Science.gov

Sample records for dynamical force microscopy

  1. Bifurcation, chaos, and scan instability in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2016-03-28

    The dynamical motion at any point on the cantilever of an atomic force microscope can be expressed quite generally as a superposition of simple harmonic oscillators corresponding to the vibrational modes allowed by the cantilever shape. Central to the dynamical equations is the representation of the cantilever-sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients that account for the interaction force “stiffness,” the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Renormalization of the cantilever beam model shows that for a given cantilever drive frequency cantilever dynamics can be accurately represented by a single nonlinear mass-spring model with frequency-dependent stiffness and damping coefficients [S. A. Cantrell and J. H. Cantrell, J. Appl. Phys. 110, 094314 (2011)]. Application of the Melnikov method to the renormalized dynamical equation is shown to predict a cascade of period doubling bifurcations with increasing cantilever drive force that terminates in chaos. The threshold value of the drive force necessary to initiate bifurcation is shown to depend strongly on the cantilever setpoint and drive frequency, effective damping coefficient, nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force, and the displacement amplitude of cantilever oscillation. The model predicts the experimentally observed interruptions of the bifurcation cascade for cantilevers of sufficiently large stiffness. Operational factors leading to the loss of image quality in dynamic atomic force microscopy are addressed, and guidelines for optimizing scan stability are proposed using a quantitative analysis based on system dynamical parameters and choice of feedback loop parameter.

  2. Magnetostriction-driven cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penedo, M.; Fernández-Martínez, I.; Costa-Krämer, J. L.; Luna, M.; Briones, F.

    2009-10-01

    An actuation mode is presented to drive the mechanical oscillation of cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy. The method is based on direct mechanical excitation of the cantilevers coated with amorphous Fe-B-N thin films, by means of the film magnetostriction, i.e., the dimensional change in the film when magnetized. These amorphous magnetostrictive Fe-B-N thin films exhibit soft magnetic properties, excellent corrosion resistance in liquid environments, nearly zero accumulated stress when properly deposited, and good chemical stability. We present low noise and high resolution topographic images acquired in liquid environment to demonstrate the method capability.

  3. Subharmonic Oscillations and Chaos in Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of dynamic atomic force microscopy (d-AFM) for nanoscale materials characterization calls for a deeper understanding of the cantilever dynamics influencing scan stability, predictability, and image quality. Model development is critical to such understanding. Renormalization of the equations governing d- AFM provides a simple interpretation of cantilever dynamics as a single spring and mass system with frequency dependent cantilever stiffness and damping parameters. The renormalized model is sufficiently robust to predict the experimentally observed splitting of the free-space cantilever resonance into multiple resonances upon cantilever-sample contact. Central to the model is the representation of the cantilever sample interaction force as a polynomial expansion with coefficients F(sub ij) (i,j = 0, 1, 2) that account for the effective interaction stiffness parameter, the cantilever-to-sample energy transfer, and the amplitude of cantilever oscillation. Application of the Melnikov method to the model equation is shown to predict a homoclinic bifurcation of the Smale horseshoe type leading to a cascade of period doublings with increasing drive displacement amplitude culminating in chaos and loss of image quality. The threshold value of the drive displacement amplitude necessary to initiate subharmonic generation depends on the acoustic drive frequency, the effective damping coefficient, and the nonlinearity of the cantilever-sample interaction force. For parameter values leading to displacement amplitudes below threshold for homoclinic bifurcation other bifurcation scenarios can occur, some of which lead to chaos.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoli; Egberts, Philip; Dong, Yalin; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-06-12

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to model amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). In this novel simulation, the model AFM tip responds to both tip-substrate interactions and to a sinusoidal excitation signal. The amplitude and phase shift of the tip oscillation observed in the simulation and their variation with tip-sample distance were found to be consistent with previously reported trends from experiments and theory. These simulation results were also fit to an expression enabling estimation of the energy dissipation, which was found to be smaller than that in a corresponding experiment. The difference was analyzed in terms of the effects of tip size and substrate thickness. Development of this model is the first step toward using MD to gain insight into the atomic-scale phenomena that occur during an AM-AFM measurement.

  5. Laser Actuation of Cantilevers for Picometre Amplitude Dynamic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Drew R.; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S. J.; Senden, Tim J.

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  6. Effects of nonlinear forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Das, Soma; Sreeram, P A; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the effects of nonlinear tip-sample forces on dynamic mode atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy. The jumps and hysteresis observed in the vibration amplitude (A) versus tip-sample distance (h) curves have been traced to bistability in the resonance curve. A numerical analysis of the basic dynamic equation was used to explain the hysteresis in the experimental curve. It has been found that the location of the hysteresis in the A-h curve depends on the frequency of the forced oscillation relative to the natural frequency of the cantilever.

  7. Direct observation of dynamic force propagation between focal adhesions of cells on microposts by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Akinori; Mizutani, Yusuke; Subagyo, Agus; Hosoi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Motonori; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Kawahara, Koichi; Okajima, Takaharu

    2011-12-01

    We investigated dynamic force propagation between focal adhesions of fibroblast cells cultured on polydimethylsiloxane micropost substrates, by atomic force microscopy. Live cells were mechanically modulated by the atomic force microscopy probe bound to cell apical surfaces at 0.01-0.5 Hz, while microposts served as a force sensor at basal surfaces. We observed that cells exhibited rheological behavior at the apical surface but had no apparent out-of-phase response at the basal surface, indicating that the dynamic force propagating through cytoskeletal filaments behaves in an elastic manner. Moreover, the direction of the propagated force was observed to be intimately associated with the prestress.

