

  15. Helium damage and helium effusion in fully stabilised zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damen, P. M. G.; Matzke, Hj.; Ronchi, C.; Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Fromknecht, R.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.

    2002-05-01

    Fully stabilised zirconia (FSZ) samples have been implanted with helium-ions of different energies (200 keV and 1 MeV) and with different fluences (1.4×10 13-1.4×10 16 He +/cm 2). Neutron depth profiling (NDP) for different annealing temperatures and effusion experiments in two different experimental systems with different thermal annealings have been performed on these samples. The samples were analysed by electron microscopy during the various annealing stages. For the low-fluence samples, the diffusion of helium is probably caused by vacancy assisted interstitial diffusion with an activation energy of 1.6 eV. In the highest fluence samples probably high pressure bubbles are formed during thermal annealing.

  16. Stabilising compensators for linear time-varying differential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a constructive test to decide whether a given linear time-varying (LTV) differential system admits a stabilising compensator for the control tasks of tracking, disturbance rejection or model matching and construct and parametrise all of them if at least one exists. In analogy to the linear time-invariant (LTI) case, the ring of stable rational functions, noncommutative in the LTV situation, and the Kučera-Youla parametrisation play prominent parts in the theory. We transfer Blumthaler's thesis from the LTI to the LTV case and sharpen, complete and simplify the corresponding results in the book 'Linear Time-Varying Systems' by Bourlès and Marinescu.

  17. Finite settling time stabilisation: the robust SISO case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milonidis, E.; Kostarigka, A.; Karcanias, N.

    2011-09-01

    This article deals with the problem of robustness to multiplicative plant perturbations for the case of finite settling time stabilisation (FSTS) of single input single output (SISO), linear, discrete-time systems. FSTS is a generalisation of the deadbeat control and as in the case of deadbeat control the main feature of FSTS is the placement of all closed-loop poles at the origin of the z-plane. This makes FSTS sensitive to plant perturbations hence, the need of robust design. An efficient robustness index is introduced and the problem is reduced to a finite linear programme where all the benefits of the simplex method, such as effectiveness, efficiency and ability to provide complete solution to the optimisation problem, can be exploited.

  18. Recycling vs. stabilisation of soil sugars - a long-term laboratory incubation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-06-01

    Independent of its chemical structure carbon (C) persists in soil for several decades, controlled by stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the importance of the two factors on the turnover dynamics of soil sugars, an important compound of soil organic matter (SOM), a three year incubation experiment was conducted on a silty loam soil under different types of land use (arable land, grassland and forest) by adding 13C-labeled glucose. The compound specific isotope analysis of soil sugars was used to examine the dynamics of different sugars during incubation. Sugar dynamics were dominated by a pool of high mean residence times (MRT) indicating that recycling plays an important role for sugars. However, this was not substantially affected by soil C content. Six months after label addition the contribution of the label was much higher for microbial biomass than for CO2 production for all examined soils, corroborating that substrate recycling was very effective within the microbial biomass. Two different patterns of tracer dynamics could be identified for different sugars: while fucose (fuc) and mannose (man) showed highest label contribution at the beginning of the incubation with a subsequent slow decline, galactose (gal) and rhamnose (rha) were characterised by slow label incorporation with subsequently constant levels, which indicates that recycling is dominating the dynamics of these sugars. This may correspond to (a) different microbial growing strategies (r and K-strategist) or (b) location within or outside the cell membrane (lipopolysaccharides vs. exopolysaccharides) and thus be subject of different re-use within the microbial food web. Our results show how the microbial community recycles substrate very effectively and that high losses of substrate only occur during initial stages after substrate addition.

  19. Strong stabilisation of a wind turbine tower model in the plane of the turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Weiss, George

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the strong stabilisation of a wind turbine tower model in the plane of the turbine blades, which comprises a nonuniform NASA Spacecraft Control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE) system and a two-mass drive-train model (with gearbox). The control input is the torque created by the electrical generator. Using a strong stabilisation theorem for a class of impedance passive linear systems with bounded control and observation operators, we show that the wind turbine tower model can be strongly stabilised. The control is by static output feedback from the angular velocities of the nacelle and the generator rotor.

  20. Intraoperative computed tomography navigation for transpedicular screw fixation to treat unstable thoracic and lumbar spine fractures: clinical analysis of a case series (CARE-compliant).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures.From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C.In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2-3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws.The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation.

  1. Event-triggered control for semi-global stabilisation of systems with actuator saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangyin; Chen, Michael Z. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the problem of event-triggered control for semi-global stabilisation of null controllable systems subject to actuator saturation. First, for a continuous-time system, novel event-triggered low-gain control algorithms based on Riccati equations are proposed to achieve semi-global stabilisation. The algebraic Riccati equation with a low-gain parameter is utilised to design both the event-triggering condition and the linear controller; a minimum inter-event time based on the Riccati ordinary differential equation is set a priori to exclude the Zeno behaviour. In addition, the high-low gain techniques are utilised to extend the semi-global results to event-based global stabilisation. Furthermore, for a discrete-time system, novel low-gain and high-low-gain control algorithms are proposed to achieve event-triggered stabilisation. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the theoretical results.

  2. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  3. CO2 dissociation in vortex-stabilised microwave plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welzel, S.; Bongers, W. A.; Graswinckel, M. F.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2014-10-01

    Plasma-assisted gas conversion techniques are widely considered as efficient building blocks in a future energy infrastructure which will be based on intermittent, renewable electricity sources. CO2 dissociation in high-frequency plasmas is of particular interest in carbon capture and utilisation process chains for the production of CO2-neutral fuels. In order to achieve efficient plasma processes of high throughput specifically designed gas flow and power injection regimes are required. In this contribution vortex-stabilised microwave plasmas in undiluted CO2 were studied in a pressure range from 170 to 1000 mbar at up to 1 kW (forward) injected power, respectively. The CO2 depletion was measured downstream, e.g. by means of mass spectrometry. Although the system configuration was entirely not optimised, energy efficiencies of nearly 40%, i.e. close to the thermal dissociation limit, and conversion efficiencies of up to 23% were achieved. Additionally, spatially-resolved emission spectroscopy was applied to map the axial and radial distribution of excited atomic (C, O) and molecular (CO, C2) species along with their rotational temperatures. Eindhoven University of Technology, Postbox 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven.

  4. Adaptive output feedback stabilisation for planar nonlinear systems with unknown control coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Fang; Liu, Yungang

    2015-08-01

    The paper is concerned with the global adaptive stabilisation via output feedback for a class of uncertain planar nonlinear systems. Remarkably, the unknowns in the systems are rather serious: the control coefficients are unknown constants which do not belong to any known interval, and the growth of the systems heavily depends on the unmeasured states and has the rate of unknown polynomial of output. First, a delicate state transformation is introduced to collect the unknown control coefficients, and subsequently, a suitable state observer is successfully designed with two different dynamic gains. Then, an adaptive output feedback controller is proposed by flexibly combining the universal control idea and the backstepping technique. Meanwhile, an appropriate estimation law is constructed to overcome the negative effect caused by the unknown control coefficients. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the design parameters, all the states of the resulting closed-loop system are globally bounded, and furthermore, the states of the original system converge to zero.

  5. Global stabilisation of nonlinear delay systems with a compact absorbing set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karafyllis, Iasson; Krstic, Miroslav; Ahmed-Ali, Tarek; Lamnabhi-Lagarrigue, Francoise

    2014-05-01

    Predictor-based stabilisation results are provided for nonlinear systems with input delays and a compact absorbing set. The control scheme consists of an inter-sample predictor, a global observer, an approximate predictor, and a nominal controller for the delay-free case. The control scheme is applicable even to the case where the measurement is sampled and possibly delayed. The input and measurement delays can be arbitrarily large but both of them must be constant and accurately known. The closed-loop system is shown to have the properties of global asymptotic stability and exponential convergence in the disturbance-free case, robustness with respect to perturbations of the sampling schedule, and robustness with respect to measurement errors. In contrast to existing predictor feedback laws, the proposed control scheme utilises an approximate predictor of a dynamic type that is expressed by a system described by integral delay equations. Additional results are provided for systems that can be transformed to systems with a compact absorbing set by means of a preliminary predictor feedback.

  6. Nonlinear hydrodynamic and thermoacoustic oscillations of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin Yik; Li, Larry Kin Bong; Juniper, Matthew P.; Cant, Robert Stewart

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flames often experience thermoacoustic instabilities when the combustion heat release rate is in phase with acoustic pressure fluctuations. Linear methods often assume a priori that oscillations are periodic and occur at a dominant frequency with a fixed amplitude. Such assumptions are not made when using nonlinear analysis. When an oscillation is fully saturated, nonlinear analysis can serve as a useful avenue to reveal flame behaviour far more elaborate than period-one limit cycles, including quasi-periodicity and chaos in hydrodynamically or thermoacoustically self-excited system. In this paper, the behaviour of a bluff-body stabilised turbulent premixed propane/air flame in a model jet-engine afterburner configuration is investigated using computational fluid dynamics. For the frequencies of interest in this investigation, an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach is found to be appropriate. Combustion is represented using a modified laminar flamelet approach with an algebraic closure for the flame surface density. The results are validated by comparison with existing experimental data and with large eddy simulation, and the observed self-excited oscillations in pressure and heat release are studied using methods derived from dynamical systems theory. A systematic analysis is carried out by increasing the equivalence ratio of the reactant stream supplied to the premixed flame. A strong variation in the global flame structure is observed. The flame exhibits a self-excited hydrodynamic oscillation at low equivalence ratios, becomes steady as the equivalence ratio is increased to intermediate values, and again exhibits a self-excited thermoacoustic oscillation at higher equivalence ratios. Rich nonlinear behaviour is observed and the investigation demonstrates that turbulent premixed flames can exhibit complex dynamical behaviour including quasiperiodicity, limit cycles and period-two limit cycles due to the interactions of various

  7. Robust scalable stabilisability conditions for large-scale heterogeneous multi-agent systems with uncertain nonlinear interactions: towards a distributed computing architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfredi, Sabato

    2016-06-01

    Large-scale dynamic systems are becoming highly pervasive in their occurrence with applications ranging from system biology, environment monitoring, sensor networks, and power systems. They are characterised by high dimensionality, complexity, and uncertainty in the node dynamic/interactions that require more and more computational demanding methods for their analysis and control design, as well as the network size and node system/interaction complexity increase. Therefore, it is a challenging problem to find scalable computational method for distributed control design of large-scale networks. In this paper, we investigate the robust distributed stabilisation problem of large-scale nonlinear multi-agent systems (briefly MASs) composed of non-identical (heterogeneous) linear dynamical systems coupled by uncertain nonlinear time-varying interconnections. By employing Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique, new conditions are given for the distributed control design of large-scale MASs that can be easily solved by the toolbox of MATLAB. The stabilisability of each node dynamic is a sufficient assumption to design a global stabilising distributed control. The proposed approach improves some of the existing LMI-based results on MAS by both overcoming their computational limits and extending the applicative scenario to large-scale nonlinear heterogeneous MASs. Additionally, the proposed LMI conditions are further reduced in terms of computational requirement in the case of weakly heterogeneous MASs, which is a common scenario in real application where the network nodes and links are affected by parameter uncertainties. One of the main advantages of the proposed approach is to allow to move from a centralised towards a distributed computing architecture so that the expensive computation workload spent to solve LMIs may be shared among processors located at the networked nodes, thus increasing the scalability of the approach than the network

  8. Stabilisation/solidification of synthetic petroleum drill cuttings.

    PubMed

    Al-Ansary, Marwa S; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2007-03-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation into the use of stabilisation/solidification (S/S) to treat synthetic drill cuttings as a pre-treatment to landfilling or for potential re-use as construction products. Two synthetic mixes were used based on average concentrations of specific contaminates present in typical drill cuttings from the North Sea and the Red Sea areas. The two synthetic drill cuttings contained similar chloride content of 2.03% and 2.13% by weight but different hydrocarbon content of 4.20% and 10.95% by weight, respectively; hence the mixes were denoted as low and high oil content mixes, respectively. A number of conventional S/S binders were tested including Portland cement (PC), lime and blast-furnace slag (BFS), in addition to novel binders such as microsilica and magnesium oxide cement. Physical, chemical and microstructural analyses were used to compare the relative performance of the different binder mixes. The unconfined compressive strength (UCS) values were observed to cover a wide range depending on the binder used. Despite the significant difference in the hydrocarbon content in the two synthetic cuttings, the measured UCS values of the mixes with the same binder type and content were similar. The leachability results showed the reduction of the synthetic drill cuttings to a stable non-reactive hazardous waste, compliant with the UK acceptance criteria for non-hazardous landfills: (a) by most of the binders for chloride concentrations, and (b) by the 20% BFS-PC and 30% PC binders for the low oil content mix. The 30% BFS-PC binder successfully reduced the leached oil concentration of the low oil content mix to inert levels. Finally, the microstructural analysis offered valuable information on the morphology and general behaviour of the mixes that were not depicted by the other tests.

  9. Quantum gate generation by T-sampling stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, H. B.; Pereira da Silva, P. S.; Rouchon, P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper considers right-invariant and controllable driftless quantum systems with state X(t) evolving on the unitary group U(n) and m inputs u = (u1, …, um). The T-sampling stabilisation problem is introduced and solved: given any initial condition X0 and any goal state ?, find a control law u = u(X, t) such that ? for the closed-loop system. The purpose is to generate arbitrary quantum gates corresponding to ?. This is achieved by the tracking of T-periodic reference trajectories ? of the quantum system that pass by ? using the framework of Coron's return method. The T-periodic reference trajectories ? are generated by applying controls ? that are a sum of a finite number M of harmonics of sin (2πt/T), whose amplitudes are parameterised by a vector a. The main result establishes that, for M big enough, X(jT) exponentially converges towards ? for almost all fixed a, with explicit and completely constructive control laws. This paper also establishes a stochastic version of this deterministic control law. The key idea is to randomly choose a different parameter vector of control amplitudes a = aj at each t = jT, and keeping it fixed for t ∈ [jT, (j + 1)T). It is shown in the paper that X(jT) exponentially converges towards ? almost surely. Simulation results have indicated that the convergence speed of X(jT) may be significantly improved with such stochastic technique. This is illustrated in the generation of the C-NOT quantum logic gate on U(4).

  10. Construction and Accuracy Assessment of Patient-Specific Biocompatible Drill Template for Cervical Anterior Transpedicular Screw (ATPS) Insertion: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangxue; Zhao, Weidong; Tang, Lei; Li, Jianyi; Ouyang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background With the properties of three-column fixation and anterior-approach-only procedure, anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) is ideal for severe multilevel traumatic cervical instabilities. However, the accurate insertion of ATPS remains challenging. Here we constructed a patient-specific biocompatible drill template and evaluated its accuracy in assisting ATPS insertion. Methods After ethical approval, 24 formalin-preserved cervical vertebrae (C2–C7) were CT scanned. 3D reconstruction models of cervical vertebra were obtained with 2-mm-diameter virtual pin tracts at the central pedicles. The 3D models were used for rapid prototyping (RP) printing. A 2-mm-diameter Kirschner wire was then inserted into the pin tract of the RP model before polymethylmethacrylate was used to construct the patient-specific biocompatible drill template. After removal of the anterior soft tissue, a 2-mm-diameter Kirschner wire was inserted into the cervical pedicle with the assistance of drill template. Cadaveric cervical spines with pin tracts were subsequently scanned using the same CT scanner. A 3D reconstruction was performed of the scanned spines to get 3D models of the vertebrae containing the actual pin tracts. The deviations were calculated between 3D models with virtual and actual pin tracts at the middle point of the cervical pedicle. 3D models of 3.5 mm-diameter screws were used in simulated insertion to grade the screw positions. Findings The patient-specific biocompatible drill template was constructed to assist ATPS insertion successfully. There were no significant differences between medial/lateral deviations (P = 0.797) or between superior/inferior deviations (P = 0.741). The absolute deviation values were 0.82±0.75 mm and 1.10±0.96 mm in axial and sagittal planes, respectively. In the simulated insertion, the screws in non-critical position were 44/48 (91.7%). Conclusions The patient-specific drill template is biocompatible, easy-to-apply and accurate

  11. Effect of particle adsorption rates on the disproportionation process in pickering stabilised bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettelaie, Rammile; Murray, Brent

    2014-05-01

    The degree of shrinkage of particle stabilised bubbles of various sizes, in a polydisperse bubble dispersion, has been investigated in the light of the finite adsorption times for the particles and the disproportionation kinetics of the bubbles. For the case where the system contains an abundance of particles we find a threshold radius, above which bubbles are stabilised without any significant reduction in their size. Bubbles with an initial radius below this threshold on the other hand undergo a large degree of shrinkage prior to stabilisation. As the ratio of the available particles to the bubbles is reduced, it is shown that the final bubble size, for the larger bubbles in the distribution, becomes increasingly governed by the number of particles, rather than their adsorption time per se. For systems with "adsorption controlled" shrinkage ratio, the final bubble distribution is found to be wider than the initial one, while for a "particle number controlled" case it is actually narrower. Starting from a unimodal bubble size distribution, we predict that at intermediate times, prior to the full stabilisation of all bubbles, the distribution breaks up into a bimodal one. However, the effect is transient and a unimodal final bubble size distribution is recovered, when all the bubbles are stabilised by the particles.

  12. Enhanced stabilisation of trapped electron modes by collisional energy scattering in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Manas, P.; Camenen, Y.; Benkadda, S.; Hornsby, W. A.; Peeters, A. G.

    2015-06-15

    The collisional stabilisation via energy scattering and pitch-angle scattering of micro-instabilities in tokamak plasmas is investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations with a special emphasis on the often neglected energy scattering operator. It is shown that in the linear regime energy scattering has a negligible effect on Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) modes but enhances the stabilisation of Trapped Electron Modes (TEM) in presence of nonzero ion temperature and density gradients. This stabilisation is sensitive to the model used for the energy restoring term in the collision operator. The contributions of parallel and drift motion to the total growth rate in velocity space are used to characterize the complex stabilisation mechanisms behind pitch-angle and energy scattering for a range of relevant parameters such as the magnetic shear, the collisionality, the logarithmic density gradient, and the logarithmic ion temperature gradient. It is shown that depending on these parameters, energy scattering stabilisation of TEM can be either due to a decrease of the contribution from drifting trapped electrons or to an increase of the contribution from the parallel motion of passing electrons. Finally, for a standard ITG/TEM case, the effect of energy scattering on the nonlinear heat and particle fluxes is investigated.

  13. Observers and output feedback stabilising controllers for nonlinear strict-feedback systems with sampled observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Hitoshi

    2016-02-01

    The design of observers and output feedback stabilising controllers for continuous-time strict-feedback systems with sampled observation is considered. First two types of observers are designed. One is a discrete-time semiglobal and practical reduced-order observer for the exact model and the other is a continuous-time semiglobal and practical full-order observer for continuous-time strict feedback systems with sampled observation. Then by combining the designed continuous-time observers and continuous-time state feedback laws that are continuous, zero at the origin, and uniformly globally asymptotically stabilise continuous-time systems, output feedback semiglobally practically uniformly asymptotically stabilising controllers are constructed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the proposed design of observers and output feedback controllers.

  14. The effect of environmentally relevant conditions on PVP stabilised gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hitchman, Adam; Smith, Gregory H Sambrook; Ju-Nam, Yon; Sterling, Mark; Lead, Jamie R

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles are a major product from the nanotechnology industry and have been shown to have a potentially large environmental exposure and hazard. In this study, sterically stabilised polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) 7 nm gold nanoparticles (NPs) were produced and characterised as prepared by surface plasmon resonance (SPR), size and aggregation, morphology and surface charge. Changes in these properties with changes in environmentally relevant conditions (pH, ionic strength, Ca concentration and fulvic acid presence) were quantified. These sterically stabilised NPs showed no aggregation with changes in pH or inorganic ions, even under high (0.1 M) Ca concentrations. In addition, the presence of fulvic acid resulted in no observable changes in SPR, size, aggregation or surface chemistry, suggesting limited interaction between the PVP stabilised nanoparticles and fulvic acid. Due to the lack of aggregation and interaction, these NPs are expected to be highly mobile and potentially bioavailable in the environment.

  15. Solidification/stabilisation of liquid oil waste in metakaolin-based geopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantarel, V.; Nouaille, F.; Rooses, A.; Lambertin, D.; Poulesquen, A.; Frizon, F.

    2015-09-01

    The solidification/stabilisation of liquid oil waste in metakaolin based geopolymer was studied in the present work. The process consists of obtaining a stabilised emulsion of oil in a water-glass solution and then adding metakaolin to engage the setting of a geopolymer block with an oil emulsion stabilised in the material. Geopolymer/oil composites have been made with various oil fraction (7, 14 and 20 vol.%). The rigidity and the good mechanical properties have been demonstrated with compressive strength tests. Leaching tests evidenced the release of oil from the composite material is very limited whereas the constitutive components of the geopolymer (Na, Si and OH-) are involved into diffusion process.

  16. Early Spin-Stabilised Rockets - the Rockets of Bergrat Heinrich Gottlob Kuhn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, H.-D.

    19th century's war rockets were at first stabilised by sticks, but these sticks produced a very uncertain flight path and it often happened that rockets changed their direction and even flew back to their firing position. So very many early inventors in Europe, America, and British-India tried to stabilise the rocket's flight in a better way. They tried fins and even rotation but they did not succeed. It is said in history that William Hale was the first who succeeded in constructing a spin stabilised (i.e. rotating) rocket which worked. But before him, in the thirties of that century, a German amateur rocket inventor succeeded as well and secretly proved his stickless rotating rockets in trials for Prussian officers and some years later officially for Saxon artillery officers. His invention was then bought by the kingdom of Saxony, but these were never use in the field because of lack of money.

  17. Greenhouse gas emissions from waste stabilisation ponds in Western Australia and Quebec (Canada).

    PubMed

    Glaz, Patricia; Bartosiewicz, Maciej; Laurion, Isabelle; Reichwaldt, Elke S; Maranger, Roxane; Ghadouani, Anas

    2016-09-15

    Waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are highly enriched environments that may emit large quantities of greenhouse gases (GHG), including CO2, CH4 and N2O. However, few studies provide detailed reports on these emissions. In the present study, we investigated GHG emissions from WSPs in Western Australia and Quebec, Canada, and compared emissions to WSPs from other climatic regions and to other types of aquatic ecosystems. Surface water GHG concentrations were related to phytoplankton biomass and nutrients. The CO2 was either emitted or absorbed by WSPs, largely as a function of phytoplankton dynamics and strong stratification in these shallow systems, whereas efflux of CH4 and N2O to the atmosphere was always observed albeit with highly variable emission rates, dependent on treatment phase and time of the day. The total global warming potential index (GWP index, calculated as CO2 equivalent) of emitted GHG from WSPs in Western Australia averaged 12.8 mmol m(-2) d(-1) (median), with CO2, CH4 and N2O respectively contributing 0%, 96.7% and 3.3% of the total emissions, while in Quebec WSPs this index was 194 mmol m(-2) d(-1), with a relative contribution of 93.8, 3.0 and 3.2% respectively. The CO2 fluxes from WSPs were of the same order of magnitude as those reported in hydroelectric reservoirs and constructed wetlands in tropical climates, whereas CH4 fluxes were considerably higher compared to other aquatic ecosystems. N2O fluxes were in the same range of values reported for WSPs in subtropical climate.

  18. Effective solidification/stabilisation of mercury-contaminated wastes using zeolites and chemically bonded phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoqing; Zhang, Xinyan; Xiong, Ya; Wang, Guoping; Zheng, Na

    2015-02-01

    In this study, two kinds of zeolites materials (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) were added to the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic processes to treat mercury-contaminated wastes. Strong promotion effects of zeolites (natural zeolite and thiol-functionalised zeolite) on the stability of mercury in the wastes were obtained and these technologies showed promising advantages toward the traditional Portland cement process, i.e. using Portland cement as a solidification agent and natural or thiol-functionalised zeolite as a stabilisation agent. Not only is a high stabilisation efficiency (lowered the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure Hg by above 10%) obtained, but also a lower dosage of solidification (for thiol-functionalised zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.5 g g(-1) and 0.7 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) and stabilisation agents (for natural zeolite as stabilisation agent, 0.35 g g(-1) and 0.4 g g(-1) for chemically bonded phosphate ceramic and Portland cement, respectively) were used compared with the Portland cement process. Treated by thiol-functionalised zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic under optimum parameters, the waste containing 1500 mg Hg kg(-1) passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test. Moreover, stabilisation/solidification technology using natural zeolite and chemically bonded phosphate ceramic also passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test (the mercury waste containing 625 mg Hg kg(-1)). Moreover, the presence of chloride and phosphate did not have a negative effect on the chemically bonded phosphate ceramic/thiol-functionalised zeolite treatment process; thus, showing potential for future application in treatment of 'difficult-to-manage' mercury-contaminated wastes or landfill disposal with high phosphate and chloride content.

  19. Robust stabilisation and L2 -gain analysis for switched systems with actuator saturation under asynchronous switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Juan; Zhao, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Robust stabilisation and L2-gain analysis for a class of switched systems with actuator saturation are studied in this paper. The switching signal of the controllers lags behind that of the system modes, which leads to the asynchronous switching between the candidate controllers and the subsystems. By combining the piecewise Lyapunov function method with the convex hull technique, sufficient conditions in terms of LMIs for the solvability of the robust stabilisation and weighted L2-gain problems are presented respectively under the dwell time scheme. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed results.

  20. Global finite-time output feedback stabilisation for a class of uncertain nontriangular nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jun-Yong

    2014-03-01

    This article addresses the problem of global finite-time output feedback stabilisation for a class of nonlinear systems in nontriangular form with an unknown output function. Since the output function is not precisely known, traditional observers based on the output is not implementable. We first design a state observer and use the observer states to construct a controller to globally stabilise the nominal system without the perturbing nonlinearities. Then, we apply the homogeneous domination approach to design a scaled homogeneous observer and controller with an appropriate choice of gain to render the nonlinear system globally finite-time stable.

  1. H ∞ output feedback stabilisation of linear discrete-time systems with impulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shouwei; Sun, Jitao; Pan, Shengtao

    2010-10-01

    This article addresses the issue of designing an H ∞ output feedback controller for linear discrete-time systems with impulses. First, a new concept of H ∞ output feedback stabilisation for general linear discrete-time systems with impulses is introduced. Then sufficient linear matrix inequality conditions for the stabilisation and H ∞ performance of general discrete systems with impulses are proposed. In addition, the result is applied to resolve typical output feedback control problems for systems with impulses, such as the decentralised H ∞ output feedback control and the simultaneous H ∞ output feedback control. Finally, a numerical simulation is also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  2. Stabilisation for switched linear systems with time-varying delay and input saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yonggang; Fei, Shumin; Zhang, Kanjian

    2014-03-01

    This article investigates the stabilisation problems for continuous-time and discrete-time switched systems with time-varying delay and saturated control input. Based on dwell time switching signals and multiple Lyapunov functional method, stabilisation conditions are well obtained in the context of linear matrix inequalities. To estimate attractive regions as large as possible, the feasibility problems are translated into optimisation problems. In addition, the corresponding results are presented for linear time-delay systems and switched delay-free systems, which improve and supplement some existing ones in the literature. Finally, numerical examples and simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness and values of the proposed results.

  3. Stabilisation analysis for switched neutral systems based on sampled-data control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnasamy, R.; Balasubramaniam, P.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of stabilisation analysis for switched neutral systems based on sampled-data control and average dwell time approach is investigated. Delay-dependent stabilisation results are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities by constructing piecewise Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional based on the Wirtinger's inequality. Also, the controller gain matrix is designed by applying an input-delay approach. Further convex combination technique and some integral inequalities are used to derive less conservative results. The effectiveness of the derived results is validated through numerical examples.

  4. Cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation (ATPS)—Part II. Accuracy of manual insertion and pull-out strength of ATPS

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Fox, Michael; Martin, Hudelmaier; Forstner, Rosmarie; Augat, Peter; Penzkofer, Rainer; Pirich, Christian; Kässmann, H.; Resch, Herbert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction after multilevel decompression of the cervical spine, especially in the weakened osteoporotic, neoplastic or infectious spine often requires circumferential stabilization and fusion. To avoid the additional posterior surgery in these cases while increasing rigidity of anterior-only screw-plate constructs, the authors introduce the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility as well as its indications in a previous study in Part I of our project. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to assess the ex vivo accuracy of placing ATPS into the cervical vertebra as well as the biomechanical performance of ATPS in comparison to traditional vertebral body screws (VBS) in terms of pull-out strength (POS). Twenty-three ATPS were inserted alternately to two screws into the pedicles and vertebral bodies, respectively, of six cadaveric specimens from C3–T1. For insertion of ATPS, a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique was used. Pre- and post insertional CT-scans were used to assess accuracy of ATPS insertion in the axial and sagittal planes. A newly designed grading system and accuracy score were used to delineate accuracy of ATPS insertion. Following insertion of screws, 23 ATPS and 22 VBS were subjected to pull-out testing (POT). The bone mineral density (BMD) of each specimen was assessed prior to POT. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of correctly placed screws and non-critical pedicles breaches in axial plane was 78.3%, and 95.7% in sagittal plane. Hence, according to our definition of “critical” pedicle breach that exposes neurovascular structures at risk, 21.7% (n = 5) of all ATPS inserted showed a critical pedicle breach in axial plane. Notably, no critical pedicle perforation occurred at the C6 to T1 levels. Pull-out testing of ATPS and VBS revealed that pull-out resistance of ATPS was 2.5-fold that of VBS. Mean POS of 23 ATPS with a mean BMD of 0.566

  5. Environmental Controls and Eco-geomorphic Interactions of the Barchan-to-parabolic Dune Stabilisation and the Parabolic-to-barchan Dune Reactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Na; Baas, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Parabolic dunes are one of a few common aeolian landforms which are highly controlled by eco-geomorphic interactions. Parabolic dunes, on the one hand, can be developed from highly mobile dune landforms, barchans for instance, in an ameliorated vegetation condition; or on the other hand, they can be reactivated and transformed back into mobile dunes due to vegetation deterioration. The fundamental mechanisms and eco-geomorphic interactions controlling both dune transformations remain poorly understood. To bridge the gap between complex processes involved in dune transformations on a relatively long temporal scale and real world monitoring records on a very limited temporal scale, this research has extended the DECAL model to incorporate 'dynamic' growth functions and the different 'growth' of perennial shrubs between growing and non-growing seasons, informed by field measurements and remote sensing analysis, to explore environmental controls and eco-geomorphic interactions of both types of dune transformation. A non-dimensional 'dune stabilising index' is proposed to capture the interactions between environmental controls (i.e. the capabilities of vegetation to withstand wind erosion and sand burial, the sandy substratum thickness, the height of the initial dune, and the sand transport potential), and establish the linkage between these controls and the geometry of a stabilising dune. An example demonstrates how to use the power-law relationship between the dune stabilising index and the normalised migration distance to assist in extrapolating the historical trajectories of transforming dunes. The modelling results also show that a slight increase in vegetation cover of an initial parabolic dune can significantly increase the reactivation threshold of climatic impact (both drought stress and wind strength) required to reactivate a stabilising parabolic dune into a barchan. Four eco-geomorphic interaction zones that govern a barchan-to-parabolic dune transformation

  6. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl‐Stabilised Ammonium Ylide‐Mediated Epoxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The key factors for carbonyl‐stabilised ammonium ylide‐mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine‐based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions. PMID:27381752

  7. Stabilisation of proteins via mixtures of amino acids during spray drying.

    PubMed

    Ajmera, Ankur; Scherließ, Regina

    2014-03-10

    Biologicals are often formulated as solids in an effort to preserve stability which generally requires stabilising excipients for proper drying. The purpose of this study was to screen amino acids and their combinations for their stabilising effect on proteins during spray drying. Catalase, as model protein, was spray dried in 1+1 or 1+2 ratios with amino acids. Some amino acids namely arginine, glycine and histidine showed good retention of catalase functionality after spray drying and subsequent storage stress. A 1+1 combination of arginine and glycine in a 1+2 ratio with catalase resulted in a tremendously good stabilising effect. Storage at high temperature/humidity also showed beneficial effects of this combination. To evaluate whether this was a general principle, these findings were transferred to an antigenic protein of comparable size and supramolecular structure (haemagglutinin) as well as to a smaller enzyme (lysozyme). Upon spray drying with the combination of amino acids it could be shown that both proteins remain more stable especially after storage compared to the unprotected protein. The combination of arginine and glycine is tailored to the needs of protein stabilisation during spray drying and may hence be utilised in dry powder formulation of biomolecules with superior stability characteristics.

  8. 'A tradition of forgetting': stabilisation and humanitarian action in historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Sultan; Deely, Seán; Zyck, Steven A

    2010-10-01

    While subject to increasing articulation and institutionalisation, stabilisation is a long-standing concept and practice that has consistently engaged with and, at times, conflicted with varied understandings of humanitarianism and humanitarian action. Reviewing selected historical experiences, including the Philippines (1898-1902), Algeria (1956-62), Vietnam (1967-75) and El Salvador (1980-92), this paper argues that contemporary models of stabilisation build on and repeat mistakes of the past, particularly the overt securitisation of aid and the perception that humanitarian and development actors are able to purchase security effectively. Where current stabilisation differs from its earlier incarnations, as in the introduction of the private sector and incorporation of humanitarian action into war-fighting strategies, the implications are shown to be troubling if not outright disastrous. T his examination of historical experience, which includes many failures and few, if any, successes, raises the likelihood that it is not solely the design or implementation of individual stability operations that require modification but perhaps the entire concept of stabilisation itself.

  9. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Stabilisation of a laser by the calculated quantum transition frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagaev, S. N.; Dmitriev, A. K.; Lugovoy, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    A method is proposed to stabilise the frequency of a He—Ne laser with an intracavity nonlinear absorption cell by the calculated frequency of the 7→6 transition of F2(2)P(7)ν3 in methane. The long-term frequency stability and reproducibility are measured for a He—Ne/CH4 laser with a telescopic cavity.

  10. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, P.; Brooks, I. M.; Brooks, B. J.; Moat, B. I.; Prytherch, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-09-01

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This holds particularly within the planetary boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of winds with a random error below 0.2 m s-1, comparable to the measurement error of standard radiosondes. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  11. Arsenic and copper stabilisation in a contaminated soil by coal fly ash and green waste compost.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Yip, Alex C K; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    In situ metal stabilisation by amendments has been demonstrated as an appealing low-cost remediation strategy for contaminated soil. This study investigated the short-term leaching behaviour and long-term stability of As and Cu in soil amended with coal fly ash and/or green waste compost. Locally abundant inorganic (limestone and bentonite) and carbonaceous (lignite) resources were also studied for comparison. Column leaching experiments revealed that coal fly ash outperformed limestone and bentonite amendments for As stabilisation. It also maintained the As stability under continuous leaching of acidic solution, which was potentially attributed to high-affinity adsorption, co-precipitation, and pozzolanic reaction of coal fly ash. However, Cu leaching in the column experiments could not be mitigated by any of these inorganic amendments, suggesting the need for co-addition of carbonaceous materials that provides strong chelation with oxygen-containing functional groups for Cu stabilisation. Green waste compost suppressed the Cu leaching more effectively than lignite due to the difference in chemical composition and dissolved organic matter. After 9-month soil incubation, coal fly ash was able to minimise the concentrations of As and Cu in the soil solution without the addition of carbonaceous materials. Nevertheless, leachability tests suggested that the provision of green waste compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of As and Cu leachability in a fairly aggressive leaching environment. These results highlight the importance of assessing stability and remobilisation of sequestered metals under varying environmental conditions for ensuring a plausible and enduring soil stabilisation.

  12. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, P.; Brooks, I. M.; Brooks, B. J.; Moat, B. I.; Prytherch, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-11-01

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne Doppler measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This held true particularly within the atmospheric boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of vertical winds with a random error below 0.2 m s-1. The comparison of lidar-measured wind and radio soundings gives a mean bias of 0.3 m s-1 (2°) and a mean standard deviation of 1.1 m s-1 (12°) for wind speed (wind direction). The agreement for wind direction degrades with height. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  13. The Stabilisation of Enzymes — a Key Factor in the Practical Application of Biocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinek, K.; Berezin, I. B.

    1980-05-01

    The present state of the problem of the practical application of biocatalysis is examined and physicochemical approaches whereby the denaturation of enzymes under the influence of elevated temperatures, extreme pH values, and organic solvents can be suppressed are analysed. The general principles of the stabilisation of enzymes are formulated. The bibliography includes 225 references.

  14. Towards 12% stabilised efficiency in single junction polymorphous silicon solar cells: experimental developments and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolmasov, Sergey; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Chatterjee, Parsathi

    2016-01-01

    We have combined recent experimental developments in our laboratory with modelling to devise ways of maximising the stabilised efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) PIN solar cells. The cells were fabricated using the conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique at various temperatures, pressures and gas flow ratios. A detailed electrical-optical simulator was used to examine the effect of using wide band gap P-and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers, as well as a MgF2 anti-reflection coating (ARC) on cell performance. We find that with the best quality a-Si:H so far produced in our laboratory and optimised deposition parameters for the corresponding solar cell, we could not attain a 10% stabilised efficiency due to the high stabilised defect density of a-Si:H, although this landmark has been achieved in some laboratories. On the other hand, a close cousin of a-Si:H, hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H), a nano-structured silicon thin film produced by PECVD under conditions close to powder formation, has been developed in our laboratory. This material has been shown to have a lower initial and stabilised defect density as well as higher hole mobility than a-Si:H. Modelling indicates that it is possible to attain stabilised efficiencies of 12% when pm-Si:H is incorporated in a solar cell, deposited in a NIP configuration to reduce the P/I interface defects and combined with P- and N-doped μc-SiOx:H layers and a MgF2 ARC.

  15. The time taken for the regional distribution of ventilation to stabilise: an investigation using electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Caruana, L; Paratz, J D; Chang, A; Barnett, A G; Fraser, J F

    2015-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography is a novel technology capable of quantifying ventilation distribution in the lung in real time during various therapeutic manoeuvres. The technique requires changes to the patient's position to place the electrical impedance tomography electrodes circumferentially around the thorax. The impact of these position changes on the time taken to stabilise the regional distribution of ventilation determined by electrical impedance tomography is unknown. This study aimed to determine the time taken for the regional distribution of ventilation determined by electrical impedance tomography to stabilise after changing position. Eight healthy, male volunteers were connected to electrical impedance tomography and a pneumotachometer. After 30 minutes stabilisation supine, participants were moved into 60 degrees Fowler's position and then returned to supine. Thirty minutes was spent in each position. Concurrent readings of ventilation distribution and tidal volumes were taken every five minutes. A mixed regression model with a random intercept was used to compare the positions and changes over time. The anterior-posterior distribution stabilised after ten minutes in Fowler's position and ten minutes after returning to supine. Left-right stabilisation was achieved after 15 minutes in Fowler's position and supine. A minimum of 15 minutes of stabilisation should be allowed for spontaneously breathing individuals when assessing ventilation distribution. This time allows stabilisation to occur in the anterior-posterior direction as well as the left-right direction.

  16. The use of muscle dynamometer for correction of muscle imbalances in the area of deep stabilising spine system.

    PubMed

    Malátová, Renata; Rokytová, Jitka; Stumbauer, Jan

    2013-08-01

    Dorsal pain caused by spine dysfunctions belongs to most frequent chronic illnesses. The muscles of the deep stabilising spine system work as a single functional unit where a dysfunction of only one muscle causes dysfunction of the whole system. Non-invasive, objective and statistically measurable evaluation of the condition of deep stabilising spine system has been made possible by the construction of muscular dynamometer. The aim of our work has been the assessment of deep stabilising spine system by diaphragm test and muscular dynamometer measurements. Based on an initial examination, a 6-week intervention programme was established including instructions on physiological body posture and correct basic body stabilisation for the given exercises and muscle strengthening. Consecutive measurements are then compared with the initial ones. It was presumed that a smaller number of the tested subjects would be able to correctly activate the deep stabilising spine system muscles before the intervention programme when compared to those after the intervention programme. A positive change of 87% has been found. It is clear that if a person actively approaches the programme, then positive adaptation changes on the deep stabilising spine system are seen only after 6 weeks. With the muscular dynamometer, activation of deep stabilising spine system can be objectively measured. Changes between the initial condition of a subject and the difference after some exercise or rehabilitation are especially noticeable. Also, the effect of given therapy or correct performance of the exercise can be followed and observed.

  17. Delay-dependent stabilisation of systems with time-delayed state and control: application to a quadruple-tank process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Haoussi, F.; Tissir, E. H.; Tadeo, F.; Hmamed, A.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a study on the stabilisation of linear systems with delays in the control and states, motivated by a benchmark problem from the literature (a quadruple-tank system). A methodology for the stabilisation of this kind of systems is presented, expressing the conditions as LMIs. Using several examples from the literature, it is shown that the proposed stabilisation theorem is less conservative than previous results. Finally, the technique is applied to the benchmark problem, showing how it is possible to derive efficient controllers for realistic problems, using the proposed technique.

  18. Resisting regime-shifts: the stabilising effect of compensatory processes.

    PubMed

    Connell, Sean D; Ghedini, Giulia

    2015-09-01

    Ecologists seem predisposed to studying change because we are intuitively interested in dynamic systems, including their vulnerability to human disturbance. We contrast this disposition with the value of studying processes that work against change. Although powerful, processes that counter disturbance often go unexplored because they yield no observable community change. This stability results from compensatory processes which are initiated by disturbance; these adjust in proportion to the strength of the disturbance to prevent community change. By recognising such buffering processes, we might also learn to recognise the early warning signals of community shifts which are notoriously difficult to predict because communities often show little to no change before their tipping point is reached.

  19. High pressure hydrogen stabilised by quantum nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needs, Richard; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Pickard, Chris

    Hydrogen under extreme pressures is of fundamental interest, as it might exhibit exotic physical phenomena, and of practical interest, as it is a major component of many astrophysical objects. Structure searches have been successful at identifying promising candidates for the known phases of high pressure hydrogen. However, these searches have so far been restricted to the location of minima of the potential energy landscape. In this talk, we will describe a new structure searching method, ``saddle-point ab initio random structure searching'' (sp-AIRSS), that allows us to identify structures associated with saddle points of the potential energy landscape. Using sp-AIRSS, we find two new high-pressure hydrogen structures that exhibit a harmonic dynamical instability, but quantum and thermal anharmonic motion render them dynamically stable. These structures are formed by mixed layers of strongly and softly bound hydrogen molecules, and become thermodynamically competitive at the highest pressures reached in experiment. The experimental implications of these new structures will also be discussed. BM is supported by Robinson College, Cambridge, and the Cambridge Philosophical Society. RJN and CJP are supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) of the UK.

  20. Stabilising falling liquid film flows using feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Alice B. Gomes, Susana N.; Pavliotis, Grigorios A.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    2016-01-15

    Falling liquid films become unstable due to inertial effects when the fluid layer is sufficiently thick or the slope sufficiently steep. This free surface flow of a single fluid layer has industrial applications including coating and heat transfer, which benefit from smooth and wavy interfaces, respectively. Here, we discuss how the dynamics of the system are altered by feedback controls based on observations of the interface height, and supplied to the system via the perpendicular injection and suction of fluid through the wall. In this study, we model the system using both Benney and weighted-residual models that account for the fluid injection through the wall. We find that feedback using injection and suction is a remarkably effective control mechanism: the controls can be used to drive the system towards arbitrary steady states and travelling waves, and the qualitative effects are independent of the details of the flow modelling. Furthermore, we show that the system can still be successfully controlled when the feedback is applied via a set of localised actuators and only a small number of system observations are available, and that this is possible using both static (where the controls are based on only the most recent set of observations) and dynamic (where the controls are based on an approximation of the system which evolves over time) control schemes. This study thus provides a solid theoretical foundation for future experimental realisations of the active feedback control of falling liquid films.

  1. Finite-time boundedness and stabilisation of networked control systems with bounded packet dropout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yeguo

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, the finite-time boundedness and stabilisation problems of a class of networked control systems (NCSs) with bounded packet dropout are investigated. The main results provided in the paper are sufficient conditions for finite-time boundedness and stability via state feedback. An iterative approach is proposed to model NCSs with bounded packet dropout as jump linear systems (JLSs). Based on Lyapunov stability theory and JLSs theory, the sufficient conditions for finite-time boundedness and stabilisation of the underlying systems are derived via linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) formulation. Moreover, both sensor-to-controller and controller-to-actuator packet dropouts are considered simultaneously. Lastly, an illustrative example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed results.

  2. Green synthesis of highly concentrated aqueous colloidal solutions of large starch-stabilised silver nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Betts, Jonathan W; Kelly, Stephen M; Hector, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    A simple, environmentally friendly and cost-effective method has been developed to prepare a range of aqueous silver colloidal solutions, using ascorbic acid as a reducing agent, water-soluble starch as a combined crystallising, stabilising and solubilising agent, and water as the solvent. The diameter of silver nanoplatelets increases with higher concentrations of AgNO3 and starch. The silver nanoparticles are also more uniform in shape the greater the diameter of the nanoparticles. Colloidal solutions with a very high concentration of large, flat, hexagonal silver nanoplatelets (~230 nm in breadth) have been used to deposit and fix an antibacterial coating of these large starch-stabilised silver nanoplates on commercial cotton fibres, using a simple dip-coating process using water as the solvent, in order to study the dependence of the antibacterial properties of these nanoplatelets on their size.

  3. Observer-based stabilisation of a class of nonlinear systems in the presence of measurement delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qing; Liu, Jinkun

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the stabilising control problem for a class of nonlinear system in the presence of measurement delay is addressed. A full-order observer is designed to eliminate the effect of variable output time delay, which is bounded and known. Then, the estimated states are utilised for the state feedback control law to stabilise the considered control system. Lyapunov-Razumikhin approach is employed to analyse the stability of the closed-loop system. Unlike the previous work, the exponential convergence of the estimation error is ensured, rather than asymptotic convergence, by designing a delay-dependent gain of the observer. Moreover, comparison with similar work is also made in simulation to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  4. Preconditioning of Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models for Stabilisation of Variance-Covariance Matrix Computations.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yasunori; Nordgren, Rikard; Hooker, Andrew C

    2016-03-01

    As the importance of pharmacometric analysis increases, more and more complex mathematical models are introduced and computational error resulting from computational instability starts to become a bottleneck in the analysis. We propose a preconditioning method for non-linear mixed effects models used in pharmacometric analyses to stabilise the computation of the variance-covariance matrix. Roughly speaking, the method reparameterises the model with a linear combination of the original model parameters so that the Hessian matrix of the likelihood of the reparameterised model becomes close to an identity matrix. This approach will reduce the influence of computational error, for example rounding error, to the final computational result. We present numerical experiments demonstrating that the stabilisation of the computation using the proposed method can recover failed variance-covariance matrix computations, and reveal non-identifiability of the model parameters.

  5. A simplified Galveston technique for the stabilisation of pathological fractures of the sacrum.

    PubMed

    McGee, A M; Bache, C E; Spilsbury, J; Marks, D S; Stirling, A J; Thompson, A G

    2000-10-01

    Mechanical stabilisation of pathological fractures of the sacrum is technically challenging. There is often inadequate purchase in the sacrum, and stabilisation has to be achieved between the lumbar vertebrae and ilium. We present a simplification of the Galveston technique. We treated a total of six patients with this technique, four for metastatic disease and two for primary tumours. Our technique consists of the formation of a proximal stable construct using ISOLA pedicle screws linked distally using a modular system of connectors to threaded iliac bolts with cross linkages. Neurological decompression and fusion was performed as appropriate. The benefits of this method are: ease of access to the ilium, a solid purchase to the ilium, less rod contouring and shorter operating time. We have had no operative complications from this procedure. All patients were discharged home mobile, with a reduced opiate requirement.

  6. Vibration-displacement measurements with a highly stabilised optical fiber Michelson interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Fang; Ren, Junyu; Chen, Zhimin; Feng, Qibo

    2010-02-01

    A highly stabilised vibration-displacement measurement system, which employs fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) to interleave two fiber Michelson interferometers that share the common-interferometric-optical path, is presented. The phase change in the interferometric signals of the two fiber Michelson interferometers have been tracked, respectively, with two electronic feedback loops. One of the fiber interferometers is used to stabilise the system by the use of an electronic feedback loop to compensate the environmental disturbances. The second fiber interferometer is used to perform the measurement task and employs another electronic feedback loop to track the phase change in the interferometric signal. The measurement system is able to measure vibration-displacement and provide the sense of direction of the displacement. The frequency range of the measured vibration-displacement is from 0.1 to 200 Hz and the measurement resolution is 10 nm.

  7. Output-feedback stabilisation for a class of switched nonlinear systems with unknown control coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2013-03-01

    This article investigates the problem of global stabilisation for a class of switched nonlinear systems with unknown control coefficients by output feedback. Full state measurements are unavailable. We first show that via a coordinate transformation, the unknown control coefficients are lumped together and the original switched nonlinear system is transformed into a new switched nonlinear system for which control design becomes feasible. Second, for the new switched nonlinear system, based on backstepping, we design output-feedback controllers for subsystems and construct a common Lyapunov function, which rely on the designed state observer, to guarantee asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system under arbitrary switchings. Finally, as an application of the proposed design method, global stabilisation of a mass-spring-damper system is achieved by output feedback.

  8. Novel Xylene-linked Maltoside Amphiphiles (XMAs) for Membrane Protein Stabilisation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung Ho; Du, Yang; Scull, Nicola J; Hariharan, Parameswaran; Gotfryd, Kamil; Loland, Claus J; Guan, Lan; Byrne, Bernadette; Kobilka, Brian K; Chae, Pil Seok

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are key functional players in biological systems. These bio-macromolecules contain both hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions and thus amphipathic molecules are necessary to extract membrane proteins from their native lipid environments and stabilise them in aqueous solutions. Conventional detergents are commonly used for membrane protein manipulation, but membrane proteins surrounded by these agents often undergo denaturation and aggregation. In this study, we developed a novel class of maltoside-bearing amphiphiles, with a xylene linker in the central region, designated xylene-linked maltoside amphiphiles (XMAs). When these novel agents were evaluated with a number of membrane proteins, we found that XMA-4 and XMA-5 have particularly favorable efficacy with respect to membrane protein stabilisation, indicating that these agents hold significant potential for membrane protein structural study. PMID:26013293

  9. Femtosecond fibre laser stabilisation to an optical frequency standard using a KTP electro-optic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Nyushkov, B N; Pivtsov, V S; Koliada, N A; Kaplun, A B; Meshalkin, A B

    2015-05-31

    A miniature intracavity KTP-based electro-optic phase modulator has been developed which can be used for effective stabilisation of an optical frequency comb of a femtosecond erbiumdoped fibre laser to an optical frequency standard. The use of such an electro-optic modulator (EOM) has made it possible to extend the working frequency band of a phase-locked loop system for laser stabilisation to several hundred kilohertz. We demonstrate that the KTP-based EOM is sufficiently sensitive even at a small optical length, which allows it to be readily integrated into cavities of femtosecond fibre lasers with high mode frequency spacings (over 100 MHz). (extreme light fields and their applications)

  10. A sol-powder coating technique for fabrication of yttria stabilised zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Wattanasiriwech, Darunee . E-mail: darunee@mfu.ac.th; Wattanasiriwech, Suthee; Stevens, Ron

    2006-08-10

    Yttria stabilised zirconia has been prepared using a simple sol-powder coating technique. The polymeric yttria sol, which was prepared using 1,3 propanediol as a network modifier, was homogeneously mixed with nanocrystalline zirconia powder and it showed a dual function: as a binder which promoted densification and a phase modifier which stabilised zirconia in the tetragonal and cubic phases. Thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction revealed that the polymeric yttria sol which decomposed at low temperature into yttrium oxide could change the m {sup {yields}} t phase transformation behaviour of the zirconia, possibly due to the small particle size and very high surface area of both yttria and zirconia particles allowing rapid alloying. The sintered samples exhibited three crystalline phases: monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic, in which cubic and tetragonal are the major phases. The weight fractions of the individual phases present in the selected specimens were determined using quantitative Rietveld analysis.

  11. Robust stabilisation of time-varying delay systems with probabilistic uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ning; Xiong, Junlin; Lam, James

    2016-09-01

    For robust stabilisation of time-varying delay systems, only sufficient conditions are available to date. A natural question is as follows: if the existing sufficient conditions are not satisfied, and hence no controllers can be found, what can one do to improve the stability performance of time-varying delay systems? This question is addressed in this paper when there is a probabilistic structure on the parameter uncertainty set. A randomised algorithm is proposed to design a state-feedback controller, which stabilises the system over the uncertainty domain in a probabilistic sense. The capability of the designed controller is quantified by the probability of stability of the resulting closed-loop system. The accuracy of the solution obtained from the randomised algorithm is also analysed. Finally, numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the developed controller design approach.

  12. Post-irradiation somatic mutation and clonal stabilisation time in the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, F; Williams, G T; Appleton, M A; Dixon, M F; Harris, M; Williams, E D

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal crypts are clonal units in which somatic mutation of marker genes in stem cells leads to crypt restricted phenotypic conversion initially involving part of the crypt, later the whole crypt. Studies in mice show that the time taken for the great majority of mutated crypts to be completely converted, the clonal stabilisation time, is four weeks in the colon and 21 weeks in the ileum. Differences in the clonal stabilisation time between tissues and species are thought to reflect differences in stem cell organisation and crypt kinetics. AIM: To study the clonal stabilisation time in the human colorectum. METHODS: Stem cell mutation can lead to crypt restricted loss of O-acetylation of sialomucins in subjects heterozygous for O-acetyltransferase gene activity. mPAS histochemistry was used to visualise and quantify crypts partially or wholly involved by the mutant phenotype in 21 informative cases who had undergone colectomy up to 34 years after radiotherapy. RESULTS: Radiotherapy was followed by a considerable increase in the discordant crypt frequency that remained significantly increased for many years. The proportion of discordant crypts showing partial involvement was initially high but fell to normal levels about 12 months after irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Crypts wholly involved by a mutant phenotype are stable and persistent while partially involved crypts are transient. The clonal stabilisation time is approximately one year in the human colon compared with four weeks in the mouse. The most likely reason for this is a difference in the number of stem cells in a crypt stem cell niche, although differences in stem cell cycle time and crypt fission may also contribute. These findings are of relevance to colorectal gene therapy and carcinogenesis in stem cell systems. PMID:8944567

  13. Rapid analysis of polyolefin antioxidants and light stabilisers by supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kithinji, J P; Bartle, K D; Raynor, M W; Clifford, A A

    1990-02-01

    Nineteen commercial antioxidants and light stabilisers, with a wide range of relative molecular masses and boiling-points, present in polyolefins were analysed by packed column supercritical fluid chromatography on four different phases with CO2 or 10% MeOH-CO2 as the mobile phase and with UV detection. The technique is shown to yield short analysis times and sufficient resolution for a number of additives present in a given polyolefin.

