Science.gov

Sample records for dynamic whole-building simulation

  1. Implementation of window shading models into dynamic whole-building simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomanowski, Bartosz Aleksander

    resistances of sealed cavities between glazing/shading layers are calculated at each time-step for various fill gases and mixtures. In addition to modeling glazing/shading layer combinations, the CFC type also provides an alternate method of modeling unshaded windows without relying on third party software to supply the solar optics and cavity resistances. To build confidence in the CFC code implementation, two comparison studies were carried out to compare the CFC type against other models. The first study compared the CFC models for unshaded windows with the standard ESP-r transparent multi-layer construction (TMC) models. The second study compared the CFC slat-type blind models with EnergyPlus 2.0. Good agreement was seen in the simulation results in both studies. The successful implementation of the Complex Fenestration Construction within ESP-r has been demonstrated in the current research. In order for ESP-r users to fully exploit the capabilities of the CFC framework, it is recommended that the current models be extended to include a facility for dynamic shading control as well as the treatment of other types of shading layers. The coupling of daylighting models with the CFC type would provide a useful tool for modeling luminance control in combination with shading control strategies. With these enhancements, it is anticipated that the CFC implementation will be of significant value to practitioners.

  2. Practical Integration Approach and Whole Building Energy Simulation of Three Energy Efficient Building Technologies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. P.; Zhivov, A.; Heron, D.; Deru, M.; Benne, K.

    2010-08-01

    Three technologies that have potential to save energy and improve sustainability of buildings are dedicated outdoor air systems, radiant heating and cooling systems and tighter building envelopes. To investigate the energy savings potential of these three technologies, whole building energy simulations were performed for a barracks facility and an administration facility in 15 U.S. climate zones and 16 international locations.

  3. Use of whole building simulation in on-line performance assessment: Modeling and implementation issues

    SciTech Connect

    Haves, Philip; Salsbury, Tim; Claridge, David; Liu, Mingsheng

    2001-06-15

    The application of model-based performance assessment at the whole building level is explored. The information requirements for a simulation to predict the actual performance of a particular real building, as opposed to estimating the impact of design options, are addressed with particular attention to common sources of input error and important deficiencies in most simulation models. The role of calibrated simulations is discussed. The communication requirements for passive monitoring and active testing are identified and the possibilities for using control system communications protocols to link on-line simulation and energy management and control systems are discussed. The potential of simulation programs to act as ''plug-and-play'' components on building control networks is discussed.

  4. Co-Simulation of Detailed Whole Building with the Power System to Study Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Fuller, Jason C.; Srivastava, Viraj; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2014-12-24

    Modernization of the power system in a way that ensures a sustainable energy system is arguably one of the most pressing concerns of our time. Buildings are important components in the power system. First, they are the main consumers of electricity and secondly, they do not have constant energy demand. Conventionally, electricity has been difficult to store and should be consumed as it is generated. Therefore, maintaining the demand and supply is critical in the power system. However, to reduce the complexity of power models, buildings (i.e., end-use loads) are traditionally modeled and represented as aggregated “dumb” nodes in the power system. This means we lack effective detailed whole building energy models that can support requirements and emerging technologies of the smart power grid. To gain greater insight into the relationship between building energy demand and power system performance, it is important to constitute a co-simulation framework to support detailed building energy modeling and simulation within the power system to study capabilities promised by the modern power grid. This paper discusses ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and presents underlying tools and framework needed to enable co-simulation of building, building energy systems and their control in the power system to study applications such as demand response, grid-based HVAC control, and deployment of buildings for ancillary services. The optimal goal is to develop an integrated modeling and simulation platform that is flexible, reusable, and scalable. Results of this work will contribute to future building and power system studies, especially those related to the integrated ‘smart grid’. Results are also expected to advance power resiliency and local (micro) scale grid studies where several building and renewable energy systems transact energy directly. This paper also reviews some applications that can be supported and studied using the framework introduced

  5. Whole Building Design Objectives for Campus Safety and Security: A System Dynamics Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, Charles G.

    2010-01-01

    The May/June 2009 issue of "Facilities Manager" introduced APPA readers to the Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG)--today's most comprehensive Internet-based depository of resources contributing to a systems approach for everything of a building nature. The emphasis in that article was on Operations and Maintenance (O&M) issues and procedures. In…

  6. HVAC BESTEST: A Procedure for Testing the Ability of Whole-Building Energy Simulation Programs to Model Space Conditioning Equipment: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Neymark, J,; Judkoff, R.; Knabe, G.; Le, H.-T.; Durig, M.; Glass, A.; Zweifel, G.

    2001-07-03

    Validation of Building Energy Simulation Programs consists of a combination of empirical validation, analytical verification, and comparative analysis techniques (Judkoff 1988). An analytical verification and comparative diagnostic procedure was developed to test the ability of whole-building simulation programs to model the performance of unitary space-cooling equipment that is typically modeled using manufacturer design data presented as empirically derived performance maps. Field trials of the method were conducted by researchers from nations participating in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme Task 22, using a number of detailed hourly simulation programs from Europe and the United States, including: CA-SIS, CLIM2000, PROMETHEUS, TRNSYS-TUD, and two versions of DOE-2.1E. Analytical solutions were also developed for the test cases.

  7. A Framework for Daylighting Optimization in Whole Buildings with OpenStudio

    SciTech Connect

    2016-08-12

    We present a toolkit and workflow for leveraging the OpenStudio (Guglielmetti et al. 2010) platform to perform daylighting analysis and optimization in a whole building energy modeling (BEM) context. We have re-implemented OpenStudio's integrated Radiance and EnergyPlus functionality as an OpenStudio Measure. The OpenStudio Radiance Measure works within the OpenStudio Application and Parametric Analysis Tool, as well as the OpenStudio Server large scale analysis framework, allowing a rigorous daylighting simulation to be performed on a single building model or potentially an entire population of programmatically generated models. The Radiance simulation results can automatically inform the broader building energy model, and provide dynamic daylight metrics as a basis for decision. Through introduction and example, this paper illustrates the utility of the OpenStudio building energy modeling platform to leverage existing simulation tools for integrated building energy performance simulation, daylighting analysis, and reportage.

  8. Tether Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of the conference are presented. The objective was to provide a forum for the discussion of the structure and status of existing computer programs which are used to simulate the dynamics of a variety of tether applications in space. A major topic was different simulation models and the process of validating them. Guidance on future work in these areas was obtained from a panel discussion; the panel was composed of resource and technical managers and dynamic analysts in the tether field. The conclusions of this panel are also presented.

  9. Dynamical Simulation of Probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-Lipschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices(such as random number generators). Self-orgainizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed. Special attention was focused upon coupled stochastic processes, defined in terms of conditional probabilities, for which joint probability does not exist. Simulations of quantum probabilities are also discussed.

  10. Using Whole Building Performance Measurement to Develop a Business Case

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Kimberly M.

    2006-09-15

    Since 1998 the U.S. Navy?s Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) has had a policy for incorporating sustainable design principles into new building construction. The policy also states it is the intent of NAVFAC to accomplish this within the given budget constraints and while meeting customer requirements. Programming a building using a first cost approach instead of a life cycle cost approach is one of the biggest challenges for integrating sustainable design into projects at the Navy. Due to this hurdle, an attempt to develop a Navy specific business case was undertaken. Through this process, it was discovered that consistent data were not being collected for all applicable Navy buildings. Therefore, the current business case information being used by the Navy is the conglomeration of existing business case analysis in the literature. Although this business case information is useful, there is still a need for collecting and analyzing the Navy business case. To develop the Navy specific business case, NAVFAC is developing program metrics to capture the status of buildings in the design and construction phase and they have started to collect whole building cost and performance data for 14 buildings (7 sustainably designed and 7 traditionally designed buildings) to capture data on their existing inventory of sustainably design buildings. Performance measurement data are being collected on water, energy, operations and maintenance, waste generation, purchasing, occupant satisfaction, and transportation. The building cost and performance data will be collected for a minimum of 12 months. Both of these data collection and analysis efforts have offered lessons learned that will be shared alongside the current Navy business case information.

  11. Data Systems Dynamic Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouff, Christopher; Clark, Melana; Davenport, Bill; Message, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The Data System Dynamic Simulator (DSDS) is a discrete event simulation tool. It was developed for NASA for the specific purpose of evaluating candidate architectures for data systems of the Space Station era. DSDS provides three methods for meeting this requirement. First, the user has access to a library of standard pre-programmed elements. These elements represent tailorable components of NASA data systems and can be connected in any logical manner. Secondly, DSDS supports the development of additional elements. This allows the more sophisticated DSDS user the option of extending the standard element set. Thirdly, DSDS supports the use of data streams simulation. Data streams is the name given to a technique that ignores packet boundaries, but is sensitive to rate changes. Because rate changes are rare compared to packet arrivals in a typical NASA data system, data stream simulations require a fraction of the CPU run time. Additionally, the data stream technique is considerably more accurate than another commonly-used optimization technique.

  12. Look-ahead Dynamic Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-20

    Look-ahead dynamic simulation software system incorporates the high performance parallel computing technologies, significantly reduces the solution time for each transient simulation case, and brings the dynamic simulation analysis into on-line applications to enable more transparency for better reliability and asset utilization. It takes the snapshot of the current power grid status, functions in parallel computing the system dynamic simulation, and outputs the transient response of the power system in real time.

  13. Remote manipulator dynamic simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, E. C.; Donges, P. K.; Garand, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    A simulator to generate the real time visual scenes required to perform man in the loop investigations of remote manipulator application and design concepts for the space shuttle is described. The simulated remote manipulator consists of a computed display system that uses a digital computer, the electronic scene generator, an operator's station, and associated interface hardware. A description of the capabilities of the implemented simulation is presented. The mathematical models and programs developed for the simulation are included.

  14. Dynamic Power Grid Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Top, Philip; Woodward, Carol; Smith, Steve; Banks, Lawrence; Kelley, Brian

    2015-09-14

    GridDyn is a part of power grid simulation toolkit. The code is designed using modern object oriented C++ methods utilizing C++11 and recent Boost libraries to ensure compatibility with multiple operating systems and environments.

  15. Floating orbital molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Perlt, Eva; Brüssel, Marc; Kirchner, Barbara

    2014-04-21

    We introduce an alternative ab initio molecular dynamics simulation as a unification of Hartree-Fock molecular dynamics and the floating orbital approach. The general scheme of the floating orbital molecular dynamics method is presented. Moreover, a simple but sophisticated guess for the orbital centers is provided to reduce the number of electronic structure optimization steps at each molecular dynamics step. The conservation of total energy and angular momentum is investigated in order to validate the floating orbital molecular dynamics approach with and without application of the initial guess. Finally, a water monomer and a water dimer are simulated, and the influence of the orbital floating on certain properties like the dipole moment is investigated.

  16. Dynamical simulation of gravothermal catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Klinko, Peter; Miller, Bruce N

    2004-01-16

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of gravothermal catastrophe in a model of a spherical cluster where, besides the energy and angular momentum, an additional integral of motion is also taken into account. Using dynamical simulation, we study a system of concentric, rotating, spherical shells employing a precise, event-driven, algorithm that permits the controlled exchange of internal angular momentum. Initially the system starts to relax to a locally stable state that is in good agreement with mean field predictions. This is followed by core collapse with the development of a core-halo structure and gravothermal oscillation.

  17. Accelerated dynamics simulations of nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, B. P.; Stuart, S. J.; Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the application of accelerated dynamics techniques to the study of carbon nanotubes. We have used the parallel replica method and temperature accelerated dynamics simulations are currently in progress. In the parallel replica study, we have stretched tubes at a rate significantly lower than that used in previous studies. In these preliminary results, we find that there are qualitative differences in the rupture of the nanotubes at different temperatures. We plan on extending this investigation to include nanotubes of various chiralities. We also plan on exploring unique geometries of nanotubes.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił

    2015-04-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are used for the investigation of molecular motions in pyridine in the temperature range 20-480 K under normal pressure. The results obtained are analyzed within the frame of the Mori Zwanzig memory function formalism. An analytical approximation of the first memory function K(t) is applied to predict some dependences on temperature. Experimental results of the Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light from liquid pyridine are used as the main base for the comparison.

  19. Dynamic simulations of tissue welding

    SciTech Connect

    Maitland, D.J.; Eder, D.C.; London, R.A.; Glinsky, M.E.

    1996-02-01

    The exposure of human skin to near-infrared radiation is numerically simulated using coupled laser, thermal transport and mass transport numerical models. The computer model LATIS is applied in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional geometries. Zones within the skin model are comprised of a topical solder, epidermis, dermis, and fatty tissue. Each skin zone is assigned initial optical, thermal and water density properties consistent with values listed in the literature. The optical properties of each zone (i.e. scattering, absorption and anisotropy coefficients) are modeled as a kinetic function of the temperature. Finally, the water content in each zone is computed from water diffusion where water losses are accounted for by evaporative losses at the air-solder interface. The simulation results show that the inclusion of water transport and evaporative losses in the model are necessary to match experimental observations. Dynamic temperature and damage distributions are presented for the skin simulations.

  20. Whole Building Cost and Performance Measurement: Data Collection Protocol Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Spees, Kathleen L.; Kora, Angela R.; Rauch, Emily M.; Hathaway, John E.; Solana, Amy E.

    2009-03-27

    This protocol was written for the Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to be used by the public as a tool for assessing building cost and performance measurement. The primary audiences are sustainable design professionals, asset owners, building managers, and research professionals within the Federal sector. The protocol was developed based on the need for measured performance and cost data on sustainable design projects. Historically there has not been a significant driver in the public or private sector to quantify whole building performance in comparable terms. The deployment of sustainable design into the building sector has initiated many questions on the performance and operational cost of these buildings.

  1. New Technology Demonstration of the Whole-Building Diagnostician at the Federal Aviation Administration-Denver Airport

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Robert G.; Bauman, Nathan N.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2003-01-17

    This report describes results from an evaluation of the Whole Building Diagnostician's (WBD) ability to automatically and continually diagnose operational problems in building air handlers at the Federal Aviation Administration's Denver airport.

  2. Dynamic Multiscale Simulation of Polyelectrolyte Nanoassemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-21

    REPORT Dynamic Multiscale Simulation of Polyelectrolyte Nanoassemblies 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The goal of this project is to...Std. Z39.18 - 31-May-2008 Dynamic Multiscale Simulation of Polyelectrolyte Nanoassemblies Report Title ABSTRACT The goal of this project is to...Total Number: Sub Contractors (DD882) Inventions (DD882) Final Progress Report Dynamic Multiscale Simulation of Polyelectrolyte Nanoassemblies

  3. 10 CFR 434.521 - The simulation tool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... or heat recovery, active or passive solar systems, zoning and controls of heating and cooling systems... model shall account for: 521.1.1 The dynamic heat transfer of the building envelope such as solar and... system controls and distribution systems by simulating the whole building; 521.1.4 The operating...

  4. Simulations of Dynamic Relativistic Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfrey, Kyle Patrick

    Neutron stars and black holes are generally surrounded by magnetospheres of highly conducting plasma in which the magnetic flux density is so high that hydrodynamic forces are irrelevant. In this vanishing-inertia—or ultra-relativistic—limit, magnetohydrodynamics becomes force-free electrodynamics, a system of equations comprising only the magnetic and electric fields, and in which the plasma response is effected by a nonlinear current density term. In this dissertation I describe a new pseudospectral simulation code, designed for studying the dynamic magnetospheres of compact objects. A detailed description of the code and several numerical test problems are given. I first apply the code to the aligned rotator problem, in which a star with a dipole magnetic field is set rotating about its magnetic axis. The solution evolves to a steady state, which is nearly ideal and dissipationless everywhere except in a current sheet, or magnetic field discontinuity, at the equator, into which electromagnetic energy flows and is dissipated. Magnetars are believed to have twisted magnetospheres, due to internal magnetic evolution which deforms the crust, dragging the footpoints of external magnetic field lines. This twisting may be able to explain both magnetars' persistent hard X-ray emission and their energetic bursts and flares. Using the new code, I simulate the evolution of relativistic magnetospheres subjected to slow twisting through large angles. The field lines expand outward, forming a strong current layer; eventually the configuration loses equilibrium and a dynamic rearrangement occurs, involving large-scale rapid magnetic reconnection and dissipation of the free energy of the twisted magnetic field. When the star is rotating, the magnetospheric twisting leads to a large increase in the stellar spin-down rate, which may take place on the long twisting timescale or in brief explosive events, depending on where the twisting is applied and the history of the system

  5. Asbestos release from whole-building demolition of buildings with asbestos-containing material.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Robert A; Hargesheimer, John; Fourie, Walter

    2007-12-01

    The whole-building demolition method, which entails one-or two-story buildings pushed down by heavy equipment, loaded into trucks, and hauled away, is generally the most cost-effective means to remove small buildings. For taller buildings, a crane and wrecking ball may be used initially to reduce the height of the building. Demolitions might release asbestos fibers from friable asbestos-containing material (ACM). Fibers also might be released from nominally nonfriable ACM (Categories I and II nonfriable ACM) if it becomes friable after rough handling throughout the whole-building demolition process. This paper reports on asbestos air monitoring from two demolition projects involving ACM. In one building, Category II nonfriable ACM was present because it could not be removed safely prior to demolition. Both projects had large quantities of gypsum wallboard with ACM joint compound and ACM flooring. One building had large quantities of ACM spray-on ceiling material. During the demolitions personal air monitoring of the workers and area air monitoring downwind and around the sites were conducted. The monitoring found the concentrations of fibers detected by phase contrast microscopy were generally well below the permissible exposure limits (PEL) of workers. Electron microcopy analysis of samples at or near the PEL indicated most of the fibers were not asbestos, and the actual asbestos exposure was often below the detection limit of the procedure. The buildings were kept wet with fire hoses during the demolition and that required large quantities of water, 20,000-60,000 gal/day (75-225 m(3)/day). Earlier studies found little asbestos release from buildings containing only nonfriable ACM demolished by this method. This project found a negligible release of asbestos fibers, despite the presence of nonfriable materials that might become friable, such as ACM joint compound and spray-on ACM ceiling coating.

  6. Dynamical simulations of sedimenting spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The sedimentation of monodisperse suspensions of rigid spheres has been studied by dynamical simulation; computational techniques are described and numerical results are reported. It has been found that there is a slow relaxation of the suspension microstructure during sedimentation, so that compared with the initial equilibrium distribution, there is an increased number of pairs of particles near contact; this leads to a 5%--10% increase in the average sedimentation velocity. Individual particle velocities fluctuate about the mean fall speed; these fluctuations are large and persist for long times. The resulting hydrodynamically induced dispersion of the particles can be characterized by strongly anisotropic diffusion coefficients; however, the dispersion process is non-Fickian at high solids concentrations.

  7. Enabling Strain Hardening Simulations with Dislocation Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenlis, A; Cai, W

    2006-12-20

    Numerical algorithms for discrete dislocation dynamics simulations are investigated for the purpose of enabling strain hardening simulations of single crystals on massively parallel computers. The algorithms investigated include the /(N) calculation of forces, the equations of motion, time integration, adaptive mesh refinement, the treatment of dislocation core reactions, and the dynamic distribution of work on parallel computers. A simulation integrating all of these algorithmic elements using the Parallel Dislocation Simulator (ParaDiS) code is performed to understand their behavior in concert, and evaluate the overall numerical performance of dislocation dynamics simulations and their ability to accumulate percents of plastic strain.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zaoshi

    This dissertation is focused on multimillion-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale materials. In the past decade, nanoscale materials have made significant commercial impacts, which will potentially lead to the next industrial revolution. The interest lies in the novel and promising features nanoscale materials exhibit due to their confined sizes. However, not all novel behaviors are understood or controllable. Many uncontrollable parameters, e.g. defects and dangling bonds, are known to hinder the performance of nanodevices. Solutions to these problems rely on our understanding of fundamental elements in nanoscience: isolated individual nanostructures and their assemblies. In this dissertation, we will address atomistic foundations of several problems of technological importance in nanoscience. Specifically, three basic problems are discussed: (1) embrittlement of nanocrystalline metal; (2) novel thermo-mechanical behaviors of nanowires (NWs); and (3) planar defect generation in NWs. With a scalable algorithm implemented on massively parallel computing platforms and various data mining methods, MD simulations can provide valuable insights into these problems. An essential role of sulfur segregation-induced amorphization of crystalline nickel was recently discovered experimentally, but the atomistic mechanism of the amorphization remains unexplained. Our MD simulations reveal that the large steric size of sulfur impurity causes strong sulfur-sulfur interaction mediated by lattice distortion, which leads to amorphization near the percolation threshold at the sulfur-sulfur network in nickel crystal. The generality of the mechanism due to the percolation of an impurity network is further confirmed by a model binary system. In our study of novel behaviors of semiconductor NWs, MD simulations construct a rich size-temperature `phase diagram' for the mechanical response of a zinc-oxide NW under tension. For smaller diameters and higher temperatures, novel

  9. Modeling Nanocomposites for Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Maximum 200 Words) The minimum energy configuration for Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations is found for a carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer...Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs), Molecular Dynamics Simulations 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 18 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT...fiber composites have shown success in improving mechanical properties. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-based nanocomposites have been studied for

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Supercritical Spray Phenomena

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-26

    Dynamics of the Rheological and Structural Properties of Linear and Branched Molecules. Simple Shear and Poiseuille Flows ; Instabilities and Slip...Michael Barrucco Publications: "Comparison of Wall Models for the Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Micro flows ," R. D. Branam and M. M...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Dec. 2003 - 31 May 2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Supercritical

  11. Novel methods for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Elber, R

    1996-04-01

    In the past year, significant progress was made in the development of molecular dynamics methods for the liquid phase and for biological macromolecules. Specifically, faster algorithms to pursue molecular dynamics simulations were introduced and advances were made in the design of new optimization algorithms guided by molecular dynamics protocols. A technique to calculate the quantum spectra of protein vibrations was introduced.

  12. Metrics for comparing dynamic earthquake rupture simulations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barall, Michael; Harris, Ruth A.

    2014-01-01

    Earthquakes are complex events that involve a myriad of interactions among multiple geologic features and processes. One of the tools that is available to assist with their study is computer simulation, particularly dynamic rupture simulation. A dynamic rupture simulation is a numerical model of the physical processes that occur during an earthquake. Starting with the fault geometry, friction constitutive law, initial stress conditions, and assumptions about the condition and response of the near‐fault rocks, a dynamic earthquake rupture simulation calculates the evolution of fault slip and stress over time as part of the elastodynamic numerical solution (Ⓔ see the simulation description in the electronic supplement to this article). The complexity of the computations in a dynamic rupture simulation make it challenging to verify that the computer code is operating as intended, because there are no exact analytic solutions against which these codes’ results can be directly compared. One approach for checking if dynamic rupture computer codes are working satisfactorily is to compare each code’s results with the results of other dynamic rupture codes running the same earthquake simulation benchmark. To perform such a comparison consistently, it is necessary to have quantitative metrics. In this paper, we present a new method for quantitatively comparing the results of dynamic earthquake rupture computer simulation codes.

  13. Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-08-01

    This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

  14. Mapping conformational dynamics of proteins using torsional dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K; Wagner, Jeffrey R; Park, In-Hee; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-07

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations are widely used to study the flexibility of protein conformations. However, enhanced sampling techniques are required for simulating protein dynamics that occur on the millisecond timescale. In this work, we show that torsional molecular dynamics simulations enhance protein conformational sampling by performing conformational search in the low-frequency torsional degrees of freedom. In this article, we use our recently developed torsional-dynamics method called Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) to study the conformational dynamics of four proteins. We investigate the use of the GNEIMO method in simulations of the conformationally flexible proteins fasciculin and calmodulin, as well as the less flexible crambin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. For the latter two proteins, the GNEIMO simulations with an implicit-solvent model reproduced the average protein structural fluctuations and sample conformations similar to those from Cartesian simulations with explicit solvent. The application of GNEIMO with replica exchange to the study of fasciculin conformational dynamics produced sampling of two of this protein's experimentally established conformational substates. Conformational transition of calmodulin from the Ca(2+)-bound to the Ca(2+)-free conformation occurred readily with GNEIMO simulations. Moreover, the GNEIMO method generated an ensemble of conformations that satisfy about half of both short- and long-range interresidue distances obtained from NMR structures of holo to apo transitions in calmodulin. Although unconstrained all-atom Cartesian simulations have failed to sample transitions between the substates of fasciculin and calmodulin, GNEIMO simulations show the transitions in both systems. The relatively short simulation times required to capture these long-timescale conformational dynamics indicate that GNEIMO is a promising molecular-dynamics technique for studying domain motion in

  15. Mapping Conformational Dynamics of Proteins Using Torsional Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Gangupomu, Vamshi K.; Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Park, In-Hee; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations are widely used to study the flexibility of protein conformations. However, enhanced sampling techniques are required for simulating protein dynamics that occur on the millisecond timescale. In this work, we show that torsional molecular dynamics simulations enhance protein conformational sampling by performing conformational search in the low-frequency torsional degrees of freedom. In this article, we use our recently developed torsional-dynamics method called Generalized Newton-Euler Inverse Mass Operator (GNEIMO) to study the conformational dynamics of four proteins. We investigate the use of the GNEIMO method in simulations of the conformationally flexible proteins fasciculin and calmodulin, as well as the less flexible crambin and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. For the latter two proteins, the GNEIMO simulations with an implicit-solvent model reproduced the average protein structural fluctuations and sample conformations similar to those from Cartesian simulations with explicit solvent. The application of GNEIMO with replica exchange to the study of fasciculin conformational dynamics produced sampling of two of this protein’s experimentally established conformational substates. Conformational transition of calmodulin from the Ca2+-bound to the Ca2+-free conformation occurred readily with GNEIMO simulations. Moreover, the GNEIMO method generated an ensemble of conformations that satisfy about half of both short- and long-range interresidue distances obtained from NMR structures of holo to apo transitions in calmodulin. Although unconstrained all-atom Cartesian simulations have failed to sample transitions between the substates of fasciculin and calmodulin, GNEIMO simulations show the transitions in both systems. The relatively short simulation times required to capture these long-timescale conformational dynamics indicate that GNEIMO is a promising molecular-dynamics technique for studying domain motion in

  16. Simulating protein dynamics: Novel methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishal, V.

    This Ph.D dissertation describes several methodological advances in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Methods like Markov State Models can be used effectively in combination with distributed computing to obtain long time scale behavior from an ensemble of short simulations. Advanced computing architectures like Graphics Processors can be used to greatly extend the scope of MD. Applications of MD techniques to problems like Alzheimer's Disease and fundamental questions in protein dynamics are described.

  17. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  18. Simulating Flexible-Spacecraft Dynamics and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Versatile program applies to many types of spacecraft and dynamical problems. Flexible Spacecraft Dynamics and Control program (FSD) developed to aid in simulation of large class of flexible and rigid spacecraft. Extremely versatile and used in attitude dynamics and control analysis as well as in-orbit support of deployment and control of spacecraft. Applicable to inertially oriented spinning, Earth-oriented, or gravity-gradient-stabilized spacecraft. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  20. Observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Issaku

    2008-11-23

    On the basis of the recently developed lattice formulation of supersymmetric theories which keeps a part of the supersymmetry, we propose a method of observing dynamical SUSY breaking with lattice simulation. We use Hamiltonian as an order parameter and measure the ground state energy as a zero temperature limit of the finite temperature simulation. Our method provides a way of obtaining a physical result from the lattice simulation for supersymmetric theories.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed. PMID:26604800

  2. Using Whole-Building Electric Load Data in Continuous or Retro-Commissioning

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Phillip N.; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2011-07-01

    Whole-building electric load data can often reveal problems with building equipment or operations. In this paper, we present methods for analyzing 15-minute-interval electric load data. These methods allow building operators, energy managers, and commissioning agents to better understand a building's electricity consumption over time and to compare it to other buildings, helping them to 'ask the right questions' to discover opportunities for electricity waste elimination, energy efficiency, peak load management, and demand response. For example: Does the building use too much energy at night, or on hot days, or in the early evening? Knowing the answer to questions like these can help with retro-commissioning or continuous commissioning. The methods discussed here can also be used to assess how building energy performance varies with time. Comparing electric load before and after fixing equipment or changing operations can help verify that the fixes have the intended effect on energy consumption. Analysis methods discussed in this paper include: ways to graphically represent electric load data; the definition of various parameters that characterize facility electricity loads; and a regression-based electricity load model that accounts for both time of week and outdoor air temperature. The methods are illustrated by applying them to data from commercial buildings. We demonstrate the ability to recognize changes in building operation, and to quantify changes in energy performance. Some key findings are: 1) Plotting time series electric load data is useful for understanding electricity consumption patterns and changes to those patterns, but results may be misleading if data from different time intervals are not weather-normalized. 2) Parameter plots can highlight key features of electric load data and may be easier to interpret than plots of time series data themselves. 3) A time-of-week indicator variable (as compared to time-of-day and day-of-week indicator variables

  3. Simulation of wetlands forest vegetation dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phipps, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A computer program, SWAMP, was designed to simulate the effects of flood frequency and depth to water table on southern wetlands forest vegetation dynamics. By incorporating these hydrologic characteristics into the model, forest vegetation and vegetation dynamics can be simulated. The model, based on data from the White River National Wildlife Refuge near De Witt, Arkansas, "grows" individual trees on a 20 x 20-m plot taking into account effects on the tree growth of flooding, depth to water table, shade tolerance, overtopping and crowding, and probability of death and reproduction. A potential application of the model is illustrated with simulations of tree fruit production following flood-control implementation and lumbering. ?? 1979.

  4. Computational plasticity algorithm for particle dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbenhoft, K.; Lyamin, A. V.; Vignes, C.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of particle dynamics simulation is interpreted in the framework of computational plasticity leading to an algorithm which is mathematically indistinguishable from the common implicit scheme widely used in the finite element analysis of elastoplastic boundary value problems. This algorithm provides somewhat of a unification of two particle methods, the discrete element method and the contact dynamics method, which usually are thought of as being quite disparate. In particular, it is shown that the former appears as the special case where the time stepping is explicit while the use of implicit time stepping leads to the kind of schemes usually labelled contact dynamics methods. The framing of particle dynamics simulation within computational plasticity paves the way for new approaches similar (or identical) to those frequently employed in nonlinear finite element analysis. These include mixed implicit-explicit time stepping, dynamic relaxation and domain decomposition schemes.

  5. Spin dynamics simulations at AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Meot, F.; Roser, T.

    2010-05-23

    To preserve proton polarization through acceleration, it is important to have a correct model of the process. It has been known that with the insertion of the two helical partial Siberian snakes in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), the MAD model of AGS can not deal with a field map with offset orbit. The stepwise ray-tracing code Zgoubi provides a tool to represent the real electromagnetic fields in the modeling of the optics and spin dynamics for the AGS. Numerical experiments of resonance crossing, including spin dynamics in presence of the snakes and Q-jump, have been performed in AGS lattice models, using Zgoubi. This contribution reports on various results so obtained.

  6. Peptide crystal simulations reveal hidden dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Pawel A.; Cerutti, David S.; Holton, James; Case, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecular crystals at atomic resolution have the potential to recover information on dynamics and heterogeneity hidden in the X-ray diffraction data. We present here 9.6 microseconds of dynamics in a small helical peptide crystal with 36 independent copies of the unit cell. The average simulation structure agrees with experiment to within 0.28 Å backbone and 0.42 Å all-atom rmsd; a model refined against the average simulation density agrees with the experimental structure to within 0.20 Å backbone and 0.33 Å all-atom rmsd. The R-factor between the experimental structure factors and those derived from this unrestrained simulation is 23% to 1.0 Å resolution. The B-factors for most heavy atoms agree well with experiment (Pearson correlation of 0.90), but B-factors obtained by refinement against the average simulation density underestimate the coordinate fluctuations in the underlying simulation where the simulation samples alternate conformations. A dynamic flow of water molecules through channels within the crystal lattice is observed, yet the average water density is in remarkable agreement with experiment. A minor population of unit cells is characterized by reduced water content, 310 helical propensity and a gauche(−) side-chain rotamer for one of the valine residues. Careful examination of the experimental data suggests that transitions of the helices are a simulation artifact, although there is indeed evidence for alternate valine conformers and variable water content. This study highlights the potential for crystal simulations to detect dynamics and heterogeneity in experimental diffraction data, as well as to validate computational chemistry methods. PMID:23631449

  7. Dynamic simulation of particle sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongzhen; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-11-01

    The sedimentation of 1024 spheres has been simulated via a recently developed method:Physalis Method. Particles are initially randomly distributed and periodic boundary conditions are assumed. The time evolution of the particle spatial distribution is studied by meassuering the structure factor. Properties of particles velocity distribution, e.g. variance, time autocorrelation, have been studied. The effects of particle rotation and collision are discussed.

  8. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee contact mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bei, Yanhong; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2006-01-01

    Multibody dynamic musculoskeletal models capable of predicting muscle forces and joint contact pressures simultaneously would be valuable for studying clinical issues related to knee joint degeneration and restoration. Current three-dimensional multi-body knee models are either quasi-static with deformable contact or dynamic with rigid contact. This study proposes a computationally efficient methodology for combining multibody dynamic simulation methods with a deformable contact knee model. The methodology requires preparation of the articular surface geometry, development of efficient methods to calculate distances between contact surfaces, implementation of an efficient contact solver that accounts for the unique characteristics of human joints, and specification of an application programming interface for integration with any multibody dynamic simulation environment. The current implementation accommodates natural or artificial tibiofemoral joint models, small or large strain contact models, and linear or nonlinear material models. Applications are presented for static analysis (via dynamic simulation) of a natural knee model created from MRI and CT data and dynamic simulation of an artificial knee model produced from manufacturer’s CAD data. Small and large strain natural knee static analyses required 1 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact conditions except for peak pressure, which was higher for the large strain model. Linear and nonlinear artificial knee dynamic simulations required 10 min of CPU time and predicted similar contact force and torque but different contact pressures, which were lower for the nonlinear model due to increased contact area. This methodology provides an important step toward the realization of dynamic musculoskeletal models that can predict in vivo knee joint motion and loading simultaneously. PMID:15564115

  9. Perspective: chemical dynamics simulations of non-statistical reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinyou; Hase, William L

    2017-04-28

    Non-statistical chemical dynamics are exemplified by disagreements with the transition state (TS), RRKM and phase space theories of chemical kinetics and dynamics. The intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) is often used for the former two theories, and non-statistical dynamics arising from non-IRC dynamics are often important. In this perspective, non-statistical dynamics are discussed for chemical reactions, with results primarily obtained from chemical dynamics simulations and to a lesser extent from experiment. The non-statistical dynamical properties discussed are: post-TS dynamics, including potential energy surface bifurcations, product energy partitioning in unimolecular dissociation and avoiding exit-channel potential energy minima; non-RRKM unimolecular decomposition; non-IRC dynamics; direct mechanisms for bimolecular reactions with pre- and/or post-reaction potential energy minima; non-TS theory barrier recrossings; and roaming dynamics.This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of substitutional diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Jones, Reese E.; Gruber, Jacob

    2016-12-18

    In atomistic simulations, diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated for each atomic jump path using a nudged elastic band method. Practical materials often involve thousands of distinct atomic jump paths that are not known a priori. Hence, it is often preferred to determine an overall diffusion energy barrier and an overall pre-exponential factor from the Arrhenius equation constructed through molecular dynamics simulations of mean square displacement of the diffusion species at different temperatures. This approach has been well established for interstitial diffusion, but not for substitutional diffusion at the same confidence. Using In 0.1 Ga 0.9 N as an example, we have identified conditions where molecular dynamics simulations can be used to calculate highly converged Arrhenius plots for substitutional alloys. As a result, this may enable many complex diffusion problems to be easily and reliably studied in the future using molecular dynamics, provided that moderate computing resources are available.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of substitutional diffusion

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Jones, Reese E.; Gruber, Jacob

    2016-12-18

    In atomistic simulations, diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated for each atomic jump path using a nudged elastic band method. Practical materials often involve thousands of distinct atomic jump paths that are not known a priori. Hence, it is often preferred to determine an overall diffusion energy barrier and an overall pre-exponential factor from the Arrhenius equation constructed through molecular dynamics simulations of mean square displacement of the diffusion species at different temperatures. This approach has been well established for interstitial diffusion, but not for substitutional diffusion at the same confidence. Using In 0.1 Ga 0.9 N as an example,more » we have identified conditions where molecular dynamics simulations can be used to calculate highly converged Arrhenius plots for substitutional alloys. As a result, this may enable many complex diffusion problems to be easily and reliably studied in the future using molecular dynamics, provided that moderate computing resources are available.« less

  12. Dynamic procedure for filtered gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, P.; Banon Navarro, A.; Albrecht-Marc, M.; Carati, D.; Merz, F.; Goerler, T.; Jenko, F.

    2012-01-15

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of gyrokinetic plasma turbulence are investigated as interesting candidates to decrease the computational cost. A dynamic procedure is implemented in the gene code, allowing for dynamic optimization of the free parameters of the LES models (setting the amplitudes of dissipative terms). Employing such LES methods, one recovers the free energy and heat flux spectra obtained from highly resolved direct numerical simulations. Systematic comparisons are performed for different values of the temperature gradient and magnetic shear, parameters which are of prime importance in ion temperature gradient driven turbulence. Moreover, the degree of anisotropy of the problem, which can vary with parameters, can be adapted dynamically by the method that shows gyrokinetic large eddy simulation to be a serious candidate to reduce numerical cost of gyrokinetic solvers.

  13. Dynamic Fracture Simulations of Explosively Loaded Cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, Carly W.; Goto, D. M.

    2015-11-30

    This report documents the modeling results of high explosive experiments investigating dynamic fracture of steel (AerMet® 100 alloy) cylinders. The experiments were conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) during 2007 to 2008 [10]. A principal objective of this study was to gain an understanding of dynamic material failure through the analysis of hydrodynamic computer code simulations. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational cylinder models were analyzed using the ALE3D multi-physics computer code.

  14. Massively-Parallel Dislocation Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, W; Bulatov, V V; Pierce, T G; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Bartelt, M; Tang, M

    2003-06-18

    Prediction of the plastic strength of single crystals based on the collective dynamics of dislocations has been a challenge for computational materials science for a number of years. The difficulty lies in the inability of the existing dislocation dynamics (DD) codes to handle a sufficiently large number of dislocation lines, in order to be statistically representative and to reproduce experimentally observed microstructures. A new massively-parallel DD code is developed that is capable of modeling million-dislocation systems by employing thousands of processors. We discuss the general aspects of this code that make such large scale simulations possible, as well as a few initial simulation results.

  15. Choice of timestep in molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincham, David

    1986-06-01

    In molecular dynamics computer simulation of liquids it is important to use as large a timestep as possible in order to sample phase space rapidly and save on computer expense. The effect of the resulting algorithm errors in the trajectories of the molecules is not well understood. An empirical investigation into this question is reported. Several simulations differing only in the timestep used are compared. It is found that much larger timesteps than usual can be employed without producing significant errors in observed thermodynamic, structural or dynamic properties.

  16. Dynamic simulation recalls condensate piping event

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, R.J.; Reneberg, K.O. ); Moy, H.C. )

    1994-05-01

    This article describes how experience gained from simulating and reconstructing a condensate piping event will be used by Consolidated Edison to analyze control system problems. A cooperative effort by Con Edison and the Chemical Engineering Department at Polytechnic University used modular modeling system to investigate the probable cause of a Con Edison condensate piping event. Con Edison commissioned the work to serve as a case study for the more general problem of control systems analysis using dynamic simulation and MMS.

  17. Numerical simulation of interplanetary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun

    This dissertation discusses investigations into the physics of the propagation of solar generated disturbances in the interplanetary medium. The motivation to initiate this study was two-fold: (1) understanding the fundamental physics of the nonlinear interactions of solar generated MHD shocks and non-homogeneous interplanetary medium, and (2) understanding the physics of solar generated disturbance effects on the Earth's environment, (i.e. the solar connection to the geomagnetic storm). In order to achieve these goals, the authors employed two numerical models to encompass these studies. In the first part, a one-dimensional MHD code with adaptive grids is used to study the evolution of interplanetary slow shocks (ISS), the interaction of a forward slow shock with a reverse slow shock, and the interaction of a fast shock with a slow shock. Results show that the slow shocks can be generated by a decreasing density, velocity or temperature perturbation or by a pressure pulse by following a forward fast shock and that slow shocks can propagate over 1 AU; results also show that the ISS never evolves into fast shocks. Interestingly, it is also found that an ISS could be 'eaten up' by an interplanetary fast shock (IFS) catching up from behind. This could be a reason that the slow shock has been difficult to observe near 1 AU. In addition, a forward slow shock could be dissipated by following a strong forward fast shock (Mach number greater than 1.7). In the second part, a fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, MHD interplanetary global model (3D IGM) is used to study the relationship between different forms of solar activity and transient variations of the north-south component, Bx, of the interplanetary magnetic field, IMF, at 1 AU. One form of solar activity, the flare, is simulated by using a pressure pulse at different locations near the solar surface and observing the simulated IMF evolution of Btheta (= -Bx) at 1 AU. Results show that, for a given pressure

  18. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  19. Molecular dynamic simulations of ocular tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qian; Fadda, Hala M; Li, Chung; Paul, Daniel; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2013-11-25

    Small tablets for implantation into the subconjunctival space in the eye are being developed to inhibit scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). There is a need to evaluate drug dissolution at the molecular level to determine how the chemical structure of the active may correlate with dissolution in the nonsink conditions of the conjunctival space. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissolution process of tablets derived from two drugs that can inhibit fibrosis after GFS, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPi), ilomastat. The dissolution was simulated in the presence of simple point charge (SPC) water molecules, and the liquid turnover of the aqueous humor in the subconjunctival space was simulated by removal of the dissolved drug molecules at regular intervals and replacement by new water molecules. At the end of the simulation, the total molecular solvent accessible surface area of 5-FU tablets increased by 60 times more than that of ilomastat as a result of tablet swelling and release of molecules into solution. The tablet dissolution pattern shown in our molecular dynamic simulations tends to correlate with experimental release profiles. This work indicates that a series of molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict the influence of the molecular properties of a drug on its dissolution profile and could be useful during preformulation where sufficient amounts of the drug are not always available to perform dissolution studies.

  20. Airborne Simulation of Launch Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Orr, Jeb S.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Gilligan, Eric T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for approximating the short-period dynamics of an exploration-class launch vehicle during flight test with a high-performance surrogate aircraft in relatively benign endoatmospheric flight conditions. The surrogate vehicle relies upon a nonlinear dynamic inversion scheme with proportional-integral feedback to drive a subset of the aircraft states into coincidence with the states of a time-varying reference model that simulates the unstable rigid body dynamics, servodynamics, and parasitic elastic and sloshing dynamics of the launch vehicle. The surrogate aircraft flies a constant pitch rate trajectory to approximate the boost phase gravity turn ascent, and the aircraft's closed-loop bandwidth is sufficient to simulate the launch vehicle's fundamental lateral bending and sloshing modes by exciting the rigid body dynamics of the aircraft. A novel control allocation scheme is employed to utilize the aircraft's relatively fast control effectors in inducing various failure modes for the purposes of evaluating control system performance. Sufficient dynamic similarity is achieved such that the control system under evaluation is configured for the full-scale vehicle with no changes to its parameters, and pilot-control system interaction studies can be performed to characterize the effects of guidance takeover during boost. High-fidelity simulation and flight-test results are presented that demonstrate the efficacy of the design in simulating the Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle dynamics using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Armstrong Flight Research Center Fullscale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST), a modified F/A-18 airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois), over a range of scenarios designed to stress the SLS's Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm.

  1. Airborne Simulation of Launch Vehicle Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, Eric T.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Orr, Jeb S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a technique for approximating the short-period dynamics of an exploration-class launch vehicle during flight test with a high-performance surrogate aircraft in relatively benign endoatmospheric flight conditions. The surrogate vehicle relies upon a nonlinear dynamic inversion scheme with proportional-integral feedback to drive a subset of the aircraft states into coincidence with the states of a time-varying reference model that simulates the unstable rigid body dynamics, servodynamics, and parasitic elastic and sloshing dynamics of the launch vehicle. The surrogate aircraft flies a constant pitch rate trajectory to approximate the boost phase gravity-turn ascent, and the aircraft's closed-loop bandwidth is sufficient to simulate the launch vehicle's fundamental lateral bending and sloshing modes by exciting the rigid body dynamics of the aircraft. A novel control allocation scheme is employed to utilize the aircraft's relatively fast control effectors in inducing various failure modes for the purposes of evaluating control system performance. Sufficient dynamic similarity is achieved such that the control system under evaluation is optimized for the full-scale vehicle with no changes to its parameters, and pilot-control system interaction studies can be performed to characterize the effects of guidance takeover during boost. High-fidelity simulation and flight test results are presented that demonstrate the efficacy of the design in simulating the Space Launch System (SLS) launch vehicle dynamics using NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's Full-scale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST), a modified F/A-18 airplane, over a range of scenarios designed to stress the SLS's adaptive augmenting control (AAC) algorithm.

  2. Multiscale model approach for magnetization dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lucia, Andrea; Krüger, Benjamin; Tretiakov, Oleg A.; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of magnetization dynamics in a multiscale environment enable the rapid evaluation of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation in a mesoscopic sample with nanoscopic accuracy in areas where such accuracy is required. We have developed a multiscale magnetization dynamics simulation approach that can be applied to large systems with spin structures that vary locally on small length scales. To implement this, the conventional micromagnetic simulation framework has been expanded to include a multiscale solving routine. The software selectively simulates different regions of a ferromagnetic sample according to the spin structures located within in order to employ a suitable discretization and use either a micromagnetic or an atomistic model. To demonstrate the validity of the multiscale approach, we simulate the spin wave transmission across the regions simulated with the two different models and different discretizations. We find that the interface between the regions is fully transparent for spin waves with frequency lower than a certain threshold set by the coarse scale micromagnetic model with no noticeable attenuation due to the interface between the models. As a comparison to exact analytical theory, we show that in a system with a Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction leading to spin spirals, the simulated multiscale result is in good quantitative agreement with the analytical calculation.

  3. Dynamic simulation of a reverse Brayton refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, N.; Xiong, L. Y.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q.; Lei, L. L.; Tang, J. C.

    2014-01-29

    A test refrigerator based on the modified Reverse Brayton cycle has been developed in the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently. To study the behaviors of this test refrigerator, a dynamic simulation has been carried out. The numerical model comprises the typical components of the test refrigerator: compressor, valves, heat exchangers, expander and heater. This simulator is based on the oriented-object approach and each component is represented by a set of differential and algebraic equations. The control system of the test refrigerator is also simulated, which can be used to optimize the control strategies. This paper describes all the models and shows the simulation results. Comparisons between simulation results and experimental data are also presented. Experimental validation on the test refrigerator gives satisfactory results.

  4. Simulating Dynamic Equilibria: A Class Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, John A.; Buckley, Paul D.

    2000-08-01

    A first-order reversible reaction is simulated on an overhead projector using small coins or discs. A simulation is carried out in which initially there are 24 discs representing reactant A and none representing reactant B. At the end of each minute half of the reactant A discs get converted to reactant B, and one quarter of the reactant B discs get converted to reactant A discs. Equilibrium is established with 8 A discs and 16 B discs, and no further net change is observed as the simulation continues. Another simulation beginning with 48 A discs and 0 B discs leads at equilibrium to 16 A discs and 32 B discs. These results illustrate how dynamic equilibria are established and allow the introduction of the concept of an equilibrium constant. Le Châtelier's principle is illustrated by further simulations.

  5. Dynamics Simulation of Langmuir-Blodgett Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    of water. During the dynamics simulation, theposition of the water molecules are frozen. A 1515 edge effect as shown in Fig. 4: the tilts for...temperature, I.e. 300K, by gradually assigning random understand. The strong edge effect makes it necessary to iintroduce periodic boundaries In future

  6. Digital simulation of stiff linear dynamic systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. D.; Walsh, J. R., Jr.; Kerr, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    A method is derived for digital computer simulation of linear time-invariant systems when the insignificant eigenvalues involved in such systems are eliminated by an ALSAP root removal technique. The method is applied to a thirteenth-order dynamic system representing a passive RLC network.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of magnetized dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben; Wilms, Jochen

    2012-10-01

    The combination of the electric field that confines a dust cloud with a static magnetic field generally leads to a rotation of the dust cloud. In weak magnetic fields, the Hall component of the ion flow exerts a drag force that sets the dust in rotation. We have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of the dynamics of torus-shaped dust clouds in anodic plasmas. The stationary flow [1] is characterized by a shell structure in the laminar dust flow and by the spontaneous formation of a shear-flow around a stationary vortex. Here we present new results on dynamic phenomena, among them fluctuations due to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear-flow. The simulations are compared with experimental results. [4pt] [1] T. Reichstein, A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 18, 083705 (2011)

  8. Test of a flexible spacecraft dynamics simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dichmann, Donald; Sedlak, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    There are a number of approaches one can take to modeling the dynamics of a flexible body. While one can attempt to capture the full dynamical behavior subject to disturbances from actuators and environmental torques, such a detailed description often is unnecessary. Simplification is possible either by limiting the amplitude of motion to permit linearization of the dynamics equations or by restricting the types of allowed motion. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of bending deformations of wire booms on spinning spacecraft. The theory allows for large amplitude excursions from equilibrium while enforcing constraints on the dynamics to prohibit those modes that are physically less relevant or are expected to damp out fast. These constraints explicitly remove the acoustic modes (i.e., longitudinal sound waves and shear waves) while allowing for arbitrary bending and twisting, motions which typically are of lower frequency. As a test case, a spin axis reorientation maneuver by the Polar Plasma Laboratory (POLAR) spacecraft has been simulated. POLAR was chosen as a representative spacecraft because it has flexible wire antennas that extend to a length of 65 meters. Bending deformations in these antennas could be quite large and have a significant effect on the attitude dynamics of the spacecraft body. Summary results from the simulation are presented along, with a comparison with POLAR flight data.

  9. Mesoscopic Simulation Methods for Polymer Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald

    2015-03-01

    We assess the accuracy and efficiency of mesoscopic simulation methods, namely Brownian Dynamics (BD), Stochastic Rotation Dynamics (SRD) and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD), for polymers in solution at equilibrium and in flows in microfluidic geometries. Both SRD and DPD use solvent ``particles'' to carry momentum, and so account automatically for hydrodynamic interactions both within isolated polymer coils, and with other polymer molecules and with nearby solid boundaries. We assess quantitatively the effects of artificial particle inertia and fluid compressibility and show that they can be made small with appropriate choice of simulation parameters. We then use these methods to study flow-induced migration of polymer chains produced by: 1) hydrodynamic interactions, 2) streamline curvature or stress-gradients, and 3) convection of wall depletion zones. We show that huge concentration gradients can be produced by these mechanisms in microfluidic geometries that can be exploited for separation of polymers by size in periodic contraction-expansion geometries. We also assess the range of conditions for which BD, SRD or DPD is preferable for mesoscopic simulations. Finally, we show how such methods can be used to simulate quantitatively the swimming of micro-organisms such as E. coli. In collaboration with Lei Jiang and Tongyang Zhao, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  10. Program For Simulating Dynamics Of Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berning, M. J.; Sagis, K. D.

    1995-01-01

    SORT (Simulation and Optimization of Rocket Trajectories) is general-purpose three-degree-of-freedom with three axis static moment balance simulation of flight dynamics of arbitrary aerospace vehicle. Modular structure facilitates application to variety of trajectory-analysis problems. Contains math model of aerodynamics completely generalized. Computes both longitudinal and lateral forces and moments. In addition to fore-body coefficients, computes longitudinal base effect aerodynamic forces and moments. Simplified ballistic-coefficient model also available for analysis of ballistic entry. Written using ANSI FORTRAN 77.

  11. Dynamic Multicore Processing for Pandemic Influenza Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Henrik; Timpka, Toomas; Spreco, Armin; Dahlström, Örjan; Strömgren, Magnus; Holm, Einar

    2016-01-01

    Pandemic simulation is a useful tool for analyzing outbreaks and exploring the impact of variations in disease, population, and intervention models. Unfortunately, this type of simulation can be quite time-consuming especially for large models and significant outbreaks, which makes it difficult to run the simulations interactively and to use simulation for decision support during ongoing outbreaks. Improved run-time performance enables new applications of pandemic simulations, and can potentially allow decision makers to explore different scenarios and intervention effects. Parallelization of infection-probability calculations and multicore architectures can take advantage of modern processors to achieve significant run-time performance improvements. However, because of the varying computational load during each simulation run, which originates from the changing number of infectious persons during the outbreak, it is not useful to us the same multicore setup during the simulation run. The best performance can be achieved by dynamically changing the use of the available processor cores to balance the overhead of multithreading with the performance gains of parallelization. PMID:28269849

  12. Brownian dynamics simulations of amelogenin microribbons formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Perez Lopez, Anthony; Liu, Ya; Chakrabarti, Amit; Gunton, James

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in chemical particle synthesis have emphasized the fundamental role of surface colloidal heterogeneities and their detailed chemical composition, which is particularly significant for an important subclass of colloidal systems, namely, proteins. Recently, the process of self-assembly of amelogenin monomers with a hydrophobic/hydrophilic bipolar nature into ordered ribbon structures has been studied experimentally. In this work, we study this dynamical process by means of a Brownian dynamic simulation of a simple model which represents the bipolar character of the globular amelogenin molecule and the hydrophilic C-terminal tail. We monitor the kinetics of self-assembly through a study of the structure factor. We also calculate the phase diagram of the model using Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulation and thermodynamic perturbation theory. This work is supported by grants from the NSF and Mathers Foundation.