  8. Minimizing tip-sample forces and enhancing sensitivity in atomic force microscopy with dynamically compliant cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Sadeghian, Hamed; Tamer, Mehmet Selman; Goosen, Johannes Frans Loodewijk; van Keulen, Fred

    2017-06-01

    Due to the harmonic motion of the cantilever in Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy, it is seemingly impossible to estimate the tip-sample interactions from the motion of the cantilever. Not directly observing the interaction force, it is possible to damage the surface or the tip by applying an excessive mechanical load. The tip-sample interactions scale with the effective stiffness of the probe. Thus, the reduction of the mechanical load is usually limited by the manufacturability of low stiffness probes. However, the one-to-one relationship between spring constant and applied force only holds when higher modes of the cantilever are not excited. In this paper, it is shown that, by passively tuning higher modes of the cantilever, it is possible to reduce the peak repulsive force. These tuned probes can be dynamically more compliant than conventional probes with the same static spring constant. Both theoretical and experimental results show that a proper tuning of dynamic modes of cantilevers reduces the contact load and increases the sensitivity considerably. Moreover, due to the contribution of higher modes, the tuned cantilevers provide more information on the tip-sample interaction. This extra information from the higher harmonics can be used for mapping and possibly identification of material properties of samples.

  9. The role of nonlinear dynamics in quantitative atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Forchheimer, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Haviland, David B

    2012-07-05

    Various methods of force measurement with the atomic force microscope are compared for their ability to accurately determine the tip-surface force from analysis of the nonlinear cantilever motion. It is explained how intermodulation, or the frequency mixing of multiple drive tones by the nonlinear tip-surface force, can be used to concentrate the nonlinear motion in a narrow band of frequency near the cantilever's fundamental resonance, where accuracy and sensitivity of force measurement are greatest. Two different methods for reconstructing tip-surface forces from intermodulation spectra are explained. The reconstruction of both conservative and dissipative tip-surface interactions from intermodulation spectra are demonstrated on simulated data.

  10. Structure and Dynamics of Dinucleosomes Assessed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Filenko, Nina A.; Palets, Dmytro B.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2012-01-01

    Dynamics of nucleosomes and their interactions are important for understanding the mechanism of chromatin assembly. Internucleosomal interaction is required for the formation of higher-order chromatin structures. Although H1 histone is critically involved in the process of chromatin assembly, direct internucleosomal interactions contribute to this process as well. To characterize the interactions of nucleosomes within the nucleosome array, we designed a dinucleosome and performed direct AFM imaging. The analysis of the AFM data showed dinucleosomes are very dynamic systems, enabling the nucleosomes to move in a broad range along the DNA template. Di-nucleosomes in close proximity were observed, but their populationmore » was low. The use of the zwitterionic detergent, CHAPS, increased the dynamic range of the di-nucleosome, facilitating the formation of tight di-nucleosomes. The role of CHAPS and similar natural products in chromatin structure and dynamics is also discussed.« less

  11. VEDA: a web-based virtual environment for dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Melcher, John; Hu, Shuiqing; Raman, Arvind

    2008-06-01

    We describe here the theory and applications of virtual environment dynamic atomic force microscopy (VEDA), a suite of state-of-the-art simulation tools deployed on nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org) for the accurate simulation of tip motion in dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) over organic and inorganic samples. VEDA takes advantage of nanoHUB's cyberinfrastructure to run high-fidelity dAFM tip dynamics computations on local clusters and the teragrid. Consequently, these tools are freely accessible and the dAFM simulations are run using standard web-based browsers without requiring additional software. A wide range of issues in dAFM ranging from optimal probe choice, probe stability, and tip-sample interaction forces, power dissipation, to material property extraction and scanning dynamics over hetereogeneous samples can be addressed.

  12. Invited Article: VEDA: A web-based virtual environment for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, John; Hu, Shuiqing; Raman, Arvind

    2008-06-01

    We describe here the theory and applications of virtual environment dynamic atomic force microscopy (VEDA), a suite of state-of-the-art simulation tools deployed on nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org) for the accurate simulation of tip motion in dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) over organic and inorganic samples. VEDA takes advantage of nanoHUB's cyberinfrastructure to run high-fidelity dAFM tip dynamics computations on local clusters and the teragrid. Consequently, these tools are freely accessible and the dAFM simulations are run using standard web-based browsers without requiring additional software. A wide range of issues in dAFM ranging from optimal probe choice, probe stability, and tip-sample interaction forces, power dissipation, to material property extraction and scanning dynamics over hetereogeneous samples can be addressed.

  13. Quantification of surface displacements and electromechanical phenomena via dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Yu, Pu; Carmichael, Ben; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2016-09-15

    Detection of dynamic surface displacements associated with local changes in material strain provides access to a number of phenomena and material properties. Contact resonance-enhanced methods of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been shown capable of detecting ~1–3 pm-level surface displacements, an approach used in techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and ultrasonic force microscopy. Here, based on an analytical model of AFM cantilever vibrations, we demonstrate a guideline to quantify surface displacements with high accuracy by taking into account the cantilever shape at the first resonant contact mode, depending on the tip–sample contact stiffness. The approach has been experimentally verified and further developed for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using well-defined ferroelectric materials. These results open up a way to accurate and precise measurements of surface displacement as well as piezoelectric constants at the pm-scale with nanometer spatial resolution and will allow avoiding erroneous data interpretations and measurement artifacts. Furthermore, this analysis is directly applicable to all cantilever-resonance-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques.

  14. Quantification of surface displacements and electromechanical phenomena via dynamic atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Yu, Pu; ...