  14. Finite-time state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear feedforward systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Xing-Hui; Zhang, Kemei

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the finite-time state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear feedforward systems. Based on the stochastic Lyapunov theorem on finite-time stability, by using the homogeneous domination method, the adding one power integrator and sign function method, constructing a ? Lyapunov function and verifying the existence and uniqueness of solution, a continuous state feedback controller is designed to guarantee the closed-loop system finite-time stable in probability.

  15. The Stabilisation Potential of Individual and Mixed Assemblages of Natural Bacteria and Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Lubarsky, Helen V.; Hubas, Cédric; Chocholek, Melanie; Larson, Fredrik; Manz, Werner; Paterson, David M.; Gerbersdorf, Sabine U.

    2010-01-01

    It is recognized that microorganisms inhabiting natural sediments significantly mediate the erosive response of the bed (“ecosystem engineers”) through the secretion of naturally adhesive organic material (EPS: extracellular polymeric substances). However, little is known about the individual engineering capability of the main biofilm components (heterotrophic bacteria and autotrophic microalgae) in terms of their individual contribution to the EPS pool and their relative functional contribution to substratum stabilisation. This paper investigates the engineering effects on a non-cohesive test bed as the surface was colonised by natural benthic assemblages (prokaryotic, eukaryotic and mixed cultures) of bacteria and microalgae. MagPI (Magnetic Particle Induction) and CSM (Cohesive Strength Meter) respectively determined the adhesive capacity and the cohesive strength of the culture surface. Stabilisation was significantly higher for the bacterial assemblages (up to a factor of 2) than for axenic microalgal assemblages. The EPS concentration and the EPS composition (carbohydrates and proteins) were both important in determining stabilisation. The peak of engineering effect was significantly greater in the mixed assemblage as compared to the bacterial (x 1.2) and axenic diatom (x 1.7) cultures. The possibility of synergistic effects between the bacterial and algal cultures in terms of stability was examined and rejected although the concentration of EPS did show a synergistic elevation in mixed culture. The rapid development and overall stabilisation potential of the various assemblages was impressive (x 7.5 and ×9.5, for MagPI and CSM, respectively, as compared to controls). We confirmed the important role of heterotrophic bacteria in “biostabilisation” and highlighted the interactions between autotrophic and heterotrophic biofilm consortia. This information contributes to the conceptual understanding of the microbial sediment engineering that represents an

  16. Cooling and thermal stabilisation of Faraday rotators in the temperature range 300 — 200 K using Peltier elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palashov, O. V.; Ievlev, Ivan V.; Perevezentsev, E. A.; Katin, E. V.; Khazanov, Efim A.

    2011-09-01

    A new method for cooling and thermal stabilisation of Faraday rotators using Peltier elements is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The scheme of thermal stabilisation of the magnetooptical elements ensures reliable operation of the device at the absorbed power ~2 W, which corresponds to the transmitted laser radiation power 1.5 kW. The results of the work make it possible to predict high efficiency of this method at the laser power of tens of kilowatts.

  17. Cold laser machining of nickel-yttrium stabilised zirconia cermets: Composition dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, D.

    2009-09-15

    Cold laser micromachining efficiency in nickel-yttrium stabilised zirconia cermets was studied as a function of cermet composition. Nickel oxide-yttrium stabilised zirconia ceramic plates obtained via tape casting technique were machined using 8-25 ns pulses of a Nd: YAG laser at the fixed wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m and a frequency of 1 kHz. The morphology of the holes, etched volume, drill diameter, shape and depth were evaluated as a function of the processing parameters such as pulse irradiance and of the initial composition. The laser drilling mechanism was evaluated in terms of laser-material interaction parameters such as beam absorptivity, material spallation and the impact on the overall process discussed. By varying the nickel oxide content of the composite the optical absorption (-value is greatly modified and significantly affected the drilling efficiency of the green state ceramic substrates and the morphology of the holes. Higher depth values and improved drilled volume upto 0.2 mm{sup 3} per pulse were obtained for substrates with higher optical transparency (lower optical absorption value). In addition, a laser beam self-focussing effect is observed for the compositions with less nickel oxide content. Holes with average diameter from 60 {mu}m to 110 {mu}m and upto 1 mm in depth were drilled with a high rate of 40 ms per hole while the final microstructure of the cermet obtained by reduction of the nickel oxide-yttrium stabilised zirconia composites remained unchanged.

  18. Stabilisation of silver and copper nanoparticles in a chemically modified chitosan matrix.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Anand D; Mishra, Ajay K; Mishra, Shivani B; Kuvarega, Alex T; Mamba, Bhekie B

    2013-02-15

    This work describes the stabilisation of silver and copper nanoparticles in chemically modified chitosan colloidal solution. Chitosan-N-2-methylidene-hydroxy-pyridine-6-methylidene hydroxy thiocarbohydrazide (CSPTH) was used as a stabilising and reducing agent for silver and copper nanoparticles. The modified chitosan derivatives and the synthesised nanoparticles were characterised by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Particle size, morphology and segregation of the nanoparticles were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The size of the nanoparticles was found to be less than 20 nm and 50 nm for silver and copper nanoparticles, respectively. These nanoparticles were stabilised in a chemically modified chitosan solution and their properties were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The optical properties of silver nanoparticles in surface plasmon band (SPB) were enhanced at 407 nm compared to those of copper nanoparticles. Fluorescence (400 nm and 756 nm), photoluminescence (450 and 504 nm) and Raman scattering (1382 and 1581 cm(-1)) properties for the copper nanoparticles were superior to those of the silver nanoparticles.

  19. Stabilisation and control design by partial output feedback and by partial interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumthaler, Ingrid

    2012-11-01

    We study stabilisation and control design by partial output feedback on the one hand and by partial interconnection according to Willems on the other hand. This article is based on the paper Design, parametrization, and pole placement of stabilizing output feedback compensators via injective cogenerator quotient signal modules by I. Blumthaler and U. Oberst, and the same technique is used. Both discrete and continuous behaviours and various notions of stability are treated simultaneously. In the case of partial output feedback, we require that both the compensator and the feedback behaviour have proper transfer matrices without presuming properness of the plant. We obtain conditions ensuring the existence of such stabilising compensators which perform additional control tasks like, for instance, tracking, and an algorithm for constructing a large class of such compensators. In the case of stabilisation by interconnection no input-output structures of plant or compensator are assumed, but the controlled behaviour is endowed with a canonical input-output structure. Again we demand this input-output behaviour to have proper transfer matrix. For this situation we obtain necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of compensators solving the given control task, and a constructive parametrisation of all of them.

  20. Integrated waste management as a climate change stabilisation wedge for the Maltese islands.

    PubMed

    Falzon, Clyde; Fabri, Simon G; Frysinger, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The continuous increase in anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions occurring since the Industrial Revolution is offering significant ecological challenges to Earth. These emissions are leading to climate changes which bring about extensive damage to communities, ecosystems and resources. The analysis in this article is focussed on the waste sector within the Maltese islands, which is the largest greenhouse gas emitter in the archipelago following the energy and transportation sectors. This work shows how integrated waste management, based on a life cycle assessment methodology, acts as an effective stabilisation wedge strategy for climate change. Ten different scenarios applicable to the Maltese municipal solid waste management sector are analysed. It is shown that the scenario that is most coherent with the stabilisation wedges strategy for the Maltese islands consists of 50% landfilling, 30% mechanical biological treatment and 20% recyclable waste export for recycling. It is calculated that 16.6 Mt less CO2-e gases would be emitted over 50 years by means of this integrated waste management stabilisation wedge when compared to the business-as-usual scenario. These scientific results provide evidence in support of policy development in Malta that is implemented through legislation, economic instruments and other applicable tools.

  1. Avalanches of coalescence events and local extensional flows--stabilisation or destabilisation due to surfactant.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Deniz Z; Clain, Xavier; Breton, Olivier; Mayor, Guy; Burbidge, Adam S

    2010-03-01

    From two-drop collision experiments, it is known that local extensional flow favors coalescence. Recently, Bremond et al. used microfluidic methods to evidence this point. Similarly, we used specific microfluidic geometries to impose sudden extensional flow, following drop collision under controlled conditions, and coalescence events were recorded with a high-speed camera. In this study we focus on the effect of surfactant on the coalescence, or stabilisation against it, between drops flowing apart due to either imposed external flow or capillary forces related to drop shape relaxation. Coalescence can be induced even when drops are initially separated by an intersticial lubricating film by far thicker than the critical thickness for rupturing under the action of Van der Waals forces. This is particularly relevant to avalanches of coalescence events, in flowing or even quiescent emulsions or foams. When non-ionic surfactant was used, it was observed that small concentrations apparently enhance coalescence in extension. But at higher concentrations it provides stabilisation through a specific mechanism of thread formation and rupture; the stabilisation mechanism can be complex.

  2. Stabilisation of Na,K-ATPase structure by the cardiotonic steroid ouabain

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Andrew J.; Fedosova, Natalya U.; Hoffmann, Søren V.; Wallace, B.A.; Esmann, Mikael

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •Ouabain binding to pig and shark Na,K-ATPase enhances thermal stability. •Ouabain stabilises both membrane-bound and solubilised Na,K-ATPase. •Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism is used for structure determination. •Secondary structure in general is not affected by ouabain binding. •Stabilisation is due to re-arrangement of tertiary structure. -- Abstract: Cardiotonic steroids such as ouabain bind with high affinity to the membrane-bound cation-transporting P-type Na,K-ATPase, leading to complete inhibition of the enzyme. Using synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy we show that the enzyme-ouabain complex is less susceptible to thermal denaturation (unfolding) than the ouabain-free enzyme, and this protection is observed with Na,K-ATPase purified from pig kidney as well as from shark rectal glands. It is also shown that detergent-solubilised preparations of Na,K-ATPase are stabilised by ouabain, which could account for the successful crystallisation of Na,K-ATPase in the ouabain-bound form. The secondary structure is not significantly affected by the binding of ouabain. Ouabain appears however, to induce a reorganization of the tertiary structure towards a more compact protein structure which is less prone to unfolding; recent crystal structures of the two enzymes are consistent with this interpretation. These circular dichroism spectroscopic studies in solution therefore provide complementary information to that provided by crystallography.

  3. Emulsions stabilised by food colloid particles: role of particle adsorption and wettability at the liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Paunov, Vesselin N; Cayre, Olivier J; Noble, Paul F; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Velikov, Krassimir P; Golding, Matt

    2007-08-15

    We study the effect of the particle wettability on the preferred type of emulsion stabilised solely by food colloid particles. We present results obtained with the recently developed gel trapping technique (GTT) for characterisation of wettability and surface structuring of individual food colloid particles adsorbed at air-water and oil-water interfaces. This method allows us to replicate a particle monolayer onto the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) without altering the position of the particles. By observing the polymer surface with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we are able to determine the contact angle of the individual particles at the initial liquid interface. We demonstrate that the GTT can be applied to fat crystal particles, calcium carbonate particles coated with stearic acid and spray-dried soy protein/calcium phosphate particles at air-water and oil-water interfaces. Subsequently, we prepare emulsions of decane and water stabilised by the same food colloid particles and correlate the wettability data obtained for these particles to the preferred type of emulsions they stabilise.

  4. Stabilising cubosomes with Tween 80 as a step towards targeting lipid nanocarriers to the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Azhari, Hanisah; Strauss, Mike; Hook, Sarah; Boyd, Ben J; Rizwan, Shakila B

    2016-07-01

    Coating nanoparticles with the surfactant Tween 80 have been previously shown to enhance drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The aim of this study was to investigate whether Tween 80 could be used to stabilise phytantriol-based cubosomes thereby enabling potential application in delivering macromolecular therapeutics to the brain. Cubosome particles with their large internal and external surface area by virtue of their nanostructure are ideal for delivery of macromolecules. Phase behaviour studies were conducted using a combination of optical microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and the addition of Tween 80 to mixtures of phytantriol and water resulted in a rich array of lyotropic mesophases. In particular, a large cubic phase region and a two-phase region of readily dispersed cubosomes is observed. Cubosomes with different concentrations of Tween 80 and phytantriol as the liquid crystal forming lipid were prepared using the solvent precursor method and their physical properties were investigated. A combination of dynamic light scattering, cryogenic electron tomography and SAXS shows formation of well-defined cubosomes with a narrow size distribution and the Im3m cubic structure. Collectively, the results confirm that Tween 80 can effectively stabilize phytantriol cubosomes, opening the possibility for future application in drug delivery across the BBB. Moreover, well-defined, homogenous cubosome formulations prepared using the mild solvent precursor dilution method has significant implications for large-scale production of cubosomes, which currently is a major barrier to the application of cubosomes in the clinic.

  5. α' Inflation: moduli stabilisation and observable tensors from higher derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicoli, Michele; Ciupke, David; de Alwis, Senarath; Muia, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The leading order dynamics of the type IIB Large Volume Scenario is characterised by the interplay between α' and non-perturbative effects which fix the overall volume and all local blow-up modes leaving (in general) several flat directions. In this paper we show that, in an arbitrary Calabi-Yau with at least one blow-up mode resolving a point-like singularity, any remaining flat directions can be lifted at subleading order by the inclusions of higher derivative α' corrections. We then focus on simple fibred cases with one remaining flat direction which can behave as an inflaton if its potential is generated by both higher derivative α' and winding loop corrections. Natural values of the underlying parameters give a spectral index in agreement with observational data and a tensor-to-scalar ratio of order r = 0 .01 which could be observed by forthcoming CMB experiments. Dangerous corrections from higher dimensional operators are suppressed due to the presence of an approximate non-compact shift symmetry.

  6. Effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability.

    PubMed

    Ng, Choong; Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Hinman, Rana

    2007-06-01

    Background  Anterior instability is a frequent complication following a traumatic glenohumeral dislocation. Frequently the underlying pathology associated with recurrent instability is a Bankart lesion. Surgical correction of Bankart lesions and other associated pathology is the key to successful treatment. Open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation has been advocated as the gold standard because of consistently low postoperative recurrent instability rates. However, arthroscopic glenohumeral stabilisation could challenge open surgical repair as the gold standard treatment for traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Objectives  Primary evidence that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical glenohumeral stabilisation was systematically collated regarding best-practice management for adults with traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability. Search strategy  A systematic search was performed using 14 databases: MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL), Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), ISI Web of Science, Expanded Academic ASAP, Proquest Medical Library, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, TRIP Database, PubMed, ISI Current Contents Connect, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Studies published between January 1984 and December 2004 were included in this review. No language restrictions were applied. Selection criteria  Eligible studies were those that compared the effectiveness of arthroscopic versus open surgical stabilisation for the management of traumatic anterior glenohumeral instability, which had more than 2 years of follow up and used recurrent instability and a functional shoulder questionnaire as primary outcomes. Studies that used non-anatomical open repair techniques, patient groups that were specifically 40 years or older, or had multidirectional instability or other concomitant

  7. Can a total knee arthroplasty be both rotationally unconstrained and anteroposteriorly stabilised?

    PubMed Central

    Imam, M. A.; Eifert, A.; Freeman, M. A. R.; Pinskerova, V.; Field, R. E.; Skinner, J.; Banks, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Throughout the 20th Century, it has been postulated that the knee moves on the basis of a four-bar link mechanism composed of the cruciate ligaments, the femur and the tibia. As a consequence, the femur has been thought to roll back with flexion, and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) prostheses have been designed on this basis. Recent work, however, has proposed that at a position of between 0° and 120° the medial femoral condyle does not move anteroposteriorly whereas the lateral femoral condyle tends, but is not obliged, to roll back – a combination of movements which equates to tibial internal/ femoral external rotation with flexion. The aim of this paper was to assess if the articular geometry of the GMK Sphere TKA could recreate the natural knee movements in situ/in vivo. Methods The pattern of knee movement was studied in 15 patients (six male: nine female; one male with bilateral TKAs) with 16 GMK Sphere implants, at a mean age of 66 years (53 to 76) with a mean BMI of 30 kg/m2 (20 to 35). The motions of all 16 knees were observed using pulsed fluoroscopy during a number of weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing static and dynamic activities. Results During maximally flexed kneeling and lunging activities, the mean tibial internal rotation was 8° (standard deviation (sd) 6). At a mean 112° flexion (sd 16) during lunging, the medial and lateral condyles were a mean of 2 mm (sd 3) and 8 mm (sd 4) posterior to a transverse line passing through the centre of the medial tibial concavity. With a mean flexion of 117° (sd 14) during kneeling, the medial and lateral condyles were a mean of 1 mm (sd 4) anterior and 6 mm (sd 4) posterior to the same line. During dynamic stair and pivoting activities, there was a mean anteroposterior translation of 0 mm to 2 mm of the medial femoral condyle. Backward lateral condylar translation occurred and was linearly related to tibial rotation. Conclusion The GMK Sphere TKA in our study group shows movements similar in

  8. Test method selection, validation against field data, and predictive modelling for impact evaluation of stabilised waste disposal.

    PubMed

    van der Sloot, Hans A; van Zomeren, Andre; Meeussen, Johannes C L; Seignette, Paul; Bleijerveld, Rob

    2007-03-15

    In setting criteria for landfill classes in Annex II of the EU Landfill Directive, it proved to be impossible to derive criteria for stabilised monolithic waste due to the lack of information on release and release controlling factors in stabilised waste monofills. In this study, we present a scientific basis, which enables a realistic description of the environmental impact of stabilised waste landfills. The work in progress involves laboratory testing of different stabilisation recipes, pilot scale studies on site and evaluation of field leachate from a full-scale stabilisation landfill. We found that the pHs in run-off and in percolate water from the pilot experiment are both around neutral. The neutral pH in run-off is apparently caused by the rapid atmospheric carbonation of those alkaline constituents that are released. The soil, used as a liner protection layer, controls the release to the subsurface below the landfill. This soil layer buffers pH and binds metals. The modelling results show that the chemistry is understood rather well. Differences between predicted and actual leaching might then be attributed to discrepancies in the description of sorption processes, complexation to organic matter and/or kinetic effects in the leaching tests. We conclude that this approach resulted in a new scientific basis for environmental impact assessment of stabilised waste landfills. The integrated approach has already resulted in a number of very valuable observations, which can be used to develop a sustainable landfill for monolithic waste and to provide guidance for the management of waste to be stabilised (e.g. improved waste mix design).

  9. Stabilisation of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) anthocyanins by different pectins.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Speth, M; Kammerer, D R; Carle, R

    2013-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different pectins on strawberry anthocyanins in viscous model solutions at pH 3.0. For this purpose, low esterified amidated, low and high methyl esterified citrus and apple pectins, and a sugar beet pectin (SBP), respectively, were added to strawberry extracts. The latter were predominantly composed of pelargonidin-glycosides, containing either reduced (E-1) or original amounts of non-anthocyanin phenolics (E-2). Model systems were stored for 18 weeks at 20±0.5 °C protected from light, and anthocyanins were quantitated in regular intervals by HPLC-DAD analyses. Half-life (t1/2) and destruction (D) values were calculated based on first-order kinetics. Generally, significant differences in pigment retention could be ascribed to differing pectin sources, while variation in the degree of esterification and amidation, respectively, had negligible effects. Compared to systems without added pectin, apple pectins and SPB enhanced anthocyanin stability moderately, while stabilising effects of citrus pectins were poor or even imperceptible. Generally, the amount of non-anthocyanin phenolics and the addition of citrate did not markedly affect anthocyanin stability. However, pectins had no influence on total phenolic contents (Folin-Ciocalteu assay) and antioxidant capacities (FRAP and TEAC assay) of strawberry phenolics over time. For pelargonidin-3-glucoside and -rutinoside largely consistent stabilities were found in all model systems. In contrast, pelargonidin-3-malonylglucoside was less stable in the blank, and stabilisation by pectins was always negligible. The findings of the present study are contrary to results reported previously for the stabilisation of cyanidin- and delphinidin-glycosides in similar model systems prepared with black currant extracts, indicating a high impact of the number of hydroxyl groups in the anthocyanin B-ring.

  10. Mathematical modelling of postbuckling in a slender beam column for active stabilisation control with respect to uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enss, Georg C.; Platz, Roland; Hanselka, Holger

    2012-04-01

    Buckling is an important design constraint in light-weight structures as it may result in the collapse of an entire structure. When a mechanical beam column is loaded above its critical buckling load, it may buckle. In addition, if the actual loading is not fully known, stability becomes highly uncertain. To control uncertainty in buckling, an approach is presented to actively stabilise a slender flat column sensitive to buckling. For this purpose, actively controlled forces applied by piezoelectric actuators located close to the column's clamped base stabilise the column against buckling at critical loading. In order to design a controller to stabilise the column, a mathematical model of the postcritically loaded system is needed. Simulating postbuckling behaviour is important to study the effect of axial loads above the critical axial buckling load within active buckling control. Within this postbuckling model, different kinds of uncertainty may occur: i) error in estimation of model parameters such as mass, damping and stiffness, ii) non-linearities e. g. in the assumption of curvature of the column's deflection shapes and many more. In this paper, numerical simulations based on the mathematical model for the postcritically axially loaded column are compared to a mathematical model based on experiments of the actively stabilised postcritically loaded real column system using closed loop identification. The motivation to develop an experimentally validated mathematical model is to develop of a model based stabilising control algorithm for a real postcritically axially loaded beam column.

  11. Spectroscopic properties of erbium-doped yttria-stabilised zirconia crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabochkina, P A; Sidorova, N V; Ushakov, S N; Lomonova, E E

    2014-02-28

    Yttria-stabilised zirconia crystals ZrO{sub 2} – Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (6 mol %) – Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5.85 mol %) are grown by directional crystallisation in a cold container using direct RF melting. The spectral and luminescent properties of these crystals are studied in order to use them as active media of solid state lasers emitting in the wavelength range 1.5 – 1.7 μm. (active media)

  12. Arm-length stabilisation for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors using frequency-doubled auxiliary lasers.

    PubMed

    Mullavey, Adam J; Slagmolen, Bram J J; Miller, John; Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Sigg, Daniel; Waldman, Sam J; Shaddock, Daniel A; McClelland, David E

    2012-01-02

    Residual motion of the arm cavity mirrors is expected to prove one of the principal impediments to systematic lock acquisition in advanced gravitational-wave interferometers. We present a technique which overcomes this problem by employing auxiliary lasers at twice the fundamental measurement frequency to pre-stabilise the arm cavities' lengths. Applying this approach, we reduce the apparent length noise of a 1.3 m long, independently suspended Fabry-Perot cavity to 30 pm rms and successfully transfer longitudinal control of the system from the auxiliary laser to the measurement laser.

  13. Global adaptive exponential stabilisation for nonlinear systems with multiple unknown control directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xifang; Chen, Weisheng; Wu, Jian

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we address the global generalised exponential stabilisation problem for a class of lower-triangular systems with multiple unknown directions. Instead of the well-known Nussbaum-gain adaptive rule, a Lyapunov-based adaptive logic switching rule is proposed to seek the correct control directions for such systems. The main advantage of the proposed controller is that it can guarantee the global generalised exponential stability of closed-loop systems. Simulation examples are given to verify the effectiveness of the developed control approach.

  14. Semi-global decentralised output feedback stabilisation for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Jun-yong; Zha, Wen-ting; Fei, Shu-min

    2013-06-01

    This paper discusses the problem of semi-global decentralised output feedback control for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. Based on the ideas of the homogeneous systems theory and the adding a power integrator technique, we first design a homogeneous observer and an output feedback control law for each nominal subsystem without the nonlinearities. Then, using the homogeneous domination approach, we relax the linear growth condition to a polynomial one and construct decentralised stabilisers to render the nonlinear system semi-globally asymptotically stable. Two simulation examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the control scheme.

  15. L ∞ and L 2 semi-global stabilisation of continuous-time periodic linear systems with bounded controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Hou, Ming-Zhe; Duan, Guang-Ren

    2013-04-01

    This article is concerned with L ∞ and L 2 semi-global stabilisation of continuous-time periodic linear systems with bounded controls. Two problems, namely L ∞ semi-global stabilisation with controls having bounded magnitude and L 2 semi-global stabilisation with controls having bounded energy, are solved based on solutions to a class of periodic Lyapunov differential equations (PLDEs) resulting from the problem of minimal energy control with guaranteed convergence rate. Under the assumption that the open-loop system is (asymptotically) null controllable with constrained controls, periodic feedback are established to solve the concerned problems. The proposed PLDE-based approaches possess the advantage that the resulting controllers are easy to implement since the designers need only to solve a linear differential equation. A numerical example is worked out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Sludge digestion instead of aerobic stabilisation - a cost benefit analysis based on experiences in Germany.

    PubMed

    Gretzschel, Oliver; Schmitt, Theo G; Hansen, Joachim; Siekmann, Klaus; Jakob, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of a worldwide increase of energy costs, the efficient use of sewage sludge as a renewable energy resource must be considered, even for smaller wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with design capacities between 10,000 and 50,000 population equivalent (PE). To find the lower limit for an economical conversion of an aerobic stabilisation plant into an anaerobic stabilisation plant, we derived cost functions for specific capital costs and operating cost savings. With these tools, it is possible to evaluate if it would be promising to further investigate refitting aerobic plants into plants that produce biogas. By comparing capital costs with operation cost savings, a break-even point for process conversion could be determined. The break-even point varies depending on project specific constraints and assumptions related to future energy and operation costs and variable interest rates. A 5% increase of energy and operation costs leads to a cost efficient conversion for plants above 7,500 PE. A conversion of WWTPs results in different positive effects on energy generation and plant operations: increased efficiency, energy savings, and on-site renewable power generation by digester gas which can be used in the plant. Also, the optimisation of energy efficiency results in a reduction of primary energy consumption.

  17. Characterisation of Physicochemical Properties of Propionylated Corn Starch and Its Application as Stabiliser.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lee-Fen; Cheng, Lai-Hoong; Lee, Chong Yew; Peh, Kok Khiang

    2015-09-01

    A series of propionylated starches with different degrees of substitution (DS) was synthesised and their physicochemical properties and application as a stabiliser were investigated. Starch propionates with moderate DS were prepared by esterification of native corn starch with propionic anhydride. By varying the reaction times of the esterification process, twelve starch propionates with DS of 0.47 to 0.94 were prepared. FTIR and NMR confirmed the introduction of propionyl groups to the starch. X-ray diffraction pattern showed reduced crystallinity in the starch propionates. The contact angle was found to increase proportionately with the increase in DS. Swelling power results showed that starch propionates were able to swell more than native corn starch at low temperature (40 °C). Oil-in- -water (O/W) emulsions prepared using starch propionates (DS of 0.64 to 0.86) showed exceptional stability when challenged by centrifugation stress test. These stable O/W emulsions had viscosities in the range of 1236.7-3330.0 mPa·s. In conclusion, moderately substituted short-chain (propionylated) starches could be a promising cold swelling starch, thickener and O/W emulsion stabiliser in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

  18. Enamel subsurface lesion remineralisation with casein phosphopeptide stabilised solutions of calcium, phosphate and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, N J; Saranathan, S; Cai, F; Cross, K J; Reynolds, E C

    2008-01-01

    Casein phosphopeptide stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) and amorphous calcium fluoride phosphate (CPP-ACFP) solutions have been shown to remineralise enamel subsurface lesions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ion composition of CPP-ACP and CPP-ACFP solutions on enamel subsurface lesion remineralisation in vitro. CPP-bound and free calcium, phosphate and fluoride ion concentrations in the solutions were determined after ultrafiltration. The ion activities of the free ion species present were calculated using an iterative computational program. The mineral deposited in the subsurface lesions was analysed using transverse microradiography and electron microprobe. CPP was found to stabilise high concentrations of calcium, phosphate and fluoride ions at all pH values (7.0-4.5). Remineralisation of the subsurface lesions was observed at all pH values tested with a maximum at pH 5.5. The CPP-ACFP solutions produced greater remineralisation than the CPP-ACP solutions at pH 5.5 and below. The mineral formed in the subsurface lesions was consistent with hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite for remineralisation with CPP-ACP and CPP-ACFP, respectively. The activity gradient of the neutral ion pair CaHPO(4)(0) into the lesion was significantly correlated with remineralisation and together with HF(0) were identified as important species for diffusion.

  19. Integration of vehicle yaw stabilisation and rollover prevention through nonlinear hierarchical control allocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberding, Matthäus B.; Tjønnås, Johannes; Johansen, Tor A.

    2014-12-01

    This work presents an approach to rollover prevention that takes advantage of the modular structure and optimisation properties of the control allocation paradigm. It eliminates the need for a stabilising roll controller by introducing rollover prevention as a constraint on the control allocation problem. The major advantage of this approach is the control authority margin that remains with a high-level controller even during interventions for rollover prevention. In this work, the high-level control is assigned to a yaw stabilising controller. It could be replaced by any other controller. The constraint for rollover prevention could be replaced by or extended to different control objectives. This work uses differential braking for actuation. The use of additional or different actuators is possible. The developed control algorithm is computationally efficient and suitable for low-cost automotive electronic control units. The predictive design of the rollover prevention constraint does not require any sensor equipment in addition to the yaw controller. The method is validated using an industrial multi-body vehicle simulation environment.

  20. Lipid oxidation in minced beef meat with added Krebs cycle substrates to stabilise colour.

    PubMed

    Yi, G; Grabež, V; Bjelanovic, M; Slinde, E; Olsen, K; Langsrud, O; Phung, V T; Haug, A; Oostindjer, M; Egelandsdal, B

    2015-11-15

    Krebs cycle substrates (KCS) can stabilise the colour of packaged meat by oxygen reduction. This study tested whether this reduction releases reactive oxygen species that may lead to lipid oxidation in minced meat under two different storage conditions. KCS combinations of succinate and glutamate increased peroxide forming potential (PFP, 1.18-1.32 mmol peroxides/kg mince) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, 0.30-0.38 mg malondialdehyde (MDA) equivalents/kg mince) under low oxygen storage conditions. Both succinate and glutamate were metabolised. Moreover, under high oxygen (75%) storage conditions, KCS combinations of glutamate, citrate and malate increased PFP (from 1.22 to 1.29 mmol peroxides/kg) and TBARS (from 0.37 to 0.40 mg MDA equivalents/kg mince). Only glutamate was metabolised. The KCS combinations that were added to stabilise colour were metabolised during storage, and acted as pro-oxidants that promoted lipid oxidation in both high and low oxygen conditions.

  1. Characterisation of Physicochemical Properties of Propionylated Corn Starch and Its Application as Stabiliser

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lee-Fen; Cheng, Lai-Hoong; Lee, Chong Yew

    2015-01-01

    Summary A series of propionylated starches with different degrees of substitution (DS) was synthesised and their physicochemical properties and application as a stabiliser were investigated. Starch propionates with moderate DS were prepared by esterification of native corn starch with propionic anhydride. By varying the reaction times of the esterification process, twelve starch propionates with DS of 0.47 to 0.94 were prepared. FTIR and NMR confirmed the introduction of propionyl groups to the starch. X-ray diffraction pattern showed reduced crystallinity in the starch propionates. The contact angle was found to increase proportionately with the increase in DS. Swelling power results showed that starch propionates were able to swell more than native corn starch at low temperature (40 °C). Oil-in- -water (O/W) emulsions prepared using starch propionates (DS of 0.64 to 0.86) showed exceptional stability when challenged by centrifugation stress test. These stable O/W emulsions had viscosities in the range of 1236.7–3330.0 mPa·s. In conclusion, moderately substituted short-chain (propionylated) starches could be a promising cold swelling starch, thickener and O/W emulsion stabiliser in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27904359

  2. Electrical in-situ characterisation of interface stabilised organic thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Striedinger, Bernd; Fian, Alexander; Petritz, Andreas; Lassnig, Roman; Winkler, Adolf; Stadlober, Barbara

    2015-07-14

    We report on the electrical in-situ characterisation of organic thin film transistors under high vacuum conditions. Model devices in a bottom-gate/bottom-contact (coplanar) configuration are electrically characterised in-situ, monolayer by monolayer (ML), while the organic semiconductor (OSC) is evaporated by organic molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE). Thermal SiO2 with an optional polymer interface stabilisation layer serves as the gate dielectric and pentacene is chosen as the organic semiconductor. The evolution of transistor parameters is studied on a bi-layer dielectric of a 150 nm of SiO2 and 20 nm of poly((±)endo,exo-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, diphenylester) (PNDPE) and compared to the behaviour on a pure SiO2 dielectric. The thin layer of PNDPE, which is an intrinsically photo-patternable organic dielectric, shows an excellent stabilisation performance, significantly reducing the calculated interface trap density at the OSC/dielectric interface up to two orders of magnitude, and thus remarkably improving the transistor performance.

  3. Electrical in-situ characterisation of interface stabilised organic thin-film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Striedinger, Bernd; Fian, Alexander; Petritz, Andreas; Lassnig, Roman; Winkler, Adolf; Stadlober, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We report on the electrical in-situ characterisation of organic thin film transistors under high vacuum conditions. Model devices in a bottom-gate/bottom-contact (coplanar) configuration are electrically characterised in-situ, monolayer by monolayer (ML), while the organic semiconductor (OSC) is evaporated by organic molecular beam epitaxy (OMBE). Thermal SiO2 with an optional polymer interface stabilisation layer serves as the gate dielectric and pentacene is chosen as the organic semiconductor. The evolution of transistor parameters is studied on a bi-layer dielectric of a 150 nm of SiO2 and 20 nm of poly((±)endo,exo-bicyclo[2.2.1]hept-5-ene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, diphenylester) (PNDPE) and compared to the behaviour on a pure SiO2 dielectric. The thin layer of PNDPE, which is an intrinsically photo-patternable organic dielectric, shows an excellent stabilisation performance, significantly reducing the calculated interface trap density at the OSC/dielectric interface up to two orders of magnitude, and thus remarkably improving the transistor performance. PMID:26457122

  4. Physiological bicarbonate buffers: stabilisation and use as dissolution media for modified release systems.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Hala M; Merchant, Hamid A; Arafat, Basel T; Basit, Abdul W

    2009-12-01

    Bicarbonate media are reflective of the ionic composition and buffer capacity of small intestinal luminal fluids. Here we investigate methods to stabilise bicarbonate buffers which can be readily applied to USP-II dissolution apparatus. The in vitro drug release behaviour of three enteric coated mesalazine (mesalamine) products is investigated. Asacol 400 mg and Asacol 800 mg (Asacol HD) and the new generation, high dose (1200 mg) delayed and sustained release formulation, Mezavant (Lialda), are compared in pH 7.4 Krebs bicarbonate and phosphate buffers. Bicarbonate stabilisation was achieved by: continuous sparging of the medium with 5% CO(2)(g), application of a layer of liquid paraffin above the medium, or a specially designed in-house seal device that prevents CO(2)(g) loss. Each of the products displayed a delayed onset of drug release in physiological bicarbonate media compared to phosphate buffer. Moreover, Mezavant displayed a zero-order, sustained release profile in phosphate buffer; in bicarbonate media, however, this slow drug release was no longer apparent and a profile similar to that of Asacol 400 mg was observed. These similar release patterns of Asacol 400 mg and Mezavant displayed in bicarbonate media are in agreement with their pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Bicarbonate media provide a better prediction of the in vivo behaviour of the mesalazine preparations investigated.

  5. A Scott bench with ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad improves body posture during preacher arm curl exercise.

    PubMed

    Biscarini, Andrea; Benvenuti, Paolo; Busti, Daniele; Zanuso, Silvano

    2016-05-01

    We assessed whether the use of an ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad, during the preacher arm curl exercise, could significantly reduce the excessive shoulder protraction and thoracic kyphosis induced by the standard flat pad built into the existing preacher arm curl equipment. A 3D motion capture system and inclinometers were used to measure shoulder protraction and thoracic kyphosis in 15 subjects performing preacher arm curl with a plate-loaded machine provided with the standard flat pad. The same measures were repeated after replacing the flat pad with a new ergonomic pad, specifically designed to accommodate the thorax profile and improve body posture. Pad replacement significantly (p < 0.001) reduced shoulder protraction (from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]) and thoracic kyphosis (from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]), enabling postural and functional improvements within the entire spine, shoulder girdle and rib cage. The ergonomic pad may potentially allow a more effective training, prevent musculoskeletal discomfort and reduce the risk of injury. Practitioner summary: We have designed an ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad for the preacher arm curl exercise. The new ergonomic pad improves the poor posture conditions induced by the standard flat pad and may potentially allow a more effective training, prevent musculoskeletal discomfort, improve the breathing function and reduce the risk of injury.

  6. Chemistry of guanidinate-stabilised diboranes: transition-metal-catalysed dehydrocoupling and hydride abstraction.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Arne; Litters, Sebastian; Elias, Jana; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-09-22

    Herein, we analyse the catalytic boron-boron dehydrocoupling reaction that leads from the base-stabilised diborane(6) [H2 B(hpp)]2 (hpp=1,3,4,6,7,8-hexahydro-2H-pyrimido[1,2-a]pyrimidinate) to the base-stabilised diborane(4) [H2 B(hpp)]2 . A number of potential transition-metal precatalysts was studied, including transition-metal complexes of the product diborane(4). The synthesis and structural characterisation of two further examples of such complexes is presented. The best results for the dehydrocoupling reactions were obtained with precatalysts of Group 9 metals in the oxidation state of +I. The active catalyst is formed in situ through a multistep process that involves reduction of the precatalyst by the substrate [H2 B(hpp)]2 , and mechanistic investigations indicate that both heterogeneous and (slower) homogeneous reaction pathways play a role in the dehydrocoupling reaction. In addition, hydride abstraction from [H2 B(hpp)]2 and related diboranes is analysed and the possibility for subsequent deprotonation is discussed by probing the protic character of the cationic boron-hydrogen compounds with NMR spectroscopic analysis.

  7. A 10-year follow-up of transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or intervertebral B-Twin system in failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spine surgeons have been combining anterior and posterolateral fusion (circumferential fusion) as the final solution to treat spinal disorders and many have been using it to treat failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). In present study, we analyzed and compared the clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral B-Twin system for FBSS with a follow-up period of 10 years after the surgery. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective case study performed on 55 patients with FBSS. Clinical and radiological changes were compared between the two groups of patients on the basis of improvement of back pain, radicular pain, and work capacity. Outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year from before surgery until 2012. We analyzed the evolution of 55 cases of FBSS those underwent segmental circumferential posterior fusions from June 2001 to February 2003, operated by a single surgeon and followed up during 10 years until February 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: In 25 patients, posterolateral fusions with Legacy™ (Medtronic, Inc. NYSE: MDT) screws and intersomatic autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft was performed, and, in 30 patients, posterolateral fusions with the same screws and intersomatic fusion B-Twin (Biomet Spain Orthopaedics, S.L.) system was performed. In all cases, we used posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for intervertebral graft, and the artrodesis was supplemented at intertransverse level with Autologus Growth Factor (AGF-MBA INCORPORADO, S.A.). The outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year and compared

  8. The effect of environmental conditions and soil physicochemistry on phosphate stabilisation of Pb in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2016-04-01

    The stabilisation of Pb in the soil by phosphate is influenced by environmental conditions and physicochemical properties of the soils to which it is applied. Stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined in four soils under different environmental conditions. The effect of soil moisture and temperature on stabilisation of Pb by phosphate was examined by measurement of water extractable and bioaccessible Pb, sequential fractionation and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The addition of humic acid, ammonium nitrate and chloride was also examined for inhibition or improvement of Pb stability with phosphate treatment. The effect of moisture level varied between soils. In soil MB and DA a soil moisture level of 50% water holding capacity was sufficient to maximise stabilisation of Pb, but in soil TV and PE reduction in bioaccessible Pb was inhibited at this moisture level. Providing moisture at twice the soil water holding capacity did not enhance the effect of phosphate on Pb stabilisation. The difference of Pb stability as a result of incubating phosphate treated soils at 18 °C and 37 °C was relatively small. However wet-dry cycles decreased the effectiveness of phosphate treatment. The reduction in bioaccessible Pb obtained was between 20 and 40% with the most optimal treatment conditions. The reduction in water extractable Pb by phosphate was substantial regardless of incubation conditions and the effect of different temperature and soil moisture regimes was not significant. Selective sequential extraction showed phosphate treatment converted Pb in fraction 1 (exchangeable, acid and water soluble) to fraction 2 (reducible). There were small difference in fraction 4 (residual) Pb and fraction 1 as a result of treatment conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of stabilised PE soil revealed small differences in Pb speciation under varying soil moisture and temperature treatments. The addition of humic acid and chloride produced the greatest effect on Pb speciation in

  9. The use of biogas plant fermentation residue for the stabilisation of toxic metals in agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geršl, Milan; Šotnar, Martin; Mareček, Jan; Vítěz, Tomáš; Koutný, Tomáš; Kleinová, Jana

    2015-04-01

    Our department has been paying attention to different methods of soil decontamination, including the in situ stabilisation. Possible reagents to control the toxic metals mobility in soils include a fermentation residue (FR) from a biogas plant. Referred to as digestate, it is a product of anaerobic decomposition taking place in such facilities. The fermentation residue is applied to soils as a fertiliser. A new way of its use is the in situ stabilisation of toxic metals in soils. Testing the stabilisation of toxic metals made use of real soil samples sourced from five agriculturally used areas of the Czech Republic with 3 soil samples taken from sites contaminated with Cu, Pb and Zn and 2 samples collected at sites of natural occurrence of Cu, Pb and Zn ores. All the samples were analysed using the sequential extraction procedure (BCR) (determine the type of Cu, Pb and Zn bonds). Stabilisation of toxic metals was tested in five soil samples by adding reagents as follows: dolomite, slaked lime, goethite, compost and fermentation residue. A single reagent was added at three different concentrations. In the wet state with the added reagents, the samples were left for seven days, shaken twice per day. After seven days, metal extraction was carried out: samples of 10 g soil were shaken for 2 h in a solution of 0.1M NH4NO3 at a 1:2.5 (g.ml-1), centrifuged for 15 min at 5,000 rpm and then filtered through PTFE 0.45 μm mesh filters. The extracts were analysed by ICP-OES. Copper The best reduction of Cu concentration in the extract was obtained at each of the tested sites by adding dolomite (10 g soil + 0.3 g dolomite). The concentration of Cu in the leachate decreased to 2.1-18.4% compare with the leachate without addition. Similar results were also shown for the addition of fermentation residue (10 g soil + 1 g FR). The Cu concentration in the leachate decreased to 16.7-26.8% compared with the leachate without addition. Lead The best results were achieved by adding

  10. Feedbacks and landscape-level vegetation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David M J S; Perry, George L W; Marston, J B

    2015-05-01

    Alternative stable-state theory (ASS) is widely accepted as explaining landscape-level vegetation dynamics, such as switches between forest and grassland. This theory argues that webs of feedbacks stabilise vegetation composition and structure, and that abrupt state shifts can occur if stabilising feedbacks are weakened. However, it is difficult to identify stabilising feedback loops and the disturbance thresholds beyond which state changes occur. Here, we argue that doing this requires a synthetic approach blending observation, experimentation, simulation, conceptual models, and narratives. Using forest boundaries and large mammal extinctions, we illustrate how a multifaceted research program can advance understanding of feedback-driven ecosystem change. Our integrative approach has applicability to other complex macroecological systems controlled by numerous feedbacks where controlled experimentation is impossible.

  11. An improved stability test and stabilisation of linear time-varying systems governed by second-order vector differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Shen-Lung; Juang, Yau-Tarng; Wu, Wei-Ying; Shieh, Wern-Yarng

    2011-12-01

    In this article, the problems of exponential stability analysis and stabilisation of linear time-varying systems described by a class of second-order vector differential equations are considered. Using bounding techniques on the trajectories of a linear time-varying system, the stability problem of the time-varying system is transformed to that of a time-invariant system and a new sufficient condition for the exponential stability is obtained. Moreover, the new criterion is proven to be superior to a test presented in the recent literature. Finally, the proposed criterion is applied to the exponential stabilisation problem via state feedback. The results are illustrated by several numerical examples.

  12. Finite-time observer-based output-feedback control for the global stabilisation of the PVTOL aircraft with bounded inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Río, A.; Fantoni, I.; Sanahuja, G.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, an output-feedback scheme for the global stabilisation of the planar vertical take-off and landing aircraft with bounded inputs is developed taking into account the positive nature of the thrust. The global stabilisation objective is proven to be achieved avoiding input saturation and by exclusively considering the system positions in the feedback. To cope with the lack of velocity measurements, the proposed algorithm involves a finite-time observer. The generalised versions of the involved finite-time stabilisers have not only permitted to solve the output-feedback stabilisation problem avoiding input saturation, but also provide additional flexibility in the control design that may be used in aid of performance improvements. With respect to previous approaches, the developed finite-time observer-based scheme guarantees the global stabilisation objective disregarding velocity measurements in a bounded input context. Simulation tests corroborate the analytical developments. The study includes further experimental results on an actual flying device.

  13. Stabilisation of spent mushroom substrate for application as a plant growth-promoting organic amendment.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fabiana S; Tatti, Enrico; Abram, Florence; Wilson, Jude; O'Flaherty, Vincent

    2017-03-23

    Over three million tonnes of spent mushroom substrate (SMS) are produced in Europe every year as a by-product of the cultivation of Agaricus bisporus. The management of SMS has become an increasing challenge for the mushroom production industry, and finding environmentally and economically sustainable solutions for this organic residue is, therefore, highly desirable. Due to its physical properties and nutrient content, SMS has great potential to be employed in agricultural and horticultural sectors, and further contribute to reduce the use of non-renewable resources, such as peat. However, SMS is often regarded as not being stable and/or mature, which hampers its wide use for crop production. Here, we demonstrate the stabilisation of SMS and its subsequent use as organic fertiliser and partial peat replacement in horticulture. The stabilisation was performed in a laboratory-scale composting system, with controlled temperature and aeration. Physical and chemical parameters were monitored during composting and provided information on the progress of the process. Water soluble carbohydrates (WSC) content was found to be the most reliable parameter to predict SMS stability. In situ oxygen consumption indicated the main composting phases, reflecting major changes in microbial activity. The structure of the bacterial community was also found to be a potential predictor of stability, as the compositional changes followed the composting progress. By contrast, the fungal community did not present clear successional process along the experiment. Maturity and quality of the stabilised SMS were assessed in a horticultural growing trial. When used as the sole fertiliser source, SMS was able to support Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) growth and significantly improved grass yield with a concentration-dependent response, increasing grass biomass up to 300%, when compared to the untreated control. In summary, the results indicated that the method employed was efficient in

  14. Stabilisation de poussieres de four a arc electrique dans les matrices cimentaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laforest, Guylaine

    L'etude de la stabilisation des poussieres de four a arc electrique (EAFD) par le laitier de haut-fourneau (GGBFS) et le ciment Portland (OPC) a ete realisee en trois parties. D'abord, la problematique de fixation du Cr dans les matrices cimentaires a ete etudiee en soumettant differents liants a des solutions de Cr lors d'essais de lixiviation en vrac et d'essais d'isothermes d'absorption. Ensuite, la caracterisation des EAFD a ete effectuee. Finalement, la stabilisation des EAFD dans les matrices cimentaires a ete etudiee en soumettant differents melanges liant-EAFD a des essais de lixiviation en vrac, de competition ionique, de solubilisation a differents pH et de lixiviation sur monolithes. Les resultats ont demontre que le OPC et le GGBFS sont efficaces pour la fixation du Cr. Les silicates de calcium hydrates, la chromatite et l'hydrocalumite ont ete identifiees comme etant des phases jouant un role dans la fixation du Cr. Les EAFD ont montre une mineralogie complexe, heterogene, riche en spinelles et oxydes metalliques. Un important pourcentage des metaux lourds (Cr, Zn, Ni et Pb) des EAFD a ete identifie lixiviable. Les EAFD etablissent un controle de solubilite sur ces metaux, mais ce controle n'est pas suffisant pour diminuer les concentrations en metaux du lixiviat sous les limites permises. Ainsi, les resulats des essais sur la stabilisation des EAFD ont demontre qu'il etait possible, avec le OPC et le GGBFS, de diminuer les concentrations en metaux lourds des lixiviats sous les limites acceptees. Les phases incorporant les metaux, ((Ni,Zn)Fe2O4, (Zn,Mo)O, Ni(OH)2 et Pb(OH) 2), ont ete determinees par SEM, XRD et par modelisation geochimique. L'hydrocalumite et le Cr(VI)-ettringite ont ete etablies comme etant des phases potentiellement capables de fixer le Cr. L'etude de la competition ionique a montre que la fixation du Cr par le GGBFS diminue legerement en presence du Pb. L'etude des monolithes, composes de EAFD et de OPC ou GGBFS et soumis a une

  15. Freshwater dispersion stability of PAA-stabilised cerium oxide nanoparticles and toxicity towards Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Booth, Andy; Størseth, Trond; Altin, Dag; Fornara, Andrea; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Jungnickel, Harald; Laux, Peter; Luch, Andreas; Sørensen, Lisbet

    2015-02-01

    An aqueous dispersion of poly (acrylic acid)-stabilised cerium oxide (CeO₂) nanoparticles (PAA-CeO₂) was evaluated for its stability in a range of freshwater ecotoxicity media (MHRW, TG 201 and M7), with and without natural organic matter (NOM). In a 15 day dispersion stability study, PAA-CeO₂ did not undergo significant aggregation in any media type. Zeta potential varied between media types and was influenced by PAA-CeO₂ concentration, but remained constant over 15 days. NOM had no influence on PAA-CeO₂ aggregation or zeta potential. The ecotoxicity of the PAA-CeO₂ dispersion was investigated in 72 h algal growth inhibition tests using the freshwater microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. PAA-CeO₂ EC₅₀ values for growth inhibition (GI; 0.024 mg/L) were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than pristine CeO₂ EC₅₀ values reported in the literature. The concentration of dissolved cerium (Ce(3+)/Ce(4+)) in PAA-CeO₂ exposure suspensions was very low, ranging between 0.5 and 5.6 μg/L. Free PAA concentration in the exposure solutions (0.0096-0.0384 mg/L) was significantly lower than the EC10 growth inhibition (47.7 mg/L) value of pure PAA, indicating that free PAA did not contribute to the observed toxicity. Elemental analysis indicated that up to 38% of the total Cerium becomes directly associated with the algal cells during the 72 h exposure. TOF-SIMS analysis of algal cell wall compounds indicated three different modes of action, including a significant oxidative stress response to PAA-CeO₂ exposure. In contrast to pristine CeO₂ nanoparticles, which rapidly aggregate in standard ecotoxicity media, PAA-stabilised CeO₂ nanoparticles remain dispersed and available to water column species. Interaction of PAA with cell wall components, which could be responsible for the observed biomarker alterations, could not be excluded. This study indicates that the increased dispersion stability of PAA-CeO₂ leads to an increase in toxicity compared to

  16. Remediation by in-situ solidification/stabilisation of Ardeer landfill, Scotland

    SciTech Connect

    Wyllie, M.; Esnault, A.; Barker, P.

    1997-12-31

    The Ardeer Landfill site at ICI Explosives factory on the west coast of Scotland had been a repository for waste from the site for 40 years. In order to safeguard the local environment ICI Explosives, with approval of Local Authorities and the Clyde River Purification Board put into action a programme of investigation and planning which culminated in the in-situ treatment of 10,000 m3 of waste within the landfill by a deep mixing method using the {open_quotes}Colmix{close_quotes} system. The paper describes in varying degrees of detail the remediation from investigation to the execution of the in-situ stabilisation and presents the post construction monitoring results.

  17. Global ?-exponential stabilisation of a class of nonlinear networked control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan-Jun; Zhang, Daoyuan; Huang, Yuehua; Liu, Yungang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate global ?-exponential stabilisation of a class of nonlinear networked control systems. The network-induced delays are assumed to be random and significantly smaller than the sampling period. First, sufficient conditions are presented to ensure global ?-exponential stability for a class of hybrid systems with time delay. Then, the networked control systems are modelled as the hybrid systems with time delay. By the techniques of adding a power integrator and a recursive argument, a sampled-data state feedback control law is presented. Sufficient conditions are given to ensure global ?-exponential stability of the closed-loop system by constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii function. Finally, a numerical example is presented to show the validity of the new methods.

  18. Stabilisation of a fibre frequency synthesiser using acousto-optical and electro-optical modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koliada, N. A.; Nyushkov, B. N.; Pivtsov, V. S.; Dychkov, A. S.; Farnosov, S. A.; Denisov, V. I.; Bagayev, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    A fibre-optic frequency synthesiser is developed that is stabilised to the optical frequency standard based on molecular iodine ({\\text{Nd : YAG/I}}2). The possibility of transferring stability of the optical frequency standard to other optical frequencies in the IR range 1 - 2 \\unicode{956}{\\text{m}} and to the RF range by using synthesiser phase-locked loops (PLLs) with acousto-optical and electro-optical modulators is experimentally demonstrated. The additive instability introduced into the optical frequency comb of the synthesiser (which arises due to PLL residual random errors) is several orders less than the intrinsic instability of the reference optical frequency standard employed (i.e., is noticeably less than 1 × 10-13 for 1 {\\text{s}} and 5 × 10-15 for 1000 {\\text{s}}).

  19. Observer-based stabilisation of linear systems with parameter uncertainties by using enhanced LMI conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheloufi, Houria; Bedouhene, Fazia; Zemouche, Ali; Alessandri, Angelo

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of observer-based stabilisation for linear systems with structured norm-bounded parameter uncertainties. A new design methodology is established thanks to a judicious use of some mathematical artefacts such as the well-known Young inequality and various matrix decompositions. The proposed method allows one to compute simultaneously the observer and controller gains by solving a single bilinear matrix inequality (BMI), which becomes a linear matrix inequality (LMI) by freezing some scalars. Furthermore, we show that some existing and elegant results reported in the literature can be regarded as particular cases of the stability conditions presented here. Numerical examples and evaluations of the conservatism are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed design methodology.