  13. Simulation of counterflow pedestrian dynamics using spheropolygons.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Marroquín, Fernando; Busch, Jonathan; Chiew, Coraline; Lozano, Celia; Ramírez-Gómez, Álvaro

    2014-12-01

    Pedestrian dynamic models are typically designed for comfortable walking or slightly congested conditions and typically use a single disk or combination of three disks for the shape of a pedestrian. Under crowd conditions, a more accurate pedestrian shape has advantages over the traditional single or three-disks model. We developed a method for simulating pedestrian dynamics in a large dense crowd of spheropolygons adapted to the cross section of the chest and arms of a pedestrian. Our numerical model calculates pedestrian motion from Newton's second law, taking into account viscoelastic contact forces, contact friction, and ground-reaction forces. Ground-reaction torque was taken to arise solely from the pedestrians' orientation toward their preferred destination. Simulations of counterflow pedestrians dynamics in corridors were used to gain insight into a tragic incident at the Madrid Arena pavilion in Spain, where five girls were crushed to death. The incident took place at a Halloween Celebration in 2012, in a long, densely crowded hallway used as entrance and exit at the same time. Our simulations reconstruct the mechanism of clogging in the hallway. The hypothetical case of a total evacuation order was also investigated. The results highlights the importance of the pedestrians' density and the effect of counterflow in the onset of avalanches and clogging and provides an estimation of the number of injuries based on a calculation of the contact-force network between the pedestrians.

  14. Integrated computer simulation on FIR FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, H.; Kuruma, S.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated computer simulation code has been developed to analyze the RF-Linac FEL dynamics. First, the simulation code on the electron beam acceleration and transport processes in RF-Linac: (LUNA) has been developed to analyze the characteristics of the electron beam in RF-Linac and to optimize the parameters of RF-Linac. Second, a space-time dependent 3D FEL simulation code (Shipout) has been developed. The RF-Linac FEL total simulations have been performed by using the electron beam data from LUNA in Shipout. The number of particles using in a RF-Linac FEL total simulation is approximately 1000. The CPU time for the simulation of 1 round trip is about 1.5 minutes. At ILT/ILE, Osaka, a 8.5MeV RF-Linac with a photo-cathode RF-gun is used for FEL oscillation experiments. By using 2 cm wiggler, the FEL oscillation in the wavelength approximately 46 {mu}m are investigated. By the simulations using LUNA with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the pulse shape and the energy spectra of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac has sharp rise-up and it slowly decays as a function of time. By the RF-linac FEL total simulations with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the dependencies of the start up of the FEL oscillations on the pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The coherent spontaneous emission effects and the quick start up of FEL oscillations have been observed by the RF-Linac FEL total simulations.

  15. Adaptive wavelet simulation of global ocean dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevlahan, N. K.-R.; Dubos, T.; Aechtner, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to easily enforce solid-wall boundary conditions in the presence of complex coastlines, we propose a new mass and energy conserving Brinkman penalization for the rotating shallow water equations. This penalization does not lead to higher wave speeds in the solid region. The error estimates for the penalization are derived analytically and verified numerically for linearized one dimensional equations. The penalization is implemented in a conservative dynamically adaptive wavelet method for the rotating shallow water equations on the sphere with bathymetry and coastline data from NOAA's ETOPO1 database. This code could form the dynamical core for a future global ocean model. The potential of the dynamically adaptive ocean model is illustrated by using it to simulate the 2004 Indonesian tsunami and wind-driven gyres.

  16. Brownian dynamics simulation of electrostatically interacting proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, E.; Krushelnitsky, A. G.; Fedotov, V. D.

    Brownian dynamics simulation software has been developed to study the dynamics of proteins as a whole in solution. The proteins were modelled as spheres with point dipoles embedded in the centre of sphere. A set of Brownian dynamics simulations at different values of the dipole moments, protein concentration and translational diffusion coefficient was performed to investigate the influence of interprotein electrostatic interactions on dynamic protein behaviour in solution. It was shown that these interactions led to the slowing down of protein rotation and a complex non-exponential shape of the rotational correlation function. Analysis of the correlation functions was performed within the frame of the model of electrostatic interprotein interactions advanced earlier on the basis of NMR and dielectric spectroscopy data. This model assumes that, due to electrostatic interactions, protein Brownian rotation becomes anisotropic. The lifetime of this anisotropy is controlled mainly by translational diffusion of proteins. Thus, the correlation function can be decomposed into two components corresponding to anisotropic Brownian rotation and an isotropic motion of an external electric field vector produced by the surrounding proteins.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Network Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drabold, David A.

    The following sections are included: * Introduction and Background * History and use of MD * The role of the potential * Scope of the method * Use of a priori information * Appraising a model * MD Method * Equations of motion * Energy minimization and equilibration * Deeper or global minima * Simulated annealing * Genetic algorithms * Activation-relaxation technique * Alternate dynamics * Modeling infinite systems: Periodic boundary conditions * The Interatomic Interactions * Overview * Empirical classical potentials * Potentials from electronic structure * The tight-binding method * Approximate methods based on tight-binding * First principles * Local basis: "ab initio tight binding" * Plane-waves: Car-Parrinello methods * Efficient ab initio methods for large systems * The need for locality of electron states in real space * Avoiding explicit orthogonalization * Connecting Simulation to Experiment * Structure * Network dynamics * Computing the harmonic modes * Dynamical autocorrelation functions * Dynamical structure factor * Electronic structure * Density of states * Thermal modulation of the electron states * Transport * Applications * g-GeSe2 * g-GexSe1-x glasses * Amorphous carbon surface * Where to Get Codes to Get Started * Acknowledgments * References

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation in virus research

    PubMed Central

    Ode, Hirotaka; Nakashima, Masaaki; Kitamura, Shingo; Sugiura, Wataru; Sato, Hironori

    2012-01-01

    Virus replication in the host proceeds by chains of interactions between viral and host proteins. The interactions are deeply influenced by host immune molecules and anti-viral compounds, as well as by mutations in viral proteins. To understand how these interactions proceed mechanically and how they are influenced by mutations, one needs to know the structures and dynamics of the proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful computational method for delineating motions of proteins at an atomic-scale via theoretical and empirical principles in physical chemistry. Recent advances in the hardware and software for biomolecular simulation have rapidly improved the precision and performance of this technique. Consequently, MD simulation is quickly extending the range of applications in biology, helping to reveal unique features of protein structures that would be hard to obtain by experimental methods alone. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in MD simulations in the study of virus–host interactions and evolution, and present future perspectives on this technique. PMID:22833741

  19. MDLab: a molecular dynamics simulation prototyping environment.

    PubMed

    Cickovski, Trevor; Chatterjee, Santanu; Wenger, Jacob; Sweet, Christopher R; Izaguirre, Jesús A

    2010-05-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation involves solving Newton's equations of motion for a system of atoms, by calculating forces and updating atomic positions and velocities over a timestep Deltat. Despite the large amount of computing power currently available, the timescale of MD simulations is limited by both the small timestep required for propagation, and the expensive algorithm for computing pairwise forces. These issues are currently addressed through the development of efficient simulation methods, some of which make acceptable approximations and as a result can afford larger timesteps. We present MDLab, a development environment for MD simulations built with Python which facilitates prototyping, testing, and debugging of these methods. MDLab provides constructs which allow the development of propagators, force calculators, and high level sampling protocols that run several instances of molecular dynamics. For computationally demanding sampling protocols which require testing on large biomolecules, MDL includes an interface to the OpenMM libraries of Friedrichs et al. which execute on graphical processing units (GPUs) and achieve considerable speedup over execution on the CPU. As an example of an interesting high level method developed in MDLab, we present a parallel implementation of the On-The-Fly string method of Maragliano and Vanden-Eijnden. MDLab is available at http://mdlab.sourceforge.net.

  20. Molecular-dynamics simulations of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, S. C.; Hall, B. D.

    2001-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of nanometer-sized lead clusters have been performed using the Lim-Ong-Ercolessi glue potential [Surf. Sci. 269/270, 1109 (1992)]. The binding energies of clusters forming crystalline (fcc), decahedron and icosahedron structures are compared, showing that fcc cuboctahedra are the most energetically favored of these polyhedral model structures. However, simulations of the freezing of liquid droplets produced a characteristic form of surface-reconstructed ``shaved'' icosahedron, in which atoms are absent at the edges and apexes of the polyhedron. This arrangement is energetically favored for 600-4000 atom clusters. Larger clusters favor crystalline structures. Indeed, simulated freezing of a 6525-atom liquid droplet produced an imperfect fcc Wulff particle, containing a number of parallel stacking faults. The effects of temperature on the preferred structure of crystalline clusters below the melting point have been considered. The implications of these results for the interpretation of experimental data is discussed.

  1. Dynamic simulator for PEFC propulsion plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraide, Masataka; Kaneda, Eiichi; Sato, Takao

    1996-12-31

    This report covers part of a joint study on a PEFC propulsion system for surface ships, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quote}Study on a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The work presented here focuses on a simulation study on PEFC propulsion plant performance, and particularly on the system response to changes in load. Using a dynamic simulator composed of system components including fuel cell, various simulations were executed, to examine the performance of the system as a whole and of the individual system components under quick and large load changes such as occasioned by maneuvering operations and by racing when the propeller emerges above water in heavy sea.

  2. Nanodrop contact angles from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravipati, Srikanth; Aymard, Benjamin; Yatsyshin, Petr; Galindo, Amparo; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    The contact angle between three phases being in thermodynamic equilibrium is highly sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular forces as well as to various fluctuation effects. Determining the Young contact angle of a sessile drop sitting on a substrate from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is a highly non-trivial task. Most commonly employed methods for finding droplet contact angles from MD simulation data either require large numbers of particles or are system-dependent. We propose a systematic geometry based methodology for extracting the contact angle from simulated sessile droplets by analysing an appropriately coarse-grained density field. To demonstrate the method, we consider Lennard-Jones (LJ) and SPC/E water nanodroplets of different sizes sitting on planar LJ walls. Our results are in good agreement with Young contact angle values computed employing test-area perturbation method.

  3. Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Krack, Matthias; Bertolus, Marjorie

    2015-10-10

    Molecular dynamics simulation is well suited to study primary damage production by irradiation, defect interactions with fission gas atoms, gas bubble nucleation, grain boundary effects on defect and gas bubble evolution in nuclear fuel, and the resulting changes in thermo-mechanical properties. In these simulations, the forces on the ions are dictated by interaction potentials generated by fitting properties of interest to experimental data. The results obtained from the present generation of potentials are qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. There is a need to refine existing potentials to provide a better representation of the performance of polycrystalline fuel under a variety of operating conditions, and to develop models that are equipped to handle deviations from stoichiometry. In addition to providing insights into fundamental mechanisms governing the behaviour of nuclear fuel, MD simulations can also provide parameters that can be used as inputs for mesoscale models.

  4. Dynamic simulation of regulatory networks using SQUAD

    PubMed Central

    Di Cara, Alessandro; Garg, Abhishek; De Micheli, Giovanni; Xenarios, Ioannis; Mendoza, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Background The ambition of most molecular biologists is the understanding of the intricate network of molecular interactions that control biological systems. As scientists uncover the components and the connectivity of these networks, it becomes possible to study their dynamical behavior as a whole and discover what is the specific role of each of their components. Since the behavior of a network is by no means intuitive, it becomes necessary to use computational models to understand its behavior and to be able to make predictions about it. Unfortunately, most current computational models describe small networks due to the scarcity of kinetic data available. To overcome this problem, we previously published a methodology to convert a signaling network into a dynamical system, even in the total absence of kinetic information. In this paper we present a software implementation of such methodology. Results We developed SQUAD, a software for the dynamic simulation of signaling networks using the standardized qualitative dynamical systems approach. SQUAD converts the network into a discrete dynamical system, and it uses a binary decision diagram algorithm to identify all the steady states of the system. Then, the software creates a continuous dynamical system and localizes its steady states which are located near the steady states of the discrete system. The software permits to make simulations on the continuous system, allowing for the modification of several parameters. Importantly, SQUAD includes a framework for perturbing networks in a manner similar to what is performed in experimental laboratory protocols, for example by activating receptors or knocking out molecular components. Using this software we have been able to successfully reproduce the behavior of the regulatory network implicated in T-helper cell differentiation. Conclusion The simulation of regulatory networks aims at predicting the behavior of a whole system when subject to stimuli, such as drugs, or

  5. INCORPORATING DYNAMIC 3D SIMULATION INTO PRA

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Prescott; Curtis Smith

    2011-07-01

    provide superior results and insights. We also couple the state model with the dynamic 3D simulation analysis representing events (such as flooding) to determine which (if any) components fail. Not only does the simulation take into account any failed items from the state model, but any failures caused by the simulation are incorporated back into the state model and factored into the overall results. Using this method we incorporate accurate 3D simulation results, eliminate static-based PRA issues, and have time ordered failure information.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of fractal aggregate diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pranami, Gaurav; Lamm, Monica H.; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2010-11-01

    The diffusion of fractal aggregates constructed with the method by Thouy and Jullien [J. Phys. A 27, 2953 (1994)10.1088/0305-4470/27/9/012] comprised of Np spherical primary particles was studied as a function of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension using molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown that finite-size effects have a strong impact on the apparent value of the diffusion coefficient (D) , but these can be corrected by carrying out simulations using different simulation box sizes. Specifically, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the length of a cubic simulation box, and the constant of proportionality appears to be independent of the aggregate mass and fractal dimension. Using this result, it is possible to compute infinite dilution diffusion coefficients (Do) for aggregates of arbitrary size and fractal dimension, and it was found that Do∝Np-1/df , as is often assumed by investigators simulating Brownian aggregation of fractal aggregates. The ratio of hydrodynamic radius to radius of gyration is computed and shown to be independent of mass for aggregates of fixed fractal dimension, thus enabling an estimate of the diffusion coefficient for a fractal aggregate based on its radius of gyration.

  7. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Protein Solutions: Structural and Dynamical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Mereghetti, Paolo; Gabdoulline, Razif R.; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2010-01-01

    The study of solutions of biomacromolecules provides an important basis for understanding the behavior of many fundamental cellular processes, such as protein folding, self-assembly, biochemical reactions, and signal transduction. Here, we describe a Brownian dynamics simulation procedure and its validation for the study of the dynamic and structural properties of protein solutions. In the model used, the proteins are treated as atomically detailed rigid bodies moving in a continuum solvent. The protein-protein interaction forces are described by the sum of electrostatic interaction, electrostatic desolvation, nonpolar desolvation, and soft-core repulsion terms. The linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation is solved to compute electrostatic terms. Simulations of homogeneous solutions of three different proteins with varying concentrations, pH, and ionic strength were performed. The results were compared to experimental data and theoretical values in terms of long-time self-diffusion coefficients, second virial coefficients, and structure factors. The results agree with the experimental trends and, in many cases, experimental values are reproduced quantitatively. There are no parameters specific to certain protein types in the interaction model, and hence the model should be applicable to the simulation of the behavior of mixtures of macromolecules in cell-like crowded environments. PMID:21112303

  8. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  9. Allosteric dynamics of SAMHD1 studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, K. K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-10-01

    SAMHD1 is a human cellular enzyme that blocks HIV-1 infection in myeloid cells and non-cycling CD4+T cells. The enzyme is an allosterically regulated triphosphohydrolase that modulates the level of cellular dNTP. The virus restriction is attributed to the lowering of the pool of dNTP in the cell to a point where reverse-transcription is impaired. Mutations in SAMHD1 are also implicated in Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome. A mechanistic understanding of the allosteric activation of the enzyme is still elusive. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the allosteric site dynamics of the protein and to examine the connection between the stability of the tetrameric complex and the Allosite occupancy.

  10. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ≈ 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ≈ 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  11. Dynamical simulation of dipolar Janus colloids: Dynamical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagy, Matthew C.; Hernandez, Rigoberto

    2013-05-01

    The dynamical properties of dipolar Janus particles are studied through simulation using our previously-developed detailed pointwise (PW) model and an isotropically coarse-grained (CG) model [M. C. Hagy and R. Hernandez, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044505 (2012), 10.1063/1.4737432]. The CG model is found to have accelerated dynamics relative to the PW model over a range of conditions for which both models have near identical static equilibrium properties. Physically, this suggests dipolar Janus particles have slower transport properties (such as diffusion) in comparison to isotropically attractive particles. Time rescaling and damping with Langevin friction are explored to map the dynamics of the CG model to that of the PW model. Both methods map the diffusion constant successfully and improve the velocity autocorrelation function and the mean squared displacement of the CG model. Neither method improves the distribution of reversible bond durations f(tb) observed in the CG model, which is found to lack the longer duration reversible bonds observed in the PW model. We attribute these differences in f(tb) to changes in the energetics of multiple rearrangement mechanisms. This suggests a need for new methods that map the coarse-grained dynamics of such systems to the true time scale.

  12. An expandable software model for collaborative decision making during the whole building life cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Papamichael, K.; Pal, V.; Bourassa, N.; Loffeld, J.; Capeluto, G.

    2000-04-01

    Decisions throughout the life cycle of a building, from design through construction and commissioning to operation and demolition, require the involvement of multiple interested parties (e.g., architects, engineers, owners, occupants and facility managers). The performance of alternative designs and courses of action must be assessed with respect to multiple performance criteria, such as comfort, aesthetics, energy, cost and environmental impact. Several stand-alone computer tools are currently available that address specific performance issues during various stages of a building's life cycle. Some of these tools support collaboration by providing means for synchronous and asynchronous communications, performance simulations, and monitoring of a variety of performance parameters involved in decisions about a building during building operation. However, these tools are not linked in any way, so significant work is required to maintain and distribute information to all parties. In this paper we describe a software model that provides the data management and process control required for collaborative decision making throughout a building's life cycle. The requirements for the model are delineated addressing data and process needs for decision making at different stages of a building's life cycle. The software model meets these requirements and allows addition of any number of processes and support databases over time. What makes the model infinitely expandable is that it is a very generic conceptualization (or abstraction) of processes as relations among data. The software model supports multiple concurrent users, and facilitates discussion and debate leading to decision making. The software allows users to define rules and functions for automating tasks and alerting all participants to issues that need attention. It supports management of simulated as well as real data and continuously generates information useful for improving performance prediction and

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hypervelocity Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Eli T.; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2007-03-01

    Outer space silicon solar cells are exposed to impacts with micro meteors that can destroy the surface leading to device failure. A protective coating of silicon nitride will protect against such failure. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to study how silicon/silicon nitride fails due to hypervelocity impacts. Three impactors made of silicon nitride are studied. Their cross-sectional areas, relative to the target, are as follows: the same as the target, half of the target, and a quarter of the target. Impactor speeds from 5 to 11 km/second yield several modes of failure, such as deformation of the target by the impactor and delimitation of the silicon nitride from the silicon at the interface. These simulations will give a much clearer picture of how solar cells composed of a silicon/silicon nitride interface will respond to impacts in outer space. This will ultimately lead to improved devices with longer life spans.

  14. Isotropic MD simulations of dynamic brittle fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Espanol, P.; Rubio, M.A.; Zuniga, I.

    1996-12-01

    The authors present results obtained by molecular dynamics simulations on the propagation of fast cracks in triangular 2D lattices. Their aim is to simulate Mode 1 fracture of brittle isotropic materials. They propose a force law that respects the isotropy of the material. The code yields the correct imposed sound c{sub {parallel}}, shear c{sub {perpendicular}} and surface V{sub R} wave speeds. Different notch lengths are systematically studied. They observed that initially the cracks are linear and always branch at a particular critical velocity c* {approx} 0.8V{sub R} and that this occurs when the crack tip reaches the position of a front emitted from the initial crack tip and propagating at a speed c = 0.68V{sub R}.

  15. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Interface Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Cao, Deng; Leonard, Robert H.; Owens, Eli T.; Swan, Wm. Trevor, III; Ducatman, Samuel C.

    2007-03-01

    The mechanical integrity of silicon/silicon nitride interfaces is of great importance in their applications in micro electronics and solar cells. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are an excellent tool to study mechanical and structural failure of interfaces subjected to externally applied stresses and strains. When pulling the system parallel to the interface, cracks in silicon nitride and slip and pit formation in silicon are typical failure mechanisms. Hypervelocity impact perpendicular to the interface plane leads to structural transformation and delamination at the interface. Influence of system temperature, strain rate, impact velocity, and system size on type and characteristics of failure will be discussed.

  17. Dynamic Deployment Simulations of Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2005-01-01

    The feasibility of using Control Volume (CV) method and the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) method in LSDYNA to simulate the dynamic deployment of inflatable space structures is investigated. The CV and ALE methods were used to predict the inflation deployments of three folded tube configurations. The CV method was found to be a simple and computationally efficient method that may be adequate for modeling slow inflation deployment sine the inertia of the inflation gas can be neglected. The ALE method was found to be very computationally intensive since it involves the solving of three conservative equations of fluid as well as dealing with complex fluid structure interactions.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  19. Parallel beam dynamics simulation of linear accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert D.

    2002-01-31

    In this paper we describe parallel particle-in-cell methods for the large scale simulation of beam dynamics in linear accelerators. These techniques have been implemented in the IMPACT (Integrated Map and Particle Accelerator Tracking) code. IMPACT is being used to study the behavior of intense charged particle beams and as a tool for the design of next-generation linear accelerators. As examples, we present applications of the code to the study of emittance exchange in high intensity beams and to the study of beam transport in a proposed accelerator for the development of accelerator-driven waste transmutation technologies.

  20. Photodynamics of oxybenzone sunscreen: Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Xiang; Guo, Wei-Wei; Xie, Bin-Bin; Cui, Ganglong

    2016-08-21

    Herein we have used combined static electronic structure calculations and "on-the-fly" global-switching trajectory surface-hopping dynamics simulations to explore the photochemical mechanism of oxybenzone sunscreen. We have first employed the multi-configurational CASSCF method to optimize minima, conical intersections, and minimum-energy reaction paths related to excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and excited-state decays in the (1)ππ(∗), (1)nπ(∗), and S0 states (energies are refined at the higher MS-CASPT2 level). According to the mapped potential energy profiles, we have identified two ultrafast excited-state deactivation pathways for the initially populated (1)ππ(∗) system. The first is the diabatic ESIPT process along the (1)ππ(∗) potential energy profile. The generated (1)ππ(∗) keto species then decays to the S0 state via the keto (1)ππ(∗)/gs conical intersection. The second is internal conversion to the dark (1)nπ(∗) state near the (1)ππ(∗) /(1)nπ(∗) crossing point in the course of the diabatic (1)ππ(∗) ESIPT process. Our following dynamics simulations have shown that the ESIPT and (1)ππ(∗) → S0 internal conversion times are 104 and 286 fs, respectively. Finally, our present work demonstrates that in addition to the ESIPT process and the (1)ππ(∗) → S0 internal conversion in the keto region, the (1)ππ(∗) → (1)nπ(∗) internal conversion in the enol region plays as well an important role for the excited-state relaxation dynamics of oxybenzone.

  1. Photodynamics of oxybenzone sunscreen: Nonadiabatic dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chun-Xiang; Guo, Wei-Wei; Xie, Bin-Bin; Cui, Ganglong

    2016-08-01

    Herein we have used combined static electronic structure calculations and "on-the-fly" global-switching trajectory surface-hopping dynamics simulations to explore the photochemical mechanism of oxybenzone sunscreen. We have first employed the multi-configurational CASSCF method to optimize minima, conical intersections, and minimum-energy reaction paths related to excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and excited-state decays in the 1ππ∗, 1nπ∗, and S0 states (energies are refined at the higher MS-CASPT2 level). According to the mapped potential energy profiles, we have identified two ultrafast excited-state deactivation pathways for the initially populated 1ππ∗ system. The first is the diabatic ESIPT process along the 1ππ∗ potential energy profile. The generated 1ππ∗ keto species then decays to the S0 state via the keto 1ππ∗/gs conical intersection. The second is internal conversion to the dark 1nπ∗ state near the 1ππ∗ /1nπ∗ crossing point in the course of the diabatic 1ππ∗ ESIPT process. Our following dynamics simulations have shown that the ESIPT and 1ππ∗ → S0 internal conversion times are 104 and 286 fs, respectively. Finally, our present work demonstrates that in addition to the ESIPT process and the 1ππ∗ → S0 internal conversion in the keto region, the 1ππ∗ → 1nπ∗ internal conversion in the enol region plays as well an important role for the excited-state relaxation dynamics of oxybenzone.

  2. The Dynamics of Miscible Interfaces: Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meiburg, Eckart

    2005-01-01

    This research project focuses on the dynamics of interfacial regions between miscible fluids. While much attention has focused on immiscible interfaces in the past, miscible interfaces have been explored to a much lesser degree, so that there are many open questions regarding their dynamics at this time. Among the more pressing issues is the role that nonconventional stresses can play in such interfacial regions. Such stresses are typically not accounted for in efforts to model the dynamics of miscible flows. Our research aims to clarify under which circumstances these stresses do have to be taken into account, and what quantitative approaches are most suitable in this regard. In order to address these issues, we have focused on conducting linear stability analyses and nonlinear simulations for capillary tube and Hele-Shaw flows, and to compare the results with corresponding experiments performed in the labs of our co-investigators Prof. Maxworthy at USC, and Dr. Balasubramaniam at NASA. Over the duration of the project we have, among other things, focused on the effects of variable diffusion coefficients in such flows, and specifically on their influence in the growth of instabilities. Furthermore, our three-dimensional spectral element simulations have made good progress, so that we have come to a point where we can conduct more detailed comparisons with experimental observations. We are currently focusing our efforts on reproducing the tip-splitting instability observed by Maxworthy. Finally, we have discovered a new core-annular flow instability in the Stokes flow regime during the last year. This represents a significant finding, as this instability does not have an immiscible counterpart.

  3. Dynamical simulations of vesicle growth and division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-03-01

    Prebiotic cells constitute a beautiful and intriguing example of self-replicating vesicles. How these cells managed to grow and divide without sophisticated machinery is still an open question. The properties of these primitive vesicles can shed light on the ways modern cells have evolved by exploiting those characteristics to develop their replication mechanisms. The equilibrium configurations of elastic shells are well understood, however the dynamical behavior during growth still lacks of a deep theoretical understanding. To study vesicle growth from a general perspective, we have developed a minimal generic model where vesicles are represented by a 2D spring network and characterized by a minimum set of magnitudes: growth rate, permeability, bending stiffness, viscosity and temperature. We have performed hybrid molecuar dynamic simulations as a function of a reduced set of dimensionless parameters. Three main outcomes were observed: vesicles that grow without division, vesicles that divide symmetrically, and vesicles that act as generators of daughter vesicles. The type of outcome depends on the system parameters and specifically on its dynamics via two timescales. Furthermore, we found sets of parameters where the system shows size homeostasis. TRH was supported by Ramon Areces Foundation.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a RNA Aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Min; Seydou, Mahamadou; Noel, Vincent; Piro, Benoit; Maurel, François; Barbault, Florent

    2017-04-14

    Single-stranded RNA aptamers have emerged as novel biosensor tools. However, the immobilization procedure of the aptamer onto a surface generally induces a loss of affinity. To understand this molecular process, we conducted a complete simulation study for the Flavin mononucleotide aptamer for which experimental data are available. Several molecular dynamics simulations (MD) of the Flavin in complex with its RNA aptamer were conducted in solution, linked with six thymidines (T6) and, finally, immobilized on an hexanol-thiol-functionalized gold surface. First, we demonstrated that our MD computations were able to reproduce the experimental solution structure and to provide a meaningful estimation of the Flavin free energy of binding. We also demonstrated that the T6 linkage, by itself, does not generate a perturbation of the Flavin recognition process. From the simulation of the complete biosensor system, we observed that the aptamer stays oriented parallel to the surface at a distance around 36 Å avoiding, this way, interaction with the surface. We evidenced a structural reorganization of the Flavin aptamer binding mode related to the loss of affinity and induced by an anisotropic distribution of sodium cationic densities. This means that ionic diffusion is different between the surface and the aptamer than above this last one. We suggest that these findings might be extrapolated to other nucleic acids systems for the future design of biosensors with higher efficiency and selectivity.

  5. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  6. Digital system for structural dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.; Lagace, L. J.; Wojnar, M. K.; Glor, C.

    1982-01-01

    State-of-the-art digital hardware and software for the simulation of complex structural dynamic interactions, such as those which occur in rotating structures (engine systems). System were incorporated in a designed to use an array of processors in which the computation for each physical subelement or functional subsystem would be assigned to a single specific processor in the simulator. These node processors are microprogrammed bit-slice microcomputers which function autonomously and can communicate with each other and a central control minicomputer over parallel digital lines. Inter-processor nearest neighbor communications busses pass the constants which represent physical constraints and boundary conditions. The node processors are connected to the six nearest neighbor node processors to simulate the actual physical interface of real substructures. Computer generated finite element mesh and force models can be developed with the aid of the central control minicomputer. The control computer also oversees the animation of a graphics display system, disk-based mass storage along with the individual processing elements.

  7. Brownian dynamics simulation of DNA condensation.

    PubMed Central

    Sottas, P E; Larquet, E; Stasiak, A; Dubochet, J

    1999-01-01

    DNA condensation observed in vitro with the addition of polyvalent counterions is due to intermolecular attractive forces. We introduce a quantitative model of these forces in a Brownian dynamics simulation in addition to a standard mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann repulsion. The comparison of a theoretical value of the effective diameter calculated from the second virial coefficient in cylindrical geometry with some experimental results allows a quantitative evaluation of the one-parameter attractive potential. We show afterward that with a sufficient concentration of divalent salt (typically approximately 20 mM MgCl(2)), supercoiled DNA adopts a collapsed form where opposing segments of interwound regions present zones of lateral contact. However, under the same conditions the same plasmid without torsional stress does not collapse. The condensed molecules present coexisting open and collapsed plectonemic regions. Furthermore, simulations show that circular DNA in 50% methanol solutions with 20 mM MgCl(2) aggregates without the requirement of torsional energy. This confirms known experimental results. Finally, a simulated DNA molecule confined in a box of variable size also presents some local collapsed zones in 20 mM MgCl(2) above a critical concentration of the DNA. Conformational entropy reduction obtained either by supercoiling or by confinement seems thus to play a crucial role in all forms of condensation of DNA. PMID:10512808

  8. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A.; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20 000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  9. Dynamics simulations for engineering macromolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Shinar, Tamar; Silver, Pamela A; Way, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The predictable engineering of well-behaved transcriptional circuits is a central goal of synthetic biology. The artificial attachment of promoters to transcription factor genes usually results in noisy or chaotic behaviors, and such systems are unlikely to be useful in practical applications. Natural transcriptional regulation relies extensively on protein-protein interactions to insure tightly controlled behavior, but such tight control has been elusive in engineered systems. To help engineer protein-protein interactions, we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation framework that simplifies features of proteins moving by constrained Brownian motion, with the goal of performing long simulations. The behavior of a simulated protein system is determined by summation of forces that include a Brownian force, a drag force, excluded volume constraints, relative position constraints, and binding constraints that relate to experimentally determined on-rates and off-rates for chosen protein elements in a system. Proteins are abstracted as spheres. Binding surfaces are defined radially within a protein. Peptide linkers are abstracted as small protein-like spheres with rigid connections. To address whether our framework could generate useful predictions, we simulated the behavior of an engineered fusion protein consisting of two 20,000 Da proteins attached by flexible glycine/serine-type linkers. The two protein elements remained closely associated, as if constrained by a random walk in three dimensions of the peptide linker, as opposed to showing a distribution of distances expected if movement were dominated by Brownian motion of the protein domains only. We also simulated the behavior of fluorescent proteins tethered by a linker of varying length, compared the predicted Förster resonance energy transfer with previous experimental observations, and obtained a good correspondence. Finally, we simulated the binding behavior of a fusion of two ligands that could

  10. Molecular Simulations of Shear-Induced Dynamics in Nitromethane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    the shear response of single-crystal and bicrystal nitromethane (NM) are simulated using molecular dynamics simulations. The atomic interactions are...compressed to 28 GPa and then sheared, Raman studies show that the decomposition is sudden and explosive.5 In addition, structural modifications are...Molecular dynamics simulations are performed using the LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic /Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) simulation package.9 The

  11. On sequential dynamical systems and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C.L.; Mortveit, H.S.; Reidys, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The generic structure of computer simulations motivates a new class of discrete dynamical systems that captures this structure in a mathematically precise way. This class of systems consists of (1) a loopfree graph {Upsilon} with vertex set {l_brace}1,2,{hor_ellipsis},n{r_brace} where each vertex has a binary state, (2) a vertex labeled set of functions (F{sub i,{Upsilon}}:F{sub 2}{sup n} {r_arrow} F{sub 2}{sup n}){sub i} and (3) a permutation {pi} {element_of} S{sub n}. The function F{sub i,{Upsilon}} updates the state of vertex i as a function of the states of vertex i and its {Upsilon}-neighbors and leaves the states of all other vertices fixed. The permutation {pi} represents the update ordering, i.e., the order in which the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} are applied. By composing the functions F{sub i,{Upsilon}} in the order given by {pi} one obtains the dynamical system (equation given in paper) which the authors refer to as a sequential dynamical system, or SDS for short. The authors will present bounds for the number of functionally different systems and for the number of nonisomorphic digraphs {Gamma}[F{sub {Upsilon}},{pi}] that can be obtained by varying the update order and applications of these to specific graphs and graph classes. This will be done using both combinatorial/algebraic techniques and probabilistic techniques. Finally the authors give results on dynamical system properties for some special systems.

  12. Euclidean lattice simulation for dynamical supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamori, Issaku; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sugino, Fumihiko

    2008-05-01

    The global supersymmetry is spontaneously broken if and only if the ground-state energy is strictly positive. We propose to use this fact to observe the spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in Euclidean lattice simulations. For lattice formulations that possess a manifest fermionic symmetry, there exists a natural choice of a Hamiltonian operator that is consistent with a topological property of the Witten index. We confirm validity of our idea in models of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics. We then examine a possibility of a dynamical supersymmetry breaking in the two-dimensional N=(2,2) super Yang-Mills theory with the gauge group SU(2), for which the Witten index is unknown. Differently from a recent conjectural claim, our numerical result tempts us to conclude that supersymmetry is not spontaneously broken in this system.

  13. Protein Dynamics from NMR and Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiong; Kravchenko, Olga; Kemple, Marvin; Likic, Vladimir; Klimtchuk, Elena; Prendergast, Franklyn

    2002-03-01

    Proteins exhibit internal motions from the millisecond to sub-nanosecond time scale. The challenge is to relate these internal motions to biological function. A strategy to address this aim is to apply a combination of several techniques including high-resolution NMR, computer simulation of molecular dynamics (MD), molecular graphics, and finally molecular biology, the latter to generate appropriate samples. Two difficulties that arise are: (1) the time scale which is most directly biologically relevant (ms to μs) is not readily accessible by these techniques and (2) the techniques focus on local and not collective motions. We will outline methods using ^13C-NMR to help alleviate the second problem, as applied to intestinal fatty acid binding protein, a relatively small intracellular protein believed to be involved in fatty acid transport and metabolism. This work is supported in part by PHS Grant GM34847 (FGP) and by a fellowship from the American Heart Association (QW).

  14. CADS:Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.

    2007-07-01

    This manual describes a library for aerosol kinetics and transport, called CADS (Cantera Aerosol Dynamics Simulator), which employs a section-based approach for describing the particle size distributions. CADS is based upon Cantera, a set of C++ libraries and applications that handles gas phase species transport and reactions. The method uses a discontinuous Galerkin formulation to represent the particle distributions within each section and to solve for changes to the aerosol particle distributions due to condensation, coagulation, and nucleation processes. CADS conserves particles, elements, and total enthalpy up to numerical round-off error, in all of its formulations. Both 0-D time dependent and 1-D steady state applications (an opposing-flow flame application) have been developed with CADS, with the initial emphasis on developing fundamental mechanisms for soot formation within fires. This report also describes the 0-D application, TDcads, which models a time-dependent perfectly stirred reactor.

  15. Simulating dynamical features of escape panic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk; Farkas, Illés; Vicsek, Tamás

    2000-09-01

    One of the most disastrous forms of collective human behaviour is the kind of crowd stampede induced by panic, often leading to fatalities as people are crushed or trampled. Sometimes this behaviour is triggered in life-threatening situations such as fires in crowded buildings; at other times, stampedes can arise during the rush for seats or seemingly without cause. Although engineers are finding ways to alleviate the scale of such disasters, their frequency seems to be increasing with the number and size of mass events. But systematic studies of panic behaviour and quantitative theories capable of predicting such crowd dynamics are rare. Here we use a model of pedestrian behaviour to investigate the mechanisms of (and preconditions for) panic and jamming by uncoordinated motion in crowds. Our simulations suggest practical ways to prevent dangerous crowd pressures. Moreover, we find an optimal strategy for escape from a smoke-filled room, involving a mixture of individualistic behaviour and collective `herding' instinct.

  16. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  17. In silico FRET from simulated dye dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefling, Martin; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments probe molecular distances on the nanometer scale. In such experiments, distances are recorded from FRET transfer efficiencies via the Förster formula, E=1/(1+(). The energy transfer however also depends on the mutual orientation of the two dyes used as distance reporter. Since this information is typically inaccessible in FRET experiments, one has to rely on approximations, which reduce the accuracy of these distance measurements. A common approximation is an isotropic and uncorrelated dye orientation distribution. To assess the impact of such approximations, we present the algorithms and implementation of a computational toolkit for the simulation of smFRET on the basis of molecular dynamics (MD) trajectory ensembles. In this study, the dye orientation dynamics, which are used to determine dynamic FRET efficiencies, are extracted from MD simulations. In a subsequent step, photons and bursts are generated using a Monte Carlo algorithm. The application of the developed toolkit on a poly-proline system demonstrated good agreement between smFRET simulations and experimental results and therefore confirms our computational method. Furthermore, it enabled the identification of the structural basis of measured heterogeneity. The presented computational toolkit is written in Python, available as open-source, applicable to arbitrary systems and can easily be extended and adapted to further problems. Catalogue identifier: AENV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AENV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GPLv3, the bundled SIMD friendly Mersenne twister implementation [1] is provided under the SFMT-License. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 317880 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 54774217 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language

  18. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-14

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Abeta16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50 ns time scale. Based on two 220 ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Abeta16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded beta sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  19. Coarse-grained protein molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derreumaux, Philippe; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-01

    A limiting factor in biological science is the time-scale gap between experimental and computational trajectories. At this point, all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) are clearly too expensive to explore long-range protein motions and extract accurate thermodynamics of proteins in isolated or multimeric forms. To reach the appropriate time scale, we must then resort to coarse graining. Here we couple the coarse-grained OPEP model, which has already been used with activated methods, to MD simulations. Two test cases are studied: the stability of three proteins around their experimental structures and the aggregation mechanisms of the Alzheimer's Aβ16-22 peptides. We find that coarse-grained isolated proteins are stable at room temperature within 50ns time scale. Based on two 220ns trajectories starting from disordered chains, we find that four Aβ16-22 peptides can form a three-stranded β sheet. We also demonstrate that the reptation move of one chain over the others, first observed using the activation-relaxation technique, is a kinetically important mechanism during aggregation. These results show that MD-OPEP is a particularly appropriate tool to study qualitatively the dynamics of long biological processes and the thermodynamics of molecular assemblies.

  20. Development of whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 1, Planning: Volume 2, Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Crawley, D.B.; Briggs, R.S.; Jones, J.W.; Seaton, W.W.; Kaufman, J.E.; Deringer, J.J.; Kennett, E.W.

    1987-08-01

    This is the second volume of the Phase 1 report and discusses the 10 tasks performed in Phase 1. The objective of this research is to develop a methodology for setting energy design targets to provide voluntary guidelines for the buildings industry. The whole-building energy targets project is being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to encourage the construction of energy-efficient buildings by informing designers and owners about cost-effective goals for energy use in new commercial buildings. The outcome of this research will be a flexible methodology for setting such targets. The tasks are listed and discussed in this report as follows: Task 1 - Develop Detailed Project Goals and Objectives; Task 2 - Establish Buildings-Industry Liaison; Task 3 - Develop Approaches to the Energy Targets Model, Building Operations, and Climate; Task 4 - Develop an Approach for Treating Economic Considerations; Task 5 - Develop an Approach for Treating Energy Sources; Task 6 - Collect Energy-Use Data; Task 7 - Survey Energy Expert Opinion; Task 8 - Evaluation Procedure Specification and Integration; Task 9 - Phase 1 Report Development; and Task 10 - Phase 1 Review Planning.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  2. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a ``tulip flame`` in the literature, occurred. The ``tulip flame`` was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  3. Numerical simulation of tulip flame dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Cloutman, L.D.

    1991-11-30

    A finite difference reactive flow hydrodynamics program based on the full Navier-Stokes equations was used to simulate the combustion process in a homogeneous-charge, constant-volume combustion bomb in which an oddly shaped flame, known as a tulip flame'' in the literature, occurred. The tulip flame'' was readily reproduced in the numerical simulations, producing good agreement with the experimental flame shapes and positions at various times. The calculations provide sufficient detail about the dynamics of the experiment to provide some insight into the physical mechanisms responsible for the peculiar flame shape. Several factors seem to contribute to the tulip formation. The most important process is the baroclinic production of vorticity by the flame front, and this rate of production appears to be dramatically increased by the nonaxial flow generated when the initial semicircular flame front burns out along the sides of the chamber. The vorticity produces a pair of vortices behind the flame that advects the flame into the tulip shape. Boundary layer effects contribute to the details of the flame shape next to the walls of the chamber, but are otherwise not important. 24 refs.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ferroelectric Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rici; Krakauer, Henry

    1997-03-01

    Based on an analysis of the wavevector dependence of the lattice instabilities in KNbO_3, we proposed a real-space chain-like instability and a scenario of sequential freezing out or onset of coherence of these instabilities, which qualitatively explains the sequence of observed temperature-dependent ferroelectric phases.(R. Yu and H. Krakauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74), 4067 (1995). We suggested that this chain-like instability should also be found in BaTiO_3, and this has been subsequently confirmed by Ghosez et al.(P. Ghosez et al.), Proc. 4th Williamsburg Workshop on First-Principles Calculations for Ferroelectrics, to be published We will present molecular dynamics simulations on BaTiO_3, using effective Hamiltonians constructed from first-principles calculations,(W. Zhong, D. Vanderbilt, and K. M. Rabe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 73), 1861 (1994). that reproduce the essential features of diffuse x-ray scattering measurements in the cubic, tetragonal, orthorhombic, and rhombohedral phases. The good agreement supports the interpretation of real-space chain-formation. Simulations for KNbO3 may also be reported.

  5. The Dynamics of Miscible Interfaces: Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meiburg, Eckart

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this experimental/computational investigation (joint with Prof Maxworthy at USC) has been to study the dynamics of miscible interfaces, both from a scientific and a practical point of view, and to prepare a related experiment to be flown on the International Space Station. In order to address these effects, we have focused experimental and computational investigations on miscible displacements in cylindrical capillary tubes, as well as in Hele-Shaw cells. Regarding the flow in a capillary tube, the question was addressed as to whether Korteweg stresses and/or divergence effects can potentially account for discrepancies observed between conventional Stokes flow simulations and experiments for miscible flows in capillary tubes. An estimate of the vorticity and streamfunction fields induced by the Kortewegs stresses was derived, which shows these stresses to result in the formation of a vortex ring structure near the tip of the concentration front. Through this mechanism the propagation velocity of the concentration front is reduced, in agreement with the experimental observations. Divergence effects, on the other hand, were seen to be very small, and they have a negligible influence on the tip velocity. As a result, it can be concluded that they are not responsible for the discrepancies between experiments and conventional Stokes simulations. A further part of our investigation focussed on the development of high-accuracy three-dimensional spectral element simulation techniques for miscible flows in capillary tubes, including the effects of variable density and viscosity. Towards this end, the conservation equations are treated in cylindrical coordinates.

  6. Consequence modeling using the fire dynamics simulator.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Noah L; Sutula, Jason A; Schemel, Christopher F; Hamer, Andrew J; Van Brunt, Vincent

    2004-11-11

    The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and in particular Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes to model fires provides an efficient tool for the prediction of large-scale effects that include plume characteristics, combustion product dispersion, and heat effects to adjacent objects. This paper illustrates the strengths of the Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), an LES code developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), through several small and large-scale validation runs and process safety applications. The paper presents two fire experiments--a small room fire and a large (15 m diameter) pool fire. The model results are compared to experimental data and demonstrate good agreement between the models and data. The validation work is then extended to demonstrate applicability to process safety concerns by detailing a model of a tank farm fire and a model of the ignition of a gaseous fuel in a confined space. In this simulation, a room was filled with propane, given time to disperse, and was then ignited. The model yields accurate results of the dispersion of the gas throughout the space. This information can be used to determine flammability and explosive limits in a space and can be used in subsequent models to determine the pressure and temperature waves that would result from an explosion. The model dispersion results were compared to an experiment performed by Factory Mutual. Using the above examples, this paper will demonstrate that FDS is ideally suited to build realistic models of process geometries in which large scale explosion and fire failure risks can be evaluated with several distinct advantages over more traditional CFD codes. Namely transient solutions to fire and explosion growth can be produced with less sophisticated hardware (lower cost) than needed for traditional CFD codes (PC type computer verses UNIX workstation) and can be solved for longer time histories (on the order of hundreds of seconds of computed time) with

  7. Dynamic Shade and Irradiance Simulation of Aquatic Landscapes and Watersheds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Penumbra is a landscape shade and irradiance simulation model that simulates how solar energy spatially and temporally interacts within dynamic ecosystems such as riparian zones, forests, and other terrain that cast topological shadows. Direct and indirect solar energy accumulate...

  8. Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Ioana M; den Otter, Wouter K; Briels, Wim J

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  9. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J.; Otter, Wouter K. den

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  10. High frequency dynamic engine simulation. [TF-30 engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerman, J. A.; Fischer, K. E.; Mclaughlin, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    A digital computer simulation of a mixed flow, twin spool turbofan engine was assembled to evaluate and improve the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation to disturbance frequencies of at least 100 Hz. One dimensional forms of the dynamic mass, momentum and energy equations were used to model the engine. A TF30 engine was simulated so that dynamic characteristics could be evaluated against results obtained from testing of the TF30 engine at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation were improved by modifying the compression system model. Modifications to the compression system model were established by investigating the influence of size and number of finite dynamic elements. Based on the results of this program, high frequency engine simulations using finite dynamic elements can be assembled so that the engine dynamic configuration is optimum with respect to dynamic characteristics and computer execution time. Resizing of the compression systems finite elements improved the dynamic characteristics of the engine simulation but showed that additional refinements are required to obtain close agreement simulation and actual engine dynamic characteristics.

  11. Simulation of chemical isomerization reaction dynamics on a NMR quantum simulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Nanyang; Xu, Ruixue; Chen, Hongwei; Gong, Jiangbin; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2011-07-08

    Quantum simulation can beat current classical computers with minimally a few tens of qubits. Here we report an experimental demonstration that a small nuclear-magnetic-resonance quantum simulator is already able to simulate the dynamics of a prototype laser-driven isomerization reaction using engineered quantum control pulses. The experimental results agree well with classical simulations. We conclude that the quantum simulation of chemical reaction dynamics not computable on current classical computers is feasible in the near future.

  12. Nonlinear Resonance Artifacts in Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlick, Tamar; Mandziuk, Margaret; Skeel, Robert D.; Srinivas, K.

    1998-02-01

    The intriguing phenomenon of resonance, a pronounced integrator-induced corruption of a system's dynamics, is examined for simple molecular systems subject to the classical equations of motion. This source of timestep limitation is not well appreciated in general, and certainly analyses of resonance patterns have been few in connection to biomolecular dynamics. Yet resonances are present in the commonly used Verlet integrator, in symplectic implicit schemes, and also limit the scope of current multiple-timestep methods that are formulated as symplectic and reversible. The only general remedy to date has been to reduce the timestep. For this purpose, we derive method-dependent timestep thresholds (e.g., Tables 1 and 2) that serve as useful guidelines in practice for biomolecular simulations. We also devise closely related symplectic implicit schemes for which the limitation on the discretization stepsize is much less severe. Specifically, we design methods to remove third-order, or both the third- and fourth-order, resonances. These severe low-order resonances can lead to instability or very large energies. Our tests on two simple molecular problems (Morse and Lennard-Jones potentials), as well as a 22-atom molecule, N-acetylalanyl-N '-methylamide, confirm this prediction; our methods can delay resonances so that they occur only at larger timesteps (EW method) or are essentially removed (LIM2 method). Although stable for large timesteps by this approach, trajectories show large energy fluctuations, perhaps due to the coupling with other factors that induce instability in complex nonlinear systems. Thus, the methods developed here may be more useful for conformational sampling of biomolecular structures. The analysis presented here for the blocked alanine model emphasizes that one-dimensional analysis of resonances can be applied to a more complex, multimode system to analyze resonance behavior, but that resonance due to frequency coupling is more complex to pinpoint

  13. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Disordered Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2004-02-27

    The melting of zircon and the amorphous state produced by quenching from the melt were simulated by molecular dynamics using a new partial charge model combined with the Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential. The model has been established for the description of the crystalline and aperiodic structures of zircon in order to be used for the simulation of displacement cascades. It provides an excellent fit to the structure, and accounts with convenient precision the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of zircon. The calculated melting temperature is about 2100 K. The activation energy for self-diffusion of ions in the liquid state was determined to be 190-200 kJ/mole. Melt quenching was employed to produce two different disordered states with distinct densities and structures. In the high density disordered state, the zircon structure is intact but the bond angle distributions are broader, 4% of the Si units are polymerized, and the volume swelling is about 8%. In the low density amorphous state, the Zr and Si coordination numbers are lower, and the Zr-O and Si-O bond lengths are shorter than corresponding values for the crystal. In addition, a highly polymerized Si network, with average connectivity of two, is observed in the low density amorphous state. These features have all been experimentally observed in natural metamict zircon. The present findings, when considered in light of experimental radiation effects studies, suggest that the swelling in zircon arises initially from disorder in the zircon crystal, and at high doses the disordered crystal is unable to accommodate the volume expansion and transforms to the amorphous state.

  15. Expansion techniques for collisionless stellar dynamical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Meiron, Yohai; Li, Baile; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Spurzem, Rainer

    2014-09-10

    We present graphics processing unit (GPU) implementations of two fast force calculation methods based on series expansions of the Poisson equation. One method is the self-consistent field (SCF) method, which is a Fourier-like expansion of the density field in some basis set; the other method is the multipole expansion (MEX) method, which is a Taylor-like expansion of the Green's function. MEX, which has been advocated in the past, has not gained as much popularity as SCF. Both are particle-field methods and optimized for collisionless galactic dynamics, but while SCF is a 'pure' expansion, MEX is an expansion in just the angular part; thus, MEX is capable of capturing radial structure easily, while SCF needs a large number of radial terms. We show that despite the expansion bias, these methods are more accurate than direct techniques for the same number of particles. The performance of our GPU code, which we call ETICS, is profiled and compared to a CPU implementation. On the tested GPU hardware, a full force calculation for one million particles took ∼0.1 s (depending on expansion cutoff), making simulations with as many as 10{sup 8} particles fast for a comparatively small number of nodes.

  16. Dynamical simulation of an abrasive wear process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elalem, Khaled; Li, D. Y.

    1999-05-01

    A dynamic computer model was developed to simulate wear behavior of materials on micro-scales. In this model, a material system is discretized and mapped onto a lattice or grid. Each lattice site represents a small volume of the material. During a wear process, a lattice site may move under the influence of external force and the interaction between the site and its adjacent sites. The site-site interaction is a function of mechanical properties of the material such as the elastic modulus, yield strength, work hardening and the fracture strain. Newton's law of motion is used to determine the movement of lattice sites during a wear process. The strain between a pair of sites is recoverable if it is within the elastic deformation range; otherwise plastic deformation takes place. A bond between two adjacent sites is broken when its strain exceeds a critical value. A site or a cluster of sites is worn away if all bonds connecting the site or the cluster to its nearest neighbors are broken. The model well describes the strain distribution in a contact region, in consistence with a finite element analysis. This model was applied to several metallic materials abraded under the ASTM G65 abrasion condition, and the results were compared to experimental observations. Good agreement between the modeling and the experiment was found.