    2016-09-15

    Detection of dynamic surface displacements associated with local changes in material strain provides access to a number of phenomena and material properties. Contact resonance-enhanced methods of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been shown capable of detecting ~1–3 pm-level surface displacements, an approach used in techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and ultrasonic force microscopy. Here, based on an analytical model of AFM cantilever vibrations, we demonstrate a guideline to quantify surface displacements with high accuracy by taking into account the cantilever shape at the first resonant contact mode, depending on the tip–sample contact stiffness. The approachmore » has been experimentally verified and further developed for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using well-defined ferroelectric materials. These results open up a way to accurate and precise measurements of surface displacement as well as piezoelectric constants at the pm-scale with nanometer spatial resolution and will allow avoiding erroneous data interpretations and measurement artifacts. Furthermore, this analysis is directly applicable to all cantilever-resonance-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques.« less

  15. Quantification of surface displacements and electromechanical phenomena via dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Yu, Pu; Carmichael, Ben; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Detection of dynamic surface displacements associated with local changes in material strain provides access to a number of phenomena and material properties. Contact resonance-enhanced methods of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been shown capable of detecting ˜1-3 pm-level surface displacements, an approach used in techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and ultrasonic force microscopy. Here, based on an analytical model of AFM cantilever vibrations, we demonstrate a guideline to quantify surface displacements with high accuracy by taking into account the cantilever shape at the first resonant contact mode, depending on the tip-sample contact stiffness. The approach has been experimentally verified and further developed for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using well-defined ferroelectric materials. These results open up a way to accurate and precise measurements of surface displacement as well as piezoelectric constants at the pm-scale with nanometer spatial resolution and will allow avoiding erroneous data interpretations and measurement artifacts. This analysis is directly applicable to all cantilever-resonance-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques.

  16. Quantification of surface displacements and electromechanical phenomena via dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Yu, Pu; Carmichael, Ben; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2016-09-15

    Detection of dynamic surface displacements associated with local changes in material strain provides access to a number of phenomena and material properties. Contact resonance-enhanced methods of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been shown capable of detecting ~1–3 pm-level surface displacements, an approach used in techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and ultrasonic force microscopy. Here, based on an analytical model of AFM cantilever vibrations, we demonstrate a guideline to quantify surface displacements with high accuracy by taking into account the cantilever shape at the first resonant contact mode, depending on the tip–sample contact stiffness. The approach has been experimentally verified and further developed for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using well-defined ferroelectric materials. These results open up a way to accurate and precise measurements of surface displacement as well as piezoelectric constants at the pm-scale with nanometer spatial resolution and will allow avoiding erroneous data interpretations and measurement artifacts. Furthermore, this analysis is directly applicable to all cantilever-resonance-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques.

  17. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  18. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.; Williams, C. C.

    2015-09-15

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  19. Dynamic tunneling force microscopy for characterizing electronic trap states in non-conductive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Williams, C C

    2015-09-01

    Dynamic tunneling force microscopy (DTFM) is a scanning probe technique for real space mapping and characterization of individual electronic trap states in non-conductive films with atomic scale spatial resolution. The method is based upon the quantum mechanical tunneling of a single electron back and forth between a metallic atomic force microscopy tip and individual trap states in completely non-conducting surface. This single electron shuttling is measured by detecting the electrostatic force induced on the probe tip at the shuttling frequency. In this paper, the physical basis for the DTFM method is unfolded through a physical model and a derivation of the dynamic tunneling signal as a function of several experimental parameters is shown. Experimental data are compared with the theoretical simulations, showing quantitative consistency and verifying the physical model used. The experimental system is described and representative imaging results are shown.

  20. Electrochemical force microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam F.; Rodriguez, Brian J.

    2017-01-10

    A system and method for electrochemical force microscopy are provided. The system and method are based on a multidimensional detection scheme that is sensitive to forces experienced by a biased electrode in a solution. The multidimensional approach allows separation of fast processes, such as double layer charging, and charge relaxation, and slow processes, such as diffusion and faradaic reactions, as well as capturing the bias dependence of the response. The time-resolved and bias measurements can also allow probing both linear (small bias range) and non-linear (large bias range) electrochemical regimes and potentially the de-convolution of charge dynamics and diffusion processes from steric effects and electrochemical reactivity.

  1. Quantification of in-contact probe-sample electrostatic forces with dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Carmichael, Ben; Baris Okatan, M.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods utilizing resonant mechanical vibrations of cantilevers in contact with a sample surface have shown sensitivities as high as few picometers for detecting surface displacements. Such a high sensitivity is harnessed in several AFM imaging modes. Here, we demonstrate a cantilever-resonance-based method to quantify electrostatic forces on a probe in the probe-sample junction in the presence of a surface potential or when a bias voltage is applied to the AFM probe. We find that the electrostatic forces acting on the probe tip apex can produce signals equivalent to a few pm of surface displacement. In combination with modeling, the measurements of the force were used to access the strength of the electrical field at the probe tip apex in contact with a sample. We find an evidence that the electric field strength in the junction can reach ca. 1 V nm-1 at a bias voltage of a few volts and is limited by non-ideality of the tip-sample contact. This field is sufficiently strong to significantly influence material states and kinetic processes through charge injection, Maxwell stress, shifts of phase equilibria, and reduction of energy barriers for activated processes. Besides, the results provide a baseline for accounting for the effects of local electrostatic forces in electromechanical AFM measurements as well as offer additional means to probe ionic mobility and field-induced phenomena in solids.