  20. Inacessible Andean sites reveal land-use induced stabilisation of soil organic carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitkamp, Felix; Maqsood, Shafique; Sylvester, Steven; Kessler, Michael; Jungkunst, Hermann

    2015-04-01

    Human activity affects properties and development of ecosystems across the globe to such a degree that it is challenging to get baseline values for undisturbed ecosystems. This is especially true for soils, which are affected by land-use history and hold a legacy of past human interventions. Therefore, it is still largely unknown how soil would have developed "naturally" and if processes of organic matter stabilisation would be different in comparison to managed soils. Here, we show undisturbed soil development, i.e., the processes of weathering and accumulation of soil organic carbon (SOC), by comparing pristine with grazed sites in the high Andes (4500 m) of southern Peru. We located study plots on a large ledge (0.2 km²) that is only accessible with mountaineering equipment. Plots with pristine vegetation were compared to rangeland plots that were constantly under grazing management for at least four millennia. All "state factors"; climate, potential biota, topography, parent material and time; besides "land-use" were, therefore, identical. Vegetation change, induced by grazing management, led to lower vegetation cover of the soil, thereby increasing soil surface temperatures and soil acidification. Both factors increased weathering in rangeland soils, as indicated by the presence of pedogenic oxides, especially amorphous Al-(oxy)hydroxides (oxalate-extractable Al). Higher losses of base cations (K, Na, Ca) and lower pH-values were related to a low base saturation of exchange sites in rangelands. Therefore, rangeland soils were classified as Umbrisol, whereas soils under pristine vegetation were classified as Phaeozeme. All profiles were rich in SOC (100 to 126 g kg-1) with no significant differences in concentrations or stocks. SOC of rangeland soils was, however, less available for microorganisms (proportion of microbial C on SOC: 1.8 vs. 0.6% in pristine and rangeland soils, respectively) and showed higher stability against thermal degradation. Reasons for

  1. Synthesis, structural studies and ligand influence on the stability of aryl-NHC stabilised trimethylaluminium complexes.

    PubMed

    M, Melissa Wu; Gill, Arran M; Yunpeng, Lu; Falivene, Laura; Yongxin, Li; Ganguly, Rakesh; Cavallo, Luigi; García, Felipe

    2015-09-14

    Treatment of a series of aromatic NHCs (IMes, SIMes, IPr and SIPr) with trimethylaluminium produced their corresponding Lewis acid-base adducts: IMes·AlMe3 (1), SIMes·AlMe3 (2), IPr·AlMe3 (3), and SIPr·AlMe3 (4). These complexes expand the few known examples of saturated NHC stabilised Group 13 complexes. Furthermore, compounds 1-4 show differential stability depending on the nature of the NHC ligand. Analyses of topographic steric maps and NHC %V(Bur) were used to explain these differences. All the compounds have been fully characterised by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, IR and single crystal X-ray analysis together with computational studies.

  2. Oil-in-water emulsions stabilised by cellulose ethers: stability, structure and in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Borreani, Jennifer; Espert, María; Salvador, Ana; Sanz, Teresa; Quiles, Amparo; Hernando, Isabel

    2017-03-09

    The effect of cellulose ethers in oil-in-water emulsions on stability during storage and on texture, microstructure and lipid digestibility during in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was investigated. All the cellulose ether emulsions showed good physical and oxidative stability during storage. In particular, the methylcellulose with high methoxyl substituents (HMC) made it possible to obtain emulsions with high consistency which remained almost unchanged during gastric digestion, and thus could enhance fullness and satiety perceptions at gastric level. Moreover, the HMC emulsion slowed down lipid digestion to a greater extent than a conventional protein emulsion or the emulsions stabilised by the other cellulose ethers. Therefore, HMC emulsions could be used in weight management to increase satiation capacity and decrease lipid digestion.

  3. Investigation of 4-year-old stabilised/solidified and accelerated carbonated contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Antemir, A; Hills, C D; Carey, P J; Magnié, M-C; Polettini, A

    2010-09-15

    The investigation of the pilot-scale application of two different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) techniques was carried out at a former fireworks and low explosives manufacturing site in SE England. Cores and granular samples were recovered from uncovered accelerated carbonated (ACT) and cement-treated soils (S/S) after 4 years to evaluate field-performance with time. Samples were prepared for microstructural examination and leaching testing. The results indicated that the cement-treated soil was progressively carbonated over time, whereas the mineralogy of the carbonated soil remained essentially unchanged. Distinct microstructures were developed in the two soils. Although Pb, Zn and Cu leached less from the carbonated soil, these metals were adequately immobilised by both treatments. Geochemical modeling of pH-dependent leaching data suggested that the retention of trace metals resulted from different immobilisation mechanisms operating in the two soils examined.

  4. Stabilisation of bank slopes that are prone to liquefaction in ecologically sensitive areas.

    PubMed

    Nestler, P; Stoll, R D

    2001-01-01

    A consequence of lignite stripping in the Lusatia mining district (East Germany) is the backfilling of dumps that mainly consist of low-compacted fine and medium-grained sands. When the ground-water table, which had been lowered while stripping the coal, is rising again, these dumps might be affected by a settlement flow due to the liquefaction of soils. Common methods for stabilisation as, for instance, blasting or vibrator-jetting deep compaction, are not very useful in ecologically sensitive areas, where dumps have been afforested and embankment areas of residual lakes have developed into highly valuable biotopes. A new so-called air-impulse method in combination with directional horizontal drilling has been developed, which does not have a considerably negative impact on the vegetation during compaction. The experience gained during the first employment of this method at the lake "Katja", a residual lake of lignite stripping, is presented in this paper.

  5. Three-axis active control system for gravity gradient stabilised microsatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si Mohammed, A. M.; Benyettou, M.; Bentoutou, Y.; Boudjemai, A.; Hashida, Y.; Sweeting, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the control system of the first Algerian microsatellite in orbit Alsat-1 is presented. Alsat-1 is a 3-axis stabilised microsatellite, using a pitch momentum wheel and yaw reaction wheel, with dual redundant 3-axis magnetorquers. A gravity gradient boom is employed to provide a high degree of platform stability. Two vector magnetometers and four dual sun sensors are carried in order to determine the attitude. This paper examines the low Earth orbit (LEO) control system requirements and design in the context of a real system, the Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) advanced microsatellite platform and puts forward designs for the control system to match the advanced capability of the enhanced microsatellite platform. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the implementation. Comparison with in orbit results is presented to evaluate the performance of the control system during accurate Nadir pointing control.

  6. Stabilisation and humanitarian access in a collapsed state: the Somali case.

    PubMed

    Menkhaus, Ken

    2010-10-01

    Somalia today is the site of three major threats: the world's worst humanitarian crisis; the longest-running instance of complete state collapse; and a robust jihadist movement with links to Al-Qa'ida. External state-building, counter-terrorism and humanitarian policies responding to these threats have worked at cross-purposes. State-building efforts that insist humanitarian relief be channelled through the nascent state in order to build its legitimacy and capacity undermine humanitarian neutrality when the state is a party to a civil war. Counter-terrorism policies that seek to ensure that no aid benefits terrorist groups have the net effect of criminalising relief operations in countries where poor security precludes effective accountability. This paper argues that tensions between stabilisation and humanitarian goals in contemporary Somalia reflect a long history of politicisation of humanitarian operations in the country.

  7. Synthesis of dense yttrium-stabilised hafnia pellets for nuclear applications by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrpekl, Vaclav; Holzhäuser, Michael; Hein, Herwin; Vigier, Jean-Francois; Somers, Joseph; Svora, Petr

    2014-11-01

    Dense yttrium-stabilised hafnia pellets (91.35 wt.% HfO2 and 8.65 wt.% Y2O3) were prepared by spark plasma sintering consolidation of micro-beads synthesised by the “external gelation” sol-gel technique. This technique allows a preparation of HfO2-Y2O3 beads with homogenous yttria-hafnia solid solution. A sintering time of 5 min at 1600 °C was sufficient to produce high density pellets (over 90% of the theoretical density) with significant reproducibility. The pellets have been machined in a lathe to the correct dimensions for use as neutron absorbers in an experimental test irradiation in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, Holland, in order to investigate the safety of americium based nuclear fuels.

  8. Comparing and validating models of driver steering behaviour in collision avoidance and vehicle stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markkula, G.; Benderius, O.; Wahde, M.

    2014-12-01

    A number of driver models were fitted to a large data set of human truck driving, from a simulated near-crash, low-friction scenario, yielding two main insights: steering to avoid a collision was best described as an open-loop manoeuvre of predetermined duration, but with situation-adapted amplitude, and subsequent vehicle stabilisation could to a large extent be accounted for by a simple yaw rate nulling control law. These two phenomena, which could be hypothesised to generalise to passenger car driving, were found to determine the ability of four driver models adopted from the literature to fit the human data. Based on the obtained results, it is argued that the concept of internal vehicle models may be less valuable when modelling driver behaviour in non-routine situations such as near-crashes, where behaviour may be better described as direct responses to salient perceptual cues. Some methodological issues in comparing and validating driver models are also discussed.

  9. Stabilisation and consensus of linear systems with multiple input delays by truncated pseudo-predictor feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Cong, Shen

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a new approach referred to as pseudo-predictor feedback (PPF) for stabilisation of linear systems with multiple input delays. Differently from the traditional predictor feedback which is from the model reduction appoint of view, the proposed PPF utilises the idea of prediction by generalising the corresponding results for linear systems with a single input delay to the case of multiple input delays. Since the PPF will generally lead to distributed controllers, a truncated pseudo-predictor feedback (TPPF) approach is established instead, which gives finite dimensional controllers. It is shown that the TPPF can compensate arbitrarily large yet bounded delays as long as the open-loop system is only polynomially unstable. The proposed TPPF approach is then used to solve the consensus problems for multi-agent systems characterised by linear systems with multiple input delays. Numerical examples show the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  10. Input-output finite-time stabilisation of nonlinear stochastic system with missing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun; Niu, Yugang; Jia, Tinggang

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the problem of the input-output finite-time stabilisation for a class of nonlinear stochastic system with state-dependent noise. The phenomenon of the missing measurements may occur when state signals are transmitted via communication networks. An estimating method is proposed to compensate the lost state information. And then, a compensator-based controller is designed to ensure the input-output finite-time stochastic stability (IO-FTSS) of the closed-loop system. Some parameters-dependent sufficient conditions are derived and the corresponding solving approach is given. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed IO-FTSS scheme.

  11. Global finite-time stabilisation of a class of switched nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ying-Jiu; Ma, Ruicheng; Wang, Min; Fu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the global finite-time stabilisation problem for a class of switched nonlinear systems under arbitrary switchings. All subsystems of the studied switched system under consideration are in lower triangular form. Based on the adding one power integrator technique, both a class of non-Lipschitz continuous state feedback controllers and a common Lyapunov function are simultaneously constructed such that the closed-loop switched system is global finite-time stable under arbitrary switchings. In the controller design process, a common coordinate transformation of all subsystems is exploited to avoid using individual coordinate transformations for subsystems. Finally, two examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Le facteur XII de la coagulation: bien plus qu’un stabilisant de la fibrine

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, N.; Lamaalmi, F.; Chakour, M.; Belmekki, A.; Naji, M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Les Auteurs considèrent le rôle du facteur XIII de la coagulation dans la cicatrisation. Identifié depuis 1923, le rôle du facteur XIII ou le facteur stabilisant de la fibrine dans la coagulation a été bien élucidé. Son rôle dans la cicatrisation suggéré dès 1960 est méconnu par les hématologistes et les médecins prenant en charge les brûlés. Les Auteurs se proposent de mettre la lumière sur ce rôle, qui reste encore mystérieux et mérite d’être élucidé. PMID:21991236

  13. Interfacing living unicellular algae cells with biocompatible polyelectrolyte-stabilised magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fakhrullin, Rawil F; Shlykova, Lubov V; Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Nurgaliev, Danis K; Osin, Yuri N; García-Alonso, Javier; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2010-10-08

    Green algae are a promising platform for the development of biosensors and bioelectronic devices. Here we report a reliable single-step technique for the functionalisation of living unicellular green algae Chlorella pyrenoidosa with biocompatible 15 nm superparamagnetic nanoparticles stabilised with poly(allylamine hydrochloride). The magnetised algae cells can be manipulated and immobilised using external permanent magnets. The distribution of the nanoparticles on the cell walls of C. pyrenoidosa was studied by optical and fluorescence microscopy, TEM, SEM and EDX spectroscopy. The viability and the magnetic properties of the magnetised algae are studied in comparison with the native cells. The technique may find a number of potential applications in biotechnology and bioelectronics.

  14. Stabilisation of medically refractory ventricular arrhythmia by intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation

    PubMed Central

    Fotopoulos, G; Mason, M; Walker, S; Jepson, N; Patel, D; Mitchell, A; Ilsley, C; Paul, V

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To review the efficacy of intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation (IABCP) in medically refractory ventricular arrhythmia.
DESIGN—Retrospective analysis of the outcome of patients with ventricular arrhythmia treated with IABCP after transfer between 1992 and 1997.
SETTING—Tertiary cardiac referral centre.
PATIENTS—21 patients (mean age 58 years) who underwent IABCP for control of ventricular arrhythmia. All had significant left ventricular impairment (mean ejection fraction 28.6%); 18 had coronary artery disease.
RESULTS—Before IABCP, 10 patients had incessant monomorphic ventricular tachycardia and 11 had paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia and/or ventricular fibrillation (VT/VF). IABCP resulted in suppression of ventricular arrhythmia in 18 patients, of whom 13 were weaned from IABCP. After stabilisation of ventricular arrhythmia, 10 patients were maintained on medical treatment alone and one underwent endocardial resection. IABCP was maintained until cardiac transplantation in five patients. One patient had a fatal arrest before discharge and one died from progressive heart failure. IABCP failed to control ventricular arrhythmia in three patients and was subsequently discontinued. A cardiac assist device was employed in one of these until cardiac transplantation; the other two were eventually stabilised on medical treatment. Nineteen patients were discharged from hospital. Overall survival was 95% at mean follow up of 25.7 months.
CONCLUSIONS—IABCP can be an effective means of controlling refractory ventricular arrhythmia, allowing time for the institution of more definitive treatment.


Keywords: ventricular arrhythmia; intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation PMID:10377318

  15. Production of nabumetone nanoparticles: Effect of molecular weight, concentration and nature of cellulose ether stabiliser.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, D J; Martini, L G; Lawrence, M J

    2016-12-05

    The ability of a range of hydrophilic nonionic cellulose ethers (CEs) (namely methylhydroxethylcellulose, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose, ethylhydroxyethylcellulose, hydroxyethylcellulose and hydroxypropylcellulose) to prepare stable nabumetone nanoparticles (<1000nm, as measured by laser diffraction) using wet-bead milling has been investigated. Due to the limited range of CE molecular weights commercially available, the CEs were degraded using ultrasonication for varying lengths of time to yield CEs of lower molecular weight. Of the CEs tested, only hydroxyethylcellulose was found not to stabilise the production of nabumetone nanoparticles at any of the molecular weights tested, namely viscosity average molecular weights (Mv) in the range of 236-33kg/mol. All other CEs successfully stabilised nabumetone nanoparticles, with the lower molecular weight/viscosity polymers within a series being more likely to result in nanoparticle production than their higher molecular weight counterparts. Unfortunately due to the nature of the ultrasonication process, it was not possible to compare the size of nabumetone particles produced using polymers of identical Mv. There was, however, enough similarity in the Mv of the various polymers to draw the general conclusion that there was no strong correlation between the Mv of the various polymers and their ability to produce nanoparticles. For example hydroxypropylcellulose of 112.2kg/mol or less successfully produced nanoparticles while only ethylhydroxyethylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethyl polymers of 52 and 38.8kg/mol or less produced nanoparticles. These results suggest that polymer molecular weight is not the only determinant of nanoparticle production and that structure of the polymer is at least as important as its molecular weight. In particular the hydrophobic nature of the CE was thought to be an important factor in the production of nabumetone nanoparticles: the more hydrophobic the polymer, the stronger its interaction

  16. Mechanisms of flame stabilisation at low lifted height in a turbulent lifted slot-jet flame

    SciTech Connect

    Karami, Shahram; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Talei, Mohsen; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-07-23

    A turbulent lifted slot-jet flame is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A one-step chemistry model is employed with a mixture-fraction-dependent activation energy which can reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the laminar burning rate on the equivalence ratio that is typical of hydrocarbon fuels. The basic structure of the flame base is first examined and discussed in the context of earlier experimental studies of lifted flames. Several features previously observed in experiments are noted and clarified. Some other unobserved features are also noted. Comparison with previous DNS modelling of hydrogen flames reveals significant structural differences. The statistics of flow and relative edge-flame propagation velocity components conditioned on the leading edge locations are then examined. The results show that, on average, the streamwise flame propagation and streamwise flow balance, thus demonstrating that edge-flame propagation is the basic stabilisation mechanism. Fluctuations of the edge locations and net edge velocities are, however, significant. It is demonstrated that the edges tend to move in an essentially two-dimensional (2D) elliptical pattern (laterally outwards towards the oxidiser, then upstream, then inwards towards the fuel, then downstream again). It is proposed that this is due to the passage of large eddies, as outlined in Suet al.(Combust. Flame, vol. 144 (3), 2006, pp. 494–512). However, the mechanism is not entirely 2D, and out-of-plane motion is needed to explain how flames escape the high-velocity inner region of the jet. Finally, the time-averaged structure is examined. A budget of terms in the transport equation for the product mass fraction is used to understand the stabilisation from a time-averaged perspective. The result of this analysis is found to be consistent with the instantaneous perspective. The budget reveals a fundamentally 2D structure, involving transport in both

  17. Mechanisms of flame stabilisation at low lifted height in a turbulent lifted slot-jet flame

    DOE PAGES

    Karami, Shahram; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Talei, Mohsen; ...

    2015-07-23

    A turbulent lifted slot-jet flame is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). A one-step chemistry model is employed with a mixture-fraction-dependent activation energy which can reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the laminar burning rate on the equivalence ratio that is typical of hydrocarbon fuels. The basic structure of the flame base is first examined and discussed in the context of earlier experimental studies of lifted flames. Several features previously observed in experiments are noted and clarified. Some other unobserved features are also noted. Comparison with previous DNS modelling of hydrogen flames reveals significant structural differences. The statistics of flow andmore » relative edge-flame propagation velocity components conditioned on the leading edge locations are then examined. The results show that, on average, the streamwise flame propagation and streamwise flow balance, thus demonstrating that edge-flame propagation is the basic stabilisation mechanism. Fluctuations of the edge locations and net edge velocities are, however, significant. It is demonstrated that the edges tend to move in an essentially two-dimensional (2D) elliptical pattern (laterally outwards towards the oxidiser, then upstream, then inwards towards the fuel, then downstream again). It is proposed that this is due to the passage of large eddies, as outlined in Suet al.(Combust. Flame, vol. 144 (3), 2006, pp. 494–512). However, the mechanism is not entirely 2D, and out-of-plane motion is needed to explain how flames escape the high-velocity inner region of the jet. Finally, the time-averaged structure is examined. A budget of terms in the transport equation for the product mass fraction is used to understand the stabilisation from a time-averaged perspective. The result of this analysis is found to be consistent with the instantaneous perspective. The budget reveals a fundamentally 2D structure, involving transport in both the streamwise and transverse

  18. Cerium reduction at the interface between ceria and yttria-stabilised zirconia and implications for interfacial oxygen non-stoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kepeng; Schmid, Herbert; Srot, Vesna; Gilardi, Elisa; Gregori, Giuliano; Du, Kui; Maier, Joachim; van Aken, Peter A.

    2014-03-01

    Epitaxial CeO2 films with different thickness were grown on Y2O3 stabilised Zirconia substrates. Reduction of cerium ions at the interface between CeO2 films and yttria stabilised zirconia substrates is demonstrated using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy. It is revealed that most of the Ce ions were reduced from Ce4+ to Ce3+ at the interface region with a decay of several nanometers. Several possibilities of charge compensations are discussed. Irrespective of the details, such local non-stoichiometries are crucial not only for understanding charge transport in such hetero-structures but also for understanding ceria catalytic properties.

  19. An improved sufficient condition for stabilisation of unstable first-order processes by observer-state feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco Marquez Rubio, Juan; del Muro Cuéllar, Basilio; Velasco Villa, Martín; de Jesús Álvarez Ramírez, José

    2015-02-01

    This work considers the stabilisation and control of unstable first-order linear systems subject to a relatively large I/O time delay. First, it is proposed an observer strategy to predict a specific internal signal in the process. The adequate prediction convergence is obtained and formally stated. Then, it is proposed an estimated state feedback control. Necessary and sufficient stability conditions with respect to time delay size and unstable time constant are provided. The proposed control strategy allows to address time delays as large as four times the unstable time constant of the open-loop system, in contrast with most of the reported related literature. Numerical examples are used for illustrating the parametric stabilisation region as a function of the time delay.

  20. Cerium reduction at the interface between ceria and yttria-stabilised zirconia and implications for interfacial oxygen non-stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Kepeng; Schmid, Herbert; Srot, Vesna; Aken, Peter A. van; Gilardi, Elisa; Gregori, Giuliano; Maier, Joachim; Du, Kui

    2014-03-01

    Epitaxial CeO{sub 2} films with different thickness were grown on Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} stabilised Zirconia substrates. Reduction of cerium ions at the interface between CeO{sub 2} films and yttria stabilised zirconia substrates is demonstrated using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy. It is revealed that most of the Ce ions were reduced from Ce{sup 4+} to Ce{sup 3+} at the interface region with a decay of several nanometers. Several possibilities of charge compensations are discussed. Irrespective of the details, such local non-stoichiometries are crucial not only for understanding charge transport in such hetero-structures but also for understanding ceria catalytic properties.

  1. Stabilisation of high-activity 99mTc-d,l-HMPAO preparations with cobalt chloride and their biological behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mang'era, K O; Vanbilloen, H P; Schiepers, C W; Verbruggen, A M

    1995-10-01

    It has been reported that the stability of a 1.11-GBq (30 mCi) technetium-99m d,l-hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime (HMPAO) preparation can be improved to up to 5 h by the addition of 200 micrograms CoCl2.6H2O within 2 min after reconstitution. However, it is not clear whether this method is also efficient for high-activity preparations (5.55 GBq) and whether this modified 99mTc-d,l-HMPAO has the same biological properties and can safely be used. We have now studied CoCl2-stabilised 99mTc-d,l-HMPAO preparations containing different amounts of "in-house" HMPAO ligand and SnCl2 and reconstituted with activities from 1.11 GBq to 5.55 GBq 99mTc. The characteristics of the generator eluates were also divergent, ranging from fresh eluates from a generator eluted less than 2 h previously to 4-h-old eluates from a generator not eluted during the preceding 72 h. Preparations containing up to 5.55 GBq 99mTc and as low as 2 micrograms SnCl2.2H2O can be efficiently stabilised for at least 6 h by the addition of CoCl2 shortly after reconstitution. Interestingly, it was found that the stabilisation method is not efficient if the cobalt ions are added prior to reconstitution of the preparation. This implies that the cobalt chloride cannot be incorporated in the labelling kit. Also, preparations with amounts of the ligand lower or higher than 0.5 mg formed the 99mTc-d,l-HMPAO complex with low radiochemical yield or showed rapid degradation. Therefore, combination of a subdivision and storage of Ceretec kits in fractions (as reported in the literature) is contra-indicated with this CoCl2 stabilisation method. CoCl2-stabilised Ceretec kits reconstituted with 5550 MBq 99mTcO4- and used 4-5 h after preparation retain the diagnostic usefulness of the fresh 1110-MBq preparation with regard to leucocyte labelling and brain imaging. Although baboon brain uptake of the stabilised preparation was 6%-9% lower, this small difference could not be distinguished in the tomographic images. The

  2. Global state feedback stabilisation of stochastic high-order nonlinear systems with high-order and low-order nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fangzheng; Wu, Yuqiang; Yu, Xin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the problem of global stabilisation by state feedback is investigated for a class of stochastic high-order nonlinear systems with both high-order and low-order nonlinearities, to which the existing control methods are inapplicable. Based on the generalised stochastic Lyapunov theorem, and by skillfully using the method of adding a power integrator, a continuous state feedback controller is successfully constructed, which can guarantee the global asymptotic stability in probability of the resulting closed-loop system in the sense of weak solution, and also is able to lead to an interesting result of finite-time stabilisation under appropriate conditions. Finally, two simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  3. Effect of human and simulated gastric juices on the digestion of whey proteins and carboxymethylcellulose-stabilised O/W emulsions.

    PubMed

    Malinauskytė, Ernesta; Ramanauskaitė, Jovita; Leskauskaitė, Daiva; Devold, Tove G; Schüller, Reidar B; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2014-12-15

    In this study, we analysed the impact of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on lipid digestion and physicochemical properties of whey proteins (WP)-stabilised emulsions during in vitro digestion with either artificial or human gastrointestinal juices. The emulsions were made by adsorbing WP on the fat droplets and subsequently adding CMC, which does not interact with the adsorbed proteins. The limited hydrolysis of lipids and their higher physical stability was recorded for WP-stabilised emulsions in the presence of CMC under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The possible mechanism by which CMC lowers the digestion of WP-stabilised emulsions is related to the limited interaction of fat droplets with gastrointestinal fluids due to the extended thickening network formed by CMC in the continuous phase. The digestion of WP- and CMC-stabilised emulsions in the in vitro model with human gastric fluids led to greater lipid hydrolysis, although the enzymatic activity in both in vitro models was observed at the same level.

  4. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi; Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-12-15

    Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3-9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants.

  5. Delay-dependent resilient-robust stabilisation of uncertain networked control systems with variable sampling intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feisheng; Zhang, Huaguang; Liu, Zhenwei; Li, Ranran

    2014-03-01

    This work is concerned with the robust resilient control problem for uncertain networked control systems (NCSs) with variable sampling intervals, variant-induced delays and possible data dropouts, which is seldom considered in current literature. It is mainly based on the continuous time-varying-delay system approach. Followed by the nominal case, delay-dependent resilient robust stabilising conditions for the closed-loop NCS against controller gain variations are derived by employing a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional which makes good use of the information of both lower and upper bounds on the varying input delay, and the upper bound on the variable sampling interval as well. A feasible solution of the obtained criterion formulated as linear matrix inequalities can be gotten. A tighter bounding technique is presented for acquiring the time derivative of the functional so as to utilise many more useful elements, meanwhile neither slack variable nor correlated augmented item is introduced to reduce overall computational burden. Two examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Modelling waste stabilisation ponds with an extended version of ASM3.

    PubMed

    Gehring, T; Silva, J D; Kehl, O; Castilhos, A B; Costa, R H R; Uhlenhut, F; Alex, J; Horn, H; Wichern, M

    2010-01-01

    In this paper an extended version of IWA's Activated Sludge Model No 3 (ASM3) was developed to simulate processes in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). The model modifications included the integration of algae biomass and gas transfer processes for oxygen, carbon dioxide and ammonia depending on wind velocity and a simple ionic equilibrium. The model was applied to a pilot-scale WSP system operated in the city of Florianópolis (Brazil). The system was used to treat leachate from a municipal waste landfill. Mean influent concentrations to the facultative pond of 1,456 g(COD)/m(3) and 505 g(NH4-N)/m(3) were measured. Experimental results indicated an ammonia nitrogen removal of 89.5% with negligible rates of nitrification but intensive ammonia stripping to the atmosphere. Measured data was used in the simulations to consider the impact of wind velocity on oxygen input of 11.1 to 14.4 g(O2)/(m(2) d) and sun radiation on photosynthesis. Good results for pH and ammonia removal were achieved with mean stripping rates of 18.2 and 4.5 g(N)/(m(2) d) for the facultative and maturation pond respectively. Based on measured chlorophyll a concentrations and depending on light intensity and TSS concentration it was possible to model algae concentrations.

  7. Highly water-soluble mast cell stabiliser-encapsulated solid lipid nanoparticles with enhanced oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi R; Chaurasia, Sundeep; Khan, Gayasuddin; Chaubey, Pramila; Kumar, Nagendra; Mishra, Brahmeshwar

    2016-05-01

    Cromolyn sodium (CS), a mast cell stabiliser, is widely employed for the prevention and treatment of allergic conditions. However, high hydrophilicity and poor oral permeability hinder its oral clinical translation. Here, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have been developed for the purpose of oral bioavailability enhancement. The CS-SLNs were engineered by double emulsification method (W1/O/W2) and optimised by using Box-Behnken experimental design. The surface and solid-state characterisations revealed the presence of CS in an amorphous form without any interactions inside the spherical-shaped SLNs. The in-vitro release study showed an extended release up to 24 hr by diffusion controlled process. Ex-vivo and in-vivo intestinal permeation study showed ∼2.96-fold increase in permeability of CS by presentation as SLNs (p < 0.05). Further, in-vivo pharmacokinetic study exhibited ∼2.86-fold enhancements in oral bioavailability of CS by encapsulating inside SLNs, which clearly indicate that SLNs can serve as the potential therapeutic carrier system for oral delivery of CS.

  8. Nanobiotechnology as a novel paradigm for enzyme immobilisation and stabilisation with potential applications in biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Verma, Madan Lal; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2013-01-01

    Nanobiotechnology is emerging as a new frontier of biotechnology. The potential applications of nanobiotechnology in bioenergy and biosensors have encouraged researchers in recent years to investigate new novel nanoscaffolds to build robust nanobiocatalytic systems. Enzymes, mainly hydrolytic class of enzyme, have been extensively immobilised on nanoscaffold support for long-term stabilisation by enhancing thermal, operational and storage catalytic potential. In the present report, novel nanoscaffold variants employed in the recent past for enzyme immobilisation, namely nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes, nanopores, nanosheets and nanocomposites, are discussed in the context of lipase-mediated nanobiocatalysis. These nanocarriers have an inherently large surface area that leads to high enzyme loading and consequently high volumetric enzyme activity. Due to their high tensile strengths, nanoscale materials are often robust and resistant to breakage through mechanical shear in the running reactor making them suitable for multiple reuses. The optimisation of various nanosupports process parameters, such as the enzyme type and selection of suitable immobilisation method may help lead to the development of an efficient enzyme reactor. This might in turn offer a potential platform for exploring other enzymes for the development of stable nanobiocatalytic systems, which could help to address global environmental issues by facilitating the production of green energy. The successful validation of the feasibility of nanobiocatalysis for biodiesel production represents the beginning of a new field of research. The economic hurdles inherent in viably scaling nanobiocatalysts from a lab-scale to industrial biodiesel production are also discussed.

  9. Stabilisation of composite LSFCO-CGO based anodes for methane oxidation in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, A.; Kopnin, E.; Dubitsky, Y.; Zaopo, A.; Aricò, A. S.; Gullo, L. R.; Rosa, D. La; Antonucci, V.

    A La 0.6Sr 0.4Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3-Ce 0.8Gd 0.2O 1.9 (LSFCO-CGO) composite anode material was investigated for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methane in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). A maximum power density of 0.17 W cm -2 at 800 °C was obtained with a methane-fed ceria electrolyte-supported SOFC. A progressive increase of performance was recorded during 140 h operation with dry methane. The anode did not show any structure degradation after the electrochemical testing. Furthermore, no formation of carbon deposits was detected by electron microscopy and elemental analysis. Alternatively, this perovskite material showed significant chemical and structural modifications after high temperature treatment in a dry methane stream in a packed-bed reactor. It is derived that the continuous supply of mobile oxygen anions from the electrolyte to the LSFCO anode, promoted by the mixed conductivity of CGO electrolyte at 800 °C, stabilises the perovskite structure near the surface under SOFC operation and open circuit conditions.

  10. Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs): High density polyethylene and hydrocarbon waxes

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Mulan E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk; Basheer, P. A. M. E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk; Bai, Yun; McNally, Tony

    2014-05-15

    Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE) with high (HPW, T{sub m}=56-58 °C) and low (L-PW, T{sub m}=18-23 °C) melting point waxes were prepared by melt-mixing in a twin-screw extruder and their potential in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications for housing assessed. The structure and morphology of these blends were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both H-PW and L-PW were uniformly distributed throughout the HDPE matrix. The melting point and latent heat of the SSPCMs were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results demonstrated that both H-PW and L-PW have a plasticisation effect on the HDPE matrix. The tensile and flexural properties of the samples were measured at room temperature (RT, 20±2 °C) and 70 °C, respectively. All mechanical properties of HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends decreased from RT to 70 °C. In all instances at RT, modulus and stress, irrespective of the mode of deformation was greater for the HDPE/H-PW blends. However, at 70 °C, there was no significant difference in mechanical properties between the HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends.

  11. Stabilisation of phytosterols by natural and synthetic antioxidants in high temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Kmiecik, Dominik; Korczak, Józef; Rudzińska, Magdalena; Gramza-Michałowska, Anna; Hęś, Marzanna; Kobus-Cisowska, Joanna

    2015-04-15

    The aim of the study was to assess the potential applicability of natural antioxidants in the stabilisation of phytosterols. A mixture of β-sitosterol and campesterol was incorporated into triacylglycerols (TAGs). The following antioxidants were added to the prepared matrix: green tea extract, rosemary extract, a mix of tocopherols from rapeseed oil, a mix of synthetic tocopherols, phenolic compounds extracted from rapeseed meal, sinapic acid and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Samples were heated at a temperature of 180 °C for 4 h. After the completion of heating, the losses of phytosterols were analysed, as well as the contents of β-sitosterol and campesterol oxidation products. The total content of phytosterol oxidation products in samples ranged from 96.69 to 268.35 μg/g of oil. The effectiveness of antioxidants decreased in the following order: phenolic compounds from rapeseed meal>rosemary extract>mix of tocopherols from rapeseed oil>mix of synthetic tocopherols>green tea extract>sinapic acid>BHT.

  12. Preparation and characterisation of hydroxide stabilised ZnO(0001)-Zn-OH surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valtiner, Markus; Borodin, Sergiy; Grundmeier, Guido

    2007-05-21

    Two different approaches under ambient conditions were developed for the preparation of clean, non-reconstructed, single crystalline ZnO(0001)-Zn surfaces. The surface preparation by a wet chemical etching procedure was compared with the same treatment in combination with a subsequent heat treatment in humidified oxygen atmosphere. Depending on the preparation technique, atomically flat terraces with a width of 100 nm to several micrometers were observed using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The obtained surface structures were further characterized by means of angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements. Based on these results it is shown that the obtained surfaces are, in contrast to surfaces prepared under UHV conditions, stabilised by the adsorption of a monolayer of hydroxides. The important role of H(2)O during the heat treatment is pointed out by comparing the results of the same heat treatment in the absence of water. H(2)O turned out to play an important role in the reorganization process of the surface at elevated temperatures, thereby yielding extremely large atomically flat terraces. The terminating edges of these terraces were found to include 120 degrees and 60 degrees angles, thus perfectly reflecting the hexagonal surface structure.

  13. Microstructural evolution of viscoelastic emulsions stabilised by sodium caseinate and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Moschakis, Thomas; Murray, Brent S; Dickinson, Eric

    2005-04-15

    The time-dependent evolution of the phase-separated microstructure of a caseinate-stabilised emulsion containing xanthan gum added before emulsification has been investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy, image analysis and rheology. Moderately low levels of xanthan addition lead to depletion flocculation and gravity-induced phase separation. Increasing the polysaccharide concentration causes immobilisation of the microstructure due to an increase in the local viscoelasticity: that is, the emulsion structure cannot easily rearrange to expel xanthan-enriched aqueous serum phase because a weak gel-like network is generated. The effect of xanthan on the evolving microstructure of phase-separated regions, which reflects indirectly the local emulsion micro-rheology, has been estimated from image analysis of time sequences of confocal micrographs. A comparison has been made between object shape analysis using four different shape descriptors. The roundness parameter has been found to be a convenient descriptor for reliably quantifying the structural change in terms of the relaxation rate of xanthan-rich aqueous drops. The Taylor parameter has been used to link the kinetics of drop relaxation to the time-dependent small-deformation rheological behaviour. The analysis of the combined experimental data reveals the difficulty of relating the evolving microstructure to bulk rheological measurements.

  14. Luxury uptake of phosphorus by microalgae in full-scale waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    Powell, N; Shilton, A; Pratt, S; Chisti, Y

    2011-01-01

    Biological phosphorus removal was studied in two full-scale waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). Luxury uptake by microalgae was confirmed to occur and in one pond the biomass contained almost four times the phosphorus required by microalgae for normal metabolism. However, the phosphorus content within the biomass was variable. This finding means that assumptions made in prior publications on modelling of phosphorus removal in WSP are questionable. While fluctuations in microalgal growth causes variation in many water quality parameters, this further variation in luxury uptake explains the high degree of variability in phosphorus removal commonly reported in the literature. To achieve effective biological phosphorus removal high levels of both luxury uptake and microalgal concentration are needed. The findings of this work show that while high levels of these parameters did occur at times in the WSP monitored, they did not occur simultaneously. This is explained because accumulated phosphorus is subsequently consumed during rapid growth of biomass resulting in a high biomass concentration with a low phosphorus content. Previous laboratory research has allowed a number of key considerations to be proposed to optimise both luxury uptake and biomass concentration. Now that is has been shown that high levels of biomass concentration and luxury uptake can occur in the field it may be possible to redesign WSP to optimise these parameters.

  15. Thermal annealing behaviour and defect evolution of helium in fully stabilised zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damen, P. M. G.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Schut, H.; van Huis, M. A.

    2003-06-01

    Helium implantations in fully stabilised zirconia have been performed with 30 keV ions with high doses (5.1 × 10 16 and 2.6 × 10 16 cm -2) and low doses (6.3 × 10 15 and 1.7 × 10 15 cm -2). The retained amount of helium and depth profiles have been monitored with neutron depth profiling and the damage distribution with positron beam analysis (PBA) after several annealing steps. The temperature dependent helium release was investigated by thermal helium desorption spectrometry. In the low dose samples, helium is released through diffusion as seen by a broadening of the helium distribution peak. PBA, performed with a two-layer model, shows shrinkage of the damage layer during annealing. For the high dose samples the helium peak does not broaden after annealing. Helium is retained up to high temperatures which is ascribed to bubble formation during thermal annealing. Fitting of the PBA results to a three-layer model shows that the ion implanted layer gets narrower after annealing at 600 K, up to 1000 K the S-parameter is increasing because helium is released from the bubbles, whereby vacancy clusters are left behind.

  16. Management of sleep-time masticatory muscle activity using stabilisation splints affects psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, H; Masaki, C; Makino, M; Yoshida, M; Mukaibo, T; Kondo, Y; Nakamoto, T; Hosokawa, R

    2013-12-01

    To treat sleep bruxism (SB), symptomatic therapy using stabilisation splints (SS) is frequently used. However, their effects on psychological stress and sleep quality have not yet been examined fully. The objective of this study was to clarify the effects of SS use on psychological stress and sleep quality. The subjects (11 men, 12 women) were healthy volunteers. A crossover design was used. Sleep measurements were performed for three consecutive days or longer without (baseline) or with an SS or palatal splint (PS), and data for the final day were evaluated. We measured masseter muscle activity during sleep using portable electromyography to evaluate SB. Furthermore, to compare psychological stress before and after sleep, assessments were made based on STAI-JYZ and the measurement of salivary chromogranin A. To compare each parameter among the three groups (baseline, SS and PS), Friedman's and Dunn's tests were used. From the results of the baseline measurements, eight subjects were identified as high group and 15 as low group. Among the high group, a marked decrease in the number of bruxism events per hour and an increase in the difference in the total STAI Y-1 scores were observed in the SS group compared with those at baseline (P < 0·05). No significant difference was observed in sleep stages. SS use may be effective in reducing the number of SB events, while it may increase psychological stress levels, and SS use did not apparently influence sleep stages.

  17. UV-Enhanced Sacrificial Layer Stabilised Graphene Oxide Hollow Fibre Membranes for Nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Chong, J Y; Aba, N F D; Wang, B; Mattevi, C; Li, K

    2015-11-03

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have demonstrated great potential in gas separation and liquid filtration. For upscale applications, GO membranes in a hollow fibre geometry are of particular interest due to the high-efficiency and easy-assembly features at module level. However, GO membranes were found unstable in dry state on ceramic hollow fibre substrates, mainly due to the drying-related shrinkage, which has limited the applications and post-treatments of GO membranes. We demonstrate here that GO hollow fibre membranes can be stabilised by using a porous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sacrificial layer, which creates a space between the hollow fibre substrate and the GO membrane thus allowing stress-free shrinkage. Defect-free GO hollow fibre membrane was successfully determined and the membrane was stable in a long term (1200 hours) gas-tight stability test. Post-treatment of the GO membranes with UV light was also successfully accomplished in air, which induced the creation of controlled microstructural defects in the membrane and increased the roughness factor of the membrane surface. The permeability of the UV-treated GO membranes was greatly enhanced from 0.07 to 2.8 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for water, and 0.14 to 7.5 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) for acetone, with an unchanged low molecular weight cut off (~250 Da).

  18. Aqueous stabilisation of carbon-encapsulated superparamagnetic α-iron nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Aguiló-Aguayo, Noemí; Maurizi, Lionel; Galmarini, Sandra; Ollivier-Beuzelin, Marie Gabrielle; Coullerez, Géraldine; Bertran, Enric; Hofmann, Heinrich

    2014-09-28

    Carbon-based nanomaterials, such as carbon-encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles (CEMNP, core@shell), show a wide range of desirable properties for applications in the biomedical field (clinical MRI, hyperthermia), for energy production and storage (hydrogen storage), for the improvement of electronic components and for environmental applications (water-treatment). However, this kind of nanoparticle tends to aggregate in water suspensions. This often hampers the processability of the suspensions and presents an obstacle to their application in many fields. Here the stabilisation of core-shell Fe-C nanoparticles by surface adsorbed polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA) is presented. Different PVA/CEMNP mass ratios (9, 36, 144 and 576 w/w) were studied. Several characterisation techniques were used in order to determine the size distribution of the particles and to optimize the PVA/CEMNP ratio. A good colloidal stability was obtained for spherical nanoparticles about 50 nm in diameter containing several superparamagnetic Fe cores. The nanoparticles were found to be isolated and well dispersed in solution. The use of PVA for coating carbon-encapsulated Fe nanoparticles does not only result in a good colloidal stability in aqueous suspensions, but the resulting particles also show low cytotoxicity and an interesting cell internalization behaviour. The simple stabilization method developed here can likely be extended to other core@shell nanoparticle systems as well as other carbon-based nanomaterials in the future.

  19. Metal concentrations in lime stabilised, thermally dried and anaerobically digested sewage sludges.

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; Fenton, O; Forrestal, P J; Danaher, M; Brennan, R B; Morrison, L

    2016-02-01

    Cognisant of the negative debate and public sentiment about the land application of treated sewage sludges ('biosolids'), it is important to characterise such wastes beyond current regulated parameters. Concerns may be warranted, as many priority metal pollutants may be present in biosolids. This study represents the first time that extensive use was made of a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyser to characterise metals in sludges, having undergone treatment by thermal drying, lime stabilisation, or anaerobic digestion, in 16 wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Ireland. The concentrations of metals, expressed as mgkg(-1) dry solids (DS), which are currently regulated in the European Union, ranged from 11 (cadmium, anaerobically digested (AD) biosolids) to 1273mgkg(-1) (zinc, AD biosolids), and with the exception of lead in one WWTP (which had a concentration of 3696mgkg(-1)), all metals were within EU regulatory limits. Two potentially hazardous metals, antimony (Sb) and tin (Sn), for which no legislation currently exists, were much higher than their baseline concentrations in soils (17-20mgSbkg(-1) and 23-55mgSnkg(-1)), meaning that potentially large amounts of these elements may be applied to the soil without regulation. This study recommends that the regulations governing the values for metal concentrations in sludges for reuse in agriculture are extended to include Sb and Sn.

  20. UV-Enhanced Sacrificial Layer Stabilised Graphene Oxide Hollow Fibre Membranes for Nanofiltration

    PubMed Central

    Chong, J. Y.; Aba, N. F. D.; Wang, B.; Mattevi, C.; Li, K.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have demonstrated great potential in gas separation and liquid filtration. For upscale applications, GO membranes in a hollow fibre geometry are of particular interest due to the high-efficiency and easy-assembly features at module level. However, GO membranes were found unstable in dry state on ceramic hollow fibre substrates, mainly due to the drying-related shrinkage, which has limited the applications and post-treatments of GO membranes. We demonstrate here that GO hollow fibre membranes can be stabilised by using a porous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sacrificial layer, which creates a space between the hollow fibre substrate and the GO membrane thus allowing stress-free shrinkage. Defect-free GO hollow fibre membrane was successfully determined and the membrane was stable in a long term (1200 hours) gas-tight stability test. Post-treatment of the GO membranes with UV light was also successfully accomplished in air, which induced the creation of controlled microstructural defects in the membrane and increased the roughness factor of the membrane surface. The permeability of the UV-treated GO membranes was greatly enhanced from 0.07 to 2.8 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 for water, and 0.14 to 7.5 L m−2 h−1 bar−1 for acetone, with an unchanged low molecular weight cut off (~250 Da). PMID:26527173

  1. Three strategies to stabilise nearly monodispersed silver nanoparticles in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Amadeus PZ; Blanco Bea, Duani; Civit, Sergi; Antoranz Contera, Sonia; Iglesias Cerveto, Alberto; Trigueros, Sonia

    2012-02-01

    Silver nanoparticles are extensively used due to their chemical and physical properties and promising applications in areas such as medicine and electronics. Controlled synthesis of silver nanoparticles remains a major challenge due to the difficulty in producing long-term stable particles of the same size and shape in aqueous solution. To address this problem, we examine three strategies to stabilise aqueous solutions of 15 nm citrate-reduced silver nanoparticles using organic polymeric capping, bimetallic core-shell and bimetallic alloying. Our results show that these strategies drastically improve nanoparticle stability by distinct mechanisms. Additionally, we report a new role of polymer functionalisation in preventing further uncontrolled nanoparticle growth. For bimetallic nanoparticles, we attribute the presence of a higher valence metal on the surface of the nanoparticle as one of the key factors for improving their long-term stability. Stable silver-based nanoparticles, free of organic solvents, will have great potential for accelerating further environmental and nanotoxicity studies. PACS: 81.07.-b; 81.16.Be; 82.70.Dd.

  2. Global adaptive stabilisation for nonlinear systems with unknown control directions and input disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Yongchao; Liu, Yungang

    2016-05-01

    This paper addresses the global adaptive stabilisation via switching and learning strategies for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. Remarkably, the systems in question simultaneously have unknown control directions, unknown input disturbance and unknown growth rate, which makes the problem in question challenging to solve and essentially different from those in the existing literature. To solve the problem, an adaptive scheme via switching and learning is proposed by skilfully integrating the techniques of backstepping design, adaptive learning and adaptive switching. One key point in the design scheme is the introduction of the learning mechanism, in order to compensate the unknown input disturbance, and the other one is the design of the switching mechanism, through tuning the design parameters online to deal with the unknown control directions, unknown bound and period of input disturbance and unknown growth rate. The designed controller guarantees that all the signals of the resulting closed-loop systems are bounded, and furthermore, the closed-loop system states globally converge to zero.

  3. Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs): High density polyethylene and hydrocarbon waxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Mulan; Basheer, P. A. M.; Bai, Yun; McNally, Tony

    2014-05-01

    Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE) with high (HPW, Tm=56-58 °C) and low (L-PW, Tm=18-23 °C) melting point waxes were prepared by melt-mixing in a twin-screw extruder and their potential in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications for housing assessed. The structure and morphology of these blends were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both H-PW and L-PW were uniformly distributed throughout the HDPE matrix. The melting point and latent heat of the SSPCMs were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results demonstrated that both H-PW and L-PW have a plasticisation effect on the HDPE matrix. The tensile and flexural properties of the samples were measured at room temperature (RT, 20±2 °C) and 70 °C, respectively. All mechanical properties of HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends decreased from RT to 70 °C. In all instances at RT, modulus and stress, irrespective of the mode of deformation was greater for the HDPE/H-PW blends. However, at 70 °C, there was no significant difference in mechanical properties between the HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends.

  4. An assessment of theoretical procedures for π-conjugation stabilisation energies in enones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li-Juan; Sarrami, Farzaneh; Karton, Amir; O'Reilly, Robert J.

    2015-06-01

    We introduce a representative database of 22 α,β- to β,γ-enecarbonyl isomerisation energies (to be known as the EIE22 data-set). Accurate reaction energies are obtained at the complete basis-set limit CCSD(T) level by means of the high-level W1-F12 thermochemical protocol. The isomerisation reactions involve a migration of one double bond that breaks the conjugated π-system. The considered enecarbonyls involve a range of common functional groups (e.g., Me, NH2, OMe, F, and CN). Apart from π-conjugation effects, the chemical environments are largely conserved on the two sides of the reactions and therefore the EIE22 data-set allows us to assess the performance of a variety of density functional theory (DFT) procedures for the calculation of π-conjugation stabilisation energies in enecarbonyls. We find that, with few exceptions (M05-2X, M06-2X, BMK, and BH&HLYP), all the conventional DFT procedures attain root mean square deviations (RMSDs) between 5.0 and 11.7 kJ mol-1. The range-separated and double-hybrid DFT procedures, on the other hand, show good performance with RMSDs below the 'chemical accuracy' threshold. We also examine the performance of composite and standard ab initio procedures. Of these, SCS-MP2 offers the best performance-to-computational cost ratio with an RMSD of 0.8 kJ mol-1.

  5. UV-Enhanced Sacrificial Layer Stabilised Graphene Oxide Hollow Fibre Membranes for Nanofiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, J. Y.; Aba, N. F. D.; Wang, B.; Mattevi, C.; Li, K.

    2015-11-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) membranes have demonstrated great potential in gas separation and liquid filtration. For upscale applications, GO membranes in a hollow fibre geometry are of particular interest due to the high-efficiency and easy-assembly features at module level. However, GO membranes were found unstable in dry state on ceramic hollow fibre substrates, mainly due to the drying-related shrinkage, which has limited the applications and post-treatments of GO membranes. We demonstrate here that GO hollow fibre membranes can be stabilised by using a porous poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) sacrificial layer, which creates a space between the hollow fibre substrate and the GO membrane thus allowing stress-free shrinkage. Defect-free GO hollow fibre membrane was successfully determined and the membrane was stable in a long term (1200 hours) gas-tight stability test. Post-treatment of the GO membranes with UV light was also successfully accomplished in air, which induced the creation of controlled microstructural defects in the membrane and increased the roughness factor of the membrane surface. The permeability of the UV-treated GO membranes was greatly enhanced from 0.07 to 2.8 L m-2 h-1 bar-1 for water, and 0.14 to 7.5 L m-2 h-1 bar-1 for acetone, with an unchanged low molecular weight cut off (~250 Da).

  6. Performance evaluation of the bioreactor landfill in treatment and stabilisation of mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Lakshmikanthan, P; Sivakumar Babu, G L

    2017-03-01

    The potential of bioreactor landfills to treat mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste is analysed in this study. Developing countries like India and China have begun to investigate bioreactor landfills for municipal solid waste management. This article describes the impacts of leachate recirculation on waste stabilisation, landfill gas generation, leachate characteristics and long-term waste settlement. A small-scale and large-scale anaerobic cell were filled with mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste collected from a landfill site at the outskirts of Bangalore, India. Leachate collected from the same landfill site was recirculated at the rate of 2-5 times a month on a regular basis for 370 days. The total quantity of gas generated was around 416 L in the large-scale reactor and 21 L in the small-scale reactor, respectively. Differential settlements ranging from 20%-26% were observed at two different locations in the large reactor, whereas 30% of settlement was observed in the small reactor. The biological oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand (COD) ratio indicated that the waste in the large reactor was stabilised at the end of 1 year. The performance of the bioreactor with respect to the reactor size, temperature, landfill gas and leachate quality was analysed and it was found that the bioreactor landfill is efficient in the treatment and stabilising of mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste.

  7. Three-year performance of in-situ mass stabilised contaminated site soils using MgO-bearing binders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Jin, Fei; Shen, Zhengtao; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2016-11-15

    This paper provides physical and chemical performances of mass stabilised organic and inorganic contaminated site soils using a new group of MgO-bearing binders over 3 years and evaluated the time-dependent performance during the 3 years. This study took place at a contaminated site in Castleford, UK in 2011, where MgO, ground granulated blastfurnace slag (GGBS) and Portland cement (PC) were mixed with the contaminated soils in a dry form using the ALLU mass mixing equipment. Soil cores were retrieved 40-day, 1-year and 3-year after the treatment. The core quality, strength, and the leaching properties were determined via physical observation, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and batch leaching tests. After 3-year treatment, the UCS values of ALLU mixes were in the range of 50-250kPa; the leachate concentrations of Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn (except Ni) in all mixes were lower than their drinking water standards; and the leachability of total organics was in the range of 10-105mg/L. No apparent degradation of the mass stabilised materials after 3 years' exposure to the field conditions was found. MgO-GGBS blends were found able to provide higher strength and less leachability of contaminants compared to PC and MgO-only mixes in mass stabilised soils.

  8. Complexation of bovine serum albumin and sugar beet pectin: stabilising oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyang; Fang, Yapeng; Al-Assaf, Saphwan; Phillips, Glyn O; Jiang, Fatang

    2012-12-15

    In a previous study (Langmuir 28 (2012) 10164-10176.), we investigated the complexation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with sugar beet pectin (SBP). A pH-composition phase diagram was established and structural transitions in relation to the phase diagram during complexation were identified. The present study examines the implications of these interactions on the emulsifying performance of BSA/SBP mixtures. Middle-chain triglycerides (MCTs) in water emulsions were prepared using conditions corresponding to different regions of the phase diagram. At high pHs and in the stable region of mixed individual soluble polymers where complexation is absent, there is no improved emulsifying performance, compared with the individual protein and polysaccharide. For these mixtures, the emulsion characteristics are controlled by the major component in the solutions, as determined by the competitive adsorption of the two components at the oil-water interface. At low pHs and low BSA/SBP ratios, and so mainly within the stable region of intramolecular soluble complexes, BSA/SBP mixtures greatly improve the stability of emulsions. Here, stabilisation is controlled by the cooperative adsorption of the two components at the oil-water interface. Through electrostatic complexation BSA promotes the adsorption of SBP on to interfaces to form a thick steric layer around emulsion droplets and thus providing better stability. At low pHs and high BSA/SBP ratios, that is, mainly within the unstable region of intermolecular insoluble complexes, emulsions prepared are extremely unstable due to bridging flocculation between emulsion droplets.

  9. Long-term olfactory memories are stabilised via protein synthesis in Camponotus fellah ants.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, Fernando J; d'Ettorre, Patrizia; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Giurfa, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Ants exhibit impressive olfactory learning abilities. Operant protocols in which ants freely choose between rewarded and non-rewarded odours have been used to characterise associative olfactory learning and memory. Yet, this approach precludes the use of invasive methods allowing the dissection of molecular bases of learning and memory. An open question is whether the memories formed upon olfactory learning that are retrievable several days after training are indeed based on de novo protein synthesis. Here, we addressed this question in the ant Camponotus fellah using a conditioning protocol in which individually harnessed ants learn an association between odour and reward. When the antennae of an ant are stimulated with sucrose solution, the insect extends its maxilla-labium to absorb the solution (maxilla-labium extension response). We differentially conditioned ants to discriminate between two long-chain hydrocarbons, one paired with sucrose and the other with quinine solution. Differential conditioning leads to the formation of a long-term memory retrievable at least 72 h after training. Long-term memory consolidation was impaired by the ingestion of cycloheximide, a protein synthesis blocker, prior to conditioning. Cycloheximide did not impair acquisition of either short-term memory (10 min) or early and late mid-term memories (1 or 12 h). These results show that, upon olfactory learning, ants form different memories with variable molecular bases. While short- and mid-term memories do not require protein synthesis, long-term memories are stabilised via protein synthesis. Our behavioural protocol opens interesting research avenues to explore the cellular and molecular bases of olfactory learning and memory in ants.