  17. Annual Report 1999 Environmental Dynamics and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    NS Foster-Mills

    2000-06-28

    This annual report describes selected 1999 research accomplishments for the Environmental Dynamics and Simulation (ED and S) directorate, one of six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). These accomplishments are representative of the different lines of research underway in the ED and S directorate. EMSL is one of US Department of Energy's (DOE) national scientific user facilities and is the centerpiece of DOE's commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems. Capabilities in the EMSL include over 100 major instrument systems for use by the resident research staff, their collaborators, and users of the EMSL. These capabilities are used to address the fundamental science that will be the basis for finding solutions to national environmental issues such as cleaning up contamianted areas at DOE sites across the country and developing green technologies that will reduce or eliminate future pollution production. The capabilities are also used to further the understanding of global climate change and environmental issues relevant to energy production and use and health effects resulting from exposure to contaminated environments.

  18. Dynamic Simulation over Long Time Periods with 100% Solar Generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Concepcion, Ricky James; Elliott, Ryan Thomas

    2015-12-01

    This project aimed to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accommodate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for potential problems.

  19. Application of control theory to dynamic systems simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auslander, D. M.; Spear, R. C.; Young, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The application of control theory is applied to dynamic systems simulation. Theory and methodology applicable to controlled ecological life support systems are considered. Spatial effects on system stability, design of control systems with uncertain parameters, and an interactive computing language (PARASOL-II) designed for dynamic system simulation, report quality graphics, data acquisition, and simple real time control are discussed.

  20. Controlled multibody dynamics simulation for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Wu, S. C.; Chang, C. W.

    1989-01-01

    Multibody dynamics discipline, and dynamic simulation in control structure interaction (CSI) design are discussed. The use, capabilities, and architecture of the Large Angle Transient Dynamics (LATDYN) code as a simulation tool are explained. A generic joint body with various types of hinge connections; finite element and element coordinate systems; results of a flexible beam spin-up on a plane; mini-mast deployment; space crane and robotic slewing manipulations; a potential CSI test article; and multibody benchmark experiments are also described.

  1. A Simulation Program for Dynamic Infrared (IR) Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoerb, Matthew C.; Harris, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    A free program for the simulation of dynamic infrared (IR) spectra is presented. The program simulates the spectrum of two exchanging IR peaks based on simple input parameters. Larger systems can be simulated with minor modifications. The program is available as an executable program for PCs or can be run in MATLAB on any operating system. Source…

  2. Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development Concept Stage Report

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, H.N. ); Deringer, J.J. ); Jones, J.W. ); Hall, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    This report documents eight tasks performed as part of the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project, in which detailed conceptual approaches were produced for each element of the proposed Targets model. The eight task reports together describe the important modules proposed for inclusion in the Targets model: input module, energy module, characteristic development moduel, building cost module, analysis control module, energy cost module, search routines module, and economic analysis module. 16 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Demonstration of the Whole-Building Diagnostician for the Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and for the University of Wisconsin at Madison

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, Nathan N.; Hail, John C.

    2003-12-30

    In an effort to expand the energy savings programs within the State, the Wisconsin Division of Energy obtained funding through the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), with additional funding assistance through the Rebuild America Program (RBA) to install the Whole Building Diagnostician (WBD) software program as a test bed project in two of the State’s facilities in Wisconsin. This report discusses the results of this effort.

  4. Multimillion atom molecular dynamics simulations of glasses and ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashishta, Priya; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro

    1999-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are a powerful tool for studying physical and chemical phenomena in materials. In these lectures we shall review the molecular dynamics method and its implementation on parallel computer architectures. Using the molecular dynamics method we will study a number of materials in different ranges of density, temperature, and uniaxial strain. These include structural correlations in silica glass under pressure, crack propagation in silicon nitride films, sintering of silicon nitride nanoclusters, consolidation of nanophase materials, and dynamic fracture. Multimillion atom simulations of oxidation of aluminum nanoclusters and nanoindentation in silicon nitride will also be discussed.

  5. Protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis: insights from simulations.

    PubMed

    McGeagh, John D; Ranaghan, Kara E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2011-08-01

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most active and controversial areas in enzymology today. Some researchers claim that protein dynamics are at the heart of enzyme catalytic efficiency, while others state that dynamics make no significant contribution to catalysis. What is the biochemist - or student - to make of the ferocious arguments in this area? Protein dynamics are complex and fascinating, as molecular dynamics simulations and experiments have shown. The essential question is: do these complex motions have functional significance? In particular, how do they affect or relate to chemical reactions within enzymes, and how are chemical and conformational changes coupled together? Biomolecular simulations can analyse enzyme reactions and dynamics in atomic detail, beyond that achievable in experiments: accurate atomistic modelling has an essential part to play in clarifying these issues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Dynamics: Experimental and Computational Approaches.

  6. Dynamics modeling and simulation of autonomous underwater vehicles with appendages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yumin; Zhao, Jinxin; Cao, Jian; Zhang, Guocheng

    2013-03-01

    To provide a simulation system platform for designing and debugging a small autonomous underwater vehicle's (AUV) motion controller, a six-degree of freedom (6-DOF) dynamic model for AUV controlled by thruster and fins with appendages is examined. Based on the dynamic model, a simulation system for the AUV's motion is established. The different kinds of typical motions are simulated to analyze the motion performance and the maneuverability of the AUV. In order to evaluate the influences of appendages on the motion performance of the AUV, simulations of the AUV with and without appendages are performed and compared. The results demonstrate the AUV has good maneuverability with and without appendages.

  7. Comparisons of Kinematics and Dynamics Simulation Software Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiue, Yeu-Sheng Paul

    2002-01-01

    Kinematic and dynamic analyses for moving bodies are essential to system engineers and designers in the process of design and validations. 3D visualization and motion simulation plus finite element analysis (FEA) give engineers a better way to present ideas and results. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) system engineering researchers are currently using IGRIP from DELMIA Inc. as a kinematic simulation tool for discrete bodies motion simulations. Although IGRIP is an excellent tool for kinematic simulation with some dynamic analysis capabilities in robotic control, explorations of other alternatives with more powerful dynamic analysis and FEA capabilities are necessary. Kinematics analysis will only examine the displacement, velocity, and acceleration of the mechanism without considering effects from masses of components. With dynamic analysis and FEA, effects such as the forces or torques at the joint due to mass and inertia of components can be identified. With keen market competition, ALGOR Mechanical Event Simulation (MES), MSC visualNastran 4D, Unigraphics Motion+, and Pro/MECHANICA were chosen for explorations. In this study, comparisons between software tools were presented in terms of following categories: graphical user interface (GUI), import capability, tutorial availability, ease of use, kinematic simulation capability, dynamic simulation capability, FEA capability, graphical output, technical support, and cost. Propulsion Test Article (PTA) with Fastrac engine model exported from IGRIP and an office chair mechanism were used as examples for simulations.

  8. Mosquito population dynamics from cellular automata-based simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syafarina, Inna; Sadikin, Rifki; Nuraini, Nuning

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present an innovative model for simulating mosquito-vector population dynamics. The simulation consist of two stages: demography and dispersal dynamics. For demography simulation, we follow the existing model for modeling a mosquito life cycles. Moreover, we use cellular automata-based model for simulating dispersal of the vector. In simulation, each individual vector is able to move to other grid based on a random walk. Our model is also capable to represent immunity factor for each grid. We simulate the model to evaluate its correctness. Based on the simulations, we can conclude that our model is correct. However, our model need to be improved to find a realistic parameters to match real data.

  9. Dynamics of water confined in lyotropic liquid crystals: Molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamic structure factor.

    PubMed

    Mantha, Sriteja; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-02-28

    The properties of water under confinement are of practical and fundamental interest. In this work, we study the properties of water in the self-assembled lyotropic phases of Gemini surfactants with a focus on testing the standard analysis of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments. In QENS experiments, the dynamic structure factor is measured and fit to models to extract the translational diffusion constant, D(T), and rotational relaxation time, τ(R). We test this procedure by using simulation results for the dynamic structure factor, extracting the dynamic parameters from the fit as is typically done in experiments, and comparing the values to those directly measured in the simulations. We find that the de-coupling approximation, where the intermediate scattering function is assumed to be a product of translational and rotational contributions, is quite accurate. The jump-diffusion and isotropic rotation models, however, are not accurate when the degree of confinement is high. In particular, the exponential approximations for the intermediate scattering function fail for highly confined water and the values of D(T) and τ(R) can differ from the measured value by as much as a factor of two. Other models have more fit parameters, however, and with the range of energies and wave-vectors accessible to QENS, the typical analysis appears to be the best choice. In the most confined lamellar phase, the dynamics are sufficiently slow that QENS does not access a large enough time scale.

  10. Simulating Hamiltonian Dynamics with a Truncated Taylor Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Rolando

    2015-03-01

    One of the main motivations for quantum computers is their ability to efficiently simulate the dynamics of quantum systems. Since the mid-1990s, many algorithms have been developed to simulate Hamiltonian dynamics on a quantum computer, with applications to problems such as simulating spin models and quantum chemistry. While it is now well known that quantum computers can efficiently simulate Hamiltonian dynamics, ongoing work has improved the performance and expanded the scope of such simulations. In this talk, I will describe a very simple and efficient algorithm for simulating Hamiltonian dynamics on a quantum computer by approximating the truncated Taylor series of the evolution operator. This algorithm can simulate the time evolution of a wide variety of physical systems. The cost of this algorithm depends only logarithmically on the inverse of the desired precision, and can be shown to be optimal. Such a cost also represents an exponential improvement over known methods for Hamiltonian simulation based on, e.g., Trotter-Suzuki approximations. Roughly speaking, doubling the number of digits of accuracy of the simulation only doubles the complexity. The new algorithm and its analysis are highly simplified due to a technique for implementing linear combinations of unitary operations to directly apply the truncated Taylor series. This is joint work with Dominic Berry, Andrew Childs, Richard Cleve, and Robin Kothari.

  11. Dynamics of adaptive structures: Design through simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, S.

    1993-01-01

    The use of a helical bi-morph actuator/sensor concept by mimicking the change of helical waveform in bacterial flagella is perhaps the first application of bacterial motions (living species) to longitudinal deployment of space structures. However, no dynamical considerations were analyzed to explain the waveform change mechanisms. The objective is to review various deployment concepts from the dynamics point of view and introduce the dynamical considerations from the outset as part of design considerations. Specifically, the impact of the incorporation of the combined static mechanisms and dynamic design considerations on the deployment performance during the reconfiguration stage is studied in terms of improved controllability, maneuvering duration, and joint singularity index. It is shown that intermediate configurations during articulations play an important role for improved joint mechanisms design and overall structural deployability.

  12. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Elber, Ron

    2016-02-14

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances.

  13. Perspective: Computer simulations of long time dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Elber, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Atomically detailed computer simulations of complex molecular events attracted the imagination of many researchers in the field as providing comprehensive information on chemical, biological, and physical processes. However, one of the greatest limitations of these simulations is of time scales. The physical time scales accessible to straightforward simulations are too short to address many interesting and important molecular events. In the last decade significant advances were made in different directions (theory, software, and hardware) that significantly expand the capabilities and accuracies of these techniques. This perspective describes and critically examines some of these advances. PMID:26874473

  14. Large-Scale Hybrid Dynamic Simulation Employing Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Guttromson, Ross T.; Hauer, John F.

    2004-06-30

    Simulation and measurements are two primary ways for power engineers to gain understanding of system behaviors and thus accomplish tasks in system planning and operation. Many well-developed simulation tools are available in today's market. On the other hand, large amount of measured data can be obtained from traditional SCADA systems and currently fast growing phasor networks. However, simulation and measurement are still two separate worlds. There is a need to combine the advantages of simulation and measurements. In view of this, this paper proposes the concept of hybrid dynamic simulation which opens up traditional simulation by providing entries for measurements. A method is presented to implement hybrid simulation with PSLF/PSDS. Test studies show the validity of the proposed hybrid simulation method. Applications of such hybrid simulation include system event playback, model validation, and software validation.

  15. Climate dynamics experiments using a GCM simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjarrald, Dan; Robertson, Franklin R.; Christy, John R.; Lu, H.-I.; Sohn, B.; Srikishen, J.

    1991-01-01

    The study of surface-atmosphere interactions has begun with studies of the effect of altering the ocean and land boundaries. A ten year simulation of global climate using observed sea surface temperature anomalies has begun using the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM1). The results for low resolution (R15) were computed for the first 8 years of the simulation and compared with the observed surface temperatures and the MSU (Microwave Sounding Unit) observations of tropospheric temperature. A simulation at higher resolution (T42) was done to ascertain the effect of interactive soil hydrology on the system response to an El Nino sea surface temperature perturbation. Initial analysis of this simulations was completed.

  16. Simulating food web dynamics along a gradient: quantifying human influence.

    PubMed

    Jordán, Ferenc; Gjata, Nerta; Mei, Shu; Yule, Catherine M

    2012-01-01

    Realistically parameterized and dynamically simulated food-webs are useful tool to explore the importance of the functional diversity of ecosystems, and in particular relations between the dynamics of species and the whole community. We present a stochastic dynamical food web simulation for the Kelian River (Borneo). The food web was constructed for six different locations, arrayed along a gradient of increasing human perturbation (mostly resulting from gold mining activities) along the river. Along the river, the relative importance of grazers, filterers and shredders decreases with increasing disturbance downstream, while predators become more dominant in governing eco-dynamics. Human activity led to increased turbidity and sedimentation which adversely impacts primary productivity. Since the main difference between the study sites was not the composition of the food webs (structure is quite similar) but the strengths of interactions and the abundance of the trophic groups, a dynamical simulation approach seemed to be useful to better explain human influence. In the pristine river (study site 1), when comparing a structural version of our model with the dynamical model we found that structurally central groups such as omnivores and carnivores were not the most important ones dynamically. Instead, primary consumers such as invertebrate grazers and shredders generated a greater dynamical response. Based on the dynamically most important groups, bottom-up control is replaced by the predominant top-down control regime as distance downstream and human disturbance increased. An important finding, potentially explaining the poor structure to dynamics relationship, is that indirect effects are at least as important as direct ones during the simulations. We suggest that our approach and this simulation framework could serve systems-based conservation efforts. Quantitative indicators on the relative importance of trophic groups and the mechanistic modeling of eco-dynamics

  17. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  18. A Process for Comparing Dynamics of Distributed Space Systems Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cures, Edwin Z.; Jackson, Albert A.; Morris, Jeffery C.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a process that was developed for comparing the primary orbital dynamics behavior between space systems distributed simulations. This process is used to characterize and understand the fundamental fidelities and compatibilities of the modeling of orbital dynamics between spacecraft simulations. This is required for high-latency distributed simulations such as NASA s Integrated Mission Simulation and must be understood when reporting results from simulation executions. This paper presents 10 principal comparison tests along with their rationale and examples of the results. The Integrated Mission Simulation (IMSim) (formerly know as the Distributed Space Exploration Simulation (DSES)) is a NASA research and development project focusing on the technologies and processes that are related to the collaborative simulation of complex space systems involved in the exploration of our solar system. Currently, the NASA centers that are actively participating in the IMSim project are the Ames Research Center, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), the Kennedy Space Center, the Langley Research Center and the Marshall Space Flight Center. In concept, each center participating in IMSim has its own set of simulation models and environment(s). These simulation tools are used to build the various simulation products that are used for scientific investigation, engineering analysis, system design, training, planning, operations and more. Working individually, these production simulations provide important data to various NASA projects.

  19. Student Diagnostic Strategies in a Dynamic Simulation Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Recker, Mimi M.; Govindaraj, T.; Vasandani, Vijay

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of simulation systems for studying diagnostic problem solving and presents results from two empirical studies in which undergraduates diagnosed faults that occurred in a computer-based, dynamic simulation. Discusses dual problem space search that includes generating and testing hypotheses; suggests implications for designing…

  20. Dynamics Simulation Model for Space Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, E. M.; Pearson, J.; Oldson, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the development of an accurate model for the dynamics of the Momentum Exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) system. The MXER is a rotating tether about 100-km long in elliptical Earth orbit designed to catch payloads in low Earth orbit and throw them to geosynchronous orbit or to Earth escape. To ensure successful rendezvous between the MXER tip catcher and a payload, a high-fidelity model of the system dynamics is required. The model developed here quantifies the major environmental perturbations, and can predict the MXER tip position to within meters over one orbit.

  1. Semiconductor nanostructure properties. Molecular Dynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolska, N. I.; Zhmakin, A. I.

    2013-08-01

    The need for research is based on the fact that development of non-planar semiconductor nanosystems and nanomaterials with controlled properties is an important scientific and industrial problem. So, final scientific and technological problem is the creation of adequate modern methods and software for growth and properties simulation and optimization of various III-V (GaAs, InAs, InP, InGaAs etc.) nanostructures (e.g. nanowires) with controlled surface morphology, crystal structure, optical, transport properties etc. Accordingly, now we are developing a specialized computer code for atomistic simulation of structural (distribution of atoms and impurities, elastic and force constants, strain distribution etc.) and thermodynamic (mixing energy, interaction energy, surface energy etc.) properties of the nanostructures. Some simulation results are shown too.

  2. Movement Characteristics Analysis and Dynamic Simulation of Collaborative Measuring Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    guoqing, MA; li, LIU; zhenglin, YU; guohua, CAO; yanbin, ZHENG

    2017-03-01

    Human-machine collaboration is becoming increasingly more necessary, and so collaborative robot applications are also in high demand. We selected a UR10 robot as our research subject for this study. First, we applied D-H coordinate transformation of the robot to establish a link system, and we then used inverse transformation to solve the robot’s inverse kinematics and find all the joints. Use Lagrange method to analysis UR robot dynamics; use ADAMS multibody dynamics simulation software to dynamic simulation; verifying the correctness of the derived kinetic models.

  3. Gamma ray observatory dynamics simulator in Ada (GRODY)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This experiment involved the parallel development of dynamics simulators for the Gamma Ray Observatory in both FORTRAN and Ada for the purpose of evaluating the applicability of Ada to the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's flight dynamics environment. The experiment successfully demonstrated that Ada is a viable, valuable technology for use in this environment. In addition to building a simulator, the Ada team evaluated training approaches, developed an Ada methodology appropriate to the flight dynamics environment, and established a baseline for evaluating future Ada projects.

  4. Gamma ray observatory dynamics simulator in Ada (GRODY)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This experiment involved the parallel development of dynamics simulators for the Gamma Ray Observatory in both FORTRAN and Ada for the purpose of evaluating the applicability of Ada to the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's flight dynamics environment. The experiment successfully demonstrated that Ada is a viable, valuable technology for use in this environment. In addition to building a simulator, the Ada team evaluated training approaches, developed an Ada methodology appropriate to the flight dynamics environment, and established a baseline for evaluating future Ada projects.

  5. Computer simulation of multigrid body dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swaminadham, M.; Moon, Young I.; Venkayya, V. B.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to set up and analyze benchmark problems on multibody dynamics and to verify the predictions of two multibody computer simulation codes. TREETOPS and DISCOS have been used to run three example problems - one degree-of-freedom spring mass dashpot system, an inverted pendulum system, and a triple pendulum. To study the dynamics and control interaction, an inverted planar pendulum with an external body force and a torsional control spring was modeled as a hinge connected two-rigid body system. TREETOPS and DISCOS affected the time history simulation of this problem. System state space variables and their time derivatives from two simulation codes were compared.

  6. AceCloud: Molecular Dynamics Simulations in the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Harvey, M J; De Fabritiis, G

    2015-05-26

    We present AceCloud, an on-demand service for molecular dynamics simulations. AceCloud is designed to facilitate the secure execution of large ensembles of simulations on an external cloud computing service (currently Amazon Web Services). The AceCloud client, integrated into the ACEMD molecular dynamics package, provides an easy-to-use interface that abstracts all aspects of interaction with the cloud services. This gives the user the experience that all simulations are running on their local machine, minimizing the learning curve typically associated with the transition to using high performance computing services.

  7. Robust state preparation in quantum simulations of Dirac dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xue-Ke; Deng, Fu-Guo; Lamata, Lucas; Muga, J. G.

    2017-02-01

    A nonrelativistic system such as an ultracold trapped ion may perform a quantum simulation of a Dirac equation dynamics under specific conditions. The resulting Hamiltonian and dynamics are highly controllable, but the coupling between momentum and internal levels poses some difficulties to manipulate the internal states accurately in wave packets. We use invariants of motion to inverse engineer robust population inversion processes with a homogeneous, time-dependent simulated electric field. This exemplifies the usefulness of inverse-engineering techniques to improve the performance of quantum simulation protocols.

  8. Destination state screening of active spaces in spin dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzystyniak, M.; Edwards, Luke J.; Kuprov, Ilya

    2011-06-01

    We propose a novel avenue for state space reduction in time domain Liouville space spin dynamics simulations, using detectability as a selection criterion - only those states that evolve into or affect other detectable states are kept in the simulation. This basis reduction procedure (referred to as destination state screening) is formally exact and can be applied on top of the existing state space restriction techniques. As demonstrated below, in many cases this results in further reduction of matrix dimension, leading to considerable acceleration of many spin dynamics simulation types. Destination state screening is implemented in the latest version of the Spinach library (http://spindynamics.org).

  9. Test and validation for robot arm control dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yae, K. Harold; Kim, Sung-Soo; Haug, Edward J.; Seering, Warren; Sundaram, Kamala; Thompson, Bruce; Turner, James; Chun, Hon; Frisch, Harold P.; Schnurr, Richard

    1989-01-01

    The Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) program will require an ability to develop, in a cost effective manner, many simulation models for design, analysis, performance evaluation, and crew training. Computational speed and the degree of modeling fidelity associated with each simulation must be commensurate with problem objectives. To demonstrate evolving state-of-the-art general purpose multibody modeling capabilities, to validate these by laboratory testing, and to expose their modeling shortcomings, two focus problems at the opposite ends of the simulation spectrum are defined: (1) Coarse Acquisition Control Dynamics. Create a real time man-in-the-control-loop simulator. Provide animated graphical display of robot arm dynamics and tactile feedback sufficient for cueing the operator. Interface simulator software with human operated tactile feedback controller; i.e., the Kraft mini-master. (2) Fine, Precision Mode Control Dynamics. Create a high speed, high fidelity simulation model for the design, analysis, and performance evaluation of autonomous 7 degree-of-freedom (DOF) trajectory control algorithms. This model must contain detail dynamic models for all significant dynamics elements within the robot arm, such as joint drive mechanisms.

  10. Simulations of Energetic Particles Interacting with Dynamical Magnetic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B0 = 0.5.

  11. SIMULATIONS OF ENERGETIC PARTICLES INTERACTING WITH DYNAMICAL MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, M.; Shalchi, A. E-mail: husseinm@myumanitoba.ca

    2016-02-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in interplanetary space by using test-particle simulations. In previous work such simulations have been performed by using either magnetostatic turbulence or undamped propagating plasma waves. In the current paper we simulate for the first time particle transport in dynamical turbulence. To do so we employ two models, namely the damping model of dynamical turbulence and the random sweeping model. We compute parallel and perpendicular diffusion coefficients and compare our numerical findings with solar wind observations. We show that good agreement can be found between simulations and the Palmer consensus range for both dynamical turbulence models if the ratio of turbulent magnetic field and mean field is δB/B{sub 0} = 0.5.

  12. SSME-HAS dynamic load simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The space shuttle main engine propellant valve actuators (SSME) were designed to simulate the loads reflected into the SSME by the chamber coolant valve, the fuel preburner, and the oxidizer. The design, and functional description are included along with a list of the drawings. The load fixture control transform, friction torque, and flow calculations are reported.

  13. SIMULATING FISH ASSEMBLAGE DYNAMICS IN RIVER NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    My recently retired colleague, Joan Baker, and I have developed a prototype computer simulation model for studying the effects of human and non-human alterations of habitats and species availability on fish assemblage populations. The fish assemblage model, written in R, is a sp...

  14. Classical trajectory simulations of post-transition state dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourderaj, Upakarasamy; Park, Kyoyeon; Hase, William L.

    Classical chemical dynamics simulations of post-transition state dynamics are reviewed. Most of the simulations involve direct dynamics for which the potential energy and gradient are obtained directly from an electronic structure theory. The chemical reaction attributes and chemical systems presented are product energy partitioning for Cl- ··· CH3Br → ClCH3 + Br- and C2H5F → C2H4 + HF dissociation, non-RRKM dynamics for cyclopropane stereomutation and the Cl- ··· CH3Cl complexes mediating the Cl- + CH3Cl SN2 nucleophilic substitution reaction, and non-IRC dynamics for the OH- + CH3F and F- + CH3OOH chemical reactions. These studies illustrate the important role of chemical dynamics simulations in understanding atomic-level reaction dynamics and interpreting experiments. They also show that widely used paradigms and model theories for interpreting reaction kinetics and dynamics are often inaccurate and are not applicable.

  15. Simulating the dynamic response of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Jeffrey; Becker, Richard

    Unlike several conventional metals, the mechanical response of magnesium is severely anisotropic for quasistatic and dynamic loading conditions. In this work we present a crystal-based strength model that is the same order of magnitude in computational cost as rate-dependent isotropic strength models, yet is able to capture essential features exhibited by textured magnesium polycrystals. The model demarcates plastic deformation into contributions from basal slip, extension twinning, and non-basal slip mechanisms. Comparisons are made between model predictions and experiments for two magnesium alloys with differing processing histories. The model is then used to explore and quantify the dependence of metallurgical and processing variations for several dynamic experiments that probe propensity for localization and failure under complex loading conditions.

  16. Hybrid Dynamics Simulation Engine for Metalloproteins

    PubMed Central

    Sparta, Manuel; Shirvanyants, David; Ding, Feng; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2012-01-01

    Quality computational description of metalloproteins is a great challenge due to the vast span of time- and lengthscales characteristic of their existence. We present an efficient new method that allows for robust characterization of metalloproteins. It combines quantum mechanical (QM) description of the metal-containing active site, and extensive dynamics of the protein captured by discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) (QM/DMD). DMD samples the entire protein, including the backbone, and most of the active site, except for the immediate coordination region of the metal. QM operates on the part of the protein of electronic and chemical significance, which may include tens to hundreds of atoms. The breathing quantum-classical boundary provides a continuous mutual feedback between the two machineries. We test QM/DMD using the Fe-containing electron transporter protein, rubredoxin, and its three mutants as a model. QM/DMD can provide a reliable balanced description of metalloproteins’ structure, dynamics, and electronic structure in a reasonable amount of time. As an illustration of QM/DMD capabilities, we then predict the structure of the Ca2+ form of the enzyme catechol O-methyl transferase, which, unlike the native Mg2+ form, is catalytically inactive. The Mg2+ site is ochtahedral, but the Ca2+ is 7-coordinate and features the misalignment of the reacting parts of the system. The change is facilitated by the backbone adjustment. QM/DMD is ideal and fast for providing this level of structural insight. PMID:22947938

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of G-DNA and perspectives on the simulation of nucleic acid structures

    PubMed Central

    šponer, Jiří; Cang, Xiaohui; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews the application of biomolecular simulation methods to understand the structure, dynamics and interactions of nucleic acids with a focus on explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of guanine quadruplex (G-DNA and G-RNA) molecules. While primarily dealing with these exciting and highly relevant four-stranded systems, where recent and past simulations have provided several interesting results and novel insight into G-DNA structure, the review provides some general perspectives on the applicability of the simulation techniques to nucleic acids. PMID:22525788

  18. Dynamics of water confined in lyotropic liquid crystals: Molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamic structure factor

    DOE PAGES

    Mantha, Sriteja; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-02-24

    The properties of water under confinement are of practical and fundamental interest. Here in this work we study the properties of water in the self-assembled lyotropic phases of gemini surfactants with a focus on testing the standard analysis of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments. In QENS experiments the dynamic structure factor is measured and fit to models to extract the translational diffusion constant, DT , and rotational relaxation time, τR. We test this procedure by using simulation results for the dynamic structure factor, extracting the dynamic parameters from the fit as is typically done in experiments, and comparing the valuesmore » to those directly measured in the simulations. We find that the decoupling approximation, where the intermediate scattering function is assumed to be a product of translational and rotational contributions, is quite accurate. The jump-diffusion and isotropic rotation models, however, are not accurate when the degree of confinement is high. In particular, the exponential approximations for the intermediate scattering function fail for highly confined water and the values of DT and τR can differ from the measured value by as much as a factor of two. Other models have more fit parameters, however, and with the range of energies and wave-vectors accessible to QENS, the typical analysis appears to be the best choice. In the most confined lamellar phase, the dynamics are sufficiently slow that QENS does not access a large enough time scale and neutron spin echo measurements would be a valuable technique in addition to QENS.« less

  19. Dynamics of water confined in lyotropic liquid crystals: Molecular dynamics simulations of the dynamic structure factor

    SciTech Connect

    Mantha, Sriteja; Yethiraj, Arun

    2016-02-24

    The properties of water under confinement are of practical and fundamental interest. Here in this work we study the properties of water in the self-assembled lyotropic phases of gemini surfactants with a focus on testing the standard analysis of quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) experiments. In QENS experiments the dynamic structure factor is measured and fit to models to extract the translational diffusion constant, DT , and rotational relaxation time, τR. We test this procedure by using simulation results for the dynamic structure factor, extracting the dynamic parameters from the fit as is typically done in experiments, and comparing the values to those directly measured in the simulations. We find that the decoupling approximation, where the intermediate scattering function is assumed to be a product of translational and rotational contributions, is quite accurate. The jump-diffusion and isotropic rotation models, however, are not accurate when the degree of confinement is high. In particular, the exponential approximations for the intermediate scattering function fail for highly confined water and the values of DT and τR can differ from the measured value by as much as a factor of two. Other models have more fit parameters, however, and with the range of energies and wave-vectors accessible to QENS, the typical analysis appears to be the best choice. In the most confined lamellar phase, the dynamics are sufficiently slow that QENS does not access a large enough time scale and neutron spin echo measurements would be a valuable technique in addition to QENS.

  20. Simulation in a dynamic prototyping environment: Petri nets or rules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.; Price, Shannon; Hale, Joseph P.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of a prototyped user interface is best supported by a simulation of the system. A simulation allows for dynamic evaluation of the interface rather than just a static evaluation of the screen's appearance. This allows potential users to evaluate both the look (in terms of the screen layout, color, objects, etc.) and feel (in terms of operations and actions which need to be performed) of a system's interface. Because of the need to provide dynamic evaluation of an interface, there must be support for producing active simulations. The high-fidelity training simulators are delivered too late to be effectively used in prototyping the displays. Therefore, it is important to build a low fidelity simulator, so that the iterative cycle of refining the human computer interface based upon a user's interactions can proceed early in software development.

  1. Improvement of surgical simulation using dynamic volume rendering.

    PubMed

    Radetzky, A; Schröcker, F; Auer, L M

    2000-01-01

    In the last years high efforts have been taken to develop surgical simulators for computer assisted training. However, most of these simulators use simple models of the human's anatomy, which are manually created using modeling software. Nevertheless, medical experts need to perform the training directly with the patient's complex anatomy, which can be received, for example, from digital imaging datasets (CT, MR). A common technique to display these datasets is volume rendering. However, even with high-end hardware only static models can be handled interactively. In surgical simulators a dynamic component is also needed because tissues must be deformed and partially removed. With the combination of springmass models, which are improved by neuro-fuzzy systems, and the recently developed OpenGL Volumizer, surgical simulation using real-time deformable (or dynamic) volume rendering became possible. As an application example the simulator ROBOSIM for minimally invasive neurosurgery is presented.

  2. Strong Analog Classical Simulation of Coherent Quantum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    A strong analog classical simulation of general quantum evolution is proposed, which serves as a novel scheme in quantum computation and simulation. The scheme employs the approach of geometric quantum mechanics and quantum informational technique of quantum tomography, which applies broadly to cases of mixed states, nonunitary evolution, and infinite dimensional systems. The simulation provides an intriguing classical picture to probe quantum phenomena, namely, a coherent quantum dynamics can be viewed as a globally constrained classical Hamiltonian dynamics of a collection of coupled particles or strings. Efficiency analysis reveals a fundamental difference between the locality in real space and locality in Hilbert space, the latter enables efficient strong analog classical simulations. Examples are also studied to highlight the differences and gaps among various simulation methods. Funding support from NSERC of Canada and a research fellowship at Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia are acknowledged

  3. Simulation in a dynamic prototyping environment: Petri nets or rules?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Loretta A.; Price, Shannon W.; Hale, Joseph P.

    1994-01-01

    An evaluation of a prototyped user interface is best supported by a simulation of the system. A simulation allows for dynamic evaluation of the interface rather than just a static evaluation of the screen's appearance. This allows potential users to evaluate both the look (in terms of the screen layout, color, objects, etc.) and feel (in terms of operations and actions which need to be performed) of a system's interface. Because of the need to provide dynamic evaluation of an interface, there must be support for producing active simulations. The high-fidelity training simulators are normally delivered too late to be effectively used in prototyping the displays. Therefore, it is important to build a low fidelity simulator, so that the iterative cycle of refining the human computer interface based upon a user's interactions can proceed early in software development.

  4. Gas dynamics for accretion disk simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, R.

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of accretion disks can largely be understood in terms of the basic physical processes of mass, energy, and momentum conservation. Despite this, detailed modeling of these systems using modern computational techniques is challenging and controversial. Disturbing differences exist between methods used widely in astrophysics, namely Eulerian finite-difference techniques and particle codes such as SPH. Therefore neither technique is fully satisfactory for accretion disk simulations. This paper describes a new fully Lagrangian method designed to resolve these difficulties.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  6. Insights from molecular dynamics simulations for computational protein design.

    PubMed

    Childers, Matthew Carter; Daggett, Valerie

    2017-02-01

    A grand challenge in the field of structural biology is to design and engineer proteins that exhibit targeted functions. Although much success on this front has been achieved, design success rates remain low, an ever-present reminder of our limited understanding of the relationship between amino acid sequences and the structures they adopt. In addition to experimental techniques and rational design strategies, computational methods have been employed to aid in the design and engineering of proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) is one such method that simulates the motions of proteins according to classical dynamics. Here, we review how insights into protein dynamics derived from MD simulations have influenced the design of proteins. One of the greatest strengths of MD is its capacity to reveal information beyond what is available in the static structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. In this regard simulations can be used to directly guide protein design by providing atomistic details of the dynamic molecular interactions contributing to protein stability and function. MD simulations can also be used as a virtual screening tool to rank, select, identify, and assess potential designs. MD is uniquely poised to inform protein design efforts where the application requires realistic models of protein dynamics and atomic level descriptions of the relationship between dynamics and function. Here, we review cases where MD simulations was used to modulate protein stability and protein function by providing information regarding the conformation(s), conformational transitions, interactions, and dynamics that govern stability and function. In addition, we discuss cases where conformations from protein folding/unfolding simulations have been exploited for protein design, yielding novel outcomes that could not be obtained from static structures.

  7. GRODY - GAMMA RAY OBSERVATORY DYNAMICS SIMULATOR IN ADA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, M.

    1994-01-01

    Analysts use a dynamics simulator to test the attitude control system algorithms used by a satellite. The simulator must simulate the hardware, dynamics, and environment of the particular spacecraft and provide user services which enable the analyst to conduct experiments. Researchers at Goddard's Flight Dynamics Division developed GRODY alongside GROSS (GSC-13147), a FORTRAN simulator which performs the same functions, in a case study to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the Ada programming language for flight dynamics software development. They used popular object-oriented design techniques to link the simulator's design with its function. GRODY is designed for analysts familiar with spacecraft attitude analysis. The program supports maneuver planning as well as analytical testing and evaluation of the attitude determination and control system used on board the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) satellite. GRODY simulates the GRO on-board computer and Control Processor Electronics. The analyst/user sets up and controls the simulation. GRODY allows the analyst to check and update parameter values and ground commands, obtain simulation status displays, interrupt the simulation, analyze previous runs, and obtain printed output of simulation runs. The video terminal screen display allows visibility of command sequences, full-screen display and modification of parameters using input fields, and verification of all input data. Data input available for modification includes alignment and performance parameters for all attitude hardware, simulation control parameters which determine simulation scheduling and simulator output, initial conditions, and on-board computer commands. GRODY generates eight types of output: simulation results data set, analysis report, parameter report, simulation report, status display, plots, diagnostic output (which helps the user trace any problems that have occurred during a simulation), and a permanent log of all runs and errors. The

  8. Dynamic computer simulations of electrophoresis: three decades of active research.

    PubMed

    Thormann, Wolfgang; Caslavska, Jitka; Breadmore, Michael C; Mosher, Richard A

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic models for electrophoresis are based upon model equations derived from the transport concepts in solution together with user-inputted conditions. They are able to predict theoretically the movement of ions and are as such the most versatile tool to explore the fundamentals of electrokinetic separations. Since its inception three decades ago, the state of dynamic computer simulation software and its use has progressed significantly and Electrophoresis played a pivotal role in that endeavor as a large proportion of the fundamental and application papers were published in this periodical. Software is available that simulates all basic electrophoretic systems, including moving boundary electrophoresis, zone electrophoresis, ITP, IEF and EKC, and their combinations under almost exactly the same conditions used in the laboratory. This has been employed to show the detailed mechanisms of many of the fundamental phenomena that occur in electrophoretic separations. Dynamic electrophoretic simulations are relevant for separations on any scale and instrumental format, including free-fluid preparative, gel, capillary and chip electrophoresis. This review includes a historical overview, a survey of current simulators, simulation examples and a discussion of the applications and achievements of dynamic simulation.

  9. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D.; Kühn, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  10. Multiscale Simulation of Microbe Structure and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V.; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin. PMID:21802438

  11. Multiscale simulation of microbe structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Harshad; Singharoy, Abhishek; Sereda, Yuriy V; Cheluvaraja, Srinath C; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2011-10-01

    A multiscale mathematical and computational approach is developed that captures the hierarchical organization of a microbe. It is found that a natural perspective for understanding a microbe is in terms of a hierarchy of variables at various levels of resolution. This hierarchy starts with the N -atom description and terminates with order parameters characterizing a whole microbe. This conceptual framework is used to guide the analysis of the Liouville equation for the probability density of the positions and momenta of the N atoms constituting the microbe and its environment. Using multiscale mathematical techniques, we derive equations for the co-evolution of the order parameters and the probability density of the N-atom state. This approach yields a rigorous way to transfer information between variables on different space-time scales. It elucidates the interplay between equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium processes underlying microbial behavior. It also provides framework for using coarse-grained nanocharacterization data to guide microbial simulation. It enables a methodical search for free-energy minimizing structures, many of which are typically supported by the set of macromolecules and membranes constituting a given microbe. This suite of capabilities provides a natural framework for arriving at a fundamental understanding of microbial behavior, the analysis of nanocharacterization data, and the computer-aided design of nanostructures for biotechnical and medical purposes. Selected features of the methodology are demonstrated using our multiscale bionanosystem simulator DeductiveMultiscaleSimulator. Systems used to demonstrate the approach are structural transitions in the cowpea chlorotic mosaic virus, RNA of satellite tobacco mosaic virus, virus-like particles related to human papillomavirus, and iron-binding protein lactoferrin.

  12. Dynamic Simulation of Airborne High Power Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    42, 43 and 44. These curves give the secondary current of phase A, IL11, the primary K current of phase A, IL22 , and the magnetizing current of phase...A, due to ILll I" and IL22 , PIX. The simulation was for wye-wye connection of three single phase trans- formers. The data used was not for any...plot of a single variable, the statement "PLOT" is used IL11, IL22 , IL33, PLOT K 185 This statement will provide a separate plot of each variable

  13. Numerical simulations of blobs with ion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, A. H.; Rasmussen, J. Juul; Madsen, J.; Xu, G. S.; Naulin, V.; Olsen, J. M. B.; Løiten, M.; Hansen, S. K.; Yan, N.; Tophøj, L.; Wan, B. N.

    2017-02-01

    The transport of particles and energy into the scrape-off layer (SOL) region at the outboard midplane of medium-sized tokamaks, operating in low confinement mode, is investigated by applying the first-principle HESEL (hot edge-sol-electrostatic) model. HESEL is a four-field drift-fluid model including finite electron and ion temperature effects, drift wave dynamics on closed field lines, and sheath dynamics on open field lines. Particles and energy are mainly transported by intermittent blobs. Therefore, blobs have a significant influence on the corresponding profiles. The formation of a ‘shoulder’ in the SOL density profile can be obtained by increasing the collisionality or connection length, thus decreasing the efficiency of the SOL’s ability to remove plasma. As the ion pressure has a larger perpendicular but smaller parallel dissipation rate compared to the electron pressure, ion energy is transported far into the SOL. This implies that the ion temperature in the SOL exceeds the electron temperature by a factor of 2-4 and significantly broadens the power deposition profile.

  14. Gas dynamic simulations of galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evrard, August E.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from a simulation modeling the formation of a group of galaxies in a 'standard' cold, dark matter universe with delta = 1, h sub 0 = 50 km/(s(Mpc)), baryon fraction omega sub b = 0.1 and spectrum normalization sigma sub 8 = 0.6 (bias parameter b = 1.7). Initial conditions are generated within a periodic box with comoving length 16 Mpc in a manner constrained to produce a small cluster of total mass approximately 10 exp 14 solar mass. Two sets of 643 particles are used to model the dark matter and baryon fluids. Each gas particle represents 1.08 x 10 exp -8 solar mass, implying an L* galaxy is resolved by approximately 1000 particles. The system is evolved self-consistently in three dimensions using the combined N-body/hydrodynamic scheme P3MSPH up to a final redshift z = 1. Evolving to the present is prohibited by the fact that the mean density in the simulated volume is above critical and the entire volume would be going nonlinear beyond this point, We are currently analyzing another run with somewhat poorer mass resolution which was evolved to the present.

  15. Distortion and flow of nematics simulated by dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tongyang; Wang, Xiaogong

    2014-05-14

    In this study, we simulated distortion and flow of nematics by dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The nematics were modeled by a binary mixture that contained rigid rods composed of DPD particles as mesogenic units and normal DPD particles as solvent. Elastic distortions were investigated by monitoring director orientation in space under influences of boundary anchoring and external fields. Static distortion demonstrated by the simulation is consistent with the prediction of Frank elastic theory. Spatial distortion profile of the director was examined to obtain static elastic constants. Rotational motions of the director under influence of the external field were simulated to understand the dynamic process. The rules revealed by the simulation are in a good agreement with those obtained from dynamical experiments and classical theories for nematics. Three Miesowicz viscosities were obtained by using external fields to hold the orientation of the rods in shear flows. The simulation showed that the Miesowicz viscosities have the order of ηc > ηa > ηb and the rotational viscosity γ1 is about two orders larger than the Miesowicz viscosity ηb. The DPD simulation correctly reproduced the non-monotonic concentration dependence of viscosity, which is a unique property of lyotropic nematic fluids. By comparing simulation results with classical theories for nematics and experiments, the DPD nematic fluids are proved to be a valid model to investigate the distortion and flow of lyotropic nematics.

  16. Simulation of ceramics fracture due to high rate dynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarinov, N. A.; Bratov, V. A.; Petrov, Y. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper dynamic fracture process due to high-speed impact of steel plunger into ceramic sample is simulated. The developed numerical model is based on finite element method and a concept of incubation time criterion, which is proven applicable in order to predict brittle fracture under high-rate deformation. Simulations were performed for ZrO2(Y2O3) ceramic plates. To characterize fracture process quantitatively fracture surface area parameter is introduced and controlled. This parameter gives the area of new surface created during dynamic fracture of a sample and is essentially connected to energetic peculiarities of fracture process. Multiple simulations with various parameters made it possible to explore dependencies of fracture area on plunger velocity and material properties. Energy required to create unit of fracture area at fracture initiation (dynamic analogue of Griffith surface energy) was evaluated and was found to be an order of magnitude higher as comparing to its static value.

  17. Simulation of nanofractal dynamics with MBN Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2013-06-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is the development of controlled, reproducible, and industrially transposable nanostructured materials. In this context, controlling of the final architecture of such materials by tuneable parameters is one of the fundamental problems. Post-growth processes occurring in patterns grown on a surface were studied using a multi-purpose computer code MBN EXPLORER introduced in the present paper. The package allows to model molecular systems of varied level of complexity, and in the present paper was used, in particular, to study dynamics of silver nanofractal formation and fragmentation on graphite surface. We demonstrate that the detachment of particles from the fractal and their diffusion within the fractal and over the surface determines the shape of the islands remaining on a surface after the fractal fragmentation.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  19. Analytical Dynamics and Nonrigid Spacecraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1974-01-01

    Application to the simulation of idealized spacecraft are considered both for multiple-rigid-body models and for models consisting of combination of rigid bodies and elastic bodies, with the elastic bodies being defined either as continua, as finite-element systems, or as a collection of given modal data. Several specific examples are developed in detail by alternative methods of analytical mechanics, and results are compared to a Newton-Euler formulation. The following methods are developed from d'Alembert's principle in vector form: (1) Lagrange's form of d'Alembert's principle for independent generalized coordinates; (2) Lagrange's form of d'Alembert's principle for simply constrained systems; (3) Kane's quasi-coordinate formulation of D'Alembert's principle; (4) Lagrange's equations for independent generalized coordinates; (5) Lagrange's equations for simply constrained systems; (6) Lagrangian quasi-coordinate equations (or the Boltzmann-Hamel equations); (7) Hamilton's equations for simply constrained systems; and (8) Hamilton's equations for independent generalized coordinates.

  20. Robotic Simulation of Flexible-Body Spacecraft Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brannan, Justin C.; Carignan, Craig R.

    2016-01-01

    A robotic testbed has been developed to conduct hardware-in-the-loop simulations of a robotic servicer interacting with a client satellite on-orbit. By creating an analytical model of a satellite with flexible appendages, it is possible to simulate the system response to external force and torque inputs and compare the predicted system motion to a robot mass simulator outfitted with physical appendages. This validation effort includes multiple test cases that encompass the types of interaction forces a satellite might experience during a nominal on-orbit servicing mission and aims to show the simulation's ability to capture the physical system response. After incorporating the flexible-body dynamics into the robotic mass simulator at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), a hardware-in-the-loop simulation can be used to characterize the potential impact of structural flexibility on an end-to-end satellite servicing mission.

  1. Hybrid simulations with dynamical quarks: Spectra, screening and thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, D.K.

    1987-11-18

    We summarize simulations made by the Argonne/University of Illinois group using the Hybrid algorithm to include dynamical staggered fermions. Recent work on the mass spectrum and screening effects due to the inclusion of four light flavors of dynamical quarks is presented. We also present a brief overview of what we have learned about the finite temperature chiral phase transition. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture and failure in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-05-01

    Numerical simulation of dynamic fracture and failure processes in solid continua using Lagrangian finite element techniques is the subject of discussion in this investigation. The specific configurations in this study include penetration of steel projectiles into aluminum blocks and concrete slabs. The failure mode in the aluminum block is excessive deformation while the concrete slab fails by hole growth, spallation, and scabbing. The transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA2D was used for the numerical analysis. The erosion capability in LS-DYNA2D was exercised to carry out the fracture and failure simulations. Calculated results were compared to the experimental data. Good correlations were obtained.

  3. Simulation of Naval Guns' Breechblock System Dynamics Based on ADAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Bo; Liu, Hui-Min; Liu, Kai

    In order to study the dynamical characteristics of the breechblock system during gun firing, a virtual prototype model was established based on ADAMS, in which motion and force transmission among mechanisms are realized by collision. By simulation, kinematics and dynamics properties of main components are obtained, and the relationships between the motion of breechblock and the position of breechblock opening plate are analyzed. According to the simulation results, the collision among the breechblock opening plate and the roller is discontinuous, which may make the breechblock system fail to hitch the breechblock reliably. And within allowable scope of the structure, the breechblock opening template should be installed near the upside as much as possible.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gas Transport in Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, David; Butler, Simon; Adolf, David

    2010-03-01

    Parallel molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to determine the permeability of O2 and N2 through polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene and cis(1-4) polybutadiene. The permeability of both mixed and unmixed gas penetrants is studied within films of these well known gas barrier polymers. Results are obtained either through the solubility and diffusion (i.e. P=D*S) or via the permeability directly. Encouraging results are obtained. Additional analysis focuses on ``unmixed/mixed gas'' intracomparisons of the simulated permeability data in addition to corresponding penetrant and host polymer local dynamics.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  6. Lessons Learned From Dynamic Simulations of Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Jacob J. Jacobson; Gretchen E. Matthern; David E. Shropshire

    2009-04-01

    Years of performing dynamic simulations of advanced nuclear fuel cycle options provide insights into how they could work and how one might transition from the current once-through fuel cycle. This paper summarizes those insights from the context of the 2005 objectives and goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Our intent is not to compare options, assess options versus those objectives and goals, nor recommend changes to those objectives and goals. Rather, we organize what we have learned from dynamic simulations in the context of the AFCI objectives for waste management, proliferation resistance, uranium utilization, and economics. Thus, we do not merely describe “lessons learned” from dynamic simulations but attempt to answer the “so what” question by using this context. The analyses have been performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics (VISION). We observe that the 2005 objectives and goals do not address many of the inherently dynamic discriminators among advanced fuel cycle options and transitions thereof.

  7. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  8. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Yin, Junqi; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  9. Dynamical QCD+QED simulation with staggered quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ran; Gottlieb, Steven

    2014-11-15

    Electromagnetic effects play an important role in many phenomena such as isospin-symmetry breaking in the hadron spectrum and the hadronic contributions to g-2. We have generalized the MILC QCD code to include the electromagnetic field. In this work, we focus on simulations including charged sea quarks using the RHMC algorithm. We show details of the dynamical QCD+QED simulation algorithm with compact QED. We analyze the code performance and results for hadron-spectrum observables.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of carbon disulphide with a Gaussian correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of liquid carbon disulphide (CS2) in the temperature range 164-318 K under normal pressure and at experimental density were performed using an expa-6 potential with a Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This correction allowed to modify the curvature of the potential. The results of the MD simulation are compared with available experimental data. The agreement is good.

  11. Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation of colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamali, Safa; Boromand, Arman; Maia, Joao

    2014-03-01

    DPD as a mesoscale method was firstly proposed to study dynamics of suspensions under flow condition. However the proposed method failed to capture shear properties of suspensions because it lacked: first a potential to reproduce lubrication forces and second a clear definition for the colloid surface. Recently we reported a modified DPD method which defines colloidal particles as particles with hard core and a dissipative coat. An additional lubrication force was introduced to include the short-range hydrodynamics that are not captured in original DPD. The model was found to be able to reproduce shear properties of suspensions for a wide range of different systems, from monodisperse to bimodal with different volume fractions, compositions and size ratios. In present work our modified DPD method is employed to study both equilibrium and flow properties of colloidal suspension. Zero shear viscosity of suspension is measured using Green-Kubo expressions and the results are compared to theoretical predictions. Furthermore, structure formation in suspensions is studied in respect to energy landscape of the fluid both at rest and under flow.

  12. Dynamic simulation of coronal mass ejections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.; Wu, S. T.

    1980-01-01

    A model is developed for the formation and propagation through the lower corona of the loop-like coronal transients in which mass is ejected from near the solar surface to the outer corona. It is assumed that the initial state for the transient is a coronal streamer. The initial state for the streamer is a polytropic, hydrodynamic solution to the steady-state radial equation of motion coupled with a force-free dipole magnetic field. The numerical solution of the complete time-dependent equations then gradually approaches a stationary coronal streamer configuration. The streamer configuration becomes the initial state for the coronal transient. The streamer and transient simulations are performed completely independent of each other. The transient is created by a sudden increase in the pressure at the base of the closed-field region in the streamer configuration. Both coronal streamers and coronal transients are calculated for values of the plasma beta (the ratio of thermal to magnetic pressure) varying from 0.1 to 100.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations: Parameter evaluation, application and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a theoretical technique for investigating the physical properties of a wide variety of molecules. This dissertation contains my studies on three important parts of the MD simulation: evaluation of parameters in empirical energy functions widely used in MD simulations, application of MD simulation on experimentally interested biological molecules and development of new methods for constraint dynamics simulations. All the work in this thesis made use of CHARMM as an MD simulation tool. The MD simulation uses empirical energy functions parameterized by a set of parameters. These parameters play an important role in the quality of the simulations. I evaluated nine parameter sets from Harvard University and Molecular Simulations, Inc. for protein simulations by the MD simulations of hydrated form of carboxy- myoglobin and interleukin-1/beta, which are rich in two typical protein structure motifs, helix and β sheet structures respectively. It is found that some sets are good at representing helical structure proteins while others are good at β sheet proteins. But all of them need improvement on representing motions at low temperature. Experimental evidence indicates that the 1A coiled-coil domains of the Intermediate Filament (IF) proteins consisting of coiled human keratins 1 and 10 (K1 and K10) are 'hot spots' for substitutional mutations. Some of these mutations are correlated to the human skin diseases-epidermolytic hyperkeratiosis (EH) and epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS). The MD simulation technique is used here for the first time to model and simulate these proteins to elucidate the molecular-level effects of these mutations. Lacking the experimental crystal structures, the initial structure of 1A domain of the wild type Intermediate Filament protein and its mutants were modeled from scratch to reproduce the well- known properties of the proteins of this kind followed by identical MD simulations. The important result is

  14. Flight Simulation of Taketombo Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Flight Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kohei; Ueno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In the present study we have developed a numerical method to simulate the flight dynamics of a small flying body with unsteady motion, where both aerodynamics and flight dynamics are fully considered. A key point of this numerical code is to use computational fluid dynamics and computational flight dynamics at the same time, which is referred to as CFD2, or double CFDs, where several new ideas are adopted in the governing equations, the method to make each quantity nondimensional, and the coupling method between aerodynamics and flight dynamics. This numerical code can be applied to simulate the unsteady motion of small vehicles such as micro air vehicles (MAV). As a sample calculation, we take up Taketombo, or a bamboo dragonfly, and its free flight in the air is demonstrated. The eventual aim of this research is to virtually fly an aircraft with arbitrary motion to obtain aerodynamic and flight dynamic data, which cannot be taken in the conventional wind tunnel.