  2. Quantification of In-Contact Probe-Sample Electrostatic Forces with Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Carmichael, Ben; Okatan, M; Kravchenko, Ivan; Kalinin, Sergei; Tselev, Alexander

    2016-12-13

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) methods utilizing resonant mechanical vibrations of cantilevers in contact with a sample surface have shown sensitivities as high as few picometers for detecting surface displacements. Such a high sensitivity is harnessed in several AFM imaging modes. Here, we demonstrate a cantilever-resonance-based method to quantify electrostatic forces on a probe in the probe-sample junction in the presence of a surface potential or when a bias voltage is applied to the AFM probe. We find that the electrostatic forces acting on the probe tip apex can produce signals equivalent to a few pm of surface displacement. In combination with modeling, the measurements of the force were used to access the strength of the electrical field at the probe tip apex in contact with a sample. We find an evidence that the electric field strength in the junction can reach ca. 1 V/nm at a bias voltage of a few volts and is limited by non-ideality of the tip-sample contact. This field is sufficiently strong to significantly influence material states and kinetic processes through charge injection, Maxwell stress, shifts of phase equilibria, and reduction of energy barriers for activated processes. Besides, the results provide a baseline for accounting for the effects of local electrostatic forces in electromechanical AFM measurements as well as offer additional means to probe ionic mobility and field-induced phenomena in solids.

  3. Quantification of in-contact probe-sample electrostatic forces with dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Carmichael, Ben; Okatan, M Baris; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Kalinin, Sergei V; Tselev, Alexander

    2017-01-04

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods utilizing resonant mechanical vibrations of cantilevers in contact with a sample surface have shown sensitivities as high as few picometers for detecting surface displacements. Such a high sensitivity is harnessed in several AFM imaging modes. Here, we demonstrate a cantilever-resonance-based method to quantify electrostatic forces on a probe in the probe-sample junction in the presence of a surface potential or when a bias voltage is applied to the AFM probe. We find that the electrostatic forces acting on the probe tip apex can produce signals equivalent to a few pm of surface displacement. In combination with modeling, the measurements of the force were used to access the strength of the electrical field at the probe tip apex in contact with a sample. We find an evidence that the electric field strength in the junction can reach ca. 1 V nm(-1) at a bias voltage of a few volts and is limited by non-ideality of the tip-sample contact. This field is sufficiently strong to significantly influence material states and kinetic processes through charge injection, Maxwell stress, shifts of phase equilibria, and reduction of energy barriers for activated processes. Besides, the results provide a baseline for accounting for the effects of local electrostatic forces in electromechanical AFM measurements as well as offer additional means to probe ionic mobility and field-induced phenomena in solids.

  4. Image contrast mechanisms in dynamic friction force microscopy: Antimony particles on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Felix; Göddenhenrich, Thomas; Dietzel, Dirk; Schirmeisen, Andre

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Friction Force Microscopy (DFFM) is a technique based on Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) where resonance oscillations of the cantilever are excited by lateral actuation of the sample. During this process, the AFM tip in contact with the sample undergoes a complex movement which consists of alternating periods of sticking and sliding. Therefore, DFFM can give access to dynamic transition effects in friction that are not accessible by alternative techniques. Using antimony nanoparticles on graphite as a model system, we analyzed how combined influences of friction and topography can effect different experimental configurations of DFFM. Based on the experimental results, for example, contrast inversion between fractional resonance and band excitation imaging strategies to extract reliable tribological information from DFFM images are devised.

  5. Dynamic nanoindentation by instrumented nanoindentation and force microscopy: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Kalfon-Cohen, Estelle

    2013-01-01

    Summary Viscoelasticity is a complex yet important phenomenon that drives material response at different scales of time and space. Burgeoning interest in nanoscale dynamic material mechanics has driven, and been driven by two key techniques: instrumented nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy. This review provides an overview of fundamental principles in nanoindentation, and compares and contrasts these two techniques as they are used for characterization of viscoelastic processes at the nanoscale. PMID:24367751

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  7. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  8. Molecular dynamic simulation of tip-polymer interaction in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, N.; Venturini, G. N.; Strachan, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a molecular dynamic study of the interaction between an amorphous silica tip (SiO2) and an amorphous poly-(methyl-methacrylate) substrate under conditions relevant for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy. To capture the actual dynamics of the tip, we use the dynamic contact simulation method [Kim et al., J. Appl. Phys. 112, 094325 (2012)]. We obtain force-displacement relationships both for neat polymer substrates and a sample with a sub-surface nanotube and extract the local stiffness and energy dissipation per cycle. The simulations capture non-trivial aspects of the interaction that originate from the viscoelastic nature of the polymer including an increase in repulsive interaction force during approach with tip velocity and an increase in adhesion during retraction with decreasing tip velocity. Scans of local stiffness and dissipation over the samples reveal intrinsic variability in the amorphous polymer but also the effect of local surface topography on the extracted properties as well as the ability of the method to detect a sub-surface nanotube. This insight and quantitative data should be valuable to interpret the results of atomic force microscopy studies.

  9. Dynamic force microscopy simulator (dForce): A tool for planning and understanding tapping and bimodal AFM experiments

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Horacio V; Garcia, Pablo D

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present a simulation environment, dForce, which can be used for a better understanding of dynamic force microscopy experiments. The simulator presents the cantilever–tip dynamics for two dynamic AFM methods, tapping mode AFM and bimodal AFM. It can be applied for a wide variety of experimental situations in air or liquid. The code provides all the variables and parameters relevant in those modes, for example, the instantaneous deflection and tip–surface force, velocity, virial, dissipated energy, sample deformation and peak force as a function of time or distance. The simulator includes a variety of interactions and contact mechanics models to describe AFM experiments including: van der Waals, Hertz, DMT, JKR, bottom effect cone correction, linear viscoelastic forces or the standard linear solid viscoelastic model. We have compared two numerical integration methods to select the one that offers optimal accuracy and speed. The graphical user interface has been designed to facilitate the navigation of non-experts in simulations. Finally, the accuracy of dForce has been tested against numerical simulations performed during the last 18 years. PMID:25821676

  10. High-speed atomic force microscopy for observing protein molecules in dynamic action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, T.