  10. Calculations of single crystal elastic constants for yttria partially stabilised zirconia from powder diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Lunt, A. J. G. Xie, M. Y.; Baimpas, N.; Korsunsky, A. M.; Zhang, S. Y.; Kabra, S.; Kelleher, J.; Neo, T. K.

    2014-08-07

    Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) is a tough, phase-transforming ceramic that finds use in a wide range of commercial applications from dental prostheses to thermal barrier coatings. Micromechanical modelling of phase transformation can deliver reliable predictions in terms of the influence of temperature and stress. However, models must rely on the accurate knowledge of single crystal elastic stiffness constants. Some techniques for elastic stiffness determination are well-established. The most popular of these involve exploiting frequency shifts and phase velocities of acoustic waves. However, the application of these techniques to YSZ can be problematic due to the micro-twinning observed in larger crystals. Here, we propose an alternative approach based on selective elastic strain sampling (e.g., by diffraction) of grain ensembles sharing certain orientation, and the prediction of the same quantities by polycrystalline modelling, for example, the Reuss or Voigt average. The inverse problem arises consisting of adjusting the single crystal stiffness matrix to match the polycrystal predictions to observations. In the present model-matching study, we sought to determine the single crystal stiffness matrix of tetragonal YSZ using the results of time-of-flight neutron diffraction obtained from an in situ compression experiment and Finite Element modelling of the deformation of polycrystalline tetragonal YSZ. The best match between the model predictions and observations was obtained for the optimized stiffness values of C11 = 451, C33 = 302, C44 = 39, C66 = 82, C12 = 240, and C13 = 50 (units: GPa). Considering the significant amount of scatter in the published literature data, our result appears reasonably consistent.

  11. A stabilised nodal spectral element method for fully nonlinear water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engsig-Karup, A. P.; Eskilsson, C.; Bigoni, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present an arbitrary-order spectral element method for general-purpose simulation of non-overturning water waves, described by fully nonlinear potential theory. The method can be viewed as a high-order extension of the classical finite element method proposed by Cai et al. (1998) [5], although the numerical implementation differs greatly. Features of the proposed spectral element method include: nodal Lagrange basis functions, a general quadrature-free approach and gradient recovery using global L2 projections. The quartic nonlinear terms present in the Zakharov form of the free surface conditions can cause severe aliasing problems and consequently numerical instability for marginally resolved or very steep waves. We show how the scheme can be stabilised through a combination of over-integration of the Galerkin projections and a mild spectral filtering on a per element basis. This effectively removes any aliasing driven instabilities while retaining the high-order accuracy of the numerical scheme. The additional computational cost of the over-integration is found insignificant compared to the cost of solving the Laplace problem. The model is applied to several benchmark cases in two dimensions. The results confirm the high order accuracy of the model (exponential convergence), and demonstrate the potential for accuracy and speedup. The results of numerical experiments are in excellent agreement with both analytical and experimental results for strongly nonlinear and irregular dispersive wave propagation. The benefit of using a high-order - possibly adapted - spatial discretisation for accurate water wave propagation over long times and distances is particularly attractive for marine hydrodynamics applications.

  12. Ecosystem function in waste stabilisation ponds: Improving water quality through a better understanding of biophysical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadouani, Anas; Reichwaldt, Elke S.; Coggins, Liah X.; Ivey, Gregory N.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Zhou, Wenxu; Laurion, Isabelle; Chua, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Wastewater stabilisation ponds (WSPs) are highly productive systems designed to treat wastewater using only natural biological and chemical processes. Phytoplankton, microbial communities and hydraulics play important roles for ecosystem functionality of these pond systems. Although WSPs have been used for many decades, they are still considered as 'black box' systems as very little is known about the fundamental ecological processes which occur within them. However, a better understanding of how these highly productive ecosystems function is particularly important for hydrological processes, as treated wastewater is commonly discharged into streams, rivers, and oceans, and subject to strict water quality guidelines. WSPs are known to operate at different levels of efficiency, and treatment efficiency of WSPs is dependent on physical (flow characteristics and sludge accumulation and distribution) and biological (microbial and phytoplankton communities) characteristics. Thus, it is important to gain a better understanding of the role and influence of pond hydraulics and vital microbial communities on pond performance and WSP functional stability. The main aim of this study is to investigate the processes leading to differences in treatment performance of WSPs. This study uses a novel and innovative approach to understand these factors by combining flow cytometry and metabolomics to investigate various biochemical characteristics, including the metabolite composition and microbial community within WSPs. The results of these analyses will then be combined with results from the characterisation of pond hydrodynamics and hydraulic performance, which will be performed using advanced hydrodynamic modelling and advanced sludge profiling technology. By understanding how hydrodynamic and biological processes influence each other and ecosystem function and stability in WSPs, we will be able to propose ways to improve the quality of the treatment using natural processes, with

  13. Soil stabilisation using AMD sludge, compost and lignite: TCLP leachability and continuous acid leaching.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A; Yip, Alex C K

    2013-11-01

    Utilising locally available industrial by-products for in situ metal stabilisation presents a low-cost remediation approach for contaminated soil. This study explored the potential use of inorganic (acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge and zero-valent iron) and carbonaceous materials (green waste compost, manure compost, and lignite) for minimising the environmental risks of As and Cu at a timber treatment site. After 9-month soil incubation, significant sequestration of As and Cu in soil solution was accomplished by AMD sludge, on which adsorption and co-precipitation could take place. The efficacy of AMD sludge was comparable to that of zero-valent iron. There was marginal benefit of adding carbonaceous materials. However, in a moderately aggressive environment (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure), AMD sludge only suppressed the leachability of As but not Cu. Therefore, the provision of compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of Cu leachability, probably via surface complexation with oxygen-containing functional groups. Under continuous acid leaching in column experiments, combined application of AMD sludge with compost proved more effective than AMD sludge with lignite. This was possibly attributed to the larger amount of dissolved organic matter with aromatic moieties from lignite, which may enhance Cu and As mobility. Nevertheless, care should be taken to mitigate ecological impact associated with short-term substantial Ca release and continuous release of Al at a moderate level under acid leaching. This study also articulated the engineering implications and provided recommendations for field deployment, material processing, and assessment framework to ensure an environmentally sound application of reactive materials.

  14. Acetabular Fractures in the Elderly: Midterm Outcomes of Column Stabilisation and Primary Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Briones, A.; Smith, S.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Interest in arthroplasty techniques for periarticular or intra-articular fractures in the elderly/osteoporotic patient continues to rise, including for geriatric acetabular fractures. In line with this, many acetabular fracture surgeons are now undertaking acute total hip arthroplasty in elderly/osteoporotic patients. Little is known however of the outcomes of this procedure, beyond the first year after surgery. Questions/Purposes. We determined the clinical outcomes of a series of elderly osteoporotic patients (mean age at surgery 77.4 years) treated for acetabular fractures with column fixation and simultaneous total hip arthroplasty, at a mean of 49 months after surgery. Methods. 24 patients (25 hips) were reviewed at a mean of 49 months after surgery. The surgical technique employed has previously been described. Radiographs were obtained, and clinical outcomes were assessed using Harris Hip Scores and the Merle d'Aubigné score. Results. 14 hips were available for assessment (9 deceased, 2 lost to follow-up). No patient suffered any complications beyond the perioperative period, no acetabular components were loose clinically or on latest radiographs, and the mean Harris Hip Score was 92. All but one patient scored good or excellent on the Merle d'Aubigné score. Conclusions. Column fixation and simultaneous total hip arthroplasty are a viable option for complex geriatric acetabular fractures, with encouraging midterm results. We conclude that THR is a viable long-term solution in this situation provided that the acetabular columns are stabilised prior to implantation, but more research is needed to aid in overall management decision making. PMID:28194414

  15. Electromyographic response of global abdominal stabilisers in response to stable- and unstable-base isometric exercise.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Stephen

    2014-12-24

    Core stability training traditionally uses stable base techniques. Less is known as to the use of unstable base techniques, such as suspension training, to activate core musculature. This study sought to assess the neuromuscular activation of global core stabilisers when using suspension training techniques, compared to more traditional forms of isometric exercise. Eighteen elite level, male youth swimmers (Age 15.5yrs ± 2.3yrs; Stature - 163.3cm ± 12.7cm; Body Mass 62.2kg ± 11.9 kg) participated in the current study. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was used to determine the rate of muscle contraction in postural musculature, associated with core stability and torso bracing (rectus abdominus-RA, external oblique's-EO, erector spinae-ES). A maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) test was used to determine peak amplitude for all muscles. Static bracing of the core was achieved using a modified 'plank' position, with and without a Swiss ball, and held for 30 seconds. A mechanically similar 'plank' was then held using suspension straps. Analysis of sEMG revealed that suspension produced higher peak amplitude in the RA than using a prone or Swiss Ball 'plank' (p=0.04). This difference was not replicated in either the EO or ES musculature. We conclude that suspension training noticeably improves engagement of anterior core musculature when compared to both lateral and posterior muscles. Further research is required to determine how best to activate both posterior and lateral musculature when using all forms of core stability training.

  16. Reducing the mobility of arsenic in brownfield soil using stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gil-Díaz, Mar; Alonso, Juan; Rodríguez-Valdés, Eduardo; Pinilla, Paloma; Lobo, Maria Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) as a new tool for the treatment of polluted soils and groundwater has received considerable attention in recent years due to its high reactivity, in situ application and cost-effectiveness. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of using a commercial stabilised suspension of nZVI to immobilise As in brownfield soil and to investigate its impact on Fe availability in the treated soil. The phytotoxicities of the soil samples were also evaluated using a germination test with two plant species: barley (Hordeum vulgare L) and common vetch (Vicia sativa L). Two doses of the commercial nZVI suspension were studied, 1% and 10%, and two soil-nanoparticle interaction times, 72 h and 3 mo, were used to compare the stabilities of the soils treated with nZVI. The As availability was evaluated using a sequential extraction procedure and the toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) test. The application of nZVI significantly decreased the availability of As in the soil. The immobilisation of As was more effective and more stable over time with the 10% dose than with the 1% dose of the commercial nZVI suspension. The application of nZVI did not induce an important increase in Fe mobility because the Fe leachability was less than 2 mg L(-1) over the time period studied. The lower availability of As in the soil led to a decrease in the phytotoxicity of the soil to barley and vetch germination. Thus, the proposed nanotechnology could be a potential alternative for the in situ remediation of As-polluted soils and could be combined with remediation processes where plants are involved.

  17. Solidification/stabilisation of electric arc furnace waste using low grade MgO.

    PubMed

    Cubukcuoglu, B; Ouki, S K

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate the potential of low grade MgO (LGMgO) for the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) of heavy metals in steel electric arc furnace wastes. Relevant characteristics such as setting time, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and leaching behaviour assessed by acid neutralisation capacity (ANC), monolithic and granular leaching tests were examined in light of the UK landfill Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for disposal. The results demonstrated that all studied mix designs with Portland cement type 1 (CEM1) and LGMgO, CEM1-LGMgO 1:2 and 1:4 at 40% and 70% waste addition met the WAC requirements by means of UCS, initial and final setting times and consistence. Most of the ANC results met the WAC limits where the threshold pH values without acid additions were stable and between 11.9 and 12.2 at 28d. Granular leaching results indicate fixation of most of the metals at all mix ratios. An optimum ratio was obtained at CEM1-LGMgO 1:4 at 40% waste additions where none of the metals leaching exceeded the WAC limits and hence may be considered for landfill disposal. The monolithic leaching test results showed that LGMgO performed satisfactorily with respect to S/S of Zn, as the metal component present at the highest concentration level in the waste exhibited very little leaching and passed the leaching test requirement at all mix ratios studied. However, its performance with respect to Pb, Cd and Cr was less effective in reducing their leaching suggesting a higher cumulative rate under those leaching regimes.

  18. Amphiphilic brush polymers produced using the RAFT polymerisation method stabilise and reduce the cell cytotoxicity of lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jiali; Suryadinata, Randy; Luan, Bao; Tran, Nhiem; Hinton, Tracey M; Ratcliffe, Julian; Hao, Xiaojuan; Drummond, Calum J

    2016-10-06

    Self-assembled lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles such as hexosomes and cubosomes contain internal anisotropic and isotropic nanostructures, respectively. Despite the remarkable potential of such nanoparticles in various biomedical applications, the stabilisers used in formulating the nanoparticles are often limited to commercially available polymers such as the Pluronic block copolymers. This study explored the potential of using Reversible Addition-Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) technology to design amphiphilic brush-type polymers for the purpose of stabilising phytantriol and monoolein-based lipid dispersions. The synthesised brush-type polymers consisted of a hydrophobic C12 short chain and a hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether acrylate (PEGA) long chain with multiple 9-unit poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) brushes with various molecular weights. It was observed that increasing the PEO brush density and thus the length of the hydrophilic component improved the stabilisation effectiveness for phytantriol and monoolein-based cubosomes. Synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments confirmed that the RAFT polymer-stabilised cubosomes had an internal double-diamond cubic phase with tunable water channel sizes. These properties were dependent on the molecular weight of the polymers, which were considered in some cases to be anisotropically distributed within the cubosomes. The in vitro toxicity of the cubosomes was assessed by cell viability of two human adenocarcinoma cell lines and haemolytic activities to mouse erythrocytes. The results showed that phytantriol cubosomes stabilised by the RAFT polymers were less toxic compared to their Pluronic F127-stabilised analogues. This study provides valuable insight into designing non-linear amphiphilic polymers for the effective stabilisation and cellular toxicity improvement of self-assembled lipid lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles.

  19. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of as-synthesised N,N'-dimethylformamide-stabilised gold nanoclusters product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shunping; Paau, Man Chin; Zhang, Yan; Shuang, Shaomin; Chan, Wan; Choi, Martin M. F.

    2012-08-01

    Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) separation and analysis of polydisperse water-soluble gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) stabilised with N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF) were investigated. Under optimal elution gradient conditions, the separation of DMF-AuNCs was monitored by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The UV-vis spectral characteristics of the separated DMF-AuNCs have been captured and they do not possess distinct surface plasmon resonance bands, indicating that all DMF-AuNCs are small AuNCs. The photoluminescence emission spectra of the separated DMF-AuNCs are in the blue-light region. Moreover, cationic DMF-AuNCs are for the first time identified by ion chromatography. Our proposed RP-HPLC methodology has been successfully applied to separate AuNCs of various Au atoms as well as DMF-stabilised ligands. Finally, the composition of the separated DMF-AuNCs was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry and electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry, proving that the as-synthesised DMF-AuNCs product consists of Au10+, Au10, Au11, Au12, Au13, and Au14 NCs stabilised with various numbers of DMF ligands.Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) separation and analysis of polydisperse water-soluble gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) stabilised with N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF) were investigated. Under optimal elution gradient conditions, the separation of DMF-AuNCs was monitored by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. The UV-vis spectral characteristics of the separated DMF-AuNCs have been captured and they do not possess distinct surface plasmon resonance bands, indicating that all DMF-AuNCs are small AuNCs. The photoluminescence emission spectra of the separated DMF-AuNCs are in the blue-light region. Moreover, cationic DMF-AuNCs are for the first time identified by ion chromatography. Our proposed RP-HPLC methodology has been successfully applied to separate AuNCs of

  20. Local structure in solid solutions of stabilised zirconia with actinide dioxides (UO{sub 2}, NpO{sub 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Marcus; Somers, Joseph; Bouexiere, Daniel; Rothe, Joerg

    2011-04-15

    The local structure of (Zr,Lu,U)O{sub 2-x} and (Zr,Y,Np)O{sub 2-x} solid solutions has been investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Samples were prepared by mixing reactive (Zr,Lu)O{sub 2-x} and (Zr,Y)O{sub 2-x} precursor materials with the actinide oxide powders, respectively. Sintering at 1600 {sup o}C in Ar/H{sub 2} yields a fluorite structure with U(IV) and Np(IV). As typical for stabilised zirconia the metal-oxygen and metal-metal distances are characteristic for the different metal ions. The bond lengths increase with actinide concentration, whereas highest adaptation to the bulk stabilised zirconia structure was observed for U---O and Np---O bonds. The Zr---O bond shows only a slight increase from 2.14 A at 6 mol% actinide to 2.18 A at infinite dilution in UO{sub 2} and NpO{sub 2}. The short interatomic distance between Zr and the surrounding oxygen and metal atoms indicate a low relaxation of Zr with respect to the bulk structure, i.e. a strong Pauling behaviour. -- Graphical abstract: Metal-oxygen bond distances in (Zr,Lu,U)O{sub 2-x} solid solutions with different oxygen vacancy concentrations (Lu/Zr=1 and Lu/Zr=0.5). Display Omitted Research Highlights: {yields} EXAFS indicates high U and Np adaption to the bulk structure of stabilised zirconia. {yields} Zr---O bond length is 2.18 A at infinite Zr dilution in UO{sub 2} and NpO{sub 2}. {yields} Low relaxation (strong Pauling behaviour) of Zr explains its low solubility in UO{sub 2}.

  1. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments. PMID:22616934

  2. Erosion and stabilisation sequences in relation to base level changes in the El Cautivo badlands, SE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, R. W.; Calvo-Cases, A.; Arnau-Rosalén, E.; Mather, A. E.; Lázaro-Suau, R.

    2008-08-01

    The complex multiple-age badlands at El Cautivo are cut in upper Miocene marls of the uplifted and dissected Tabernas Basin, Almería, in semi-arid SE Spain. Previous work identified six episodes of erosion and subsequent stabilisation, with ages ranging from the late Pleistocene to the present day. This paper uses newly-acquired digital elevation models, orthorectified aerial photographs, and field survey data to illustrate the development sequence of a series of gullies which drain into the Rambla de Tabernas. Changing drainage directions and phases of incision and stabilisation are related to the filling and subsequent dissection of the Tabernas lower lake sediments, differential material strengths, changing process mixes on hillslopes and, in more recent times, land-use changes. We propose that the erosional phases differed considerably in both time-span and depth of incision. A long period of stability during the existence of the lake led to extensive pediment development in the area. Subsequent incision into the lake sediments by the Rambla de Tabernas produced a limited amount of localised pediment incision in the tributary catchment. Subsequent aggradation occurred in the lower reaches of gullies when incision by the Rambla de Tabernas reached the underlying bedrock. Following incision through the lip of the lake the Rambla de Tabernas cut rapidly into the bedrock leading to an altered drainage direction in the tributary catchments and the major phase of badland development visible today. Stabilisation of the pediments and some of the north-facing slopes occurred subsequently. Increased sediment loads, caused by climatic shift, a change in land use, or both, gave rise to a later phase of valley fill in the gullies. The modern channels have reduced this fill to isolated terrace benches and there are also localised remnants of a lower, more recent fill. Whilst supporting the general interpretation of the site's development by Alexander et al. [Alexander, R

  3. Electrically switchable polymer stabilised broadband infrared reflectors and their potential as smart windows for energy saving in buildings

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Hitesh; Loonen, Roel C. G. M.; Hensen, Jan L. M.; Debije, Michael G.; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Electrically switchable broadband infrared reflectors that are relatively transparent in the visible region have been fabricated using polymer stabilised cholesteric liquid crystals. The IR reflectors can change their reflection/transmission properties by applying a voltage in response to changes in environmental conditions. Simulations predict that a significant amount of energy can be saved on heating, cooling and lighting of buildings in places such as Madrid by using this switchable IR reflector. We have also fabricated a switchable IR reflector which can also generate electricity. These polymer based switchable IR reflectors are of high potential as windows of automobiles and buildings to control interior temperatures and save energy. PMID:26132328

  4. Electrically switchable polymer stabilised broadband infrared reflectors and their potential as smart windows for energy saving in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Hitesh; Loonen, Roel C. G. M.; Hensen, Jan L. M.; Debije, Michael G.; Schenning, Albertus P. H. J.

    2015-07-01

    Electrically switchable broadband infrared reflectors that are relatively transparent in the visible region have been fabricated using polymer stabilised cholesteric liquid crystals. The IR reflectors can change their reflection/transmission properties by applying a voltage in response to changes in environmental conditions. Simulations predict that a significant amount of energy can be saved on heating, cooling and lighting of buildings in places such as Madrid by using this switchable IR reflector. We have also fabricated a switchable IR reflector which can also generate electricity. These polymer based switchable IR reflectors are of high potential as windows of automobiles and buildings to control interior temperatures and save energy.

  5. Electrically switchable polymer stabilised broadband infrared reflectors and their potential as smart windows for energy saving in buildings.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Hitesh; Loonen, Roel C G M; Hensen, Jan L M; Debije, Michael G; Schenning, Albertus P H J

    2015-07-01

    Electrically switchable broadband infrared reflectors that are relatively transparent in the visible region have been fabricated using polymer stabilised cholesteric liquid crystals. The IR reflectors can change their reflection/transmission properties by applying a voltage in response to changes in environmental conditions. Simulations predict that a significant amount of energy can be saved on heating, cooling and lighting of buildings in places such as Madrid by using this switchable IR reflector. We have also fabricated a switchable IR reflector which can also generate electricity. These polymer based switchable IR reflectors are of high potential as windows of automobiles and buildings to control interior temperatures and save energy.

  6. Asymptotic stabilisation of the ball and beam system: design of energy-based control law and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Vijay; Anantharaman, S.; Mahindrakar, Arun D.

    2010-06-01

    We present a new nonlinear control law to stabilise the ball and beam system at a desired operating point. The control law is based on the interconnection and damping assignment-passivity-based control (IDA-PBC) methodology developed in Ortega, Spong, Gomez-Estern, and Blankenstien (Ortega, R., Spong, M., Gomez-Estern, F., and Blankenstien, G. (2002), 'Stabilization of Underactuated Mechanical Systems via Interconnection and Damping Assignment', IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 47, 1218-1233) that guarantees stability in the sense of Lyapunov. We present a novel proof of the asymptotic stability of the desired operating point. The validity of the proposed control law is demonstrated through the experimental results.

  7. Backstepping designs for the stabilisation of nonlinear sampled-data systems via approximate discrete-time model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Üstüntürk, Ahmet; Kocaoğlan, Erol

    2013-05-01

    The problems of backstepping, adaptive backstepping and reduced order observer based output feedback control of sampled-data nonlinear systems in strict feedback form are considered. Controller design methods based on the Euler approximate model are presented for these problems. The controllers are designed to compensate the effects of the discrepancy between the Euler approximate model and exact discrete time model, parameter estimation error in adaptive control and observer error in output feedback control, which behave as disturbance. It is shown that the obtained controllers semi-globally practically asymptotically stabilise the plant model under standard assumptions. Then numerical examples are given to illustrate the design methods.

  8. Embolisation of pheochromocytoma to stabilise and wean a patient in cardiogenic shock from emergency extracorporeal life support

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Thomas Morris; Elle, Bo; Jensen, Marianne Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a catecholamine-secreting tumour associated with varying symptoms ranging from episodic headache, sweating, paroxysmal hypertension and tachycardia to intractable cardiogenic shock. Cardiogenic shock is rare but well-described and the timing of correct management is crucial since mortality is high. Fifty per cent of pheochromocytomas are diagnosed on autopsy. We report on a case of embolisation of the adrenal artery during ongoing extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in order to stabilise and wean the patient from ECLS as a bridge to final surgery. PMID:25737217

  9. Ecotoxicity of chemically stabilised metal(loid)s in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2014-02-01

    Five chemical amendments (soft rock phosphate, lime, commercial phosphate amendment, red mud and magnesium oxide) were applied across four different shooting range soils to chemically stabilise metal(loid)s in the soils. Soils were contaminated with Pb between 2330 and 12,167 mg/kg, Sb from 7.4 to 325 mg/kg and soil pH ranged from 5.43 to 9.29. Amendments were tested for their ability to reduce the bioavailability of Pb, Sb, Zn, Ni, Cu and As in the soils to soil organisms after one year of aging, by measuring a series of ecotoxicological endpoints for earthworms and plants and soil microbial activity. Growth-based endpoints for earthworms and plants were not significantly affected by amendment addition, except in the most contaminated soil. Per cent survival and weight-loss reduction of earthworms was enhanced by amendment addition in only the most contaminated soil. Plant biomass and root elongation was not significantly affected by amendment addition (p=<0.05). Red mud and magnesium oxide appeared toxic to plants and earthworms, probably due to highly alkaline pH (9-12). Lead in soil organisms was relatively low despite the high concentrations of Pb in the soils, suggesting low bioavailability of Pb. Uptake of Pb by earthworms was reduced by between 40 and 96 per cent by amendments, but not across all soils. Amendments reduced Sb in earthworms in Townsville soil by up to 92 per cent. For lettuce the average uptake of Pb was reduced by 40 to 70 per cent with amendment addition in Townsville, Darwin and Perth soil. The effect of amendments on the uptake of Sb, Zn, Ni, Cu and As was variable between soils and amendments. Microbial activity was increased by greater than 50 per cent with amendments addition, with soft rock phosphate and lime being the most effective in Murray Bridge and TV soils and commercial phosphate and MgO being the most effective in Darwin and Perth soils.

  10. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  11. Failure of Polyethelene Insert Locking Mechanism after a Posterior Stabilised Total Knee Arthroplasty- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, AY Gurava; Rajan, D Soundar; Chiranjeevi, T; Karthik, C; Kiran, E Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Disengagement of polyethylene insert used in total knee arthroplasty is a rare but serious complication. Still rarer is disengagement because of failure of tibial insert locking mechanism. We report a previously unpublished complication of polyethylene insert locking mechanism failure in a 10-months-old posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty in a 70-year-old woman with osteoarthritis for whom Attune (Depuy) knee implant was used. Case Presentation: A 70-year-old female underwent (Attune, Depuy) primary bilateral posterior stabilised total knee arthroplasty in a private hospital. The patient did not have any complaints and had had been functioning well post her arthroplasty. After five months of surgery she had a fall and sustained injury over right hip which was treated with Cemented Bipolar Hemiarthroplasty. Ten months after index surgery, she sustained trivial fall and presented to the same hospital with knee pain and swelling, where the right knee prosthesis was found to be dislocated. An attempted closed reduction under anaesthesia failed, after which she was referred to our centre with an unstable, painful, swollen right knee in a long knee brace. The physical examination at the time of admission showed posterior sag of the tibia, fullness in the postero-lateral corner, quadriceps muscle atrophy without any neurovascular deficit oflower leg. Postero-lateral dislocation was confirmed with radiographs. Surgical error as a possible causative factor was excluded because patient had been functioning well after surgery. Her comorbidities included hypertension and hyponatremia. ESR and CRP were within normal limits. An open reduction surgery was planned. On exposure, polyethylene was found in the postero-lateral corner of the knee. We were not sure that revising the polyethylene alone would suffice as the poly and locking mechanism was of a relatively new design and hence it was decided to proceed with revision of the components. Revision was done

  12. Local curvature measurements of a lean, partially premixed swirl-stabilised flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayley, Alan E.; Hardalupas, Yannis; Taylor, Alex M. K. P.

    2012-04-01

    A swirl-stabilised, lean, partially premixed combustor operating at atmospheric conditions has been used to investigate the local curvature distributions in lifted, stable and thermoacoustically oscillating CH4-air partially premixed flames for bulk cold-flow Reynolds numbers of 15,000 and 23,000. Single-shot OH planar laser-induced fluorescence has been used to capture instantaneous images of these three different flame types. Use of binary thresholding to identify the reactant and product regions in the OH planar laser-induced fluorescence images, in order to extract accurate flame-front locations, is shown to be unsatisfactory for the examined flames. The Canny-Deriche edge detection filter has also been examined and is seen to still leave an unacceptable quantity of artificial flame-fronts. A novel approach has been developed for image analysis where a combination of a non-linear diffusion filter, Sobel gradient and threshold-based curve elimination routines have been used to extract traces of the flame-front to obtain local curvature distributions. A visual comparison of the effectiveness of flame-front identification is made between the novel approach, the threshold binarisation filter and the Canny-Deriche filter. The novel approach appears to most accurately identify the flame-fronts. Example histograms of the curvature for six flame conditions and of the total image area are presented and are found to have a broader range of local flame curvatures for increasing bulk Reynolds numbers. Significantly positive values of mean curvature and marginally positive values of skewness of the histogram have been measured for one lifted flame case, but this is generally accounted for by the effect of flame brush curvature. The mean local flame-front curvature reduces with increasing axial distance from the burner exit plane for all flame types. These changes are more pronounced in the lifted flames but are marginal for the thermoacoustically oscillating flames. It is

  13. Use of the AO veterinary mini 'T'-plate for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M H; Langley Hobbs, S J

    2005-01-01

    The use of the AO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen) veterinary mini 'T'-plate for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs was evaluated in a retrospective study. All of the 14 dogs in the study weighed 3.5 kg or less. The AO mini 'T'-plate was used as the final means of fixation in all cases. It was used as the primary form of stabilisation in ten dogs, and in four dogs it was used at revision surgery. In all cases, of the fractures healed. Return to function was graded 'as excellent' in six cases, 'good' in four and 'fair' in two. Two dogs were lost to long-term follow up. It was concluded that the AO veterinary mini 'T'-plate is a suitable choice of implant for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs, especially when the distal fragment is very small.

  14. Physicochemical properties of whey protein, lactoferrin and Tween 20 stabilised nanoemulsions: Effect of temperature, pH and salt.

    PubMed

    Teo, Anges; Goh, Kelvin K T; Wen, Jingyuan; Oey, Indrawati; Ko, Sanghoon; Kwak, Hae-Soo; Lee, Sung Je

    2016-04-15

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions were prepared by emulsification and solvent evaporation using whey protein isolate (WPI), lactoferrin and Tween 20 as emulsifiers. Protein-stabilised nanoemulsions showed a decrease in particle size with increasing protein concentration from 0.25% to 1% (w/w) level with Z-average diameter between 70 and 90 nm. However, larger droplets were produced by Tween 20 (120-450 nm) especially at concentration above 0.75% (w/w). The stability of nanoemulsions to temperature (30-90°C), pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-500 mM NaCl or 0-90 mM CaCl2) was also tested. Tween 20 nanoemulsions were unstable to heat treatment at 90°C for 15 min. WPI-stabilised nanoemulsions exhibited droplet aggregation near the isoelectric point at pH 4.5 and 5 and they were also unstable at salt concentration above 30 mM CaCl2. These results indicated that stable nanoemulsions can be prepared by careful selection of emulsifiers.

  15. Comparative antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesised by biological and chemical routes with pluronic F68 as a stabilising agent.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carolina Alves Dos; Seckler, Marcelo Martins; Ingle, Avinash P; Rai, Mahendra

    2016-08-01

    The authors report the comparative antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesised by biological (using Fusarium oxysporum) and chemical routes in the presence and absence of pluronic F68 as a stabilising agent. The production of silver nanoparticles was evidenced by UV-visible spectra, with absorbance at about 420 nm in the case of both biological and chemical synthesis. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the presence of face-centred cubic structure (FCC plane). The nanoparticles characterised by transmission and scanning electron microscopy showed spherical silver nanoparticles with size range of 5-40 and 10-70 nm in the case of biologically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles, respectively. Addition of pluronic F68 showed the stabilisation of silver nanoparticles. Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles demonstrated different inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Overall, biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles showed higher activity as compared with chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles synthesised in the presence of pluronic F68 by the chemical route exhibited synergism in antibacterial activity as compared with those synthesised without pluronic F68. On the contrary, biogenic silver nanoparticles without pluronic F68 showed higher antibacterial potential.

  16. Structural, functional and in vitro digestion characteristics of spray dried fish roe powder stabilised with gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Binsi, P K; Natasha, Nayak; Sarkar, P C; Muhamed Ashraf, P; George, Ninan; Ravishankar, C N

    2017-04-15

    Fish roes are considered as nutritionally valuable for their high content of essential fatty acids and amino acids. However, roe lipids undergo considerable extent of oxidation during processing and storage, imparting objectionable bitter taste and rancid flavour to roe products. Hence, the objective of the study was to reconstitute the roe mass and microencapsulate lipid fraction, so that small oil droplets are entrapped within a dry matrix of roe proteins during spray drying. Prior to spray drying, the emulsion was stabilised with gum arabic as it also act as a co-wall polymer. The microscopic images indicated presence of larger aggregates in unstabilised powder (RC) compared to well-separated particles in stabilised powder (RG). Incorporation of gum arabic retarded rancidity development during storage. In vitro digestive pattern of roe powder indicated higher amount of oil release in RG. These observations highlight the potential of converting the soft textured carp roe mass into stable fish roe powder with superior storage stability and functionality.

  17. ? and ? nonquadratic stabilisation of discrete-time Takagi-Sugeno systems based on multi-instant fuzzy Lyapunov functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tognetti, Eduardo S.; Oliveira, Ricardo C. L. F.; Peres, Pedro L. D.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of state feedback control design for discrete-time Takagi-Sugeno (TS) (T-S) fuzzy systems is investigated in this paper. A Lyapunov function, which is quadratic in the state and presents a multi-polynomial dependence on the fuzzy weighting functions at the current and past instants of time, is proposed.This function contains, as particular cases, other previous Lyapunov functions already used in the literature, being able to provide less conservative conditions of control design for TS fuzzy systems. The structure of the proposed Lyapunov function also motivates the design of a new stabilising compensator for Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy systems. The main novelty of the proposed state feedback control law is that the gain is composed of matrices with multi-polynomial dependence on the fuzzy weighting functions at a set of past instants of time, including the current one. The conditions for the existence of a stabilising state feedback control law that minimises an upper bound to the ? or ? norms are given in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Numerical examples show that the approach can be less conservative and more efficient than other methods available in the literature.

  18. [Interactions between cyclodextrins and triglycerides: from emulsion stabilisation to the emergence of a new drug delivery system called "beads"].

    PubMed

    Hamoudi, M; Trichard, L; Grossiord, J-L; Chaminade, P; Duchêne, D; Le Bas, G; Fattal, E; Bochot, A

    2009-11-01

    Natural cyclodextrins are cyclic oligosaccharides which can be modified to obtain more water soluble or insoluble derivatives. The main interest of cyclodextrins results from their ability to form an inclusion complex with hydrophobic molecules. Inclusion constitutes a true molecular encapsulation. This property is employed in pharmaceutical industry to facilitate the formulation of poorly water soluble and/or fragile drugs. A more recent application of cyclodextrins consists in their use in the preparation of dispersed systems such as micro- and nanoparticles or even liposomes. When incorporated in dispersed systems, cyclodextrin can enhance drug solubility, drug stability and drug loading. Interestingly, cyclodextrins themselves can also be employed to form or stabilise dispersed systems (material or emulsifying agent). For example, the interactions between cyclodextrins with components of the vegetable oils (more especially with triglycerides) allow to stabilise simple or multiple emulsions but also to form particles called "beads". Very rich in oil, this novel lipid carrier presents an important potential for the encapsulation of highly lipophilic compounds and their delivery by topical and oral routes. These two applications are more particularly developed in the present paper.

  19. Decentralised adaptive output feedback stabilisation for stochastic time-delay systems via LaSalle-Yoshizawa-type theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Ticao; Xu, Shengyuan; Lu, Junwei; Wei, Yunliang; Zou, Yun

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the decentralised output feedback stabilisation problem for a class of large-scale stochastic time-delay nonlinear systems. A general theorem is firstly given to guarantee the global existence and uniqueness of the solution for stochastic time-delay systems. In addition, a stochastic version of the well-known LaSalle-Yoshizawa theorem with time-varying delay is initially proposed for the controller design and stability analysis. Then, for a class of large-scale stochastic systems with time-varying delays, totally decentralised adaptive delay-dependent controllers are designed by using K-filter and backstepping approach. Via LaSalle-Yoshizawa-type theorem and constructing a general Lyapunov function, it is shown that all signals in the closed-loop system are bounded almost surely and the solution is almost surely asymptotically stable. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the results of this paper.

  20. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Laser plume spectroscopy. 2. Graphite yttrium-stabilised and zirconium oxide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. V.; Solomonov, V. I.; Platonov, V. V.; Snigireva, O. A.; Ivanov, M. G.; Lisenkov, V. V.

    2005-07-01

    Spectral and kinetic properties of a plume formed in the vicinity of a graphite and a pressed yttrium-stabilised zirconium oxide (YSZ) powder targets irradiated in air by a 10.6-μm pulsed CO2 laser with a peak power of 1.5-9 kW at room temperature are studied. The plume propagated at right angles to the target surface and at an angle of 45° to the laser radiation. The spectral and kinetic characteristics of its luminescence were measured discretely along the entire length of the plume. It is shown that the YSZ plume as well as the graphite plume is a flux of nonequilibrium gaseous plasma at a temperature of about 4.7-3.1 kK, in which a luminescence of YO and ZrO radicals is excited.

  1. Chemical torrefaction as an alternative to established thermal technology for stabilisation of sugar cane bagasse as fuel.

    PubMed

    Valix, M; Katyal, S; Cheung, W H

    2016-10-11

    Dry and chemical torrefaction of sugar cane bagasse was examined in this study with the aim of stabilising and upgrading the fuel properties of bagasse. Dry torrefaction was conducted at temperatures from 160°C to 300°C under inert conditions, whilst chemical torrefaction incorporated a H2SO4 pre-treatment of bagasse. Chemical torrefaction imparted superior chemical and physical properties inducing morphological transformation and textural development with the potential to address issues in handling, feeding and processing bagasse. It increased the energy density of the chars with maximum HHVmass 21.5 MJ/kg and maximum HHVvolume of 7.4 GJ/m(3). Chemically torrefied bagasse demonstrated resistance against microbiological attack for 18 months. These features demonstrate the practical value of chemical torrefaction in advancing the utilisation of bagasse as fuel.

  2. Three-year performance of in-situ solidified/stabilised soil using novel MgO-bearing binders.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fei; Wang, Fei; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2016-02-01

    A new group of MgO-bearing binders has been developed recently which showed improved sustainability and technical performance compared to Portland cement (PC). However, the application of these MgO-bearing binders in the Solidification/Stabilisation (S/S) techniques is very limited. This study investigates the three-year performance of a highly contaminated soil treated by in-situ S/S using MgO-bearing binders and PC. The core quality, strength, permeability and the leaching properties of the S/S materials were evaluated. The effects of binder composition, addition of inorgano-organo-clay (IOC) and the grout content on the properties of the 3-y S/S materials are discussed. It is found that although MgO alone provided negligible strength to the soil, it is superior in immobilising both inorganic and organic contaminants. Replacing MgO by ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) significantly enhanced the strength while also performed well in immobilising the contaminants. The improved pH buffering capacity was attributed to the low solubilities of brucite and hydrotalcite-like phases formed in the MgO-bearing binders, and was also the reason for the improved performance in stabilising contaminants. The addition of IOC slightly decreased the strength and the permeability of the S/S materials but inconsistent effect on the contaminant immobilisation was found depending on the binder composition. This study showed no degradation of the S/S materials after 3 y exposure to field conditions and has proved the applicability and the advantages of MgO-bearing binders over PC in S/S.

  3. Voluntary head stabilisation in space during oscillatory trunk movements in the frontal plane performed before, during and after a prolonged period of weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Amblard, B; Assaiante, C; Vaugoyeau, M; Baroni, G; Ferrigno, G; Pedotti, A

    2001-03-01

    The ability to voluntarily stabilise the head in space exhibited by two subjects during lateral rhythmic oscillations of the trunk has been investigated before, during and after a prolonged period of microgravity (microG) exposure. In flight acquisitions were performed onboard the Core Module of the Russian Space Station MIR as part of the T4 "Human Posture in Microgravity" experiment of the 179-days ESA-RKA mission EUROMIR-95. Data collection and kinematic analysis were performed by means of a space-qualified version of the automatic motion analyser ELITE. Head stabilisation in space strategy was estimated by means of the head anchoring index and cross-correlation analysis. Results show that head orientation may be well stabilised about the roll axis both with and without the presence of visual information. This was true despite the expected reduction in vestibular efficiency and muscular proprioception occurring in-flight. In one subject, however, vision was found to improve head stabilisation in space post-flight, presumably to recover from the postural deficiency induced by the long-term microG exposure. Head stability during trunk movements was achieved with either over-compensatory (out-of-phase), under-compensatory (in-phase) or mixed movement strategies, as was attested by the analysis of cross-correlation functions between head and shoulder movements. In weightlessness, vision occlusion seemed to influence the choice of the strategies to be used as well as the reduction of movement variability. The feedforward nature of compensatory head movements suggests that head stabilisation could be based in weightlessness on the internal postural body scheme, supposed to be adapted to the weightless environment within 5 months of microG exposure.

  4. Efficacy of stabilisation splint therapy combined with non-splint multimodal therapy for treating RDC/TMD axis I patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Nagata, K; Maruyama, H; Mizuhashi, R; Morita, S; Hori, S; Yokoe, T; Sugawara, Y

    2015-12-01

    Stabilisation splint therapy has long been thought to be effective for the management of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). However, the superiority of stabilisation splint therapy compared to other TMD treatments remains controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of stabilisation splint therapy combined with non-splint multimodal therapy for TMD. A total of 181 TMD participants were randomly allocated to a non-splint multimodal therapy (NS) group (n = 85) or a non-splint multimodal therapy plus stabilisation splint (NS+S) group (n = 96). Non-splint multimodal therapy included self-exercise of the jaw, cognitive-behavioural therapy, self-management education and additional jaw manipulation. Three outcome measurements were used to assess treatment efficacy: mouth-opening limitation, oro-facial pain and temporomandibular joint sounds. A two-factor repeated-measures analysis of variance (anova) was used to evaluate the efficacy of the two treatment modalities (NS vs. NS+S), and Scheffe's multiple comparison test was used to compare the treatment periods. Subgroup analyses were performed to disclose the splint effects for each TMD diagnostic group. All three parameters significantly decreased over time in both groups. However, there were no significant differences between the two treatment groups in the total comparison or subgroup analyses; an exception was the group with degenerative joint disease. No significant difference between the NS and NS+S treatment approaches was revealed in this study. Therefore, we conclude that the additional effects of stabilisation splint are not supported for patients with TMD during the application of multimodal therapy.

  5. Red queen dynamics in specific predator-prey systems.

    PubMed

    Harris, Terence; Cai, Anna Q

    2015-10-01

    The dynamics of a predator-prey system are studied, with a comparison of discrete and continuous strategy spaces. For a [Formula: see text] system, the average strategies used in the discrete and continuous case are shown to be the same. It is further shown that the inclusion of constant prey switching in the discrete case can have a stabilising effect and reduce the number of available predator types through extinction.

  6. Design and stabilisation of a high area iron molybdate surface for the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Stephanie; Brookes, Catherine; Bowker, Michael; Gibson, Emma K; Wells, Peter P

    2016-07-04

    The performance of Mo-enriched, bulk ferric molybdate, employed commercially for the industrially important reaction of the selective oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde, is limited by a low surface area, typically 5-8 m(2) g(-1). Recent advances in the understanding of the iron molybdate catalyst have focused on the study of MoOx@Fe2O3 (MoOx shell, Fe2O3 core) systems, where only a few overlayers of Mo are present on the surface. This method of preparing MoOx@Fe2O3 catalysts was shown to support an iron molybdate surface of higher surface area than the industrially-favoured bulk phase. In this research, a MoOx@Fe2O3 catalyst of even higher surface area was stabilised by modifying a haematite support containing 5 wt% Al dopant. The addition of Al was an important factor for stabilising the haematite surface area and resulted in an iron molybdate surface area of ∼35 m(2) g(-1), around a 5 fold increase on the bulk catalyst. XPS confirmed Mo surface-enrichment, whilst Mo XANES resolved an amorphous MoOx surface monolayer supported on a sublayer of Fe2(MoO4)3 that became increasingly extensive with initial Mo surface loading. The high surface area MoOx@Fe2O3 catalyst proved amenable to bulk characterisation techniques; contributions from Fe2(MoO4)3 were detectable by Raman, XAFS, ATR-IR and XRD spectroscopies. The temperature-programmed pulsed flow reaction of methanol showed that this novel, high surface area catalyst (3ML-HSA) outperformed the undoped analogue (3ML-ISA), and a peak yield of 94% formaldehyde was obtained at ∼40 °C below that for the bulk Fe2(MoO4)3 phase. This work demonstrates how core-shell, multi-component oxides offer new routes for improving catalytic performance and understanding catalytic activity.

  7. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Effect of the 129I impurity on the radiation frequency of a stabilised He — Ne/127I2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negriyko, Anatolii M.; Boyko, Oleksei V.; Kachalova, Nataliya M.; Khodakovskii, Vladimir M.

    2004-05-01

    The radiation frequency of a He — Ne/127I2 laser stabilised to the hyperfine structure component of molecular iodine exhibits shifts caused by the presence of impurities in the iodine cell. The specific effect of the 129I impurity on the radiation frequency of a stabilised laser is considered. It is shown that even for a 0.25 % concentration of 129I, the frequency shift in a He — Ne/127I2 laser caused by this isotope plays a decisive role. To exclude the possible effect of other iodine isotopes on the accuracy of reproducibility of the frequency of metrological lasers, it is expedient to carry out the laser fluorescence test of the cells to check for the presence of heteroisotopic molecular iodine impurity.

  8. "Hummingbird" behaviour of N-heterocyclic carbenes stabilises out-of-plane bonding of AuCl and CuCl units.

    PubMed

    Teci, Matthieu; Brenner, Eric; Matt, Dominique; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Toupet, Loic

    2015-07-27

    An N-heterocyclic carbene substituted by two expanded 9-ethyl-9-fluorenyl groups was shown to bind an AuCl unit in an unusual manner, namely with the AuX rod sitting out of the plane defined by the heterocyclic carbene unit. As shown by X-ray studies and DFT calculations, the observed large pitch angle (21°) arises from an easy displacement of the gold(I) atom away from the carbene lone-pair axis, combined with the stabilisation provided by weak CH⋅⋅⋅Au interactions involving aliphatic and aromatic H atoms of the NHC wingtips. Weak, intermolecular Cl⋅⋅⋅H bonds are likely to cooperate with the H⋅⋅⋅Au interactions to stabilise the out-of-plane conformation. A general belief until now was that tilt angles in NHC complexes arise mainly from steric effects within the first coordination sphere.

  9. Application of X-ray microtomography for the characterisation of hollow polymer-stabilised spray dried amorphous dispersion particles.

    PubMed

    Gamble, John F; Terada, Masako; Holzner, Christian; Lavery, Leah; Nicholson, Sarah J; Timmins, Peter; Tobyn, Mike

    2016-08-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of X-ray microtomography to obtain information relating to powder characteristics such as wall thickness and solid volume fraction for hollow, polymer-stabilised spray dried dispersion (SDD) particles. SDDs of varying particle properties, with respect to shell wall thickness and degree of particle collapse, were utilised to assess the capability of the approach. The results demonstrate that the approach can provide insight into the morphological characteristics of these hollow particles, and thereby a means to understand/predict the processability and performance characteristics of the bulk material. Quantitative assessments of particle wall thickness, particle/void volume and thereby solid volume fraction were also demonstrated to be achievable. The analysis was also shown to be able to qualitatively assess the impact of the drying rate on the morphological nature of the particle surfaces, thus providing further insight into the final particle shape. The approach demonstrated a practical means to access potentially important particle characteristics for SDD materials which, in addition to the standard bulk powder measurements such as particle size and bulk density, may enable a better understanding of such materials, and their impact on downstream processability and dosage form performance.

  10. The adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) on CO2 laser modified magnesia partially stabilised zirconia (MgO-PSZ).

    PubMed

    Hao, L; Lawrence, J

    2004-03-15

    Magnesia partially stabilised zirconia (MgO-PSZ), a bioinert ceramic, exhibits high mechanical strength, excellent corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility, but it does not naturally form a direct bond with bone resulting in a lack of osteointegration. The surface properties and structure of a biomaterial play an essential role in protein adsorption. As such, changes in the surface properties and structure of biomaterials may in turn alter their bioactivity. So, the fundamental reactions at the interface of biomaterials and tissue should influence their integration and bone-bonding properties. To this end, CO2 laser radiation was used to modify the surface roughness, crystal size, phase and surface energy of the MgO-PSZ. The basic mechanisms active in improving the surface energy were analysed and found to be the phase change and augmented surface area. The adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA), which is a non-cell adhesive protein, was compared on the untreated and CO2 laser modified MgO-PSZ. It was observed that the thickness of the adsorbed HSA decreased as the polar surface energy of the MgO-PSZ increased, indicating that HSA adsorbed more effectively on the hydrophobic MgO-PSZ surface than the hydrophilic surface. The current study provided important information regarding protein-biomaterial interactions and possible mechanisms behind the cell interaction and in vivo behaviour.

  11. Foams stabilised by mixtures of nanoparticles and oppositely charged surfactants: relationship between bubble shrinkage and foam coarsening.

    PubMed

    Maestro, Armando; Rio, Emmanuelle; Drenckhan, Wiebke; Langevin, Dominique; Salonen, Anniina

    2014-09-28

    We have studied foams stabilised by surfactant-decorated nanoparticles adsorbed at the bubble surfaces. We show that the controlled compression of a single bubble allows one to understand the coarsening behavior of these foams. When bubbles are compressed, the particles become tightly packed in the surface layer. They lose their mobility, and the interface becomes solid-like when the jammed state is reached. Further compression leads to interfacial buckling characterised by crumpled surfaces. We find that the surface concentration of particles at which the jamming and the buckling transitions occur are independent of the surfactant concentration. This is a surprising feature. It suggests that the surfactants are mandatory to help the particles adsorb at the interface and that they change the equilibrium surface concentration of the decorated particles. But they do not affect the surface properties once the particles are adsorbed. We measured the compression elastic modulus of the surface in the jammed state and found it to be compatible with the Gibbs condition for which the spontaneous dissolution of bubbles is arrested. Due to this effect, the coarsening process of a foam composed of many close-packed bubbles occurs in two steps. In the first step, coarsening is slow and coalescence of the bigger bubbles is observed. In the second step, a number of very small bubbles remains, which exhibit crumpled surfaces and are stable over long times. This suggests that foam coarsening is arrested once the smallest bubbles become fully covered after the initial shrinking step.

  12. Phase II study of SPI-77 (sterically stabilised liposomal cisplatin) in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    White, S C; Lorigan, P; Margison, G P; Margison, J M; Martin, F; Thatcher, N; Anderson, H; Ranson, M

    2006-10-09

    To determine the efficacy and tolerability of SPI-77 (sterically stabilised liposomal cisplatin) at three dose levels in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients had Stage IIIB or IV NSCLC and were chemo-naïve, and Eastern Oncology Cooperative Group 0-2. The first cohort received SPI-77 at 100 mg m-2, the second 200 mg m-2 and the final cohort 260 mg m-2. Patients had also pharmacokinetics and analysis of leucocyte platinum (Pt)-DNA adducts performed. Twenty-six patients were treated, with 22 patients being evaluable for response. Only one response occurred at the 200 mg m-2 dose level for an overall response rate of 4.5% (7.1% at >or=200 mg m-2). No significant toxicity was noted including nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity aside from two patients with Grade 3 nausea. No routine antiemetics or hydration was used. The pharmacokinetic profile of SPI-77 was typical for a liposomally formulated drug, and the AUC appeared to be proportional to the dose of SPI-77. Plasma Pt levels and leucocyte DNA adduct levels did not appear to rise with successive doses. SPI-77 demonstrates only modest activity in patients with NSCLC.

  13. Phase II study of SPI-77 (sterically stabilised liposomal cisplatin) in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    White, S C; Lorigan, P; Margison, G P; Margison, J M; Martin, F; Thatcher, N; Anderson, H; Ranson, M

    2006-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and tolerability of SPI-77 (sterically stabilised liposomal cisplatin) at three dose levels in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients had Stage IIIB or IV NSCLC and were chemo-naïve, and Eastern Oncology Cooperative Group 0–2. The first cohort received SPI-77 at 100 mg m−2, the second 200 mg m−2 and the final cohort 260 mg m−2. Patients had also pharmacokinetics and analysis of leucocyte platinum (Pt)-DNA adducts performed. Twenty-six patients were treated, with 22 patients being evaluable for response. Only one response occurred at the 200 mg m−2 dose level for an overall response rate of 4.5% (7.1% at ⩾200 mg m−2). No significant toxicity was noted including nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity aside from two patients with Grade 3 nausea. No routine antiemetics or hydration was used. The pharmacokinetic profile of SPI-77 was typical for a liposomally formulated drug, and the AUC appeared to be proportional to the dose of SPI-77. Plasma Pt levels and leucocyte DNA adduct levels did not appear to rise with successive doses. SPI-77 demonstrates only modest activity in patients with NSCLC. PMID:16969346

  14. Reduced glutathione and procaine hydrochloride protect the nucleoprotein structure of boar spermatozoa during freeze-thawing by stabilising disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Yeste, Marc; Flores, Eva; Estrada, Efrén; Bonet, Sergi; Rigau, Teresa; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan E

    2013-01-01

    One important change the head of boar spermatozoa during freeze-thawing is the destabilisation of its nucleoprotein structure due to a disruption of disulfide bonds. With the aim of better understanding these changes in frozen-thawed spermatozoa, two agents, namely reduced glutathione (GSH) and procaine hydrochloride (ProHCl), were added at different concentrations to the freezing media at different concentrations and combinations over the range 1-2mM. Then, 30 and 240 min after thawing, cysteine-free residue levels of boar sperm nucleoproteins, DNA fragmentation and other sperm functional parameters were evaluated. Both GSH and ProHCl, at final concentrations of 2mM, induced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the number of non-disrupted sperm head disulfide bonds 30 and 240 min after thawing compared with the frozen-thawed control. This effect was accompanied by a significant (P<0.05) decrease in DNA fragmentation 240 min after thawing. Concomitantly, 1 and 2mM GSH, but not ProHCl at any of the concentrations tested, partially counteracted the detrimental effects caused by freeze-thawing on sperm peroxide levels, motility patterns and plasma membrane integrity. In conclusion, the results show that both GSH and ProHCl have a stabilising effect on the nucleoprotein structure of frozen-thawed spermatozoa, although only GSH exerts an appreciable effect on sperm viability.

  15. Effect of antioxidants and light stabilisers on silver migration from nanosilver-polyethylene composite packaging films into food simulants.