  15. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  16. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    PubMed Central

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26075210

  17. Efficient dynamic simulation for multiple chain robotic mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilly, Kathryn W.; Orin, David E.

    1989-01-01

    An efficient O(mN) algorithm for dynamic simulation of simple closed-chain robotic mechanisms is presented, where m is the number of chains, and N is the number of degrees of freedom for each chain. It is based on computation of the operational space inertia matrix (6 x 6) for each chain as seen by the body, load, or object. Also, computation of the chain dynamics, when opened at one end, is required, and the most efficient algorithm is used for this purpose. Parallel implementation of the dynamics for each chain results in an O(N) + O(log sub 2 m+1) algorithm.

  18. Selection of Solar Simulator for Solar Dynamic Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolbert, Carol M.

    1994-01-01

    The 2 kWe Solar Dynamic (SD) Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) experiment will be conducted in 1995 at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). This solar dynamic power system test will be conducted in a simulated space environment and will require an artificial sun. To address the solar simulator requirements for the GTD, Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) was hired under contract to review and visit four existing solar simulator facilities. The four facilities included, AEDC's Mark 1 Chamber, NASA-JSC Chamber A, AEDC's 12V Chamber, and NASA-JPL Space Simulator Chamber. Two design concepts were considered following several months of evaluating existing solar simulator facilities throughout the United States. To satisfy system requirements for the SD GTD experiment the solar simulator needs to provide a uniform light flux to the SD concentrator, provide the light within a subtense angle of one degree, and provide an intensity of one solar constant (1.37 kW/sq m) at airmass zero. Most solar simulators are designed for supplying heat loads to spacecraft where a cone angle as large as 3 degrees is acceptable. It was also concluded that a solar simulator, such like these considered in the AEDC study, would require major facility modifications for NASA LeRC and result in significant impacts to the program. The advanced solar simulator concept developed by NASA LeRC will meet the system requirements for the SD GTD experiment Since SD GTD solar simulator requirements could not be addressed by existing simulator, an advanced concept was considered.

  19. Determining equilibrium constants for dimerization reactions from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Djurre H; Schäfer, Lars V; De Vries, Alex H; Marrink, Siewert J; Berendsen, Herman J C; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2011-07-15

    With today's available computer power, free energy calculations from equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations "via counting" become feasible for an increasing number of reactions. An example is the dimerization reaction of transmembrane alpha-helices. If an extended simulation of the two helices covers sufficiently many dimerization and dissociation events, their binding free energy is readily derived from the fraction of time during which the two helices are observed in dimeric form. Exactly how the correct value for the free energy is to be calculated, however, is unclear, and indeed several different and contradictory approaches have been used. In particular, results obtained via Boltzmann statistics differ from those determined via the law of mass action. Here, we develop a theory that resolves this discrepancy. We show that for simulation systems containing two molecules, the dimerization free energy is given by a formula of the form ΔG ∝ ln(P(1) /P(0) ). Our theory is also applicable to high concentrations that typically have to be used in molecular dynamics simulations to keep the simulation system small, where the textbook dilute approximations fail. It also covers simulations with an arbitrary number of monomers and dimers and provides rigorous error estimates. Comparison with test simulations of a simple Lennard Jones system with various particle numbers as well as with reference free energy values obtained from radial distribution functions show full agreement for both binding free energies and dimerization statistics.

  20. Dynamic simulation and validation of a satellite docking system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, Anthony B.; Tchoryk, Peter, Jr.; Pavlich, Jane C.; Wassick, Gregory

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, Michigan Aerospace has approached the problem of gentle autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking using a flexible soft-dock cable that is extended from the docking spacecraft to the target spacecraft. Because of the nature of a soft-dock cable, testing and validation of the technology is difficult in normal gravity. To properly emulate the behavior of this soft-dock cable, we have performed dynamic computer simulations so that the effects of micro-gravity could be simulated. The Autonomous Satellite Docking System (ASDS) was initially prototyped and tested at Marshall Space Flight Center"s air-bearing floor facility. The test data was compared to the simulations and used to validate the model. Once a good correlation between the simulation"s predicted results and the actual data was shown, the model was used to predict future performance of the ASDS mechanism on several potential spacecraft for the Orbital Express program. A new dynamic simulation model was created and compared to test data from a recent KC-135 flight test to further validate the modeling approach used. This paper will describe the methodology used in modeling and simulating the ASDS mechanism. Correlation between the models and the test data will be discussed.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of aqueous solutions of glycine betaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civera, Monica; Fornili, Arianna; Sironi, Maurizio; Fornili, Sandro L.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to investigate hydration properties of glycine betaine in a large range of solute concentrations. Statistical analyses of the system trajectories evidence microscopic details suggesting an interpretation of experimental results recently obtained for aqueous solutions of trimethylamine- N-oxide, a bioprotectant closely related to glycine betaine.

  2. The 3-axis Dynamic Motion Simulator (DMS) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A three-axis dynamic motion simulator (DMS) consisting of a test table with three degrees of freedom and an electronics control system was designed, constructed, delivered, and tested. Documentation, as required in the Data Requirements List (DRL), was also provided.

  3. Simulating Poverty and Inequality Dynamics in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansoms, An; Geenen, Sara

    2012-01-01

    This article considers how the simulation game of DEVELOPMENT MONOPOLY provides insight into poverty and inequality dynamics in a development context. It first discusses how the game is rooted in theoretical and conceptual frameworks on poverty and inequality. Subsequently, it reflects on selected playing experiences, with special focus on the…

  4. Evaluating the Accuracy of Hessian Approximations for Direct Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yu; Siebert, Matthew R; Hase, William L; Kay, Kenneth G; Ceotto, Michele

    2013-01-08

    Direct dynamics simulations are a very useful and general approach for studying the atomistic properties of complex chemical systems, since an electronic structure theory representation of a system's potential energy surface is possible without the need for fitting an analytic potential energy function. In this paper, recently introduced compact finite difference (CFD) schemes for approximating the Hessian [J. Chem. Phys.2010, 133, 074101] are tested by employing the monodromy matrix equations of motion. Several systems, including carbon dioxide and benzene, are simulated, using both analytic potential energy surfaces and on-the-fly direct dynamics. The results show, depending on the molecular system, that electronic structure theory Hessian direct dynamics can be accelerated up to 2 orders of magnitude. The CFD approximation is found to be robust enough to deal with chaotic motion, concomitant with floppy and stiff mode dynamics, Fermi resonances, and other kinds of molecular couplings. Finally, the CFD approximations allow parametrical tuning of different CFD parameters to attain the best possible accuracy for different molecular systems. Thus, a direct dynamics simulation requiring the Hessian at every integration step may be replaced with an approximate Hessian updating by tuning the appropriate accuracy.

  5. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green’s function reaction dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; Rein ten Wolde, Pieter

    2015-12-07

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green’s Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation: A tool for exploration and discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    The exploratory and didactic aspects of science both benefit from the ever-growing role played by computer simulation. One particularly important simulational approach is the molecular dynamics method, used for studying the nature of matter from the molecular to much larger scales. The effectiveness of molecular dynamics can be enhanced considerably by employing visualization and interactivity during the course of the computation and afterwards, allowing the modeler not only to observe the detailed behavior of the systems simulated in different ways, but also to steer the computations in alternative directions by manipulating parameters that govern the actual behavior. This facilitates the creation of potentially rich simulational environments for examining a multitude of complex phenomena, as well as offering an opportunity for enriching the learning process. A series of relatively advanced examples involving molecular dynamics will be used to demonstrate the value of this approach, in particular, atomistic simulations of spontaneously emergent structured fluid flows (the classic Rayleigh--B'enard and Taylor--Couette problems), supramolecular self-assembly of highly symmetric shell structures (involved in the formation of viral capsids), and that most counterintuitive of phenomena, granular segregation (e.g., axial and radial separation in a rotating cylinder).

  7. Acoustic properties in glycerol glass-former: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busselez, Remi; Pezeril, Thomas; Institut des Materiaux et Molecules du Mans Team

    2013-03-01

    Study of high-frequency collective dynamics around TeraHertz region in glass former has been a subject of intense investigations and debates over the past decade. In particular, the presence of the Boson peak characteristic of glassy material and its relation to other glass anomalies. Recently, experiments and simulations have underlined possible relation between Boson peak and transverse acoustic modes in glassy materials. In particular, simulations of simple Lennard Jones glass former have shown a relation between Ioffe-Regel criterion in transverse modes and Boson peak. We present here molecular dynamics simulation on high frequency dynamics of glycerol. In order to study mesoscopic order (0.5-5nm-1), we made use of large simulation box containing 80000 atoms. Analysis of collective longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes shows striking similarities in comparison with simulation of Lennard-Jones particles. In particular, it seems that a connection may exist between Ioffe-Regel criterion for transverse modes and Bose Peak frequency. However,in our case we show that this connection may be related with structural correlation arising from molecular clusters.

  8. 4D simulation of explosive eruption dynamics at Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, Augusto; Esposti Ongaro, Tomaso; Menconi, Gianluca; De'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Cavazzoni, Carlo; Erbacci, Giovanni; Baxter, Peter J.

    2007-02-01

    We applied a new simulation model, based on multiphase transport laws, to describe the 4D (3D spatial coordinates plus time) dynamics of explosive eruptions. Numerical experiments, carried out on a parallel supercomputer, describe the collapse of the volcanic eruption column and the propagation of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs), for selected medium scale (sub-Plinian) eruptive scenarios at Vesuvius, Italy. Simulations provide crucial insights into the effects of the generation mechanism of the flows - partial collapse vs boiling-over - on their evolution and hazard potential, the unstable dynamics of the fountain, and the influence of Mount Somma on the propagation of PDCs into the circum-Vesuvian area, one of the world's most hazardous volcanic settings. Results also show that it is possible to characterize the volcanic column behavior in terms of percentage of the mass of pyroclasts collapsed to the ground and how this parameter strongly influences the dynamics and hazard of the associated PDCs.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Perylenediimide DNA Base Surrogates.

    PubMed

    Markegard, Cade B; Mazaheripour, Amir; Jocson, Jonah-Micah; Burke, Anthony M; Dickson, Mary N; Gorodetsky, Alon A; Nguyen, Hung D

    2015-09-03

    Perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimides (PTCDIs) are a well-known class of organic materials. Recently, these molecules have been incorporated within DNA as base surrogates, finding ready applications as probes of DNA structure and function. However, the assembly dynamics and kinetics of PTCDI DNA base surrogates have received little attention to date. Herein, we employ constant temperature molecular dynamics simulations to gain an improved understanding of the assembly of PTCDI dimers and trimers. We also use replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the energetic landscape dictating the formation of stacked PTCDI structures. Our studies provide insight into the equilibrium configurations of multimeric PTCDIs and hold implications for the construction of DNA-inspired systems from perylene-derived organic semiconductor building blocks.

  10. Quantum Dynamics Simulations for Modeling Experimental Pump-Probe Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Brett; Nayyar, Sahil; Liss, Kyle; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved studies of quantum dynamics have benefited greatly from developments in ultrafast table-top and free electron lasers. Advances in computer software and hardware have lowered the barrier for performing calculations such that relatively simple simulations allow for direct comparison with experimental results. We describe here a set of quantum dynamics calculations in low-dimensional molecular systems. The calculations incorporate coupled electronic-nuclear dynamics, including two interactions with an applied field and nuclear wave packet propagation. The simulations were written and carried out by undergraduates as part of a senior research project, with the specific goal of allowing for detailed interpretation of experimental pump-probe data (in additional to the pedagogical value).

  11. Multiscale and multimodel simulation of Bloch-point dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Christian; Kákay, Attila; Hertel, Riccardo

    2014-04-01

    We present simulation results on the structure and dynamics of micromagnetic point singularities with atomistic resolution. This is achieved by embedding an atomistic computational region into a standard micromagnetic algorithm. Several length scales are bridged by means of an adaptive mesh refinement and a seamless coupling between the continuum theory and a Heisenberg formulation for the atomistic region. The code operates on graphical processing units and is able to detect and track the position of strongly inhomogeneous magnetic regions. This enables us to reliably simulate the dynamics of Bloch points, which means that a fundamental class of micromagnetic switching processes can be analyzed with unprecedented accuracy. We test the code by comparing it with established results and present its functionality with the example of a simulated field-driven Bloch-point motion in a soft-magnetic cylinder.

  12. Understanding water: Molecular dynamics simulations of solubilized and crystallized myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Gu; Garcia, A.E.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on CO myoglobin to evaluate the stability of the bound water molecules as determined in a neutron diffraction analysis. The myoglobin structure derived from the neutron analysis provided the starting coordinate set used in the simulations. The simulations show that only a few water molecules are tightly bound to protein atoms, while most solvent molecules are labile, breaking and reforming hydrogen bonds. Comparison between myoglobin in solution and in a single crystal highlighted some of the packing effects on the solvent structure and shows that water solvent plays an indispensable role in protein dynamics and structural stability. The described observations explain some of the differences in the experimental results of protein hydration as observed in NMR, neutron and X-ray diffraction studies.

  13. Linear Optics Simulation of Quantum Non-Markovian Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chiuri, Andrea; Greganti, Chiara; Mazzola, Laura; Paternostro, Mauro; Mataloni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The simulation of open quantum dynamics has recently allowed the direct investigation of the features of system-environment interaction and of their consequences on the evolution of a quantum system. Such interaction threatens the quantum properties of the system, spoiling them and causing the phenomenon of decoherence. Sometimes however a coherent exchange of information takes place between system and environment, memory effects arise and the dynamics of the system becomes non-Markovian. Here we report the experimental realisation of a non-Markovian process where system and environment are coupled through a simulated transverse Ising model. By engineering the evolution in a photonic quantum simulator, we demonstrate the role played by system-environment correlations in the emergence of memory effects. PMID:23236588

  14. Linear Optics Simulation of Quantum Non-Markovian Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiuri, Andrea; Greganti, Chiara; Mazzola, Laura; Paternostro, Mauro; Mataloni, Paolo

    2012-12-01

    The simulation of open quantum dynamics has recently allowed the direct investigation of the features of system-environment interaction and of their consequences on the evolution of a quantum system. Such interaction threatens the quantum properties of the system, spoiling them and causing the phenomenon of decoherence. Sometimes however a coherent exchange of information takes place between system and environment, memory effects arise and the dynamics of the system becomes non-Markovian. Here we report the experimental realisation of a non-Markovian process where system and environment are coupled through a simulated transverse Ising model. By engineering the evolution in a photonic quantum simulator, we demonstrate the role played by system-environment correlations in the emergence of memory effects.

  15. Ultrascale simulations of non-smooth granular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preclik, Tobias; Rüde, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    This article presents new algorithms for massively parallel granular dynamics simulations on distributed memory architectures using a domain partitioning approach. Collisions are modelled with hard contacts in order to hide their micro-dynamics and thus to extend the time and length scales that can be simulated. The global multi-contact problem is solved using a non-linear block Gauss-Seidel method that is conforming to the subdomain structure. The parallel algorithms employ a sophisticated protocol between processors that delegate algorithmic tasks such as contact treatment and position integration uniquely and robustly to the processors. Communication overhead is minimized through aggressive message aggregation, leading to excellent strong and weak scaling. The robustness and scalability is assessed on three clusters including two peta-scale supercomputers with up to 458,752 processor cores. The simulations can reach unprecedented resolution of up to ten billion () non-spherical particles and contacts.

  16. Software life cycle dynamic simulation model: The organizational performance submodel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, Robert C.

    1985-01-01

    The submodel structure of a software life cycle dynamic simulation model is described. The software process is divided into seven phases, each with product, staff, and funding flows. The model is subdivided into an organizational response submodel, a management submodel, a management influence interface, and a model analyst interface. The concentration here is on the organizational response model, which simulates the performance characteristics of a software development subject to external and internal influences. These influences emanate from two sources: the model analyst interface, which configures the model to simulate the response of an implementing organization subject to its own internal influences, and the management submodel that exerts external dynamic control over the production process. A complete characterization is given of the organizational response submodel in the form of parameterized differential equations governing product, staffing, and funding levels. The parameter values and functions are allocated to the two interfaces.

  17. ParaDiS-FEM dislocation dynamics simulation code primer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, M; Hommes, G; Aubry, S; Arsenlis, A

    2011-09-27

    The ParaDiS code is developed to study bulk systems with periodic boundary conditions. When we try to perform discrete dislocation dynamics simulations for finite systems such as thin films or cylinders, the ParaDiS code must be extended. First, dislocations need to be contained inside the finite simulation box; Second, dislocations inside the finite box experience image stresses due to the free surfaces. We have developed in-house FEM subroutines to couple with the ParaDiS code to deal with free surface related issues in the dislocation dynamics simulations. This primer explains how the coupled code was developed, the main changes from the ParaDiS code, and the functions of the new FEM subroutines.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of friction of hydrocarbon thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Muneo; Kusakabe, Kenichi

    1999-10-26

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate the dynamic behavior of hydrocarbon molecules under shear conditions. Frictional properties of cyclohexane, n-hexane, and iso-hexane thin films confirmed between two solid surfaces were calculated. Because the affinity of the solid surfaces in these simulations is strong, slippages occurred at inner parts of the confined films, whereas no slippages were observed at the solid boundaries. The hexagonal closest packing structure was observed for the adsorbed cyclohexane molecular layers. The branched methyl groups in the iso-hexane molecules increase the shear stress between the molecular layers. For the n-hexane monolayer, molecules were observed to roll during the sliding simulations. Rolling of the n-hexane molecules decreased the shear stress.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of triclinic lysozyme in a crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Liu, Chunmei; Deckman, Jason; Case, David A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals can enlighten interpretation of experimental X-ray crystallography data and elucidate structural dynamics and heterogeneity in biomolecular crystals. Furthermore, because of the direct comparison against experimental data, they can inform assessment of molecular dynamics methods and force fields. We present microsecond scale results for triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme in a supercell consisting of 12 independent unit cells using four contemporary force fields (Amber ff99SB, ff14ipq, ff14SB, and CHARMM 36) in crystalline and solvated states (for ff14SB only). We find the crystal simulations consistent across multiple runs of the same force field and robust to various solvent equilibration schemes. However, convergence is slow compared with solvent simulations. All the tested force fields reproduce experimental structural and dynamic properties well, but Amber ff14SB maintains structure and reproduces fluctuations closest to the experimental model: its average backbone structure differs from the deposited structure by 0.37Å; by contrast, the average backbone structure in solution differs from the deposited by 0.65Å. All the simulations are affected by a small progressive deterioration of the crystal lattice, presumably due to imperfect modeling of hydrogen bonding and other crystal contact interactions; this artifact is smallest in ff14SB, with average lattice positions deviating by 0.20Å from ideal. Side-chain disorder is surprisingly low with fewer than 30% of the nonglycine or alanine residues exhibiting significantly populated alternate rotamers. Our results provide helpful insight into the methodology of biomolecular crystal simulations and indicate directions for future work to obtain more accurate energy models for molecular dynamics.

  20. Information diversity in structure and dynamics of simulated neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Mäki-Marttunen, Tuomo; Aćimović, Jugoslava; Nykter, Matti; Kesseli, Juha; Ruohonen, Keijo; Yli-Harja, Olli; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal networks exhibit a wide diversity of structures, which contributes to the diversity of the dynamics therein. The presented work applies an information theoretic framework to simultaneously analyze structure and dynamics in neuronal networks. Information diversity within the structure and dynamics of a neuronal network is studied using the normalized compression distance. To describe the structure, a scheme for generating distance-dependent networks with identical in-degree distribution but variable strength of dependence on distance is presented. The resulting network structure classes possess differing path length and clustering coefficient distributions. In parallel, comparable realistic neuronal networks are generated with NETMORPH simulator and similar analysis is done on them. To describe the dynamics, network spike trains are simulated using different network structures and their bursting behaviors are analyzed. For the simulation of the network activity the Izhikevich model of spiking neurons is used together with the Tsodyks model of dynamical synapses. We show that the structure of the simulated neuronal networks affects the spontaneous bursting activity when measured with bursting frequency and a set of intraburst measures: the more locally connected networks produce more and longer bursts than the more random networks. The information diversity of the structure of a network is greatest in the most locally connected networks, smallest in random networks, and somewhere in between in the networks between order and disorder. As for the dynamics, the most locally connected networks and some of the in-between networks produce the most complex intraburst spike trains. The same result also holds for sparser of the two considered network densities in the case of full spike trains.

  1. Dynamic simulation for distortion image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Huijie; Fei, Jindong; Qing, Duzheng; Zhao, Hongming; Yu, Hong; Cheng, Chen

    2013-09-01

    The imaging through atmospheric turbulence is an inevitable problem encountered by infrared imaging sensors working in the turbulence atmospheric environment. Before light-rays enter the window of the imaging sensors, the atmospheric turbulence will randomly interfere with the transmission of the light waves came from the objects, causing the distribution of image intensity values on the focal plane to diffuse, the peak value to decrease, the image to get blurred, and the pixels to deviate, and making image identification very difficult. Owing to the fact of the long processing time and that the atmospheric turbulent flow field is unknown and hard to be described by mathematical models, dynamic simulation for distortion Image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects is much more difficult and challenging in the world. This paper discusses the dynamic simulation for distortion Image of turbulence atmospheric transmission effect. First of all, with the data and the optical transmission model of the turbulence atmospheric, the ray-tracing method is applied to obtain the propagation path of optical ray which propagates through the high-speed turbulent flow field, and then to calculate the OPD from the reference wave to the reconverted wave front and obtain the point spread function (PSF). Secondly, infrared characteristics models of typical scene were established according to the theory of infrared physics and heat conduction, and then the dynamic infrared image was generated by OpenGL. The last step is to obtain the distortion Image with turbulence atmospheric transmission effects .With the data of atmospheric transmission computation, infrared simulation image of every frame was processed according to the theory of image processing and the real-time image simulation, and then the dynamic distortion simulation images with effects of blurring, jitter and shifting were obtained. Above-mentioned simulation method can provide the theoretical bases for recovering

  2. Simulating Field-Scale Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics Using EPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Causarano, Hector J.; Shaw, Joey N.; Franzluebbers, A. J.; reeves, D. W.; Raper, Randy L.; Balkcom, Kipling S.; Norfleet, M. L.; Izaurralde, R Cesar

    2007-07-01

    Simulation models integrate our knowledge of soil organic C (SOC) dynamics and are useful tools for evaluating impacts of crop management on soil C sequestration; yet, they require local calibration. Our objectives were to calibrate the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model, and evaluate its performance for simulating SOC fractions as affected by soil landscape and management. An automated parameter optimization procedure was used to calibrate the model for a site-specific experiment in the Coastal Plain of central Alabama. The ability of EPIC to predict corn (Zea mays L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yields and SOC dynamics on different soil landscape positions (summit, sideslope and drainageway) during the initial period of conservation tillage adoption (5 years) was evaluated using regression and mean squared deviations. Simulated yield explained 88% of measured yield variation, with greatest disagreement on the sideslope position and highest agreement in the drainageway. Simulations explained approximately 1, 34 and 40% of the total variation in microbial biomass C (MBC), particulate organic C (POC) and total organic C (TOC), respectively. Lowest errors on TOC simulations (0-20 cm) were found on the sideslope and summit. We conclude that the automated parameterization was generally successful, although further work is needed to refine the MBC and POC fractions, and to improve EPIC predictions of SOC dynamics with depth. Overall, EPIC was sensitive to spatial differences in C fractions that resulted from differing soil landscape positions. The model needs additional refinement for accurate simulations of field-scale SOC dynamics affected by short-term management decisions.

  3. Human Sensibility Ergonomics Approach to Vehicle Simulator Based on Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwon; Choi, Kyung-Hyun; Yoon, Ji-Sup

    Simulators have been used to evaluate drivers' reactions to various transportation products. Most research, however, has concentrated on their technical performance. This paper considers driver's motion perception on a vehicle simulator through the analysis of human sensibility ergonomics. A sensibility ergonomic method is proposed in order to improve the reliability of vehicle simulators. A simulator in a passenger vehicle consists of three main modules such as vehicle dynamics, virtual environment, and motion representation modules. To evaluate drivers' feedback, human perceptions are categorized into a set verbal expressions collected and investigated to find the most appropriate ones for translation and angular accelerations of the simulator. The cut-off frequency of the washout filter in the representation module is selected as one sensibility factor. Sensibility experiments were carried out to find a correlation between the expressions and the cut-off frequency of the filter. This study suggests a methodology to obtain an ergonomic database that can be applied to the sensibility evaluation of dynamic simulators.

  4. Dynamic Simulation of a Wave Rotor Topped Turboshaft Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greendyke, R. B.; Paxson, D. E.; Schobeiri, M. T.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a wave rotor topped turboshaft engine is examined using a numerical simulation. The simulation utilizes an explicit, one-dimensional, multi-passage, CFD based wave rotor code in combination with an implicit, one-dimensional, component level dynamic engine simulation code. Transient responses to rapid fuel flow rate changes and compressor inlet pressure changes are simulated and compared with those of a similarly sized, untopped, turboshaft engine. Results indicate that the wave rotor topped engine responds in a stable, and rapid manner. Furthermore, during certain transient operations, the wave rotor actually tends to enhance engine stability. In particular, there is no tendency toward surge in the compressor of the wave rotor topped engine during rapid acceleration. In fact, the compressor actually moves slightly away from the surge line during this transient. This behavior is precisely the opposite to that of an untopped engine. The simulation is described. Issues associated with integrating CFD and component level codes are discussed. Results from several transient simulations are presented and discussed.

  5. Research on hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dandan; Gao, Jiaobo; Sun, Kefeng; Hu, Yu; Li, Yu; Xie, Junhu; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation method of hyper-spectral dynamic scene and image sequence for hyper-spectral equipment evaluation and target detection algorithm. Because of high spectral resolution, strong band continuity, anti-interference and other advantages, in recent years, hyper-spectral imaging technology has been rapidly developed and is widely used in many areas such as optoelectronic target detection, military defense and remote sensing systems. Digital imaging simulation, as a crucial part of hardware in loop simulation, can be applied to testing and evaluation hyper-spectral imaging equipment with lower development cost and shorter development period. Meanwhile, visual simulation can produce a lot of original image data under various conditions for hyper-spectral image feature extraction and classification algorithm. Based on radiation physic model and material characteristic parameters this paper proposes a generation method of digital scene. By building multiple sensor models under different bands and different bandwidths, hyper-spectral scenes in visible, MWIR, LWIR band, with spectral resolution 0.01μm, 0.05μm and 0.1μm have been simulated in this paper. The final dynamic scenes have high real-time and realistic, with frequency up to 100 HZ. By means of saving all the scene gray data in the same viewpoint image sequence is obtained. The analysis results show whether in the infrared band or the visible band, the grayscale variations of simulated hyper-spectral images are consistent with the theoretical analysis results.

  6. Research on hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dandan; Liu, Fang; Gao, Jiaobo; Sun, Kefeng; Hu, Yu; Li, Yu; Xie, Junhu; Zhang, Lei

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a simulation method of hyperspectral dynamic scene and image sequence for hyperspectral equipment evaluation and target detection algorithm. Because of high spectral resolution, strong band continuity, anti-interference and other advantages, in recent years, hyperspectral imaging technology has been rapidly developed and is widely used in many areas such as optoelectronic target detection, military defense and remote sensing systems. Digital imaging simulation, as a crucial part of hardware in loop simulation, can be applied to testing and evaluation hyperspectral imaging equipment with lower development cost and shorter development period. Meanwhile, visual simulation can produce a lot of original image data under various conditions for hyperspectral image feature extraction and classification algorithm. Based on radiation physic model and material characteristic parameters this paper proposes a generation method of digital scene. By building multiple sensor models under different bands and different bandwidths, hyperspectral scenes in visible, MWIR, LWIR band, with spectral resolution 0.01μm, 0.05μm and 0.1μm have been simulated in this paper. The final dynamic scenes have high real-time and realistic, with frequency up to 100 HZ. By means of saving all the scene gray data in the same viewpoint image sequence is obtained. The analysis results show whether in the infrared band or the visible band, the grayscale variations of simulated hyperspectral images are consistent with the theoretical analysis results.

  7. The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem: Simulation and modern dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weissert, T.P.

    1992-01-01

    In 1952, Enrico Fermi, John Pasta and Stanislaw Ulam (FPU) simulated the loaded string model, perturbed with small, nonlinear interaction terms. Because Poincare's theorem guarantees the non-existence of a complete set of integrals for three-body problem, they expected to see the diffusion of energy from its single-mode initial condition to all other modes of the string. But for every combination of initial conditions, the energy remained bounded within the lowest few modes. No theoretical explanation existed for this failure of the underlying hypothesis that erogidicity follows from the lack of a complete set of integrals of the motion in a Hamiltonian model. The author traces the history of this problem from the FPU simulation to the point that a consensus was reached concerning its solution twenty years later. During this period, the simulation of nonlinearly-perturbed integral models became the methodology for a new era in dynamics. Through the use of simulation, dynamicists discovered deterministic chaos, in which the exponential separation of pair orbits generate randomness in deterministic macroscopic systems, and a new kind of structure-related to the KAM theorem-that provides limited order in the absence of analytic integrals of the motions. The author maps the set of conceptually-related journal articles into a chronological inference topology that tracks the understanding of this problem of dynamics. Simulating non-integrable models on a digital computer requires the discretization of time and space. These approximations affect what the simulation can reveal about the model, and the model about reality. Simulations play the role of experiments on mathematical models. A discussion is presented of the issues that emerge with the use of simulation as a heuristic device and the groundwork is laid for an epistemology of simulation.

  8. The fractional-nonlinear robotic manipulator: Modeling and dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, S. A.; Balthazar, J. M.; Julio, B. H. S.; Oliveira, C.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we applied the Riemann-Liouville approach and the fractional Euler-Lagrange equations in order to obtain the fractional-order nonlinear dynamics equations of a two link robotic manipulator. The aformentioned equations have been simulated for several cases involving: integer and non-integer order analysis, with and without external forcing acting and some different initial conditions. The fractional nonlinear governing equations of motion are coupled and the time evolution of the angular positions and the phase diagrams have been plotted to visualize the effect of fractional order approach. The new contribution of this work arises from the fact that the dynamics equations of a two link robotic manipulator have been modeled with the fractional Euler-Lagrange dynamics approach. The results reveal that the fractional-nonlinear robotic manipulator can exhibit different and curious behavior from those obtained with the standard dynamical system and can be useful for a better understanding and control of such nonlinear systems.

  9. Generic solar photovoltaic system dynamic simulation model specification

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Abraham; Behnke, Michael Robert; Elliott, Ryan Thomas

    2013-10-01

    This document is intended to serve as a specification for generic solar photovoltaic (PV) system positive-sequence dynamic models to be implemented by software developers and approved by the WECC MVWG for use in bulk system dynamic simulations in accordance with NERC MOD standards. Two specific dynamic models are included in the scope of this document. The first, a Central Station PV System model, is intended to capture the most important dynamic characteristics of large scale (> 10 MW) PV systems with a central Point of Interconnection (POI) at the transmission level. The second, a Distributed PV System model, is intended to represent an aggregation of smaller, distribution-connected systems that comprise a portion of a composite load that might be modeled at a transmission load bus.

  10. Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Structural Dynamic Frequency Characteristics Control

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingwu; Chen, Xuefeng; You, Shangqin; He, Zhengjia; Li, Bing

    2012-01-01

    In general, mechanical equipment such as cars, airplanes, and machine tools all operate with constant frequency characteristics. These constant working characteristics should be controlled if the dynamic performance of the equipment demands improvement or the dynamic characteristics is intended to change with different working conditions. Active control is a stable and beneficial method for this, but current active control methods mainly focus on vibration control for reducing the vibration amplitudes in the time domain or frequency domain. In this paper, a new method of dynamic frequency characteristics active control (DFCAC) is presented for a flat plate, which can not only accomplish vibration control but also arbitrarily change the dynamic characteristics of the equipment. The proposed DFCAC algorithm is based on a neural network including two parts of the identification implement and the controller. The effectiveness of the DFCAC method is verified by several simulation and experiments, which provide desirable results. PMID:22666072

  11. Dynamical fingerprints for probing individual relaxation processes in biomolecular dynamics with simulations and kinetic experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Noe, F; Diadone, Isabella; Lollmann, Marc; Sauer, Marcus; Chondera, John D; Smith, Jeremy C

    2011-01-01

    There is a gap between kinetic experiment and simulation in their views of the dynamics of complex biomolecular systems. Whereas experiments typically reveal only a few readily discernible exponential relaxations, simulations often indicate complex multistate behavior. Here, a theoretical framework is presented that reconciles these two approaches. The central concept is dynamical fingerprints which contain peaks at the time scales of the dynamical processes involved with amplitudes determined by the experimental observable. Fingerprints can be generated from both experimental and simulation data, and their comparison by matching peaks permits assignment of structural changes present in the simulation to experimentally observed relaxation processes. The approach is applied here to a test case interpreting single molecule fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments on a set of fluorescent peptides with molecular dynamics simulations. The peptides exhibit complex kinetics shown to be consistent with the apparent simplicity of the experimental data. Moreover, the fingerprint approach can be used to design new experiments with site-specific labels that optimally probe specific dynamical processes in the molecule under investigation.

  12. NETIMIS: Dynamic Simulation of Health Economics Outcomes Using Big Data.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Owen A; Hall, Peter S; Hulme, Claire

    2016-02-01

    Many healthcare organizations are now making good use of electronic health record (EHR) systems to record clinical information about their patients and the details of their healthcare. Electronic data in EHRs is generated by people engaged in complex processes within complex environments, and their human input, albeit shaped by computer systems, is compromised by many human factors. These data are potentially valuable to health economists and outcomes researchers but are sufficiently large and complex enough to be considered part of the new frontier of 'big data'. This paper describes emerging methods that draw together data mining, process modelling, activity-based costing and dynamic simulation models. Our research infrastructure includes safe links to Leeds hospital's EHRs with 3 million secondary and tertiary care patients. We created a multidisciplinary team of health economists, clinical specialists, and data and computer scientists, and developed a dynamic simulation tool called NETIMIS (Network Tools for Intervention Modelling with Intelligent Simulation; http://www.netimis.com ) suitable for visualization of both human-designed and data-mined processes which can then be used for 'what-if' analysis by stakeholders interested in costing, designing and evaluating healthcare interventions. We present two examples of model development to illustrate how dynamic simulation can be informed by big data from an EHR. We found the tool provided a focal point for multidisciplinary team work to help them iteratively and collaboratively 'deep dive' into big data.

  13. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Graphene Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolev, S.; Balchev, I.; Cvetkov, K.; Tinchev, S.; Milenov, T.

    2017-01-01

    The study of graphene is important because it is a promising material for a variety of applications in the electronic industry. In the present work, the properties of а 2D periodic graphene sheet are studied with the use of ab initio molecular dynamics. DFT in the generalized gradient approximation is used in order to carry out the dynamical simulations. The PBE functional and DZVP-MOLOPT basis set are implemented in the CP2K/Quickstep package. A periodic box, consisting of 288 carbon atoms is chosen for the simulations. After geometry optimization it has dimensions 2964 x 2964 x 1500 pm and form angles of 90, 90, 60 degrees. The dynamical simulation is run for 1 ps in the NPT ensemble, at temperature T = 298.15 K. The radial distribution function shows a first peak at 142 pm, marking the bond length between carbon atoms. The density of states for the periodic systems is simulated as occupied orbitals represent the valence band and unoccupied ones the conduction band. The calculated bandgap, as expected is close to 0 eV.

  14. Climate Simulations with an Isentropic Finite Volume Dynamical Core

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chih-Chieh; Rasch, Philip J.

    2012-04-15

    This paper discusses the impact of changing the vertical coordinate from a hybrid pressure to a hybrid-isentropic coordinate within the finite volume dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). Results from a 20-year climate simulation using the new model coordinate configuration are compared to control simulations produced by the Eulerian spectral and FV dynamical cores of CAM which both use a pressure-based ({sigma}-p) coordinate. The same physical parameterization package is employed in all three dynamical cores. The isentropic modeling framework significantly alters the simulated climatology and has several desirable features. The revised model produces a better representation of heat transport processes in the atmosphere leading to much improved atmospheric temperatures. We show that the isentropic model is very effective in reducing the long standing cold temperature bias in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, a deficiency shared among most climate models. The warmer upper troposphere and stratosphere seen in the isentropic model reduces the global coverage of high clouds which is in better agreement with observations. The isentropic model also shows improvements in the simulated wintertime mean sea-level pressure field in the northern hemisphere.

  15. Analysis of utilization of desert habitats with dynamic simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of climate and herbivores on cool desert shrubs in north-western Utah were investigated with a dynamic simulation model. Cool desert shrublands are extensively managed as grazing lands, and are defoliated annually by domestic livestock. A primary production model was used to simulate harvest yields and shrub responses under a variety of climatic regimes and defoliation patterns. The model consists of six plant components, and it is based on equations of growth analysis. Plant responses were simulated under various combinations of 20 annual weather patterns and 14 defoliation strategies. Results of the simulations exhibit some unexpected linearities in model behavior, and emphasize the importance of both the pattern of climate and the level of plant vigor in determining optimal harvest strategies. Model behaviors are interpreted in terms of shrub morphology, physiology and ecology.

  16. Survey of Dynamic Simulation Programs for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Troy J. Tranter; Daryl R. Haefner

    2008-06-01

    The absence of any industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other industries. Modeling programs to simulate the dynamic behavior of nuclear fuel separations and processing were originally developed to support the US government’s mission of weapons production and defense fuel recovery. Consequently there has been little effort is the US devoted towards improving this specific process simulation capability during the last two or three decades. More recent work has been focused on elucidating chemical thermodynamics and developing better models of predicting equilibrium in actinide solvent extraction systems. These equilibrium models have been used to augment flowsheet development and testing primarily at laboratory scales. The development of more robust and complete process models has not kept pace with the vast improvements in computational power and user interface and is significantly behind simulation capability in other chemical processing and separation fields.

  17. Molecular-dynamics simulation of a ceramide bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Sagar A.; Scott, H. Larry

    2006-01-01

    Ceramide is the simplest lipid in the biologically important class of glycosphingolipids. Ceramide is an important signaling molecule and a major component of the strateum corneum layer in the skin. In order to begin to understand the biophysical properties of ceramide, we have carried out a molecular-dynamics simulation of a hydrated 16:0 ceramide lipid bilayer at 368K (5° above the main phase transition). In this paper we describe the simulation and present the resulting properties of the bilayer. We compare the properties of the simulated ceramide bilayer to an earlier simulation of 18:0 sphingomyelin, and we discuss the results as they relate to experimental data for ceramide and other sphingolipids. The most significant differences arise at the lipid/water interface, where the lack of a large ceramide polar group leads to a different electron density and a different electrostatic potential but, surprisingly, not a different overall "dipole potential," when ceramide is compared to sphingomyelin.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walther, J. H.; Jaffe, R.; Halicioglu, T.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2000-01-01

    We study the hydrophobic/hydrophilic behavior of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The energetics of the carbon-water interface are mainly dispersive but in the present study augmented with a carbon quadrupole term acting on the charge sites of the water. The simulations indicate that this contribution is negligible in terms of modifying the structural properties of water at the interface. Simulations of two carbon nanotubes in water display a wetting and drying of the interface between the nanotubes depending on their initial spacing. Thus, initial tube spacings of 7 and 8 A resulted in a drying of the interface whereas spacing of > 9 A remain wet during the course of the simulation. Finally, we present a novel particle-particle-particle-mesh algorithm for long range potentials which allows for general (curvilinear) meshes and "black-box" fast solvers by adopting an influence matrix technique.

  19. Advanced beam-dynamics simulation tools for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, R. W.; Wangler, T. P.; Billen, J. H.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Crandall, K. R.; Ostroumov, P.; York, R.; Zhao, Q.; Physics; LANL; LBNL; Tech Source; Michigan State Univ.

    2005-01-01

    We are developing multi-particle beam-dynamics simulation codes for RIA driver-linac simulations extending from the low-energy beam transport (LEBT) line to the end of the linac. These codes run on the NERSC parallel supercomputing platforms at LBNL, which allow us to run simulations with large numbers of macroparticles. The codes have the physics capabilities needed for RIA, including transport and acceleration of multiple-charge-state beams, beam-line elements such as high-voltage platforms within the linac, interdigital accelerating structures, charge-stripper foils, and capabilities for handling the effects of machine errors and other off-normal conditions. This year will mark the end of our project. In this paper we present the status of the work, describe some recent additions to the codes, and show some preliminary simulation results.

  20. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of multiple-droplet interaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenchao; Loney, Drew; Fedorov, Andrei G.; Degertekin, F. Levent; Rosen, David W.

    2014-03-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) formulation, which is consistent with the phase-field model for two-phase incompressible fluid, is proposed to model the interface dynamics of droplet impingement. The interparticle force is derived by comparing the macroscopic transport equations recovered from LB equations with the governing equations of the continuous phase-field model. The inconsistency between the existing LB implementations and the phase-field model in calculating the relaxation time at the phase interface is identified and an approximation is proposed to ensure the consistency with the phase-field model. It is also shown that the commonly used equilibrium velocity boundary for the binary fluid LB scheme does not conserve momentum at the wall boundary and a modified scheme is developed to ensure the momentum conservation at the boundary. In addition, a geometric formulation of the wetting boundary condition is proposed to replace the popular surface energy formulation and results show that the geometric approach enforces the prescribed contact angle better than the surface energy formulation in both static and dynamic wetting. The proposed LB formulation is applied to simulating droplet impingement dynamics in three dimensions and results are compared to those obtained with the continuous phase-field model, the LB simulations reported in the literature, and experimental data from the literature. The results show that the proposed LB simulation approach yields not only a significant speed improvement over the phase-field model in simulating droplet impingement dynamics on a submillimeter length scale, but also better accuracy than both the phase-field model and the previously reported LB techniques when compared to experimental data. Upon validation, the proposed LB modeling methodology is applied to the study of multiple-droplet impingement and interactions in three dimensions, which demonstrates its powerful capability of simulating extremely complex interface

  1. A reliable simulator for dynamic flux balance analysis.

    PubMed

    Höffner, K; Harwood, S M; Barton, P I

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA) provides a platform for detailed design, control and optimization of biochemical process technologies. It is a promising modeling framework that combines genome-scale metabolic network analysis with dynamic simulation of the extracellular environment. Dynamic flux balance analysis assumes that the intracellular species concentrations are in equilibrium with the extracellular environment. The resulting underdetermined stoichiometric model is solved under the assumption of a biochemical objective such as growth rate maximization. The model of the metabolism is coupled with the dynamic mass balance equations of the extracellular environment via expressions for the rates of substrate uptake and product excretion, which imposes additional constraints on the linear program (LP) defined by growth rate maximization of the metabolism. The linear program is embedded into the dynamic model of the bioreactor, and together with the additional constraints this provides an accurate model of the substrate consumption, product secretion, and biomass production during operation. A DFBA model consists of a system of ordinary differential equations for which the evaluation of the right-hand side requires not only function evaluations, but also the solution of one or more linear programs. The numerical tool presented here accurately and efficiently simulates large-scale dynamic flux balance models. The main advantages that this approach has over existing implementation are that the integration scheme has a variable step size, that the linear program only has to be solved when qualitative changes in the optimal flux distribution of the metabolic network occur, and that it can reliably simulate behavior near the boundary of the domain where the model is defined. This is illustrated through large-scale examples taken from the literature.

  2. Autoinhibitory mechanisms of ERG studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yan; Salsbury, Freddie R.

    2015-01-01

    ERG, an ETS-family transcription factor, acts as a regulator of differentiation of early hematopoietic cells. It contains an autoinhibitory domain, which negatively regulates DNA-binding. The mechanism of autoinhibitory is still illusive. To understand the mechanism, we study the dynamical properties of ERG protein by molecular dynamics simulations. These simulations suggest that DNA binding autoinhibition associates with the internal dynamics of ERG. Specifically, we find that (1), The N-C terminal correlation in the inhibited ERG is larger than that in uninhibited ERG that contributes to the autoinhibition of DNA-binding. (2), DNA-binding changes the property of the N-C terminal correlation from being anti-correlated to correlated, that is, changing the relative direction of the correlated motions and (3), For the Ets-domain specifically, the inhibited and uninhibited forms exhibit essentially the same dynamics, but the binding of the DNA decreases the fluctuation of the Ets-domain. We also find from PCA analysis that the three systems, even with quite different dynamics, do have highly similar free energy surfaces, indicating that they share similar conformations.

  3. Trotter-based simulation of quantum-classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Dónal Mac; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond

    2008-01-17

    Quantum rate processes in condensed phase systems are often computed by combining quantum and classical descriptions of the dynamics. An algorithm for simulating the quantum-classical Liouville equation, which describes the dynamics of a quantum subsystem coupled to a classical bath, is presented in this paper. The algorithm is based on a Trotter decomposition of the quantum-classical propagator, in conjunction with Monte Carlo sampling of quantum transitions, to yield a surface-hopping representation of the dynamics. An expression for the nonadiabatic propagator that is responsible for quantum transitions and associated bath momentum changes is derived in a form that is convenient for Monte Carlo sampling and exactly conserves the total energy of the system in individual trajectories. The expectation values of operators or quantum correlation functions can be evaluated by initial sampling of quantum states and use of quantum-classical Liouville dynamics for the time evolution. The algorithm is tested by calculations on the spin-boson model, for which exact quantum results are available, and is shown to reproduce the exact results for stronger nonadiabatic coupling and much longer times using fewer trajectories than other schemes for simulating quantum-classical Liouville dynamics.

  4. Spectral Element Simulations of Rupture Dynamics along kinked faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilotte, J.; Festa, G.; Madariaga, R.

    2005-12-01

    Numerical simulation of earthquake source dynamics provides key elements for ground-motion prediction and insights into the physics of dynamic rupture propagation. Faulting is controlled by non-linear frictional interactions and damage within the fault zone. Important features of the earthquakes dynamics, such as rupture velocity, arrest phase and high-frequency radiation are believed to be strongly influenced by the geometry of the faults (kinks, jogs and forks). Data analysis as well as kinematic inversions have pointed out potential links between super-shear and geometry, as in the case of the Denali and Izmit earthquakes. Finally, recent laboratory experiments of sub- and super-shear rupture propagation along kink interfaces have shed new lights on these phenomena. We present here spectral element simulations of the dynamic rupture propagation along kinked and curved fault interfaces, a problem that has been experimentally investigated by Rousseau and Rosakis (2003). Depending on the state of the initial stress, we numerically analyze the mechanics of the dynamical fault branching for sub- and super-shear rupture propagation. Special interest is devoted to source directivity effects and high frequency generation related to the branching process. Implications for strong motion analysis will be discussed. This work was supported by the SPICE - Research and Training project

  5. Nonholonomic Hamiltonian method for molecular dynamics simulations of reacting shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, Joseph; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional molecular dynamics simulations of reacting shocks employ a holonomic Hamiltonian formulation: the breaking and forming of covalent bonds is described by potential functions. In general the potential functions: (a) are algebraically complex, (b) must satisfy strict smoothness requirements, and (c) contain many fitted parameters. In recent research the authors have developed a new nonholonomic formulation of reacting molecular dynamics. In this formulation bond orders are determined by rate equations, and the bonding-debonding process need not be described by differentiable functions. This simplifies the representation of complex chemistry and reduces the number of fitted parameters.

  6. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ilyar; Fang, Meng; Duan, Haiming

    2015-04-15

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures.

  7. Beam Dynamics Design and Simulation in Ion Linear Accelerators (

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, Peter N.; Asseev, Vladislav N.; Mustapha, and Brahim

    2006-08-01

    Orginally, the ray tracing code TRACK has been developed to fulfill the many special requirements for the Rare Isotope Accelerator Facility known as RIA. Since no available beam-dynamics code met all the necessary requirements, modifications to the code TRACK were introduced to allow end-to-end (from the ion souce to the production target) simulations of the RIA machine, TRACK is a general beam-dynamics code and can be applied for the design, commissioning and operation of modern ion linear accelerators and beam transport systems.

  8. Investigation of Ribosomes Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation Methods.

    PubMed

    Makarov, G I; Makarova, T M; Sumbatyan, N V; Bogdanov, A A

    2016-12-01

    The ribosome as a complex molecular machine undergoes significant conformational changes while synthesizing a protein molecule. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used as complementary approaches to X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy, as well as biochemical methods, to answer many questions that modern structural methods leave unsolved. In this review, we demonstrate that all-atom modeling of ribosome molecular dynamics is particularly useful in describing the process of tRNA translocation, atomic details of behavior of nascent peptides, antibiotics, and other small molecules in the ribosomal tunnel, and the putative mechanism of allosteric signal transmission to functional sites of the ribosome.

  9. Multi-Scale Dynamics, Control, and Simulation of Granular Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quadrelli, Marco B.; Basinger, Scott; Swartzlander, Grover

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present some ideas regarding the modeling, dynamics and control aspects of granular spacecraft. Granular spacecraft are complex multibody systems composed of a spatially disordered distribution of a large number of elements, for instance a cloud of grains in orbit. An example of application is a spaceborne observatory for exoplanet imaging, where the primary aperture is a cloud instead of a monolithic aperture. A model is proposed of a multi-scale dynamics of the grains and cloud in orbit, as well as a control approach for cloud shape maintenance and alignment, and preliminary simulation studies are carried out for the representative imaging system.

  10. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Petsev, Nikolai D; Leal, L Gary; Shell, M Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  11. Hybrid molecular-continuum simulations using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2015-01-28

    We present a new multiscale simulation methodology for coupling a region with atomistic detail simulated via molecular dynamics (MD) to a numerical solution of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations obtained from smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD). In this approach, chemical potential gradients emerge due to differences in resolution within the total system and are reduced by introducing a pairwise thermodynamic force inside the buffer region between the two domains where particles change from MD to SDPD types. When combined with a multi-resolution SDPD approach, such as the one proposed by Kulkarni et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 234105 (2013)], this method makes it possible to systematically couple atomistic models to arbitrarily coarse continuum domains modeled as SDPD fluids with varying resolution. We test this technique by showing that it correctly reproduces thermodynamic properties across the entire simulation domain for a simple Lennard-Jones fluid. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach is also suitable for non-equilibrium problems by applying it to simulations of the start up of shear flow. The robustness of the method is illustrated with two different flow scenarios in which shear forces act in directions parallel and perpendicular to the interface separating the continuum and atomistic domains. In both cases, we obtain the correct transient velocity profile. We also perform a triple-scale shear flow simulation where we include two SDPD regions with different resolutions in addition to a MD domain, illustrating the feasibility of a three-scale coupling.

  12. Process Modeling and Dynamic Simulation for EAST Helium Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaofei; Fu, Peng; Zhuang, Ming; Qiu, Lilong; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the process modeling and dynamic simulation for the EAST helium refrigerator has been completed. The cryogenic process model is described and the main components are customized in detail. The process model is controlled by the PLC simulator, and the realtime communication between the process model and the controllers is achieved by a customized interface. Validation of the process model has been confirmed based on EAST experimental data during the cool down process of 300-80 K. Simulation results indicate that this process simulator is able to reproduce dynamic behaviors of the EAST helium refrigerator very well for the operation of long pulsed plasma discharge. The cryogenic process simulator based on control architecture is available for operation optimization and control design of EAST cryogenic systems to cope with the long pulsed heat loads in the future. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51306195) and Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, CAS (No. CRYO201408)

  13. Methods for simulating the dynamics of complex biological processes.

    PubMed

    Schilstra, Maria J; Martin, Stephen R; Keating, Sarah M

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we provide the basic information required to understand the central concepts in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical processes. We underline the fact that most biochemical processes involve sequences of interactions between distinct entities (molecules, molecular assemblies), and also stress that models must adhere to the laws of thermodynamics. Therefore, we discuss the principles of mass-action reaction kinetics, the dynamics of equilibrium and steady state, and enzyme kinetics, and explain how to assess transition probabilities and reactant lifetime distributions for first-order reactions. Stochastic simulation of reaction systems in well-stirred containers is introduced using a relatively simple, phenomenological model of microtubule dynamic instability in vitro. We demonstrate that deterministic simulation [by numerical integration of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODE)] produces trajectories that would be observed if the results of many rounds of stochastic simulation of the same system were averaged. In Section V, we highlight several practical issues with regard to the assessment of parameter values. We draw some attention to the development of a standard format for model storage and exchange, and provide a list of selected software tools that may facilitate the model building process, and can be used to simulate the modeled systems.