    2017-02-01

    Directly observing protein molecules in dynamic action at high spatiotemporal resolution has long been a holy grail for biological science. To materialize this long quested dream, I have been developing high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) since 1993. Tremendous strides were recently accomplished in its high-speed and low-invasive performances. Consequently, various dynamic molecular actions, including bipedal walking of myosin V and rotary propagation of structural changes in F1-ATPase, were successfully captured on video. The visualized dynamic images not only provided irrefutable evidence for speculated actions of the protein molecules but also brought new discoveries inaccessible with other approaches, thus giving great mechanistic insights into how the molecules function. HS-AFM is now transforming "static" structural biology into dynamic structural bioscience.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Atomic Force Microscopy at the Water-Muscovite Interface: Hydration Layer Structure and Force Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng; Amano, Ken-ichi; Murata, Sumihiko; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-04-19

    With the development of atomic force microscopy (AFM), it is now possible to detect the buried liquid-solid interfacial structure in three dimensions at the atomic scale. One of the model surfaces used for AFM is the muscovite surface because it is atomically flat after cleavage along the basal plane. Although it is considered that force profiles obtained by AFM reflect the interfacial structures (e.g., muscovite surface and water structure), the force profiles are not straightforward because of the lack of a quantitative relationship between the force and the interfacial structure. In the present study, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the relationship between the muscovite-water interfacial structure and the measured AFM force using a capped carbon nanotube (CNT) AFM tip. We provide divided force profiles, where the force contributions from each water layer at the interface are shown. They reveal that the first hydration layer is dominant in the total force from water even after destruction of the layer. Moreover, the lateral structure of the first hydration layer transcribes the muscovite surface structure. It resembles the experimentally resolved surface structure of muscovite in previous AFM studies. The local density profile of water between the tip and the surface provides further insight into the relationship between the water structure and the detected force structure. The detected force structure reflects the basic features of the atomic structure for the local hydration layers. However, details including the peak-peak distance in the force profile (force-distance curve) differ from those in the density profile (density-distance curve) because of disturbance by the tip.

  12. Vertical and lateral force mapping on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface by dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Namikawa, Takashi; Miki, Koutaro; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2008-05-01

    The topographic image of dynamic force microscopy (DFM) keeping the frequency shift (Δfz) constant at tiny cantilever oscillation amplitudes corresponds to the constant-vertical force (Fz) gradient surface, while the interpretation becomes complicated at larger oscillation amplitudes. We discuss how Fz and the potential energy (U) act on the tip during DFM topographic scan at various cantilever oscillation amplitudes by measuring the Δfz map on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface at room temperature. The Δfz map is numerically converted into Fz and U maps. DFM topographic curves at various cantilever oscillation amplitudes are numerically derived by using the experimentally obtained Fz map. In addition, we discuss how the lateral force (Fx) acts on the tip at various tip-surface distances on various surface sites by an Fx map converted from a U map. The positions at which Fx becomes zero are identified as U minimum sites, such as the top of adatom sites, and U maximum sites (equilibrium positions of Fx ), such as the center positions among three center adatoms. The tip deviated from these sites is then laterally attracted toward the U minimum sites. It is also demonstrated that lateral force microscopy performed at 1Å cantilever oscillation enables direct measurement of the lateral force gradient by numerically deriving the frequency shift (Δfx) caused by Fx .

  13. Cell Adhesion on Dynamic Supramolecular Surfaces Probed by Fluid Force Microscopy-Based Single-Cell Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Biomimetic and stimuli-responsive cell-material interfaces are actively being developed to study and control various cell-dynamics phenomena. Since cells naturally reside in the highly dynamic and complex environment of the extracellular matrix, attempts are being made to replicate these conditions in synthetic biomaterials. Supramolecular chemistry, dealing with noncovalent interactions, has recently provided possibilities to incorporate such dynamicity and responsiveness in various types of architectures. Using a cucurbit[8]uril-based host–guest system, we have successfully established a dynamic and electrochemically responsive interface for the display of the integrin-specific ligand, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), to promote cell adhesion. Due to the weak nature of the noncovalent forces by which the components at the interface are held together, we expected that cell adhesion would also be weaker in comparison to traditional interfaces where ligands are usually immobilized by covalent linkages. To assess the stability and limitations of our noncovalent interfaces, we performed single-cell force spectroscopy studies using fluid force microscopy. This technique enabled us to measure rupture forces of multiple cells that were allowed to adhere for several hours on individual substrates. We found that the rupture forces of cells adhered to both the noncovalent and covalent interfaces were nearly identical for up to several hours. We have analyzed and elucidated the reasons behind this result as a combination of factors including the weak rupture force between linear Arg-Gly-Asp and integrin, high surface density of the ligand, and increase in effective concentration of the supramolecular components under spread cells. These characteristics enable the construction of highly dynamic biointerfaces without compromising cell-adhesive properties. PMID:28319669

  14. Cell Adhesion on Dynamic Supramolecular Surfaces Probed by Fluid Force Microscopy-Based Single-Cell Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Shrikrishnan; Jaatinen, Leena; Brinkmann, Jenny; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vörös, Janos; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2017-04-25