    PubMed

    Su, Qi-Zhi; Lin, Qin-Bao; Chen, Chao-Fang; Wu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Li-Bing; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The effect of exposure time, temperature and food simulants, especially additives, on the release of silver from nanosilver-polyethylene composite films to food simulants was studied. Two different type of nanosilver-polyethylene composite films (with or without additives) were chosen to conduct the experiment with the aim of exploring the behaviour of silver migration. It was shown that the migration of silver into 50% ethanol at 40 and 70°C was much less than that into 3% acetic acid. With the increase of exposure time and temperature, the release of silver increased. The migration even continued after a long exposure time (14 days at 20°C, 10 days at 40°C, and 6 days at 70°C respectively). Only about 0.15‰ of silver migrated from composite films with the additives into 3% acetic acid after 6 days of exposure at 70°C, while about 1.3% of silver migrated from composite films that did not contain additives under the same conditions. This could be because the addition of the antioxidants and light stabilisers prevents silver from being oxidised, which is an important way for the release of silver.

  16. Structural evidence for solvent-stabilisation by aspartic acid as a mechanism for halophilic protein stability in high salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lenton, Samuel; Walsh, Danielle L; Rhys, Natasha H; Soper, Alan K; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-21

    Halophilic organisms have adapted to survive in high salt environments, where mesophilic organisms would perish. One of the biggest challenges faced by halophilic proteins is the ability to maintain both the structure and function at molar concentrations of salt. A distinct adaptation of halophilic proteins, compared to mesophilic homologues, is the abundance of aspartic acid on the protein surface. Mutagenesis and crystallographic studies of halophilic proteins suggest an important role for solvent interactions with the surface aspartic acid residues. This interaction, between the regions of the acidic protein surface and the solvent, is thought to maintain a hydration layer around the protein at molar salt concentrations thereby allowing halophilic proteins to retain their functional state. Here we present neutron diffraction data of the monomeric zwitterionic form of aspartic acid solutions at physiological pH in 0.25 M and 2.5 M concentration of potassium chloride, to mimic mesophilic and halophilic-like environmental conditions. We have used isotopic substitution in combination with empirical potential structure refinement to extract atomic-scale information from the data. Our study provides structural insights that support the hypothesis that carboxyl groups on acidic residues bind water more tightly under high salt conditions, in support of the residue-ion interaction model of halophilic protein stabilisation. Furthermore our data show that in the presence of high salt the self-association between the zwitterionic form of aspartic acid molecules is reduced, suggesting a possible mechanism through which protein aggregation is prevented.

  17. Iterative algorithm to compute the maximal and stabilising solutions of a general class of discrete-time Riccati-type equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragan, Vasile; Morozan, Toader; Stoica, Adrian-Mihail

    2010-04-01

    In this article an iterative method to compute the maximal solution and the stabilising solution, respectively, of a wide class of discrete-time nonlinear equations on the linear space of symmetric matrices is proposed. The class of discrete-time nonlinear equations under consideration contains, as special cases, different types of discrete-time Riccati equations involved in various control problems for discrete-time stochastic systems. This article may be viewed as an addendum of the work of Dragan and Morozan (Dragan, V. and Morozan, T. (2009), 'A Class of Discrete Time Generalized Riccati Equations', Journal of Difference Equations and Applications, first published on 11 December 2009 (iFirst), doi: 10.1080/10236190802389381) where necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of the maximal solution and stabilising solution of this kind of discrete-time nonlinear equations are given. The aim of this article is to provide a procedure for numerical computation of the maximal solution and the stabilising solution, respectively, simpler than the method based on the Newton-Kantorovich algorithm.

  18. Evaluation of a lime-mediated sewage sludge stabilisation process. Product characterisation and technological validation for its use in the cement industry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, N Husillos; Granados, R J; Blanco-Varela, M T; Cortina, J L; Martínez-Ramírez, S; Marsal, M; Guillem, M; Puig, J; Fos, C; Larrotcha, E; Flores, J

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes an industrial process for stabilising sewage sludge (SS) with lime and evaluates the viability of the stabilised product, denominated Neutral, as a raw material for the cement industry. Lime not only stabilised the sludge, raised the temperature of the mix to 80-100°C, furthering water evaporation, portlandite formation and the partial oxidation of the organic matter present in the sludge. Process mass and energy balances were determined. Neutral, a white powder consisting of portlandite (49.8%), calcite (16.6%), inorganic oxides (13.4%) and organic matter and moisture (20.2%), proved to be technologically apt for inclusion as a component in cement raw mixes. In this study, it was used instead of limestone in raw mixes clinkerised at 1400, 1450 and 1500°C. These raw meals exhibited greater reactivity at high temperatures than the limestone product and their calcination at 1500°C yielded clinker containing over 75% calcium silicates, the key phases in Portland clinker. Finally, the two types of raw meal (Neutral and limestone) were observed to exhibit similar mineralogy and crystal size and distribution.

  19. Effect of anterior-posterior and internal-external motion restraint during knee wear simulation on a posterior stabilised knee design.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Thomas M; Saleh, Khaled J; Mihalko, William M; Hintner, Martin; Fritz, Bernhard; Schilling, Christoph; Schwiesau, Jens; Kaddick, Christian

    2013-02-01

    The objective of our study was to examine the effect of biphaseal AP translation and IE rotation restraint, using a system defined specifically for posterior stabilised knee designs, on wear, kinematics and particle release in comparison to linear motion restraint as required by the established ISO 14243-1:2002(E) protocol. In the ISOlinear groups, an AP motion restraint of 30 N/mm and an IE rotation restraint of 0.6 Nm/° were applied in the knee wear simulation. In the ISOgap biphaseal groups with PCL sacrificing implants, the restraining AP force was zero in a ±2.5mm range with, externally, a constant of 9.3N/mm applied proportionally to the AP translation of the tibia plateau, whereas the restraining IE torque was zero in a ±6° range with, externally, a constant of 0.13 Nm/° applied proportionally to the IE rotation of the tibia plateau. Using the ISOgap biphaseal protocol on a posterior stabilised knee design, we found an increase of 41% in AP translation and of 131% in IE rotation, resulting in a 3.2-fold higher wear rate compared to the results obtained using the ISOlinear protocol. Changes in AP translation and IE rotation ligament motion restraints have a high impact on knee joint kinematics and wear behaviour of a fixed bearing posterior stabilised knee design.

  20. Physicochemical characterisation of β-carotene emulsion stabilised by covalent complexes of α-lactalbumin with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate or chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoya; Liu, Fuguo; Liu, Lei; Wei, Zihao; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Yanxiang

    2015-04-15

    In this study the impact of covalent complexes of α-lactalbumin (α-La) with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) or chlorogenic acid (CA) was investigated on the physicochemical properties of β-carotene oil-in-water emulsions. EGCG, or CA, was covalently linked to α-La at pH 8.0, as evidenced by increased total phenolic content and declined fluorescence intensity. Compared with those stabilised by α-La alone and α-La-CA or EGCG mixture, the emulsion stabilised by the α-La-EGCG covalent complex exhibited the least changes in particle size and transmission profiles, using a novel centrifugal sedimentation technique, indicating an improvement in the physical stability. The least degradation of β-carotene occurred in the emulsion stabilised with the α-La-EGCG covalent complex when stored at 25 °C. These results implied that protein-polyphenol covalent complexes were able to enhance the physical stability of β-carotene emulsion and inhibit the degradation of β-carotene in oil-in-water emulsion, and the effect was influenced by the types of the phenolic compounds.

  1. Soil acidity determines the effectiveness of an organic amendment and a native bacterium for increasing soil stabilisation in semiarid mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Roldán, A

    2009-01-01

    Unstable mine tailings are vulnerable to water and air erosion, so it is important to promote their surface stabilisation in order to avoid the spread of heavy metals. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste and inoculation with a native bacterium, Bacillus cereus, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two acidic, semiarid mine tailings, with different acidity degree, during watering and drying periods. Organic amendment raised the pH of both the moderately and highly acidic tailings, whereas the bacterial inoculation increased this parameter in the former. Only the amendment addition increased soil water-soluble carbon in both tailings compared with their controls, under either watering or drying conditions. Both the amendment and B. cereus enhanced water-soluble carbohydrates. Both treatments increased dehydrogenase activity and aggregate stability, particularly in the moderately acidic tailing under drying conditions. After soil drying, aggregate stability was increased by the amendment (about 66% higher than the control soil) and by the bacterium (about 45% higher than the control soil) in the moderately acidic tailing. The effectiveness of these treatments as structure-stabilisation methods for degraded, semiarid mine ecosystems appears to be restricted to tailings of moderate acidity.

  2. Experimental observations on the effect of interface slip on rotation and stabilisation of rigid particles in simple shear and a comparison with natural mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancktelow, Neil S.; Arbaret, Laurent; Pennacchioni, Giorgio

    2002-03-01

    For axial ratios R>˜3, porphyroclasts from three mylonites all show a very strong SPO with the long axis of the best fit ellipse at an antithetic angle of 5-10° to the shear direction. This is more consistent with a stable end orientation than with the transient fabrics predicted by theory for elliptical rigid particles in simple shear. The cause of this divergence is investigated in a series of high simple shear strain ( γ>15) analogue experiments, performed in a ring-shear machine (couette flow) using a linear viscous matrix (PDMS). The rotational behaviour of elongate ( R=˜5) rigid particles with elliptical and rhomboidal shapes, comparable with the natural examples, is modelled for both coherent and slipping particle-matrix interfaces. Interface slip causes a dramatic reduction in the rotation rate of the elliptical particle compared with theory when the long axis is close to the shear direction, but not stabilisation. Interface slip does result in stabilisation of the rhomboidal particle, with the long diagonal oriented at a small antithetic angle to the shear direction. For monoclinic particles, mirror image shapes (referred to here as Types 1 and 2) show different rotational behaviour. For the Type 1 particle (with a shape comparable to σ porphyroclast systems and mica fish), the long side rotates asymptotically into parallelism with the shear direction. Natural examples of Type 1 particles, such as hornblende and olivine porphyroclasts measured from the Finero mylonites (Southern Alps), show a very strong preferred orientation (for R>˜3), with the long side parallel or at a small (<5°) antithetic angle to the mylonitic foliation. For Type 2 particles, the short side stabilises close to the shear direction, or at a small synthetic angle, as also observed for sillimanite porphyroclasts from the Mont Mary mylonites (Western Alps). In this natural case, stabilisation of the short sides is against an extensional crenulation cleavage rather than the

  3. Development of Tools and Techniques to Survey, Assess, Stabilise, Monitor and Preserve Underwater Archaeological Sites: SASMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, D. J.

    2015-08-01

    SASMAP's purpose is to develop new technologies and best practices in order to locate, assess and manage Europe's underwater cultural heritage in a more effective way than is possible today. SASMAP has taken an holistic- and process- based approach to investigating underwater environments and the archaeological sites contained therein. End user of the results of SASMAP are severalfold; i) to benefiet the SMEs involved in the project and development of their products for the offshore industry (not just for archaeological purposes) ii) a better understanding of the marine environment and its effect on archaeological materials iii) the collation of the results from the project into guidelines that can be used by cultural resource managers to better administer and optimise developer lead underwater archaeological project within Europe in accordance with European legislation (Treaty of Valetta (1992). Summarily the project has utilised a down scaling approach to localise archaeological sites at a large scale regional level. This has involved using innovative satellite imagery to obtain seamless topography maps over coastal areas and the seabed (accurate to a depth of 6m) as well as the development of a 3D sub bottom profiler to look within the seabed. Results obtained from the downscaling approach at the study areas in the project (Greece and Denmark) have enabled geological models to be developed inorder to work towards predictive modelling of where submerged prehistoric sites may be encountered. Once sites have been located an upscaling approach has been taken to assessing an individual site and the materials on and within it in order to better understand the state of preservation and dynamic conditions of a site and how it can best be preserved through in situ preservation or excavation. This has involved the development of equipment to monitor the seabed environment (open water and in sediments), equipment for sampling sediments and assessing the state of

  4. On the nature and origin of garnet in highly-refractory Archean lithosphere: implications for continent stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Sally

    2014-05-01

    The nature and timescales of garnet formation in the Earth's subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) are important to our understanding of how this rigid outer shell has evolved and stabilised since the Archean. Nevertheless, the widespread occurrence of pyrope garnet in the sub-cratonic mantle remains one of the 'holy grails' of mantle petrology. The paradox is that garnet often occurs in mantle lithologies (dunites and harzburgites) which represent residues of major melting events (up to 40 %) whereas experimental studies on fertile peridotite suggest this phase should be exhausted by <20 % melting. Furthermore, garnets commonly found in mantle peridotite suites have diverse compositions that are typically in equilibrium with high-pressure, small-fraction, mantle melts suggesting they formed as a result of enrichment of the lithospheric mantle following cratonisation. This refertilisation -- which typically involves addition of Fe, incompatible trace elements and volatiles -- affects the lower 30 km of the lithosphere and potentially leads to negative buoyancy and destabilisation. Pyrope garnets found in mantle xenoliths from the eastern margin of the Tanzanian Craton (Lashaine) have diverse compositions and provide major constraints on how the underlying deep (120 to 160 km) mantle stabilised and evolved during the last 3 billion years. The garnets display systematic trends from ultra-depleted to enriched compositions that have not been recognised in peridotite suites from elsewhere (Gibson et al., 2013). Certain harzburgite members of the xenolith suite contain the first reported occurrence of pyrope garnets with rare-earth element (REE) patterns similar to hypothetical garnets proposed by Stachel et al. (2004) to have formed in the Earth's SCLM during the Archean, prior to metasomatism. These rare ultra-depleted low-Cr garnets occur in low temperature (~1050 oC) xenoliths derived from depths of ~120 km and coexist in chemical and textural equilibrium with

  5. The influence of biogenic stabilisation on the stability and transport of cohesive and mixed sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Julie; Aspden, Rebecca; Baas, Jaco; Paterson, David

    2015-04-01

    between sites and seasons with a significant interaction between these variables (P<0.001). EPS content on the sandier site was significant higher in the summer than any other season (P<0.001) providing the greatest mechanical protection to the sediment, resulting in increased sediment stability whereas the mixed and muddier sites had higher EPS contents in spring (P<0.001 and P<0.001 respectively). The coefficient of variation was larger during the peak seasons than winter and autumn for EPS content, microbial biomass and sediment stability measurements, this is probably associated with the patchy distribution of biofilms on the sediment surface. PSD analysis reveals there were bimodal sediments deposited and accumulating at each site on the sediment bed, throughout the sampling period. Despite the percentage of depositing fines captured in sediment traps varying temporally at all sites, there was no significant spatial difference in sediments size classes between sites whereas the bed sediments changed both spatially and temporally suggesting variation in resuspension dynamics between sites. Significant effects, relative influence and correlations between controlling biological and physical factors at each site are explained and highlight the complexity of estuarine systems and the need for greater understanding in the face of sea level rise and increased storm events.

  6. Bathochromic and stabilising effects of sugar beet pectin and an isolated pectic fraction on anthocyanins exhibiting pyrogallol and catechol moieties.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2012-12-15

    The formation of anthocyanin-metal chelates, exhibiting intense blue colours was monitored over a period up to 10 weeks. Evaluating normalised absorption spectra in the range of 580-700 nm and their proportion of the total area under the curve (AUC), provided information about the blue colour hue, intensity and stability. Colour stability in model solutions containing commercial sugar beet pectin or an isolated pectic polysaccharide fraction (PPF) therefrom, both being naturally enriched in aluminium and ferric ions, was assessed in a pH range of 3.6-7.0. The pectic structures stabilised anthocyanin-metal chelates, and thus blue colours by efficiently preventing complex precipitation. Highest bathochromic shifts and most intense blue colours were observed in PPF model solutions containing delphinidin-3-glucoside (Dpd-3-glc), exhibiting a pyrogallol moiety in the flavylium B-ring, compared to cyanidin- (Cyd-3-glc) and petunidin-3-glucoside (Pet-3-glc), both carrying a catechol substituted B-ring. Hue and intensity of the blue colour at pH 5.0 were only insignificantly influenced by the buffer system except for citrate and phosphate buffers, which both annihilated anthocyanin-metal chelate formation. The blue colours faded following first order kinetics. Best stabilities as deduced from storage experiments performed at 20 ± 2°C in the dark were observed for Dpd-3-glc. In contrast, Cyd-3-glc displayed shortened half-life values, whereas blue Pet-3-glc chelates decomposed rapidly. These results demonstrate that the solubilisation of anthocyanin-metal chelates by pectic structures is a promising option for developing water soluble natural blue food colourants.

  7. Strontium- and calcium-containing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with prolonged degradation for orthopaedic tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Al Qaysi, Mustafa; Walters, Nick J; Foroutan, Farzad; Owens, Gareth J; Kim, Hae-Won; Shah, Rishma

    2015-01-01

    Strontium- and calcium-releasing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with a controlled degradation rate are currently under development for orthopaedic tissue engineering applications. Ca and/or Sr were incorporated at varying concentrations in quaternary phosphate-based glasses, in order to promote osteoinduction. Ti was incorporated at a fixed concentration in order to prolong degradation. Glasses of the general formula (P2O5)–(Na2O)–(TiO2)–(CaO)–(SrO) were prepared via the melt-quench technique. The materials were characterised by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis and density determination. The dissolution rate in distilled water was determined by measuring mass loss, ion release and pH change over a two-week period. In addition, the cytocompatibility and alkaline phosphatase activity of an osteoblast-like cell line cultured on the surface of glass discs was assessed. The glasses were shown to be amorphous and contained Q1, Q2 and Q3 species. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed small changes in the glass structure as Ca was substituted with Sr and differential thermal analysis confirmed a decrease in crystallisation temperature with increasing Sr content. Degradation and ion release studies also showed that mass loss was positively correlated with Sr content. These results were attributed to the lower electronegativity of Sr in comparison to Ca favouring the formation of phosphate-based mineral phases. All compositions supported cell proliferation and survival and induced at least 2.3-fold alkaline phosphatase activity relative to the control. Glass containing 17.5 mol% Sr had 3.6-fold greater alkaline phosphatase activity than the control. The gradual release of Ca and Sr supported osteoinduction, indicating their potential suitability in orthopaedic tissue engineering applications

  8. Mechanical and leaching behaviour of slag-cement and lime-activated slag stabilised/solidified contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2011-05-01

    Stabilisation/solidification (S/S) is an effective technique for reducing the leachability of contaminants in soils. Very few studies have investigated the use of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) for S/S treatment of contaminated soils, although it has been shown to be effective in ground improvement. This study sought to investigate the potential of GGBS activated by cement and lime for S/S treatment of a mixed contaminated soil. A sandy soil spiked with 3000mg/kg each of a cocktail of heavy metals (Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu and Pb) and 10,000mg/kg of diesel was treated with binder blends of one part hydrated lime to four parts GGBS (lime-slag), and one part cement to nine parts GGBS (slag-cement). Three binder dosages, 5, 10 and 20% (m/m) were used and contaminated soil-cement samples were compacted to their optimum water contents. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed using unconfined compressive strength (UCS), permeability and acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) tests with determination of contaminant leachability at the different acid additions. UCS values of up to 800kPa were recorded at 28days. The lowest coefficient of permeability recorded was 5×10(-9)m/s. With up to 20% binder dosage, the leachability of the contaminants was reduced to meet relevant environmental quality standards and landfill waste acceptance criteria. The pH-dependent leachability of the metals decreased over time. The results show that GGBS activated by cement and lime would be effective in reducing the leachability of contaminants in contaminated soils.

  9. Decadal morphological response of an ebb-tidal delta and down-drift beach to artificial breaching and inlet stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, E.; Sousa, C.; Ferreira, Ó.; Morales, J. A.

    2014-07-01

    The morphodynamic response of a mixed-energy ebb-tidal delta (Guadiana estuary, southern Portugal) and its down-drift barrier island (Canela Island) to channel relocation and stabilisation by jetties is examined using a series of sequential bathymetric maps and vertical aerial photographs spanning five decades. Morphological analysis indicates that the ebb delta is in an immature state, characterised by weak sediment bypassing. Landward-migrating shoals on the swash platform have been produced by the jetty-induced artificial bank-breaching and by the collapse of the eastern portion of the delta. The welding of these shoals has largely controlled the evolution of the coast, with local accretion and erosion lasting for years, and large amounts of regional accretion occurring over decades due to sand accumulation against jetties located further down-drift. These observations provide insights into the potential response of a coast to very large, locally concentrated sand nourishment in the form of shoals. The main effects of the jetties on the coast are observed at the centre of Canela Island, with the production of an erosion hot-spot associated with a temporally persistent and divergent longshore transport providing sand to the adjacent areas. Significant accretion is anticipated for the next decade along the entire island due to the ongoing attachment of the presently observed shoals. After the depletion of this sediment source, and in the context of weak sediment bypassing, the most severe down-drift erosion induced by the jetties is predicted to occur some decades after their construction. This study demonstrates that the geomorphic response of an ebb-tidal delta to jetty construction must be considered at multiple temporal and spatial scales when assessing the impacts of jetties on the down-drift coast.

  10. Characterising in situ activation and degradation of hindered amine light stabilisers using liquid extraction surface analysis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paine, Martin R L; Barker, Philip J; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-01-15

    Changes in the molecular structure of polymer antioxidants such as hindered amine light stabilisers (HALS) is central to their efficacy in retarding polymer degradation and therefore requires careful monitoring during their in-service lifetime. The HALS, bis-(1-octyloxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate (TIN123) and bis-(1,2,2,6,6-pentamethyl-4-piperidinyl) sebacate (TIN292), were formulated in different polymer systems and then exposed to various curing and ageing treatments to simulate in-service use. Samples of these coatings were then analysed directly using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Analysis of TIN123 formulated in a cross-linked polyester revealed that the polymer matrix protected TIN123 from undergoing extensive thermal degradation that would normally occur at 292°C, specifically, changes at the 1- and 4-positions of the piperidine groups. The effect of thermal versus photo-oxidative degradation was also compared for TIN292 formulated in polyacrylate films by monitoring the in situ conversion of N-CH3 substituted piperidines to N-H. The analysis confirmed that UV light was required for the conversion of N-CH3 moieties to N-H - a major pathway in the antioxidant protection of polymers - whereas this conversion was not observed with thermal degradation. The use of tandem mass spectrometric techniques, including precursor-ion scanning, is shown to be highly sensitive and specific for detecting molecular-level changes in HALS compounds and, when coupled with LESA, able to monitor these changes in situ with speed and reproducibility.

  11. Stabilising metal(loid)s in soil with iron and aluminium-based products: microbial, biochemical and plant growth impact.

    PubMed

    Garau, Giovanni; Silvetti, Margherita; Castaldi, Paola; Mele, Elena; Deiana, Pietrino; Deiana, Salvatore

    2014-06-15

    Four iron and aluminium-based products, including red mud (RM), hematite (Fe2O3), an iron-rich water treatment residual (Fe-WTR) and amorphous Al hydroxide (Al-OH), were evaluated for their effectiveness at stabilising As and heavy metals (i.e. Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) in a circumneutral contaminated soil [As (2105 mg kg(-1)), Cd (18 mg kg(-1)), Cu (264 mg kg(-1)), Pb (710 mg kg(-1)), Zn (522 mg kg(-1))]. Treatment impacts on soil microbial and biochemical features (i.e. microbial biomass-C, microbial counts, 16S rRNA PCR-TTGE of culturable bacteria, dehydrogenase, urease and β-glucosidase activity, Biolog derived parameters-AWCD and richness) as well as bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and wheat (Triticum vulgare) growth were also assessed. After 6 months equilibration, all the amendments (application rate 3% w/w) but RM reduced labile As while only Al-OH reduced the concentration of water-soluble heavy metals. Despite the highest bioavailability of contaminants, most of the soil microbial and biochemical features monitored (i.e. microbial biomass-C, total bacterial counts, dehydrogenase activity and AWCD) were significantly higher in the RM-soil. Bean germination was completely inhibited in RM-soil while wheat growth was similar to that of the control. The Al-OH treatment was best overall, promoting microbial abundance, diversity and activity while increasing bean and wheat growth and reducing As accumulated in plant shoots. Results suggest that Al-OH is a suitable candidate for field evaluations while the use of RM in the remediation of circumneutral or subalkaline contaminated soils should be reconsidered.

  12. MGMT expression levels predict disease stabilisation, progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanomas treated with DTIC.

    PubMed

    Busch, Christian; Geisler, Jürgen; Lillehaug, Johan R; Lønning, Per Eystein

    2010-07-01

    Metastatic melanoma responds poorly to systemic treatment. We report the results of a prospective single institution study evaluating O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) status as a potential predictive and/or prognostic marker among patients treated with dacarbazine (DTIC) 800-1000 mg/m(2) monotherapy administered as a 3-weekly schedule for advanced malignant melanomas. The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Committee. Surgical biopsies from metastatic or loco-regional deposits obtained prior to DTIC treatment were snap-frozen immediately upon removal and stored in liquid nitrogen up to processing. Median time from enrolment to end of follow-up was 67 months. MGMT expression levels evaluated by qRT-PCR correlated significantly to DTIC benefit (CR/PR/SD; p=0.005), time to progression (TTP) (p=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (p=0.003). MGMT expression also correlated to Breslow thickness in the primary tumour (p=0.014). While MGMT promoter hypermethylation correlated to MGMT expression, MGMT promoter hypermethylation did not correlate to treatment benefit, TTP or OS, suggesting that other factors may be critical in determining MGMT expression levels in melanomas. In a Cox proportional regression analysis, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, p<0.001), MGMT expression (p=0.022) and p16(INK4a) expression (p=0.037) independently predicted OS, while TTP correlated to DTIC benefit after 6 weeks only (p=0.001). Our data reveal MGMT expression levels to be associated with disease stabilisation and prognosis in patients receiving DTIC monotherapy for advanced melanoma. The role of MGMT expression as a predictor to DTIC sensitivity versus a general prognostic factor in advanced melanomas warrants further evaluation.

  13. Strontium- and calcium-containing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with prolonged degradation for orthopaedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Al Qaysi, Mustafa; Walters, Nick J; Foroutan, Farzad; Owens, Gareth J; Kim, Hae-Won; Shah, Rishma; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-09-01

    Strontium- and calcium-releasing, titanium-stabilised phosphate-based glasses with a controlled degradation rate are currently under development for orthopaedic tissue engineering applications. Ca and/or Sr were incorporated at varying concentrations in quaternary phosphate-based glasses, in order to promote osteoinduction. Ti was incorporated at a fixed concentration in order to prolong degradation. Glasses of the general formula (P2O5)-(Na2O)-(TiO2)-(CaO)-(SrO) were prepared via the melt-quench technique. The materials were characterised by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis and density determination. The dissolution rate in distilled water was determined by measuring mass loss, ion release and pH change over a two-week period. In addition, the cytocompatibility and alkaline phosphatase activity of an osteoblast-like cell line cultured on the surface of glass discs was assessed. The glasses were shown to be amorphous and contained Q(1), Q(2) and Q(3) species. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed small changes in the glass structure as Ca was substituted with Sr and differential thermal analysis confirmed a decrease in crystallisation temperature with increasing Sr content. Degradation and ion release studies also showed that mass loss was positively correlated with Sr content. These results were attributed to the lower electronegativity of Sr in comparison to Ca favouring the formation of phosphate-based mineral phases. All compositions supported cell proliferation and survival and induced at least 2.3-fold alkaline phosphatase activity relative to the control. Glass containing 17.5 mol% Sr had 3.6-fold greater alkaline phosphatase activity than the control. The gradual release of Ca and Sr supported osteoinduction, indicating their potential suitability in orthopaedic tissue engineering applications.

  14. Anaerobic stabilisation and conversion of biopolymers in primary sludge--effect of temperature and sludge retention time.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Nidal; Zeeman, Grietje; Gijzen, Huub; Lettinga, Gatze

    2004-02-01

    The effect of sludge retention time (SRT) and process temperature on the hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis of primary sludge was investigated in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). The CSTRs were operated to maintain SRTs of 10, 15, 20 and 30 days at process temperatures of 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C. The rates of hydrolysis and the biodegradability of primary sludge were assessed in batch reactors incubated at 15 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C. The results revealed that the major amount of sludge stabilisation occurred between 0 and 10 days at 35 degrees C and 10 and 15 days at 25 degrees C. Hydrolysis was found to be the rate limiting-step of the overall digestion process, for the reactors operated at 35 degrees C and 25 degrees C, except for the reactor operated at 10 days and 25 degrees C. At the latter conditions, methanogenesis was the rate-limiting step of the overall digestion process. Proteins hydrolysis was limited to a maximum value of 39% at 30 days and 35 degrees C due to proteins availability in the form of biomass. The biodegradability of primary sludge was around 60%, and showed no temperature dependency. The hydrolysis of the main biopolymers and overall particulate COD of the primary sludge digested in CSTRs were well described by first-order kinetics, in case hydrolysis was the rate-limiting step. Similarly, the hydrolysis of the overall particulate COD of the primary sludge digested in batch reactors were described by first-order kinetics and revealed strong temperature dependency, which follows Arrhenius equation.

  15. Biotribology of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design--effect of motion restraint on wear, tibio-femoral kinematics and particles.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Thomas M; Schroeder, Christian; Kyun Kim, Tae; Miehlke, Rolf K; Fritz, Bernhard; Jansson, Volkmar; Utzschneider, Sandra

    2014-07-18

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of a biphaseal anterior-posterior (AP) and internal-external (IE) motion restraint system on the wear behaviour, tibio-femoral kinematics and particle release of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design in comparison to the widely used linear restraint. in vitro wear simulation was performed using a posterior stabilised total knee replacement with a mobile rotating platform gliding surface design to compare the standard ISO 14243-1:2002 (E) protocol with a linear AP and IE motion restraint and the new ISO 14243-1:2009 (E) protocol with a biphaseal AP and IE motion restraint. For the mobile gliding surfaces, an increase in wear rate by more than a magnitude was measured applying the biphaseal protocol (8.5±1.6 mg/million cycles) in a direct comparison to the linear protocol (0.33±0.07 mg/million cycles), with statistically significant difference. The amplitudes of AP displacement were 3.22±0.47 mm for the biphaseal test, compared to 1.97±0.22 mm in the linear test and the amplitudes of the IE rotation angle had mean values of 7.32°±0.91° under the biphaseal setup, compared to 1.97°±0.14° under linear motion restraint test conditions. From our observations, we conclude that the changes in AP translation and IE rotation motion restraints from ISO linear to ISO biphaseal test conditions highly impact the knee joint kinematics and wear behaviour of a mobile bearing posterior stabilised knee design.

  16. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-04-30

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  17. Electronic structure calculations and physicochemical experiments quantify the competitive liquid ion association and probe stabilisation effects for nitrobenzospiropyran in phosphonium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Damien; Coleman, Simon; Diamond, Dermot; Byrne, Robert

    2011-04-07

    Liquid ion association in ionic liquids (ILs) has been examined using a comprehensive series of electronic structure calculations that measure the relative extents of ion association and probe stabilisation for the photochromic dye nitrobenzospiropyran (BSP) in a range of ILs featuring both long-tailed phosphonium cations and short-tailed imidazolium cations, paired with both chloride and NTf(2) anions. New physicochemical experiments measured the photochromic properties of BSP in the phosphonium-based room temperature ILs. Taken together, the computed complexation energies and measured spectroscopic properties support recent Walden plots of unusual conductivity-viscosity behaviour obtained for the same ILs and reveal some new features in the atom-scale structure and energetics of local, ion-ion and ion-molecule interactions. Calculations show inter-ion interactions strengthened by between 0.4 and 0.7 eV as stronger constituent ions are used, which contributes to the longer range rigidity of the Cl-based IL structure as reflected in the doubled |zwitterion → closed| probe relaxation time measured for Cl(-)vs. NTf(2)(-) in phosphonium-based ILs. Calculations further reveal a similar, approximately 0.6-0.7 eV maximum "residual" IL headgroup-mediated probe stabilisation potentially available for the anion-probe-cation complexes via the stabilising interaction that remains following the "quenching" interaction between the IL anion and cation. This potential stabilisation, however, is offset by both longer-range charge networks, beyond the scope of the current purely quantum mechanical simulations, and also energetic penalties for disruption of the highly-interdigitated alkyl tail networks in the phosphonium-based ILs which may be estimated from known diffusion data. Overall the electronic calculations of local, individual ion-ion and ion-molecule interactions serve to clarify some of the measured physicochemical properties and provide new data for the development of

  18. Nucleic acid binding properties of a helix stabilising nucleoid protein from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that condenses DNA into compact structures.

    PubMed

    Celestina, F; Suryanarayana, T

    1995-12-01

    Helix stabilising nucleoid protein (HSNP-C') from an acidothermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius has been characterised with respect to interaction with nucleic acids by gel retardation assay, binding to nucleic acid columns, fluorescence titrations and electron microscopy. The protein exists in solution as very large multimeric aggregates as indicated by cross-linking studies. The protein binds strongly and co-operatively to double stranded DNA. Electron microscopy of the complexes of the protein with DNA shows compact structures suggesting that the protein condenses DNA.

  19. [Recommendations for Releasing the Pelvic Binder After a Non-Invasive Pelvic Stabilisation Procedure Under Emergency Room Conditions].

    PubMed

    Schweigkofler, U; Wohlrath, B; Paffrath, T; Flohé, S; Wincheringer, D; Hoffmann, R; Trentzsch, H

    2016-10-01

    Severe brain, thoracic and intrapelvic injuries, as well as heavy bleeding, are the main causes of death in patients with major trauma. Unstable pelvic ring fractures can cause this bleeding and the so-called "C problem". This is usually due to haemorrhagic shock caused by the loss of large volumes of blood from the presacral venous plexus, iliac vessels and the fracture surfaces. Many clinical studies have shown that, in the preclinical setting, unstable pelvic ring injuries are often underestimated. The application of a non-invasive external pelvic ring stabilisation (pelvic binder) is therefore recommended if a pelvic fracture is possible. Several circumferential pelvic binders have been developed and their prehospital use is increasing. Clinical and biomechanical studies have demonstrated that there is a favourable haemodynamic effect in unstable fractures, due to rapid closure of the pelvic ring. It is unclear whether the pelvic binder can be safely removed in a presumably haemodynamically stable patient. A correctly placed pelvic binder leads to anatomical closure of the pelvic ring. Therefore unstable pelvic ring fractures may be clinically and radiologically overlooked. This is a particular problem in unconscious patients. Furthermore, the real severity of the injury may then be underestimated in the diagnostic evaluation. Unconsidered opening of the pelvic binder can thus provoke renewed deterioration of the circulatory situation, especially if the injury was adequately treated by the binder and the C problem was controlled. The aim of this article is to describe procedures for handling pelvic binders, particularly as to how to deal with an already applied pelvic binder and how to "clear the pelvic region" while reducing the risk of haemodynamic instability. A detailed analysis of the literature and a Delphi-like discussion among several experts were performed. The following points were raised: 1) Assessment of the clinical situation, including trauma

  20. Atmospheric isoprene ozonolysis: impacts of stabilised Criegee intermediate reactions with SO2, H2O and dimethyl sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newland, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Vereecken, L.; Muñoz, A.; Ródenas, M.; Bloss, W. J.

    2015-08-01

    Isoprene is the dominant global biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) emission. Reactions of isoprene with ozone are known to form stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs), which have recently been shown to be potentially important oxidants for SO2 and NO2 in the atmosphere; however the significance of this chemistry for SO2 processing (affecting sulfate aerosol) and NO2 processing (affecting NOx levels) depends critically upon the fate of the SCIs with respect to reaction with water and decomposition. Here, we have investigated the removal of SO2 in the presence of isoprene and ozone, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity, confirming a significant reaction for isoprene-derived SCIs with H2O. Under excess SO2 conditions, the total isoprene ozonolysis SCI yield was calculated to be 0.56 (±0.03). The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with a relative rate constant, k(SCI + H2O) / k(SCI + SO2), of 3.1 (±0.5) × 10-5 for isoprene-derived SCIs. The relative rate constant for k(SCI decomposition) / k(SCI+SO2) is 3.0 (±3.2) × 1011 cm-3. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These kinetic parameters are based on the simplification that a single SCI species is formed in isoprene ozonolysis, an approximation which describes the results well across the full range of experimental conditions. Our data indicate that isoprene-derived SCIs are unlikely to make a substantial contribution to gas-phase SO2 oxidation in the troposphere. We also present results from an analogous set of experiments, which show a clear dependence of SO2 removal in the isoprene-ozone system as a function of dimethyl sulfide concentration. We propose that this behaviour arises from a rapid reaction between isoprene-derived SCIs and dimethyl sulfide (DMS); the observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with a relative rate constant, k(SCI + DMS

  1. Stabilising Fragile States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    benefits of government—and to douse attempts by spoilers to fan grievances into a blaze of dissatisfaction .   The upshot is that there is a...there is less awareness of the steps needed to boost employment. Large-scale, labour -intensive, public-sector work programmes are the most...benefits. The tasks undertaken in public works schemes will normally be fairly straightforward labour -intensive roles (e.g., collecting garbage

  2. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M.; Marincel, Daniel M.; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M.; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D.; Fraleigh, Robert D.; Ross, Ian M.; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Mark Rainforth, W.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)3+ Fe3+O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community. PMID:26272264

  3. Restoring the anatomical tibial slope and limb axis may maximise post-operative flexion in posterior-stabilised total knee replacements.

    PubMed

    Singh, G; Tan, J H; Sng, B Y; Awiszus, F; Lohmann, C H; Nathan, S S

    2013-10-01

    The optimal management of the tibial slope in achieving a high flexion angle in posterior-stabilised (PS) total knee replacement (TKR) is not well understood, and most studies evaluating the posterior tibial slope have been conducted on cruciate-retaining TKRs. We analysed pre- and post-operative tibial slope differences, pre- and post-operative coronal knee alignment and post-operative maximum flexion angle in 167 patients undergoing 209 TKRs. The mean pre-operative posterior tibial slope was 8.6° (1.3° to 17°) and post-operatively it was 8.0° (0.1° to 16.7°). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the absolute difference between pre- and post-operative tibial slope (p < 0.001), post-operative coronal alignment (p = 0.02) and pre-operative range of movement (p < 0.001) predicted post-operative flexion. The variance of change in tibial slope became larger as the post-operative maximum flexion angle decreased. The odds ratio of having a post-operative flexion angle < 100° was 17.6 if the slope change was > 2°. Our data suggest that recreation of the anatomical tibial slope appears to improve maximum flexion after posterior-stabilised TKR, provided coronal alignment has been restored.

  4. Lithium choreography: intramolecular arylations of carbamate-stabilised carbanions and their mechanisms probed by in situ IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Anne M; Nichols, Christopher J; Vincent, Mark A; Hillier, Ian H; Clayden, Jonathan

    2012-12-14

    Deprotonation of O-allyl, O-propargyl or O-benzyl carbamates in the presence of a lithium counterion leads to carbamate-stabilised organolithium compounds that may be quenched with electrophiles. We now report that when the allylic, propargylic or benzylic carbamate bears an N-aryl substituent, an aryl migration takes place, leading to stereochemical inversion and C-arylation of the carbamate α to oxygen. The aryl migration is an intramolecular S(N) Ar reaction, despite the lack of anion-stabilising aryl substituents. Our in situ IR studies reveal a number of intermediates along the rearrangement pathway, including a "pre-lithiation complex," the deprotonated carbamate, the rearranged anion, and the final arylated carbamate. No evidence was obtained for a dearomatised intermediate during the aryl migration. DFT calculations predict that during the reaction the solvated Li cation moves from the carbanion centre, thus freeing its lone pair for nucleophilic attack on the remote phenyl ring. This charge separation leads to several alternative conformations. The one having Li(+) bound to the carbamate oxygen gives rise to the lowest-energy transition structure, and also leads to inversion of the configuration. In agreement with the IR studies, the DFT calculations fail to locate a dearomatised intermediate.

  5. Geotechnical and mineralogical characterisations of marine-dredged sediments before and after stabilisation to optimise their use as a road material.

    PubMed

    Saussaye, L; van Veen, E; Rollinson, G; Boutouil, M; Andersen, J; Coggan, J

    2017-02-15

    Dredging activities to extend, deepen and maintain access to harbours generate significant volumes of waste dredged material. Some ways are investigated to add value to these sediments. One solution described here is their use in road construction following treatment with hydraulic binders. This paper presents the characterisation of four sediments, in their raw state and after 90 days of curing following stabilisation treatment with lime and cement, using a combination of novel and established analytical techniques to investigate subsequent changes in mineralogy. These sediments are classified as fine, moderately to highly organic and highly plastic and their behaviour is linked to the presence of smectite clays. The main minerals found in the sediments using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and automated mineralogy are quartz, calcite, feldspars, aluminium silicates, pyrite and halite. Stabilisation was found to improve the mechanical performances of all the sediments. The formation of cementitious hydrates was not specifically detected using automated mineralogy or XRD. However, a decrease in the percentage volume of aluminium silicates and aluminium-iron silicates and an increase of the percentage volume of feldspars and carbonates was observed.

  6. Effectiveness of chemical amendments for stabilisation of lead and antimony in risk-based land management of soils of shooting ranges.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to examine the effectiveness of amendments for risk-based land management of shooting range soils and to explore the effectiveness of amendments applied to sites with differing soil physiochemical parameters. A series of amendments with differing mechanisms for stabilisation were applied to four shooting range soils and aged for 1 year. Chemical stabilisation was monitored by pore water extraction, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and the physiologically based extraction test (PBET) over 1 year. The performance of amendments when applied in conditions reflecting field application did not match the performance in the batch studies. Pore water-extractable metals were not greatly affected by amendment addition. TCLP-extractable Pb was reduced significantly by amendments, particularly lime and magnesium oxide. Antimony leaching was reduced by red mud but mobilised by some of the other amendments. Bioaccessible Pb measured by PBET shows that bioaccessible Pb increased with time after an initial decrease due to the presence of metallic fragments in the soil. Amendments were able to reduce bioaccessible Pb by up to 50 %. Bioaccessible Sb was not readily reduced by soil amendments. Soil amendments were not equally effective across the four soils.

  7. Bioaccumulation of metals in ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) following the application of lime stabilised, thermally dried and anaerobically digested sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; Ryan, P C; Fenton, O; Peyton, D P; Wall, D P; Morrison, L

    2016-08-01

    The uptake and accumulation of metals in plants is a potential pathway for the transfer of environmental contaminants in the food chain, and poses potential health and environmental risks. In light of increased population growth and urbanisation, the safe disposal of sewage sludge, which can contain significant levels of toxic contaminants, remains an environmental challenge globally. The aims of this experiment were to apply municipal sludge, having undergone treatment by thermal drying, anaerobic digestion, and lime stabilisation, to permanent grassland in order to assess the bioaccumulation of metals (B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Nb, Mo, Sb, Ba, W, Pb, Fe, Cd) by perennial ryegrass over a period of up to 18 weeks after application. The legislation currently prohibits use of grassland for fodder or grazing for at least three weeks after application of treated sewage sludge (biosolids). Five treatments were used: thermally dried (TD), anaerobically digested (AD) and lime stabilised (LS) sludge all from one wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), AD sludge from another WWTP, and a study control (grassland only, without application of biosolids). In general, there was no significant difference in metal content of the ryegrass between micro-plots that received treated municipal sludge and the control over the study duration. The metal content of the ryegrass was below the levels at which phytotoxicity occurs and below the maximum levels specified for animal feeds.

  8. Stabilisation of Fe2O3-rich Perovskite Nanophase in Epitaxial Rare-earth Doped BiFeO3 Films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huairuo; Reaney, Ian M; Marincel, Daniel M; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Ramasse, Quentin M; MacLaren, Ian; Findlay, Scott D; Fraleigh, Robert D; Ross, Ian M; Hu, Shunbo; Ren, Wei; Rainforth, W Mark

    2015-08-14

    Researchers have demonstrated that BiFeO3 exhibits ferroelectric hysteresis but none have shown a strong ferromagnetic response in either bulk or thin film without significant structural or compositional modification. When remanent magnetisations are observed in BiFeO3 based thin films, iron oxide second phases are often detected. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, atomic resolution electron energy loss spectrum-mapping and quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis, we reveal the existence of a new Fe2O3-rich perovskite nanophase, with an approximate formula (Fe0.6Bi0.25Nd0.15)(3+) Fe(3+)O3, formed within epitaxial Ti and Nd doped BiFeO3 perovskite films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The incorporation of Nd and Bi ions on the A-site and coherent growth with the matrix stabilise the Fe2O3-rich perovskite phase and preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that it should have a ferrimagnetic response. Perovskite-structured Fe2O3 has been reported previously but never conclusively proven when fabricated at high-pressure high-temperature. This work suggests the incorporation of large A-site species may help stabilise perovskite-structured Fe2O3. This finding is therefore significant not only to the thin film but also to the high-pressure community.

  9. Characterization of mudstone, clayey rock and argillite towards stabilisation of boreholes by developing new drilling strategies for geothermal resources exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witthaus, M.; Lempp, Ch.; Röckel, Th.; Hecht, Ch.; Herold, M.

    2009-04-01

    In this study, relating to the BMU Project „ borehole stabilisation as an important factor for the utilization of deep geothermal resources" (Project No. 0327594), sediment rocks with comparable lithology to the pelite beds of the Upper Rhine zone were investigated by a number of geomechanical tests. The investigation will provide detailed information on the geomechanical behaviour (brittle and ductile deformation) of clay stone formations in order to find out critical reasons for the instability of boreholes at a depth of about 2000 m. The main aspect of the study is to develop improved technical options in order to increase borehole stability. Many geothermal energy projects started near the Upper Rhine Rift in order to produce electricity, as the geothermal gradient rises there to about 150° C at 3 - 4 km depth. For these enhanced geothermal systems it is necessary to drill deep boreholes to install geothermal heat exchangers, so that the injected cold water conducts the high temperature of the rocks (Hot Dry Rock-Technology). The drillings have to be intersected through different rock layers that are influenced by varying regional stress fields respective to their depth. Between depths of 1500 to 2000 m within the Upper Rhine zone some of the drilled boreholes were in some parts very unstable, especially in formations where mud- and clay stones were dominant, as well as in interbedded strata with sandstones. As the maximum load capacity of these clays is very low and due to their ductile as well as brittle deformation behaviour, borehole convergence and borehole breakouts are detected. These changes were also caused by deep injection of drilling fluid into the rock formation, increasing the pore pressure there, so that hydraulic tension cracks were induced (hydraulic fracturing). This occurred mainly during drilling and it is the reason why there is an imminent risk of the stability of geothermal boreholes in geological formations composed of mudstones, clay

  10. Longitudinally diode-pumped 1.06-{mu}m Nd{sup 3+}:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} laser without pump-wavelength stabilisation

    SciTech Connect

    Zharikov, Evgeny V; Lis, Denis A; Subbotin, Kirill A; Ushakov, S N; Onishchenko, A M; Romanyuk, V A; Shestakov, A V

    2006-01-31

    The spectral and lasing characteristics of a Nd{sup 3+}:NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal longitudinally diode-pumped without pump-wavelength stabilisation are studied. A variation in the output power did not exceed 30% when the pump wavelength was changed in the spectral region from 0.794 to 0.811 {mu}m. (lasers)

  11. Open reduction and stabilisation of coxofemoral joint luxation in dogs and cats, using a stainless steel rope inserted via a ventral approach to the hip joint.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, T; Niiyama, M; Taniyama, H

    1996-12-01

    Open reduction and stabilisation of coxofemoral joint luxation was made via a ventral approach to the hip joint in dogs and cats, using a transarticular stainless steel rope. A feature of the procedure is transarticular penetration of the rope from the pelvic cavity to the femoral neck by guidance with a guide wire which was previously inserted from the femoral neck into the pelvic cavity and by detection of the guide wire in the pelvic cavity by use of forceps connected to an alarm-ohmmeter. Forty-seven animals (37 dogs and 10 cats) with acute and simple coxofemoral luxation were treated and postoperatively maintained in cage rest without external fixation. Most of the animals regained an almost normal gait within several days.

  12. Non-resonant wavelength modulation saturation spectroscopy in acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fibres applied to modulation-free laser diode stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Vadillo, Pablo; Lynch, Michael; Charlton, Christy; Donegan, John F; Weldon, Vincent

    2009-12-07

    In this paper the application of Wavelength Modulation (WM) techniques to non-resonant saturation spectroscopy in acetylene-filled Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibres (HC-PBFs) and modulation-free Laser Diode (LD) frequency stabilisation is investigated. In the first part WM techniques are applied to non-resonant pump-probe saturation of acetylene overtone rotational transitions in a HC-PBF. A high-power DFB chip-on-carrier mounted LD is used in conjunction with a tuneable External Cavity Laser (ECL) and the main saturation parameters are characterized. In the second part a novel feedback system to stabilize the DFB emission wavelength based on the WM saturation results is implemented. Modulation-free locking of the DFB laser frequency to the narrow linewidth saturation feature is achieved for both constant and variable LD temperatures.

  13. Highly efficient stabilisation of meta-ethynylpyridine polymers with amide side chains in water by coordination of rare-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Makida, Hiroki; Abe, Hajime; Inouye, Masahiko

    2015-02-14

    An amphiphilic meta-ethynylpyridine polymer with chiral amide side chains was developed. The polymer was prepared by sequential Sonogashira reactions, and the product was soluble in polar and apolar solvents. The additive effects of metal salts on the polymer were examined in water and aqueous EtOH on the basis of UV-vis and CD spectra. The enhancement of the positive Cotton effect and hypochromism around 360 nm occurred by the addition of various metal salts, indicating the coordination of the cations to the amide side chains of the polymer to stabilise the helical structure. Among them, rare-earth metal salts, especially Sc(OTf)3 showed more efficient additive effects probably because of its strong coordination ability even in water. Positive cooperativity was observed for the coordination of Sc(OTf)3 to the polymer in aqueous EtOH.

  14. On the use of the stabilised Q1P0 element for geodynamical simulations and why this is a bad choice for buyoancy-driven flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Many Finite Element geodynamical codes (Fullsack,1995; Zhong et al., 2000; Thieulot, 2011) are based on bi/tri­-linear velocity constant pressure element (commonly called Q1P0), because of its ease of programming and rather low memory footprint, despite the presence of (pressure) checker­board modes. However, it is long known that the Q1P0 is not inf­-sup stable and does not lend itself to the use of iterative solvers, which makes it a less­ than­ ideal candidate for high resolution 3D models. Other attempts were made more recently (Burstedde et al., 2013; Le Pourhiet et al., 2012) with the use of the stabilised Q1Q1 element (bi/tri­-linear velocity and pressure). This element, while also attractive from an implementation and memory standpoint, suffers a major drawback due to the artificial compressibility introduced by the polynomial projection stabilization. These observations have shifted part of the community towards the Finite Difference Method while the remaining part is now embracing inf­sup stable second­ order elements [May et al., 2015; Kronbichler,2012). Rather surprinsingly, a third option exists when it comes to first ­order elements in the form of the stabilised Q1P0 element, but virtually no literature exists concerning its use for geodynamical applications. I will then recall the specificity of the stabilisation and will carry out a series of benchmark experiments and geodynamical tests to assess its performance. While being shown to work as expected in benchmark experiments, the stabilised Q1P0 element turns out to introduce first-order numerical artefacts in the velocity and pressure solutions in the case of buoyancy-driven flows. Burstedde, C., Stadler, G., Alisic, L., Wilcox, L. C., Tan, E., Gurnis, M., & Ghattas, O. (2013). Large­scale adaptive mantle convection simulation. Geophysical Journal International, 192(3), 889­906. Fullsack, P. (1995). An arbitrary Lagrangian­Eulerian formulation for creeping flows and its application in

  15. Kangaroo mother method: randomised controlled trial of an alternative method of care for stabilised low-birthweight infants. Maternidad Isidro Ayora Study Team.

    PubMed

    Sloan, N L; Camacho, L W; Rojas, E P; Stern, C

    1994-09-17

    Because resources for care of low-birthweight (LBW) infants in developing countries are scarce, the Kangaroo mother method (KMM) was developed. The infant is kept upright in skin-to-skin contact with the mother's breast. Previous studies reported several benefits with the KMM but interpretation of their findings is limited by small size and design weaknesses. We have done a longitudinal, randomised, controlled trial at the Isidro Ayora Maternity Hospital in Quito, Ecuador. Infants with LBW (< 2000 g) who satisfied out-of-risk criteria of tolerance of food and weight stabilisation were randomly assigned to KMM and control (standard incubator care) groups (n = 128 and 147, respectively). During 6 months of follow-up the KMM group had a significantly lower rate than the control group of serious illness (lower-respiratory-tract disorders, apnoea, aspiration, pneumonia, septicaemia, general infections; 7 [5%] vs 27 [18%], p < 0.002), although differences between the groups in less severe morbidity were not significant. There was no significant difference in growth or in the proportion of women breastfeeding, perhaps because the proportion breastfeeding was high in both groups owing to strong promotion. Mortality was the same in both groups; most deaths occurred during the stabilisation period before randomisation. KMM mothers made more unscheduled clinic visits than control mothers but their infants had fewer re-admissions and so the cost of care was lower with the KMM. Since the eligibility criteria excluded nearly 50% of LBW infants from the study, the KMM is not universally applicable to these infants. The benefits might be greater in populations where breastfeeding is not so common.