  14. Petascale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polymers and Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Trung Dac; Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W. Michael

    2014-03-01

    The availability of faster and larger supercomputers and more efficient parallel algorithms now enable us to perform unprecedented simulations approaching experimental scales. Here we present two examples of our latest large-scale molecular dynamics simulations using the Titan supercomputer in the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). In the first study, we address the rupture origin of liquid crystal thin films wetting a solid substrate. Our simulations show the key signatures of spinodal instability in isotropic and nematic films on top of thermal nucleation. Importantly, we found evidence of a common rupture mechanism independent of initial thickness and LC orientational ordering. In the second study, we used coarse-grained molecular dynamics to simulate the thermal annealing of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blends in the presence of a silicon substrate found in organic solar cells. Our simulations show different phase segregated morphologies dependent on the P3HT chain length and PCBM volume fraction in the blend. Furthermore, the ternary blend of short and long P3HT chains with PCBM affects the vertical phase segregation of PCBM decreasing its concentration in the vicinity of the substrate. U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  15. Quantum dynamical simulations of local field enhancement in metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Negre, Christian F A; Perassi, Eduardo M; Coronado, Eduardo A; Sánchez, Cristián G

    2013-03-27

    Field enhancements (Γ) around small Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are calculated using a quantum dynamical simulation formalism and the results are compared with electrodynamic simulations using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) in order to address the important issue of the intrinsic atomistic structure of NPs. Quite remarkably, in both quantum and classical approaches the highest values of Γ are located in the same regions around single NPs. However, by introducing a complete atomistic description of the metallic NPs in optical simulations, a different pattern of the Γ distribution is obtained. Knowing the correct pattern of the Γ distribution around NPs is crucial for understanding the spectroscopic features of molecules inside hot spots. The enhancement produced by surface plasmon coupling is studied by using both approaches in NP dimers for different inter-particle distances. The results show that the trend of the variation of Γ versus inter-particle distance is different for classical and quantum simulations. This difference is explained in terms of a charge transfer mechanism that cannot be obtained with classical electrodynamics. Finally, time dependent distribution of the enhancement factor is simulated by introducing a time dependent field perturbation into the Hamiltonian, allowing an assessment of the localized surface plasmon resonance quantum dynamics.

  16. Conformational analysis of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates usually have a large number of rotatable bonds and consequently a large number of theoretically possible conformations can be generated (combinatorial explosion). The application of systematic search methods for conformational analysis of carbohydrates is therefore limited to disaccharides and trisaccharides in a routine analysis. An alternative approach is to use Monte-Carlo methods or (high-temperature) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the conformational space of complex carbohydrates. This chapter describes how to use MD simulation data to perform a conformational analysis (conformational maps, hydrogen bonds) of oligosaccharides and how to build realistic 3D structures of large polysaccharides using Conformational Analysis Tools (CAT).

  17. The architecture of Newton, a general-purpose dynamics simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremer, James F.; Stewart, A. James

    1989-01-01

    The architecture for Newton, a general-purpose system for simulating the dynamics of complex physical objects, is described. The system automatically formulates and analyzes equations of motion, and performs automatic modification of this system equations when necessitated by changes in kinematic relationships between objects. Impact and temporary contact are handled, although only using simple models. User-directed influence of simulations is achieved using Newton's module, which can be used to experiment with the control of many-degree-of-freedom articulated objects.

  18. Research of TREETOPS Structural Dynamics Controls Simulation Upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Rose M.

    1996-01-01

    Under the provisions of contract number NAS8-40194, which was entitled 'TREETOPS Structural Dynamics and Controls Simulation System Upgrade', Oakwood College contracted to produce an upgrade to the existing TREETOPS suite of analysis tools. This suite includes the main simulation program, TREETOPS, two interactive preprocessors, TREESET and TREEFLX, an interactive post processor, TREEPLOT, and an adjunct program, TREESEL. A 'Software Design Document', which provides descriptions of the argument lists and internal variables for each subroutine in the TREETOPS suite, was established. Additionally, installation guides for both DOS and UNIX platforms were developed. Finally, updated User's Manuals, as well as a Theory Manual, were generated.

  19. Periodic boundary conditions for dislocation dynamics simulations in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V V; Rhee, M; Cai, W

    2000-11-20

    This article presents an implementation of periodic boundary conditions (PBC) for Dislocation Dynamics (DD) simulations in three dimensions (3D). We discuss fundamental aspects of PBC development, including preservation of translational invariance and line connectivity, the choice of initial configurations compatible with PBC and a consistent treatment of image stress. On the practical side, our approach reduces to manageable proportions the computational burden of updating the long-range elastic interactions among dislocation segments. The timing data confirms feasibility and practicality of PBC for large-scale DD simulations in 3D.

  20. Using collective variables to drive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorin, Giacomo; Klein, Michael L.; Hénin, Jérôme

    2013-12-01

    A software framework is introduced that facilitates the application of biasing algorithms to collective variables of the type commonly employed to drive massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The modular framework that is presented enables one to combine existing collective variables into new ones, and combine any chosen collective variable with available biasing methods. The latter include the classic time-dependent biases referred to as steered MD and targeted MD, the temperature-accelerated MD algorithm, as well as the adaptive free-energy biases called metadynamics and adaptive biasing force. The present modular software is extensible, and portable between commonly used MD simulation engines.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of threshold displacement energies in zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Pedro A.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Yu, Jianguo; Weber, William J.

    2009-10-15

    Molecular-dynamics simulations were used to examine the displacement threshold energy (Ed) surface for Zr, Si and O in zircon using two different interatomic potentials. For each sublattice, the simulation was repeated from different initial conditions to estimate the uncertainty in the calculated value of Ed. The displacement threshold energies vary considerably with crystallographic direction and sublattice. The average displacement energy calculated with a recently developed transferable potential is about 120 and 60 eV for cations and anions, respectively. The oxygen displacement energy shows good agreement with experimental estimates in ceramics.

  2. Superionicity in Na3 PO4 : A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wei-Guo; Liu, Jianjun; Duan, Chun-Gang; Mei, W. N.; Smith, R. W.; Hardy, J. R.

    2004-08-01

    Fast ionic conduction in solid Na3PO4 is studied by use of molecular dynamics simulation based on the modified Lu -Hardy approach. We obtain reasonable agreement with experiment for the structural transition and diffusion of the sodium ions. All the sodium ions are found to contribute comparably to the high ionic conductivity. The results of the simulation are discussed in terms of the relative magnitude of the two proposed transport mechanisms: percolation and paddle-wheel. It appears to us that the percolation mechanism dominates the sodium diffusion.

  3. The very local Hubble flow: Computer simulations of dynamical history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Karachentsev, I. D.; Valtonen, M. J.; Dolgachev, V. P.; Domozhilova, L. M.; Makarov, D. I.

    2004-02-01

    The phenomenon of the very local (≤3 Mpc) Hubble flow is studied on the basis of the data of recent precision observations. A set of computer simulations is performed to trace the trajectories of the flow galaxies back in time to the epoch of the formation of the Local Group. It is found that the ``initial conditions'' of the flow are drastically different from the linear velocity-distance relation. The simulations enable one also to recognize the major trends of the flow evolution and identify the dynamical role of universal antigravity produced by the cosmic vacuum.

  4. Structural considerations for a software life cycle dynamic simulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.; Mckenzie, M.; Lin, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary study into the prospects for simulating the software implementation and maintenance life cycle process, with the aim of producing a computerized tool for use by management and software engineering personnel in project planning, tradeoff studies involving product, environmental, situational, and technological factors, and training. The approach taken is the modular application of a 'flow of resource' concept to the systems dynamics simulation modeling technique. The software life cycle process is represented as a number of stochastic, time-varying, interacting work tasks that each achieves one of the project milestones. Each task is characterized by the item produced, the personnel applied, and the budgetary profile.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine bilayer with Na+ counterions.

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Sagar A; Berkowitz, Max L

    2002-01-01

    We performed a molecular dynamics simulation of dipalmitoylphosphatidylserine (DPPS) bilayer with Na+ counterions. We found that hydrogen bonding between the NH group and the phosphate group leads to a reduction in the area per headgroup when compared to the area in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer. The Na+ ions bind to the oxygen in the carboxyl group of serine, thus giving rise to a dipolar bilayer similar to dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine bilayer. The results of the simulation show that counterions play a crucial role in determining the structural and electrostatic properties of DPPS bilayer. PMID:11916841

  6. Classical molecular dynamics simulations for non-equilibrium correlated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, S.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    2017-03-01

    A classical molecular dynamics model was recently extended to simulate neutral multi-component plasmas where various charge states of the same atom and electrons coexist. It is used to investigate the plasma effects on the ion charge and on the ionization potential in dense plasmas. Different simulated statistical properties will show that the concept of isolated particles is lost in such correlated plasmas. The charge equilibration is discussed for a carbon plasma at solid density and investigation on the charge distribution and on the ionization potential depression (IPD) for aluminum plasmas is discussed with reference to existing experiments.

  7. Finite-size effects in dissipative particle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, María Eugenia; Gama-Goicochea, Armando; González-Melchor, Minerva; Neria, Maricela; Alejandre, José

    2006-02-28

    We have performed dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to evaluate the effect that finite size of transversal area has on stress anisotropy and interfacial tension. The simulations were carried out in one phase and two phases in parallelepiped cells. In one-phase simulations there is no finite-size effect on stress anisotropy when the simulation is performed using repulsive forces. However, an oscillatory function of stress anisotropy is found for attractive-repulsive interactions. In the case of liquid-liquid interfaces with repulsive interaction between molecules, there is only a small effect of surface area on interfacial tension when the simulations are performed using the Monte Carlo method at constant temperature and normal pressure. An important but artificial finite-size effect of interfacial area on surface tension is found in simulations in the canonical ensemble. Reliable results of interfacial tension from DPD simulations can be obtained using small systems, less than 2000 particles, when they interact exclusively with repulsive forces.

  8. Dislocation dynamics simulations of plasticity at small scales

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi

    2010-01-01

    As metallic structures and devices are being created on a dimension comparable to the length scales of the underlying dislocation microstructures, the mechanical properties of them change drastically. Since such small structures are increasingly common in modern technologies, there is an emergent need to understand the critical roles of elasticity, plasticity, and fracture in small structures. Dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations, in which the dislocations are the simulated entities, offer a way to extend length scales beyond those of atomistic simulations and the results from DD simulations can be directly compared with the micromechanical tests. The primary objective of this research is to use 3-D DD simulations to study the plastic deformation of nano- and micro-scale materials and understand the correlation between dislocation motion, interactions and the mechanical response. Specifically, to identify what critical events (i.e., dislocation multiplication, cross-slip, storage, nucleation, junction and dipole formation, pinning etc.) determine the deformation response and how these change from bulk behavior as the system decreases in size and correlate and improve our current knowledge of bulk plasticity with the knowledge gained from the direct observations of small-scale plasticity. Our simulation results on single crystal micropillars and polycrystalline thin films can march the experiment results well and capture the essential features in small-scale plasticity. Furthermore, several simple and accurate models have been developed following our simulation results and can reasonably predict the plastic behavior of small scale materials.

  9. Grain-level simulation of dynamic failure in ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Spandan

    2002-04-01

    Advanced ceramic materials are finding increasing use in different adverse mechanical and chemical situations due to their good mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and thermal stability. Their wider use is however impeded by their brittleness, especially in applications involving dynamic loads, in which dynamic fracture and fragmentation events are often observed. Most of the research aimed at the understanding of dynamic crack initiation and propagation mechanisms in this class of materials do not take into account the inherent granular microstructure of ceramics. In this project, we develop a grain-based finite element scheme that allows for the mesoscale study of a range of dynamic failure events in granular media, including propagation and branching of inter-granular cracks and fragmentation. The scheme relies on Voronoi tessellation to generate the granular microstructure and on a 2-D explicit cohesive/volumetric finite element (CVFE) scheme to simulate the constitutive and failure response of the material under dynamic loads. A non-linear kinematics description is used in our analysis to account for the possible large deformations and/or rotations of the grains during the fracture event. A viscoplastic update algorithm is also introduced to model problems (such as dynamic indentation and grinding) for which localized plasticity plays a key role. The numerical scheme finally relies on robust contact search and enforcement algorithms to capture the complex contact events between fracture surfaces, between individual grains and between the impactor/tool and the ceramic specimen. To demonstrate the capabilities and versatility of the grain-based CVFE code, we investigate four dynamic fracture problems. The first one is concerned with the propagation of dynamic intergranular cracks under mode I loading, with special emphasis on the effect of the microstructure on the branching instability of the crack motion. The second problem is that of dynamic fracture

  10. Hydrodynamics in adaptive resolution particle simulations: Multiparticle collision dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseeva, Uliana; Winkler, Roland G.; Sutmann, Godehard

    2016-06-01

    A new adaptive resolution technique for particle-based multi-level simulations of fluids is presented. In the approach, the representation of fluid and solvent particles is changed on the fly between an atomistic and a coarse-grained description. The present approach is based on a hybrid coupling of the multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC) method and molecular dynamics (MD), thereby coupling stochastic and deterministic particle-based methods. Hydrodynamics is examined by calculating velocity and current correlation functions for various mixed and coupled systems. We demonstrate that hydrodynamic properties of the mixed fluid are conserved by a suitable coupling of the two particle methods, and that the simulation results agree well with theoretical expectations.

  11. Description of ferrocenylalkylthiol SAMs on gold by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixed monolayers consisting of Fc(CH2)12S-/C10S-Au SAMs are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, angular distributions, positions of atoms) and energetic properties. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible inhomogeneity of the neutral ferrocene moieties within the monolayer. Five systems have been studied using different grafting densities for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates. The angular distributions are described in terms of the relative contributions from isolated and clustered ferrocene moieties in the binary SAMs. It is shown that the energetic contributions strongly depend on the state of the ferrocene. The ability of molecular dynamics simulations to enable better understanding the SAM structure is illustrated in this work.

  12. Spin dynamics simulations for a nanoscale Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhuofei; Landau, D. P.; Brown, G.; Stocks, G. M.

    2010-03-01

    Thermoinduced magnetization(TiM) is a novel response which was predicted to occur in nanoscale antiferromagnetic materials. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations footnotetextG. Brown, A. Janotti, M. Eisenbach, and G. M. Stocks, Phys.Rev.B 72, 140405(2005) have shown that TiM is an intrinsic property of the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model below the Neel temperature. To obtain a fundamental understanding of TiM, spin dynamics(SD) simulations are performed to study the spin wave behavior, which seems to be the cause of TiM. A classical Heisenberg model with an antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor exchange interaction and uniaxial single-site anisotropy is studied. Simple-cubic lattices with free boundary conditions are used. We employed the fast spin dynamics algorithms with fourth-order Suzuki-Trotter decompositions of the exponential operator. Additional small excitation peaks due to surface effects are found in transverse S(q,w).

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, J. T.; Robinson, M.; Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K.; Marks, N. A.

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  14. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-02-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nitrobenzene Dioxygenase Using AMBER Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation of the oxygenase component of nitrobenzene dioxygenase (NBDO) system, a member of the naphthalene family of Rieske nonheme iron dioxygenases, has been carried out using the AMBER force field combined with a new set of parameters for the description of the mononuclear nonheme iron center and iron–sulfur Rieske cluster. Simulation results provide information on the structure and dynamics of nitrobenzene dioxygenase in an aqueous environment and shed light on specific interactions that occur in its catalytic center. The results suggest that the architecture of the active site is stabilized by key hydrogen bonds, and Asn258 positions the substrate for oxidation. Analysis of protein–water interactions reveal the presence of a network of solvent molecules at the entrance to the active site, which could be of potential catalytic importance. PMID:24955078

  16. Dislocation dynamics: simulation of plastic flow of bcc metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lassila, D H

    2001-02-20

    This is the final report for the LDRD strategic initiative entitled ''Dislocation Dynamic: Simulation of Plastic Flow of bcc Metals'' (tracking code: 00-SI-011). This report is comprised of 6 individual sections. The first is an executive summary of the project and describes the overall project goal, which is to establish an experimentally validated 3D dislocation dynamics simulation. This first section also gives some information of LLNL's multi-scale modeling efforts associated with the plasticity of bcc metals, and the role of this LDRD project in the multiscale modeling program. The last five sections of this report are journal articles that were produced during the course of the FY-2000 efforts.

  17. Extrapolated gradientlike algorithms for molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, I P

    2006-09-01

    A class of symplectic algorithms is introduced to integrate the equations of motion in many-body systems. The algorithms are derived on the basis of an advanced gradientlike decomposition approach. Its main advantage over the standard gradient scheme is the avoidance of time-consuming evaluations of force gradients by force extrapolation without any loss of precision. As a result, the efficiency of the integration improves significantly. The algorithms obtained are analyzed and optimized using an error-function theory. The best among them are tested in actual molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations for comparison with well-known nongradient and gradient algorithms such as the Störmer-Verlet, Runge-Kutta, Cowell-Numerov, Forest-Ruth, Suzuki-Chin, and others. It is demonstrated that for moderate and high accuracy, the extrapolated algorithms should be considered as the most efficient for the integration of motion in molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. A review of the analytical simulation of aircraft crash dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Carden, Huey D.; Boitnott, Richard L.; Hayduk, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    A large number of full scale tests of general aviation aircraft, helicopters, and one unique air-to-ground controlled impact of a transport aircraft were performed. Additionally, research was also conducted on seat dynamic performance, load-limiting seats, load limiting subfloor designs, and emergency-locator-transmitters (ELTs). Computer programs were developed to provide designers with methods for predicting accelerations, velocities, and displacements of collapsing structure and for estimating the human response to crash loads. The results of full scale aircraft and component tests were used to verify and guide the development of analytical simulation tools and to demonstrate impact load attenuating concepts. Analytical simulation of metal and composite aircraft crash dynamics are addressed. Finite element models are examined to determine their degree of corroboration by experimental data and to reveal deficiencies requiring further development.

  19. A dynamical formulation for multiflexible controlled spacecraft simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrado, G.; Ravazzotti, M. T.

    1981-09-01

    The dynamic behavior of highly flexible, rotating spacecraft is described by a method which does not require any particular approximation and is not limited to any particular arrangement of the bodies constituting the system. The analytical technique is based on the formalism of the DISCOS computer program (Bodley, 1978), a powerful tool for the dynamic simulation of complex spacecraft. The state equations, described in a general format, are applicable to any complex spacecraft under any environmental load. The approach takes into account the distributed flexibility, the relative motion of the bodies, the automatic coupling of the momentum wheels, the system control laws, and their interaction with the structure. Synthesis and analysis of the linearized system are used to solve time and frequency equations. The required computing times for different program options are listed, along with the number of equations and the integration step size. A block diagram of the DISCOS package structure is given, showing the development from problem definition to simulation results.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Membranes and a Transmembrane Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duong, Tap Ha; Mehler, Ernest L.; Weinstein, Harel

    1999-05-01

    Three molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 1.5-ns length were carried out on fully hydrated patches of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers in the liquid-crystalline phase. The simulations were performed using different ensembles and electrostatic conditions: a microcanonical ensemble or constant pressure-temperature ensemble, with or without truncated electrostatic interactions. Calculated properties of the membrane patches from the three different protocols were compared to available data from experiments. These data include the resulting overall geometrical dimensions, the order characteristics of the lipid hydrocarbon chains, as well as various measures of the conformations of the polar head groups. The comparisons indicate that the simulation carried out within the microcanonical ensemble with truncated electrostatic interactions yielded results closest to the experimental data, provided that the initial equilibration phase preceding the production run was sufficiently long. The effects of embedding a non-ideal helical protein domain in the membrane patch were studied with the same MD protocols. This simulation was carried out for 2.5 ns. The protein domain corresponds to the seventh transmembrane segment (TMS7) of the human serotonin 5HT 2Areceptor. The peptide is composed of two α-helical segments linked by a hinge domain around a perturbing Asn-Pro motif that produces at the end of the simulation a kink angle of nearly 80° between the two helices. Several aspects of the TMS7 structure, such as the bending angle, backbone Φ and Ψ torsion angles, the intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and the overall conformation, were found to be very similar to those determined by NMR for the corresponding transmembrane segment of the tachykinin NK-1 receptor. In general, the simulations were found to yield structural and dynamic characteristics that are in good agreement with experiment. These findings support the application of simulation methods to the study

  1. The Dynamics of Simulated Convective Storms in Hurricane Environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaul, Eugene Williamson, Jr.

    Numerical simulations of convection in selected hurricane environments show that supercell storms are possible, even when buoyancy is relatively small. In one simulated supercell, the dynamic pressure force is found to reach a maximum about three times as strong as that of buoyancy in the late stages of the simulation. Updrafts reach peak intensity at low levels, often around 2-3 km AGL, and may exceed magnitudes expected from consideration of moist CAPE alone. Interactions between updraft and ambient vertical shear, and, later, growing contributions from vorticity, appear to dominate the development of the dynamic pressure field. Although the weak buoyancy tends to restrict storm intensity, a favorable matching of the vertical distribution of buoyancy with that of the vertical shear allows the pressure forces to become strong enough to take up the slack. Terms in the disturbance kinetic energy budget are correspondingly more strongly influenced by pressure effects than by buoyancy. Although the simulated supercells display the very strong, organized rotation characteristic of tornadic storms, many of the multicell storms which appear in the simulations also contain local concentrations of vorticity intense enough to suggest tornado potential. Simulations with differing background rotation (Coriolis) rates "f" show that convection which was multicellular at low f can become supercellular at higher f. The enhanced vertical vorticity that develops naturally in decaying tropical cyclones when angular momentum disperses under the influence of weakening pressure gradients may, by analogy, help explain why dissipating tropical cyclones are an especially fertile breeding ground for tornadic storms. Test simulations in which surface drag and a slightly modified subgrid mixing formulation were used show that the details of storm behavior can be quite sensitive to changes in these model parameters, although updraft and vorticity statistics are not altered greatly. In general

  2. Dissipative particle dynamics: a useful thermostat for equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Soddemann, Thomas; Dünweg, Burkhard; Kremer, Kurt

    2003-10-01

    We discuss dissipative particle dynamics as a thermostat to molecular dynamics, and highlight some of its virtues: (i) universal applicability irrespective of the interatomic potential; (ii) correct and unscreened reproduction of hydrodynamic correlations; (iii) stabilization of the numerical integration of the equations of motion; and (iv) the avoidance of a profile bias in boundary-driven nonequilibrium simulations of shear flow. Numerical results on a repulsive Lennard-Jones fluid illustrate our arguments.

  3. Algorithm for simulation of quantum many-body dynamics using dynamical coarse-graining

    SciTech Connect

    Khasin, M.; Kosloff, R.

    2010-04-15

    An algorithm for simulation of quantum many-body dynamics having su(2) spectrum-generating algebra is developed. The algorithm is based on the idea of dynamical coarse-graining. The original unitary dynamics of the target observables--the elements of the spectrum-generating algebra--is simulated by a surrogate open-system dynamics, which can be interpreted as weak measurement of the target observables, performed on the evolving system. The open-system state can be represented by a mixture of pure states, localized in the phase space. The localization reduces the scaling of the computational resources with the Hilbert-space dimension n by factor n{sup 3/2}(ln n){sup -1} compared to conventional sparse-matrix methods. The guidelines for the choice of parameters for the simulation are presented and the scaling of the computational resources with the Hilbert-space dimension of the system is estimated. The algorithm is applied to the simulation of the dynamics of systems of 2x10{sup 4} and 2x10{sup 6} cold atoms in a double-well trap, described by the two-site Bose-Hubbard model.

  4. The Architecture of Newton, a General-Purpose Dynamics Simulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    11 N The Architecture of Newton, a General-Purpose Dynamics 0 Simulator OTIC James F. Cremer ELECTE A. James Stewart JUL 141989f l Computer Science...173SS, ONR grant N00t4.SK-0281 and DARPA grant N0014-OOK.0S91 Support for James Stewart is provided in part by U.S. Army Math-4.3 Control matica Sciences

  5. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  6. Using Soft Computing Technologies for the Simulation of LCAC Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    real-time, time-domain predictions of the vehicle’s dynamics as a function of the control signals given by the driver. Results are presented...free- running LCAC model, faster-than-real-time simulation, soft computing technology 1.0 INTRODUCTION The Maneuvering and Control Division (MCD...like all hovercraft , rides on a cushion of air. The air is supplied to the cushion by four centrifugal fans driven by the craft’s gas turbine

  7. Simulated dynamic response of a servovalve controlled hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Dale A.

    1990-01-01

    A general purpose math model of a servovalve controlled hydraulic actuator system is derived. The system consists of a linear actuator with unequal piston areas, a single stage servovalve, a gas charged hydraulic accumulator, and the interconnecting piping. The state equations are integrated using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) for determining the system's dynamic response characteristics. Using this generalized hydraulic actuator system model, response characteristics were determined for various servovalve commands.

  8. Simulation of dynamic material response with the PAGOSA code

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Adams, T.F.

    1993-08-01

    The 3D Eulerian PAGOSA hydrocode is being run on the massively parallel Connection Machine (CM) to simulate the response of materials to dynamic loading, such as by high explosives or high velocity impact. The code has a variety of equation of state forms, plastic yield models, and fracture and fragmentation models. The numerical algorithms in PAGOSA and the implementation of material models are discussed briefly.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of ordering of polydimethylsiloxane under uniaxial extension

    SciTech Connect

    Lacevic, N M; Gee, R H

    2005-03-11

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a bulk melts of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are utilized to study chain conformation and ordering under constant uniaxial tension. We find that large extensions induce chain ordering in the direction of applied tension. We also find that voids are created via a cavitation mechanism. This study represents a validation of the current model for PDMS and benchmark for the future study of mechanical properties of PDMS melts enriched with fillers under tension.

  10. Simulating market dynamics: interactions between consumer psychology and social networks.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Marco A; Jager, Wander

    2003-01-01

    Markets can show different types of dynamics, from quiet markets dominated by one or a few products, to markets with continual penetration of new and reintroduced products. In a previous article we explored the dynamics of markets from a psychological perspective using a multi-agent simulation model. The main results indicated that the behavioral rules dominating the artificial consumer's decision making determine the resulting market dynamics, such as fashions, lock-in, and unstable renewal. Results also show the importance of psychological variables like social networks, preferences, and the need for identity to explain the dynamics of markets. In this article we extend this work in two directions. First, we will focus on a more systematic investigation of the effects of different network structures. The previous article was based on Watts and Strogatz's approach, which describes the small-world and clustering characteristics in networks. More recent research demonstrated that many large networks display a scale-free power-law distribution for node connectivity. In terms of market dynamics this may imply that a small proportion of consumers may have an exceptional influence on the consumptive behavior of others (hubs, or early adapters). We show that market dynamics is a self-organized property depending on the interaction between the agents' decision-making process (heuristics), the product characteristics (degree of satisfaction of unit of consumption, visibility), and the structure of interactions between agents (size of network and hubs in a social network).

  11. 4D Simulation of Explosive Eruption Dynamics at Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, A.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Menconi, G.; de'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Cavazzoni, C.; Erbacci, G.; Baxter, P. J.

    2006-12-01

    We applied, using a supercomputer, a new simulation model based on fundamental transport laws to describe the 4D (3D spatial co-ordinates plus time) multiphase flow dynamics of explosive eruptions. The model solves the fundamental transport equations for a multiphase mixture formed by a continuous multi-component gas phase and n solid particulate phases representative of magma fragments (such as ash, crystals, and lapilli). Numerical simulations describe the collapse of the volcanic eruption column and the propagation of pyroclastic density currents, for selected medium scale (sub-Plinian) eruptive scenarios at Vesuvius, Italy. The study shows that 4D multiphase numerical models can illuminate the non-intuitive and internal dynamics of explosive eruptions that cannot otherwise be studied by direct observation or using previous models. In particular, simulations provide crucial insights into the effects of the generation mechanism of the flows - partial collapse vs boiling-over - on their hazard potential, the complex dynamics of the collapsing column, and the influence of Mount Somma on the propagation of PDCs into the circum-Vesuvian area, one of the world's most hazardous volcanic settings.

  12. Direct identification of predator-prey dynamics in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Sumire Gürcan, Özgür D; Diamond, Patrick H.

    2015-09-15

    The interaction between spontaneously formed zonal flows and small-scale turbulence in nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations is explored in a shearless closed field line geometry. It is found that when clear limit cycle oscillations prevail, the observed turbulent dynamics can be quantitatively captured by a simple Lotka-Volterra type predator-prey model. Fitting the time traces of full gyrokinetic simulations by such a reduced model allows extraction of the model coefficients. Scanning physical plasma parameters, such as collisionality and density gradient, it was observed that the effective growth rates of turbulence (i.e., the prey) remain roughly constant, in spite of the higher and varying level of primary mode linear growth rates. The effective growth rate that was extracted corresponds roughly to the zonal-flow-modified primary mode growth rate. It was also observed that the effective damping of zonal flows (i.e., the predator) in the parameter range, where clear predator-prey dynamics is observed, (i.e., near marginal stability) agrees with the collisional damping expected in these simulations. This implies that the Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instability may be negligible in this range. The results imply that when the tertiary instability plays a role, the dynamics becomes more complex than a simple Lotka-Volterra predator prey.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water: Hybrid density functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Todorova, T; Seitsonen, A; Hutter, J; Kuo, W; Mundy, C

    2005-09-12

    The structure, dynamical and electronic properties of liquid water utilizing different hybrid density functionals were tested within the plane wave framework of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. The computational approach, which employs modified functionals with short-ranged Hartree-Fock exchange, was first tested in calculations of the structural and bonding properties of the water dimer and cyclic water trimer. Liquid water simulations were performed at the state point of 350 K at the experimental density. Simulations included three different hybrid functionals, a meta functional, four gradient corrected functionals, the local density and Hartree-Fock approximation. It is found that hybrid functionals are superior in reproducing the experimental structure and dynamical properties as measured by the radial distribution function and self diffusion constant when compared to the pure density functionals. The local density and Hartree-Fock approximations show strongly over- and under-structured liquids, respectively. Hydrogen bond analysis shows that the hybrid functionals give slightly smaller averaged numbers of hydrogen bonds and similar hydrogen bond populations as pure density functionals. The average molecular dipole moments in the liquid from the three hybrid functionals are lower than from the corresponding pure density functionals.

  14. NETL's IGCC Dynamic Simulator Reserach and Training Center

    SciTech Connect

    Erbes, M.; Zitney, S.

    2008-01-01

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is collaborating with software, industry, and university partners to establish a world-class Dynamic Simulator Research and Training (DSR&T) Center dedicated to the operation and control of advanced energy plants with carbon capture capabilities. The DSR&T Center will offer a collaborative R&D program and comprehensive hands-on training built around a portfolio of non-proprietary, high-fidelity, real-time dynamic simulators. The simulators will provide full-scope operator training system (OTS) capabilities for normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown, and load following. Immersive three-dimensional (3-D) virtual reality will add another dimension of realism to the dynamic OTS systems and extend the training scope to both control room and outside operators, allowing them to work as a team. The benefits of high-fidelity immersive training systems (ITS) include more realistic training scenarios, improved communication and collaboration among work crews, off-line evaluations of procedures, and training for safety-critical tasks and rare abnormal situations.

  15. Pavement nondestructive evaluation using finite-element dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, W.; Hackett, R. M.

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes the nondestructive evaluation devices, visual distress survey and coring used to investigate jointed concrete pavement performance in northern Mississippi. 3D finite-element models were developed to simulate in-service conditions and to characterize in-situ material properties. Reasonable good agreement is found between in-situ moduli backcalculated from the dynamic analysis of falling weight deflectometer (FWD) deflections measured on selected pavements and laboratory moduli. Effects of load pulse shape, cracking, and discontinuities on the surface deflection response of pavements subjected to FWD load wee also investigated. It is shown that 3D analysis of temperature distribution and resulting thermal stresses play a significant role int he performance of concrete pavements. The study results demonstrated the extensive usefulness of the finite-element dynamic analysis and limitations of the static multilayered analysis and other pavement analysis programs which do not allow for crack modeling and dynamic analysis.

  16. Simulating fast and slow dynamic effects in power systems

    SciTech Connect

    de Mello, F.P.; Feltes, J.W.; Laskowski, T.F.; Oppel, L.J. )

    1992-07-01

    Electric power systems comprise a nearly infinite number of devices, exhibiting dynamic characteristics in a wide range of bandwidths and with significant nonlinear effects. Historically, the nature of these devices, the robust configuration of the electric power system, and its loading were such that the interaction between devices became relatively unimportant in system performance several seconds after disturbances. Greater utilization of electric plant, through heavier system loadings, interconnections, and increasing use of controls, has at times necessitated predictions of system performance through simulation extending over a time range of tens of seconds to several minutes. The phenomena occurring over this extended time frame has been referred to as long-term dynamics. There are basically two classes of problems involving long-term dynamics. One is the problem of islanding with significant imbalances between load and generation where prime mover action in response to frequency deviations is significant. The other concerns problems of insufficient damping and/or synchronizing power, and voltage collapse.

  17. Reweighted ensemble dynamics simulations: Theory, improvement, and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lin-Chen; Zhou, Xin; Ouyang, Zhong-Can

    2015-06-01

    Based on multiple parallel short molecular dynamics simulation trajectories, we designed the reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method to more efficiently sample complex (biopolymer) systems, and to explore their hierarchical metastable states. Here we further present an improvement to depress statistical errors of the RED and we discuss a few keys in practical application of the RED, provide schemes on selection of basis functions, and determination of the free parameter in the RED. We illustrate the application of the improvements in two toy models and in the solvated alanine dipeptide. The results show the RED enables us to capture the topology of multiple-state transition networks, to detect the diffusion-like dynamical behavior in an entropy-dominated system, and to identify solvent effects in the solvated peptides. The illustrations serve as general applications of the RED in more complex biopolymer systems. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11175250).

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in water/sugar solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerbret, A.; Affouard, F.; Bordat, P.; Hédoux, A.; Guinet, Y.; Descamps, M.

    2008-04-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of the solvent at the protein/solvent interface have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme in trehalose, maltose and sucrose solutions. Results are discussed in the framework of the bioprotection phenomena. The analysis of the relative concentration of water oxygen atoms around lysozyme suggests that lysozyme is preferentially hydrated. When comparing the three sugars, trehalose is seen more excluded than maltose and sucrose. The preferential exclusion of sugars from the protein surface induces some differences in the behavior of trehalose and maltose, particularly at 50 and 60 wt% concentrations, that are not observed experimentally in binary sugar/mixtures. The dynamical slowing down of the solvent is suggested to mainly arise from the homogeneity of the water/sugar matrices controlled by the percolation of the sugar hydrogen bonds networks. Furthermore, lysozyme strongly increases relaxation times of solvent molecules at the protein/solvent interface.

  19. Dynamic regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by simulated redox manipulation.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Julian E; Huber, Roland G; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Wallnoefer, Hannes G; Spitzer, Gudrun M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Liedl, Klaus R

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical studies revealed increased phenylalanine levels and phenylalanine to tyrosine ratios in patients suffering from infection, inflammation and general immune activity. These data implicated down-regulation of activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase by oxidative stress upon in vivo immune activation. Though the structural damage of oxidative stress is expected to be comparably small, a structural rationale for this experimental finding was lacking. Hence, we investigated the impact of side chain oxidation at two vicinal cysteine residues on local conformational flexibility in the protein by comparative molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of backbone dynamics revealed a highly flexible loop region (Tyr138-loop) in proximity to the active center of phenylalanine hydroxylase. We observed elevated loop dynamics in connection with a loop movement towards the active site in the oxidized state, thereby partially blocking access for the substrate phenylalanine. These findings were confirmed by extensive replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations and serve as a first structural explanation for decreased enzyme turnover in situations of oxidative stress.

  20. Thermostats and thermostat strategies for molecular dynamics simulations of nanofluidics.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xin; Zhang, Lucy T

    2013-02-28

    The thermostats in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of highly confined channel flow may have significant influences on the fidelity of transport phenomena. In this study, we exploit non-equilibrium MD simulations to generate Couette flows with different combinations of thermostat algorithms and strategies. We provide a comprehensive analysis on the effectiveness of three thermostat algorithms Nosé-Hoover chain (NHC), Langevin (LGV) and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) when applied in three thermostat strategies, thermostating either walls (TW) or fluid (TF), and thermostating both the wall and fluid (TWTF). Our results of thermal and mechanical properties show that the TW strategy more closely resembles experimental conditions. The TF and TWTF systems also produce considerably similar behaviors in weakly sheared systems, but deviate the dynamics in strongly sheared systems due to the isothermal condition. The LGV and DPD thermostats used in the TF and TWTF systems provide vital ways to yield correct dynamics in coarse-grained systems by tuning the fluid transport coefficients. Using conventional NHC thermostat to thermostat fluid only produces correct thermal behaviors in weakly sheared systems, and breaks down due to significant thermal inhomogeneity in strongly sheared systems.

  1. Two-Speed Gearbox Dynamic Simulation Predictions and Test Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; DeSmidt, Hans; Smith, Edward C.; Bauman, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic simulations and experimental validation tests were performed on a two-stage, two-speed gearbox as part of the drive system research activities of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Subsonics Rotary Wing Project. The gearbox was driven by two electromagnetic motors and had two electromagnetic, multi-disk clutches to control output speed. A dynamic model of the system was created which included a direct current electric motor with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) speed control, a two-speed gearbox with dual electromagnetically actuated clutches, and an eddy current dynamometer. A six degree-of-freedom model of the gearbox accounted for the system torsional dynamics and included gear, clutch, shaft, and load inertias as well as shaft flexibilities and a dry clutch stick-slip friction model. Experimental validation tests were performed on the gearbox in the NASA Glenn gear noise test facility. Gearbox output speed and torque as well as drive motor speed and current were compared to those from the analytical predictions. The experiments correlate very well with the predictions, thus validating the dynamic simulation methodologies.

  2. Numerical simulation of landfill aeration using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Fytanidis, Dimitrios K; Voudrias, Evangelos A

    2014-04-01

    The present study is an application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the numerical simulation of landfill aeration systems. Specifically, the CFD algorithms provided by the commercial solver ANSYS Fluent 14.0, combined with an in-house source code developed to modify the main solver, were used. The unsaturated multiphase flow of air and liquid phases and the biochemical processes for aerobic biodegradation of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste were simulated taking into consideration their temporal and spatial evolution, as well as complex effects, such as oxygen mass transfer across phases, unsaturated flow effects (capillary suction and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity), temperature variations due to biochemical processes and environmental correction factors for the applied kinetics (Monod and 1st order kinetics). The developed model results were compared with literature experimental data. Also, pilot scale simulations and sensitivity analysis were implemented. Moreover, simulation results of a hypothetical single aeration well were shown, while its zone of influence was estimated using both the pressure and oxygen distribution. Finally, a case study was simulated for a hypothetical landfill aeration system. Both a static (steadily positive or negative relative pressure with time) and a hybrid (following a square wave pattern of positive and negative values of relative pressure with time) scenarios for the aeration wells were examined. The results showed that the present model is capable of simulating landfill aeration and the obtained results were in good agreement with corresponding previous experimental and numerical investigations.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of pervaporation in zeolite membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, W.; Murad, S.

    The pervaporation separation of liquid mixtures of water/ethanol and water/methanol using three zeolite (Silicalite, NaA and Chabazite) membranes has been examined using the method of molecular dynamics. The main goal of this study was to identify intermolecular interactions between water, methanol, ethanol and the membrane surface that play a critical role in the separations. This would then allow better membranes to be designed more efficiently and systematically than the trial-and-error procedures often being used. Our simulations correctly exhibited all the qualitative experimental observations for these systems, including the hydrophobic or hydrophilic behaviour of zeolite membranes. The simulations showed that, for Silicalite zeolite, the separation is strongly influenced by the selective adsorption of ethanol. The separation factor, as a consequence, increases almost exponentially as the ethanol composition decreases. For ethanol dehydration in NaA and Chabazite, pore size was found to play a very important role in the separation; very high separation factors were therefore possible. Simulations were also used to investigate the effect of pore structure, feed compositions and operating conditions on the pervaporation efficiency. Finally, our simulations also demonstrated that molecular simulations could serve as a useful screening tool to determine the suitability of a membrane for potential pervaporation separation applications. Simulations can cost only a small fraction of an experiment, and can therefore be used to design experiments most likely to be successful.

  4. Dynamic and routine interprofessional simulations: expanding the use of simulation to enhance interprofessional competencies.

    PubMed

    King, Sharla; Carbonaro, Michael; Greidanus, Elaine; Ansell, Dawn; Foisy-Doll, Colette; Magus, Sam

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, deliver, and assess relevant interprofessional (IP) simulation experiences for prelicensure students from multiple disciplines in certificate, diploma, and degree programs. Seventy-eight students from four post-secondary institutions participated in either a high-fidelity mannequin postoperative simulation experience (dynamic simulation) or a standardized patient homecare simulation experience (routine simulation). The University of West England Questionnaire was used pre- and post-simulation experience to determine the change in communication and teamwork. Overall, students' perceptions of their communication and teamwork skills increased after completing either simulation. Students from certificate, diploma, and degree programs participating in the same simulations demonstrated improvements on self-report measures of communication and teamwork. The key was creating a simulation learning experience that reflected the realities of practice, rather than the participants' credentials. Placing students in teams that are relevant for practice, rather than grouping them by academic credentials, is necessary and can provide positive learning experiences for all participants, as demonstrated by these results.

  5. Hybrid molecular dynamics simulation for plasma induced damage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable further device size reduction (also known as Moore's law) and improved power performance, the semiconductor industry is introducing new materials and device structures into the semiconductor fabrication process. Materials now include III-V compounds, germanium, cobalt, ruthenium, hafnium, and others. The device structure in both memory and logic has been evolving from planar to three dimensional (3D). One such device is the FinFET, where the transistor gate is a vertical fin made either of silicon, silicon-germanium or germanium. These changes have brought renewed interests in the structural damages caused by energetic ion bombardment of the fin sidewalls which are exposed to the ion flux from the plasma during the fin-strip off step. Better control of the physical damage of the 3D devices requires a better understanding of the damage formation mechanisms on such new materials and structures. In this study, the damage formation processes by ion bombardment have been simulated for Si and Ge substrate by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid simulations and compared to the results from the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In our QM/MM simulations, the highly reactive region in which the structural damage is created is simulated with the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the region remote from the primary region is simulated using classical MD with the Stillinger-Weber and Moliere potentials. The learn on the fly method is also used to reduce the computational load. Hence our QM/MM simulation is much faster than the full QC-MD simulations and the original QM/MM simulations. The amorphous layers profile simulated with QM/MM have obvious differences in their thickness for silicon and germanium substrate. The profile of damaged structure in the germanium substrate is characterized by a deeper tail then in silicon. These traits are also observed in the results from the mass selected ion beam

  6. How to identify dislocations in molecular dynamics simulations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo; Wang, FengChao; Yang, ZhenYu; Zhao, YaPu

    2014-12-01

    Dislocations are of great importance in revealing the underlying mechanisms of deformed solid crystals. With the development of computational facilities and technologies, the observations of dislocations at atomic level through numerical simulations are permitted. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation suggests itself as a powerful tool for understanding and visualizing the creation of dislocations as well as the evolution of crystal defects. However, the numerical results from the large-scale MD simulations are not very illuminating by themselves and there exist various techniques for analyzing dislocations and the deformed crystal structures. Thus, it is a big challenge for the beginners in this community to choose a proper method to start their investigations. In this review, we summarized and discussed up to twelve existing structure characterization methods in MD simulations of deformed crystal solids. A comprehensive comparison was made between the advantages and disadvantages of these typical techniques. We also examined some of the recent advances in the dynamics of dislocations related to the hydraulic fracturing. It was found that the dislocation emission has a significant effect on the propagation and bifurcation of the crack tip in the hydraulic fracturing.

  7. Simulated impacts of insect defoliation on forest carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvigy, D.; Clark, K. L.; Skowronski, N. S.; Schäfer, K. V. R.

    2012-12-01

    Many temperate and boreal forests are subject to insect epidemics. In the eastern US, over 41 million meters squared of tree basal area are thought to be at risk of gypsy moth defoliation. However, the decadal-to-century scale implications of defoliation events for ecosystem carbon dynamics are not well understood. In this study, the effects of defoliation intensity, periodicity and spatial pattern on the carbon cycle are investigated in a set of idealized model simulations. A mechanistic terrestrial biosphere model, ecosystem demography model 2, is driven with observations from a xeric oak-pine forest located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Simulations indicate that net ecosystem productivity (equal to photosynthesis minus respiration) decreases linearly with increasing defoliation intensity. However, because of interactions between defoliation and drought effects, aboveground biomass exhibits a nonlinear decrease with increasing defoliation intensity. The ecosystem responds strongly with both reduced productivity and biomass loss when defoliation periodicity varies from 5 to 15 yr, but exhibits a relatively weak response when defoliation periodicity varies from 15 to 60 yr. Simulations of spatially heterogeneous defoliation resulted in markedly smaller carbon stocks than simulations with spatially homogeneous defoliation. These results show that gypsy moth defoliation has a large effect on oak-pine forest biomass dynamics, functioning and its capacity to act as a carbon sink.

  8. An undergraduate laboratory activity on molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Spitznagel, Benjamin; Pritchett, Paige R; Messina, Troy C; Goadrich, Mark; Rodriguez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Vision and Change [AAAS, 2011] outlines a blueprint for modernizing biology education by addressing conceptual understanding of key concepts, such as the relationship between structure and function. The document also highlights skills necessary for student success in 21st century Biology, such as the use of modeling and simulation. Here we describe a laboratory activity that allows students to investigate the dynamic nature of protein structure and function through the use of a modeling technique known as molecular dynamics (MD). The activity takes place over two lab periods that are 3 hr each. The first lab period unpacks the basic approach behind MD simulations, beginning with the kinematic equations that all bioscience students learn in an introductory physics course. During this period students are taught rudimentary programming skills in Python while guided through simple modeling exercises that lead up to the simulation of the motion of a single atom. In the second lab period students extend concepts learned in the first period to develop skills in the use of expert MD software. Here students simulate and analyze changes in protein conformation resulting from temperature change, solvation, and phosphorylation. The article will describe how these activities can be carried out using free software packages, including Abalone and VMD/NAMD.

  9. Lightweight computational steering of very large scale molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Beazley, D.M.; Lomdahl, P.S.

    1996-09-01

    We present a computational steering approach for controlling, analyzing, and visualizing very large scale molecular dynamics simulations involving tens to hundreds of millions of atoms. Our approach relies on extensible scripting languages and an easy to use tool for building extensions and modules. The system is extremely easy to modify, works with existing C code, is memory efficient, and can be used from inexpensive workstations and networks. We demonstrate how we have used this system to manipulate data from production MD simulations involving as many as 104 million atoms running on the CM-5 and Cray T3D. We also show how this approach can be used to build systems that integrate common scripting languages (including Tcl/Tk, Perl, and Python), simulation code, user extensions, and commercial data analysis packages.

  10. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  11. Network Visualization of Conformational Sampling during Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Baker, Joseph Lee; Ehrlich, Kent; Campbell, Zachary T.; Patel, Sunita; Vorontsov, Ivan I.; Tama, Florence; Miyashita, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Effective data reduction methods are necessary for uncovering the inherent conformational relationships present in large molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. Clustering algorithms provide a means to interpret the conformational sampling of molecules during simulation by grouping trajectory snapshots into a few subgroups, or clusters, but the relationships between the individual clusters may not be readily understood. Here we show that network analysis can be used to visualize the dominant conformational states explored during simulation as well as the connectivity between them, providing a more coherent description of conformational space than traditional clustering techniques alone. We compare the results of network visualization against 11 clustering algorithms and principal component conformer plots. Several MD simulations of proteins undergoing different conformational changes demonstrate the effectiveness of networks in reaching functional conclusions. PMID:24211466

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Acoustic Properties of Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguez, Cecilia; Esquivel-Sirvent, Raul; Ramírez-Santiago, Guillermo

    1998-03-01

    Recent experiments of ultrasound waves in colloidal suspensions [1] have found that the acoustic velocity and attenuation exhibit an anomalous behavior close to the solid volume concentration of 40%. Currently, there appears that there is no clear understanding of these results. Motivated by these observations we have carried out extensive non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to study the propagation of pressure waves through a colloidal suspension. The simulations consider the far from equilibrium corrections and calculate the viscosity and attenuation of sound waves traveling in the suspension. These quantities are studied as functions of frecuency and volume fraction. The possible relation between the results from the simulations and the experimental observatios is briefly discussed. [1] R. Esquivel-Sirvent and D. H. Green, Appl. Phys. Lett. 67, 3087 (1995); ibid, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. 407, p. 99 (1996).

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Iron — A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, C. P.; Liu, Wenqing; Xu, Yongbing; Zhou, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) is a technique of atomistic simulation which has facilitated scientific discovery of interactions among particles since its advent in the late 1950s. Its merit lies in incorporating statistical mechanics to allow for examination of varying atomic configurations at finite temperatures. Its contributions to materials science from modeling pure metal properties to designing nanowires is also remarkable. This review paper focuses on the progress of MD in understanding the behavior of iron — in pure metal form, in alloys, and in composite nanomaterials. It also discusses the interatomic potentials and the integration algorithms used for simulating iron in the literature. Furthermore, it reveals the current progress of MD in simulating iron by exhibiting some results in the literature. Finally, the review paper briefly mentions the development of the hardware and software tools for such large-scale computations.

  14. Multiscale simulations of anisotropic particles combining molecular dynamics and Green's function reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Bolhuis, Peter G.

    2017-03-01

    The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic molecular dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P. G. Bolhuis, and P. R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale MD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We present the novel algorithm focusing on Brownian dynamics only, although the methodology is generic. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm, we discuss its performance. The rotational Brownian dynamics MD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of protein signalling networks.

  15. Hybrid simulation theory for a classical nonlinear dynamical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drazin, Paul L.; Govindjee, Sanjay

    2017-03-01

    Hybrid simulation is an experimental and computational technique which allows one to study the time evolution of a system by physically testing a subset of it while the remainder is represented by a numerical model that is attached to the physical portion via sensors and actuators. The technique allows one to study large or complicated mechanical systems while only requiring a subset of the complete system to be present in the laboratory. This results in vast cost savings as well as the ability to study systems that simply can not be tested due to scale. However, the errors that arise from splitting the system in two requires careful attention, if a valid simulation is to be guaranteed. To date, efforts to understand the theoretical limitations of hybrid simulation have been restricted to linear dynamical systems. In this work we consider the behavior of hybrid simulation when applied to nonlinear dynamical systems. As a model problem, we focus on the damped, harmonically-driven nonlinear pendulum. This system offers complex nonlinear characteristics, in particular periodic and chaotic motions. We are able to show that the application of hybrid simulation to nonlinear systems requires a careful understanding of what one expects from such an experiment. In particular, when system response is chaotic we advocate the need for the use of multiple metrics to characterize the difference between two chaotic systems via Lyapunov exponents and Lyapunov dimensions, as well as correlation exponents. When system response is periodic we advocate the use of L2 norms. Further, we are able to show that hybrid simulation can falsely predict chaotic or periodic response when the true system has the opposite characteristic. In certain cases, we are able to show that control system parameters can mitigate this issue.

  16. An Evaluative Review of Simulated Dynamic Smart 3d Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeijn, H.; Sheth, F.; Pettit, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modelling of plants can be an asset for creating agricultural based visualisation products. The continuum of 3D plants models ranges from static to dynamic objects, also known as smart 3D objects. There is an increasing requirement for smarter simulated 3D objects that are attributed mathematically and/or from biological inputs. A systematic approach to plant simulation offers significant advantages to applications in agricultural research, particularly in simulating plant behaviour and the influences of external environmental factors. This approach of 3D plant object visualisation is primarily evident from the visualisation of plants using photographed billboarded images, to more advanced procedural models that come closer to simulating realistic virtual plants. However, few programs model physical reactions of plants to external factors and even fewer are able to grow plants based on mathematical and/or biological parameters. In this paper, we undertake an evaluation of plant-based object simulation programs currently available, with a focus upon the components and techniques involved in producing these objects. Through an analytical review process we consider the strengths and weaknesses of several program packages, the features and use of these programs and the possible opportunities in deploying these for creating smart 3D plant-based objects to support agricultural research and natural resource management. In creating smart 3D objects the model needs to be informed by both plant physiology and phenology. Expert knowledge will frame the parameters and procedures that will attribute the object and allow the simulation of dynamic virtual plants. Ultimately, biologically smart 3D virtual plants that react to changes within an environment could be an effective medium to visually represent landscapes and communicate land management scenarios and practices to planners and decision-makers.