    Biomimetic and stimuli-responsive cell-material interfaces are actively being developed to study and control various cell-dynamics phenomena. Since cells naturally reside in the highly dynamic and complex environment of the extracellular matrix, attempts are being made to replicate these conditions in synthetic biomaterials. Supramolecular chemistry, dealing with noncovalent interactions, has recently provided possibilities to incorporate such dynamicity and responsiveness in various types of architectures. Using a cucurbit[8]uril-based host-guest system, we have successfully established a dynamic and electrochemically responsive interface for the display of the integrin-specific ligand, Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), to promote cell adhesion. Due to the weak nature of the noncovalent forces by which the components at the interface are held together, we expected that cell adhesion would also be weaker in comparison to traditional interfaces where ligands are usually immobilized by covalent linkages. To assess the stability and limitations of our noncovalent interfaces, we performed single-cell force spectroscopy studies using fluid force microscopy. This technique enabled us to measure rupture forces of multiple cells that were allowed to adhere for several hours on individual substrates. We found that the rupture forces of cells adhered to both the noncovalent and covalent interfaces were nearly identical for up to several hours. We have analyzed and elucidated the reasons behind this result as a combination of factors including the weak rupture force between linear Arg-Gly-Asp and integrin, high surface density of the ligand, and increase in effective concentration of the supramolecular components under spread cells. These characteristics enable the construction of highly dynamic biointerfaces without compromising cell-adhesive properties.

  15. Cutting down the forest of peaks in acoustic dynamic atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, C; Ares, P; de Pablo, P J; Gómez-Herrero, J

    2008-12-01

    Acoustic dynamic force microscopy in liquids is a fundamental technique for the investigation of biological samples under physiological conditions. However, it shows an important drawback that consists of producing a myriad of resonance peaks, known as the forest of peaks, which hides the natural resonance frequency of the cantilever and prevents an optimum operation of the microscope. In this work, we propose a simple remedy for this problem, which consists on adding a small clay damper to the dither piezoelectric. The resulting frequency spectrum exhibits a single resonance peak that is comparable with the one obtained using magnetic excitation.

  16. Exploratory Study of RNA Polymerase II Using Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodin, Thor; Umemura, Kazuo; Gad, Mohammed; Jarvis, Suzanne; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Fu, Jianhua

    2002-03-01

    An exploratory study of the microtopological dimensions and shape features of yeast RNA polymerase II (y-poly II) on freshly cleaved mica was made in phosphate aqueous buffer solution at room temperature following previous work by Hansma and others. The molecules were imaged by stabilization on freshly cleaved mica at a limiting resolution of 10 Å and scanned using dynamical atomic force microscopy with a 10 nm multi-wall carbon nanotube in the resonance frequency modulation mode. They indicated microtopological shape and dimensional features similar to those predicted by electron density plots derived from the X-ray crystallographic model. It is concluded that this is considered primarily a feasibility study with definitive conclusions subject to more detailed systematic measurements of the 3D microtopology. These measurements appear to establish validity of the noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) approach into defining the primary microtopology and biochemical functionality of RNA polymerase II. Further nc-AFM studies at higher resolution using dynamical nc-AFM will be required to clearly define the detailed 3D microtopology of RNA polymerase II in anaerobic aqueous environments for both static and dynamic conditions.

  17. Polymer Droplet Dynamic Wetting Measurement at the Nanometer Scale on Smooth Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymaniha, Mohammadreza; Felts, Jonathan Robert; Anml Team

    2016-11-01

    Fluid spreading is a complex phenomenon driven strongly by intermolecular forces that requires nanometer scale microscopy to observe and understand. We present a technique for measuring molten polymer spreading dynamics with nanometer scale spatial resolution at elevated temperatures on sapphire, silicon oxide and mica using tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental setup is used to measure the spreading dynamics of polystyrene droplets with 2 μ m diameters at 115-175 C. Custom image processing algorithms realize the droplet height, radius, volume and contact angle of the droplet over time. The contact angle evolution followed a power law with time with experimental exponent values of -0.26, -0.08, and -0.2 for sapphire, silicon oxide, and mica, respectively at 115 C. The non-zero steady state contact angles result in a slower evolution of contact angle with time compared to Tanner's Law, as expected. We observe local crystallinity on the molten droplet surface, where crystalline structures appear to nucleate at the contact line and migrate toward the top of the droplet. Increasing the temperature from 115 C to 175 C reduced surface crystallinity from 35% to 12%, consistent with increasingly energetically favorable amorphous phase as the temperature approaches the melting temperature. This platform provides a way to measure spreading dynamics of extremely small volumes of heterogeneously complex fluids not possible through other means. Dr.Jonathan Felts is the principal investigator of the ANML research group in Mechanical Engineering Department of Texas A&M University.