  16. Enhancement of tetragonal anisotropy and stabilisation of the tetragonal phase by Bi/Mn-double-doping in BaTiO3 ferroelectric ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Yabuta, Hisato; Tanaka, Hidenori; Furuta, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kubota, Makoto; Matsuda, Takanori; Ifuku, Toshihiro; Yoneda, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    To stabilise ferroelectric-tetragonal phase of BaTiO3, the double-doping of Bi and Mn up to 0.5 mol% was studied. Upon increasing the Bi content in BaTiO3:Mn:Bi, the tetragonal crystal-lattice-constants a and c shrank and elongated, respectively, resulting in an enhancement of tetragonal anisotropy, and the temperature-range of the ferroelectric tetragonal phase expanded. X-ray absorption fine structure measurements confirmed that Bi and Mn were located at the A(Ba)-site and B(Ti)-site, respectively, and Bi was markedly displaced from the centrosymmetric position in the BiO12 cluster. This A-site substitution of Bi also caused fluctuations of B-site atoms. Magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed a change in the Mn valence from +4 to +3 upon addition of the same molar amount of Bi as Mn, probably resulting from a compensating behaviour of the Mn at Ti4+ sites for donor doping of Bi3+ into the Ba2+ site. Because addition of La3+ instead of Bi3+ showed neither the enhancement of the tetragonal anisotropy nor the stabilisation of the tetragonal phase, these phenomena in BaTiO3:Mn:Bi were not caused by the Jahn-Teller effect of Mn3+ in the MnO6 octahedron, but caused by the Bi-displacement, probably resulting from the effect of the 6 s lone-pair electrons in Bi3+. PMID:28367973

  17. Treatment of temporomandibular disorders with a combination of hard acrylic stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw. A retro- and prospective study.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Erik; Nilsson, Håkan; Helkimo, Martti; Magnusson, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the treatment effect of a combined treatment with a stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw in patients refractory to previous TMD treatment. During a 5-year-period, 2001-2005, a total of 98 patients received the combined treatment at the Department of Stomatognathic Physiology, the Institute for Postgraduate Dental Education, Jönköping, Sweden. Before the patients received the combined treatment, they had already been given several different TMD treatments during a long period of time, either before referral or at the specialist clinic, with only minor or no effect on their TMD symptoms. The patients were followed prospectively (n=10), or analysed retrospectively (n=88). The data registered were gender, age, main indication for TMD treatment, number of visits to the clinic before and after the introduction of the combined treatment, as well as according to a clinical (Di) and anamnestic (Ai) dysfunction index. The most common causes for treatment in the retrospective material were problems of muscular origin and problems of both muscular and TMJ origin. In the prospective material, most of the patients had mainly muscular symptoms. Both the clinical and anamnestic dysfunction index decreased statistically significantly in the retrospective material after the introduction of the combined treatment. There was a numerical improvement of both indices also in the prospective material. In conclusion, the present investigation showed that a combined treatment with a hard acrylic stabilisation appliance and a soft appliance in the opposing jaw seems to give a remarkable improvement of TMD signs and symptoms in apparently therapy resistant TMD patients. General conclusions should, however, be made with caution due to the fact that the study did not include any control group. There is an obvious need for randomized controlled studies concerning the efficacy and effectiveness of the combined treatment presented

  18. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-07-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilisation within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30 years old labelling experiment after a~wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilisation in plant and microbial derived sugars: while plant derived sugars are only affected by stabilisation processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (>2 g cm-3; Mineral)) of a~silty loam under long term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). While apparent mean residence times (MRT) of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugars in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, mean residence times of the mainly plant derived xylose (xyl) were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial derived sugars like galactose (gal), rhamnose (rha), fucose (fuc), indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics

  19. Feedback enhancement of the amplitude of dynamically excited coherent population trapping resonance in Rb vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radnatarov, Daba; Khripunov, Sergey; Kobtsev, Sergey; Taichenachev, Alexey; Yudin, Valery; Basalaev, Maxim; Popkov, Ivan; Andryushkov, Valeriy; Steschenko, Tatiana

    2016-11-01

    This work reports on possibilities of contrast enhancement of dynamically excited coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance in 87Rb vapour arising from application of feedback methods. Controlling the bichromatic pump radiation power through a feedback loop that stabilises Rb atom luminescence when scanning the frequency difference of the bichromatic pump radiation resulted in a more than an order-or-magnitude improvement in the amplitude of the CPT resonance at scanning frequencies over 100 Hz. It is established that the excursion of the pump radiation power controlled by the feedback loop under dynamic excitation is by an order of magnitude smaller than that under quasistationary excitation at scan frequencies < 1 Hz.

  20. Finite-time fuzzy stabilisation and control for nonlinear descriptor systems with non-zero initial state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zhan; Zhang, Qingling; Ai, Jun; Sun, Xin

    2015-01-01

    For nonlinear descriptor systems, this paper presents an approach to obtain a fuzzy controller with guaranteed finite-time stability and finite-time boundedness with non-zero initial state, which outperforms some recent work and additionally provides a precision estimation of model approximation. We prove necessary and sufficient conditions of finite-time stability and finite-time boundedness with non-zero initial state for nonlinear descriptor systems. Using Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy dynamic models and proposed sufficient conditions, we define fuzzy sets and use linear matrix inequalities to satisfy differential linear matrix inequalities. A simulation confirms efficiency and precision of the given method.

  1. Effects of xanthan-locust bean gum mixtures on the physicochemical properties and oxidative stability of whey protein stabilised oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Khouryieh, Hanna; Puli, Goutham; Williams, Kevin; Aramouni, Fadi

    2015-01-15

    The effects of xanthan gum (XG)-locust bean gum (LBG) mixtures (0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5 wt%) on the physicochemical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) stabilised oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions containing 20% v/v menhaden oil was investigated. At higher concentrations, the apparent viscosity of the emulsions containing XG/LBG mixtures was significantly higher (p<0.05) than the emulsions containing either XG or LBG alone. Locust bean gum showed the greatest phase separation, followed by XG. Microstructure images showed depletion flocculation at lower biopolymer concentrations, and thus led to an increase in creaming instability and apparent viscosity of the emulsions. Addition of 0.15, 0.2 and 0.5 wt% XG/LBG mixtures greatly decreased the creaming of the emulsions. The rate of lipid oxidation for 8-week storage was significantly lower (p<0.05) in emulsions containing XG/LBG mixtures than in emulsions containing either of the biopolymer alone.

  2. Is the incidence of type 1 diabetes in children and adolescents stabilising? The first 6 years of a National Register.

    PubMed

    Roche, Edna F; McKenna, Amanda M; Ryder, Kerry J; Brennan, Adrienne A; O'Regan, Myra; Hoey, Hilary McV

    2016-12-01

    The Irish Childhood Diabetes National Register (ICDNR) was established in 2008 to define accurately the incidence and monitor the epidemiology of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the Irish population. Here, we report data from the first 6 years of the National Register and compare with previous national data. Prospective national incident data regarding T1D in those under 15 years resident in Ireland were collected from 2008 to 2013 and national incidence rates (IRs) calculated. Ascertainment completeness was assessed using capture-recapture methodology. The period identified 1566 new cases of T1D, ascertainment reached 96.8 % in 2013. The standardised incidence rate was 27.5 in 2008 stabilising at 28.7 and 28.8 cases /100,000/year in 2012 and 2013. There was no evidence that the incidence changed significantly in the 6-year period either overall or for each age group and gender. There was evidence of a difference in the incidence of T1D across the age groups with the overall incidence highest in the 10-14 year age category. A strong seasonal association was demonstrated.

  3. Aluminium hydroxide stabilised MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as dual-modality contrasts agent for MRI and PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xianjin; Belo, Salome; Krüger, Dirk; Yan, Yong; de Rosales, Rafael T M; Jauregui-Osoro, Maite; Ye, Haitao; Su, Shi; Mathe, Domokos; Kovács, Noémi; Horváth, Ildikó; Semjeni, Mariann; Sunassee, Kavitha; Szigeti, Krisztian; Green, Mark A; Blower, Philip J

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) MnFe2O4 and Fe3O4 were stabilised by depositing an Al(OH)3 layer via a hydrolysis process. The particles displayed excellent colloidal stability in water and a high affinity to [(18)F]-fluoride and bisphosphonate groups. A high radiolabeling efficiency, 97% for (18)F-fluoride and 100% for (64)Cu-bisphosphonate conjugate, was achieved by simply incubating NPs with radioactivity solution at room temperature for 5 min. The properties of particles were strongly dependant on the thickness and hardness of the Al(OH)3 layer which could in turn be controlled by the hydrolysis method. The application of these Al(OH)3 coated magnetic NPs in molecular imaging has been further explored. The results demonstrated that these NPs are potential candidates as dual modal probes for MR and PET. In vivo PET imaging showed a slow release of (18)F from NPs, but no sign of efflux of (64)Cu.

  4. Solar-powered aeration and disinfection, anaerobic co-digestion, biological CO2 scrubbing and biofuel production: the energy and carbon management opportunities of waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    Shilton, A N; Mara, D D; Craggs, R; Powell, N

    2008-01-01

    Waste stabilisation pond (WSP) technology offers some important advantages and interesting possibilities when viewed in the light of sustainable energy and carbon management. Pond systems stand out as having significant advantages due to simple construction; low (or zero) operating energy requirements; and the potential for bio-energy generation. Conventional WSP requires little or no electrical energy for aerobic treatment as a result of algal photosynthesis. Sunlight enables WSP to disinfect wastewaters very effectively without the need for any chemicals or electricity consumption and their associated CO(2) emissions. The energy and carbon emission savings gained over electromechanical treatment systems are immense. Furthermore, because algal photosynthesis consumes CO(2), WSP can be utilised as CO(2) scrubbers. The environmental and financial benefits of pond technology broaden further when considering the low-cost, energy production opportunities of anaerobic ponds and the potential of algae as a biofuel. As we assess future best practice in wastewater treatment technology, perhaps one of the greatest needs is an improved consideration of the carbon footprint and the implications of future increases in the cost of electricity and the value of biogas.

  5. GSK-3 mediated phosphorylation couples ER-Golgi transport and nuclear stabilisation of the CREB-H transcription factor to mediate Apolipoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Sónia; Carreira, Suzanne; O'Hare, Peter

    2017-04-05

    CREB-H, an ER-anchored transcription factor plays a key role in regulating secretion in metabolic pathways, particularly triglyceride homeostasis. It controls the production both of secretory pathway components and cargoes including apolipoproteins ApoA-IV and ApoC-II, contributing to VLDL/HDL distribution and lipolysis. The key mechanism controlling CREB-H activity involves its ER retention and forward transport to the Golgi, where it is cleaved by Golgi-resident proteases releasing the N-terminal product which traffics to the nucleus to effect transcriptional responses. Here we show that a serine-rich motif, termed the P-motif located in the N-terminus between serines 73 to 90, controls release of the precursor transmembrane form from the ER and its forward transport to the Golgi. This motif is subject to GSK-3 phosphorylation promoting ER-retention while mutation of target serines or drug inhibition of GSK-3 activity, co-ordinately induces both forward transport of the precursor and cleavage, resulting in nuclear import. We previously showed that for the nuclear product, the P-motif is subject to multiple phosphorylations which regulate stability by targeting the protein to the SCF(Fbw1a) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Thus phosphorylation at the P-motif provides integrated control of CREB-H function, coupling intercompartmental transport in the cytoplasm with stabilisation of the active form in the nucleus.

  6. Hume-Rothery stabilisation mechanism and d-states-mediated Fermi surface-Brillouin zone interactions in structurally complex metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, U.; Inukai, M.; Sato, H.

    2011-07-01

    The stability of Co2Zn11 and Al8V5 gamma-brasses, both of which are composed of a transition metal element and polyvalent elements Zn or Al, can be discussed in terms of d-states-mediated Fermi surface-Brillouin zone (FsBz) interactions in the context of first-principles full-potential linearised augmented plane wave (FLAPW) band calculations. A FsBz-induced pseudogap is revealed in the FLAPW-Fourier spectrum, though it is hidden behind a much larger d-band in the total density of states. The stability range of three families of complex metallic alloys (CMAs) that include gamma-brasses, RT-, MI- and Tsai-type 1/1-1/1-1/1 approximants and 2/1-2/1-2/1 approximant, each of which is characterised by ? = 18, 50 and 125, respectively, can be well scaled in terms of the number of electrons per unit cell (e/uc) given by the product of the number of atoms per unit cell and the e/a value determined by the Hume-Rothery plot on the basis of the FLAPW-Fourier method. This is taken as the evidence for the justification of the Hume-Rothery stabilisation mechanism for all these CMAs having a pseudogap at the Fermi level.

  7. Influence of commercial and residual sorbents and silicates as additives on the stabilisation/solidification of organic and inorganic industrial waste.

    PubMed

    Coz, A; Andrés, A; Soriano, S; Viguri, J R; Ruiz, M C; Irabien, J A

    2009-05-30

    An environmental problem of the foundry activities is the management of industrial waste generated in different processes. The foundry sludge from gas wet cleaning treatment that contains organic and inorganic compounds and a high content of water is an interesting example. Due to their characteristics, they can be managed using different stabilisation/solidification (S/S) technologies prior to land disposal. The purpose of this work is to study S/S formulations in order to improve the control of the mobility of the pollutants and the ecotoxicity of the samples. Different mixtures of cement or lime as binders and additives (foundry sand, silica fume, sodium silicate, silicic acid, activated carbon and black carbon) have been used in order to reduce the mobility of the chemical and ecotoxicological regulated parameters and to compare the results for commercial and residual additives. The best results have been obtained with sorbents (activated carbon and black carbon) or sodium silicate. The results of the foundry sand ash as additive can conclude that it can be used as replacement in the cement products. However, silica fume in the samples with lime and siliceous resin sand as additives gives products that do not fulfil the regulated limits. Finally, some linear expressions between the chemical parameters and the quantity of material used in the samples have been obtained.

  8. Feasibility of a constructed wetland and wastewater stabilisation pond system as a sewage reclamation system for agricultural reuse in a decentralised rural area.

    PubMed

    Ham, J H; Yoon, C G; Jeon, J H; Kim, H C

    2007-01-01

    The performance of a constructed wetland (CW) and wastewater stabilisation pond (WSP) system for sewage reclamation and paddy rice irrigation in a decentralised rural area was examined using a feasibility study. The CW was satisfactory for sewage treatment, with good removal efficiency even in the winter period, but the effluent concentration was relatively high in the winter period owing to the high influent concentration. The CW effluent was further treated in a WSP and the WSP effluent was considered safe for crop irrigation with respect to sewage-borne pathogens. Reclaimed water irrigation did not adversely affect the yield of rice; on the contrary, it resulted in an approximately 50% greater yield than in controls. The chemical characteristics of the soil did not change significantly during the experimental period of irrigation with reclaimed water. In the winter, CW effluent could be stored and treated in a WSP until the spring; the water could then be discharged or reused for supplemental irrigation during the typical Korean spring drought. Overall, sewage treatment and agronomic reuse using a CW-WSP system could be a practical integrated sewage management measure for protecting receiving water bodies and overcoming water shortages in decentralised rural areas.

  9. Performance study and influence of radiation emission energy and soil contamination level on γ-radiation shielding of stabilised/solidified radionuclide-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Falciglia, Pietro P; Puccio, Valentina; Romano, Stefano; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2015-05-01

    This work focuses on the stabilisation/solidification (S/S) of radionuclide-polluted soils at different (232)Th levels using Portland cement alone and with barite aggregates. The potential of S/S was assessed applying a full testing protocol and calculating γ-radiation shielding (γRS) index, that included the measurement of soil radioactivity before and after the S/S as a function of the emission energy and soil contamination level. The results indicate that setting processes are strongly dependent on the contaminant concentration, and for contamination level higher than 5%, setting time values longer than 72 h. The addition of barite aggregates to the cement gout leads to a slight improvement of the S/S performance in terms of durability and contaminant leaching but reduces the mechanical resistance of the treated soils samples. Barite addition also causes an increase in the γ-rays shielding properties of the S/S treatment up to about 20%. Gamma-ray measurements show that γRS strongly depends on the energy, and that the radioactivity with the contamination level was governed by a linear trend, while, γRS index does not depend on the radionuclide concentration. Results allow the calculated γRS values and those available from other experiments to be applied to hazard radioactive soil contaminations.

  10. Hydrodynamic impacts on biogenic stabilisation and the fate of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in mixed sediment bedforms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, J. A.; Aspden, R.; Schindler, R.; Parsons, D. R.; Ye, L.; Baas, J.; Paterson, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The stability and morphology of bedforms have traditionally been treated as a function of mean flow velocity/non-dimensional bed shear stress and sediment particle size, despite the known influence of key biological components such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). EPS is produced by microbial communities and can increase erosion thresholds by more than 300%. However, the mechanisms behind the influence of EPS on sediment transport and bedform dynamics is poorly understood, as is the fate of EPS and exchange of EPS between the sediment bed and water column during ripple formation. The exchange of EPS between the sediment bed and water column is dynamic, with important implications for a range of physical and geochemical processes, with the spatio-temporal variation in EPS content, from source to eventual fate, being extremely important for determining the behaviour and natural variability of sedimentary systems. This paper reports on a series of flume experiments where a tripartite mixture of sand, clay and model EPS (xanthan gum) was used to create a sediment substrate, which was subject to a unidirectional current (0.8 ms-1 for 10.5 hrs, n=6). For each run the spatio-temporal changes in concentration, distribution, and effect of EPS, on the evolving bed of mixed sediment was monitored throughout, with complete 3D bed morphology scans also acquired at ~360 s intervals. The various substrate mixtures produced bedforms varying from ripples to dunes and biochemical analysis of EPS concentration across the formed bedforms, suggest EPS is winnowed from the sediment - water interface, particularly at the bedform crests. The depth of winnowing in each run was found to be related to the bedform size, with variation in the stoss, crest and trough of the bedforms identified. The loss of EPS was also significantly correlated with the depth to which clay was winnowed, presumably due to a close association between the clay mineral and EPS fractions. The paper will

  11. The stability and activity of human neuroserpin are modulated by a salt bridge that stabilises the reactive centre loop

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Rosina; Randazzo, Loredana; Raccosta, Samuele; Caccia, Sonia; Moriconi, Claudia; Miranda, Elena; Martorana, Vincenzo; Manno, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Neuroserpin (NS) is an inhibitory protein belonging to the serpin family and involved in several pathologies, including the dementia Familial Encephalopathy with Neuroserpin Inclusion Bodies (FENIB), a genetic neurodegenerative disease caused by accumulation of NS polymers. Our Molecular Dynamics simulations revealed the formation of a persistent salt bridge between Glu289 on strand s2C and Arg362 on the Reactive Centre Loop (RCL), a region important for the inhibitory activity of NS. Here, we validated this structural feature by simulating the Glu289Ala mutant, where the salt bridge is not present. Further, MD predictions were tested in vitro by purifying recombinant Glu289Ala NS from E. coli. The thermal and chemical stability along with the polymerisation propensity of both Wild Type and Glu289Ala NS were characterised by circular dichroism, emission spectroscopy and non-denaturant gel electrophoresis, respectively. The activity of both variants against the main target protease, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), was assessed by SDS-PAGE and chromogenic kinetic assay. Our results showed that deletion of the salt bridge leads to a moderate but clear reduction of the overall protein stability and activity. PMID:26329378

  12. Eco-evolutionary dynamics in a coevolving host-virus system.

    PubMed

    Frickel, Jens; Sieber, Michael; Becks, Lutz

    2016-04-01

    Eco-evolutionary dynamics have been shown to be important for understanding population and community stability and their adaptive potential. However, coevolution in the framework of eco-evolutionary theory has not been addressed directly. Combining experiments with an algal host and its viral parasite, and mathematical model analyses we show eco-evolutionary dynamics in antagonistic coevolving populations. The interaction between antagonists initially resulted in arms race dynamics (ARD) with selective sweeps, causing oscillating host-virus population dynamics. However, ARD ended and populations stabilised after the evolution of a general resistant host, whereas a trade-off between host resistance and growth then maintained host diversity over time (trade-off driven dynamics). Most importantly, our study shows that the interaction between ecology and evolution had important consequences for the predictability of the mode and tempo of adaptive change and for the stability and adaptive potential of populations.

  13. Stabilisation of SWNTs by alkyl-sulfate chitosan derivatives of different molecular weight: towards the preparation of hybrids with anticoagulant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatouros, Dimitrios G.; Power, Kieron; Kadir, Omar; Dékány, Imre; Yannopoulos, Spyros N.; Bouropoulos, Nikolaos; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Antonijevic, Milan D.; Zouganelis, George D.; Roldo, Marta

    2011-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that chitosan derivative N-octyl-O-sulfate chitosan (NOSC), which presents important pharmacological properties, can suspend single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) up to 20 times more effectively than other chitosan derivatives in an aqueous environment. In an attempt to further investigate the impact of different molecular weights of chitosan to the solubilization and anticoagulant properties of these hybrids an array of NOSC derivatives varying their molecular weight (low, medium and high respectively) was synthesised and characterised by means of FT-IR spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Microwave and nitric acid purified SWNTs, characterised by FT-IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy, were colloidally stabilised by these polymers and their anticoagulant activity was assessed. The results revealed that the low molecular weight NOSC coated SWNTs exhibit the highest activity when 0.5 mg mL-1 NOSC solutions are used, activity which is similar to that of the free polymer. Preliminary studies by exposure of these hybrids to Brine Shrimp (Artemia) cysts revealed no effect on the viability of sub-adult Artemia. Our findings suggest the possibility of tailoring these nanomaterials to bear the required properties for application as biocompatible building blocks for nanodevices including biosensors and biomaterials.We have previously demonstrated that chitosan derivative N-octyl-O-sulfate chitosan (NOSC), which presents important pharmacological properties, can suspend single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) up to 20 times more effectively than other chitosan derivatives in an aqueous environment. In an attempt to further investigate the impact of different molecular weights of chitosan to the solubilization and anticoagulant properties of these hybrids an array of NOSC derivatives varying their molecular weight (low, medium and high respectively) was synthesised

  14. Occurrence and removal of butyltin compounds in a waste stabilisation pond of a domestic waste water treatment plant of a rural French town.

    PubMed

    Sabah, A; Bancon-Montigny, C; Rodier, C; Marchand, P; Delpoux, S; Ijjaali, M; Tournoud, M-G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fate and behaviour of butyltin pollutants, including monobutyltin (MBT), dibutylin (DBT), and tributyltin (TBT), in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). The study was conducted as part of a baseline survey and included five sampling campaigns comprising bottom sludge and the water column from each pond from a typical WSP in France. Butyltins were detected in all raw wastewater and effluents, reflecting their widespread use. Our results revealed high affinity between butyltins and particulate matter and high accumulation of butyltins in the sludge taken from anaerobic ponds. The dissolved butyltins in the influent ranged from 21.5 to 28.1 ng(Sn).L(-1) and in the effluent, from 8.8 to 29.3 ng(Sn).L(-1). The butyltin concentrations in the sludge ranged from 45.1 to 164 and 3.6-8.1 ng(Sn).g(-1) respectively in the first and last ponds. Our results showed an average treatment efficiency of 71% for MBT, 47% for DBT, 55% for TBT. Laboratory sorption experiments enabled the calculation of a distribution coefficient (Kd = 75,000 L.kg-1) between TBT and particulate matter from the WSPs. The Kd explained the accumulation and persistence of the TBT in the sludge after settling of particulate matter. The continuous supply of contaminated raw wastewater and the sorption-desorption processes in the ponds led to incomplete bio- and photolytic degradation and to the persistence of butyltins in dissolved and particulate matrices throughout the survey period. It is thus recommended to use shallow ponds and to pay particular attention when sludge is used for soil amendment.

  15. Electronic and vibrational properties of yttria-stabilised zirconia from first-principles for 10-40 mol% Y2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousland, G. P.; Cui, X. Y.; Ringer, S.; Smith, A. E.; Stampfl, A. P. J.; Stampfl, C. M.

    2014-11-01

    Density-functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the electronic and vibrational density-of-states (DOS) for a series of recently predicted stable and metastable structures of yttria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ) with yttria (Y2O3) concentrations of 14, 17 and 20 mol%. Analogous quantities are also studied for the so-called δ-phase, which forms for 40 mol% yttria, as well as for model structures with ≈10.3 mol% yttria. These calculated results, together with those for the cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic phases of ZrO2, afford a comparison of structural, electronic and vibrational properties as a function of yttria concentration. With increasing yttria content, the electronic DOS exhibit a decrease in the valence band-width (of about 2.0 eV relative to the cubic phase) and a corresponding increase of the band-gap of 0.73 eV (from cubic to 40 mol% yttria containing ZrO2). Regarding the vibrational DOS (vDOS), the addition of yttria causes the peaks in the vDOS of ZrO2 to become less distinct, reflecting the more dense occupation of states due to the larger number of atoms in each primitive cell, and to the lower symmetry. The vDOS of the various YSZ structures appear qualitatively similar with contributions from O atoms spanning the whole frequency range and cation related contributions present for frequencies < 40 - 45 meV. With increasing yttria content, more Zr atoms become seven-fold coordinated as in monoclinic ZrO2, concominantly the vDOS increasingly resembles that of m-ZrO2, but with notable contributions from Y atoms, which has a main peak at about 17 meV, similar to that of Zr atoms.

  16. Peroxidase activity of selenoprotein GrdB of glycine reductase and stabilisation of its integrity by components of proprotein GrdE from Eubacterium acidaminophilum.

    PubMed

    Gröbe, Tina; Reuter, Michael; Gursinsky, Torsten; Söhling, Brigitte; Andreesen, Jan R

    2007-01-01

    The anaerobe Eubacterium acidaminophilum has been shown to contain an uncharacterized peroxidase, which may serve to protect the sensitive selenoproteins in that organism. We purified this peroxidase and found that it was identical with the substrate-specific "protein B"-complex of glycine reductase. The "protein B"-complex consists of the selenocysteine-containing GrdB subunit and two subunits, which derive from the GrdE proprotein. The specific peroxidase activity was 1.7 U (mg protein)(-1) with DTT and cumene hydroperoxide as substrates. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GrdB was important for DTT- and NADH-dependent peroxidase activities in crude extracts, whereas the selenoperoxiredoxin PrxU could be depleted without affecting these peroxidase activities. GrdB could be heterologously produced in Escherichia coli with coexpression of selB and selC from E. acidaminophilum for selenocysteine insertion. Although GrdB was sensitive to proteolysis, some full-size protein was present which accounted for a peroxidase activity of about 0.5 U (mg protein)(-1) in these extracts. Mutation of the potentially redox-active UxxCxxC motif in GrdB resulted in still significant, but decreased activity. Heterologous GrdB was protected from degradation by full-length GrdE or by GrdE-domains. The GrdB-GrdE interaction was confirmed by copurification of GrdE with Strep-tagged GrdB. The data suggest that GrdE domains serve to stabilise GrdB.

  17. Stabilisation dynamique d'un winging scapula (à propos d'un cas avec revue de la littérature)

    PubMed Central

    Boukhris, Jalal; Boussouga, Mostapha; Jaafar, Abdelouahab; Bouslmame, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Décrit pour la première fois par Velpeau en 1937, le winging scapula reste une affection rare, encore peu connue aussi bien du grand public que des professionnels de santé. Il s'agit en fait de la paralysie isolée du nerf thoracique long, responsable de l'innervation unique du muscle serratus antérieur, laquelle paralysie génère un décollement du bord spinal et de la pointe de l'omoplate, particulièrement visible lors des mouvements d'abduction et d'antépulsion du bras. Evoluant habituellement vers la récupération spontanée, le diagnostic de cette affection est essentiellement clinique, l'exploration électromyographique, peut appuyer le diagnostic et surtout servir d’élément de surveillance. Le traitement est avant tout conservateur; la chirurgie n’étant envisagée que dans les formes chroniques qui ne répondent pas à la rééducation, le cas d'ailleurs de notre patient. Le choix du type d'intervention devra obéir à des critères précis. La stabilisation dynamique de la scapula est une intervention séduisante et donne entre des mains entraînées des résultats très satisfaisants, beaucoup de critiques sont faites sur la récupération de la force musculaire, ce qui en limite l'indication quand les exigences professionnelles des patients sont importantes. Néanmoins, certaines séries en font la méthode de choix avec des résultats excellents. PMID:25918571

  18. The 2.1 Å resolution structure of cyanopindolol-bound β1-adrenoceptor identifies an intramembrane Na+ ion that stabilises the ligand-free receptor.

    PubMed

    Miller-Gallacher, Jennifer L; Nehmé, Rony; Warne, Tony; Edwards, Patricia C; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Leslie, Andrew G W; Tate, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    The β1-adrenoceptor (β1AR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated by the endogenous agonists adrenaline and noradrenaline. We have determined the structure of an ultra-thermostable β1AR mutant bound to the weak partial agonist cyanopindolol to 2.1 Å resolution. High-quality crystals (100 μm plates) were grown in lipidic cubic phase without the assistance of a T4 lysozyme or BRIL fusion in cytoplasmic loop 3, which is commonly employed for GPCR crystallisation. An intramembrane Na+ ion was identified co-ordinated to Asp872.50, Ser1283.39 and 3 water molecules, which is part of a more extensive network of water molecules in a cavity formed between transmembrane helices 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7. Remarkably, this water network and Na+ ion is highly conserved between β1AR and the adenosine A2A receptor (rmsd of 0.3 Å), despite an overall rmsd of 2.4 Å for all Cα atoms and only 23% amino acid identity in the transmembrane regions. The affinity of agonist binding and nanobody Nb80 binding to β1AR is unaffected by Na+ ions, but the stability of the receptor is decreased by 7.5°C in the absence of Na+. Mutation of amino acid side chains that are involved in the co-ordination of either Na+ or water molecules in the network decreases the stability of β1AR by 5-10°C. The data suggest that the intramembrane Na+ and associated water network stabilise the ligand-free state of β1AR, but still permits the receptor to form the activated state which involves the collapse of the Na+ binding pocket on agonist binding.

  19. Changes in Muscarinic M2 Receptor Levels in the Cortex of Subjects with Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder and in Rats after Treatment with Mood Stabilisers and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Andrew Stuart; Jeon, Won Je; Scarr, Elizabeth; Dean, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasingly, data are implicating muscarinic receptors in the aetiology and treatment of mood disorders. This led us to measure levels of different muscarinic receptor-related parameters in the cortex from people with mood disorders and the CNS of rats treated with mood stabilisers and antidepressant drugs. Methods: We measured [3H]AF-DX 384 binding in BA 46 and BA 24 from subjects with bipolar disorders (n = 14), major depressive disorders (n = 19), as well as age- and sex-matched controls (n = 19) and the CNS of rats treated with fluoxetine or imipramine. In addition, we used Western blots to measure levels of CHRM2 protein and oxotremorine-M stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding as a measure of CHRM 2 / 4 signaling. Results: Compared with controls, [3H]AF-DX 384 binding was lower in BA 24 and BA 46 in bipolar disorders and major depressive disorders, while CHRM2 protein and oxotremorine-M stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding was only lower in BA 24. Compared with vehicle, treatment with mood stabilisers, antidepressant drugs for 10 days, or imipramine for 28 days resulted in higher levels of in [3H]AF-DX 384 binding select regions of rat CNS. Conclusions: Our data suggest that levels of CHRM2 are lower in BA 24 from subjects with mood disorders, and it is possible that signalling by that receptor is also less in this cortical region. Our data also suggest increasing levels of CHRM2 may be involved in the mechanisms of action of mood stabilisers and tricyclic antidepressants. PMID:26475745

  20. Delay driven spatiotemporal chaos in single species population dynamics models.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Masha; Petrovskii, Sergei; Banerjee, Malay

    2016-08-01

    Questions surrounding the prevalence of complex population dynamics form one of the central themes in ecology. Limit cycles and spatiotemporal chaos are examples that have been widely recognised theoretically, although their importance and applicability to natural populations remains debatable. The ecological processes underlying such dynamics are thought to be numerous, though there seems to be consent as to delayed density dependence being one of the main driving forces. Indeed, time delay is a common feature of many ecological systems and can significantly influence population dynamics. In general, time delays may arise from inter- and intra-specific trophic interactions or population structure, however in the context of single species populations they are linked to more intrinsic biological phenomena such as gestation or resource regeneration. In this paper, we consider theoretically the spatiotemporal dynamics of a single species population using two different mathematical formulations. Firstly, we revisit the diffusive logistic equation in which the per capita growth is a function of some specified delayed argument. We then modify the model by incorporating a spatial convolution which results in a biologically more viable integro-differential model. Using the combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we investigate the effect of time delay on pattern formation. In particular, we show that for sufficiently large values of time delay the system's dynamics are indicative to spatiotemporal chaos. The chaotic dynamics arising in the wake of a travelling population front can be preceded by either a plateau corresponding to dynamical stabilisation of the unstable equilibrium or by periodic oscillations.

  1. Stabilisation problem in biaxial platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Tymoteusz; Rybarczyk, Dominik; Wyrwał, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The article describes investigation of rolling ball stabilization problem on a biaxial platform. The aim of the control system proposed here is to stabilize ball moving on a plane in equilibrium point. The authors proposed a control algorithm based on cascade PID and they compared it with another control method. The article shows the results of the accuracy of ball stabilization and influence of applied filter on the signal waveform. The application used to detect the ball position measured by digital camera has been written using a cross platform .Net wrapper to the OpenCV image processing library - EmguCV. The authors used the bipolar stepper motor with dedicated electronic controller. The data between the computer and the designed controller are sent with use of the RS232 standard. The control stand is based on ATmega series microcontroller.

  2. Conditional and unconditional Gaussian quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, Marco G.; Lami, Ludovico; Serafini, Alessio

    2016-07-01

    This article focuses on the general theory of open quantum systems in the Gaussian regime and explores a number of diverse ramifications and consequences of the theory. We shall first introduce the Gaussian framework in its full generality, including a classification of Gaussian (also known as 'general-dyne') quantum measurements. In doing so, we will give a compact proof for the parametrisation of the most general Gaussian completely positive map, which we believe to be missing in the existing literature. We will then move on to consider the linear coupling with a white noise bath, and derive the diffusion equations that describe the evolution of Gaussian states under such circumstances. Starting from these equations, we outline a constructive method to derive general master equations that apply outside the Gaussian regime. Next, we include the general-dyne monitoring of the environmental degrees of freedom and recover the Riccati equation for the conditional evolution of Gaussian states. Our derivation relies exclusively on the standard quantum mechanical update of the system state, through the evaluation of Gaussian overlaps. The parametrisation of the conditional dynamics we obtain is novel and, at variance with existing alternatives, directly ties in to physical detection schemes. We conclude our study with two examples of conditional dynamics that can be dealt with conveniently through our formalism, demonstrating how monitoring can suppress the noise in optical parametric processes as well as stabilise systems subject to diffusive scattering.

  3. Equilibrium and dynamic pleating of a crystalline bonded network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Saswati; Nath, Parswa; Horbach, Jürgen; Sollich, Peter; Karmakar, Smarajit; Sengupta, Surajit

    2017-03-01

    We describe a phase transition that gives rise to structurally non-trivial states in a two-dimensional ordered network of particles connected by harmonic bonds. Monte Carlo simulations reveal that the network supports, apart from the homogeneous phase, a number of heterogeneous "pleated" phases, which can be stabilised by an external field. This field is conjugate to a global collective variable quantifying "non-affineness," i.e., the deviation of local particle displacements from local affine deformation. In the pleated phase, stress is localised in ordered rows of pleats and eliminated from the rest of the lattice. The kinetics of the phase transition is unobservably slow in molecular dynamics simulation near coexistence, due to very large free energy barriers. When the external field is increased further to lower these barriers, the network exhibits rich dynamic behaviour: it transforms into a metastable phase with the stress now localised in a disordered arrangement of pleats. The pattern of pleats shows ageing dynamics and slow relaxation to equilibrium. Our predictions may be checked by experiments on tethered colloidal solids in dynamic laser traps.

  4. Dynamic Effects of Anchor Positional Tolerance on Tension Moored Floating Wind Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Christopher; Pakrashi, Vikram; Murphy, Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    For water depths greater than 60m floating wind turbines will become the most economical option for generating offshore wind energy. Tension mooring stabilised units are one type of platform being considered by the offshore wind energy industry. The complex mooring arrangement used by this type of platform means that the dynamics are greatly effected by offsets in the positioning of the anchors. This paper examines the issue of tendon anchor position tolerances. The dynamic effects of three positional tolerances are analysed in survival state using the time domain FASTLink. The severe impact of worst case anchor positional offsets on platform and turbine survivability is shown. The worst anchor misposition combinations are highlighted and should be strongly avoided. Novel methods to mitigate this issue are presented.

  5. Intermediate fragmentation per se provides stable predator-prey metapopulation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jennifer K; Li, Jiqiu; Montagnes, David J S

    2012-08-01

    The extent to which a landscape is fragmented affects persistence of predator-prey dynamics. Increasing fragmentation concomitantly imposes conditions that stabilise and destabilise metapopulations. For the first time, we explicitly assessed the hypothesis that intermediate levels provide optimal conditions for stability. We examine four structural changes arising from increased fragmentation: increased fragment number; decreased fragment size; increased connectedness (corridors scaled to fragment); increased fragment heterogeneity (based on connectedness). Using the model predator-prey system (Didinium-Paramecium) we support our hypothesis, by examining replicated metapopulations dynamics at five fragmentation levels. Although both species became extinct without fragmentation, prey survived at low and high levels, and both survived at intermediate levels. By examining time to extinction, maximum abundances, and population asynchrony we conclude that fragmentation produces structural heterogeneity (independent of environmental heterogeneity), which influences stability. Our analysis suggests why some theoretical, field and microcosm studies present conflicting views of fragmentation effects on population persistence.

  6. Adaptive synchronised tracking control for multiple robotic manipulators with uncertain kinematics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dongya; Li, Shaoyuan; Zhu, Quanmin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a new adaptive synchronised tracking control approach is developed for the operation of multiple robotic manipulators in the presence of uncertain kinematics and dynamics. In terms of the system synchronisation and adaptive control, the proposed approach can stabilise position tracking of each robotic manipulator while coordinating its motion with the other robotic manipulators. On the other hand, the developed approach can cope with kinematic and dynamic uncertainties. The corresponding stability analysis is presented to lay a foundation for theoretical understanding of the underlying issues as well as an assurance for safely operating real systems. Illustrative examples are bench tested to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. In addition, to face the challenging issues, this study provides an exemplary showcase with effectively to integrate several cross boundary theoretical results to formulate an interdisciplinary solution.

  7. An efficient model of drillstring dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butlin, T.; Langley, R. S.

    2015-11-01

    High amplitude vibration regimes can cause significant damage to oilwell drillstrings: torsional stick-slip oscillation, forward whirl and backward whirl are each associated with different kinds of damage. There is a need for models of drillstring dynamics that can predict this variety of phenomena that are: efficient enough to carry out parametric studies; simple enough to provide insight into the underlying physics, and which retain sufficient detail to correlate to real drillstrings. The modelling strategy presented in this paper attempts to balance these requirements. It includes the dynamics of the full length of the drillstring over a wide bandwidth but assumes that the main nonlinear effects are due to spatially localised regions of strong nonlinearity, for example at the drillbit cutting interface and at stabilisers where the borehole wall clearance is smallest. The equations of motion can be formed in terms of this reduced set of degrees of freedom, coupled to the nonlinear contact laws and solved by time-domain integration. Two implementations of this approach are presented, using (1) digital filters and (2) a finite element model to describe the linear dynamics. Choosing a sampling period that is less than the group delay between nonlinear degrees of freedom results in a decoupled set of equations that can be solved very efficiently. Several cases are presented which demonstrate a variety of phenomena, including stick-slip oscillation; forward whirl and backward whirl. Parametric studies are shown which reveal the conditions which lead to high amplitude vibration regimes, and an analytic regime boundary is derived for torsional stick-slip oscillation. The digital filter and finite element models are shown to be in good agreement and are similarly computationally efficient. The digital filter approach has the advantage of more intuitive interpretation, while the finite element model is more readily implemented using existing software packages.

  8. New amphiphilic glycopolymers by click functionalization of random copolymers – application to the colloidal stabilisation of polymer nanoparticles and their interaction with concanavalin A lectin

    PubMed Central

    Otman, Otman; Boullanger, Paul; Drockenmuller, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Summary Glycopolymers with mannose units were readily prepared by click chemistry of an azido mannopyranoside derivative and a poly(propargyl acrylate-co-N-vinyl pyrrolidone). These glycopolymers were used as polymer surfactants, in order to obtain glycosylated polycaprolactone nanoparticles. Optimum stabilization for long time storage was achieved by using a mixture of glycopolymers and the non-ionic triblock copolymer Pluronic® F-68. The mannose moieties are accessible at the surface of nanoparticles and available for molecular recognition by concanavalin A lectin. Interaction of mannose units with the lectin were evaluated by measuring the changes in nanoparticles size by dynamic light scattering in dilute media. PMID:20625527

  9. Cybersecurity Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-20

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: In the course of seeking fundamental concepts that can drive the study of cybersecurity for the many years to come...of Cybersecurity Dynamics emerged. Intuitively, Cybersecurity Dynamics describes the evolution of cybersecurity state as caused by cyber attack...defense interactions. By studying Cybersecurity Dynamics, we can characterize the cybersecurity phenomena exhibited in the evolution of cybersecurity

  10. First principles static and dynamic calculations for the transition metal hydride series MH4L3 (M = Fe, Ru and Os; L = NH3, PH3 and PF3).

    PubMed

    Sieffert, Nicolas; Kendrick, Thomas; Tiana, Davide; Morrison, Carole A

    2015-03-07

    We present a first principles static and dynamical study of the transition metal hydride series MH4L3 (M = Fe, Ru and Os; L = NH3, PH3 and PF3), with a view to arriving at an understanding of how the variation in the electronic properties of the metal sites and ligands can influence the dynamics of the resulting complexes. A broad range of behaviour was observed, encompassing stable classical minima (M = Os, L = NH3 and M = Ru, L = PH3) to stable η(2)-H2 non-classical minima (M = Fe, L = PF3 and M = Ru, L = PH3 or PF3), with the other structures exhibiting dynamical behaviour that spontaneously converted between the classical and non-classical states during the molecular dynamics simulations. The importance of a small L(axial)-M-L(axial) angle in stabilising the non-classical state is highlighted, as is a short η(2)-H2···H(cis) distance in non-classical complexes that spontaneously convert to the classical form. We also investigated the changes in the electronic structure of the complex FeH4(PH3)3 during a η(2)-H2 bond breaking/bond making reaction and observed direct evidence of the 'cis effect', whereby a neighbouring hydride ligand acts to stabilise the intermediate classical state.

  11. A dynamic feedback control strategy for control loops with time-varying delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Behrouz; Tafreshi, Reza; Franchek, Matthew; Grigoriadis, Karolos; Mohammadpour, Javad

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic systems of nth order with time-varying delay in the control loop are examined in this paper. The infinite-dimensional pure delay problem is approximated using a jth-order Padé approximation. Although the approximation provides a well-matched finite-dimensional configuration, it poses a new challenge in terms of unstable internal dynamics for the resulted non-minimum phase system. Such a non-minimum phase characteristic limits the closed-loop system bandwidth and leads to an imperfect tracking performance. To circumvent this problem, the unstable internal dynamics of the system is captured and a new dynamic compensator is proposed to stabilise it in a systematic framework. A dynamic controller is developed, which provides the overall system stability against unmatched perturbation and meets the desired tracking error dynamics. The proposed approach is then applied to fuelling control in gasoline engines addressing the varying transport delay of the oxygen-sensor measurement in the exhaust. The developed methodology is finally validated on a Ford F-150 SI lean-burn engine model with large time-varying delay in the control loop.

  12. Improving transient performance of adaptive control architectures using frequency-limited system error dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucelen, Tansel; De La Torre, Gerardo; Johnson, Eric N.

    2014-11-01

    Although adaptive control theory offers mathematical tools to achieve system performance without excessive reliance on dynamical system models, its applications to safety-critical systems can be limited due to poor transient performance and robustness. In this paper, we develop an adaptive control architecture to achieve stabilisation and command following of uncertain dynamical systems with improved transient performance. Our framework consists of a new reference system and an adaptive controller. The proposed reference system captures a desired closed-loop dynamical system behaviour modified by a mismatch term representing the high-frequency content between the uncertain dynamical system and this reference system, i.e., the system error. In particular, this mismatch term allows the frequency content of the system error dynamics to be limited, which is used to drive the adaptive controller. It is shown that this key feature of our framework yields fast adaptation without incurring high-frequency oscillations in the transient performance. We further show the effects of design parameters on the system performance, analyse closeness of the uncertain dynamical system to the unmodified (ideal) reference system, discuss robustness of the proposed approach with respect to time-varying uncertainties and disturbances, and make connections to gradient minimisation and classical control theory. A numerical example is provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed architecture.

  13. Transport and fate of silver as polymer-stabilised nanoparticles and ions in a pilot wastewater treatment plant, followed by sludge digestion and disposal of sludge/soil mixtures: A case study.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Jonas; Baresel, Christian; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger

    2014-01-01

    A case study of transport and changes in properties of polymer-stabilised Ag NPs is presented in this paper investigating their interaction in different treatment steps within a fully realistic pilot wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), in anaerobic digested sludge, and in soil/sludge mixtures. The fate of the same Ag NPs was tracked in these environments, hence taking the history of the Ag NPs into account. The results show that most of the Ag NPs end up in the sludge (80-100%), also after anaerobically digestion. Furthermore, the fraction of silver in the supernatant was very low after 48 h incubation with silver-containing digested sludge mixed with different soil types. However, when Ag NPs were added directly to the sludge/soil mixture, soluble silver was present in the supernatant with sandy soil, but not with clayey soil. In all, generated findings show that risk assessments and toxicological studies of Ag NPs suspensions must take into account possible chemical and particle transformations upon environmental entry, as silver in general become less soluble when transported to WWTPs and interacting with sludge, and soil.

  14. No statistically significant kinematic difference found between a cruciate-retaining and posterior-stabilised Triathlon knee arthroplasty: a laboratory study involving eight cadavers examining soft-tissue laxity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, N C; Ghosh, K M; Blain, A P; Rushton, S P; Longstaff, L M; Deehan, D J

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the maximum laxity conferred by the cruciate-retaining (CR) and posterior-stabilised (PS) Triathlon single-radius total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for anterior drawer, varus-valgus opening and rotation in eight cadaver knees through a defined arc of flexion (0º to 110º). The null hypothesis was that the limits of laxity of CR- and PS-TKAs are not significantly different. The investigation was undertaken in eight loaded cadaver knees undergoing subjective stress testing using a measurement rig. Firstly the native knee was tested prior to preparation for CR-TKA and subsequently for PS-TKA implantation. Surgical navigation was used to track maximal displacements/rotations at 0º, 30º, 60º, 90º and 110° of flexion. Mixed-effects modelling was used to define the behaviour of the TKAs. The laxity measured for the CR- and PS-TKAs revealed no statistically significant differences over the studied flexion arc for the two versions of TKA. Compared with the native knee both TKAs exhibited slightly increased anterior drawer and decreased varus-valgus and internal-external roational laxities. We believe further study is required to define the clinical states for which the additional constraint offered by a PS-TKA implant may be beneficial.

  15. Thickness dependence of the strain, band gap and transport properties of epitaxial In2O3 thin films grown on Y-stabilised ZrO2(111).

    PubMed

    Zhang, K H L; Lazarov, V K; Veal, T D; Oropeza, F E; McConville, C F; Egdell, R G; Walsh, A

    2011-08-24

    Epitaxial films of In(2)O(3) have been grown on Y-stabilised ZrO(2)(111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy over a range of thicknesses between 35 and 420 nm. The thinnest films are strained, but display a 'cross-hatch' morphology associated with a network of misfit dislocations which allow partial accommodation of the lattice mismatch. With increasing thickness a 'dewetting' process occurs and the films break up into micron sized mesas, which coalesce into continuous films at the highest coverages. The changes in morphology are accompanied by a progressive release of strain and an increase in carrier mobility to a maximum value of 73 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The optical band gap in strained ultrathin films is found to be smaller than for thicker films. Modelling of the system, using a combination of classical pair-wise potentials and ab initio density functional theory, provides a microscopic description of the elastic contributions to the strained epitaxial growth, as well as the electronic effects that give rise to the observed band gap changes. The band gap increase induced by the uniaxial compression is offset by the band gap reduction associated with the epitaxial tensile strain.

  16. Nafion-stabilised bimetallic Pt–Cr nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs)† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ra16025e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G.; Sharma, S.

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the unique combination of alloying (Pt with Cr) and Nafion stabilisation to reap the benefits of catalyst systems with enhanced catalytic activity and improved durability in PEMFCs. Pt–Cr alloy nanoparticles stabilised with Nafion were chosen in the current study owing to their higher stability in acidic and oxidising media at high temperatures compared to other Pt-transition metal alloys (e.g. Pt–Ni, Pt–Co). Two different precursor : reducing agent (1 : 10 and 1 : 20) ratios were used in order to prepare two different alloys, denoted as Pt–Cr 10 and Pt–Cr 20. The Pt–Cr 20 alloy system (with composition Pt80Cr20) demonstrated higher electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction compared to commercial Pt/C (TKK) catalysts. Accelerated stress tests and single cell tests revealed that Nafion stabilised alloy catalyst systems displayed significantly enhanced durability (only ∼20% loss of ECSA) compared with Pt/C (50% loss of ECSA) due to improved catalyst–ionomer interaction. Furthermore, the Pt–Cr 20 alloy system demonstrated a current density comparable to that of Pt/C making them promising potential electrocatalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. PMID:27774145

  17. Does mutual interference always stabilize predator-prey dynamics? A comparison of models.

    PubMed

    Arditi, Roger; Callois, Jean-Marc; Tyutyunov, Yuri; Jost, Christian

    2004-11-01

    Based on a qualitative analysis of ODE systems, the dynamic properties of alternative predator-prey models with predator-dependent functional response have been compared in order to study the role that predator interference plays in the stabilisation of trophic systems. The models considered for interference have different mathematical expressions and different conceptual foundations. Despite these differences, they give essentially the same qualitative results: when interference is low, increasing it has a positive effect on asymptotic stability and thus on the resilience of the biological system. When it is high, it is the contrary (with logistic prey growth, increasing the interference parameter ensures stability but leads to very small predator densities). Possible consequences on the evolution of the interference level in real ecosystems are discussed.

  18. Persuasion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, Gérard; Deffuant, Guillaume; Amblard, Frédéric

    2005-08-01

    We here discuss a model of continuous opinion dynamics in which agents adjust continuous opinions as a result of random binary encounters whenever their difference in opinion is below a given threshold. We concentrate on the version of the model in the presence of few extremists which might drive the dynamics to generalized extremism. A network version of the dynamics is presented here, and its results are compared to those previously obtained for the full-mixing case. The same dynamical regimes are observed, but in rather different parameter regions. We here show that the combination of meso-scale features resulting from the first interaction steps determines the asymptotic state of the dynamics.

  19. Dynamic triggering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  20. Dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Nalbantoğlu, Ö Ufuk

    2014-01-01

    Independent scoring of the aligned sections to determine the quality of biological sequence alignments enables recursive definitions of the overall alignment score. This property is not only biologically meaningful but it also provides the opportunity to find the optimal alignments using dynamic programming-based algorithms. Dynamic programming is an efficient problem solving technique for a class of problems that can be solved by dividing into overlapping subproblems. Pairwise sequence alignment techniques such as Needleman-Wunsch and Smith-Waterman algorithms are applications of dynamic programming on pairwise sequence alignment problems. These algorithms offer polynomial time and space solutions. In this chapter, we introduce the basic dynamic programming solutions for global, semi-global, and local alignment problems. Algorithmic improvements offering quadratic-time and linear-space programs and approximate solutions with space-reduction and seeding heuristics are discussed. We finally introduce the application of these techniques on multiple sequence alignment briefly.

  1. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, Sergey A.; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  2. Nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall.

    PubMed

    Suslov, Sergey A; Ooi, Andrew; Manasseh, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of microscopic bubbles near a rigid wall is investigated. Oscillations are driven by the ultrasonic pressure field that arises in various biomedical applications such as ultrasound imaging or targeted drug delivery. It is known that, when bubbles approach a blood-vessel wall, their linear dynamic response is modified. This modification may be very useful for real-time detection of bubbles that have found targets; in future therapeutic technologies, it may be useful for controlled release of medical agents encapsulating microbubbles. In this paper, the nonlinear response of microbubbles near a wall is studied. The Keller-Miksis-Parlitz equation is adopted, but modified to account for the presence of a rigid wall. This base model describes the time evolution of the bubble surface, which is assumed to remain spherical, and accounts for the effect of acoustic radiation losses owing to liquid compressibility in the momentum conservation. Two situations are considered: the base case of an isolated bubble in an unbounded medium, and a bubble near a rigid wall. In the latter case, the wall influence is modeled by including a symmetrically oscillating image bubble. The bubble dynamics is traced using a numerical solution of the model equation. Subsequently, Floquet theory is used to accurately detect the bifurcation point where bubble oscillations stop following the driving ultrasound frequency and undergo period-changing bifurcations. Of particular interest is the detection of the subcritical period-tripling and -quadrupling transition. The parametric bifurcation maps are obtained as functions of nondimensional parameters representing the bubble radius, the frequency and pressure amplitude of the driving ultrasound field, and the distance from the wall. It is shown that the presence of the wall generally stabilises the bubble dynamics, so that much larger values of the pressure amplitude are needed to generate nonlinear responses. Thus, a

  3. Prominence Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kucera, Terry; Kawashima, Rei; DeVore, C.; Karpen, Judy; Antiochos, Spiro

    2011-01-01

    Fine structure prominence dynamics are visible in the majority of high-spatial resolution data from Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). We present the results of a study investigating the nature of these horizontal and vertical flows and discuss them in the context of ion-neutral coupling in a partially ionized prominence plasma. We also discuss how models can help in the interpretation of these observations.

  4. Spinal alignment in surgical, multisegmental, transpedicular correction of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Nowakowski, Andrzej; Dworak, Lechosław B.; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Kaczmarczyk, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study was to discuss the variables influencing alignment mechanisms of the spine, with particular consideration of post-surgical alignment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The analysis is based on information currently available in the literature, and on the authors’ own experience, which includes surgical material from over 2200 cases of idiopathic scoliosis. Over 50% of cases of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis are decompensated before surgical treatment. Spinal alignment is most significantly influenced by the position of the pelvis. Surgical restoration of lumbar lordosis is more important than attempting to restore thoracic kyphosis in the sagittal plane. The sagittal profile has an essential impact on spinal alignment. The same curves in the coronal plane can have various 3-dimensional configurations. Clinical difficulties in the assessment of thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis result from the fact that they undergo constant change with age. Thoracic hypokyphosis diagnosed before surgery is a very frequent symptom of curve progression. The presence of proximal (thoraco-thoracic) and distal (thoraco-lumbar) junctional kyphosis is very important for planning the scope of spondylodesis. The natural tendency of the spine for alignment (compensation) after surgery nowadays occurs more naturally by applying derotational forces through pedicle screws, compared to the distraction devices (eg, Harrington rod) used in the past. PMID:23229319

  5. Partitioning dynamic electron correlation energy: Viewing Møller-Plesset correlation energies through Interacting Quantum Atom (IQA) energy partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonagh, James L.; Vincent, Mark A.; Popelier, Paul L. A.

    2016-10-01

    Here MP2, MP3 and MP4(SDQ) are energy-partitioned for the first time within the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) context, as proof-of-concept for H2, He2 and HF. Energies are decomposed into four primary energy contributions: (i) atomic self-energies, and atomic interaction energies comprising of (ii) Coulomb, (iii) exchange and (iv) dynamic election correlation terms. We generate and partition one- and two-particle density-matrices to obtain all atomic energy components. This work suggests that, in terms of Van der Waals dispersion, the correlation energies represent an atomic stabilisation, by proximity to other atoms, as opposed to direct interactions with other nearby atoms.