  17. Monte Carlo-based simulation of dynamic jaws tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpin, E.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Q.; Lu, W.; Mackie, T. R.; Vynckier, S.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: Original TomoTherapy systems may involve a trade-off between conformity and treatment speed, the user being limited to three slice widths (1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 cm). This could be overcome by allowing the jaws to define arbitrary fields, including very small slice widths (<1 cm), which are challenging for a beam model. The aim of this work was to incorporate the dynamic jaws feature into a Monte Carlo (MC) model called TomoPen, based on the MC code PENELOPE, previously validated for the original TomoTherapy system. Methods: To keep the general structure of TomoPen and its efficiency, the simulation strategy introduces several techniques: (1) weight modifiers to account for any jaw settings using only the 5 cm phase-space file; (2) a simplified MC based model called FastStatic to compute the modifiers faster than pure MC; (3) actual simulation of dynamic jaws. Weight modifiers computed with both FastStatic and pure MC were compared. Dynamic jaws simulations were compared with the convolution/superposition (C/S) of TomoTherapy in the ''cheese'' phantom for a plan with two targets longitudinally separated by a gap of 3 cm. Optimization was performed in two modes: asymmetric jaws-constant couch speed (''running start stop,'' RSS) and symmetric jaws-variable couch speed (''symmetric running start stop,'' SRSS). Measurements with EDR2 films were also performed for RSS for the formal validation of TomoPen with dynamic jaws. Results: Weight modifiers computed with FastStatic were equivalent to pure MC within statistical uncertainties (0.5% for three standard deviations). Excellent agreement was achieved between TomoPen and C/S for both asymmetric jaw opening/constant couch speed and symmetric jaw opening/variable couch speed, with deviations well within 2%/2 mm. For RSS procedure, agreement between C/S and measurements was within 2%/2 mm for 95% of the points and 3%/3 mm for 98% of the points, where dose is greater than 30% of the prescription dose (gamma analysis

  18. Coupling a geodynamic seismic cycling model to rupture dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Alice; van Dinther, Ylona

    2014-05-01

    The relevance and results of dynamic rupture scenarios are implicitly linked to the geometry and pre-existing stress and strength state on a fault. The absolute stresses stored along faults during interseismic periods, are largely unquantifiable. They are, however, pivotal in defining coseismic rupture styles, near-field ground motion, and macroscopic source properties (Gabriel et al., 2012). Obtaining these in a physically consistent manner requires seismic cycling models, which directly couple long-term deformation processes (over 1000 year periods), the self-consistent development of faults, and the resulting dynamic ruptures. One promising approach to study seismic cycling enables both the generation of spontaneous fault geometries and the development of thermo-mechanically consistent fault stresses. This seismo-thermo-mechanical model has been developed using a methodology similar to that employed to study long-term lithospheric deformation (van Dinther et al., 2013a,b, using I2ELVIS of Gerya and Yuen, 2007). We will innovatively include the absolute stress and strength values along physically consistent evolving non-finite fault zones (regions of strain accumulation) from the geodynamic model into dynamic rupture simulations as an initial condition. The dynamic rupture simulations will be performed using SeisSol, an arbitrary high-order derivative Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) scheme (Pelties et al., 2012). The dynamic rupture models are able to incorporate the large degree of fault geometry complexity arising in naturally evolving geodynamic models. We focus on subduction zone settings with and without a splay fault. Due to the novelty of the coupling, we first focus on methodological challenges, e.g. the synchronization of both methods regarding the nucleation of events, the localization of fault planes, and the incorporation of similar frictional constitutive relations. We then study the importance of physically consistent fault stress, strength, and

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation for PBR pebble tracking simulation via a random walk approach using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung O; Holmes, Thomas W; Calderon, Adan F; Gardner, Robin P

    2012-05-01

    Using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, random walks were used for pebble tracking in a two-dimensional geometry in the presence of a biased gravity field. We investigated the effect of viscosity damping in the presence of random Gaussian fluctuations. The particle tracks were generated by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation for a Pebble Bed Reactor. The MD simulations were conducted in the interaction of noncohesive Hertz-Mindlin theory where the random walk MC simulation has a correlation with the MD simulation. This treatment can easily be extended to include the generation of transient gamma-ray spectra from a single pebble that contains a radioactive tracer. Then the inverse analysis thereof could be made to determine the uncertainty of the realistic measurement of transient positions of that pebble by any given radiation detection system designed for that purpose.

  20. Spin Dynamics simulations of the dynamic properties of classical models for magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Alex; Landau, D. P.

    1998-03-01

    The Spin Dynamics simulation technique, which has had considerable success for the study of critical properties of classical Heisenberg antiferromagnets(A. Bunker, K. Chen, and D. P. Landau Phys. Rev. B) \\underline54, 9259 (1996), has been used to determine more general properties for a wider range of materials. A general spin dynamics program has been developed which can determine the dynamic structure factor, S(q,ω), in the [100], [110], and [111] directions for a wide range of classical magnetic models at any temperature desired. We have simulated the magnetic dynamics in the ordered phase of the isotropic Heisenberg model with both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic coupling on L×L×L BCC and SC lattices. Outside of the critical regime relatively small lattice sizes of L = 12, 24 could be used. From our simulation we have determined the stiffness coefficient and the spin relaxation rate which were compared to both experimental(J. Als-Nielsen in Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena), ed. C. Domb, M. S. Green, Academic Press, (1976) and theoretical results. We have performed the same simulation with anisotropy appropriate for MnF2 and FeF_2. Research supported in part by the NSF

  1. Isotopic hydration of cellobiose: vibrational spectroscopy and dynamical simulations.

    PubMed

    Pincu, Madeleine; Cocinero, Emilio J; Mayorkas, Nitzan; Brauer, Brina; Davis, Benjamin G; Gerber, R Benny; Simons, John P

    2011-09-01

    The conformation and structural dynamics of cellobiose, one of the fundamental building blocks in nature, its C4' epimer, lactose, and their microhydrated complexes, isolated in the gas phase, have been explored through a combination of experiment and theory. Their structures at low temperature have been determined through double resonance, IR-UV vibrational spectroscopy conducted under molecular beam conditions, substituting D(2)O for H(2)O to separate isotopically, the carbohydrate (OH) bands from the hydration (OD) bands. Car-Parrinello (CP2K) simulations, employing dispersion corrected density functional potentials and conducted "on-the-fly" from ∼20 to ∼300 K, have been used to explore the consequences of raising the temperature. Comparisons between the experimental data, anharmonic vibrational self-consistent field calculations based upon ab initio potentials, and the CP2K simulations have established the role of anharmonicity; the reliability of classical molecular dynamics predictions of the vibrational spectra of carbohydrates and the accuracy of the dispersion corrected (BLYP-D) force fields employed; the structural consequences of increasing hydration; and the dynamical consequences of increasing temperature. The isolated and hydrated cellobiose and lactose units both present remarkably rigid structures: their glycosidic linkages adopt a "cis" (anti-ϕ and syn-ψ) conformation bound by inter-ring hydrogen bonds. This conformation is maintained when the temperature is increased to ∼300 K and it continues to be maintained when the cellobiose (or lactose) unit is hydrated by one or two explicitly bound water molecules. Despite individual fluctuations in the intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding pattern and some local structural motions, the water molecules remain locally bound and the isolated carbohydrates remain trapped within the cis potential well. The Car-Parrinello dynamical simulations do not suggest any accessible pathway to the trans

  2. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-28

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica{sup ®} package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics . Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories.

  3. Simulation of all-scale atmospheric dynamics on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.; Szmelter, Joanna; Xiao, Feng

    2016-10-01

    The advance of massively parallel computing in the nineteen nineties and beyond encouraged finer grid intervals in numerical weather-prediction models. This has improved resolution of weather systems and enhanced the accuracy of forecasts, while setting the trend for development of unified all-scale atmospheric models. This paper first outlines the historical background to a wide range of numerical methods advanced in the process. Next, the trend is illustrated with a technical review of a versatile nonoscillatory forward-in-time finite-volume (NFTFV) approach, proven effective in simulations of atmospheric flows from small-scale dynamics to global circulations and climate. The outlined approach exploits the synergy of two specific ingredients: the MPDATA methods for the simulation of fluid flows based on the sign-preserving properties of upstream differencing; and the flexible finite-volume median-dual unstructured-mesh discretisation of the spatial differential operators comprising PDEs of atmospheric dynamics. The paper consolidates the concepts leading to a family of generalised nonhydrostatic NFTFV flow solvers that include soundproof PDEs of incompressible Boussinesq, anelastic and pseudo-incompressible systems, common in large-eddy simulation of small- and meso-scale dynamics, as well as all-scale compressible Euler equations. Such a framework naturally extends predictive skills of large-eddy simulation to the global atmosphere, providing a bottom-up alternative to the reverse approach pursued in the weather-prediction models. Theoretical considerations are substantiated by calculations attesting to the versatility and efficacy of the NFTFV approach. Some prospective developments are also discussed.

  4. Ice formation on kaolinite: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosso, Gabriele C.; Tribello, Gareth A.; Zen, Andrea; Pedevilla, Philipp; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    The formation of ice affects many aspects of our everyday life as well as important technologies such as cryotherapy and cryopreservation. Foreign substances almost always aid water freezing through heterogeneous ice nucleation, but the molecular details of this process remain largely unknown. In fact, insight into the microscopic mechanism of ice formation on different substrates is difficult to obtain even if state-of-the-art experimental techniques are used. At the same time, atomistic simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation frequently face extraordinary challenges due to the complexity of the water-substrate interaction and the long time scales that characterize nucleation events. Here, we have investigated several aspects of molecular dynamics simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation considering as a prototypical ice nucleating material the clay mineral kaolinite, which is of relevance in atmospheric science. We show via seeded molecular dynamics simulations that ice nucleation on the hydroxylated (001) face of kaolinite proceeds exclusively via the formation of the hexagonal ice polytype. The critical nucleus size is two times smaller than that obtained for homogeneous nucleation at the same supercooling. Previous findings suggested that the flexibility of the kaolinite surface can alter the time scale for ice nucleation within molecular dynamics simulations. However, we here demonstrate that equally flexible (or non flexible) kaolinite surfaces can lead to very different outcomes in terms of ice formation, according to whether or not the surface relaxation of the clay is taken into account. We show that very small structural changes upon relaxation dramatically alter the ability of kaolinite to provide a template for the formation of a hexagonal overlayer of water molecules at the water-kaolinite interface, and that this relaxation therefore determines the nucleation ability of this mineral.

  5. Myoglobin-CO Substate Structures and Dynamics: Multidimensional Vibrational Echoes and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Kusai A.; Noid, W. G.; Akiyama, Ryo; Finkelstein, Ilya J.; Goun, Alexei; McClain, Brian L.; Loring, Roger F.; Fayer, M. D.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally resolved infrared stimulated vibrational echo data were obtained for sperm whale carbonmonoxymyoglobin (MbCO) at 300 K. The measured dephasing dynamics of the CO ligand are in agreement with dephasing dynamics calculated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for MbCO with the residue histidine-64 (His64) having its imidazole ε nitrogen protonated (Nε–H). The two conformational substate structures Bε and Rε observed in the MD simulations are assigned to the spectroscopic A1 and A3 conformational substates of MbCO, respectively, based on the agreement between the experimentally measured and calculated dephasing dynamics for these substates. In the A1 substate, the Nε–H proton and Nδ of His64 are approximately equidistant from the CO ligand, while in the A3 substate, the Nε–H of His64 is oriented toward the CO, and the Nδ is on the surface of the protein. The MD simulations show that dynamics of His64 represent the major source of vibrational dephasing of the CO ligand in the A3 state on both femtosecond and picosecond time scales. Dephasing in the A1 state is controlled by His64 on femtosecond time scales, and by the rest of the protein and the water solvent on longer time scales. PMID:14599220

  6. Validation of Bubble Dynamics Equation for a Nano-scale Bubble via Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, S.; Hyodo, H.; Watanabe, S.

    2015-12-01

    For a validation of the application of conventional bubble dynamics to a nano-scale bubble behaviour, we simulated a nano-scale bubble collapsing or vibration by Molecular Dynamics (MD) method and compared the result with the solution of Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation and that of Confined RP (CRP) equation, whose boundary condition was corrected to be consistent with that of MD simulation. As a result, a good coincidence was obtained between MD, RP, and CRP in the case of one-component fluid. In addition, also a good correspondence was obtained particularly in the comparison between MD and CRP in the case of two-component fluid containing non-condensable gas. The present results indicate that conventional bubble dynamics equation can be applied even to a nano-scale tiny bubble.

  7. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation of binary charged lipid membranes: Phase separation and morphological dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Higuchi, Yuji; Shimokawa, Naofumi

    2016-10-01

    Biomembranes, which are mainly composed of neutral and charged lipids, exhibit a large variety of functional structures and dynamics. Here, we report a coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the phase separation and morphological dynamics in charged lipid bilayer vesicles. The screened long-range electrostatic repulsion among charged head groups delays or inhibits the lateral phase separation in charged vesicles compared with neutral vesicles, suggesting the transition of the phase-separation mechanism from spinodal decomposition to nucleation or homogeneous dispersion. Moreover, the electrostatic repulsion causes morphological changes, such as pore formation, and further transformations into disk, string, and bicelle structures, which are spatiotemporally coupled to the lateral segregation of charged lipids. Based on our coarse-grained MD simulation, we propose a plausible mechanism of pore formation at the molecular level. The pore formation in a charged-lipid-rich domain is initiated by the prior disturbance of the local molecular orientation in the domain.

  8. Molecular Dynamics, Monte Carlo Simulations, and Langevin Dynamics: A Computational Review

    PubMed Central

    Paquet, Eric; Viktor, Herna L.

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular structures, such as neuraminidases, hemagglutinins, and monoclonal antibodies, are not rigid entities. Rather, they are characterised by their flexibility, which is the result of the interaction and collective motion of their constituent atoms. This conformational diversity has a significant impact on their physicochemical and biological properties. Among these are their structural stability, the transport of ions through the M2 channel, drug resistance, macromolecular docking, binding energy, and rational epitope design. To assess these properties and to calculate the associated thermodynamical observables, the conformational space must be efficiently sampled and the dynamic of the constituent atoms must be simulated. This paper presents algorithms and techniques that address the abovementioned issues. To this end, a computational review of molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo simulations, Langevin dynamics, and free energy calculation is presented. The exposition is made from first principles to promote a better understanding of the potentialities, limitations, applications, and interrelations of these computational methods. PMID:25785262

  9. Measurement of human pilot dynamic characteristics in flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, James T.

    1987-01-01

    Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Least Square Error (LSE) estimation techniques were applied to the problem of identifying pilot-vehicle dynamic characteristics in flight simulation. A brief investigation of the effects of noise, input bandwidth and system delay upon the FFT and LSE techniques was undertaken using synthetic data. Data from a piloted simulation conducted at NASA Ames Research Center was then analyzed. The simulation was performed in the NASA Ames Research Center Variable Stability CH-47B helicopter operating in fixed-basis simulator mode. The piloting task consisted of maintaining the simulated vehicle over a moving hover pad whose motion was described by a random-appearing sum of sinusoids. The two test subjects used a head-down, color cathode ray tube (CRT) display for guidance and control information. Test configurations differed in the number of axes being controlled by the pilot (longitudinal only versus longitudinal and lateral), and in the presence or absence of an important display indicator called an 'acceleration ball'. A number of different pilot-vehicle transfer functions were measured, and where appropriate, qualitatively compared with theoretical pilot- vehicle models. Some indirect evidence suggesting pursuit behavior on the part of the test subjects is discussed.

  10. Integrated Turbine-Based Combined Cycle Dynamic Simulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haid, Daniel A.; Gamble, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    A Turbine-Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) dynamic simulation model has been developed to demonstrate all modes of operation, including mode transition, for a turbine-based combined cycle propulsion system. The High Mach Transient Engine Cycle Code (HiTECC) is a highly integrated tool comprised of modules for modeling each of the TBCC systems whose interactions and controllability affect the TBCC propulsion system thrust and operability during its modes of operation. By structuring the simulation modeling tools around the major TBCC functional modes of operation (Dry Turbojet, Afterburning Turbojet, Transition, and Dual Mode Scramjet) the TBCC mode transition and all necessary intermediate events over its entire mission may be developed, modeled, and validated. The reported work details the use of the completed model to simulate a TBCC propulsion system as it accelerates from Mach 2.5, through mode transition, to Mach 7. The completion of this model and its subsequent use to simulate TBCC mode transition significantly extends the state-of-the-art for all TBCC modes of operation by providing a numerical simulation of the systems, interactions, and transient responses affecting the ability of the propulsion system to transition from turbine-based to ramjet/scramjet-based propulsion while maintaining constant thrust.

  11. Thermostat artifacts in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Buchete, Nicolae-Viorel; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We explore the effects of thermostats in replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations. For thermostats that do not produce a canonical ensemble, REMD simulations are found to distort the configuration-space distributions. For bulk water, we find small deviations of the average potential energies, the buildup of tails in the potential energy distributions, and artificial correlations between the energies at different temperatures. If a solute is present, as in protein folding simulations, its conformational equilibrium can be altered. In REMD simulations of a helix-forming peptide with a weak-coupling (Berendsen) thermostat, we find that the folded state is overpopulated by about 10% at low temperatures, and underpopulated at high temperatures. As a consequence, the enthalpy of folding deviates by almost 3 kcal/mol from the correct value. The reason for this population shift is that non-canonical ensembles with narrowed potential energy fluctuations artificially bias toward replica exchanges between low-energy folded structures at the high temperature and high-energy unfolded structures at the low temperature. We conclude that REMD simulations should only be performed in conjunction with thermostats that produce a canonical ensemble.

  12. Dissociation dynamics of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamura, K.; Shibuta, Y.; Ohmura, S.; Arifin, R.; Shimojo, F.

    2016-04-01

    The atomistic mechanism of dissociative adsorption of ethylene molecules on a Ni cluster is investigated by ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. The activation free energy to dehydrogenate an ethylene molecule on the Ni cluster and the corresponding reaction rate is estimated. A remarkable finding is that the adsorption energy of ethylene molecules on the Ni cluster is considerably larger than the activation free energy, which explains why the actual reaction rate is faster than the value estimated based on only the activation free energy. It is also found from the dynamic simulations that hydrogen molecules and an ethane molecule are formed from the dissociated hydrogen atoms, whereas some exist as single atoms on the surface or in the interior of the Ni cluster. On the other hand, the dissociation of the C-C bonds of ethylene molecules is not observed. On the basis of these simulation results, the nature of the initial stage of carbon nanotube growth is discussed.

  13. Structure and dynamics of aqueous solutions from PBE-based first-principles molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Lau, Edmond Y.; Schwegler, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Establishing an accurate and predictive computational framework for the description of complex aqueous solutions is an ongoing challenge for density functional theory based first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) simulations. In this context, important advances have been made in recent years, including the development of sophisticated exchange-correlation functionals. On the other hand, simulations based on simple generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals remain an active field, particularly in the study of complex aqueous solutions due to a good balance between the accuracy, computational expense, and the applicability to a wide range of systems. Such simulations are often performed at elevated temperatures to artificially "correct" for GGA inaccuracies in the description of liquid water; however, a detailed understanding of how the choice of temperature affects the structure and dynamics of other components, such as solvated ions, is largely unknown. To address this question, we carried out a series of FPMD simulations at temperatures ranging from 300 to 460 K for liquid water and three representative aqueous solutions containing solvated Na+, K+, and Cl- ions. We show that simulations at 390-400 K with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional yield water structure and dynamics in good agreement with experiments at ambient conditions. Simultaneously, this computational setup provides ion solvation structures and ion effects on water dynamics consistent with experiments. Our results suggest that an elevated temperature around 390-400 K with the PBE functional can be used for the description of structural and dynamical properties of liquid water and complex solutions with solvated ions at ambient conditions.

  14. Aneesur Rahman Prize Talk: Dynamics of Entangled Polymer Melts: Perceptive from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.

    2008-03-01

    Twenty years ago at the APS March Meeting, Kurt Kremer and I presented the first numerical evidence from computer simulations that the reptation model of Edwards and de Gennes correctly describes the dynamics of entangled linear polymer melts. For chains longer than the entanglement length Ne, the monomers of a chain move predominantly along their own contour. The distinctive signature of reptation dynamics, which we observed, was that on intermediate time scales, the mean squared displacement of a monomer increases with time as t^ 1/4. Though these early simulations were limited to chains of a few Ne, they demonstrated the potential of computer simulations to contribute to our understanding of polymer dynamics. Here I will review the progress over the past twenty years and present an outlook for the future in modeling entangled polymer melts and networks. With present day computers coupled with efficient parallel molecular dynamics codes, it is now possible to follow the equilibrium dynamics of chains of length 10-20Ne from the early Rouse regime to the long time diffusive regime. Result of these simulations support the earlier results obtained on chains of only a few Ne. Further evidence for the tube models of polymer dynamics has been obtained by identifying the primitive path mesh that characterizes the microscopic topological state of the computer- generated conformations of the chains. In particular, the plateau moduli derived on the basis of this analysis quantitatively reproduce experimental data for a wide spectrum of entangled polymer liquids including semi-dilute theta solutions of synthetic polymers, the corresponding dense melts, and solutions of semi-flexible (bio)polymers such as f-actin or suspensions of rodlike viruses. We also find that in agreement with the reptation model, the stress, end-to-end distance and entanglement length of an entangled melt subjected to uniaxial elongation, all relax on the same time scale.

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations from SNL's Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Plimpton, Steve; Thompson, Aidan; Crozier, Paul

    LAMMPS (http://lammps.sandia.gov/index.html) stands for Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator and is a code that can be used to model atoms or, as the LAMMPS website says, as a parallel particle simulator at the atomic, meso, or continuum scale. This Sandia-based website provides a long list of animations from large simulations. These were created using different visualization packages to read LAMMPS output, and each one provides the name of the PI and a brief description of the work done or visualization package used. See also the static images produced from simulations at http://lammps.sandia.gov/pictures.html The foundation paper for LAMMPS is: S. Plimpton, Fast Parallel Algorithms for Short-Range Molecular Dynamics, J Comp Phys, 117, 1-19 (1995), but the website also lists other papers describing contributions to LAMMPS over the years.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen diffusion in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. W.; El Gabaly, F.; Stavila, V.; Allendorf, M. D.

    2016-03-23

    In this study, hydrogen diffusion impacts the performance of solid-state hydrogen storage materials and contributes to the embrittlement of structural materials under hydrogen-containing environments. In atomistic simulations, the diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated using molecular statics simulations where a nudged elastic band method is used to constrain a path connecting the two end points of an atomic jump. This approach requires prior knowledge of the “end points”. For alloy and defective systems, the number of possible atomic jumps with respect to local atomic configurations is tremendous. Even when these jumps can be exhaustively studied, it is still unclear how they can be combined to give an overall diffusion behavior seen in experiments. Here we describe the use of molecular dynamics simulations to determine the overall diffusion energy barrier from the Arrhenius equation. This method does not require information about atomic jumps, and it has additional advantages, such as the ability to incorporate finite temperature effects and to determine the pre-exponential factor. As a test case for a generic method, we focus on hydrogen diffusion in bulk aluminum. We find that the challenge of this method is the statistical variation of the results. However, highly converged energy barriers can be achieved by an appropriate set of temperatures, output time intervals (for tracking hydrogen positions), and a long total simulation time. Our results help elucidate the inconsistencies of the experimental diffusion data published in the literature. The robust approach developed here may also open up future molecular dynamics simulations to rapidly study diffusion properties of complex material systems in multidimensional spaces involving composition and defects.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen diffusion in aluminum

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, X. W.; El Gabaly, F.; Stavila, V.; ...

    2016-03-23

    In this study, hydrogen diffusion impacts the performance of solid-state hydrogen storage materials and contributes to the embrittlement of structural materials under hydrogen-containing environments. In atomistic simulations, the diffusion energy barriers are usually calculated using molecular statics simulations where a nudged elastic band method is used to constrain a path connecting the two end points of an atomic jump. This approach requires prior knowledge of the “end points”. For alloy and defective systems, the number of possible atomic jumps with respect to local atomic configurations is tremendous. Even when these jumps can be exhaustively studied, it is still unclear howmore » they can be combined to give an overall diffusion behavior seen in experiments. Here we describe the use of molecular dynamics simulations to determine the overall diffusion energy barrier from the Arrhenius equation. This method does not require information about atomic jumps, and it has additional advantages, such as the ability to incorporate finite temperature effects and to determine the pre-exponential factor. As a test case for a generic method, we focus on hydrogen diffusion in bulk aluminum. We find that the challenge of this method is the statistical variation of the results. However, highly converged energy barriers can be achieved by an appropriate set of temperatures, output time intervals (for tracking hydrogen positions), and a long total simulation time. Our results help elucidate the inconsistencies of the experimental diffusion data published in the literature. The robust approach developed here may also open up future molecular dynamics simulations to rapidly study diffusion properties of complex material systems in multidimensional spaces involving composition and defects.« less

  18. A dynamic motion simulator for future European docking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brondino, G.; Marchal, PH.; Grimbert, D.; Noirault, P.

    1990-01-01

    Europe's first confrontation with docking in space will require extensive testing to verify design and performance and to qualify hardware. For this purpose, a Docking Dynamics Test Facility (DDTF) was developed. It allows reproduction on the ground of the same impact loads and relative motion dynamics which would occur in space during docking. It uses a 9 degree of freedom, servo-motion system, controlled by a real time computer, which simulates the docking spacecraft in a zero-g environment. The test technique involves and active loop based on six axis force and torque detection, a mathematical simulation of individual spacecraft dynamics, and a 9 degree of freedom servomotion of which 3 DOFs allow extension of the kinematic range to 5 m. The configuration was checked out by closed loop tests involving spacecraft control models and real sensor hardware. The test facility at present has an extensive configuration that allows evaluation of both proximity control and docking systems. It provides a versatile tool to verify system design, hardware items and performance capabilities in the ongoing HERMES and COLUMBUS programs. The test system is described and its capabilities are summarized.

  19. Computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics around cations and anions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-03-03

    In this paper, we present the first computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics between the first and second solvation shells around different cations and anions. After water, methanol is the most frequently used solvent for ions. Methanol has different structural and dynamical properties than water, so its ion solvation process is different. To this end, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable potential models to describe methanol-methanol and ion-methanol interactions. In particular, we computed methanol exchange rates by employing the transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux approach, and the Grote-Hynes theory. We observed that methanol exchange occurs at a nanosecond time scale for Na+ and at a picosecond time scale for other ions. We also observed a trend in which, for like charges, the exchange rate is slower for smaller ions because they are more strongly bound to methanol. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  20. Pattern Recognition for a Flight Dynamics Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Restrepo, Carolina; Hurtado, John E.

    2011-01-01

    The design, analysis, and verification and validation of a spacecraft relies heavily on Monte Carlo simulations. Modern computational techniques are able to generate large amounts of Monte Carlo data but flight dynamics engineers lack the time and resources to analyze it all. The growing amounts of data combined with the diminished available time of engineers motivates the need to automate the analysis process. Pattern recognition algorithms are an innovative way of analyzing flight dynamics data efficiently. They can search large data sets for specific patterns and highlight critical variables so analysts can focus their analysis efforts. This work combines a few tractable pattern recognition algorithms with basic flight dynamics concepts to build a practical analysis tool for Monte Carlo simulations. Current results show that this tool can quickly and automatically identify individual design parameters, and most importantly, specific combinations of parameters that should be avoided in order to prevent specific system failures. The current version uses a kernel density estimation algorithm and a sequential feature selection algorithm combined with a k-nearest neighbor classifier to find and rank important design parameters. This provides an increased level of confidence in the analysis and saves a significant amount of time.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  2. Weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics simulations for protein association reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, G A; Kim, S

    1996-01-01

    A new method, weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics, is proposed for the simulation of protein-association reactions and other events whose frequencies of outcomes are constricted by free energy barriers. The method features a weighted ensemble of trajectories in configuration space with energy levels dictating the proper correspondence between "particles" and probability. Instead of waiting a very long time for an unlikely event to occur, the probability packets are split, and small packets of probability are allowed to diffuse almost immediately into regions of configuration space that are less likely to be sampled. The method has been applied to the Northrup and Erickson (1992) model of docking-type diffusion-limited reactions and yields reaction rate constants in agreement with those obtained by direct Brownian simulation, but at a fraction of the CPU time (10(-4) to 10(-3), depending on the model). Because the method is essentially a variant of standard Brownian dynamics algorithms, it is anticipated that weighted-ensemble Brownian dynamics, in conjunction with biophysical force models, can be applied to a large class of association reactions of interest to the biophysics community. Images FIGURE 4 PMID:8770190

  3. Helicopter flight dynamics simulation with refined aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Colin Rhys

    This dissertation describes the development of a coupled rotor-fuselage flight dynamic simulation that includes a maneuvering free wake model and a coupled flap-lag-torsion flexible blade representation. This mathematical model is used to investigate effects of main rotor inflow and blade modeling on various flight dynamics characteristics for both articulated and hingeless rotor helicopters. The inclusion of the free wake model requires the development of new numerical procedures for the calculation of trim equilibrium positions, for the extraction of high-order, constant coefficient linearized models, and for the calculation of the free flight responses to arbitrary pilot inputs. The free wake model, previously developed by other investigators at the University of Maryland, is capable of modeling the changes in rotor wake geometry resulting from maneuvers, and the effects of such changes on the main rotor inflow. The overall flight dynamic model is capable of simulating the helicopter behavior during maneuvers that can be arbitrarily large. The combination of sophisticated models of rotor wake and blade flexibility enables the flight dynamics model to capture the effects of maneuvers with unprecedented accuracy for simulations based on first principles: this is the main contribution of the research presented in this dissertation. The increased accuracy brought about by the free wake model significantly improves the predictions of the helicopter trim state for both helicopter configurations considered in this study. This is especially true in low speed flight and hover. The most significant improvements are seen in the predictions of the main rotor collective and power required by the rotor, which can be significantly underpredicted using traditional linear inflow models. Results show that the free-flight on-axis responses to pilot inputs can be predicted with good accuracy with a relatively unsophisticated models that do not include either a free wake nor a

  4. Molecular dynamic simulations of the water absorbency of hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiang; Han, Qiang; Dai, Hui-Hui; Wang, Jiong

    2015-09-01

    A polymer gel can imbibe solvent molecules through surface tension effect. When the solvent happens to be water, the gel can swell to a large extent and forms an aggregate called hydrogel. The large deformation caused by such swelling makes it difficult to study the behaviors of hydrogels. Currently, few molecular dynamic simulation works have been reported on the water absorbing mechanism of hydrogels. In this paper, we first use molecular dynamic simulation to study the water absorbing mechanism of hydrogels and propose a hydrogel-water interface model to study the water absorbency of the hydrogel surface. Also, the saturated water content and volume expansion rate of the hydrogel are investigated by building a hydrogel model with different cross-linking degree and by comparing the water absorption curves under different temperatures. The sample hydrogel model used consists of Polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (PEGDGE) as epoxy and the Jeffamine, poly-oxy-alkylene-amines, as curing agent. The conclusions obtained are useful for further investigation on PEGDGE/Jeffamine hydrogel. Moreover, the simulation methods, including hydrogel-water interface modeling, we first propose are also suitable to study the water absorbing mechanism of other hydrogels.

  5. Thermostat for nonequilibrium multiparticle-collision-dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Varghese, Anoop; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G.

    2015-01-01

    Multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC), a particle-based mesoscale simulation technique for complex fluid, is widely employed in nonequilibrium simulations of soft matter systems. To maintain a defined thermodynamic state, thermalization of the fluid is often required for certain MPC variants. We investigate the influence of three thermostats on the nonequilibrium properties of a MPC fluid under shear or in Poiseuille flow. In all cases, the local velocities are scaled by a factor, which is either determined via a local simple scaling approach (LSS), a Monte Carlo-like procedure (MCS), or by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kinetic energy (MBS). We find that the various scaling schemes leave the flow profile unchanged and maintain the local temperature well. The fluid viscosities extracted from the various simulations are in close agreement. Moreover, the numerically determined viscosities are in remarkably good agreement with the respective theoretically predicted values. At equilibrium, the calculation of the dynamic structure factor reveals that the MBS method closely resembles an isothermal ensemble, whereas the MCS procedure exhibits signatures of an adiabatic system at larger collision-time steps. Since the velocity distribution of the LSS approach is non-Gaussian, we recommend to apply the MBS thermostat, which has been shown to produce the correct velocity distribution even under nonequilibrium conditions.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations through GPU video games technologies

    PubMed Central

    Loukatou, Styliani; Papageorgiou, Louis; Fakourelis, Paraskevas; Filntisi, Arianna; Polychronidou, Eleftheria; Bassis, Ioannis; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Makałowski, Wojciech; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics is the scientific field that focuses on the application of computer technology to the management of biological information. Over the years, bioinformatics applications have been used to store, process and integrate biological and genetic information, using a wide range of methodologies. One of the most de novo techniques used to understand the physical movements of atoms and molecules is molecular dynamics (MD). MD is an in silico method to simulate the physical motions of atoms and molecules under certain conditions. This has become a state strategic technique and now plays a key role in many areas of exact sciences, such as chemistry, biology, physics and medicine. Due to their complexity, MD calculations could require enormous amounts of computer memory and time and therefore their execution has been a big problem. Despite the huge computational cost, molecular dynamics have been implemented using traditional computers with a central memory unit (CPU). A graphics processing unit (GPU) computing technology was first designed with the goal to improve video games, by rapidly creating and displaying images in a frame buffer such as screens. The hybrid GPU-CPU implementation, combined with parallel computing is a novel technology to perform a wide range of calculations. GPUs have been proposed and used to accelerate many scientific computations including MD simulations. Herein, we describe the new methodologies developed initially as video games and how they are now applied in MD simulations. PMID:27525251

  7. Parareal in Time for Dynamic Simulations of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gurrala, Gurunath; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Starke, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been significant developments in parallel algorithms and high performance parallel computing platforms. Parareal in time algorithm has become popular for long transient simulations (e.g., molecular dynamics, fusion, reacting flows). Parareal is a parallel algorithm which divides the time interval into sub-intervals and solves them concurrently. This paper investigates the applicability of the parareal algorithm to power system dynamic simulations. Preliminary results on the application of parareal for multi-machine power systems are reported in this paper. Two widely used test systems, WECC 3-generator 9-bus system, New England 10-generator 39- bus system, is used to explore the effectiveness of the parareal. Severe 3 phase bus faults are simulated using both the classical and detailed models of multi-machine power systems. Actual Speedup of 5-7 times is observed assuming ideal parallelization. It has been observed that the speedup factors of the order of 20 can be achieved by using fast coarse approximations of power system models. Dependency of parareal convergence on fault duration and location has been observed.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations through GPU video games technologies.

    PubMed

    Loukatou, Styliani; Papageorgiou, Louis; Fakourelis, Paraskevas; Filntisi, Arianna; Polychronidou, Eleftheria; Bassis, Ioannis; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Makałowski, Wojciech; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia

    Bioinformatics is the scientific field that focuses on the application of computer technology to the management of biological information. Over the years, bioinformatics applications have been used to store, process and integrate biological and genetic information, using a wide range of methodologies. One of the most de novo techniques used to understand the physical movements of atoms and molecules is molecular dynamics (MD). MD is an in silico method to simulate the physical motions of atoms and molecules under certain conditions. This has become a state strategic technique and now plays a key role in many areas of exact sciences, such as chemistry, biology, physics and medicine. Due to their complexity, MD calculations could require enormous amounts of computer memory and time and therefore their execution has been a big problem. Despite the huge computational cost, molecular dynamics have been implemented using traditional computers with a central memory unit (CPU). A graphics processing unit (GPU) computing technology was first designed with the goal to improve video games, by rapidly creating and displaying images in a frame buffer such as screens. The hybrid GPU-CPU implementation, combined with parallel computing is a novel technology to perform a wide range of calculations. GPUs have been proposed and used to accelerate many scientific computations including MD simulations. Herein, we describe the new methodologies developed initially as video games and how they are now applied in MD simulations.

  9. Thermostat for nonequilibrium multiparticle-collision-dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Cheng; Varghese, Anoop; Gompper, Gerhard; Winkler, Roland G

    2015-01-01

    Multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC), a particle-based mesoscale simulation technique for complex fluid, is widely employed in nonequilibrium simulations of soft matter systems. To maintain a defined thermodynamic state, thermalization of the fluid is often required for certain MPC variants. We investigate the influence of three thermostats on the nonequilibrium properties of a MPC fluid under shear or in Poiseuille flow. In all cases, the local velocities are scaled by a factor, which is either determined via a local simple scaling approach (LSS), a Monte Carlo-like procedure (MCS), or by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of kinetic energy (MBS). We find that the various scaling schemes leave the flow profile unchanged and maintain the local temperature well. The fluid viscosities extracted from the various simulations are in close agreement. Moreover, the numerically determined viscosities are in remarkably good agreement with the respective theoretically predicted values. At equilibrium, the calculation of the dynamic structure factor reveals that the MBS method closely resembles an isothermal ensemble, whereas the MCS procedure exhibits signatures of an adiabatic system at larger collision-time steps. Since the velocity distribution of the LSS approach is non-Gaussian, we recommend to apply the MBS thermostat, which has been shown to produce the correct velocity distribution even under nonequilibrium conditions.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Binary Fluid in a Nanochannel

    SciTech Connect

    Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pathania, Y.

    2011-12-12

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of binary fluid (mixture of argon and krypton) in the nanochannel flow. The computational software LAMMPS is used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations. Binary fluids of argon and krypton with varying concentration of atom species were taken for two densities 0.65 and 0.45. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. To drive the flow, a constant force is applied in one direction. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Week-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) potential. The velocity profile has been looked at for three nanochannel widths i.e for 12{sigma}, 14{sigma} and 16{sigma} and also for the different concentration of two species. The velocity profile of the binary fluid predicted by the simulations agrees with the quadratic shape of the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow in continuum theory.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of TCDD adsorption on organo-montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Runliang; Hu, Wenhao; You, Zhimin; Ge, Fei; Tian, Kaixun

    2012-07-01

    In this work, molecular dynamics simulation was applied to investigate the adsorption of Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD) on tetramethylammonium (TMA) and tetrapropylammonium (TPA) modified montmorillonite, with the aim of providing novel information for understanding the adsorptive characteristics of organo-montmorillonite toward organic contaminants. The simulation results showed that on both outer surface and interlayer space of TPA modified montmorillonite (TPA-mont), TCDD was adsorbed between the TPA cations with the molecular edge facing siloxane surface. Similar result was observed for the adsorption on the outer surface of TMA modified montmorillonite (TMA-mont). These results indicated that TCDD had stronger interaction with organic cation than with siloxane surface. While in the interlayer space of TMA-mont, TCDD showed a coplanar orientation with the siloxane surfaces, which could be ascribed to the limited gallery height within TMA-mont interlayer. Comparing with TMA-mont, TPA-mont had larger adsorption energy toward TCDD but smaller interlayer space to accommodate TCDD. Our results indicated that molecular dynamics simulation can be a powerful tool in characterizing the adsorptive characteristics of organoclays and provided additional proof that for the organo-montmorillonite synthesized with small organic cations, the available interlayer space rather than the attractive force plays the dominant role for their adsorption capacity toward HOCs.

  12. Energy conservation in molecular dynamics simulations of classical systems.

    PubMed

    Toxvaerd, Søren; Heilmann, Ole J; Dyre, Jeppe C

    2012-06-14

    Classical Newtonian dynamics is analytic and the energy of an isolated system is conserved. The energy of such a system, obtained by the discrete "Verlet" algorithm commonly used in molecular dynamics simulations, fluctuates but is conserved in the mean. This is explained by the existence of a "shadow Hamiltonian" H [S. Toxvaerd, Phys. Rev. E 50, 2271 (1994)], i.e., a Hamiltonian close to the original H with the property that the discrete positions of the Verlet algorithm for H lie on the analytic trajectories of H. The shadow Hamiltonian can be obtained from H by an asymptotic expansion in the time step length. Here we use the first non-trivial term in this expansion to obtain an improved estimate of the discrete values of the energy. The investigation is performed for a representative system with Lennard-Jones pair interactions. The simulations show that inclusion of this term reduces the standard deviation of the energy fluctuations by a factor of 100 for typical values of the time step length. Simulations further show that the energy is conserved for at least one hundred million time steps provided the potential and its first four derivatives are continuous at the cutoff. Finally, we show analytically as well as numerically that energy conservation is not sensitive to round-off errors.

  13. Parallel methods for dynamic simulation of multiple manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Scott; Sadayappan, P.; Orin, David E.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, efficient dynamic simulation algorithms for a system of m manipulators, cooperating to manipulate a large load, are developed; their performance, using two possible forms of parallelism on a general-purpose parallel computer, is investigated. One form, temporal parallelism, is obtained with the use of parallel numerical integration methods. A speedup of 3.78 on four processors of CRAY Y-MP8 was achieved with a parallel four-point block predictor-corrector method for the simulation of a four manipulator system. These multi-point methods suffer from reduced accuracy, and when comparing these runs with a serial integration method, the speedup can be as low as 1.83 for simulations with the same accuracy. To regain the performance lost due to accuracy problems, a second form of parallelism is employed. Spatial parallelism allows most of the dynamics of each manipulator chain to be computed simultaneously. Used exclusively in the four processor case, this form of parallelism in conjunction with a serial integration method results in a speedup of 3.1 on four processors over the best serial method. In cases where there are either more processors available or fewer chains in the system, the multi-point parallel integration methods are still advantageous despite the reduced accuracy because both forms of parallelism can then combine to generate more parallel tasks and achieve greater effective speedups. This paper also includes results for these cases.

  14. Theoretical studies of lipid bilayer electroporation using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary Alan

    Computer simulations of physical, chemical, and biological systems have improved tremendously over the past five decades. From simple studies of liquid argon in the 1960s to fully atomistic simulations of entire viruses in the past few years, recent advances in high-performance computing have continuously enabled simulations to bridge the gap between scientific theory and experiment. Molecular dynamics simulations in particular have allowed for the direct observation of spatial and temporal events which are at present inaccessible to experiments. For this dissertation I employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the transient, electric field-induced poration (or electroporation) of phospholipid bilayers at MV/m electric fields. Phospholipid bilayers are the dominant constituents of cell membranes and act as both a barrier and gatekeeper to the cell interior. This makes their structural integrity and susceptibility to external perturbations an important topic for study, especially as the density of electromagnetic radiation in our environment is increasing steadily. The primary goal of this dissertation is to understand the specific physical and biological mechanisms which facilitate electroporation, and to connect our simulated observations to experiments with live cells and to continuum models which seek to describe the underlying biological processes of electroporation. In Chapter 1 I begin with a brief introduction to phospholipids and phospholipid bilayers, followed by an extensive overview of electroporation and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The following chapters will then focus on peer-reviewed and published work we performed, or on existing projects which are currently being prepared for submission. Chapter 2 looks at how external electric fields affect both oxidized and unoxidized lipid bilayers as a function of oxidation concentration and oxidized lipid type. Oxidative damage to cell membranes represents a physiologically relevant

  15. Collective dynamics of a photosynthetic protein probed by neutron spin-echo spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellerue, S.; Petrescu, A.; Smith, J. C.; Longeville, S.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    2000-03-01

    We have studied the collective dynamics of an hydrated soluble protein, the C-phycocyanin by using neutron spin-echo spectroscopy. Molecular dynamics simulations, performed with the same system, showed that the main dynamic contribution comes from backbone and side-chain motions. Both the experimental and spectra exhibit a dynamic relaxation with a characteristic time of about 10 ps.

  16. Emulation of dynamic simulators with application to hydrology

    SciTech Connect

    Machac, David; Reichert, Peter; Albert, Carlo

    2016-05-15

    Many simulation-intensive tasks in the applied sciences, such as sensitivity analysis, parameter inference or real time control, are hampered by slow simulators. Emulators provide the opportunity of speeding up simulations at the cost of introducing some inaccuracy. An emulator is a fast approximation to a simulator that interpolates between design input–output pairs of the simulator. Increasing the number of design data sets is a computationally demanding way of improving the accuracy of emulation. We investigate the complementary approach of increasing emulation accuracy by including knowledge about the mechanisms of the simulator into the formulation of the emulator. To approximately reproduce the output of dynamic simulators, we consider emulators that are based on a system of linear, ordinary or partial stochastic differential equations with a noise term formulated as a Gaussian process of the parameters to be emulated. This stochastic model is then conditioned to the design data so that it mimics the behavior of the nonlinear simulator as a function of the parameters. The drift terms of the linear model are designed to provide a simplified description of the simulator as a function of its key parameters so that the required corrections by the conditioned Gaussian process noise are as small as possible. The goal of this paper is to compare the gain in accuracy of these emulators by enlarging the design data set and by varying the degree of simplification of the linear model. We apply this framework to a simulator for the shallow water equations in a channel and compare emulation accuracy for emulators based on different spatial discretization levels of the channel and for a standard non-mechanistic emulator. Our results indicate that we have a large gain in accuracy already when using the simplest mechanistic description by a single linear reservoir to formulate the drift term of the linear model. Adding some more reservoirs does not lead to a significant

  17. Emulation of dynamic simulators with application to hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machac, David; Reichert, Peter; Albert, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Many simulation-intensive tasks in the applied sciences, such as sensitivity analysis, parameter inference or real time control, are hampered by slow simulators. Emulators provide the opportunity of speeding up simulations at the cost of introducing some inaccuracy. An emulator is a fast approximation to a simulator that interpolates between design input-output pairs of the simulator. Increasing the number of design data sets is a computationally demanding way of improving the accuracy of emulation. We investigate the complementary approach of increasing emulation accuracy by including knowledge about the mechanisms of the simulator into the formulation of the emulator. To approximately reproduce the output of dynamic simulators, we consider emulators that are based on a system of linear, ordinary or partial stochastic differential equations with a noise term formulated as a Gaussian process of the parameters to be emulated. This stochastic model is then conditioned to the design data so that it mimics the behavior of the nonlinear simulator as a function of the parameters. The drift terms of the linear model are designed to provide a simplified description of the simulator as a function of its key parameters so that the required corrections by the conditioned Gaussian process noise are as small as possible. The goal of this paper is to compare the gain in accuracy of these emulators by enlarging the design data set and by varying the degree of simplification of the linear model. We apply this framework to a simulator for the shallow water equations in a channel and compare emulation accuracy for emulators based on different spatial discretization levels of the channel and for a standard non-mechanistic emulator. Our results indicate that we have a large gain in accuracy already when using the simplest mechanistic description by a single linear reservoir to formulate the drift term of the linear model. Adding some more reservoirs does not lead to a significant

  18. Static and dynamic contact angles of water droplet on a solid surface using molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Do; Ha, Man Yeong; Balachandar, S

    2009-11-01

    The present study investigates the variation of static contact angle of a water droplet in equilibrium with a solid surface in the absence of a body force and the dynamic contact angles of water droplet moving on a solid surface for different characteristic energies using the molecular dynamics simulation. With increasing characteristic energy, the static contact angle in equilibrium with a solid surface in the absence of a body force decreases because the hydrophobic surface changes its characteristics to the hydrophilic surface. In order to consider the effect of moving water droplet on the dynamic contact angles, we apply the constant acceleration to an individual oxygen and hydrogen atom. In the presence of a body force, the water droplet changes its shape with larger advancing contact angle than the receding angle. The dynamic contact angles are compared with the static contact angle in order to see the effect of the presence of a body force.

  19. Quantum mechanics simulation of protein dynamics on long timescale.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Elstner, M; Kaxiras, E; Frauenheim, T; Hermans, J; Yang, W

    2001-09-01

    Protein structure and dynamics are the keys to a wide range of problems in biology. In principle, both can be fully understood by using quantum mechanics as the ultimate tool to unveil the molecular interactions involved. Indeed, quantum mechanics of atoms and molecules have come to play a central role in chemistry and physics. In practice, however, direct application of quantum mechanics to protein systems has been prohibited by the large molecular size of proteins. As a consequence, there is no general quantum mechanical treatment that not only exceeds the accuracy of state-of-the-art empirical models for proteins but also maintains the efficiency needed for extensive sampling in the conformational space, a requirement mandated by the complexity of protein systems. Here we show that, given recent developments in methods, a general quantum mechanical-based treatment can be constructed. We report a molecular dynamics simulation of a protein, crambin, in solution for 350 ps in which we combine a semiempirical quantum-mechanical description of the entire protein with a description of the surrounding solvent, and solvent-protein interactions based on a molecular mechanics force field. Comparison with a recent very high-resolution crystal structure of crambin (Jelsch et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2000;102:2246-2251) shows that geometrical detail is better reproduced in this simulation than when several alternate molecular mechanics force fields are used to describe the entire system of protein and solvent, even though the structure is no less flexible. Individual atomic charges deviate in both directions from "canonical" values, and some charge transfer is found between the N and C-termini. The capability of simulating protein dynamics on and beyond the few hundred ps timescale with a demonstrably accurate quantum mechanical model will bring new opportunities to extend our understanding of a range of basic processes in biology such as molecular recognition and enzyme

  20. Decoherence Allows Model Reduction in Nonadiabatic Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Dhara J; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-08-20

    A nonadiabatic (NA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation requires calculation of NA coupling matrix elements, the number of which scales as a square of the number of basis states. The basis size can be huge in studies of nanoscale materials, and calculation of the NA couplings can present a significant bottleneck. A quantum-classical approximation, NAMD overestimates coherence in the quantum, electronic subsystem, requiring decoherence correction. Generally, decoherence times decrease with increasing energy separation between pairs of states forming coherent superpositions. Since rapid decoherence stops quantum dynamics, one expects that decoherence-corrected NAMD can eliminate the need for calculation of NA couplings between energetically distant states, notably reducing the computational cost. Considering several types of dynamics in a semiconductor quantum dot, we demonstrate that indeed, decoherence allows one to reduce the number of needed NA coupling matrix elements. If the energy levels are spaced closer than 0.1 eV, one obtains good results while including only three nearest-neighbor couplings, and in some cases even with just the first nearest-neighbor coupling scheme. If the energy levels are spaced by about 0.4 eV, the nearest-neighbor model fails, while three or more nearest-neighbor schemes also provide good results. In comparison, the results of NAMD simulation without decoherence vary continuously with changes in the number of NA couplings. Thus, decoherence effects induced by coupling to a quantum-mechanical environment not only provide the physical mechanism for NAMD trajectory branding and improve the accuracy of NAMD simulations, but also afford significant computational savings.

  1. Dynamic simulation and parameter estimation in river streams.

    PubMed

    Karadurmus, E; Berber, R

    2004-04-01

    Predictions and quality management issues for environmental protection in river basins rely on water-quality models. The key step in model calibration and verification is obtaining the right values of the model parameters. Current practice in model calibration is such that the reaction coefficients are adjusted by trial-and-error until the predicted values and measured data are within a pre-selected margin of error, and this may be a very time consuming task. This study is directed towards developing a parameter estimation strategy coupled with the simulation of water quality models so that the heavy burden of finding reaction rate coefficients is overcome. Dynamic mass balances for different forms of nitrogen and phosphorus, biological oxygen demand, dissolved oxygen, coliforms, nonconservative constituent and algae were written for a single computational element. The model parameters conforming to those in QUAL2E water quality model were estimated by a nonlinear multi-response parameter estimation strategy coupled with a stiff integrator. Yesilirmak river basin around the city of Amasya in Turkey served as the prototype system for the model development. Samples were collected simultaneously from two stations, and concentrations of many water-quality constituents were determined either on-site or in laboratory. This dynamic data was then used for numerical parameter estimation during computer simulation. When the model was simulated with the estimated parameters, it was seen that the model was quite able to predict the dynamics of major water quality constituents. It is concluded that the proposed method shows promise for automatically generating reliable estimates of model parameters.

  2. Dynamic damping control: Implementation issues and simulation results

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Computed torque algorithms are used to compensate for the changing dynamics of robot manipulators in order to ensure that a constant level of damping is maintained for all configurations. Unfortunately, there are three significant problems with existing computed torque algorithms. First, they are nonpassive and can lead to unstable behavior; second, they make inefficient use of actuator capability; and third, they cannot be used to maintain a constant end-effector stiffness for force control tasks. Recently, we introduced a new control algorithm for robots which, like computed torque, uses a model of the manipulator's dynamics to maintain a constant level of damping in the system, but does so passively. This new class of passive control algorithms has guaranteed stability properties, utilizes actuators more effectively, and can also be used to maintain constant end-effector stiffness. In this paper, this approach is described in detail, implementation issues are discussed, and simulation results are given. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Accurate direct Eulerian simulation of dynamic elastic-plastic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kamm, James R; Walter, John W

    2009-01-01

    The simulation of dynamic, large strain deformation is an important, difficult, and unsolved computational challenge. Existing Eulerian schemes for dynamic material response are plagued by unresolved issues. We present a new scheme for the first-order system of elasto-plasticity equations in the Eulerian frame. This system has an intrinsic constraint on the inverse deformation gradient. Standard Godunov schemes do not satisfy this constraint. The method of Flux Distributions (FD) was devised to discretely enforce such constraints for numerical schemes with cell-centered variables. We describe a Flux Distribution approach that enforces the inverse deformation gradient constraint. As this approach is new and novel, we do not yet have numerical results to validate our claims. This paper is the first installment of our program to develop this new method.