  18. Optimization and calibration of atomic force microscopy sensitivity in terms of tip-sample interactions in high-order dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yu; Guo Qiuquan; Nie Hengyong; Lau, W. M.; Yang Jun

    2009-12-15

    The mechanism of dynamic force modes has been successfully applied to many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications, such as tapping mode and phase imaging. The high-order flexural vibration modes are recent advancement of AFM dynamic force modes. AFM optical lever detection sensitivity plays a major role in dynamic force modes because it determines the accuracy in mapping surface morphology, distinguishing various tip-surface interactions, and measuring the strength of the tip-surface interactions. In this work, we have analyzed optimization and calibration of the optical lever detection sensitivity for an AFM cantilever-tip ensemble vibrating in high-order flexural modes and simultaneously experiencing a wide range and variety of tip-sample interactions. It is found that the optimal detection sensitivity depends on the vibration mode, the ratio of the force constant of tip-sample interactions to the cantilever stiffness, as well as the incident laser spot size and its location on the cantilever. It is also found that the optimal detection sensitivity is less dependent on the strength of tip-sample interactions for high-order flexural modes relative to the fundamental mode, i.e., tapping mode. When the force constant of tip-sample interactions significantly exceeds the cantilever stiffness, the optimal detection sensitivity occurs only when the laser spot locates at a certain distance from the cantilever-tip end. Thus, in addition to the 'globally optimized detection sensitivity', the 'tip optimized detection sensitivity' is also determined. Finally, we have proposed a calibration method to determine the actual AFM detection sensitivity in high-order flexural vibration modes against the static end-load sensitivity that is obtained traditionally by measuring a force-distance curve on a hard substrate in the contact mode.

  19. Dynamics of a disturbed sessile drop measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    PubMed

    McGuiggan, Patricia M; Grave, Daniel A; Wallace, Jay S; Cheng, Shengfeng; Prosperetti, Andrea; Robbins, Mark O

    2011-10-04

    A new method for studying the dynamics of a sessile drop by atomic force microscopy (AFM) is demonstrated. A hydrophobic microsphere (radius, r ∼ 20-30 μm) is brought into contact with a small sessile water drop resting on a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface. When the microsphere touches the liquid surface, the meniscus rises onto it because of capillary forces. Although the microsphere volume is 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the drop, it excites the normal resonance modes of the liquid interface. The sphere is pinned at the interface, whose small (<100 nm) oscillations are readily measured with AFM. Resonance oscillation frequencies were measured for drop volumes between 5 and 200 μL. The results for the two lowest normal modes are quantitatively consistent with continuum calculations for the natural frequency of hemispherical drops with no adjustable parameters. The method may enable sensitive measurements of volume, surface tension, and viscosity of small drops. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. High-speed atomic force microscopy shows dynamic molecular processes in photoactivated bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Yamashita, Hayato; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Kandori, Hideki; Ando, Toshio

    2010-03-01

    Dynamic changes in protein conformation in response to external stimuli are important in biological processes, but it has proved difficult to directly visualize such structural changes under physiological conditions. Here, we show that high-speed atomic force microscopy can be used to visualize dynamic changes in stimulated proteins. High-resolution movies of a light-driven proton pump, bacteriorhodopsin, reveal that, upon illumination, a cytoplasmic portion of each bacteriorhodopsin monomer is brought into contact with adjacent trimers. The bacteriorhodopsin-bacteriorhodopsin interaction in the transiently formed assembly engenders both positive and negative cooperative effects in the decay kinetics as the initial bacteriorhodopsin recovers and, as a consequence, the turnover rate of the photocycle is maintained constant, on average, irrespective of the light intensity. These results confirm that high-resolution visualization is a powerful approach for studying elaborate biomolecular processes under realistic conditions.

  1. Boundary slip study on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces with dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Wang, Yuliang; Maali, Abdelhamid

    2009-07-21

    Slip length has been measured using the dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) method. Unlike the contact AFM method, the sample surface approaches an oscillating sphere with a very low velocity in the dynamic AFM method. During this process, the amplitude and phase shift data are recorded to calculate the hydrodynamic damping coefficient, which is then used to obtain slip length. In this study, a glass sphere with a large radius was glued to the end of an AFM cantilever to measure the slip length on rough surfaces. Experimental results for hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces show that the hydrodynamic damping coefficient decreases from the hydrophilic surface to the hydrophobic surface and from the hydrophobic one to the superhydrophobic one. The slip lengths obtained on the hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces are 43 and 236 nm, respectively, which indicates increasing boundary slip from the hydrophobic surface to the superhydrophobic one.

  2. Cantilever tilt causing amplitude related convolution in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Sun, Jielin; Itoh, Hiroshi; Shen, Dianhong; Hu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the topography in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a convolution of the tip's shape and the sample's geometry. The classical convolution model was established in contact mode assuming a static probe, but it is no longer valid in dynamic mode AFM. It is still not well understood whether or how the vibration of the probe in dynamic mode affects the convolution. Such ignorance complicates the interpretation of the topography. Here we propose a convolution model for dynamic mode by taking into account the typical design of the cantilever tilt in AFMs, which leads to a different convolution from that in contact mode. Our model indicates that the cantilever tilt results in a dynamic convolution affected by the absolute value of the amplitude, especially in the case that corresponding contact convolution has sharp edges beyond certain angle. The effect was experimentally demonstrated by a perpendicular SiO(2)/Si super-lattice structure. Our model is useful for quantitative characterizations in dynamic mode, especially in probe characterization and critical dimension measurements.

  3. Development and Optimization of Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy Techniques with Applications in Soft Matter Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, Babak

    The overall goals of this project are (i) to improve the current dynamic modes of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the focus of multifrequency AFM measurements on soft matters in ambient air and liquid environments and (ii) to develop a new methodology for mechanically characterizing the subsurface of soft samples, allowing users to gradually, controllably and reversibly reveal features that are buried under the surface. This dissertation includes a wide range of studies on multifrequency atomic force microscopy. Firstly, the imaging parameters (drive amplitude and frequency) of each eigenmode is studied, optimized based on the observables. Secondly, a new mutltifrequency AFM technique with capability of imaging subsurface features has been developed and verified through experiments. Based on the first goal of the project, an experimental protocol to select excitation frequency in air for single tapping mode and bimodal AFM are provided. Additionally, a rigorous guideline for the selection of drive frequency in ambient air, liquid environment based on the energy quantities and slope of the cantilever's phase response is established. Finally, an advantage of using higher and stiffer eigenmodes for imaging soft matters has been proposed and verified experimentally. By this technique, subsurface imaging capabilities of AFM are expanded.