  6. Forest dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  7. Forest dynamics.

    PubMed

    Frelich, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Forest dynamics encompass changes in stand structure, species composition, and species interactions with disturbance and environment over a range of spatial and temporal scales. For convenience, spatial scale is defined as individual tree, neighborhood, stand, and landscape. Whether a given canopy-leveling disturbance will initiate a sequence of development in structure with little change in composition or initiate an episode of succession depends on a match or mismatch, respectively, with traits of the dominant tree species that allow the species to survive disturbance. When these match, certain species-disturbance type combinations lock in a pattern of stand and landscape dynamics that can persist for several generations of trees; thus, dominant tree species regulate, as well as respond to, disturbance. A complex interaction among tree species, neighborhood effects, disturbance type and severity, landform, and soils determines how stands of differing composition form and the mosaic of stands that compose the landscape. Neighborhood effects (e.g., serotinous seed rain, sprouting, shading, leaf-litter chemistry, and leaf-litter physical properties) operate at small spatial extents of the individual tree and its neighbors but play a central role in forest dynamics by contributing to patch formation at stand scales and dynamics of the entire landscape. Dominance by tree species with neutral to negative neighborhood effects leads to unstable landscape dynamics in disturbance-prone regions, wherein most stands are undergoing succession; stability can only occur under very low-severity disturbance regimes. Dominance by species with positive effects leads to stable landscape dynamics wherein only a small proportion of stands undergo succession at any one time. Positive neighborhood effects are common in temperate and boreal zones, whereas negative effects are more common in tropical climates. Landscapes with positive dynamics have alternate categories of dynamics

  8. Characterising dynamic non-linearity in floating wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupton, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Fully coupled aero-hydro-control-elastic codes are being developed to cope with the new modelling challenges presented by floating wind turbines, but there is also a place for more efficient methods of analysis. One option is linearisation and analysis in the frequency domain. For this to be an effective method, the non-linearities in the system must be well understood. The present study focusses on understanding the dynamic response of the rotor to the overall platform motion, as would arise from wave loading, by using a simple model of a floating wind turbine with a rigid tower and flexible rotor (represented by hinged rigid blades). First, an equation of motion of the blade is derived and an approximate solution for the blade response is found using the perturbation method. Secondly, the full non-linear solution is found by time- domain simulation. The response is found to be linear at lower platform pitching frequencies, becoming non-linear at higher frequencies, with the approximate solution giving good results for weakly non-linear behaviour. Higher rotor speeds have a stabilising effect on the response. In the context of typical floating turbine parameters, it is concluded that the blade flapwise response is likely to be linear.

  9. Postfire seedling dynamics and performance in Pinus halepensis Mill. populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskalakou, Evangelia N.; Thanos, Costas A.

    2010-09-01

    Postfire dynamics of Aleppo pine seedling density, survival and growth were assessed in five burned forests of Attica, Greece (Stamata, Villia, Avlona, Kapandriti and Agios Stefanos) through the establishment of permanent experimental plots. All emerging seedlings were tagged and their survival and growth monitored at regular intervals. Seedling density dynamics show an initial, steep increase (to maximum values 2.9-4.6 seedlings m -2) followed by a gradual decrease that levels off at the second and third postfire year (1.3-3.0 seedlings m -2); similarly, postfire seedling survival more or less stabilised at 30-50%, 2-3 years after fire. On the basis of density and mortality trends as well as relevant bibliographic data, it is predicted that very dense, mature forests (10.000 trees ha -1 or more) will be reinstated within 15-20 years. During the first 5-7 postfire years, seedling/sapling annual height followed linear trends with various yearly rates, ranging mostly between 8 and 15 cm (and 27-30 cm in two exceptional, fast growing cases). Within an individual growth season, seedling height dynamics were found to follow sigmoid curves with growth increment peaks in mid-spring. The time (on a monthly basis) of seedling emergence did not affect seedling growth or survival. On the other hand, for the first time under natural conditions, it has been shown that cotyledon number per seedling, an indirect measure of both seed size and initial photosynthetic capacity, significantly affected seedling survival but not growth. Seedlings bearing a higher number of cotyledons, presumably derived from larger seeds, showed greater survival at the end of the first postfire year than seedlings with fewer cotyledons. A postfire selective pressure, favouring large seed size, is postulated to counteract with a contrasting one, which favours small seed size, expressed during fire-free conditions.

  10. Dynamics & Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-06

    This project takes the first steps towards a “Compressive Information Extraction” paradigm: Unmanned vehicles Flight and perch sensors Human in the...the program has solid efforts in control of MAVs, hypersonic vehicles , smart materials and biological systems. • Support of fundamental research...BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF PORTFOLIO: Developing mathematical theory and algorithms based on the interplay of dynamical systems and

  11. Dynamism & Detail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    New material discovered in the study of cell research is presented for the benefit of biology teachers. Huge amounts of data are being generated in fields like cellular dynamics, and it is felt that people's understanding of the cell is becoming much more complex and detailed.

  12. Cyclostationary analysis with logarithmic variance stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, Pietro; Shahriar, Md Rifat

    2016-03-01

    Second order cyclostationary (CS2) components in vibration or acoustic emission signals are typical symptoms of a wide variety of faults in rotating and alternating mechanical systems. The square envelope spectrum (SES), obtained via Hilbert transform of the original signal, is at the basis of the most common indicators used for detection of CS2 components. It has been shown that the SES is equivalent to an autocorrelation of the signal's discrete Fourier transform, and that CS2 components are a cause of high correlations in the frequency domain of the signal, thus resulting in peaks in the SES. Statistical tests have been proposed to determine if peaks in the SES are likely to belong to a normal variability in the signal or if they are proper symptoms of CS2 components. Despite the need for automated fault recognition and the theoretical soundness of these tests, this approach to machine diagnostics has been mostly neglected in industrial applications. In fact, in a series of experimental applications, even with proper pre-whitening steps, it has been found that healthy machines might produce high spectral correlations and therefore result in a highly biased SES distribution which might cause a series of false positives. In this paper a new envelope spectrum is defined, with the theoretical intent of rendering the hypothesis test variance-free. This newly proposed indicator will prove unbiased in case of multiple CS2 sources of spectral correlation, thus reducing the risk of false alarms.

  13. Confinement stabilises single crystal vaterite rods.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Anna S; Albarracin, Eduardo J; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Ihli, Johannes; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2014-05-11

    Single-crystals of vaterite, the least-stable anhydrous polymorph of CaCO3, are rare in biogenic and synthetic systems. We here describe the synthesis of high aspect ratio single crystal vaterite rods under additive-free conditions by precipitating CaCO3 within the cylindrical pores of track-etch membranes.

  14. Drop dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The drop dynamics module is a Spacelab-compatible acoustic positioning and control system for conducting drop dynamics experiments in space. It consists basically of a chamber, a drop injector system, an acoustic positioning system, and a data collection system. The principal means of collecting data is by a cinegraphic camera. The drop is positioned in the center of the chamber by forces created by standing acoustic waves generated in the nearly cubical chamber (about 12 cm on a side). The drop can be spun or oscillated up to fission by varying the phse and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The system is designed to perform its experiments unattended, except for start-up and shutdown events and other unique events that require the attention of the Spacelab payload specialist.

  15. Chromatin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Michael R.; Spector, David L.

    2010-01-01

    The expression patterns of many protein-coding genes are orchestrated in response to exogenous stimuli, as well as cell-type-specific developmental programs. In recent years, researchers have shown that dynamic chromatin movements and interactions in the nucleus play a crucial role in gene regulation. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the organization of chromatin in the interphase nucleus and the impact of chromatin dynamics on gene expression. We also discuss the current state of knowledge with regard to the localization of active and inactive genes within the three-dimensional nuclear space. Furthermore, we address recent findings that demonstrate the movements of chromosomal regions and genomic loci in association with changes in transcriptional activity. Finally, we discuss the role of intra-and interchromosomal interactions in the control of coregulated genes. PMID:20462379

  16. Dynamic UNITY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    present the first of our example Dynamic UNITY systems, Eratosthenes ’ prime number sieve. This example is chosen for its determinism; we know the...element of the sequence is the ith prime number.” We know of an algorithm to generate arbitrarily large prime numbers: Eratosthenes ’ prime number sieve. We...filters the in- teger sequences as necessary to implement Eratosthenes ’ algorithm. We introduce the function SIEVE for use in the following proofs. This

  17. Dynamic Maternal Gradients Control Timing and Shift-Rates for Drosophila Gap Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Verd, Berta; Crombach, Anton

    2017-01-01

    Pattern formation during development is a highly dynamic process. In spite of this, few experimental and modelling approaches take into account the explicit time-dependence of the rules governing regulatory systems. We address this problem by studying dynamic morphogen interpretation by the gap gene network in Drosophila melanogaster. Gap genes are involved in segment determination during early embryogenesis. They are activated by maternal morphogen gradients encoded by bicoid (bcd) and caudal (cad). These gradients decay at the same time-scale as the establishment of the antero-posterior gap gene pattern. We use a reverse-engineering approach, based on data-driven regulatory models called gene circuits, to isolate and characterise the explicitly time-dependent effects of changing morphogen concentrations on gap gene regulation. To achieve this, we simulate the system in the presence and absence of dynamic gradient decay. Comparison between these simulations reveals that maternal morphogen decay controls the timing and limits the rate of gap gene expression. In the anterior of the embyro, it affects peak expression and leads to the establishment of smooth spatial boundaries between gap domains. In the posterior of the embryo, it causes a progressive slow-down in the rate of gap domain shifts, which is necessary to correctly position domain boundaries and to stabilise the spatial gap gene expression pattern. We use a newly developed method for the analysis of transient dynamics in non-autonomous (time-variable) systems to understand the regulatory causes of these effects. By providing a rigorous mechanistic explanation for the role of maternal gradient decay in gap gene regulation, our study demonstrates that such analyses are feasible and reveal important aspects of dynamic gene regulation which would have been missed by a traditional steady-state approach. More generally, it highlights the importance of transient dynamics for understanding complex regulatory

  18. Dynamical monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.; Ivory, M.; Aubin, S.; Delos, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Integrable Hamiltonian systems are said to display nontrivial monodromy if fundamental action-angle loops defined on phase-space tori change their topological structure when the system is carried around a circuit. In an earlier paper it was shown that this topological change can occur as a result of time evolution under certain rather abstract flows in phase space. In the present paper, we show that the same topological change can occur as a result of application of ordinary forces. We also show how this dynamical phenomenon could be observed experimentally in classical or in quantum systems.

  19. PREFACE: Cooperative dynamics Cooperative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gov, Nir

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics within living cells are dominated by non-equilibrium processes that consume chemical energy (usually in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate) and convert it into mechanical forces and motion. The mechanisms that allow this conversion process are mostly driven by the components of the cytoskeleton: (i) directed (polar) polymerization of filaments (either actin or microtubules) and (ii) molecular motors. The forces and motions produced by these two components of the cytoskeleton give rise to the formation of cellular shapes, and drive the intracellular transport and organization. It is clear that these systems present a multi-scale challenge, from the physics of the molecular processes to the organization of many interacting units. Understanding the physical nature of these systems will have a large impact on many fundamental problems in biology and break new grounds in the field of non-equilibrium physics. This field of research has seen a rapid development over the last ten years. Activities in this area range from theoretical and experimental work on the underlying fundamental (bio)physics at the single-molecule level, to investigations (in vivo and in vitro) of the dynamics and patterns of macroscopic pieces of 'living matter'. In this special issue we have gathered contributions that span the whole spectrum of length- and complexity-scales in this field. Some of the works demonstrate how active forces self-organize within the polymerizing cytoskeleton, on the level of cooperative cargo transport via motors or due to active fluxes at the cell membrane. On a larger scale, it is shown that polar filaments coupled to molecular motors give rise to a huge variety of surprising dynamics and patterns: spontaneously looping rings of gliding microtubules, and emergent phases of self-organized filaments and motors in different geometries. All of these articles share the common feature of being out-of-equilibrium, driven by metabolism. As demonstrated here

  20. Sunspot dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes recent results of our theoretical and observational work on dynamical phenomena in sunspots. The overall goal of this research has been a better understanding of the various oscillatory, transient, and steady motions in a sunspot and their relation to the basic structure of the sunspot. The principal topics of the research reported here are the following: (1) sunspot seismology, i.e., the study of the interaction of solar p-modes with a sunspot as a probe of the subsurface structure of a sunspot; (2) local sources of acoustic waves in the solar photosphere; and (3) siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes and their relation to the photospheric Evershed flow and to intense magnetic elements outside of sunspots.

  1. Sunspot dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John H.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this research was the understanding of the various oscillatory, transient, and quasi-steady motions in sunspots and the basic structure of a sunspot. The research involved both theoretical modeling (based on thermohydrodynamic theory) and observations of dynamical phenomena in sunspots. The principal topics of the research were sunspot seismology (the interaction of solar p-modes with a sunspot as a probe of the subsurface structure of a sunspot); three minute umbral oscillations and their relation to the structure of the umbral atmosphere; siphon flows in isolated magnetic flux tubes and their relation to the photospheric Evershed flow and to intense magnetic elements outside of sunspots; and more general theoretical work on magneto-atmospheric waves. Here, a summary of results is given.

  2. NuSAP modulates the dynamics of kinetochore microtubules by attenuating MCAK depolymerisation activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chenyu; Zhang, Yajun; Yang, Qiaoyun; Ye, Fan; Sun, Stella Ying; Chen, Ee Sin; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    2016-01-01

    Nucleolar and spindle-associated protein (NuSAP) is a microtubule-associated protein that functions as a microtubule stabiliser. Depletion of NuSAP leads to severe mitotic defects, however the mechanism by which NuSAP regulates mitosis remains elusive. In this study, we identify the microtubule depolymeriser, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK), as a novel binding partner of NuSAP. We show that NuSAP regulates the dynamics and depolymerisation activity of MCAK. Phosphorylation of MCAK by Aurora B kinase, a component of the chromosomal passenger complex, significantly enhances the interaction of NuSAP with MCAK and modulates the effects of NuSAP on the depolymerisation activity of MCAK. Our results reveal an underlying mechanism by which NuSAP controls kinetochore microtubule dynamics spatially and temporally by modulating the depolymerisation function of MCAK in an Aurora B kinase-dependent manner. Hence, this study provides new insights into the function of NuSAP in spindle formation during mitosis. PMID:26733216

  3. Dynamics of pseudotachylytes in volcanic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, Y.; Mitchell, T. M.; Heap, M. J.; Hirose, T.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes in volcanic systems and structures may play a major role in strain localisation and deformation. Pseudotachylyte formation is typically initiated by nonequilibrium melting of silicate rocks. Such processes may however approach chemical equilibrium if slip is sufficiently sustained. The chemical mixing of initially disequilibrium silicate melts is controlled by diffusion and convection. The latter is strongly enhanced by frictional slip. The rheological properties of silicate melts depend on chemical composition, temperature, the presence of crystals and bubbles, as well as strain rate (at high rates). Thus the complexity of dynamics and rheological behaviour of pseudotachylyte formation associated with volcanic structures requires experimental investigation. Here, high-velocity (1500 rpm equivalent to 2 m/s) friction experiments on andesitic and basaltic volcanic rocks are combined with rheological, geochemical and microstructural analyses as well as neutron-computed-tomography to constrain the development of pseudotachylytes in volcanic structures and their rheological control on the frictional properties of volcano-tectonic faults. The formation of a frictional melt occurs at 1050+/-50 °C and coincides with a peak in the coefficient of friction (1.25 for the andesite and 0.6 for the basalt). As friction is sustained, the coefficient of friction decreases by about 20% to stabilisation while the temperature rises by ca. 300 °C. Post-experiment FE-SEM and SEM image analysis combined with electron microprobe data show a gradation from the host rock, to a thin, outer region of chemically heterogeneous initial melts (protomelts), and an inner region of chemically homogeneous frictional melts in the core of the slip zone. The initial protomelts chemically reflect the composition of the local crystal assemblage and as such, their rheological behaviour may vary locally. The frictional melt in the slip zone, however, chemically reflects the composition

  4. Dynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingshirn, C.

    The purpose of this chapter is to present the results of the dynamics of exciton (polariton)s or more generally of electron-hole pairs. For a recent review of this topic concentrating on quantum wells, see Davies and Jagadish (Laser Photon. Rev. 3(1), 1(2008)). We neither consider the dynamics of carriers, for example, their relaxation time entering in Hall mobility or electrical conductivity, nor the dynamics of phonons or spins, respectively. We give here only a very small selection of references to these topics (Baxter and Schmuttenmaer, J. Phys. Chem. B, 110:25229, 2006; Queiroz et al. Superlattice Microstruct. 42:270, 2007; Niehaus and Schwarz, Superlattice Microstruct. 42:299, 2007; Lee et al., J. Appl. Phys. 93:4939, 2003; A. K Azad, J. Han, W. Zhang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 88:021103, 2006; Janssen et al., QELS 2008 IEEE 2; D. Lagarde et al., Phys. Stat. Sol. C 4:472, 2007; S. Gosh et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86:232507, 2005; W. K. Liu et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 98:186804, 2007). The main characteristic time constants relevant to optical properties close to the fundamental absorption edge are the dephasing time T 2, (i.e. the time after which the polarization amplitude of the optically excited electron-hole pair loses the coherence with the driving light field), the intra band or inter sub band relaxation times T 3 (i.e. the time it takes for the electron-hole pairs to relax from their initial state of excitation to a certain other state e.g. to a thermal distribution with a temperature equal to or possibly still above lattice temperature) and finally the lifetime T 1 (i.e. the time until the electron-hole pairs recombine). The characteristic time constants T 2 and T 1 are also known as transverse and longitudinal relaxation times, respectively. Their inverses are the corresponding rate constants. T 2 is inversely proportional to the homogeneous width Γ, and T 1 includes both the radiative and the generally dominating non-radiative recombination (Hauser et al., Appl

  5. Dynamic refractometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A refractometer computer controls the rotation of a rotary plate upon which are mounted a prism optically coupled via an optical window to a spectroscopic cell holding a resin exhibiting a dynamic refractive index during photocuring. The computer system positions the prism and spectroscopic cell relative to a visible light laser which illuminates the prism-resin interface at selected incidence angles. A photodetector mounted on the plate generates a signal to the computer proportional to intensity of an internally reflected light beam. A curing light is selectively transmitted through the prism and into the photocurable resin. The refractometer determines the intensity of the internally reflected beam a selected incidence angles and determines the effective refractive index curve of the resin at an uncured state and, optionally, at a completely cured state. Next, an amount of uncured resin and selected optical components to be joined by the resin is placed in the spectroscopic cell and irradiated with the UV light. The refractometer is fixed at a selected incidence angle and measures the intensity of an internally reflected light beam of light throughout the cure cycle. The refractometer determines the resin's refractive index of the polymeric mixture by means of extrapolation of a horizontal shift in the effective refractive index curve of the resin from an uncured state to a selected point in the cure cycle.

  6. Internet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukose, Rajan Mathew

    The World Wide Web and the Internet are rapidly expanding spaces, of great economic and social significance, which offer an opportunity to study many phenomena, often previously inaccessible, on an unprecedented scale and resolution with relative ease. These phenomena are measurable on the scale of tens of millions of users and hundreds of millions of pages. By virtue of nearly complete electronic mediation, it is possible in principle to observe the time and ``spatial'' evolution of nearly all choices and interactions. This cyber-space therefore provides a view into a number of traditional research questions (from many academic disciplines) and creates its own new phenomena accessible for study. Despite its largely self-organized and dynamic nature, a number of robust quantitative regularities are found in the aggregate statistics of interesting and useful quantities. These regularities can be understood with the help of models that draw on ideas from statistical physics as well as other fields such as economics, psychology and decision theory. This thesis develops models that can account for regularities found in the statistics of Internet congestion and user surfing patterns and discusses some practical consequences. practical consequences.

  7. Originator dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Manapat, Michael; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Bürger, Reinhard; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    We study the origin of evolution. Evolution is based on replication, mutation, and selection. But how does evolution begin? When do chemical kinetics turn into evolutionary dynamics? We propose “prelife” and “prevolution” as the logical precursors of life and evolution. Prelife generates sequences of variable length. Prelife is a generative chemistry that proliferates information and produces diversity without replication. The resulting “prevolutionary dynamics” have mutation and selection. We propose an equation that allows us to investigate the origin of evolution. In one limit, this “originator equation” gives the classical selection equation. In the other limit, we obtain “prelife.” There is competition between life and prelife and there can be selection for or against replication. Simple prelife equations with uniform rate constants have the property that longer sequences are exponentially less frequent than shorter ones. But replication can reverse such an ordering. As the replication rate increases, some longer sequences can become more frequent than shorter ones. Thus, replication can lead to “reversals” in the equilibrium portraits. We study these reversals, which mark the transition from prelife to life in our model. If the replication potential exceeds a critical value, then life replicates into existence. PMID:18996397

  8. Void Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Nelson D.; Paz, Dante; Lares, Marcelo; Ceccarelli, Laura; Lambas, Diego Garcí A.; Cai, Yan-Chuan; Li, Baojiu

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic voids are becoming key players in testing the physics of our Universe.Here we concentrate on the abundances and the dynamics of voids as these are among the best candidatesto provide information on cosmological parameters. Cai, Padilla & Li (2014)use the abundance of voids to tell apart Hu & Sawicki f(R) models from General Relativity. An interestingresult is that even though, as expected, voids in the dark matter field are emptier in f(R) gravity due to the fifth force expellingaway from the void centres, this result is reversed when haloes are used to find voids. The abundance of voids in this casebecomes even lower in f(R) compared to GR for large voids. Still, the differences are significant and thisprovides a way to tell apart these models. The velocity field differences between f(R) and GR, on the other hand, arethe same for halo voids and for dark matter voids.Paz et al. (2013), concentrate on the velocity profiles around voids. First they show the necessityof four parameters to describe the density profiles around voids given two distinct voidpopulations, voids-in-voids and voids-in-clouds. This profile is used to predict peculiar velocities around voids,and the combination of the latter with void density profiles allows the construction of modelvoid-galaxy cross-correlation functions with redshift space distortions. When these modelsare tuned to fit the measured correlation functions for voids and galaxies in the SloanDigital Sky Survey, small voids are found to be of the void-in-cloud type, whereas largerones are consistent with being void-in-void. This is a novel result that is obtaineddirectly from redshift space data around voids. These profiles can be used toremove systematics on void-galaxy Alcock-Pacinsky tests coming from redshift-space distortions.

  9. Dissecting the stability of a beta-hairpin peptide that folds in water: NMR and molecular dynamics analysis of the beta-turn and beta-strand contributions to folding.

    PubMed

    Griffiths-Jones, S R; Maynard, A J; Searle, M S

    1999-10-08

    NMR studies of the folding and conformational properties of a beta-hairpin peptide, several peptide fragments of the hairpin, and sequence-modified analogues, have enabled the various contributions to beta-hairpin stability in water to be dissected. Temperature and pH-induced unfolding studies indicate that the folding-unfolding equilibrium approximates to a two-state model. The hairpin is highly resistant to denaturation and is still significantly folded in 7 M urea at 298 K. Thermodynamic analysis shows the hairpin to fold in water with a significant change in heat capacity, however, DeltaCp degrees in 7 M urea is reduced. V/Y-->A mutations on one strand of the hairpin reduce folding to <10 %, consistent with a hydrophobic stabilisation model. We show that in a truncated peptide (residues 6-16) lacking the hydrophobic residues on one beta-strand, the type I' Asn-Gly turn in the sequence SINGKK is significantly populated in water in the absence of interstrand hydrophobic contacts. Unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations of unfolding, using an explicit solvation model, show that the conformation of the NG turn persists for longer than the AG analogue, which has a much lower propensity for type I' turn formation from a data base analysis of preferred turns. The origin of the high stability of the Asn-Gly turn is not entirely clear; data base analysis of 66 NG turns, together with molecular dynamics simulations, reveals no participation of the Asn side-chain in turn-stabilising interactions with the peptide backbone. However, hydration analysis of the molecular dynamics simulations reveals a pocket of "high density" water bridging between the Asn side-chain and peptide main-chain that suggests solvent-mediated interactions may play an important role in modulating phi,psi propensities in the NG turn region.

  10. Structural and Dynamic Requirements for Optimal Activity of the Essential Bacterial Enzyme Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, C. F.; Porebski, B. T.; Griffin, M. D. W.; Dobson, R. C. J.; Perugini, M. A.; Gerrard, J. A.; Buckle, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) is an essential enzyme involved in the lysine biosynthesis pathway. DHDPS from E. coli is a homotetramer consisting of a ‘dimer of dimers’, with the catalytic residues found at the tight-dimer interface. Crystallographic and biophysical evidence suggest that the dimers associate to stabilise the active site configuration, and mutation of a central dimer-dimer interface residue destabilises the tetramer, thus increasing the flexibility and reducing catalytic efficiency and substrate specificity. This has led to the hypothesis that the tetramer evolved to optimise the dynamics within the tight-dimer. In order to gain insights into DHDPS flexibility and its relationship to quaternary structure and function, we performed comparative Molecular Dynamics simulation studies of native tetrameric and dimeric forms of DHDPS from E. coli and also the native dimeric form from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). These reveal a striking contrast between the dynamics of tetrameric and dimeric forms. Whereas the E. coli DHDPS tetramer is relatively rigid, both the E. coli and MRSA DHDPS dimers display high flexibility, resulting in monomer reorientation within the dimer and increased flexibility at the tight-dimer interface. The mutant E. coli DHDPS dimer exhibits disorder within its active site with deformation of critical catalytic residues and removal of key hydrogen bonds that render it inactive, whereas the similarly flexible MRSA DHDPS dimer maintains its catalytic geometry and is thus fully functional. Our data support the hypothesis that in both bacterial species optimal activity is achieved by fine tuning protein dynamics in different ways: E. coli DHDPS buttresses together two dimers, whereas MRSA dampens the motion using an extended tight-dimer interface. PMID:22685390

  11. Dynamic light-scattering measurement comparability of nanomaterial suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickel, Carmen; Angelstorf, Judith; Bienert, Ralf; Burkart, Corinna; Gabsch, Stephan; Giebner, Sabrina; Haase, Andrea; Hellack, Bryan; Hollert, Henner; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Jungmann, Dirk; Kaminski, Heinz; Luch, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M.; Nogowski, André; Oetken, Matthias; Schaeffer, Andreas; Schiwy, Andreas; Schlich, Karsten; Stintz, Michael; von der Kammer, Frank; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.

    2014-02-01

    Increased use of nanomaterials in everyday products leads to their environmental release and therefore, the information need on their fate and behaviour. Nanomaterials have to be suspended with high repeatability and comparability for studies on environmental effects. They also have to be well characterised with a focus on the state of agglomeration and particle size distribution. Dynamic light-scattering (DLS) is a common technique used for these measurements. If suspensions are prepared in different laboratories, then concern has risen about the comparability of the measured results, especially when different DLS instruments are used. Therefore, for quality assurance, a round-robin test was conducted to assess the comparability of different DLS instruments and a dispersion protocol in ten independent laboratories. Polystyrene and TiO2 were chosen as test (nano)materials. For the comparability of the DLS instruments, the average sizes of the PSL and a stabilised TiO2 suspension were measured. The measured average hydrodynamic diameter shows an overall good inter-laboratory comparability. For the PSL suspension, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 201 ± 13 nm and for the TiO2 suspension an average diameter of 224 ± 24 nm were detected. For the TiO2 suspension that was prepared at each laboratory following an established suspension preparation protocol, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 211 ± 11 nm was detected. The measured average particle size (mode) increased up to 284 nm with a high standard deviation of 119 nm if the preparation protocol could not established and different procedures or different equipment were employed. This study shows that no significant differences between the employed DLS instrument types were determined. It was also shown that comparable measurements and suspension preparation could be achieved if well-defined suspension preparation protocols and comparable equipment can be used.

  12. How do microbubbles and ultrasound interact? Basic physical, dynamic and engineering principles.

    PubMed

    Azmin, Mehrdad; Harfield, Caroline; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Edirisinghe, Mohan; Stride, Eleanor

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents consisting of gas microbubbles stabilised by a polymer or surfactant coating have been in clinical use for several decades. Research into the biomedical uses of microbubbles, however, remains a highly active and growing field. This is largely due to their considerable versatility and the wide range of applications for which they have demonstrated potential benefits. In addition to contrast enhancement, diagnostic applications include: perfusion mapping and quantification and molecular imaging. In drug and gene therapy microbubbles can be used as vehicles which are inherently traceable in vivo and can provide both targeted and controlled release. In addition, the dynamic behaviour of the microbubbles in response to ultrasound excitation contributes to the therapeutic process. At low intensities microbubbles have been shown to mediate reversible enhancement of cell and endothelial permeability, including temporary opening of the blood brain barrier. At higher intensities they have been used as means of increasing the efficiency of thrombolysis, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery and lithotripsy. The aim of this review is to describe the key physical principles which determine how microbubbles and ultrasound interact and the implications for their design, preparation and exploitation in diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  13. Dynamics of additional food provided predator-prey system with mutually interfering predators.

    PubMed

    Prasad, B S R V; Banerjee, Malay; Srinivasu, P D N

    2013-11-01

    Use of additional/alternative food source to predators is one of the widely recognised practices in the field of biological control. Both theoretical and experimental works point out that quality and quantity of additional food play a vital role in the controllability of the pest. Theoretical studies carried out previously in this direction indicate that incorporating mutual interference between predators can stabilise the system. Experimental evidence also point out that mutual interference between predators can affect the outcome of the biological control programs. In this article dynamics of additional food provided predator-prey system in the presence of mutual interference between predators has been studied. The mutual interference between predators is modelled using Beddington-DeAngelis type functional response. The system analysis highlights the role of mutual interference on the success of biological control programs when predators are provided with additional food. The model results indicate the possibility of stable coexistence of predators with low prey population levels. This is in contrast to classical predator-prey models wherein this stable co-existence at low prey population levels is not possible. This study classifies the characteristics of biological control agents and additional food (of suitable quality and quantity), permitting the eco-managers to enhance the success rate of biological control programs.

  14. An upwind vertex centred Finite Volume solver for Lagrangian solid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Miquel; Gil, Antonio J.; Bonet, Javier; Lee, Chun Hean

    2015-11-01

    A vertex centred Jameson-Schmidt-Turkel (JST) finite volume algorithm was recently introduced by the authors (Aguirre et al., 2014 [1]) in the context of fast solid isothermal dynamics. The spatial discretisation scheme was constructed upon a Lagrangian two-field mixed (linear momentum and the deformation gradient) formulation presented as a system of conservation laws [2-4]. In this paper, the formulation is further enhanced by introducing a novel upwind vertex centred finite volume algorithm with three key novelties. First, a conservation law for the volume map is incorporated into the existing two-field system to extend the range of applications towards the incompressibility limit (Gil et al., 2014 [5]). Second, the use of a linearised Riemann solver and reconstruction limiters is derived for the stabilisation of the scheme together with an efficient edge-based implementation. Third, the treatment of thermo-mechanical processes through a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state is incorporated in the proposed formulation. For completeness, the study of the eigenvalue structure of the resulting system of conservation laws is carried out to demonstrate hyperbolicity and obtain the correct time step bounds for non-isothermal processes. A series of numerical examples are presented in order to assess the robustness of the proposed methodology. The overall scheme shows excellent behaviour in shock and bending dominated nearly incompressible scenarios without spurious pressure oscillations, yielding second order of convergence for both velocities and stresses.

  15. Substrate-dependent dynamics of the multidrug efflux transporter AcrB of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Tamai, Rei; Yamazaki, Megumi; Inaba, Takehiko; Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Kawagishi, Ikuro

    2016-02-26

    The resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type xenobiotic efflux system plays a major role in the multidrug resistance of gram-negative bacteria. The only constitutively expressed RND system of Escherichia coli consists of the inner membrane transporter AcrB, the membrane fusion protein AcrA, and the outer membrane channel TolC. The latter two components are shared with another RND-type transporter AcrD, whose expression is induced by environmental stimuli. Here, we demonstrate how RND-type ternary complexes, which span two membranes and the cell wall, form in vivo. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy revealed that most fluorescent foci formed by AcrB fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) were stationary in the presence of TolC but showed lateral displacements when tolC was deleted. The fraction of stationary AcrB-GFP foci decreased with increasing levels of AcrD. We propose that the AcrB-containing complex becomes unstable upon the induction of AcrD, which presumably replaces AcrB, a process we call "transporter exchange." This instability is suppressed by AcrB-specific substrates, suggesting that the ternary complex is stabilised when it is in action. These results suggest that the assembly of the RND-type efflux system is dynamically regulated in response to external stimuli, shedding new light on the adaptive antibiotic resistance of bacteria.

  16. Dynamics of shoot vs. root C assessed by natural 13C abundance of their biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez-Millan, Mercedes; Dignac, Marie-France; Rumpel, Cornelia; Rasse, Daniel P.; Derenne, Sylvie

    2010-05-01

    Cutins and suberins are biopolyesters that have been suggested to significantly contribute to the stable pool of soil organic matter (SOM). They might be used as tracers for the above- or belowground origin of plant material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamics of shoot and root-derived biomarkers in soils using a wheat/maize (C3/C4) chronosequence. Our results suggest that α,?-alkanedioic acids can be considered as root specific markers and mid-chain hydroxy acids as shoot specific markers of wheat and maize in this agricultural soil. The changes of the 13C isotopic signatures of these markers with years of maize cropping after wheat evidenced their contrasted behaviour in soil. After 12 years of maize cropping, shoot markers present in soils probably originated from old C3 vegetation suggesting that new maize cutin added to soils was mostly degraded within a year. The reasons for long-term stabilisation of shoot biomarkers remain unclear. By contrast, maize root markers were highly incorporated into SOM during the first six years of maize crop, which suggested a selective preservation of root biomass when compared to shoots, possibly due to physical protection. The contrasting distribution of the plant-specific monomers in plants and soils might be explained by different chemical mechanisms leading to selective degradation or stabilization of some biomarkers.

  17. Using PHREEQC for modelling and simulation of dynamic leaching tests and scenarios.

    PubMed

    Tiruta-Barna, L

    2008-09-15

    This paper presents an extension of the application field of PHREEQC geochemical software for modelling the dynamic leaching tests (and scenarios) by taking into account the leachant compartment as complex reactive/transport system and the coupling of many reactive compartments linked by substance fluxes. This study focuses on the specific case of dynamic leaching of monolithic porous materials (particularly the case of continuous monolithic leaching test, CMLT) where reaction/diffusion occurs in the porous matrix and where the leachant is a complex reactor in which chemistry coupled with inter-phase mass transfer and convection processes take place. It is demonstrated here that the modelling of open reactors (convection) is possible with PHREEQC by using RATES and KINETICS keyword data blocks. The PHREEQC model was validated by results comparison with analytical solutions of the system equations. Coupling a diffusion compartment with an open reactor (complex boundary conditions for the diffusion equation) requires the introduction of a stagnant cell on the first grid cell of the diffusion compartment in TRANSPORT data block and the use of MIX function for model the monolith/leachant interface transfer. The proposed model was validated by comparison with numerical solutions obtained with MATLAB and by a numerical sensibility study. Finally, the model equations are given for a complex dynamic leaching process of a porous monolith involving beside reaction/diffusion in the monolith, reactions, interface mass transfers, gas absorption and convection in the leachant. Examples of PHREEQC modelling are presented: (1) the case of continuous leaching of a cement based material using carbonated water and (2) a field scale water storage pool constructed with a solidified/stabilised material. The comparison with the experimental leaching data shows the simulation results are very satisfying.

  18. Strain-Induced Reactivity in the Dynamic Covalent Chemistry of Macrocyclic Imines.

    PubMed

    Ratjen, Lars; Vantomme, Ghislaine; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-06

    The displacement of molecular structures from their thermodynamically most stable state by imposition of various types of electronic and conformational constraints generates highly strained entities that tend to release the accumulated strain energy by undergoing either structural changes or chemical reactions. The latter case amounts to strain-induced reactivity (SIR) that may enforce specific chemical transformations. A particular case concerns dynamic covalent chemistry which may present SIR, whereby reversible reactions are activated by coupling to a high-energy state. We herewith describe such a dynamic covalent chemical (DCC) system involving the reversible imine formation reaction. It is based on the formation of strained macrocyclic bis-imine metal complexes in which the macrocyclic ligand is in a high energy form enforced by the coordination of the metal cation. Subsequent demetallation generates a highly strained free macrocycle that releases its accumulated strain energy by hydrolysis and reassembly into a resting state. Specifically, the metal-templated condensation of a dialdehyde with a linear diamine leads to a bis-imine [1+1]-macrocyclic complex in which the macrocyclic ligand is in a coordination-enforced strained conformation. Removal of the metal cation by a competing ligand yields a highly reactive [1+1]-macrocycle, which then undergoes hydrolysis to transient non-cyclic aminoaldehyde species, which then recondense to a strain-free [2+2]-macrocyclic resting state. The process can be monitored by (1) H NMR spectroscopy. Energy differences between different conformational states have been evaluated by Hartree-Fock (HF) computations. One may note that the stabilisation of high-energy molecular forms by metal ion coordination followed by removal of the latter, offers a general procedure for producing out-of-equilibrium molecular states, the fate of which may then be examined, in particular when coupled to dynamic covalent chemical processes.

  19. Dynamics of Carroll particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2014-10-01

    We investigate particles whose dynamics are invariant under the Carroll group. Although a single, free such Carroll particle has no non-trivial dynamics (the Carroll particle does not move), we show that non-trivial dynamics exists for a set of interacting Carroll particles. Furthermore, we gauge the Carroll algebra and couple the Carroll particle to these gauge fields. It turns out that for such a coupled system, even a single Carroll particle can have non-trivial dynamics.

  20. Intramolecular and nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program focuses on three interconnected areas. The first involves the study of intramolecular dynamics, particularly of highly excited systems. The second area involves the use of nonlinear dynamics as a tool for the study of molecular dynamics and complex kinetics. The third area is the study of the classical/quantum correspondence for highly excited systems, particularly systems exhibiting classical chaos.

  1. Planning a dynamic kill

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, L.W.

    1996-05-01

    This article discusses the methodology, design philosophy, and guidelines for planning a dynamic-kill operation for a wild well. The topics covered are two methods of computer analysis for designing dynamic-kill requirements, the design process, determining the pumping spread, and the pitfalls that a designer faces in planning a dynamic kill.

  2. Dynamic Interactive Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabry, Khaled; Barker, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses the notions of interactivity and dynamicity of learning systems in relation to information technologies and design principles that can contribute to interactive and dynamic learning. It explores the concept of dynamic interactive learning systems based on the emerging generation of information as part of a…

  3. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting

  4. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  5. Dynamics at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  6. Modelling the dynamic response of Jakobshavn Isbræ, West Greenland, to calving rate perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondzio, J. H.; Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Kleiner, T.; Rückamp, M.; Humbert, A.; Larour, E.

    2015-10-01

    Calving is a major means of ice discharge of the Antarctic and Greenland Ice Sheets. The breaking off of icebergs changes the ice front configuration of marine terminating glaciers, which affects the stress regime of their upstream areas. Recent observations show the close correlation between the ice front position and the behaviour of many outlet glaciers. However, modelling of a glacier subject to calving poses various challenges. No universal calving rate parametrisation is known, and tracking of a moving ice front and the related boundary conditions in two or three spatial dimensions is non-trivial. Here, we present the theoretical and technical framework for a Level-Set Method, an implicit boundary tracking scheme, which we implemented into the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). The scheme allows us to study the dynamic response of a drainage basin to user-defined front ablation rates. We apply the method in a suite of experiments to Jakobshavn Isbræ, a major marine terminating outlet glacier of the western Greenland Ice Sheet. The model robustly reproduces the high sensitivity of the glacier to frontal ablation in form of calving. We find that enhanced calving is able to trigger significant acceleration of the ice stream. Upstream acceleration is sustained through a combination of various feedback mechanisms. However, lateral stress and ice influx into the trough are able to stabilise the ice stream. This study contributes to the present discussion on causes and effects of the continued changes occurring at Jakobshavn Isbræ, and emphasises that the incorporation of seasonal calving and dynamic lateral effects is key for realistic model projections of future global sea level rise on centennial time scales.

  7. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, Antonio; Bingham, Richard J.; Ballone, Pietro

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF{sub 6}]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]{sup +}) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]{sup +} into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]{sup +} and of POPC. The [bmim]{sup +} absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D{sub POPC}) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D{sub POPC} increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF{sub 6}] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  8. Modelling the effects of Zostera noltei meadows on sediment dynamics: application to the Arcachon lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kombiadou, Katerina; Ganthy, Florian; Verney, Romaric; Plus, Martin; Sottolichio, Aldo

    2014-10-01

    A three-dimensional model has been modified to describe the complex interactions between hydrodynamics, sediment dynamics and biological parameters in the presence of Zostera noltei. The model treats seagrass leafs as flexible blades that bend under hydrodynamic forcing and alter the local momentum and turbulence fluxes and, therefore, the benthic shear conditions; these changes cause related changes to the mass balance at the boundary of the bed, in turn affecting the suspended matter in the column and ultimately primary productivity and the growth of the dwarf-grass. Modelling parameters related to the impact of Z. noltei to the local flow and to erosion and deposition rates were calibrated using flume experimental measurements; results from the calibration of the model are presented and discussed. The coupled model is applied in the Arcachon Bay, an area with high environmental significance and large abundance of dwarf-grass meadows. In the present paper, results from preliminary applications of the model are presented and discussed; the effectiveness of the coupled model is assessed comparing modelling results with available field measurements of suspended sediment concentrations and seagrass growth parameters. The model generally reproduces sediment dynamics and dwarf-grass seasonal growth in the domain efficiently. Investigations regarding the effects of the vegetation to the near-bed hydrodynamics and to the sediment suspension in the domain show that dwarf-grass meadows play an important part to velocity attenuation and to sediment stabilisation, with flow and suspended sediment concentrations damping, compared to an unvegetated state, to reach 35-50 and 65 %, respectively, at peak seagrass growth.

  9. Dynamical principles in neuroscience

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Varona, Pablo; Selverston, Allen I.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2006-10-15

    Dynamical modeling of neural systems and brain functions has a history of success over the last half century. This includes, for example, the explanation and prediction of some features of neural rhythmic behaviors. Many interesting dynamical models of learning and memory based on physiological experiments have been suggested over the last two decades. Dynamical models even of consciousness now exist. Usually these models and results are based on traditional approaches and paradigms of nonlinear dynamics including dynamical chaos. Neural systems are, however, an unusual subject for nonlinear dynamics for several reasons: (i) Even the simplest neural network, with only a few neurons and synaptic connections, has an enormous number of variables and control parameters. These make neural systems adaptive and flexible, and are critical to their biological function. (ii) In contrast to traditional physical systems described by well-known basic principles, first principles governing the dynamics of neural systems are unknown. (iii) Many different neural systems exhibit similar dynamics despite having different architectures and different levels of complexity. (iv) The network architecture and connection strengths are usually not known in detail and therefore the dynamical analysis must, in some sense, be probabilistic. (v) Since nervous systems are able to organize behavior based on sensory inputs, the dynamical modeling of these systems has to explain the transformation of temporal information into combinatorial or combinatorial-temporal codes, and vice versa, for memory and recognition. In this review these problems are discussed in the context of addressing the stimulating questions: What can neuroscience learn from nonlinear dynamics, and what can nonlinear dynamics learn from neuroscience?.

  10. Geospace Plasma Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-22

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2013-0082 TR-2013-0082 GEOSPACE PLASMA DYNAMICS Daniel Ober, et al. 22 May 2013...COVERED (From - To) 1 Oct 2007 to 30 Sep 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Geospace Plasma Dynamics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Force Office of Scientific Research task titled, “ Geospace Plasma Dynamics.” The goal of this research effort was to develop a detailed knowledge of

  11. Thermal dynamic modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ojalvo, I. U.

    1972-01-01

    Some thermal dynamic requirements associated with the space shuttle vehicle are reviewed. Pertinent scaling laws are discussed and recommendations are offered regarding the need for conducting reduced-scale dynamic tests of major components at elevated temperatures. Items considered are the development and interpretation of thermal dynamic structural scaling laws, the identification of major related problem areas and a presentation of viable model fabrication, instrumentation, and test procedures.

  12. Dynamics of Oceanic Motions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-31

    Sciences, Harvard University This project researched the dynamics of oceanic motions: aspects of the theory and mod- eling of fundamental dynamical and...84-C-0461 Published 1. Pinardi, N. (1985) Quasigeostrophic Energetics and Oceanic Mesoscale Dynamics, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA (Ph.D. Thesis...Layer Model to the Harvard Quasigeostrophic Model, Harvard University , Cam- bridge, MA (Ph.D. thesis). 15. Robinson, A.R., M.A. Spell and N. Pinardi

  13. Dynamical principles in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I.; Varona, Pablo; Selverston, Allen I.; Abarbanel, Henry D. I.

    2006-10-01

    Dynamical modeling of neural systems and brain functions has a history of success over the last half century. This includes, for example, the explanation and prediction of some features of neural rhythmic behaviors. Many interesting dynamical models of learning and memory based on physiological experiments have been suggested over the last two decades. Dynamical models even of consciousness now exist. Usually these models and results are based on traditional approaches and paradigms of nonlinear dynamics including dynamical chaos. Neural systems are, however, an unusual subject for nonlinear dynamics for several reasons: (i) Even the simplest neural network, with only a few neurons and synaptic connections, has an enormous number of variables and control parameters. These make neural systems adaptive and flexible, and are critical to their biological function. (ii) In contrast to traditional physical systems described by well-known basic principles, first principles governing the dynamics of neural systems are unknown. (iii) Many different neural systems exhibit similar dynamics despite having different architectures and different levels of complexity. (iv) The network architecture and connection strengths are usually not known in detail and therefore the dynamical analysis must, in some sense, be probabilistic. (v) Since nervous systems are able to organize behavior based on sensory inputs, the dynamical modeling of these systems has to explain the transformation of temporal information into combinatorial or combinatorial-temporal codes, and vice versa, for memory and recognition. In this review these problems are discussed in the context of addressing the stimulating questions: What can neuroscience learn from nonlinear dynamics, and what can nonlinear dynamics learn from neuroscience?

  14. Dynamic Environmental Qualification Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    ORGANISATION DU TRAITE DE L’ATLANTIQUE NORD) AGARD Report No.682 DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENTAL QUALIFICATION TECHNIQUES II¥ ,n . r-,, q - .j, i ~Papers present d at...better the knowledge of sources of excitation, transmission paths, dynamic system behaviour , the better the understanding and establishment of appropriate...featuring resonance dwell have poor similarity to the dynamic equipment behaviour in the A/C. As a specific example, a vibration test with a

  15. Vehicle Dynamics and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamani, Rajesh

    Vehicle Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive coverage of vehicle control systems and the dynamic models used in the development of these control systems. The control system topics covered in the book include cruise control, adaptive cruise control, ABS, automated lane keeping, automated highway systems, yaw stability control, engine control, passive, active and semi-active suspensions, tire models and tire-road friction estimation. In developing the dynamic model for each application, an effort is made to both keep the model simple enough for control system design but at the same time rich enough to capture the essential features of the dynamics.

  16. Dynamics of multibody systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, Robert E.; Schwertassek, Richard

    The fundamental mathematical principles of multibody-system dynamics and their implementation in numerical simulations are examined in a rigorous introduction for design engineers. Chapters are devoted to the history of rotational dynamics; typical spacecraft, vehicle, and robotics applications; terminology and notation; the kinematics of a rigid body (location and orientation, velocity, and the kinematical equations of motion); the dynamics of a rigid body; multibody formalisms, kinematics, and dynamics; the linearized equations for multibody systems; and computer simulation techniques. Diagrams, drawings, and a glossary of symbols are provided.

  17. Dynamic power flow controllers

    DOEpatents

    Divan, Deepakraj M.; Prasai, Anish

    2017-03-07

    Dynamic power flow controllers are provided. A dynamic power flow controller may comprise a transformer and a power converter. The power converter is subject to low voltage stresses and not floated at line voltage. In addition, the power converter is rated at a fraction of the total power controlled. A dynamic power flow controller controls both the real and the reactive power flow between two AC sources having the same frequency. A dynamic power flow controller inserts a voltage with controllable magnitude and phase between two AC sources; thereby effecting control of active and reactive power flows between two AC sources.

  18. Wind Turbine Structural Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A workshop on wind turbine structural dynamics was held to review and document current United States work on the dynamic behavior of large wind turbines, primarily of the horizontal-axis type, and to identify and discuss other wind turbine configurations that may have lower cost and weight. Information was exchanged on the following topics: (1) Methods for calculating dynamic loads; (2) Aeroelasticity stability (3) Wind loads, both steady and transient; (4) Critical design conditions; (5) Drive train dynamics; and (6) Behavior of operating wind turbines.

  19. Disease dynamics in a dynamic social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Claire; Albert, István; Grenfell, Bryan; Albert, Réka

    2010-07-01

    We develop a framework for simulating a realistic, evolving social network (a city) into which a disease is introduced. We compare our results to prevaccine era measles data for England and Wales, and find that they capture the quantitative and qualitative features of epidemics in populations spanning two orders of magnitude. Our results provide unique insight into how and why the social topology of the contact network influences the propagation of the disease through the population. We argue that network simulation is suitable for concurrently probing contact network dynamics and disease dynamics in ways that prior modeling approaches cannot and it can be extended to the study of less well-documented diseases.

  20. Design of a chatter-free terminal sliding mode controller for nonlinear fractional-order dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourmahmood Aghababa, Mohammad

    2013-10-01

    This paper investigates the problem of robust control of nonlinear fractional-order dynamical systems in the presence of uncertainties. First, a novel switching surface is proposed and its finite-time stability to the origin is proved. Subsequently, using the sliding mode theory, a robust fractional control law is proposed to ensure the existence of the sliding motion in finite time. We use a fractional Lyapunov stability theory to prove the stability of the system in a given finite time. In order to avoid the chattering, which is inherent in conventional sliding mode controllers, we transfer the sign function of the control input into the fractional derivative of the control signal. The proposed chattering-free sliding mode technique is then applied for stabilisation of a broad class of three-dimensional fractional-order chaotic systems via a single variable driving control input. Simulation results reveal that the proposed fractional sliding mode controller works well for chaos control of fractional-order hyperchaotic Chen, chaotic Lorenz and chaotic Arneodo systems with no-chatter control inputs.

  1. Interaction of acetonitrile with Na-zeolites: adsorption modes and vibrational dynamics in the zeolite channels and cavities.

    PubMed

    Nachtigallová, Dana; Vrbka, L; Bludský, O; Nachtigall, P

    2008-07-28

    The interaction of acetonitrile with the extra-framework Na(+) cations in zeolites, namely Na-LTA and Na-FER, was investigated. The relative stabilities of possible types of adsorption complexes were calculated at the periodic DFT level. Individual effects on the complex stability and on the vibrational dynamics of adsorbed acetonitrile were qualitatively analysed on various cluster models. The acetonitrile primarily interacts with the Na(+) cation (via the N end), and the complex stability is modulated by the interaction of the methyl group with the framework oxygen atoms, which has a partial hydrogen-bond character. In line with the results of recent analyses of CO interactions with metal-exchanged zeolites [D. Nachtigallová, O. Bludský, C. O. Areán, R. Bulanek and P. Nachtigall, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2006, 8, 4849], two types of effects should be taken into consideration for acetonitrile complexes in Na-zeolites: (i) the effects from the bottom, reflecting the accessibility and coordination of the primary metal cation, to which the acetonitrile molecule is bonded via the N atom; and (ii) the effects from the top, including H-bond formation (stabilising effect) or repulsion due to the secondary metal cation. The effect from the bottom results in a blue shift of nu(CN) while the effect from the top (H-bond formation) results in a red shift in both nu(CN) and nu(CH).

  2. A molecular dynamics study of CaCO3 nanoparticles in a hydrophobic solvent with a stearate co-surfactant.

    PubMed

    Bodnarchuk, Michael S; Heyes, David M; Breakspear, Angela; Chahine, Samir; Dini, Daniele

    2015-05-28

    Stearates containing overbased detergent nanoparticles (NPs) are used as acid neutralising additives in automotive and marine engine oils. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the self-assembly of calcium carbonate, calcium stearate as a co-surfactant and stabilising surfactants of such NPs in a model explicit molecular hydrophobic solvent have been carried out using a methodology described first by Bodnarchuk et al. [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2014, 118, 21092]. The cores and particles as a whole become more elongated with stearate, and the surfactant molecules are more spaced out in this geometry than in their stearate-free counterparts. The rod dimensions are found to be largely independent of the surfactant type for a given amount of CaCO3. The corresponding particles without stearate were more spherical, the precise shape depending to a greater extent on the chemical architecture of the surfactant molecule. The rod-shaped stearate containing nanoparticles penetrated a model water droplet to a greater depth than the corresponding near-spherical particle, which is possibly facilitated by the dissociation of nanoparticle surfactant molecules onto the surface of the water in this process. These simulations are the first to corroborate the nanoparticle-water penetration mechanism proposed previously by experimental groups investigating the NP acid neutralisation characteristics.

  3. NN-adaptive output feedback tracking control for a class of discrete-time non-affine systems with a dynamic compensator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijun; Zhao, Jiemei; Qi, Xue; Jia, Heming

    2013-06-01

    The problem of tracking control for a class of uncertain non-affine discrete-time nonlinear systems with internal dynamics is addressed. The fixed point theorem is first employed to ensure the control problem in question is solvable and well-defined. Based on it, an adaptive output feedback control scheme based on neural network (NN) is presented. The proposed control algorithm consists of two parts: a dynamic compensator is introduced to stabilise the linear portion of the tracking error system; a single-hidden-layer neural network (SHL NN) approximation mechanism is introduced to cancel the uncertainties resulting from the non-affine function, where the recursive weight update rules of NN estimation are derived from the discrete-time version of Lyapunov control theory. Ultimate boundedness of the error signals is shown through Lyapunov's direct method and the discrete-time version of input-to-state stability (ISS) theory. Finally, a model of automatical underwater vehicle (AUV) is considered to show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  4. Dynamic Calorimetry for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2007-01-01

    A student experiment on dynamic calorimetry is described. Dynamic calorimetry is a powerful technique for calorimetric studies, especially at high temperatures and pressures. A low-power incandescent lamp serves as the sample. The ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system with DataStudio software from PASCO Scientific displays the results of the…

  5. Dynamic defense workshop :

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  6. Systems With Emergent Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Ian

    2002-09-01

    Evolutionary biologists often reject deterministic models of evolutionary processes because they equate `deterministic' with `goal-seeking', and have learned the hard way not to trust goal-seeking explanations of evolutionary adaptations. On the other hand, the general theory of dynamical systems potentially has much to offer for evolutionary biology— for example, as a resolution of the conflict between gradualism and punctuated equilibrium. The concept of a system with emergent dynamics retains the deterministic nature of dynamical systems, while eliminating any goal-seeking interpretation. Define an emergent property of a complex system to be a property whose computation from the entity-level rules of the system is intractable (in some reasonable sense). Say that a dynamical system has emergent dynamics if the computation of trajectories is intractable. Then systems with emergent dynamics are deterministic but not goal-seeking. As such, they offer a sensible way to use dynamical systems as models for evolutionary processes in biology, and in other areas. We discuss these issues and examine a few simple aspects of emergence in dynamical systems.