  4. Enhancing Protein Adsorption Simulations by Using Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Mücksch, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2013-01-01

    The atomistic modeling of protein adsorption on surfaces is hampered by the different time scales of the simulation ( s) and experiment (up to hours), and the accordingly different ‘final’ adsorption conformations. We provide evidence that the method of accelerated molecular dynamics is an efficient tool to obtain equilibrated adsorption states. As a model system we study the adsorption of the protein BMP-2 on graphite in an explicit salt water environment. We demonstrate that due to the considerably improved sampling of conformational space, accelerated molecular dynamics allows to observe the complete unfolding and spreading of the protein on the hydrophobic graphite surface. This result is in agreement with the general finding of protein denaturation upon contact with hydrophobic surfaces. PMID:23755156

  5. Trajectory-guided configuration interaction simulations of multidimensional quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott

    2012-02-07

    We propose an approach to modelling multidimensional quantum systems which uses direct-dynamics trajectories to guide wavefunction propagation. First, trajectory simulations are used to generate a sample of dynamically relevant configurations on the potential energy surface (PES). Second, the sampled configurations are used to construct an n-mode representation of the PES using a greedy algorithm. Finally, the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved using a configuration interaction expansion of the wavefunction, with individual basis functions derived directly from the 1-mode contributions to the n-mode PES. This approach is successfully demonstrated by application to a 20-dimensional benchmark problem describing tunnelling in the presence of coupled degrees of freedom.

  6. Trajectory-guided configuration interaction simulations of multidimensional quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Habershon, Scott

    2012-02-07

    We propose an approach to modelling multidimensional quantum systems which uses direct-dynamics trajectories to guide wavefunction propagation. First, trajectory simulations are used to generate a sample of dynamically relevant configurations on the potential energy surface (PES). Second, the sampled configurations are used to construct an n-mode representation of the PES using a greedy algorithm. Finally, the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is solved using a configuration interaction expansion of the wavefunction, with individual basis functions derived directly from the 1-mode contributions to the n-mode PES. This approach is successfully demonstrated by application to a 20-dimensional benchmark problem describing tunnelling in the presence of coupled degrees of freedom.

  7. Dynamical localization simulated on a few-qubit quantum computer

    SciTech Connect

    Benenti, Giuliano; Montangero, Simone; Casati, Giulio; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2003-05-01

    We show that a quantum computer operating with a small number of qubits can simulate the dynamical localization of classical chaos in a system described by the quantum sawtooth map model. The dynamics of the system is computed efficiently up to a time t{>=}l, and then the localization length l can be obtained with accuracy {nu} by means of order 1/{nu}{sup 2} computer runs, followed by coarse-grained projective measurements on the computational basis. We also show that in the presence of static imperfections, a reliable computation of the localization length is possible without error correction up to an imperfection threshold which drops polynomially with the number of qubits.

  8. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing the electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.

  9. Phase portrait methods for verifying fluid dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, H.B.

    1989-01-01

    As computing resources become more powerful and accessible, engineers more frequently face the difficult and challenging engineering problem of accurately simulating nonlinear dynamic phenomena. Although mathematical models are usually available, in the form of initial value problems for differential equations, the behavior of the solutions of nonlinear models is often poorly understood. A notable example is fluid dynamics: while the Navier-Stokes equations are believed to correctly describe turbulent flow, no exact mathematical solution of these equations in the turbulent regime is known. Differential equations can of course be solved numerically, but how are we to assess numerical solutions of complex phenomena without some understanding of the mathematical problem and its solutions to guide us

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of binary mixtures of molten alkali carbonates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissen, J. T. W. M.; Janssen, G. J. M.; van der Eerden, P.

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on three binary eutectic mixtures: Li/NaCO3 (53-47 mol%), Li/KCO3 (62-38 mol%) and KCO3 (43-57 mol%) at 1200 K. The short-range order in the mixtures differs in many respects from the short-range order found in the pure components. The Li+ ions are coordinated by a smaller number of oxygen atoms, the Na+ and K+ ions by a larger number. The Li+ ions become trapped in their first coordination shell, leaving relatively more space for the larger atoms. This feature is the cause of the often-observed non-additivity of the dynamic properties of these mixtures, such as the Chemla effect in Li/KCO3, the large negative deviations from linear additivity for the electrical conductivity, as well as the dependence of the self-diffusion coefficient of the cations on the Li2CO3 content.

  11. Clustering effects in ionic polymers: Molecular dynamics simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Agrawal, Anupriya; Perahia, Dvora; Grest, Gary S.

    2015-08-18

    Ionic clusters control the structure, dynamics, and transport in soft matter. Incorporating a small fraction of ionizable groups in polymers substantially reduces the mobility of the macromolecules in melts. Furthermore, these ionic groups often associate into random clusters in melts, where the distribution and morphology of the clusters impact the transport in these materials. Here, using molecular dynamic simulations we demonstrate a clear correlation between cluster size and morphology with the polymer mobility in melts of sulfonated polystyrene. We show that in low dielectric media ladderlike clusters that are lower in energy compared with spherical assemblies are formed. Reducing themore » electrostatic interactions by enhancing the dielectric constant leads to morphological transformation from ladderlike clusters to globular assemblies. Finally, decrease in electrostatic interaction significantly enhances the mobility of the polymer.« less

  12. Simulation of the photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Welch, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) uses six video cameras in the Space Shuttle cargo bay to measure vibration of the Russian Mir space station Kvant-ll solar array. It occurs on Shuttle/Mir docking mission STS-74 scheduled for launch in November 1995. The objective of PASDE is to demonstrate photogrammetric technology for measuring 'untargeted' spacecraft appendage structural dynamics. This paper discusses a pre-flight simulation test conducted in July 1995, focusing on the image processing aspects. The flight camera system recorded vibrations of a full-scale structural test article having grids of white lines on black background, similar in appearance to the Mir solar array. Using image correlation analysis, line intersections on the structure are tracked in the video recordings to resolutions of less than 0.1 pixel. Calibration and merging of multiple camera views generated 3-dimensional displacements from which structural modal parameters are then obtained.

  13. Unfolding dynamics of the protein ubiquitin: insight from simulation.

    PubMed

    Dastidar, Shubhra Ghosh; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2005-11-01

    The temperature-induced unfolding pathway of ubiquitin has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation at four different temperatures. It has been observed that the sequences of the unfolding events are same at all the temperatures. However, the time scale of the dynamics at different temperatures are different. The transition states at various temperatures also possess similar secondary structural elements. The intermediate conformations visited by the protein at different temperatures can help determination of the transition states. The well known " state" of ubiquitin, hitherto found to be stable only in methanol water mixture, have been observed to be a common transient intermediate conformation in the unfolding path of the protein in water. Our observation about the similarities of the unfolding process at different temperatures strongly recommend for a defined pathway for the unfolding process.

  14. Dynamic Simulation and Optimization of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul I. Barton; Mujid S. Kaximi; Georgios Bollas; Patricio Ramirez Munoz

    2009-07-31

    This project is part of a research effort to design a hydrogen plant and its interface with a nuclear reactor. This project developed a dynamic modeling, simulation and optimization environment for nuclear hydrogen production systems. A hybrid discrete/continuous model captures both the continuous dynamics of the nuclear plant, the hydrogen plant, and their interface, along with discrete events such as major upsets. This hybrid model makes us of accurate thermodynamic sub-models for the description of phase and reaction equilibria in the thermochemical reactor. Use of the detailed thermodynamic models will allow researchers to examine the process in detail and have confidence in the accurary of the property package they use.

  15. A family of dynamic models for large-eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, D.; Jansen, K.; Lund, T.

    1995-01-01

    Since its first application, the dynamic procedure has been recognized as an effective means to compute rather than prescribe the unknown coefficients that appear in a subgrid-scale model for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). The dynamic procedure is usually used to determine the nondimensional coefficient in the Smagorinsky (1963) model. In reality the procedure is quite general and it is not limited to the Smagorinsky model by any theoretical or practical constraints. The purpose of this note is to consider a generalized family of dynamic eddy viscosity models that do not necessarily rely on the local equilibrium assumption built into the Smagorinsky model. By invoking an inertial range assumption, it will be shown that the coefficients in the new models need not be nondimensional. This additional degree of freedom allows the use of models that are scaled on traditionally unknown quantities such as the dissipation rate. In certain cases, the dynamic models with dimensional coefficients are simpler to implement, and allow for a 30% reduction in the number of required filtering operations.

  16. Development of a methodology for defining whole-building energy design targets for commercial buildings: Phase 2, Development Concept Stage Report

    SciTech Connect

    Deringer, J.J. ); Hall, J.D. ); Jones, J.W. ); McKay, H.N. ); Alley, P.K. )

    1990-09-01

    The primary focus of the Whole-Building Energy Design Targets project is to develop a flexible methodology for setting target guidelines with which to assess energy efficiency in commercial building design. The proposed methodology has several innovative features. In this report, the authors document their work to define the software development concepts upon which the overall Targets methodology will be based. Three task reports are included here. Development of the user interface--that critical connection through which the human end-user (architect, engineer, planner, owner) will apply the methodology--is described in Section 2. In Section 3, the use of the software engineering process in Targets model development efforts is described. Section 4 provides details on the data and system integration task, in which interactions between and among all the major components, termed modules, of the Targets model were examined to determine how to put them together to create a methodology that is effective and easy to use. 4 refs., 26 figs.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of wetting on modified amorphous silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Jingchun; Liu, Shuyan; Yang, Xiaoning

    2009-08-01

    The microscopic wetting of water on amorphous silica surfaces has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Different degrees of surface hydroxylation/silanization were considered. It was observed that the hydrophobicity becomes enhanced with an increase in the degree of surface silanization. A continuous transformation from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity can be attained for the amorphous silica surfaces through surface modification. From the simulation result, the contact angle can exceed 90° when surface silanization percentage is above 50%, showing a hydrophobic character. It is also found that when the percentage of surface silanization is above 70% on the amorphous silica surface, the water contact angle almost remains unchanged (110-120°). This phenomenon is a little different from the wetting behavior on smooth quartz plates in previous experimental report. This change in the wettability on modified amorphous silica surfaces can be interpreted in terms of the interaction between water molecules and the silica surfaces.

  18. Rheology of dense suspensions: Insights from soft dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognon, P.; Gay, C.; Einav, I.

    2013-06-01

    Soft Dynamics is a discrete element method that we designed to simulate the flow of dense suspensions. We use it here to simulate plane shear flows of non-Brownian grains with only short range interactions: the viscous lubrication and a steric repulsion with a tunable range. We measure a macroscopic constitutive law that can be expressed, as for dry grains, through a friction law and a dilatation law. We then analyze the contribution of lubrication and repulsion forces to the macroscopic shear stress. This allows us to identity two flow regimes: depending on the shear rate and repulsion range, the shear stress may be mainly due to either repulsion or lubrication forces. This study could be useful to model the rheological behaviour of similar particulate fluids such as foams and emulsions, which comprise bubbles and droplets interacting with lubrication and steric repulsion.

  19. Pasta Elasticity: Molecular dynamics simulations of nuclear pasta deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, M. E.; Horowitz, C. J.; Berry, D. K.

    2015-04-01

    Nuclear pasta is expected in the inner crust of neutron stars at densities near the nuclear saturation density. In this work, the elastic properties of pasta are calculated from large scale molecular dynamics simulations by deforming the simulation volume. Our model uses a semi-classical two-nucleon potential that reproduces nuclear saturation. We report the shear modulus and breaking strain of a variety of pasta phases for different temperatures, densities, and proton fractions. The presence of pasta in neutron stars could have significant effects on crustal oscillations and could be inferred from observations of soft-gamma repeaters. Additionally, these elastic parameters will enable us to improve estimates of the maximum size and lifetime of ``mountains'' on the crust, which could efficiently radiate gravitational waves.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of field emission from a planar nanodiode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torfason, Kristinn; Valfells, Agust; Manolescu, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    High resolution molecular dynamics simulations with full Coulomb interactions of electrons are used to investigate field emission in planar nanodiodes. The effects of space-charge and emitter radius are examined and compared to previous results concerning transition from Fowler-Nordheim to Child-Langmuir current [Y. Y. Lau, Y. Liu, and R. K. Parker, Phys. Plasmas 1, 2082 (1994) and Y. Feng and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 13, 073105 (2006)]. The Fowler-Nordheim law is used to determine the current density injected into the system and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to find a favourable point of emission on the emitter surface. A simple fluid like model is also developed and its results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations.

  1. Molecular Dynamic Simulations on Surface Tension of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, Abdalla

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations have been performed to study the surface tension of methanol at low temperatures. Six different models of methanol have been studied to compute the surface tension of different models. The models have been used to predict the surface tensions are: OPLS, Gromos 96, H1, J1, J2, and van Leeuwen model. Our results show that the most accurate model compared to true methanol was van Leeuwen model. The results were fitted to a straight line to predict other data of surface tension at specific temperature. The simulation were performed using the Gromacs package at temperatures: 200, 210, 220, 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, 290, and 300 K. This work is supported by JUST.

  2. Digital simulation of dynamic processes in radiometer systems. [microwave radiometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    The development and application of several computer programs for simulating different classes of microwave radiometers are described. The programs are dynamic in nature, and they may be used to determine the instantaneous behavior of system variables as a function of time. Some of the programs employ random variable models in the simulations so that the statistical nature of the results may be investigated. The programs have been developed to utilize either the Continuous System Modeling Program or the Advanced Continuous System Language. The validity of most of the programs was investigated using statistical tests, and the results show excellent correlation with theoretical predictions. The programs are currently being used in the investigation of new design techniques for microwave radiometers.

  3. Homogenous mixing of ionic liquids: molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Payal, Rajdeep Singh; Balasubramanian, Sundaram

    2013-12-28

    Binary mixtures of room temperature ionic liquids (IL) with a common cation were investigated using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two different binary ILs, viz., [C4mim][PF6]-[C4mim][Cl] and [C4mim][PF6]-[C4mim][BF4], were studied with varying fractions of either anion. The coordination environment of an anion around the cation is altered in the presence of another type of anion. The extent of change is larger for anions with much different radii. Atomistic MD and coarse grain MD simulations do not show any evidence for the clustering of like anions at any concentration. The binary liquids are well mixed at the molecular level.

  4. Schmidt number effects in dissipative particle dynamics simulation of polymers.

    PubMed

    Symeonidis, Vasileios; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2006-11-14

    Simulation studies for dilute polymeric systems are presented using the dissipative particle dynamics method. By employing two different thermostats, the velocity-Verlet and Lowe's scheme, we show that the Schmidt number (S(c)) of the solvent strongly affects nonequilibrium polymeric quantities. The fractional extension of wormlike chains subjected to steady shear is obtained as a function of S(c). Poiseuille flow in microchannels for fixed polymer concentration and varying number of repeated units within a chain is simulated. The nonuniform concentration profiles and their dependence on S(c) are computed. We show the effect of the bounce-forward wall boundary condition on the depletion layer thickness. A power law fit of the velocity profile in stratified Poiseuille flow in a microchannel yields wall viscosities different from bulk values derived from uniform, steady plane Couette flow. The form of the velocity profiles indicates that the slip flow model is not useful for the conditions of these calculations.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Homogeneous Crystallization in Polymer Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of homogeneous nucleation and crystal growth from the melt of polyethylene-like polymer were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The crystallinity was determined by using the site order parameter method (SOP), which described local order degree around an atom. Snapshots of the simulations showed evolution of the nucleation and the crystal growth through SOP images clearly. The isothermal crystallization kinetics was determined at different temperatures. The rate of crystallization, Kc, and the Avrami exponents, n, were determined as a function of temperature. The forming of nucleis was traced to reveal that the nucleis were formed with more ordered cores and less ordered shells. A detailed statistical analysis of the MD snapshots and trajectories suggested conformations of the polymer chains changed smoothly from random coil to chain folded lamella in the crystallization processes.

  6. Temperature fluctuations in canonical systems: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, J.; Mishin, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a quasiharmonic solid are conducted to elucidate the meaning of temperature fluctuations in canonical systems and validate a well-known but frequently contested equation predicting the mean square of such fluctuations. The simulations implement two virtual and one physical (natural) thermostat and examine the kinetic, potential, and total energy correlation functions in the time and frequency domains. The results clearly demonstrate the existence of quasiequilibrium states in which the system can be characterized by a well-defined temperature that follows the mentioned fluctuation equation. The emergence of such states is due to the wide separation of time scales between thermal relaxation by phonon scattering and slow energy exchanges with the thermostat. The quasiequilibrium states exist between these two time scales when the system behaves as virtually isolated and equilibrium.

  7. A Modal Model to Simulate Typical Structural Dynamic Nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect

    Pacini, Benjamin Robert; Mayes, Randall L.; Roettgen, Daniel R

    2015-10-01

    Some initial investigations have been published which simulate nonlinear response with almost traditional modal models: instead of connecting the modal mass to ground through the traditional spring and damper, a nonlinear Iwan element was added. This assumes that the mode shapes do not change with amplitude and there are no interactions between modal degrees of freedom. This work expands on these previous studies. An impact experiment is performed on a structure which exhibits typical structural dynamic nonlinear response, i.e. weak frequency dependence and strong damping dependence on the amplitude of vibration. Use of low level modal test results in combination with high level impacts are processed using various combinations of modal filtering, the Hilbert Transform and band-pass filtering to develop response data that are then fit with various nonlinear elements to create a nonlinear pseudo-modal model. Simulations of forced response are compared with high level experimental data for various nonlinear element assumptions.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of MgSiO3 Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin-xiang, Zhou; L, Zhou X.; J, Hardy R.; Xin, Xu; X, Xu

    1998-06-01

    Using molecular dynamics to simulate MgSiO3 perovskite is performed to investigate its phase transitions and superionicity. These simulations has used parameter-free Gordon-Kim potentials and a novel technique to monitor the motion of ions which clearly demonstrates the sublattice melting of ions O2- and the rotations of SiO6 octahedra. MgSiO3 has to undergo a few of phase transitions, then enter into the cubic phase. In particular, there is a transitional phase between orthorhombic phase and cubic phase. There are a superionic phase and the cubic phase in magnesium-rich silicate perovskite. This superionic phase occurs after the onset of cubic phase before the melting point. The onset temparature Tc for superionicity is about 200-700 K below the melting point Tm, Tc / Tm similar 0.92.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of field emission from a planar nanodiode

    SciTech Connect

    Torfason, Kristinn; Valfells, Agust; Manolescu, Andrei

    2015-03-15

    High resolution molecular dynamics simulations with full Coulomb interactions of electrons are used to investigate field emission in planar nanodiodes. The effects of space-charge and emitter radius are examined and compared to previous results concerning transition from Fowler-Nordheim to Child-Langmuir current [Y. Y. Lau, Y. Liu, and R. K. Parker, Phys. Plasmas 1, 2082 (1994) and Y. Feng and J. P. Verboncoeur, Phys. Plasmas 13, 073105 (2006)]. The Fowler-Nordheim law is used to determine the current density injected into the system and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm to find a favourable point of emission on the emitter surface. A simple fluid like model is also developed and its results are in qualitative agreement with the simulations.

  10. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  11. Fast stochastic algorithm for simulating evolutionary population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev; Hasty, Jeff; Mather, William

    2012-02-01

    Evolution and co-evolution of ecological communities are stochastic processes often characterized by vastly different rates of reproduction and mutation and a coexistence of very large and very small sub-populations of co-evolving species. This creates serious difficulties for accurate statistical modeling of evolutionary dynamics. In this talk, we introduce a new exact algorithm for fast fully stochastic simulations of birth/death/mutation processes. It produces a significant speedup compared to the direct stochastic simulation algorithm in a typical case when the total population size is large and the mutation rates are much smaller than birth/death rates. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm on several representative examples: evolution on a smooth fitness landscape, NK model, and stochastic predator-prey system.

  12. Hypervelocity Impact on Interfaces: A Molecular-Dynamics Simulations Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Owens, Eli T.; Leonard, Robert H.; Cockburn, Bronwyn C.

    2008-03-01

    Silicon/silicon nitride interfaces are found in micro electronics and solar cells. In either application the mechanical integrity of the interface is of great importance. Molecular-dynamics simulations are performed to study the failure of interface materials under the influence of hypervelocity impact. Silicon nitride plates impacting on silicon/silicon nitride interface targets of different thicknesses result in structural phase transformation and delamination at the interface. Detailed analyses of atomic velocities, bond lengths, and bond angles are used to qualitatively examine the respective failure mechanisms.

  13. Molecular-dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Hee; Biswas, R.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Wang, C. Z.; Chan, C. T.; Ho, K. M.

    1991-03-01

    The temperature-dependent thermal conductivity κ(T) of amorphous silicon has been calculated from equilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations using the time correlations of the heat flux operator in which anharmonicity is explicitly incorporated. The Stillinger-Weber two- and three-body Si potential and the Wooten-Weaire-Winer a-Si model were utilized. The calculations correctly predict an increasing thermal conductivity at low temperatures (below 400 K). The κ(T), for T>400 K, is affected by the thermally generated coordination-defect states. Comparisons to both experiment and previous calculations will be described.

  14. Extracting the diffusion tensor from molecular dynamics simulation with Milestoning

    SciTech Connect

    Mugnai, Mauro L.; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-07

    We propose an algorithm to extract the diffusion tensor from Molecular Dynamics simulations with Milestoning. A Kramers-Moyal expansion of a discrete master equation, which is the Markovian limit of the Milestoning theory, determines the diffusion tensor. To test the algorithm, we analyze overdamped Langevin trajectories and recover a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The recovery process determines the flux through a mesh and estimates local kinetic parameters. Rate coefficients are converted to the derivatives of the potential of mean force and to coordinate dependent diffusion tensor. We illustrate the computation on simple models and on an atomically detailed system—the diffusion along the backbone torsions of a solvated alanine dipeptide.

  15. Limits of hardness at the nanoscale: Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Nhon Q.; Averback, Robert S.; Bellon, Pascal; Caro, Alfredo

    2008-12-01

    Contrary to the often reported findings from molecular dynamics computer simulation that metals soften as their grain sizes fall below 10-15 nm, we do not observe such softening in nanocrystalline specimens when they are first thermally relaxed. We offer a simple model that illustrates that the increased hardening is a consequence of grain-boundary relaxation, which suppresses grain-boundary sliding and forces the material to deform by dislocation glide. These observations provide an explanation for why some experiments observe an inverse Hall-Petch relationship at grain sizes below 10-20 nm while others do not.

  16. Accelerating ab initio molecular dynamics simulations by linear prediction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Jonathan D.; Steele, Ryan P.

    2016-09-01

    Acceleration of ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations can be reliably achieved by extrapolation of electronic data from previous timesteps. Existing techniques utilize polynomial least-squares regression to fit previous steps' Fock or density matrix elements. In this work, the recursive Burg 'linear prediction' technique is shown to be a viable alternative to polynomial regression, and the extrapolation-predicted Fock matrix elements were three orders of magnitude closer to converged elements. Accelerations of 1.8-3.4× were observed in test systems, and in all cases, linear prediction outperformed polynomial extrapolation. Importantly, these accelerations were achieved without reducing the MD integration timestep.

  17. Extracting the diffusion tensor from molecular dynamics simulation with Milestoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnai, Mauro L.; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We propose an algorithm to extract the diffusion tensor from Molecular Dynamics simulations with Milestoning. A Kramers-Moyal expansion of a discrete master equation, which is the Markovian limit of the Milestoning theory, determines the diffusion tensor. To test the algorithm, we analyze overdamped Langevin trajectories and recover a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The recovery process determines the flux through a mesh and estimates local kinetic parameters. Rate coefficients are converted to the derivatives of the potential of mean force and to coordinate dependent diffusion tensor. We illustrate the computation on simple models and on an atomically detailed system—the diffusion along the backbone torsions of a solvated alanine dipeptide.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of hollow thick-walled cylinder collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2015-10-27

    The generation and evolution of plastic deformation in a hollow single-crystal cylinder under high-rate axisymmetric loading were studied. An advantage of the proposed loading scheme is that all loading modes are applied simultaneously within the chosen crystallographic plane of the cylinder base and different strain degrees are achieved along the specimen cross section. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to show that the achievement of a certain strain causes the formation of structural defects on the inner surface of the specimen. The obtained results can be used to explain the main plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline solids.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Telomere and TRF1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaburagi, Masaaki; Fukuda, Masaki; Yamada, Hironao; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Takasu, Masako; Kato, Takamitsu A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    Telomeres play a central role in determining longevity of a cell. Our study focuses on the interaction between telomeric guanines and TRF1 as a means to observe the telomeric based mechanism of the genome protection. In this research, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a telomeric DNA and TRF1. Our results show a stable structure with a high affinity for the specific protein. Additionally, we calculated the distance between guanines and the protein in their complex state. From this comparison, we found the calculated values of distance to be very similar, and the angle of guanines in their complex states was larger than that in their single state.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations studies of laser ablation in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Johannes; Sonntag, Steffen; Karlin, Johannes; Paredes, Carolina Trichet; Sartison, Marc; Krauss, Armin; Trebin, Hans-Rainer

    2012-07-30

    An overview of several aspects of our recent molecular dynamics simulations of femtosecond laser ablation is presented. This includes the study of phase diagrams for suitable interactions, analysis of ablated material and bubble formation below threshold, study of two-pulse ablation and the classification of materials with respect to electron properties and electron-phonon coupling in the two-temperature model. A treatment of boundary conditions and of an extended twotemperature model is also included. Most of the results apply to aluminum, others also to copper and iron, and to metals in general.

  1. Thermal stability of marks gold nanoparticles: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yanlin; Li, Siqi; Qi, Weihong; Wang, Mingpu; Li, Zhou; Wang, Zhixing

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MDs) simulations were used to explore the thermal stability of Au nanoparticles (NPs) with decahedral, cuboctahedral, icosahedral and Marks NPs. According to the calculated cohesive energy and melting temperature, the Marks NPs have a higher cohesive energy and melting temperature compared to these other shapes. The Lindemann index, radial distribution function, deformation parameters, mean square displacement and self-diffusivity have been used to characterize the structure variation during heating. This work may inspire researchers to prepare Marks NPs and apply them in different fields.

  2. Investigations of Solar Prominence Dynamics Using Laboratory Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M Bellan

    2008-05-28

    Laboratory experiments simulating many of the dynamical features of solar coronal loops have been carried out. These experiments manifest collimation, kinking, jet flows, and S-shapes. Diagnostics include high-speed photography and x-ray detectors. Two loops having opposite or the same magnetic helicity polarities have been merged and it is found that counter-helicity merging provides much greater x-ray emission. A non-MHD particle orbit instability has been discovered whereby ions going in the opposite direction of the current flow direction can be ejected from a magnetic flux tube.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps.

    PubMed

    Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V; Collu, Francesca; Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformational samples of transporter components to obtain insights into the functional mechanism underlying efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Computer Simulations of Multidrug RND Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Ruggerone, Paolo; Vargiu, Attilio V.; Collu, Francesca; Fischer, Nadine; Kandt, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Over-expression of multidrug efflux pumps of the Resistance Nodulation Division (RND) protein super family counts among the main causes for microbial resistance against pharmaceuticals. Understanding the molecular basis of this process is one of the major challenges of modern biomedical research, involving a broad range of experimental and computational techniques. Here we review the current state of RND transporter investigation employing molecular dynamics simulations providing conformational samples of transporter components to obtain insights into the functional mechanism underlying efflux pump-mediated antibiotics resistance in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:24688701

  5. Extracting the diffusion tensor from molecular dynamics simulation with Milestoning.

    PubMed

    Mugnai, Mauro L; Elber, Ron

    2015-01-07

    We propose an algorithm to extract the diffusion tensor from Molecular Dynamics simulations with Milestoning. A Kramers-Moyal expansion of a discrete master equation, which is the Markovian limit of the Milestoning theory, determines the diffusion tensor. To test the algorithm, we analyze overdamped Langevin trajectories and recover a multidimensional Fokker-Planck equation. The recovery process determines the flux through a mesh and estimates local kinetic parameters. Rate coefficients are converted to the derivatives of the potential of mean force and to coordinate dependent diffusion tensor. We illustrate the computation on simple models and on an atomically detailed system-the diffusion along the backbone torsions of a solvated alanine dipeptide.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation of bicrystalline metal surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nikonov, A. Yu.

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports the molecular dynamics simulation results on the behavior of a copper crystallite in local frictional contact. The crystallite has a perfect defect-free structure and contains a high-angle grain boundary of type Σ5. The influence of the initial structure on the specimen behavior under loading was analyzed. It is shown that nanoblocks are formed in the subsurface layer. The atomic mechanism of nanofragmentation was studied. A detailed analysis of atomic displacements in the blocks showed that the displacements are rotational. Calculations revealed that the misorientation angle of formed nanoblocks along different directions does not exceed 2 degrees.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of silicate glasses and their surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xianglong

    1999-12-01

    The bulk and surface structures of vitreous silica and silicate glasses have been modeled using the molecular dynamics technique. An extensive preliminary study, on the influences of different potential models and of different simulation approaches on the final bulk and surface structures, concludes that good result can be obtained using the constant volume simulation with a modified pair-wise potential from van Beest and coworkers, together with alkali-oxygen potential models developed in this study. Glass structures with the reliability factors, Rchi of 7.2% for vitreous silica and 5.6% for sodium silicate have been achieved. The environments of O, Si and Na in silicate glasses have been thoroughly examined. Considerable similarities in local structures exist between crystalline and the simulated glass structures. It is found that our simulated glasses more resemble high-pressured experimental glasses, which is implied by the existence of fivefold silicon species. Based on bulk structures studied, glass surfaces were created by a fracture process. It is speculated that surface defect concentrations depend on the topological characteristics of the network structure, and are essential for the viability of surfaces. Analysis of local structures for difference species implies that the sodium silicate surfaces resemble more the Na-rich regions in the bulk structures. An efficient algorithm for finding primitive rings in a topological network has been developed. Analysis using this algorithm shows that reconstruction of Na-rich regions occurs on extending simulation size, demonstrating simulation size influence on modeled glass structures. Finally, our detailed analysis of Si-O-Si bond angle distributions demonstrates that vitreous silica glass has a broader Si-O-Si BAD, whilst sodium silicate glasses favor narrower distributions.

  8. Accurate Langevin approaches to simulate Markovian channel dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yandong; Rüdiger, Sten; Shuai, Jianwei

    2015-12-01

    The stochasticity of ion-channels dynamic is significant for physiological processes on neuronal cell membranes. Microscopic simulations of the ion-channel gating with Markov chains can be considered to be an accurate standard. However, such Markovian simulations are computationally demanding for membrane areas of physiologically relevant sizes, which makes the noise-approximating or Langevin equation methods advantageous in many cases. In this review, we discuss the Langevin-like approaches, including the channel-based and simplified subunit-based stochastic differential equations proposed by Fox and Lu, and the effective Langevin approaches in which colored noise is added to deterministic differential equations. In the framework of Fox and Lu’s classical models, several variants of numerical algorithms, which have been recently developed to improve accuracy as well as efficiency, are also discussed. Through the comparison of different simulation algorithms of ion-channel noise with the standard Markovian simulation, we aim to reveal the extent to which the existing Langevin-like methods approximate results using Markovian methods. Open questions for future studies are also discussed.

  9. Using stochastic dynamics to validate runtimes of protein simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen D.; Henley, Christopher L.

    2009-03-01

    We use short molecular dynamics simulations (˜200 cpu-hr, using NAMD) of individual bonds between capsid proteins to microscopically determine coarse-grained elastic parameters of entire virus capsids. In particular, we treat each protein (or for larger proteins, each domain) as a rigid body described by a 6-vector of translational and orientational degrees of freedom, xi(t). We then model the evolution of the relative positions as an overdamped random walk, xi(t) = -γijKjk(xk(t)-xk) + ζi(t), where ζi(t) are random variables satisfying <ζi(t)ζj(t')>= 2γijTδ(t-t'). Our goal is to determine the stiffness matrix Kij, but this requires long-time data to measure accurately. We therefore measure the noise matrix 2γijT, which depends on much shorter timescales, and compute the relaxation times by diagonalizing 12̂K12̂. Although we use biologically relevant configurations in each simulation, we have taken the domains out of their full context by simulating one pair at a time, and therefore external stresses are missing, which we measure from the drift and compensate for in subsequent simulations. Finally, we apply this technique to the HIV capsid protein.

  10. Thermocapillary simulation of single bubble dynamics in zero gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhendal, Yousuf; Turan, Ali; Hollingsworth, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The lack of significant buoyancy effects in zero gravity conditions poses an issue with fluid transfer in a stagnant liquid. In this paper bubble movement in a stagnant liquid is analysed and presented numerically using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The governing continuum conservation equations for two phase flow are solved using the commercial software package Ansys-Fluent v.13 and the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is used to track the liquid/gas interface in 2D and 3D domains. The simulation results are in reasonable agreement with the earlier experimental observations, the VOF algorithm is found to be a valuable tool for studying the phenomena of gas-liquid interaction. The flow is driven via Marangoni influence induced by the temperature difference which in turn drives the bubble from the cold to the hot region. A range of thermal Reynolds (ReT) and Marangoni numbers (MaT) are selected for the numerical simulations, specifically ReT=13-658 and MaT=214-10,721 respectively. The results indicate that the inherent velocity of bubbles decreases with an increase of the Marangoni number, a result that is line with the results of previous space experiments (Kang et al., 2008) [1]. An expression for predicting the scaled velocity of bubble has been derived based on the data obtained in the present numerical study. Some three-dimensional simulations are also performed to compare and examine the results with two-dimensional simulations.

  11. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of shock compressed quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, M. R.; Probert, M. I. J.

    2011-07-01

    Atomistic non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of shock wave compression of quartz have been performed using the so-called BKS semi-empirical potential of van Beest, Kramer, and van Santen [Phys. Rev. B 43, 5068 (1991)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.43.5068 to construct the Hugoniot of quartz. Our scheme mimics the real world experimental set up by using a flyer-plate impactor to initiate the shock wave and is the first shock wave simulation that uses a geometry optimised system of a polar slab in a three-dimensional system employing periodic boundary conditions. Our scheme also includes the relaxation of the surface dipole in the polar quartz slab which is an essential pre-requisite to a stable simulation. The original BKS potential is unsuited to shock wave calculations and so we propose a simple modification. With this modification, we find that our calculated Hugoniot is in good agreement with experimental shock wave data up to 25 GPa, but significantly diverges beyond this point. We conclude that our modified BKS potential is suitable for quartz under representative pressure conditions of the Earth core, but unsuitable for high-pressure shock wave simulations. We also find that the BKS potential incorrectly prefers the β-quartz phase over the α-quartz phase at zero-temperature, and that there is a β → α phase-transition at 6 GPa.

  12. RIAPMTQ/Impact : beam-dynamics simulation tool for RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T. P.; Billen, J. H.; Garnett, R. W.; Qiang, J.; Ryne, R.; Crandall, K. R.; Ostroumov, P.; Aseev, V. N.; Mustapha, B.; York, R. C.; Wu, X.; Zhao, Q.; Gorelov, D.; Doleans, M.; Physics; LANL; Tech Source; Michigan State Univ.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a pair of multiparticle beam dynamics codes for end-to-end computer simulations of the proposed RIA heavy-ion driver linac. The two codes are: (1) an adaptation of PARMTEQ called RIAPMTQ for the normal-conducting-linac front end, and (2) IMPACT for the superconducting linac. The codes run on a PC as well as on parallel supercomputing platforms such as NERSC at LBNL. The parallel capability allows us to run simulations with large numbers of macroparticles for the computation of beam halo and beam-losses. The codes are being benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The work is being performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and Michigan State University (MSU). In this paper we present an overview, the status of the work, comparison of simulation results from RIAPMTQ and the ANL code TRACK for the ANL front-end design, and the first RIAPMTQ/IMPACT end-to-end multiprocessor simulation for the MSU design.

  13. Dynamic simulation of sulfur-removal systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.H.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Henline, W.D.; Wilkins, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    A generalized computer simulation has been developed to predict the dynamic response of alternate gas absorption systems for selective removal of sulfur compounds or ammonia from fuel gas or synthesis gas produced from coal or other fossil fuels. The models use numerical methods based upon finite difference techniques to determine the spatial distribution of process variables within both the absorption and regeneration columns of such gas cleanup processes. The simulator may be applied to systems for selective gas absorption based on either chemical or physical principles. Examples of such systems include the Benfield process based on absorption by chemical reaction with an activated alkali carbonate solvent, and the Allied SELEXOL Solvent Process based on physical absorption as a result of partial pressure differences of the gas components above an organic solvent system. Simulations of either individual process units or an entire integrated plant can be performed. This computer program has specifically been structured to permit convenient flow sheet modification, as well as addition of new units. This research has emphasized the development of a general theoretical structure which can be easily modified by substituting alternate sets of data on the physicochemical properties of the appropriate liquid solvent. This model has been applied to Selexol Solvent Processes using both published and proprietary data on solvent properties. Test calculations have been performed to simulate open loop response of individual scrubber towers, and the complete system, to input composition and flow rate transients.

  14. Simulation of Snow Dynamics in Response to Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Wang, S.; Trishchenko, A.

    2004-05-01

    Snow dynamics not only affects the energy dissipation in northern ecosystems during non-growing season, but also affects plant growth through its impact on the soil water conditions of early growing season. To better simulate the snow and soil dynamics, a multiple-layer snow and soil interaction module has been recently developed within the Ecological Assimilation of Land and Climate Observations (EALCO) model. Up to 6 snow layers and 6 soil layers with flexible depth are currently represented in the module. Soil or snow skin temperature is obtained by numerically solving the surface energy balance equation. Energy dissipation to latent, sensible and soil/snow surface heat fluxes are thus calculated. Snow density is simulated in consideration of both compaction and destructive metamorphism, which depends on snow age, temperature and the residing weight above. The snow surface albedo, thermal and water properties and change of snow depth are updated in each time step and snow layers are re-calculated accordingly. The temperatures of snow and soil layers are implicitly solved in a tridiagonal linear system for thermal conduction equations. Freezing and thawing are computed according to the solved layer temperature and the existing water phase in the layer. Water movement between snow layers is computed according to the liquid water content and water holding capacity. Soil Water movement is simulated using Richard's equation and Darcy's law. The soil water content of each layer is thus implicitly solved as for temperatures. The model runs in half-hourly time step and main outputs include snow depth, snow water equivalent, and the temperature and water profiles for both snow and soil. In this study, the model was tested using data collected from several Canadian sites in the prairie and boreal forest region. The observed snow depth and temperature were compared with the corresponding model outputs. Sensitivities of snow cover change and soil thermal and moisture regime

  15. Nonequilibrium Simulations of Ion Dynamics in Ionomer Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frischknecht, Amalie

    Ionomers, polymers containing a small fraction of covalently bound ionic groups, are of interest as possible electrolytes in batteries. However, to date ionomers do not have sufficiently high conductivities for practical application, most likely because the ions tend to form aggregates, leading to slow ion transport. To build a better understanding of the relationships among ionomer chemistry, morphology, and ion transport, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations and connected aspects of these simulations with experiment. In previous work using both atomistic and coarse-grained models, we showed that precise ionomers (with a fixed spacing between ionic groups along the polymer backbone) exhibit a range of ionic aggregate morphologies, from discrete clusters to percolated aggregates. In this talk I will describe recent simulations of our coarse-grained ionomer melts in an applied electric field. From a constant applied field, we are able to extract the ion mobilities and hence conductivities. We find that ionomers with percolated ionic aggregate morphologies have higher ion mobilities and hence higher conductivities. Application of an oscillating electric field enables us to calculate the frequency-dependent conductivity of the model ionomer melts. The real part of the conductivity has a high frequency peak associated with plasma oscillations, and a very broad low frequency peak associated with ion motions in ionic aggregates. I will end with comments on the connections to atomistic simulations and to experimental probes of ion dynamics. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  16. Dynamics-function correlation in Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase: a spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed Central

    Falconi, M; Stroppolo, M E; Cioni, P; Strambini, G; Sergi, A; Ferrario, M; Desideri, A

    2001-01-01

    A single mutation (Val29-->Gly) at the subunit interface of a Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase dimer leads to a twofold increase in the second order catalytic rate, when compared to the native enzyme, without causing any modification of the structure or the electric field distribution. To check the role of dynamic processes in this catalytic enhancement, the flexibility of the dimeric protein at the subunit interface region has been probed by the phosphorescence and fluorescence properties of the unique tryptophan residue. Multiple spectroscopic data indicate that Trp83 experiences a very similar, and relatively hydrophobic, environment in both wild-type and mutant protein, whereas its mobility is distinctly more restrained in the latter. Molecular dynamics simulation confirms this result, and provides, at the molecular level, details of the dynamic change felt by tryptophan. Moreover, the simulation shows that the loops surrounding the active site are more flexible in the mutant than in the native enzyme, making the copper more accessible to the incoming substrate, and being thus responsible for the catalytic rate enhancement. Evidence for increased, dynamic copper accessibility also comes from faster copper removal in the mutant by a metal chelator. These results indicate that differences in dynamic, rather than structural, features of the two enzymes are responsible for the observed functional change. PMID:11371434

  17. Dynamics of Nanoscale Grain-Boundary Decohesion in Aluminum by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Phillips, D. R.; Glaessegen, E. H.

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics and energetics of intergranular crack growth along a flat grain boundary in aluminum is studied by a molecular-dynamics simulation model for crack propagation under steady-state conditions. Using the ability of the molecular-dynamics simulation to identify atoms involved in different atomistic mechanisms, it was possible to identify the energy contribution of different processes taking place during crack growth. The energy contributions were divided as: elastic energy, defined as the potential energy of the atoms in fcc crystallographic state; and plastically stored energy, the energy of stacking faults and twin boundaries; grain-boundary and surface energy. In addition, monitoring the amount of heat exchange with the molecular-dynamics thermostat gives the energy dissipated as heat in the system. The energetic analysis indicates that the majority of energy in a fast growing crack is dissipated as heat. This dissipation increases linearly at low speed, and faster than linear at speeds approaching 1/3 the Rayleigh wave speed when the crack tip becomes dynamically unstable producing periodic dislocation bursts until the crack is blunted.

  18. A Sidekick for Membrane Simulations: Automated Ensemble Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Transmembrane Helices

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Benjamin A; Halim, Khairul Abd; Buyan, Amanda; Emmanouil, Beatrice; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-01-01

    The interactions of transmembrane (TM) α-helices with the phospholipid membrane and with one another are central to understanding the structure and stability of integral membrane proteins. These interactions may be analysed via coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations. To obtain statistically meaningful analysis of TM helix interactions, large (N ca. 100) ensembles of CGMD simulations are needed. To facilitate the running and analysis of such ensembles of simulations we have developed Sidekick, an automated pipeline software for performing high throughput CGMD simulations of α-helical peptides in lipid bilayer membranes. Through an end-to-end approach, which takes as input a helix sequence and outputs analytical metrics derived from CGMD simulations, we are able to predict the orientation and likelihood of insertion into a lipid bilayer of a given helix of family of helix sequences. We illustrate this software via analysis of insertion into a membrane of short hydrophobic TM helices containing a single cationic arginine residue positioned at different positions along the length of the helix. From analysis of these ensembles of simulations we estimate apparent energy barriers to insertion which are comparable to experimentally determined values. In a second application we use CGMD simulations to examine self-assembly of dimers of TM helices from the ErbB1 receptor tyrosine kinase, and analyse the numbers of simulation repeats necessary to obtain convergence of simple descriptors of the mode of packing of the two helices within a dimer. Our approach offers proof-of-principle platform for the further employment of automation in large ensemble CGMD simulations of membrane proteins. PMID:26580541

  19. Spatially resolved dynamic structure factor of finite systems from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Raitza, Thomas; Roepke, Gerd; Reinholz, Heidi; Morozov, Igor

    2011-09-15

    The dynamical response of metallic clusters up to 10{sup 3} atoms is investigated using the restricted molecular dynamics simulations scheme. Exemplarily, a sodium like material is considered. Correlation functions are evaluated to investigate the spatial structure of collective electron excitations and the optical response of laser-excited clusters. In particular, the spectrum of bilocal correlation functions shows resonances representing different modes of collective excitations inside the nano plasma. The spatial structure, the resonance energy, and the width of the eigenmodes have been investigated for various values of electron density, temperature, cluster size, and ionization degree. Comparison with bulk properties is performed and the dispersion relation of collective excitations is discussed.

  20. GUMICS4 Synthetic and Dynamic Simulations of the ECLAT Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facsko, G.; Palmroth, M. M.; Gordeev, E.; Hakkinen, L. V.; Honkonen, I. J.; Janhunen, P.; Sergeev, V. A.; Kauristie, K.; Milan, S. E.

    2012-12-01

    The European Commission funded the European Cluster Assimilation Techniques (ECLAT) project as a collaboration of five leader European universities and research institutes. A main contribution of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) is to provide a wide range of global MHD runs with the Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling simulation (GUMICS). The runs are divided in two categories: synthetic runs investigating the extent of solar wind drivers that can influence magnetospheric dynamics, as well as dynamic runs using measured solar wind data as input. Here we consider the first set of runs with synthetic solar wind input. The solar wind density, velocity and the interplanetary magnetic field had different magnitudes and orientations; furthermore two F10.7 flux values were selected for solar radiation minimum and maximum values. The solar wind parameter values were constant such that a constant stable solution was archived. All configurations were run several times with three different (-15°, 0°, +15°) tilt angles in the GSE X-Z plane. The Cray XT supercomputer of the FMI provides a unique opportunity in global magnetohydrodynamic simulation: running the GUMICS-4 based on one year real solar wind data. Solar wind magnetic field, density, temperature and velocity data based on Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and WIND measurements are downloaded from the OMNIWeb open database and a special input file is created for each Cluster orbit. All data gaps are replaced with linear interpolations between the last and first valid data values before and after the data gap. Minimum variance transformation is applied for the Interplanetary Magnetic Field data to clean and avoid the code of divergence. The Cluster orbits are divided into slices allowing parallel computation and each slice has an average tilt angle value. The file timestamps start one hour before the perigee to provide time for building up a magnetosphere in the simulation space. The real

  1. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} Molecular Dynamics codes implemented on GPUs have achieved two-order of magnitude computational accelerations. {yields} Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations require a large number of random numbers per time step. {yields} We introduce a method for generating small batches of pseudorandom numbers distributed over many threads of calculations. {yields} With this method, Dissipative Particle Dynamics is implemented on a GPU device without requiring thread-to-thread communication. - Abstract: Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  2. Lattice gas simulations of dynamical geometry in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klales, Anna; Cianci, Donato; Needell, Zachary; Meyer, David A.; Love, Peter J.

    2010-10-01

    We present a hydrodynamic lattice gas model for two-dimensional flows on curved surfaces with dynamical geometry. This model is an extension to two dimensions of the dynamical geometry lattice gas model previously studied in one dimension. We expand upon a variation of the two-dimensional flat space Frisch-Hasslacher-Pomeau (FHP) model created by Frisch [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 56, 1505 (1986)]10.1103/PhysRevLett.56.1505 and independently by Wolfram, and modified by Boghosian [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 333 (2002)]10.1098/rsta.2001.0933. We define a hydrodynamic lattice gas model on an arbitrary triangulation whose flat space limit is the FHP model. Rules that change the geometry are constructed using the Pachner moves, which alter the triangulation but not the topology. We present results on the growth of the number of triangles as a function of time. Simulations show that the number of triangles grows with time as t1/3 , in agreement with a mean-field prediction. We also present preliminary results on the distribution of curvature for a typical triangulation in these simulations.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of polymer crystallization via self-seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chuanfu; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2010-03-01

    We use large scale molecular dynamics (MD) to simulate the processes of polymer crystallization with a coarse-grained model. In total we are able to simulate 1000 polymer chains made of 1000 monomers each, a system large enough to compare to experimental relevant, entangled melts. It is found that some micro crystalline domains (MCDs) can survive slightly above the apparent melting temperature after a consistent cooling and reheating cycle. We chose the stablest MCD as a baby seed and let it grow at a constant quenched temperature. A single lamella can be formed via this self-seeding process. We observe the growth pathway and analyze the chain dynamics especially at the growth front.[4pt] [1] C. Luo and J. Sommer, Comp Phys. Comm. 180, 1382 (2009)[0pt] [2] C. Luo and J. Sommer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 147801 (2009)[0pt] [3] J-J. Xu, Y. Ma, W.B. Hu, M. Rehahn and G. Reiter, Nature Materials 8, 348 (2009)

  4. Computer simulation of some dynamical properties of the Lorentz gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joslin, C. G.; Egelstaff, P. A.

    1989-07-01

    We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of a Lorentz gas, consisting of a lone hydrogen molecule moving in a sea of stationary argon atoms. A Lennard-Jones form was assumed for the H2-Ar potential. The calculations were performed at a reduced temperature K * = kT/ɛH 2-Ar = 4.64 and at reduced densities ρ *= ρ Arσ{Ar/3} in the range 0.074-0.414. The placement of Ar atoms was assumed to be random rather than dictated by equilibrium considerations. We followed the trajectories of many H2 molecules, each of which is assigned in turn a velocity given by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution at the temperature of the simulation. Solving the equations of motion classically, we obtained the translational part of the incoherent dynamic structure factor for the H2 molecule, S tr( q, ω). This was convoluted with the rotational structure factor S rot( q, ω) calculated assuming unhindered rotation to obtain the total structure factor S( q, ω). Our results agree well with experimental data on this function obtained by Egelstaff et al. At the highest density ( ρ *=0.414) we studied the dependence of S( q, ω) on system size (number of Ar atoms), number of H2 molecules for which trajectories are generated, and the length of time over which these trajectories are followed.

  5. Droplets impact on textured surfaces: Mesoscopic simulation of spreading dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuxiang; Chen, Shuo

    2015-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have attracted much attention due to their excellent water-repellent property. In the present study, droplets in the ideal Cassie state were focused on, and a particle-based numerical method, many-body dissipative particle dynamics, was employed to explore the mechanism of droplets impact on textured surfaces. A solid-fluid interaction with three linear weight functions was used to generate different wettability and a simple but efficient method was introduced to compute the contact angle. The simulated results show that the static contact angle is in good agreement with the Cassie-Baxter formula for smaller ∅S and Fa, but more deviation will be produced for larger ∅S and Fa, and it is related to the fact that the Cassie-Baxter theory does not consider the contact angle hysteresis effect in their formula. Furthermore, high impact velocity can induce large contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with larger ∅S and Fa. The typical time-based evolutions of the spreading diameter were simulated, and they were analyzed from an energy transformation viewpoint. These results also show that the dynamical properties of droplet, such as rebounding or pinning, contact time and maximum spreading diameters, largely depend on the comprehensive effects of the material wettability, fraction of the pillars and impact velocities of the droplets.

  6. Assessment of dynamic closure for premixed combustion large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langella, Ivan; Swaminathan, Nedunchezhian; Gao, Yuan; Chakraborty, Nilanjan

    2015-09-01

    Turbulent piloted Bunsen flames of stoichiometric methane-air mixtures are computed using the large eddy simulation (LES) paradigm involving an algebraic closure for the filtered reaction rate. This closure involves the filtered scalar dissipation rate of a reaction progress variable. The model for this dissipation rate involves a parameter βc representing the flame front curvature effects induced by turbulence, chemical reactions, molecular dissipation, and their interactions at the sub-grid level, suggesting that this parameter may vary with filter width or be a scale-dependent. Thus, it would be ideal to evaluate this parameter dynamically by LES. A procedure for this evaluation is discussed and assessed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data and LES calculations. The probability density functions of βc obtained from the DNS and LES calculations are very similar when the turbulent Reynolds number is sufficiently large and when the filter width normalised by the laminar flame thermal thickness is larger than unity. Results obtained using a constant (static) value for this parameter are also used for comparative evaluation. Detailed discussion presented in this paper suggests that the dynamic procedure works well and physical insights and reasonings are provided to explain the observed behaviour.

  7. GPU-enabled molecular dynamics simulations of ankyrin kinase complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Vertika; Chong, Wei Lim; Wisitponchai, Tanchanok; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Zain, Sharifuddin M.; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd.; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran

    2014-10-01

    The ankyrin repeat (AR) protein can be used as a versatile scaffold for protein-protein interactions. It has been found that the heterotrimeric complex between integrin-linked kinase (ILK), PINCH, and parvin is an essential signaling platform, serving as a convergence point for integrin and growth-factor signaling and regulating cell adhesion, spreading, and migration. Using ILK-AR with high affinity for the PINCH1 as our model system, we explored a structure-based computational protocol to probe and characterize binding affinity hot spots at protein-protein interfaces. In this study, the long time scale dynamics simulations with GPU accelerated molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in AMBER12 have been performed to locate the hot spots of protein-protein interaction by the analysis of the Molecular Mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area/Generalized Born Solvent Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) of the MD trajectories. Our calculations suggest good binding affinity of the complex and also the residues critical in the binding.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Adhesion at Epoxy Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Clancy, Thomas C.; Hinkley, J. A.; Gates. T. S.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of moisture on adhesives used in aerospace applications can be modeled with chemically specific techniques such as molecular dynamics simulation. In the present study, the surface energy and work of adhesion are calculated for epoxy surfaces and interfaces, respectively, by using molecular dynamics simulation. Modifications are made to current theory to calculate the work of adhesion at the epoxy-epoxy interface with and without water. Quantitative agreement with experimental values is obtained for the surface energy and work of adhesion at the interface without water. The work of adhesion agrees qualitatively with the experimental values for the interface with water: the magnitude is reduced 15% with respect to the value for the interface without water. A variation of 26% in the magnitude is observed depending on the water configuration at a concentration of 1.6 wt%. The methods and modifications to the method that are employed to obtain these values are expected to be applicable for other epoxy adhesives to determine the effects of moisture uptake on their work of adhesion.