  7. Team coordination dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Jamie C; Amazeen, Polemnia G; Cooke, Nancy J

    2010-07-01

    Team coordination consists of both the dynamics of team member interaction and the environmental dynamics to which a team is subjected. Focusing on dynamics, an approach is developed that contrasts with traditional aggregate-static concepts of team coordination as characterized by the shared mental model approach. A team coordination order parameter was developed to capture momentary fluctuations in coordination. Team coordination was observed in three-person uninhabited air vehicle teams across two experimental sessions. The dynamics of the order parameter were observed under changes of a team familiarity control parameter. Team members returned for the second session to either the same (Intact) or different (Mixed) team. 'Roadblock' perturbations, or novel changes in the task environment, were introduced in order to probe the stability of team coordination. Nonlinear dynamic methods revealed differences that a traditional approach did not: Intact and Mixed team coordination dynamics looked very different; Mixed teams were more stable than Intact teams and explored the space of solutions without the need for correction. Stability was positively correlated with the number of roadblock perturbations that were overcome successfully. The novel and non-intuitive contribution of a dynamical analysis was that Mixed teams, who did not have a long history working together, were more adaptive. Team coordination dynamics carries new implications for traditional problems such as training adaptive teams.

  8. Extensible Systems Dynamics Framework

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    pedigree information across communities-of-interest and across network boundaries. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ptolemy II, Systems Dynamics, PMESII, National...3 4.2 ADAPT THE PTOLEMY II FRAMEWORK TO ENSURE A WELL-SUITED MODELING...report of activities in the Extensible Systems Dynamics Framework project performed by the Ptolemy Project, University of California, Berkeley for

  9. Dynamic covalent polymers

    PubMed Central

    García, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This Highlight presents an overview of the rapidly growing field of dynamic covalent polymers. This class of polymers combines intrinsic reversibility with the robustness of covalent bonds, thus enabling formation of mechanically stable, polymer‐based materials that are responsive to external stimuli. It will be discussed how the inherent dynamic nature of the dynamic covalent bonds on the molecular level can be translated to the macroscopic level of the polymer, giving access to a range of applications, such as stimuli‐responsive or self‐healing materials. A primary distinction will be made based on the type of dynamic covalent bond employed, while a secondary distinction will be based on the consideration whether the dynamic covalent bond is used in the main chain of the polymer or whether it is used to allow side chain modification of the polymer. Emphasis will be on the chemistry of the dynamic covalent bonds present in the polymer, in particular in relation to how the specific (dynamic) features of the bond impart functionality to the polymer material, and to the conditions under which this dynamic behavior is manifested. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2016, 54, 3551–3577. PMID:27917019

  10. Dynamic covalent polymers.

    PubMed

    García, Fátima; Smulders, Maarten M J

    2016-11-15

    This Highlight presents an overview of the rapidly growing field of dynamic covalent polymers. This class of polymers combines intrinsic reversibility with the robustness of covalent bonds, thus enabling formation of mechanically stable, polymer-based materials that are responsive to external stimuli. It will be discussed how the inherent dynamic nature of the dynamic covalent bonds on the molecular level can be translated to the macroscopic level of the polymer, giving access to a range of applications, such as stimuli-responsive or self-healing materials. A primary distinction will be made based on the type of dynamic covalent bond employed, while a secondary distinction will be based on the consideration whether the dynamic covalent bond is used in the main chain of the polymer or whether it is used to allow side chain modification of the polymer. Emphasis will be on the chemistry of the dynamic covalent bonds present in the polymer, in particular in relation to how the specific (dynamic) features of the bond impart functionality to the polymer material, and to the conditions under which this dynamic behavior is manifested. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Polymer Science Part A: Polymer Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Polym. Sci., Part A: Polym. Chem. 2016, 54, 3551-3577.

  11. Miscible polymer blend dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Jai Avinash

    The segmental and terminal dynamics of miscible polymer blends have been systematically investigated with pointed experiments to test dichotomous literature ideas on the origin of dynamic heterogeneity in these systems. Segmental dynamics have been studied by dielectric spectroscopy, while terminal dynamics have been studied by oscillatory shear rheology. It has been found that when composition fluctuations are suppressed, dynamic heterogeneities, such as the failure of time-temperature superposition (tTS), are also suppressed. This observation lends credence to the ideas of Fischer and Kumar that spontaneous composition fluctuations in miscible blends profoundly affect their segmental dynamics. In addition, data acquired in this study on two model weakly-interacting miscible polyolefin blends, were combined with literature data to show that breakdown of tTS worsens with increasing dynamic asymmetry (intrinsic differences in component dynamics) in weakly-interacting miscible blends. This observation is adduced as evidence for the role of dynamic asymmetry in miscible blend dynamics, in addition to the role of composition fluctuations. Finally, attempts were made to use information on component segmental dynamics, as obtained from the composition fluctuation model of Kumar, to predict terminal dynamics in miscible blends. In this regard, the composition fluctuation model was first used to model segmental dynamics in a model weakly-interacting blend. Then, experimental segmental and terminal dynamics data were used to identify a possible segmental time-scale which may control terminal relaxation of a chain in a blend. This timescale was found to lie on the long-time end of the distribution of segmental relaxation times for each component. It was calculated from the segmental relaxation time distribution for each component of a miscible blend as the average-longest segmental time experienced by the monomers of a given chain. Using the Doi-Edwards tube model, the

  12. The dynamic plant chondriome.

    PubMed

    Logan, David C

    2010-08-01

    The higher plant chondriome is highly dynamic both in terms of the morphology and velocity of individual mitochondria within any given cell. Plant mitochondrial dynamics is a relatively new area of research, but one that has developed considerably over the early years of this century due to the generation of mitochondrially targeted fluorescent protein constructs and stably transformed lines. Several putative members of the plant mitochondrial division apparatus have been identified, but no genes have been identified as being involved in mitochondrial fusion. Despite the highly dynamic nature of plant mitochondria there is little specific scientific evidence linking mitochondrial dynamics to organelle and cell function. Two exceptions to this are the changes in mitochondrial dynamics that are early events during the induction of cell death programmes, and the extensive mitochondrial fusion that occurs before cytokinesis, although in both cases the role(s) of these events are a matter for conjecture.

  13. Perception and Hierarchical Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kiebel, Stefan J.; Daunizeau, Jean; Friston, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we suggest that perception could be modeled by assuming that sensory input is generated by a hierarchy of attractors in a dynamic system. We describe a mathematical model which exploits the temporal structure of rapid sensory dynamics to track the slower trajectories of their underlying causes. This model establishes a proof of concept that slowly changing neuronal states can encode the trajectories of faster sensory signals. We link this hierarchical account to recent developments in the perception of human action; in particular artificial speech recognition. We argue that these hierarchical models of dynamical systems are a plausible starting point to develop robust recognition schemes, because they capture critical temporal dependencies induced by deep hierarchical structure. We conclude by suggesting that a fruitful computational neuroscience approach may emerge from modeling perception as non-autonomous recognition dynamics enslaved by autonomous hierarchical dynamics in the sensorium. PMID:19649171

  14. Coupled nonlinear dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongyan

    In this dissertation, we study coupled nonlinear dynamical systems that exhibit new types of complex behavior. We numerically and analytically examine a variety of dynamical models, ranging from systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE) with novel elements of feedback to systems of partial differential equations (PDE) that model chemical pattern formation. Chaos, dynamical uncertainty, synchronization, and spatiotemporal pattern formation constitute the primary topics of the dissertation. Following the introduction in Chapter 1, we study chaos and dynamical uncertainty in Chapter 2 with coupled Lorenz systems and demonstrate the existence of extreme complexity in high-dimensional ODE systems. In Chapter 3, we demonstrate that chaos synchronization can be achieved by mutual and multiplicative coupling of dynamical systems. Chapter 4 and 5 focus on pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems, and we investigate segregation and integration behavior of populations in competitive and cooperative environments, respectively.

  15. Financial market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Fredrick; Johnson, M. D.

    2003-03-01

    A necessary precondition for modeling financial markets is a complete understanding of their statistics, including dynamics. Distributions derived from nonextensive Tsallis statistics are closely connected with dynamics described by a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation. The combination shows promise in describing stochastic processes with power-law distributions and superdiffusive dynamics. We investigate intra-day price changes in the S& P500 stock index within this framework. We find that the power-law tails of the distributions, and the index's anomalously diffusing dynamics, are very accurately described by this approach. Our results show good agreement between market data and Fokker-Planck dynamics. This approach may be applicable in any anomalously diffusing system in which the correlations in time can be accounted for by an Ito-Langevin process with a simple time-dependent diffusion coefficient.

  16. Methods of applied dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rheinfurth, M. H.; Wilson, H. B.

    1991-01-01

    The monograph was prepared to give the practicing engineer a clear understanding of dynamics with special consideration given to the dynamic analysis of aerospace systems. It is conceived to be both a desk-top reference and a refresher for aerospace engineers in government and industry. It could also be used as a supplement to standard texts for in-house training courses on the subject. Beginning with the basic concepts of kinematics and dynamics, the discussion proceeds to treat the dynamics of a system of particles. Both classical and modern formulations of the Lagrange equations, including constraints, are discussed and applied to the dynamic modeling of aerospace structures using the modal synthesis technique.

  17. Nonlinear Dynamics in Cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of many cardiac arrhythmias, as well as the nature of transitions between different heart rhythms, have long been considered evidence of nonlinear phenomena playing a direct role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. In most types of cardiac disease, the pathology develops slowly and gradually, often over many years. In contrast, arrhythmias often occur suddenly. In nonlinear systems, sudden changes in qualitative dynamics can, counter-intuitively, result from a gradual change in a system parameter –this is known as a bifurcation. Here, we review how nonlinearities in cardiac electrophysiology influence normal and abnormal rhythms and how bifurcations change the dynamics. In particular, we focus on the many recent developments in computational modeling at the cellular level focused on intracellular calcium dynamics. We discuss two areas where recent experimental and modeling work have suggested the importance of nonlinearities in calcium dynamics: repolarization alternans and pacemaker cell automaticity. PMID:22524390

  18. Dynamics of aesthetic appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2012-03-01

    Aesthetic appreciation is a complex cognitive processing with inherent aspects of cold as well as hot cognition. Research from the last decades of empirical has shown that evaluations of aesthetic appreciation are highly reliable. Most frequently, facial attractiveness was used as the corner case for investigating aesthetic appreciation. Evaluating facial attractiveness shows indeed high internal consistencies and impressively high inter-rater reliabilities, even across cultures. Although this indicates general and stable mechanisms underlying aesthetic appreciation, it is also obvious that our taste for specific objects changes dynamically. Aesthetic appreciation on artificial object categories, such as fashion, design or art is inherently very dynamic. Gaining insights into the cognitive mechanisms that trigger and enable corresponding changes of aesthetic appreciation is of particular interest for research as this will provide possibilities to modeling aesthetic appreciation for longer durations and from a dynamic perspective. The present paper refers to a recent two-step model ("the dynamical two-step-model of aesthetic appreciation"), dynamically adapting itself, which accounts for typical dynamics of aesthetic appreciation found in different research areas such as art history, philosophy and psychology. The first step assumes singular creative sources creating and establishing innovative material towards which, in a second step, people adapt by integrating it into their visual habits. This inherently leads to dynamic changes of the beholders' aesthetic appreciation.

  19. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  20. Ansatz for dynamical hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, S; Baas, N A; Mayer, B; Nilsson, M; Olesen, M W

    2001-01-01

    Complex, robust functionalities can be generated naturally in at least two ways: by the assembly of structures and by the evolution of structures. This work is concerned with spontaneous formation of structures. We define the notion of dynamical hierarchies in natural systems and show the importance of this particular kind of organization for living systems. We then define a framework that enables us to formulate, investigate, and manipulate such dynamical hierarchies. This framework allows us to simultaneously investigate different levels of description together with their interrelationship, which is necessary to understand the nature of dynamical hierarchies. Our framework is then applied to a concrete and very simple formal, physicochemical, dynamical hierarchy involving water and monomers at level one, polymers and water at level two, and micelles (polymer aggregates) and water at level three. Formulating this system as a simple two-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) lattice gas allows us within one dynamical system to demonstrate the successive emergence of two higher levels (three levels all together) of robust structures with associated properties. Second, we demonstrate how the framework for dynamical hierarchies can be used for realistic (predictive) physicochemical simulation of molecular self-assembly and self-organization processes. We discuss the detailed process of micellation using the three-dimensional MD lattice gas. Finally, from these examples we can infer principles about formal dynamical hierarchies. We present an ansatz for how to generate robust, higher-order emergent properties in formal dynamical systems that is based on a conjecture of a necessary minimal complexity within the fundamental interacting structures once a particular simulation framework is chosen.

  1. Dynamic Recrystallization: The Dynamic Deformation Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murr, L. E.; Pizaña, C.

    2007-11-01

    Severe plastic deformation (PD), especially involving high strain rates (>103 s 1), occurs through solid-state flow, which is accommodated by dynamic recrystallization (DRX), either in a continuous or discontinuous mode. This flow can be localized in shear instability zones (or adiabatic shear bands (ASBs)) with dimensions smaller than 5 μ, or can include large volumes with flow zone dimensions exceeding centimeters. This article illustrates these microstructural features using optical and electron metallography to examine a host of dynamic deformation examples: shaped charge jet formation, high-velocity and hypervelocity impact crater formation, rod penetration into thick targets (which includes rod and target DRX flow and mixing), large projectile-induced target plug formation and failure, explosive welding, and friction-stir welding and processing. The DRX is shown to be a universal mechanism that accommodates solid-state flow in extreme (or severe) PD regimes.

  2. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  3. Microemulsions: Structure and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Friberg, S.E.; Bothorel, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the state-of-the-art in stability, structure, applications, and dynamics representation of microemulsion systems. An international group of reviewers discuss the introductory investigations into macroemulsions and interfacial free energy, the derivation of the microemulsion systems from micellar solutions, and the correlation between structure and dynamics. Future developments in this area are also considered. The book presents following: contents; phase diagrams and pseudophase assumption; phase diagram and critical behavior of a quaternary microemulsion system; non-aqueous microemulsions; nonionics; molecular diffusion in microemulsions; dynamics of microemulsions; low interfacial tensions in microemulsion systems; oil recovery and microemulsions.

  4. Chiral Gauge Dynamics and Dynamical Supersymmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U.

    2009-05-07

    We study the dynamics of a chiral SU(2) gauge theory with a Weyl fermion in the I = 3/2 representation and of its supersymmetric generalization. In the former, we find a new and exotic mechanism of confinement, induced by topological excitations that we refer to as magnetic quintets. The supersymmetric version was examined earlier in the context of dynamical supersymmetry breaking by Intriligator, Seiberg, and Shenker, who showed that if this gauge theory confines at the origin of moduli space, one may break supersymmetry by adding a tree level superpotential. We examine the dynamics by deforming the theory on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}, and show that the infrared behavior of this theory is an interacting CFT at small S{sup 1}. We argue that this continues to hold at large S{sup 1}, and if so, that supersymmetry must remain unbroken. Our methods also provide the microscopic origin of various superpotentials in SQCD on S{sup 1} x R{sup 3}--which were previously obtained by using symmetry and holomorphy--and resolve a long standing interpretational puzzle concerning a flux operator discovered by Affleck, Harvey, and Witten. It is generated by a topological excitation, a 'magnetic bion', whose stability is due to fermion pair exchange between its constituents. We also briefly comment on composite monopole operators as leading effects in two dimensional antiferromagnets.

  5. Holographic tissue dynamics spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, David D.; An, Ran; Turek, John; Jeong, Kwan

    2011-08-01

    Tissue dynamics spectroscopy uses digital holography as a coherence gate to extract depth-resolved quasi-elastic dynamic light scattering from inside multicellular tumor spheroids. The temporal speckle contrast provides endogenous dynamical images of proliferating and hypoxic or necrotic tissues. Fluctuation spectroscopy similar to diffusing wave spectroscopy is performed on the dynamic speckle to generate tissue-response spectrograms that track time-resolved changes in intracellular motility in response to environmental perturbations. The spectrograms consist of several frequency bands that range from 0.005 to 5 Hz. The fluctuation spectral density and temporal autocorrelations show the signature of constrained anomalous diffusion, but with large fluctuation amplitudes caused by active processes far from equilibrium. Differences in the tissue-response spectrograms between the proliferating outer shell and the hypoxic inner core differentiate normal from starved conditions. The differential spectrograms provide an initial library of tissue-response signatures to environmental conditions of temperature, osmolarity, pH, and serum growth factors.

  6. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-02-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications.

  7. Dynamic Boolean Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic mathematical environments allow users to reify mathematical concepts through multiple representations, transform mathematical relations and organically explore mathematical properties, investigate integrated mathematics, and develop conceptual understanding. Herein, we integrate Boolean algebra, the functionalities of a dynamic…

  8. Dynamic model for biospeckle.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Crysttian Arantes; da Costa, Antonio Tavares

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a simple dynamic microscopic model to describe the main features of the phenomenon known as dynamic speckle, or biospeckle. Biospeckle is an interference pattern formed when a biological surface is illuminated with coherent light. The dynamic characteristics of biospeckle have been investigated as possible tools for assessing the quality of biological products. Our model, despite its simplicity, was able to reproduce qualitatively the main features of biospeckle. We were able to correlate variations in a microscopic parameter associated with movement of the particles comprising the organic surface with changes in a macroscopic parameter that measures the change rate of a dynamic interference pattern. We showed that this correlation occurs only within a limited range of parameter microscope values. We also showed how our model was able to describe nonuniform surfaces composed of more than one type of particles.

  9. Macroevolution: dynamics of diversity.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Douglas H

    2011-12-20

    The fossil record typically exhibits very dynamic patterns of innovation, diversification and extinction. In contrast, molecular phylogenies suggest smoother patterns of evolutionary change. Several new studies reconcile this difference and reveal more about the mechanisms behind macroevolutionary change.

  10. Dynamics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.

    1996-01-01

    Granular materials exhibit a rich variety of dynamical behavior, much of which is poorly understood. Fractal-like stress chains, convection, a variety of wave dynamics, including waves which resemble capillary waves, l/f noise, and fractional Brownian motion provide examples. Work beginning at Duke will focus on gravity driven convection, mixing and gravitational collapse. Although granular materials consist of collections of interacting particles, there are important differences between the dynamics of a collections of grains and the dynamics of a collections of molecules. In particular, the ergodic hypothesis is generally invalid for granular materials, so that ordinary statistical physics does not apply. In the absence of a steady energy input, granular materials undergo a rapid collapse which is strongly influenced by the presence of gravity. Fluctuations on laboratory scales in such quantities as the stress can be very large-as much as an order of magnitude greater than the mean.

  11. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  12. Dynamical compactness and sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wen; Khilko, Danylo; Kolyada, Sergiĭ; Zhang, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    To link the Auslander point dynamics property with topological transitivity, in this paper we introduce dynamically compact systems as a new concept of a chaotic dynamical system (X , T) given by a compact metric space X and a continuous surjective self-map T : X → X. Observe that each weakly mixing system is transitive compact, and we show that any transitive compact M-system is weakly mixing. Then we discuss the relationships between it and other several stronger forms of sensitivity. We prove that any transitive compact system is Li-Yorke sensitive and furthermore multi-sensitive if it is not proximal, and that any multi-sensitive system has positive topological sequence entropy. Moreover, we show that multi-sensitivity is equivalent to both thick sensitivity and thickly syndetic sensitivity for M-systems. We also give a quantitative analysis for multi-sensitivity of a dynamical system.

  13. Holographic tissue dynamics spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nolte, David D; An, Ran; Turek, John; Jeong, Kwan

    2011-08-01

    Tissue dynamics spectroscopy uses digital holography as a coherence gate to extract depth-resolved quasi-elastic dynamic light scattering from inside multicellular tumor spheroids. The temporal speckle contrast provides endogenous dynamical images of proliferating and hypoxic or necrotic tissues. Fluctuation spectroscopy similar to diffusing wave spectroscopy is performed on the dynamic speckle to generate tissue-response spectrograms that track time-resolved changes in intracellular motility in response to environmental perturbations. The spectrograms consist of several frequency bands that range from 0.005 to 5 Hz. The fluctuation spectral density and temporal autocorrelations show the signature of constrained anomalous diffusion, but with large fluctuation amplitudes caused by active processes far from equilibrium. Differences in the tissue-response spectrograms between the proliferating outer shell and the hypoxic inner core differentiate normal from starved conditions. The differential spectrograms provide an initial library of tissue-response signatures to environmental conditions of temperature, osmolarity, pH, and serum growth factors.

  14. Dynamic plasmonic colour display

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaoyang; Kamin, Simon; Liu, Na

    2017-01-01

    Plasmonic colour printing based on engineered metasurfaces has revolutionized colour display science due to its unprecedented subwavelength resolution and high-density optical data storage. However, advanced plasmonic displays with novel functionalities including dynamic multicolour printing, animations, and highly secure encryption have remained in their infancy. Here we demonstrate a dynamic plasmonic colour display technique that enables all the aforementioned functionalities using catalytic magnesium metasurfaces. Controlled hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of the constituent magnesium nanoparticles, which serve as dynamic pixels, allow for plasmonic colour printing, tuning, erasing and restoration of colour. Different dynamic pixels feature distinct colour transformation kinetics, enabling plasmonic animations. Through smart material processing, information encoded on selected pixels, which are indiscernible to both optical and scanning electron microscopies, can only be read out using hydrogen as a decoding key, suggesting a new generation of information encryption and anti-counterfeiting applications. PMID:28232722

  15. Dynamic Channel Allocation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    7 1 . Fixed Channel Allocation (FCA) ........................................................7 2. Dynamic Channel ...19 7. CSMA/CD-Based Multiple Network Lines .....................................20 8. Hybrid Channel Allocation in Wireless Networks...28 1 . Channel Allocation

  16. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  17. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Defining Dynamic Route Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelinski, Shannon; Jastrzebski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This poster describes a method for defining route structure from flight tracks. Dynamically generated route structures could be useful in guiding dynamic airspace configuration and helping controllers retain situational awareness under dynamically changing traffic conditions. Individual merge and diverge intersections between pairs of flights are identified, clustered, and grouped into nodes of a route structure network. Links are placed between nodes to represent major traffic flows. A parametric analysis determined the algorithm input parameters producing route structures of current day flight plans that are closest to todays airway structure. These parameters are then used to define and analyze the dynamic route structure over the course of a day for current day flight paths. Route structures are also compared between current day flight paths and more user preferred paths such as great circle and weather avoidance routing.

  19. Equivalent Dynamic Models.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Peter C M

    2017-02-16

    Equivalences of two classes of dynamic models for weakly stationary multivariate time series are discussed: dynamic factor models and autoregressive models. It is shown that exploratory dynamic factor models can be rotated, yielding an infinite set of equivalent solutions for any observed series. It also is shown that dynamic factor models with lagged factor loadings are not equivalent to the currently popular state-space models, and that restriction of attention to the latter type of models may yield invalid results. The known equivalent vector autoregressive model types, standard and structural, are given a new interpretation in which they are conceived of as the extremes of an innovating type of hybrid vector autoregressive models. It is shown that consideration of hybrid models solves many problems, in particular with Granger causality testing.

  20. Dynamics of collisionless systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zang, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    The three dimensional dynamics of rotating stellar systems were studied. A comparison of various mathematical models of flat galaxies is presented. The effects of self-gravity upon a flat galaxy undergoing a tidal encounter with another galaxy were investigated.

  1. Uncalibrated Dynamic Visual Servoing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    PREPARED FOR IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, PRINTED ON MAY 29, 2003 1 Uncalibrated Dynamic Visual Servoing J. A. Piepmeier, G.V...FOR IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, PRINTED ON MAY 29, 2003 2 is where and are...small or the target is PREPARED FOR IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, PRINTED ON MAY 29, 2003 3 stationary. The dynamic method should be

  2. Photochemical reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.C.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the program is to develop a fundamental understanding of unimolecular and bimolecular reaction dynamics with application in combustion and energy systems. The energy dependence in ketene isomerization, ketene dissociation dynamics, and carbonyl substitution on organometallic rhodium complexes in liquid xenon have been studied. Future studies concerning unimolecular processes in ketene as well as energy transfer and kinetic studies of methylene radicals are discussed.

  3. Study of atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnider, Richard T.; Christy, John R.; Cox, Gregory N.

    1993-01-01

    In order to better understand the dynamics of the global atmosphere, a data set of precision temperature measurements was developed using the NASA built Microwave Sounding Unit. Modeling research was carried out to validate global model outputs using various satellite data. Idealized flows in a rotating annulus were studied and applied to the general circulation of the atmosphere. Dynamic stratospheric ozone fluctuations were investigated. An extensive bibliography and several reprints are appended.

  4. Nonlinear Ship Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-07-07

    mrtegrating the original governing differential equation. 2. A. H. Nayfeh, " Parametric Identification of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems," Computers...Structures, Vol. 20. No. 1-3. 1985, pp. 487-493. A parametric identification technique that exploits nonlinear resonances and comparisons of the behavior of...617-631. Presentations 1. A. H. Vn’.yfeh, " Parametric Identification of Nonlinear Dynamic Systems," Symposium on Advances and Trends in Structures

  5. Multipulsed dynamic moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.

    1991-01-01

    An improved dynamic moire interferometer comprised of a lasing medium providing a plurality of beams of coherent light, a multiple q-switch producing multiple trains of 100,000 or more pulses per second, a combining means collimating multiple trains of pulses into substantially a single train and directing beams to specimen gratings affixed to a test material, and a controller, triggering and sequencing the emission of the pulses with the occurrence and recording of a dynamic loading event.

  6. Uncertainty analysis as essential step in the establishment of the dynamic Design Space of primary drying during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Mortier, Séverine Thérèse F C; Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Corver, Jos; Nopens, Ingmar; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Large molecules, such as biopharmaceuticals, are considered the key driver of growth for the pharmaceutical industry. Freeze-drying is the preferred way to stabilise these products when needed. However, it is an expensive, inefficient, time- and energy-consuming process. During freeze-drying, there are only two main process variables to be set, i.e. the shelf temperature and the chamber pressure, however preferably in a dynamic way. This manuscript focuses on the essential use of uncertainty analysis for the determination and experimental verification of the dynamic primary drying Design Space for pharmaceutical freeze-drying. Traditionally, the chamber pressure and shelf temperature are kept constant during primary drying, leading to less optimal process conditions. In this paper it is demonstrated how a mechanistic model of the primary drying step gives the opportunity to determine the optimal dynamic values for both process variables during processing, resulting in a dynamic Design Space with a well-known risk of failure. This allows running the primary drying process step as time efficient as possible, hereby guaranteeing that the temperature at the sublimation front does not exceed the collapse temperature. The Design Space is the multidimensional combination and interaction of input variables and process parameters leading to the expected product specifications with a controlled (i.e., high) probability. Therefore, inclusion of parameter uncertainty is an essential part in the definition of the Design Space, although it is often neglected. To quantitatively assess the inherent uncertainty on the parameters of the mechanistic model, an uncertainty analysis was performed to establish the borders of the dynamic Design Space, i.e. a time-varying shelf temperature and chamber pressure, associated with a specific risk of failure. A risk of failure acceptance level of 0.01%, i.e. a 'zero-failure' situation, results in an increased primary drying process time

  7. Dynamic influence of pinning points on marine ice-sheet stability: a numerical study in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank; Berger, Sophie; Drews, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    The East Antarctic ice sheet is likely more stable than its West Antarctic counterpart because its bed is largely lying above sea level. However, the ice sheet in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, contains marine sectors that are in contact with the ocean through overdeepened marine basins interspersed by grounded ice promontories and ice rises, pinning and stabilising the ice shelves. In this paper, we use the ice-sheet model BISICLES to investigate the effect of sub-ice-shelf melting, using a series of scenarios compliant with current values, on the ice-dynamic stability of the outlet glaciers between the Lazarev and Roi Baudouin ice shelves over the next millennium. Overall, the sub-ice-shelf melting substantially impacts the sea-level contribution. Locally, we predict a short-term rapid grounding-line retreat of the overdeepened outlet glacier Hansenbreen, which further induces the transition of the bordering ice promontories into ice rises. Furthermore, our analysis demonstrated that the onset of the marine ice-sheet retreat and subsequent promontory transition into ice rise is controlled by small pinning points, mostly uncharted in pan-Antarctic datasets. Pinning points have a twofold impact on marine ice sheets. They decrease the ice discharge by buttressing effect, and they play a crucial role in initialising marine ice sheets through data assimilation, leading to errors in ice-shelf rheology when omitted. Our results show that unpinning increases the sea-level rise by 10 %, while omitting the same pinning point in data assimilation decreases it by 10 %, but the more striking effect is in the promontory transition time, advanced by two centuries for unpinning and delayed by almost half a millennium when the pinning point is missing in data assimilation. Pinning points exert a subtle influence on ice dynamics at the kilometre scale, which calls for a better knowledge of the Antarctic margins.

  8. Riverine habitat dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, R.B.

    2013-01-01

    The physical habitat template is a fundamental influence on riverine ecosystem structure and function. Habitat dynamics refers to the variation in habitat through space and time as the result of varying discharge and varying geomorphology. Habitat dynamics can be assessed at spatial scales ranging from the grain (the smallest resolution at which an organism relates to its environment) to the extent (the broadest resolution inclusive of all space occupied during its life cycle). In addition to a potentially broad range of spatial scales, assessments of habitat dynamics may include dynamics of both occupied and nonoccupied habitat patches because of process interactions among patches. Temporal aspects of riverine habitat dynamics can be categorized into hydrodynamics and morphodynamics. Hydrodynamics refers to habitat variation that results from changes in discharge in the absence of significant change of channel morphology and at generally low sediment-transport rates. Hydrodynamic assessments are useful in cases of relatively high flow exceedance (percent of time a flow is equaled or exceeded) or high critical shear stress, conditions that are applicable in many studies of instream flows. Morphodynamics refers to habitat variation resulting from changes to substrate conditions or channel/floodplain morphology. Morphodynamic assessments are necessary when channel and floodplain boundary conditions have been significantly changed, generally by relatively rare flood events or in rivers with low critical shear stress. Morphodynamic habitat variation can be particularly important as disturbance mechanisms that mediate population growth or for providing conditions needed for reproduction, such as channel-migration events that erode cutbanks and provide new pointbar surfaces for germination of riparian trees. Understanding of habitat dynamics is increasing in importance as societal goals shift toward restoration of riverine ecosystems. Effective investment in restoration

  9. Dynamic hardness of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  10. Dynamic Characterization of Galfenol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheidler, Justin; Asnani, Vivake M.; Deng, Zhangxian; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2015-01-01

    A novel and precise characterization of the constitutive behavior of solid and laminated research-grade, polycrystalline Galfenol (Fe81:6Ga18:4) under under quasi-static (1 Hz) and dynamic (4 to 1000 Hz) stress loadings was recently conducted by the authors. This paper summarizes the characterization by focusing on the experimental design and the dynamic sensing response of the solid Galfenol specimen. Mechanical loads are applied using a high frequency load frame. The dynamic stress amplitude for minor and major loops is 2.88 and 31.4 MPa, respectively. Dynamic minor and major loops are measured for the bias condition resulting in maximum, quasi-static sensitivity. Three key sources of error in the dynamic measurements are accounted for: (1) electromagnetic noise in strain signals due to Galfenol's magnetic response, (2) error in load signals due to the inertial force of fixturing, and (3) time delays imposed by conditioning electronics. For dynamic characterization, strain error is kept below 1.2 % of full scale by wiring two collocated gauges in series (noise cancellation) and through lead wire weaving. Inertial force error is kept below 0.41 % by measuring the dynamic force in the specimen using a nearly collocated piezoelectric load washer. The phase response of all conditioning electronics is explicitly measured and corrected for. In general, as frequency increases, the sensing response becomes more linear due to an increase in eddy currents. The location of positive and negative saturation is the same at all frequencies. As frequency increases above about 100 Hz, the elbow in the strain versus stress response disappears as the active (soft) regime stiffens toward the passive (hard) regime.

  11. The ethics of dynamic pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Faruqui, Ahmad

    2010-07-15

    Dynamic pricing has garnered much interest among regulators and utilities, since it has the potential for lowering energy costs for society. But the deployment of dynamic pricing has been remarkably tepid. The underlying premise is that dynamic pricing is unfair. But the presumption of unfairness in dynamic pricing rests on an assumption of fairness in today's tariffs. (author)

  12. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  13. Dynamics in Epistasis Analysis.

    PubMed

    Awdeh, Aseel; Phenix, Hilary; Kaern, Mads; Perkins, Theodore

    2017-01-16

    Finding regulatory relationships between genes, including the direction and nature of influence between them, is a fundamental challenge in the field of molecular genetics. One classical approach to this problem is epistasis analysis. Broadly speaking, epistasis analysis infers the regulatory relationships between a pair of genes in a genetic pathway by considering the patterns of change in an observable trait resulting from single and double deletion of genes. While classical epistasis analysis has yielded deep insights on numerous genetic pathways, it is not without limitations. Here, we explore the possibility of dynamic epistasis analysis, in which, in addition to performing genetic perturbations of a pathway, we drive the pathway by a time-varying upstream signal. We explore the theoretical power of dynamical epistasis analysis by conducting an identifiability analysis of Boolean models of genetic pathways, comparing static and dynamic approaches. We find that even relatively simple input dynamics greatly increases the power of epistasis analysis to discriminate alternative network structures. Further, we explore the question of experiment design, and show that a subset of short time-varying signals, which we call dynamic primitives, allow maximum discriminative power with a reduced number of experiments.

  14. Semipredictable dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    A new class of deterministic dynamical systems, termed semipredictable dynamical systems, is presented. The spatiotemporal evolution of these systems have both predictable and unpredictable traits, as found in natural complex systems. We prove a general result: The dynamics of any deterministic nonlinear cellular automaton (CA) with p possible dynamical states can be decomposed at each instant of time in a superposition of N layers involving p0, p1, …, pN - 1 dynamical states each, where the pk ∈ N , k ∈ [ 0 , N - 1 ] are divisors of p. If the divisors coincide with the prime factors of p this decomposition is unique. Conversely, we also prove that N CA working on symbols p0, p1, …, pN - 1 can be composed to create a graded CA rule with N different layers. We then show that, even when the full spatiotemporal evolution can be unpredictable, certain traits (layers) can exactly be predicted. We present explicit examples of such systems involving compositions of Wolfram's 256 elementary CA and a more complex CA rule acting on a neighborhood of two sites and 12 symbols and whose rule table corresponds to the smallest Moufang loop M12(S3, 2).

  15. Sublattice parallel replica dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Enrique; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Voter, Arthur F.

    2014-06-01

    Exascale computing presents a challenge for the scientific community as new algorithms must be developed to take full advantage of the new computing paradigm. Atomistic simulation methods that offer full fidelity to the underlying potential, i.e., molecular dynamics (MD) and parallel replica dynamics, fail to use the whole machine speedup, leaving a region in time and sample size space that is unattainable with current algorithms. In this paper, we present an extension of the parallel replica dynamics algorithm [A. F. Voter, Phys. Rev. B 57, R13985 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevB.57.R13985] by combining it with the synchronous sublattice approach of Shim and Amar [Y. Shim and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 71, 125432 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevB.71.125432], thereby exploiting event locality to improve the algorithm scalability. This algorithm is based on a domain decomposition in which events happen independently in different regions in the sample. We develop an analytical expression for the speedup given by this sublattice parallel replica dynamics algorithm and compare it with parallel MD and traditional parallel replica dynamics. We demonstrate how this algorithm, which introduces a slight additional approximation of event locality, enables the study of physical systems unreachable with traditional methodologies and promises to better utilize the resources of current high performance and future exascale computers.

  16. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  17. Transoral decompression and posterior stabilisation in Morquio's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, J; Crockard, H A; Ransford, A O; Stevens, J M

    1991-01-01

    A 3.5 year old boy with Morquio's disease was referred with a persisting left hemiparesis four months after a fall and was found to have craniocervical junction compression due to atlantoaxial subluxation and significant anterior soft tissue compression. Transient unconsciousness at the time of the fall was probably due to medullary concussion as a result of hyperextension, not a head injury. Spinal cord compression due to atlantoaxial subluxation at the craniovertebral junction is a major cause of disability and death in these patients. Once cervical myelopathy appears, early posterior occipitocervical fusion has been advocated in order to arrest the progression of neurological disability and this is successful in most cases. This conventional approach was considered unsafe because of the significant anterior compression. A combined anterior transoral decompression with posterior fusion to deal with this particularly difficult problem is described. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1755646

  18. Stabilisation of Laryngeal AL Amyloidosis with Long Term Curcumin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H.; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), smoldering myeloma (SMM), and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) represent a spectrum of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL) falls within the spectrum of these diseases and has a mortality rate of more than 80% within 2 years of diagnosis. Curcumin, derived from turmeric, has been shown to have a clinical benefit in some patients with PCDs. In addition to a clinical benefit in these patients, curcumin has been found to have a strong affinity for fibrillar amyloid proteins. We thus administered curcumin to a patient with laryngeal amyloidosis and smoldering myeloma and found that the patient has shown a lack of progression of his disease for a period of five years. This is in keeping with our previous findings of clinical benefits of curcumin in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias. We recommend further evaluation of curcumin in patients with primary AL amyloidosis. PMID:26199769

  19. Plaque regression and plaque stabilisation in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Tarun; Ezhilan, J.; Vasnawala, Hardik; Somani, Vinod

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by formation of plaques on the inner walls of arteries that threatens to become the leading cause of death worldwide via its sequelae of myocardial infarction and stroke. Endothelial dysfunction leads to cholesterol uptake and accumulation of inflammatory markers within the plaque. The stability of a plaque eventually depends on the balance between vascular smooth muscle cells that stabilize it and the inflammatory cells like macrophages and T lymphocytes that make it prone to rupture. The current approach to manage atherosclerosis focuses on the treatment of a ruptured plaque and efforts have been made to reduce the risk of plaque rupture by identifying vulnerable plaques and treating them before they precipitate into clinical events. New diagnostic approaches such as IVUS and CIMT ultrasound are now being preferred over traditional coronary angiography because of their better accuracy in measuring plaque volume rather than the level of stenosis caused. The present review highlights the literature available on two prevalent approaches to manage a vulnerable plaque, namely, plaque stabilization and plaque regression, and their validation through various treatment modalities in recent plaque management studies. Plaque stabilization focuses on stabilizing the content of plaque and strengthening the overlying endothelium, while plaque regression focuses on the overall reduction in plaque volume and to reverse the arterial endothelium to its normal functional state. Although earlier studies contemplated the practicality of plaque regression and focused greatly on stabilization of a vulnerable plaque, our review indicated that, aided by the use of superior diagnostics tools, more intensive lipid modifying therapies have resulted in actual plaque regression. PMID:24381872

  20. Global health equity and climate stabilisation: a common agenda.

    PubMed

    Friel, Sharon; Marmot, Michael; McMichael, Anthony J; Kjellstrom, Tord; Vågerö, Denny

    2008-11-08

    Although health has improved for many people, the extent of health inequities between and within countries is growing. Meanwhile, humankind is disrupting the global climate and other life-supporting environmental systems, thereby creating serious risks for health and wellbeing, especially in vulnerable populations but ultimately for everybody. Underlying determinants of health inequity and environmental change overlap substantially; they are signs of an economic system predicated on asymmetric growth and competition, shaped by market forces that mostly disregard health and environmental consequences rather than by values of fairness and support. A shift is needed in priorities in economic development towards healthy forms of urbanisation, more efficient and renewable energy sources, and a sustainable and fairer food system. Global interconnectedness and interdependence enable the social and environmental determinants of health to be addressed in ways that will increase health equity, reduce poverty, and build societies that live within environmental limits.

  1. Generator voltage stabilisation for series-hybrid electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P; Gladwin, D; Stewart, J; Cowley, R

    2008-04-01

    This paper presents a controller for use in speed control of an internal combustion engine for series-hybrid electric vehicle applications. Particular reference is made to the stability of the rectified DC link voltage under load disturbance. In the system under consideration, the primary power source is a four-cylinder normally aspirated gasoline internal combustion engine, which is mechanically coupled to a three-phase permanent magnet AC generator. The generated AC voltage is subsequently rectified to supply a lead-acid battery, and permanent magnet traction motors via three-phase full bridge power electronic inverters. Two complementary performance objectives exist. Firstly to maintain the internal combustion engine at its optimal operating point, and secondly to supply a stable 42 V supply to the traction drive inverters. Achievement of these goals minimises the transient energy storage requirements at the DC link, with a consequent reduction in both weight and cost. These objectives imply constant velocity operation of the internal combustion engine under external load disturbances and changes in both operating conditions and vehicle speed set-points. An electronically operated throttle allows closed loop engine velocity control. System time delays and nonlinearities render closed loop control design extremely problematic. A model-based controller is designed and shown to be effective in controlling the DC link voltage, resulting in the well-conditioned operation of the hybrid vehicle.

  2. Stabilisation of distal radius fractures: Lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Horst, Taylor A; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of the diagnosis and management of distal radius fractures has been a long developed over centuries. There has been a shift in treatment of these very common injuries from closed reduction and casting to internal fixation. The answer to the best method of treatment has yet to be found. Today, we have a multitude of treatment options available with varying degrees of evidence to support their use. This review helps to illustrate the lessons we have learned and future directions for treatment.

  3. Stabilised electromagnetic levitation at 2-13 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danley, T. J.; Schiffman, R. A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Krishnan, S.; Nordine, P. C.; Rey, C. A.; Bruno, P. A.

    SEL, the Stabilized Electromagnetic Levitator, has been developed to exploit the unique design opportunities available in containerless microgravity experiments. Efficiency and versatility are obtained with multiple coils driven by individual broadband amplifiers whose phase and frequency are controlled. The heating and positioning fields are decoupled. Specimen translation, spin, and for liquids, shape, may be adjusted. An open coil structure provides access for optical and diagnostic probes. Results of experiments with a prototype device are discussed. Levitating and heating materials on earth were demonstrated at frequencies up to 13 MHz.

  4. Slow crystallisation of a monodisperse foam stabilised against coarsening.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Aaron J; Whyte, David; Banhart, John; Hutzler, Stefan; Weaire, Denis; García-Moreno, Francisco

    2015-06-21

    The evolution of a three-dimensional monodisperse foam was investigated using X-ray tomography over the course of seven days. The coarsening of the sample was inhibited through the use of perfluorohexane gas. The internal configuration of bubbles is seen to change markedly, evolving from a disordered arrangement towards a more ordered state. We chart this ordering process through the use of the coordination number, the bond orientational order parameter (BOOP) and the translational order parameter.

  5. Direct observation of OH formation from stabilised Criegee intermediates.

    PubMed

    Novelli, A; Vereecken, L; Lelieveld, J; Harder, H

    2014-10-07

    The syn-CH3CHOO Criegee intermediate formed from the ozonolysis of propene and (E)-2-butene was detected via unimolecular decomposition and subsequent detection of OH radicals by a LIF-FAGE instrument. An observed time dependent OH concentration profile was analysed using a detailed model focusing on the speciated chemistry of Criegee intermediates based on the recent literature. The absolute OH concentration was found to depend on the steady state concentration of syn-CH3CHOO at the injection point while the time dependence of the OH concentration profile was influenced by the sum of the rates of unimolecular decomposition of syn-CH3CHOO and wall loss. By varying the most relevant parameters influencing the SCI chemistry in the model and based on the temporal OH concentration profile, the unimolecular decomposition rate k (293 K) of syn-CH3CHOO was shown to lie within the range 3-30 s(-1), where a value of 20 ± 10 s(-1) yields the best agreement with the CI chemistry literature.

  6. The Reactions of Nitrogen Peroxide with Possible Stabilisers for Propellants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1957-03-01

    ethyl anilide Camphor Mineral jelly Cracked mineral jelly (as used for cordite M.C.) Terpineol Benzene-azo- . -naphthols Hydro.Vearbamite These...carbamite; clearly all the oxygen initially present had reacted and the brown fumes observed were due to oxidation of nitric oxide. This source of error...below), cyclohexanone, and terpineol . ii) Moderately reactive substances, including polynuclear hydrocarbons fluorene and phenamthrene) and an ether

  7. Primary amnesia of insidious onset with subsequent stabilisation.

    PubMed Central

    Lucchelli, F; De Renzi, E; Perani, D; Fazio, F

    1994-01-01

    A patient had a slowly developing amnesic syndrome that remained substantially unchanged during the two and a half years of observation. Intellectual skills were excellent and there was no language, perception, praxis, or calculation deficit. The memory impairment involved verbal and visual learning, sparing spatial learning and, to a large extent, retrograde memory. Magnetic resonance imaging was normal, but PET showed a hypometabolism of the left temporal mesial region and thalamus. This case extends the spectrum of monosymptomatic cognitive disorders, previously reported in the area of language, praxis, and visual recognition, to amnesia. Images PMID:7964813

  8. Increased decomposer diversity accelerates and potentially stabilises litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kitz, Florian; Steinwandter, Michael; Traugott, Michael; Seeber, Julia

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the effect of decomposer diversity on litter decomposition in alpine areas. Especially under the premise that alpine ecosystems are very sensitive to global change and are currently undergoing extensive land-use changes, a better understanding is needed to predict how environmental change will affect litter decomposition. A mesocosm experiment was conducted to compare the effects of the most common and functionally diverse invertebrates (earthworms, millipedes and sciarid larvae) found in alpine soils on decomposition rates and to assess how decomposer diversity affects litter decomposition. Experimental and estimated (i.e. projected to field decomposer-biomass) litter mass loss was 13-33% higher in the three-species treatment. Notably, the variability in decomposition was greatly reduced when decomposer diversity was high, indicating a portfolio effect. Our results suggest that invertebrate decomposer diversity is essential for sustaining litter decomposition in alpine areas and for the stability of this service.

  9. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods.

    PubMed

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK(®)-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA(®) polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones.

  10. Molecularly stabilised ultrasmall gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifert, Annika; Pan-Bartnek, Yu; Simon, Ulrich; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2013-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely used as contrast agents in electron microscopy as well as for diagnostic tests. Due to their unique optical and electrical properties and their small size, there is also a growing field of potential applications in medical fields of imaging and therapy, for example as drug carriers or as active compounds in thermotherapy. Besides their intrinsic optical properties, facile surface decoration with (bio)functional ligands renders AuNPs ideally suited for many industrial and medical applications. However, novel AuNPs may have toxicological profiles differing from bulk and therefore a thorough analysis of the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is required. Several mechanisms are proposed that cause adverse effects of nanoparticles in biological systems. Catalytic generation of reactive species due to the large and chemically active surface area of nanomaterials is well established. Because nanoparticles approach the size of biological molecules and subcellular structures, they may overcome natural barriers by active or passive uptake. Ultrasmall AuNPs with sizes of 2 nm or less may even behave as molecular ligands. These types of potential interactions would imply a size and ligand-dependent behaviour of any nanomaterial towards biological systems. Thus, to fully understand their QSAR, AuNPs bioactivity should be analysed in biological systems of increasing complexity ranging from cell culture to whole animal studies.

  11. Boundary feedback stabilisation of a flexible robotic manipulator with constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Sun, Chen

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the flexible robotic manipulator is modelled as a distributed parameter system, represented by a group of partial differential equations and ordinary differential equations. Control is designed at the boundary of the robotic manipulator based on integral-barrier Lyapunov function to suppress the vibration of the elastic deflection and track the desired angular position. With the proposed boundary control, the manipulator can be driven to the desired set-point with angular position and elastic deflection stay under the former setting constraint. Uniformed boundedness of the closed-loop system under the unknown time-varying disturbance is achieved. Stability analysis of the closed-loop system is given by employing the Lyapunov stability theory. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed boundary controller for ensuring output constraint and suppressing vibrations.

  12. Vitamin C for stabilising biological lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Ajoy K.; Mackenzie, Mark D.; Cialowicz, Katarzyna I.; Saleeb, Rebecca S.; Duncan, Rory R.

    2016-04-01

    We report on efforts to improve the lifetime of biological lasers through the use of ascorbic acid (also commonly known as vitamin C). Fluorescent proteins and dyes, used in biological lasers, suffer from photobleaching due to the build-up of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which causes damage leading to a decrease in emission over time. This is an issue both for laser lifetime and cell health. It has previously been shown that ascorbic acid can be effective in reducing ROS levels in a variety of applications. For our experiments human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), containing the fluorescent dye Calcein AM, were placed between two dielectric plane mirrors to form a laser cavity. The cells were pumped using the output of a Ti:Sapphire femtosecond OPO system, frequency doubled twice in BBO crystals, giving an output of 474 nm. Initial results have shown an increase in laser lifetime when ascorbic acid is added to cells indicating a reduction in the build-up of ROS.

  13. Time-delayed feedback stabilisation of nonlinear potential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A. Yu.; Zhabko, A. P.; Zhabko, I. A.

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical systems with nonlinear potential forces and delayed feedback are studied. It is assumed that, in the absence of control, the trivial equilibrium positions of considered systems are stable, but they are not attracting ones. An approach for the constructing of nonlinear controllers providing the asymptotic stability of the equilibrium positions is proposed. By the use of the Lyapunov direct method and the Razumikhin approach, it is proved that for the corresponding closed-loop systems the asymptotic stability can be guaranteed even in the cases when delay is unknown and time-varying. Moreover, estimates for solutions of closed-loop systems are found. An example and the results of a computer simulation are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. Tension band stabilisation of acetabular physeal fractures in four kittens.

    PubMed

    Langley-Hobbs, S J; Sissener, T R; Shales, C J

    2007-06-01

    The surgical repair of acetabular physeal fractures in four kittens using a screw and tension band technique is reported. This was an appropriate method for restoring articular congruency and improving pelvic alignment. All cases had an excellent outcome and full limb use following fracture repair. In kittens younger than 12 weeks, there is a possibility of premature fusion of the acetabular bone resulting in development of a deformed, shallow acetabulum and hip subluxation. However, surgery is still justified when there is pelvic canal narrowing to decrease the risk of future defecatory problems. Early implant removal in such young kittens may decrease the severity of deformity caused by premature physeal closure. In kittens of 16 weeks or older, the prognosis is good for normal acetabular development and implant removal is not necessary.

  15. Stabilising the Herpes Simplex Virus capsid by DNA packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuite, Gijs; Radtke, Kerstin; Sodeik, Beate; Roos, Wouter

    2009-03-01

    Three different types of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) nuclear capsids can be distinguished, A, B and C capsids. These capsids types are, respectively, empty, contain scaffold proteins, or hold DNA. We investigate the physical properties of these three capsids by combining biochemical and nanoindentation techniques. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments show that A and C capsids are mechanically indistinguishable whereas B capsids already break at much lower forces. By extracting the pentamers with 2.0 M GuHCl or 6.0 M Urea we demonstrate an increased flexibility of all three capsid types. Remarkably, the breaking force of the B capsids without pentamers does not change, while the modified A and C capsids show a large drop in their breaking force to approximately the value of the B capsids. This result indicates that upon DNA packaging a structural change at or near the pentamers occurs which mechanically reinforces the capsids structure. The reported binding of proteins UL17/UL25 to the pentamers of the A and C capsids seems the most likely candidate for such capsids strengthening. Finally, the data supports the view that initiation of DNA packaging triggers the maturation of HSV-1 capsids.

  16. Dynamical symmetries for fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model (FDSM). The analytical symmetry limits of the model are then applied to the calculation of physical quantities such as ground-state masses and B(E{sub 2}) values in heavy nuclei. These comparisons with data provide strong support for a new principle of collective motion, the Dynamical Pauli Effect, and suggest that dynamical symmetries which properly account for the pauli principle are much more persistent in nuclear structure than the corresponding boson symmetries. Finally, we present an assessment of criticisms which have been voiced concerning the FDSM, and a discussion of new phenomena and exotic spectroscopy'' which may be suggested by the model. 14 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Dynamically stabilized magnetic skyrmions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Iacocca, E.; Awad, A. A.; Dumas, R. K.; Zhang, F. C.; Braun, H. B.; Åkerman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically non-trivial spin textures that manifest themselves as quasiparticles in ferromagnetic thin films or noncentrosymmetric bulk materials. So far attention has focused on skyrmions stabilized either by the Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) or by dipolar interaction, where in the latter case the excitations are known as bubble skyrmions. Here we demonstrate the existence of a dynamically stabilized skyrmion, which exists even when dipolar interactions and DMI are absent. We establish how such dynamic skyrmions can be nucleated, sustained and manipulated in an effectively lossless medium under a nanocontact. As quasiparticles, they can be transported between two nanocontacts in a nanowire, even in complete absence of DMI. Conversely, in the presence of DMI, we observe that the dynamical skyrmion experiences strong breathing. All of this points towards a wide range of skyrmion manipulation, which can be studied in a much wider class of materials than considered so far. PMID:26351104

  18. Custom designed dynamic videokeratometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mas, David; Kowalska, Malgorzata A.; Espinosa, Julian; Kasprzak, Henryk T.

    2010-01-01

    The human eye is a complex dynamic system that undergoes fine rotations and deformations. Usually information about the eye globe deformation and micromovements are averaged and lost when using commercial measuring devices, although they provide important information about the eye's physiology and the visual process. We have constructed a dynamic topographer from an existing Placido projection head and a video camera. The algorithms of calibration, data processing and topographic reconstruction are also explained in this paper. With our system, the CCD parameters and the algorithms can be controlled offering many possibilities for eye researchers. Obtained results show that the system is reliable for measuring eye dynamics. Some applications of the device are also outlined.

  19. Rotorcraft Dynamics 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    In the conference proceedings are 24 presented papers, their discussions, and material given in two panels. The presented papers address the general areas of the dynamics of rotorcraft or helicopters. Specific topics include the stability of rotors in hover and forward flight, the stability of coupled rotor-fuselage systems in hover, the loads on a rotor in forward flight including new developments in rotor loads calculations, and the calculation of rotorcraft vibration and means for its control or suppression. Material in the first panel deals with the successful application of dynamics technology to engineering development of flight vehicles. Material in the second panel is concerned with large data bases in the area of rotorocraft dynamics and how they are developed, managed, and used.

  20. Stochastic ice stream dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, Elisa; Bertagni, Matteo Bernard; Ridolfi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    Ice streams are narrow corridors of fast-flowing ice that constitute the arterial drainage network of ice sheets. Therefore, changes in ice stream flow are key to understanding paleoclimate, sea level changes, and rapid disintegration of ice sheets during deglaciation. The dynamics of ice flow are tightly coupled to the climate system through atmospheric temperature and snow recharge, which are known exhibit stochastic variability. Here we focus on the interplay between stochastic climate forcing and ice stream temporal dynamics. Our work demonstrates that realistic climate fluctuations are able to (i) induce the coexistence of dynamic behaviors that would be incompatible in a purely deterministic system and (ii) drive ice stream flow away from the regime expected in a steady climate. We conclude that environmental noise appears to be crucial to interpreting the past behavior of ice sheets, as well as to predicting their future evolution.