  9. Spontaneous formation of polyglutamine nanotubes with molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand

    2010-04-01

    Expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) beyond the pathogenic threshold (35-40 Gln) is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's disease, several forms of spinocerebellar ataxias and spinobulbar muscular atrophy. To determine the structure of polyglutamine aggregates we perform replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations coupled with the optimized potential for effective peptide forcefield. Using a range of temperatures from 250 to 700 K, we study the aggregation kinetics of the polyglutamine monomer and dimer with chain lengths from 30 to 50 residues. All monomers show a similar structural change at the same temperature from α-helical structure to random coil, without indication of any significant β-strand. For dimers, by contrast, starting from random structures, we observe spontaneous formation of antiparallel β-sheets and triangular and circular β-helical structures for polyglutamine with 40 residues in a 400 ns 50 temperature replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation (total integrated time 20 μs). This ˜32 Å diameter structure reorganizes further into a tight antiparallel double-stranded ˜22 Å nanotube with 22 residues per turn close to Perutz' model for amyloid fibers as water-filled nanotubes. This diversity of structures suggests the existence of polymorphism for polyglutamine with possibly different pathways leading to the formation of toxic oligomers and to fibrils.

  10. Photodissociation dynamics of phenol: multistate trajectory simulations including tunneling.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefei; Zheng, Jingjing; Yang, Ke R; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-11-19

    We report multistate trajectory simulations, including coherence, decoherence, and multidimensional tunneling, of phenol photodissociation dynamics. The calculations are based on full-dimensional anchor-points reactive potential surfaces and state couplings fit to electronic structure calculations including dynamical correlation with an augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence double-ζ basis set. The calculations successfully reproduce the experimentally observed bimodal character of the total kinetic energy release spectra and confirm the interpretation of the most recent experiments that the photodissociation process is dominated by tunneling. Analysis of the trajectories uncovers an unexpected dissociation pathway for one quantum excitation of the O-H stretching mode of the S1 state, namely, tunneling in a coherent mixture of states starting in a smaller ROH (∼0.9-1.0 Å) region than has previously been invoked. The simulations also show that most trajectories do not pass close to the S1-S2 conical intersection (they have a minimum gap greater than 0.6 eV), they provide statistics on the out-of-plane angles at the locations of the minimum energy adiabatic gap, and they reveal information about which vibrational modes are most highly activated in the products.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  12. Non-steady Reconnection in Global Simulations of Magnetosphere Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, M. M.; Hesse, M.; Sibeck, D.; Rastaetter, L.; Toth, G.; Ridley, A.

    2008-01-01

    To analyze the non-steady magnetic reconnection during quasi-steady solar wind driving we employed high resolution global MHD model BATSRUS with non-MHD corrections in diffusion regions around the reconnection sites. To clarify the role of small-scale non-MHD effects on the global magnetospheric dynamic we performed simulations with different models of dissipation. We found that magnetopause surface is not in steady state even during extended periods of steady solar wind conditions. The so-called tilted reconnection lines become unstable due to formation of pressure bubbles, strong core field flux tubes, vortices, and traveling magnetic field cavities. Non-steady dayside reconnection results in formation of flux tubes with bended axis magnetically connecting magnetic field cavities generated at flanks and strong core segments formed near the subsolar region. We found that the rate of magnetic flux loading to the tail lobes is not very sensitive to the dissipation mechanism and details of the dayside reconnection. On the other hand the magnetotail reconnection rate, the speed of the reconnection site retreat and the global magnetotail dynamics strongly depend on the model of dissipation. THEMIS and Cluster observations are consistent with signatures predicted by simulations.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of ss-DNA translocation between copper nanoelectrodes incorporating electrode charge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christina M; Zhao, Xiongce; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T

    2008-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the translocation of single-stranded (ss)-DNA through the nanoscale gap between the nanoscale electrodes of a proposed genomic sequencing device. Using a fixed gap width between the electrodes and a small sample segment of ss-DNA as initial starting points in this project, the effect of applied electric fields on translocation velocity was studied. To describe the electrostatic interactions of the water, ions, and ss-DNA with the nanoscale electrodes, we applied the electrode charge dynamics (ECD) method. Through the density profile and comparison of translocation velocities to extrapolated experimental data, we found the ECD potential to be a better descriptor of the metal/nonmetal electrostatic interactions compared to the commonly used universal force field (UFF). Translocation velocities obtained using the ECD potential were consistent with simulated bulk data.

  14. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells.

  15. Information flow and protein dynamics: the interplay between nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Nina; Amero, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Proteins participate in information pathways in cells, both as links in the chain of signals, and as the ultimate effectors. Upon ligand binding, proteins undergo conformation and motion changes, which can be sensed by the following link in the chain of information. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations represent powerful tools for examining the time-dependent function of biological molecules. The recent advances in NMR and the availability of faster computers have opened the door to more detailed analyses of structure, dynamics, and interactions. Here we briefly describe the recent applications that allow NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations to offer unique insight into the basic motions that underlie information transfer within and between cells. PMID:25999971

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure and dynamics of 5-HT3 serotonin receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, M. Yu.; Popinako, A. V.; Prokopiev, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we investigated structure, dynamics and ion transportation in transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 serotonin receptor. High-resolution (0.35 nm) structure of the 5-HT3 receptor in complex with stabilizing nanobodies was determined by protein crystallography in 2014 (Protein data bank (PDB) code 4PIR). Transmembrane domain of the structure was prepared in complex with explicit membrane environment (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and solvent (TIP3P water model). Molecular dynamics protocols for simulation and stabilization of the transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 receptor model were developed and 60 ns simulation of the structure was conducted in order to explore structural parameters of the system. We estimated the mean force profile for Na+ ions using umbrella sampling method.

  17. Combined Molecular Dynamics-Spin Dynamics Simulation of α-Iron in an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudrick, Mark; Perera, Dilina; Landau, David P.

    Using an atomistic model that treats both translational and spin degrees of freedom, combined molecular and spin dynamics simulations have been performed to study dynamic properties of α-iron. Atomic interactions are described by an empirical many-body potential while spin-spin interactions are handled with a Heisenberg-like Hamiltonian with a coordinate dependent exchange interaction. Each of these interactions are parameterized by first-principles calculations. These simulations numerically solve equations of motion using an algorithm based on the second-order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition for the time evolution operator. Through calculation of the Fourier transform of space-displaced time-displaced correlation functions, vibrational and magnetic excitations have been studied. The application of an external magnetic field up to 10-T has now been included and has been shown to increase the characteristic frequencies of the single-spin-wave excitations. Two-spin-wave interactions have also been investigated.

  18. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of Fe 3+ (aq).

    PubMed

    Amira, Sami; Spångberg, Daniel; Zelin, Viktor; Probst, Michael; Hermansson, Kersti

    2005-07-28

    The optimized geometry and energetic properties of Fe(D2O)n 3+ clusters, with n = 4 and 6, have been studied with density-functional theory calculations and the BLYP functional, and the hydration of a single Fe 3+ ion in a periodic box with 32 water molecules at room temperature has been studied with Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and the same functional. We have compared the results from the CPMD simulation with classical MD simulations, using a flexible SPC-based water model and the same number of water molecules, to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of the two MD methods. The classical MD simulations and the CPMD simulations both give Fe-water distances in good agreement with experiment, but for the intramolecular vibrations, the classical MD yields considerably better absolute frequencies and ion-induced frequency shifts. On the other hand, the CPMD method performs considerably better than the classical MD in describing the intramolecular geometry of the water molecule in the first hydration shell and the average first shell...second shell hydrogen-bond distance. Differences between the two methods are also found with respect to the second-shell water orientations. The effect of the small box size (32 vs 512 water molecules) was evaluated by comparing results from classical simulations using different box sizes; non-negligible effects are found for the ion-water distance and the tilt angles of the water molecules in the second hydration shell and for the O-D stretching vibrational frequencies of the water molecules in the first hydration shell.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of solvated protein at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, D B; Reed, L H; Levy, R M

    1992-10-20

    We have completed a molecular dynamics simulation of protein (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, BPTI) in solution at high pressure (10 kbar). The structural and energetic effects of the application of high pressure to solvated protein are analyzed by comparing the results of the high-pressure simulation with a corresponding simulation at low pressure. The volume of the simulation cell containing one protein molecule plus 2943 water molecules decreases by 24.7% at high pressure. This corresponds to a compressibility for the protein solution of beta = 1.8 x 10(-2) kbar-1. The compressibility of the protein is estimated to be about one-tenth that of bulk water, while the protein hydration layer water is found to have a greater compressibility as compared to the bulk, especially for water associated with hydrophobic groups. The radius of gyration of BPTI decreases by 2% and there is a one third decrease in the protein backbone atomic fluctuations at high pressure. We have analyzed pressure effects on the hydration energy of the protein. The total hydration energy is slightly (4%) more favorable at high pressure even though the surface accessibility of the protein has decreased by a corresponding amount. Large pressure-induced changes in the structure of the hydration shell are observed. Overall, the solvation shell waters appear more ordered at high pressure; the pressure-induced ordering is greatest for nonpolar surface groups. We do not observe evidence of pressure-induced unfolding of the protein over the 100-ps duration of the high-pressure simulation. This is consistent with the results of high-pressure optical experiments on BPTI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Macromolecule Diffusion in a Protocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Tadashi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The interiors of all living cells are highly crowded with macro molecules, which differs considerably the thermodynamics and kinetics of biological reactions between in vivo and in vitro. For example, the diffusion of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in E. coli is ~10-fold slower than in dilute conditions. In this study, we performed Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of rigid macromolecules in a crowded environment mimicking the cytosol of E. coli to study the motions of macromolecules. The simulation systems contained 35 70S ribosomes, 750 glycolytic enzymes, 75 GFPs, and 392 tRNAs in a 100 nm × 100 nm × 100 nm simulation box, where the macromolecules were represented by rigid-objects of one bead per amino acid or four beads per nucleotide models. Diffusion tensors of these molecules in dilute solutions were estimated by using a hydrodynamic theory to take into account the diffusion anisotropy of arbitrary shaped objects in the BD simulations. BD simulations of the system where each macromolecule is represented by its Stokes radius were also performed for comparison. Excluded volume effects greatly reduce the mobility of molecules in crowded environments for both molecular-shaped and equivalent sphere systems. Additionally, there were no significant differences in the reduction of diffusivity over the entire range of molecular size between two systems. However, the reduction in diffusion of GFP in these systems was still 4-5 times larger than for the in vivo experiment. We will discuss other plausible factors that might cause the large reduction in diffusion in vivo.

  1. Motion Tree Delineates Hierarchical Structure of Protein Dynamics Observed in Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Moritsugu, Kei; Koike, Ryotaro; Yamada, Kouki; Kato, Hiroaki; Kidera, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins provide important information to understand their functional mechanisms, which are, however, likely to be hidden behind their complicated motions with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A straightforward and intuitive analysis of protein dynamics observed in MD simulation trajectories is therefore of growing significance with the large increase in both the simulation time and system size. In this study, we propose a novel description of protein motions based on the hierarchical clustering of fluctuations in the inter-atomic distances calculated from an MD trajectory, which constructs a single tree diagram, named a "Motion Tree", to determine a set of rigid-domain pairs hierarchically along with associated inter-domain fluctuations. The method was first applied to the MD trajectory of substrate-free adenylate kinase to clarify the usefulness of the Motion Tree, which illustrated a clear-cut dynamics picture of the inter-domain motions involving the ATP/AMP lid and the core domain together with the associated amplitudes and correlations. The comparison of two Motion Trees calculated from MD simulations of ligand-free and -bound glutamine binding proteins clarified changes in inherent dynamics upon ligand binding appeared in both large domains and a small loop that stabilized ligand molecule. Another application to a huge protein, a multidrug ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, captured significant increases of fluctuations upon binding a drug molecule observed in both large scale inter-subunit motions and a motion localized at a transmembrane helix, which may be a trigger to the subsequent structural change from inward-open to outward-open states to transport the drug molecule. These applications demonstrated the capabilities of Motion Trees to provide an at-a-glance view of various sizes of functional motions inherent in the complicated MD trajectory.

  2. Motion Tree Delineates Hierarchical Structure of Protein Dynamics Observed in Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Moritsugu, Kei; Koike, Ryotaro; Yamada, Kouki; Kato, Hiroaki; Kidera, Akinori

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins provide important information to understand their functional mechanisms, which are, however, likely to be hidden behind their complicated motions with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A straightforward and intuitive analysis of protein dynamics observed in MD simulation trajectories is therefore of growing significance with the large increase in both the simulation time and system size. In this study, we propose a novel description of protein motions based on the hierarchical clustering of fluctuations in the inter-atomic distances calculated from an MD trajectory, which constructs a single tree diagram, named a “Motion Tree”, to determine a set of rigid-domain pairs hierarchically along with associated inter-domain fluctuations. The method was first applied to the MD trajectory of substrate-free adenylate kinase to clarify the usefulness of the Motion Tree, which illustrated a clear-cut dynamics picture of the inter-domain motions involving the ATP/AMP lid and the core domain together with the associated amplitudes and correlations. The comparison of two Motion Trees calculated from MD simulations of ligand-free and -bound glutamine binding proteins clarified changes in inherent dynamics upon ligand binding appeared in both large domains and a small loop that stabilized ligand molecule. Another application to a huge protein, a multidrug ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter, captured significant increases of fluctuations upon binding a drug molecule observed in both large scale inter-subunit motions and a motion localized at a transmembrane helix, which may be a trigger to the subsequent structural change from inward-open to outward-open states to transport the drug molecule. These applications demonstrated the capabilities of Motion Trees to provide an at-a-glance view of various sizes of functional motions inherent in the complicated MD trajectory. PMID:26148295

  3. Spin-dynamics simulations of the antiferromagnetic triangular XY model*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Kwangsik; Landau, D. P.

    2002-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo and spin-dynamics methods, we have simulated the dynamic behavior of the classical, antiferromagnetic XY model on a triangular lattice. The temporal evolutions of spin configurations were obtained by solving numerically the coupled equations of motion for each spin using fourth-order Suzuki-Trotter decompositions of exponential operators. From space-and time-displaced spin-spin correlation functions and their space-time Fourier transforms we obtained the dynamic structure factor S(q,w) for momentum q and frequency w. Below T_c, where long-range order appears in the staggered chirality[1], S(q,w) exhibits very strong and sharp spin-wave peaks in the in-plane-component S^xx. We also observe two-spin-wave peaks at low w and an almost dispersionless domain-wall peak at high w. Above T_c, a weak spin-wave peak persists but the domain-wall peak disappears for all q. We have calculated the dispersion relation and the linewidth of the spin-wave peak in S^xx by fitting the line shape to simple Lorentzians. *Supported by NSF [1] D.H. Lee, J.D. Joannopoulos, J.W. Negele, and D.P. Landau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 433 (1984)

  4. Simulation of dynamics of hydraulic system with proportional control valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureček, Adam; Hružík, Lumír; Vašina, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Dynamics of a hydraulic system is influenced by several parameters, in this case mainly by proportional control valve, oil bulk modulus, oil viscosity, mass load etc. This paper will be focused on experimental measurement and mathematical simulation of dynamics of a hydraulic system with proportional control valve, linear hydraulic cylinder and mass load. The measurement is performed on experimental equipment that enables realization of dynamic processes of the hydraulic system. Linear hydraulic cylinder with mass load is equipped with position sensor of piston. The movement control of piston rod is ensured by the proportional control valve. The equipment enables to test an influence of parameter settings of regulator of the proportional control valve on position and pressure system responses. The piston position is recorded by magnetostrictive sensor that is located in drilled piston rod side of the linear hydraulic cylinder. Pressures are measured by piezoresistive sensors on the piston side and the piston rod side of the hydraulic cylinder. The measurement is performed during movement of the piston rod with mass load to the required position. There is realized and verified a mathematical model using Matlab SimHydraulics software for this hydraulic system.

  5. Protein Under Pressure: Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Arc Repressor

    SciTech Connect

    Trzesniak, Daniel Rodrigo F.; Lins, Roberto D.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2006-10-01

    Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance results for the Arc Repressor have shown that this dimeric protein dissociates into a molten globule at high pressure. This structural change is accompanied by a modification of the hydrogenbonding pattern of the intermolecular -sheet: it changes its character from intermolecular to intramolecular with respect to the two monomers. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Arc Repressor, as a monomer and a dimer, at elevated pressure have been performed with the aim to study this hypothesis and to identify the major structural and dynamical changes of the protein under such conditions. The monomer appears less stable than the dimer. However, the complete dissociation has not been seen because of the long timescale needed to observe this phenomenon. In fact, the protein structure altered very little when increasing the pressure. It became slightly compressed and the dynamics of the side-chains and the unfolding process slowed down. Increasing both, temperature and pressure, a tendency of conversion of intermolecular into intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the -sheet region has been detected, supporting the mentioned hypothesis. Also, the onset of denaturation of the separated chains was observed.

  6. Langevin Dynamics Simulations of Genome Packing in Bacteriophage

    PubMed Central

    Forrey, Christopher; Muthukumar, M.

    2006-01-01

    We use Langevin dynamics simulations to study the process by which a coarse-grained DNA chain is packaged within an icosahedral container. We focus our inquiry on three areas of interest in viral packing: the evolving structure of the packaged DNA condensate; the packing velocity; and the internal buildup of energy and resultant forces. Each of these areas has been studied experimentally, and we find that we can qualitatively reproduce experimental results. However, our findings also suggest that the phage genome packing process is fundamentally different than that suggested by the inverse spool model. We suggest that packing in general does not proceed in the deterministic fashion of the inverse-spool model, but rather is stochastic in character. As the chain configuration becomes compressed within the capsid, the structure, energy, and packing velocity all become dependent upon polymer dynamics. That many observed features of the packing process are rooted in condensed-phase polymer dynamics suggests that statistical mechanics, rather than mechanics, should serve as the proper theoretical basis for genome packing. Finally we suggest that, as a result of an internal protein unique to bacteriophage T7, the T7 genome may be significantly more ordered than is true for bacteriophage in general. PMID:16617089

  7. Extensions to Dynamic System Simulation of Fissile Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Steven Karl; Bernardin, John David; Kimpland, Robert Herbert; Spernjak, Dusan

    2015-08-24

    Previous reports have documented the results of applying dynamic system simulation (DSS) techniques to model a variety of fissile solution systems. The SUPO (Super Power) aqueous homogeneous reactor (AHR) was chosen as the benchmark for comparison of model results to experimental data for steadystate operation.1 Subsequently, DSS was applied to additional AHR to verify results obtained for SUPO and extend modeling to prompt critical excursions, ramp reactivity insertions of various magnitudes and rate, and boiling operations in SILENE and KEWB (Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler).2 Additional models for pressurized cores (HRE: Homogeneous Reactor Experiment), annular core geometries, and accelerator-driven subcritical systems (ADAHR) were developed and results reported.3 The focus of each of these models is core dynamics; neutron kinetics, thermal hydraulics, radiolytic gas generation and transport are coupled to examine the time-based evolution of these systems from start-up through transition to steady-state. A common characteristic of these models is the assumption that (a) core cooling system inlet temperature and flow and (b) plenum gas inlet pressure and flow are held constant; no external (to core) component operations that may result in dynamic change to these parameters are considered. This report discusses extension of models to include explicit reference to cooling structures and radiolytic gas handling. The accelerator-driven subcritical generic system model described in References 3 and 4 is used as a basis for this extension.

  8. Swimming patterns and dynamics of simulated Escherichia coli bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zonia, Laura; Bray, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    A spatially and temporally realistic simulation of Escherichia coli chemotaxis was used to investigate the swimming patterns of wild-type and mutant bacteria within a rectangular arena in response to chemoattractant gradients. Swimming dynamics were analysed during long time series with phase-space trajectories, power spectra and estimations of fractal dimensions (FDs). Cell movement displayed complex trajectories in the phase space owing to interaction of multiple attractors that captured runs and tumbles. Deletion of enzymes responsible for adaptation (CheR and CheB) restricted the pattern of bacterial swimming in the absence of a gradient. In the presence of a gradient, there was a strong increase in trajectories arising from runs and attenuation of those arising from tumbles. Similar dynamics were observed for mutants lacking CheY, which are unable to tumble. The deletion of CheR, CheB and CheY also caused significant shifts in chemotaxis spectral frequencies. Rescaled range analysis and estimation of FD suggest that wild-type bacteria display characteristics of fractional Brownian motion with positive correlation between past and future events. These results reveal an underlying order in bacterial swimming dynamics, which enables a chemotactic search strategy conforming to a fractal walk. PMID:19324687

  9. Dynamics of Vapor-Deposited Polymer Glasses from Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wengang; Starr, Francis; Douglas, Jack

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to mimic the physical vapor deposition of glassy polymer films. Like experiments, the deposition results in ''ultrastable glasses'' that have lower energies, and greater kinetic stability than ordinary glasses. It has been suggested that these ultrastable glasses may be equivalent to very highly aged ordinary glasses. To explore this possibility, we contrast both the structure and dynamics of deposited and ordinary glasses. Our modeling indicates that the deposited polymer glass is structurally distinct from the ordinary glass due to anisotropy of chain packing. If the deposited glasses correspond to highly aged ordinary glasses, we would expect vastly larger relaxation times for the deposited glass. Instead, we find that relaxation times of the vapor-deposited glass are nearly the same as that of the ordinary glass. These findings do not support the view that vapor-deposited glassy polymer films are equivalent to highly-aged ordinary glassy polymer films. We further study the dynamical heterogeneity of highly out-of-equilibrium polymer films. Computer time was provided by Wesleyan University. This work was supported in part by NIST Award 70NANB13H202 and ACS-PRF Grant 51983-ND7.

  10. Observations of Crew Dynamics during Mars Analog Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusack, Stacy L.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation reviews the crew dynamics during two simulations of Mars Missions. Using an analog of a Mars habitat in two locations, Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station (FMARS) which is located on Devon Island at 75 deg North in the Canadian Arctic, and the Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS) which is located in the south of Utah, the presentation examines the crew dynamics in relation to the leadership style of the commander of the mission. The difference in the interaction of the two crews were shown to be related to the leadership style and the age group in the crew. As much as possible the habitats and environment was to resemble a Mars outpost. The difference between the International Space Station and a Mars missions is reviewed. The leadership styles are reviewed and the contrast between the FMARS and the MDRS leadership styles were related to crew productivity, and the personal interactions between the crew members. It became evident that leadership styles and interpersonal skill had more affect on mission success and crew dynamics than other characteristics.

  11. Dynamic simulation models and performance of an OTEC power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wormley, D.N.; Carmichael, D.A.; Umans, S.

    1983-08-01

    In this study, the aspects of plant performance which influence the potential for integration of an OTEC plant into a utility grid are considered. A set of simulation models have been developed for the evaluation of OTEC dynamic plant performance. A detailed nonlinear dynamic model has been forumlated which is useful for the assessment of component performance including heat exchangers, turbines, pumps and control systems. A reduced order linear model has been developed which is useful for studies of plant stability, control system development and transient performance of the plant connected to a utility grid. This model is particularly suitable for transient dynamic studies of an OTEC plant as a unit in a utility grid. A quasi-steady power availability model has also been developed which is useful to determine plant ouput power as a function of ocean thermal gradients so that the influence of daily and seasonal temperature variations may be easily computed. The study has found no fundamental technical barriers which would prohibit the interconnection of an OTEC plant into a utility grid. It has also shown that detailed consideration of turbine nozzle angle control is merited and such a control has the potential to provide superior performance in comparison to turbine bypass valve control.

  12. Protein under pressure: molecular dynamics simulation of the arc repressor.

    PubMed

    Trzesniak, Daniel; Lins, Roberto D; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2006-10-01

    Experimental nuclear magnetic resonance results for the Arc Repressor have shown that this dimeric protein dissociates into a molten globule at high pressure. This structural change is accompanied by a modification of the hydrogen-bonding pattern of the intermolecular beta-sheet: it changes its character from intermolecular to intramolecular with respect to the two monomers. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Arc Repressor, as a monomer and a dimer, at elevated pressure have been performed with the aim to study this hypothesis and to identify the major structural and dynamical changes of the protein under such conditions. The monomer appears less stable than the dimer. However, the complete dissociation has not been seen because of the long timescale needed to observe this phenomenon. In fact, the protein structure altered very little when increasing the pressure. It became slightly compressed and the dynamics of the side-chains and the unfolding process slowed down. Increasing both, temperature and pressure, a tendency of conversion of intermolecular into intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the beta-sheet region has been detected, supporting the mentioned hypothesis. Also, the onset of denaturation of the separated chains was observed.

  13. Swimming patterns and dynamics of simulated Escherichia coli bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zonia, Laura; Bray, Dennis

    2009-11-06

    A spatially and temporally realistic simulation of Escherichia coli chemotaxis was used to investigate the swimming patterns of wild-type and mutant bacteria within a rectangular arena in response to chemoattractant gradients. Swimming dynamics were analysed during long time series with phase-space trajectories, power spectra and estimations of fractal dimensions (FDs). Cell movement displayed complex trajectories in the phase space owing to interaction of multiple attractors that captured runs and tumbles. Deletion of enzymes responsible for adaptation (CheR and CheB) restricted the pattern of bacterial swimming in the absence of a gradient. In the presence of a gradient, there was a strong increase in trajectories arising from runs and attenuation of those arising from tumbles. Similar dynamics were observed for mutants lacking CheY, which are unable to tumble. The deletion of CheR, CheB and CheY also caused significant shifts in chemotaxis spectral frequencies. Rescaled range analysis and estimation of FD suggest that wild-type bacteria display characteristics of fractional Brownian motion with positive correlation between past and future events. These results reveal an underlying order in bacterial swimming dynamics, which enables a chemotactic search strategy conforming to a fractal walk.

  14. Dynamic Deformation of Thermosetting Polymers---All Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsige, Mesfin; Shenogina, Natalia; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila; Patnaik, Soumya

    2013-03-01

    We are using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interconnection between structural and mechanical properties of highly cross-linked polymer networks. In this study we focused on the widely used resin-hardener system composed of DGEBA epoxy oligomers and aromatic amine hardener DETDA. Accurate cross-linked models were developed using the effective cross-linking procedure that enables to generate thermoset structures with realistic structural characteristics. These models were used to examine the elastic properties of thermosetting networks with various degrees of curing and length of resin strands both in glassy and rubbery states. In our recent study we employed static deformation approach to estimate potential energy contribution to the mechanical response. In the present work we are using dynamic deformation approach which takes into account both potential energy and thermal motions in the structure. Uniaxial, volumetric and shear dynamic deformation modes were used to obtain Young's, bulk, shear moduli and Poisson's ratio directly. We also calculated elastic constants using formulae of linear elasticity and analyzed the results obtained by direct deformation and interconversion methods. The elastic properties determined from these two approaches are in good agreement with each other and also with experimental data.

  15. Cold-active enzymes studied by comparative molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Spiwok, Vojtech; Lipovová, Petra; Skálová, Tereza; Dusková, Jarmila; Dohnálek, Jan; Hasek, Jindrich; Russell, Nicholas J; Králová, Blanka

    2007-04-01

    Enzymes from cold-adapted species are significantly more active at low temperatures, even those close to zero Celsius, but the rationale of this adaptation is complex and relatively poorly understood. It is commonly stated that there is a relationship between the flexibility of an enzyme and its catalytic activity at low temperature. This paper gives the results of a study using molecular dynamics simulations performed for five pairs of enzymes, each pair comprising a cold-active enzyme plus its mesophilic or thermophilic counterpart. The enzyme pairs included alpha-amylase, citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, alkaline protease and xylanase. Numerous sites with elevated flexibility were observed in all enzymes; however, differences in flexibilities were not striking. Nevertheless, amino acid residues common in both enzymes of a pair (not present in insertions of a structure alignment) are generally more flexible in the cold-active enzymes. The further application of principle component analysis to the protein dynamics revealed that there are differences in the rate and/or extent of opening and closing of the active sites. The results indicate that protein dynamics play an important role in catalytic processes where structural rearrangements, such as those required for active site access by substrate, are involved. They also support the notion that cold adaptation may have evolved by selective changes in regions of enzyme structure rather than in global change to the whole protein.

  16. Numerical Simulations of Droplet Dynamics in PEM Fuel Cell Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauble, Eric; Owkes, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are of beneficial interest due to their capability of producing clean energy with zero emissions. An important design challenge hindering the performance of fuel cells is controlling water removal to maintain a hydrated membrane while avoiding excess water that may lead to channel blockage. Fuel cell water management requires a detailed knowledge of multiphase flow dynamics within microchannels. Direct observation of gas-liquid flows is difficult due to the small scale and viewing obstructions of the channels within the fuel cell. Instead, this work uses a CFD approach to compute the formation and dynamics of droplets in fuel cell channels. The method leverages a conservative volume-of-fluid (VOF) formulation coupled with a novel methodology to track dynamic contact angles. We present details of the numerical approach and simulation results relevant to water management in PEM fuel cells. In particular, it is shown that variation of the contact hysteresis angle influences the wetting properties of the droplet and significantly impacts water transport throughout the a fuel cell channel.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of ballistic He penetration into W fuzz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaver, T. P. C.; Nordlund, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Westerhof, E.; Thijsse, B. J.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Results are presented of large-scale Molecular Dynamics simulations of low-energy He bombardment of W nanorods, or so-called ‘fuzz’ structures. The goal of these simulations is to see if ballistic He penetration through W fuzz offers a more realistic scenario for how He moves through fuzz layers than He diffusion through fuzz nanorods. Instead of trying to grow a fuzz layer starting from a flat piece of bulk W, a new approach of creating a fully formed fuzz structure 0.43 µm thick out of ellipsoidal pieces of W is employed. Lack of detailed experimental knowledge of the 3D structure of fuzz is dealt with by simulating He bombardment on five different structures of 15 vol% W and determining the variation in He penetration for each case. The results show that by far the most important factor determining He penetration is the amount of open channels through which He ions can travel unimpeded. For a more or less even W density distribution He penetration into fuzz falls off exponentially with distance and can thus be described by a ‘half depth’. In a 15 vol% fuzz structure, the half depth can reach 0.18 µm. In the far sparser fuzz structures that were recently reported, the half depth might be 1 µm or more. This means that ballistic He penetration offers a more likely scenario than He diffusion through nanorods for how He moves through fuzz and may provide an adequate explanation for how He penetrates through the thickest fuzz layers reported so far. Furthermore, the exponential decrease in penetration with depth would follow a logarithmic dependence on fluence which is compatible with experiments. A comparison of these results and molecular dynamics calculations carried out in the recoil interaction approximation shows that results for W fuzz are qualitatively very different from conventional stopping power calculations on W with a similarly low but homogeneous density distribution.

  18. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-01-01

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects. PMID:24277840

  19. Grain boundary migration in metals: Molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao

    Grain boundary migration is key to materials microstructural processes such as grain growth and recrystallization. Quantitative boundary dynamic data is difficult to obtain, yet important for quantitative prediction of microstructural evolution and understanding migration fundamentals. Our molecular dynamics simulations first focus on curvature driven grain boundary migration to extract the reduced mobility and activation energy for migration as a function of boundary misorientation in aluminum. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental observations except that the activation energy for migration found is much smaller than in experiment. This discrepancy led to a more systematic study of the absolute mobility and atomistic level mechanism for boundary migration. To study the mobility of a flat, fully defined boundary, we developed a strain-energy-anisotropy-driven migration simulation method. We applied this method to a series of Sigma5 [010] asymmetric tilt grain boundaries and extracted the absolute mobility as a function of temperature and inclination. Simulation results suggest that the mobility is a sensitive function of temperature and inclination. The boundary mobility tends to be minimized when one of the grain boundary planes has low Miller indices. Meanwhile, the comparison between grain boundary mobility, grain boundary self-diffusivity and energy suggests strong correlation at special inclinations, when one of the boundary planes is a high symmetry plane. In addition, we derive the grain boundary stiffness and reduced mobility as a function of boundary inclination. The grain boundary stiffness exhibits a large anisotropy, which is of the same order of magnitude as that of the grain boundary mobility. However, these two anisotropies nearly cancel, leaving the reduced mobility nearly isotropic. Finally, we identify the migration mechanism through frequent quenches and analysis of the atomic displacements, local and global excess volume

  20. Dynamics of semi-flexible tethered sheets : a simulation study using stochastic rotation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Babu, S B; Stark, H

    2011-12-01

    The dynamics of a semi-flexible sheet or tethered membrane in a solvent is studied using the method of stochastic rotation dynamics. Hydrodynamic interactions between different parts of the sheet are naturally included in this method. We confirm the scaling law for the radius of gyration versus sheet size predicted for a self-avoiding tethered membrane. The mean-square displacement shows both sub-diffusive and diffusive behavior similar to linear polymers. In the intermediate scattering function the sub-diffusive behavior appears as stretched exponential which we reproduce in our simulations. Thereby, we confirm an early prediction between the roughness and the sub-diffusion exponent derived from Zimm dynamics (E. Frey, D.R. Nelson, J. Phys. I 1, 1715 (1991)). Finally, we show that the diffusion coefficient of the square sheet is inversely proportional to the edge length of the sheet again in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of He bubble nucleation at grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Millett, Paul C; Tonks, Michael; Zhang, Liangzhe; Biner, Bulent

    2012-08-01

    The nucleation behavior of He bubbles in single-crystal (sc) and nano-grain body-centered-cubic (bcc) Mo is simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, focusing on the effects of the grain boundary (GB) structure. In sc Mo, the nucleation behavior of He bubbles depends on irradiation conditions. He bubbles nucleate by either clustering of He atoms with pre-existing vacancies or self-interstitial-atom (SIA) punching without initial vacancies. In nano-grain Mo, strong precipitation of He at the GBs is observed, and the density, size and spatial distribution of He bubbles vary with the GB structure. The corresponding He bubble density is higher in nano-grain Mo than that in sc Mo and the average bubble size is smaller. In the GB plane, He bubbles distribute along the dislocation cores for GBs consisting of GB dislocations and randomly for those without distinguishable dislocation structures. The simulation results in nano-grain Mo are in agreement with previous experiments in metal nano-layers, and they are further explained by the effect of excess volume associated with the GBs.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of thionated hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Eichenberger, Andreas P; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-08-01

    Understanding of the driving forces of protein folding is a complex challenge because different types of interactions play a varying role. To investigate the role of hydrogen bonding involving the backbone, the effect of thio substitutions in a protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), was investigated through molecular dynamics simulations of native as well as partly (only residues in loops) and fully thionated HEWL using the GROMOS 54A7 force field. The results of the three simulations show that the structural properties of fully thionated HEWL clearly differ from those of the native protein, while for partly thionated HEWL they only changed slightly compared with native HEWL. The analysis of the torsional-angle distributions and hydrogen bonds in the backbone suggests that the α-helical segments of native HEWL tend to show a propensity to convert to 3(10)-helical geometry in fully thionated HEWL. A comparison of the simulated quantities with experimental NMR data such as nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) atom-atom distance bounds and (3)J((H)(N)(H)(α))-couplings measured for native HEWL illustrates that the information content of these quantities with respect to the structural changes induced by thionation of the protein backbone is rather limited.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of thionated hen egg white lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Eichenberger, Andreas P; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of the driving forces of protein folding is a complex challenge because different types of interactions play a varying role. To investigate the role of hydrogen bonding involving the backbone, the effect of thio substitutions in a protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), was investigated through molecular dynamics simulations of native as well as partly (only residues in loops) and fully thionated HEWL using the GROMOS 54A7 force field. The results of the three simulations show that the structural properties of fully thionated HEWL clearly differ from those of the native protein, while for partly thionated HEWL they only changed slightly compared with native HEWL. The analysis of the torsional-angle distributions and hydrogen bonds in the backbone suggests that the α-helical segments of native HEWL tend to show a propensity to convert to 310-helical geometry in fully thionated HEWL. A comparison of the simulated quantities with experimental NMR data such as nuclear overhauser effect (NOE) atom–atom distance bounds and 3JHNHα-couplings measured for native HEWL illustrates that the information content of these quantities with respect to the structural changes induced by thionation of the protein backbone is rather limited. PMID:22653637

  4. Dynamic Evaluation of Two Decades of CMAQ Simulations ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation focuses on the dynamic evaluation of the CMAQ model over the continental United States using multi-decadal simulations for the period from 1990 to 2010 to examine how well the changes in observed ozone air quality induced by variations in meteorology and/or emissions are simulated by the model. We applied spectral decomposition of the ozone time-series using the KZ filter to assess the variations in the strengths of synoptic (weather-induced variations) and baseline (long-term variation) forcings, embedded in the simulated and observed concentrations. The results reveal that CMAQ captured the year-to-year variability (more so in the later years than the earlier years) and the synoptic forcing in accordance with what the observations are showing. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, decision-support tools, and models to be applied to media-specific or receptor-specific problem areas. CED uses modeling-based approaches to characterize exposures, evaluate fate and transport, and support environmental diagnostics/forensics with input from multiple data sources. It also develops media- and receptor-specific models, process models, and decision support tools for use both within and outside of EPA.

  5. Granular Flow and Dynamics of Lunar Simulants in Excavating Implements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of the lunar surface will rely on properly designed excavation equipment for surface preparations and for collection of lunar regolith in In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) processes. Performance efficiency, i.e minimizing loading forces while maximizing material collection, and mass and volume reductions are major design goals. The NASA Glenn Research Center has embarked on an experimental program to determine the flow characteristics and dynamic forces produced by excavation operations using various excavator bucket designs. A new large scale soil bin facility, 2.27 m x 5.94 m x 0.76 m (nominally 8 ft. x 20 ft. x 27 in.) in size, capable of accommodating moderately large test implements was used for the simulations of lunar operations. The soil bin is filled with GRC-3simulant (a mixture of industrial sands and silt with a particle size distribution and the bulk mechanical (shear) strength representative of an average of lunar regolith from different regions) and uses motorized horizontal rails and a vertical actuator to drive the implement through the lunar simulant soil. A six-axis load cell and encoders provide well resolved measurements of the three dimensional forces and torques and motion of the bucket. In addition, simultaneous video allows for the analysis of the flow behavior and structure formation of the regolith during excavation. The data may be useful in anchoring soil mechanic models and to provide engineering data for design consideration.

  6. Dynamic Simulation of EAF on RTDS for Compensation Sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meera, K. S.

    2016-06-01

    Large sized electric arc furnaces (EAF) causes power quality problems such as flicker, harmonics etc. due to their unbalanced and non-linear behavior characteristics. The rapid swings in real and reactive power of such non-linear loads causes fast repetitive voltage variations with appreciable voltage distortion caused by harmonics and unbalance. Some form of reactive compensation is usually adopted to limit the disturbances caused by EAF in electric power system, in particular the flicker. This paper highlights the results of a case study, where the arc furnace is modelled using statistical dynamic model of the furnace using real time digital simulator which allows more real time simulations tests to be conducted in a shorter time and also provides a more detailed power system representation for the tests. The investigation of the simulation study results showed that static VAR compensators can be successfully used for reduction of flicker levels, compensation of reactive power and for the regulation of voltage levels in the EAF plant under study.

  7. Ion dynamics at supercritical quasi-parallel shocks: Hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yanqing; Lu, Quanming; Gao, Xinliang; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2012-09-01

    By separating the incident ions into directly transmitted, downstream thermalized, and diffuse ions, we perform one-dimensional (1D) hybrid simulations to investigate ion dynamics at a supercritical quasi-parallel shock. In the simulations, the angle between the upstream magnetic field and shock nominal direction is θBn=30°, and the Alfven Mach number is MA˜5.5. The shock exhibits a periodic reformation process. The ion reflection occurs at the beginning of the reformation cycle. Part of the reflected ions is trapped between the old and new shock fronts for an extended time period. These particles eventually form superthermal diffuse ions after they escape to the upstream of the new shock front at the end of the reformation cycle. The other reflected ions may return to the shock immediately or be trapped between the old and new shock fronts for a short time period. When the amplitude of the new shock front exceeds that of the old shock front and the reformation cycle is finished, these ions become thermalized ions in the downstream. No noticeable heating can be found in the directly transmitted ions. The relevance of our simulations to the satellite observations is also discussed in the paper.

  8. Dynamic Simulation of EAF on RTDS for Compensation Sizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meera, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    Large sized electric arc furnaces (EAF) causes power quality problems such as flicker, harmonics etc. due to their unbalanced and non-linear behavior characteristics. The rapid swings in real and reactive power of such non-linear loads causes fast repetitive voltage variations with appreciable voltage distortion caused by harmonics and unbalance. Some form of reactive compensation is usually adopted to limit the disturbances caused by EAF in electric power system, in particular the flicker. This paper highlights the results of a case study, where the arc furnace is modelled using statistical dynamic model of the furnace using real time digital simulator which allows more real time simulations tests to be conducted in a shorter time and also provides a more detailed power system representation for the tests. The investigation of the simulation study results showed that static VAR compensators can be successfully used for reduction of flicker levels, compensation of reactive power and for the regulation of voltage levels in the EAF plant under study.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Thermal Induced Chemistry in TATB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenneville, Jason; Germann, Timothy

    2006-03-01

    Equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of high explosives can provide important information on their thermal decomposition by helping to characterize processes with timescales that are much longer than those attainable with non-equilibrium MD shock studies. A reactive force field is used with MD to probe the chemisty induced by intense heating (`cook-off') of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). The force field (ReaxFF) was developed by van Duin, Goddard and coworkers^ at CalTech and has already shown promise in predicting the chemistry in small samples of RDX under either shock compression or intense heat. Large-system simulations are desired for TATB because of the high degree of carbon clustering expected in this material. We will show results of 100,000-particle simulations at several temperatures, carried out with the massively parallel GRASP MD software developed at Sandia National Lab. Finally, we will compare the reactions and reaction timescales with those of RDX and HMX. ^ A. C. T. Van Duin, et al, J. Phys. Chem. A, 1005, 9396 (2001).

  10. Dynamical diffraction simulations in FePt--I.

    PubMed

    Torres, Karen L; Vanfleet, Richard R; Thompson, Gregory B

    2011-06-01

    A series of multislice simulations to quantify the effect of various degrees of order, composition, and thickness on the electron diffracted intensities were performed using the L1₀ FePt system as the case study. The dynamical diffraction studies were done in both a convergent electron beam diffraction and selected area electron diffraction condition. The L1₀ symmetry demonstrated some peculiar challenges in the simulation, in particular between the {111} plane normal and the <111> direction, which are not equivalent because of tetragonality. A hybrid weighting function atom of Fe-Pt was constructed to account for S < 1 or nonequiatomic compositions. This statistical approach reduced the complexity of constructing a crystal with the probability that a particular atom was at a particular lattice site for a given order parameter and composition. Considerations of accelerating voltage, convergent angle, and thermal effects are discussed. The simulations revealed significant differences in intensity ratios between films of various compositions but equivalent unit cell numbers and degree of order.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ion Equilibration in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, Nikola; Langin, Thomas; Strickler, Trevor; Killian, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Understanding transport and equilibration in strongly coupled plasmas is important for modeling plasmas found in extreme environments like inertial confinement fusion plasmas and interiors of gas-giant planets. We use molecular dynamics simulations of Yukawa one component plasmas under periodic boundary conditions to study the evolution of strongly coupled ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) at early times. Simulations provide access to observable quantities in strongly coupled plasmas, namely correlation functions. Experimentally, the average velocity of an ion subset with a skewed velocity profile has been used to measure velocity autocorrelation functions and provide access to diffusion coefficients and other transport processes in UNPs. Using the simulation, we verify the experimental measurements of average velocities of ion subsets in UNPs and confirm their agreement with the velocity autocorrelation function. Finally, we examine the collective mode behavior of the ions during their equilibration phase by calculating the longitudinal current correlation function at various times during equilibration. This allows us to study the collective mode coupling behavior of the equilibration of ions in UNPs and its dependence on screening parameter.

  12. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi

    2016-04-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, and COMSOL. Using the new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (Geol Soc SP, 2015) as a guide, we model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal and sloping surfaces, topographic obstacles, and digital elevation models of natural topography. We compare model results to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We can apply these models to reconstruct past lava flows in Hawai'i and Saudi Arabia using parameters assembled from morphology, textural analysis, and eruption observations as natural test cases. Our study highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of graphene bombardment with Si ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xin-Mao; Gao, Ting-Hong; Yan, Wan-Jun; Guo, Xiao-Tian; Xie, Quan

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with Tersoff-Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark (Tersoff-ZBL) potential and adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond order (AIREBO) potential are performed to study the effect of irradiated graphene with silicon ion at several positions and energy levels of 0.1-1000 eV. The simulations reveal four processes: absorption, replacement, transmission and damage. At energies below 110 eV, the dominant process is absorption. For atom in group (a), the process that takes place is replacement, in which the silicon ion removes one carbon atom and occupies the place of the eliminated atom at the incident energy of 72-370 eV. Transmission is present at energies above 100 eV for atom in group (d). Damage is a very important process in current bombardment, and there are four types of defects: single vacancy, replacement-single vacancy, double vacancy and nanopore. The simulations provide a fundamental understanding of the silicon bombardment of graphene, and the parameters required to develop graphene-based devices by controlling defect formation.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of cesium adsorption on illite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Laura N; Bourg, Ian C; Okumura, Masahiko; Kolluri, Kedarnath; Sposito, Garrison; Machida, Masahiko

    2017-03-15

    The charged surfaces of micaceous minerals, especially illite, regulate the mobility of the major radioisotopes of Cs ((134)Cs, (135)Cs, (137)Cs) in the geosphere. Despite the long history of Cs adsorption studies, the nature of the illite surface sites remains incompletely understood. To address this problem, we present atomistic simulations of Cs competition with Na for three candidate illite adsorption sites - edge, basal plane, and interlayer. Our simulation results are broadly consistent with affinities and selectivities that have been inferred from surface complexation models. Cation exchange on the basal planes is thermodynamically ideal, but exchange on edge surfaces and within interlayers shows complex, thermodynamically non-ideal behavior. The basal planes are weakly Cs-selective, while edges and interlayers have much higher affinity for Cs. The dynamics of NaCs exchange are rapid for both cations on the basal planes, but considerably slower for Cs localized on edge surfaces. In addition to new insights into Cs adsorption and exchange with Na on illite, we report the development of a methodology capable of simulating fully-flexible clay mineral nanoparticles with stable edge surfaces using a well-tested interatomic potential model.

  15. Efficiency in nonequilibrium molecular dynamics Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radak, Brian K.; Roux, Benoît

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid algorithms combining nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo (neMD/MC) offer a powerful avenue for improving the sampling efficiency of computer simulations of complex systems. These neMD/MC algorithms are also increasingly finding use in applications where conventional approaches are impractical, such as constant-pH simulations with explicit solvent. However, selecting an optimal nonequilibrium protocol for maximum efficiency often represents a non-trivial challenge. This work evaluates the efficiency of a broad class of neMD/MC algorithms and protocols within the theoretical framework of linear response theory. The approximations are validated against constant pH-MD simulations and shown to provide accurate predictions of neMD/MC performance. An assessment of a large set of protocols confirms (both theoretically and empirically) that a linear work protocol gives the best neMD/MC performance. Finally, a well-defined criterion for optimizing the time parameters of the protocol is proposed and demonstrated with an adaptive algorithm that improves the performance on-the-fly with minimal cost.

  16. Dynamics and energetics of permeation through aquaporins. What do we learn from molecular dynamics simulations?

    PubMed

    Hub, Jochen S; Grubmüller, Helmut; de Groot, Bert L

    2009-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of integral membrane proteins, which facilitate the rapid and yet highly selective flux of water and other small solutes across biological membranes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations contributed substantially to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie this remarkable efficiency and selectivity of aquaporin channels. This chapter reviews the current state of MD simulations of aquaporins and related aquaglyceroporins as well as the insights these simulations have provided. The mechanism of water permeation through AQPs and methods to determine channel permeabilities from simulations are described. Protons are strictly excluded from AQPs by a large electrostatic barrier and not by an interruption of the Grotthuss mechanism inside the pore. Both the protein's electric field and desolvation effects contribute to this barrier. Permeation of apolar gas molecules such as CO(2) through AQPs is accompanied by a large energetic barrier and thus can only be expected in membranes with a low intrinsic gas permeability. Additionally, the insights from simulations into the mechanism of glycerol permeation through the glycerol facilitator GlpF from E. coli are summarized. Finally, MD simulations are discussed that revealed that the aro-matic/arginine constriction region is generally the filter for uncharged solutes, and that AQP selectivity is controlled by a hydrophobic effect and steric restraints.

  17. Non-equilibrium dynamics in disordered materials: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Yao, Makoto; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2015-08-17

    The dynamic properties of liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} under pressure and highly-charged bromophenol molecule are studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT). Diffusion properties of covalent liquids under high pressure are very interesting in the sense that they show unexpected pressure dependence. It is found from our simulation that the magnitude relation of diffusion coefficients for boron and oxygen in liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows the anomalous pressure dependence. The simulation clarified the microscopic origin of the anomalous diffusion properties. Our simulation also reveals the dissociation mechanism in the coulomb explosion of the highly-charged bromophenol molecule. When the charge state n is 6, hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl group dissociates at times shorter than 20 fs while all hydrogen atoms dissociate when n is 8. After the hydrogen dissociation, the carbon ring breaks at about 100 fs. There is also a difference on the mechanism of the ring breaking depending on charge states, in which the ring breaks with expanding (n = 6) or shrink (n = 8)

  18. Dynamics of the EAG1 K(+) channel selectivity filter assessed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Bernsteiner, Harald; Bründl, Michael; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna

    2017-02-26

    EAG1 channels belong to the KCNH family of voltage gated potassium channels. They are expressed in several brain regions and increased expression is linked to certain cancer types. Recent cryo-EM structure determination finally revealed the structure of these channels in atomic detail, allowing computational investigations. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the ion binding sites and the dynamical behavior of the selectivity filter. Our simulations suggest that sites S2 and S4 form stable ion binding sites, while ions placed at sites S1 and S3 rapidly switched to sites S2 and S4. Further, ions tended to dissociate away from S0 within less than 20 ns, due to increased filter flexibility. This was followed by water influx from the extracellular side, leading to a widening of the filter in this region, and likely non-conductive filter configurations. Simulations with the inactivation-enhancing mutant Y464A or Na(+) ions lead to trapped water molecules behind the SF, suggesting that these simulations captured early conformational changes linked to C-type inactivation.

  19. Non-equilibrium dynamics in disordered materials: Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Satoshi; Nagaya, Kiyonobu; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Yao, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    The dynamic properties of liquid B2O3 under pressure and highly-charged bromophenol molecule are studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on density functional theory (DFT). Diffusion properties of covalent liquids under high pressure are very interesting in the sense that they show unexpected pressure dependence. It is found from our simulation that the magnitude relation of diffusion coefficients for boron and oxygen in liquid B2O3 shows the anomalous pressure dependence. The simulation clarified the microscopic origin of the anomalous diffusion properties. Our simulation also reveals the dissociation mechanism in the coulomb explosion of the highly-charged bromophenol molecule. When the charge state n is 6, hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl group dissociates at times shorter than 20 fs while all hydrogen atoms dissociate when n is 8. After the hydrogen dissociation, the carbon ring breaks at about 100 fs. There is also a difference on the mechanism of the ring breaking depending on charge states, in which the ring breaks with expanding (n = 6) or shrink (n = 8).

  20. Ensemble Simulations with Coupled Atmospheric Dynamic and Dispersion Models: Illustrating Uncertainties in Dosage Simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Thomas T.; Sheu, Rong-Shyang; Bowers, James F.; Sykes, R. Ian; Dodd, Gregory C.; Henn, Douglas S.

    2002-05-01

    Ensemble simulations made using a coupled atmospheric dynamic model and a probabilistic Lagrangian puff dispersion model were employed in a forensic analysis of the transport and dispersion of a toxic gas that may have been released near Al Muthanna, Iraq, during the Gulf War. The ensemble study had two objectives, the first of which was to determine the sensitivity of the calculated dosage fields to the choices that must be made about the configuration of the atmospheric dynamic model. In this test, various choices were used for model physics representations and for the large-scale analyses that were used to construct the model initial and boundary conditions. The second study objective was to examine the dispersion model's ability to use ensemble inputs to predict dosage probability distributions. Here, the dispersion model was used with the ensemble mean fields from the individual atmospheric dynamic model runs, including the variability in the individual wind fields, to generate dosage probabilities. These are compared with the explicit dosage probabilities derived from the individual runs of the coupled modeling system. The results demonstrate that the specific choices made about the dynamic-model configuration and the large-scale analyses can have a large impact on the simulated dosages. For example, the area near the source that is exposed to a selected dosage threshold varies by up to a factor of 4 among members of the ensemble. The agreement between the explicit and ensemble dosage probabilities is relatively good for both low and high dosage levels. Although only one ensemble was considered in this study, the encouraging results suggest that a probabilistic dispersion model may be of value in quantifying the effects of uncertainties in a dynamic-model ensemble on dispersion model predictions of atmospheric transport and dispersion.