  4. Dynamics of Nanoconfined Fluids measured by combined Force Microscopy and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subba Rao, Venkatesh; Pantea, Mircea; Grabowski, Christopher; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis; Hoffmann, Peter

    2009-03-01

    We present work performed on a model liquid, tetrakis(2-ethylhexoxy)silane (TEHOS), using Atomic Force microscopy (AFM) and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) to study its dynamical structure at the nanoscale. A novel homebuilt interferometer-based small amplitude AFM was used to measure directly the stiffness and damping coefficient of TEHOS film. Oscillations in stiffness and damping coefficient with period ˜1 nm (TEHOS molecular size) were observed. Translational diffusion in spin-coated TEHOS films was measured using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS). Diffusion was found to be heterogeneous. Finally we present the ongoing work on an integrated platform of AFM and FCS to perform simultaneous measurements of nanoconfined fluids. Recent results using this new setup on a fluorescently labelled nanoparticle solution in confinement will be discussed.

  5. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  6. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification. PMID:27302624

  7. The importance of cantilever dynamics in the interpretation of Kelvin probe force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Satzinger, Kevin J.; Brown, Keith A.; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    A realistic interpretation of the measured contact potential difference (CPD) in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is crucial in order to extract meaningful information about the sample. Central to this interpretation is a method to include contributions from the macroscopic cantilever arm, as well as the cone and sharp tip of a KPFM probe. Here, three models of the electrostatic interaction between a KPFM probe and a sample are tested through an electrostatic simulation and compared with experiment. In contrast with previous studies that treat the KPFM cantilever as a rigid object, we allow the cantilever to bend and rotate; accounting for cantilever bending provides the closest agreement between theory and experiment. We demonstrate that cantilever dynamics play a major role in CPD measurements and provide a simulation technique to explore this phenomenon. PMID:23093809

  8. Dynamic nano-triboelectrification using torsional resonance mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the mechanism of charge generation, distribution, and transfer between surfaces is very important for energy harvesting applications based on triboelectric effect. Here, we demonstrate dynamic nanotriboelectrification with torsional resonance (TR) mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experiments on rubbing the sample surface using TR mode for the generation of triboelectric charges and in-situ characterization of the charge distribution using scanning Kelvin probe microcopy (SKPM) were performed. This method allows the tip to perform lateral oscillation and maintains the tip-sample interaction in the attractive region to ensure high efficiency of the charge generation during the rubbing process. The measured efficiency of generating triboelectric charges can achieve ~10.53 times higher than conventional static/contact mode in the triboelectrification experiments. In addition to the charge generation, local discharging experiments were also performed. This work would provide a new method to generate patterned charges and also be helpful in understanding the mechanism of nanotriboelectrification.

  9. Autonomous and forced dynamics in a spin-transfer nano-oscillator: Quantitative magnetic-resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    In this talk, we will discuss how magnetic-resonance force microscopy, can provide quantitative measurement of the power emitted by a spin-transfer nano-oscillator, consisting of a normally magnetized Py|Cu|Py circular nanopillar, excited both in the autonomous and forced regimes.[2] From the power behavior in the subcritical region of the autonomous dynamics, one obtains a quantitative measurement of the threshold current and of the noise level. Their field dependence directly yields both the spin torque efficiency acting on the thin layer and the nature of the mode which first auto-oscillates: the lowest energy, spatially most uniform spin-wave mode. We will then demonstrate that the observed spin-wave spectrum in the forced regime critically depends on the method of excitation. While the spatially uniform radio-frequency (RF) magnetic field excites only the axially symmetric modes having azimuthal index l = 0 , the RF current flowing through the nano-pillar, creating a circular RF Oersted field, excites only the modes having azimuthal index l = + 1 .[3] It is then demonstrated that in order to phase lock this auto-oscillating mode, the external source must have the same spatial symmetry as the mode profile, i.e., a uniform microwave field must be used rather than a microwave current flowing through the nanopillar. This research was partially supported by the French Grant Spinnova (ANR-11-NANO-0016)

  10. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sergio; Guang, Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H

    2012-04-01

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  11. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the local electronic, ionic and electrochemical functionalities in a broad range of materials and devices. In classical KPFM, which utilizes heterodyne detection and closed loop bias feedback, the cantilever response is down-sampled to a single measurement of the contact potential difference (CPD) per pixel. This level of detail, however, is insufficient for materials and devices involving bias and time dependent electrochemical events; or at solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear or lossy dielectrics are present. Here, we demonstrate direct recovery of the bias dependence of the electrostatic force at high temporal resolution using General acquisition Mode (G-Mode) KPFM. G-Mode KPFM utilizes high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates. We show how G-Mode KPFM can be used to capture nanoscale CPD and capacitance information with a temporal resolution much faster than the cantilever bandwidth, determined by the modulation frequency of the AC voltage. In this way, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic electric phenomena in electroactive interfaces as well as a promising route to extend KPFM to the solid-liquid interface.

  12. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the local electronic, ionic and electrochemical functionalities in a broad range of materials and devices. In classical KPFM, which utilizes heterodyne detection and closed loop bias feedback, the cantilever response is down-sampled to a single measurement of the contact potential difference (CPD) per pixel. This level of detail, however, is insufficient for materials and devices involving bias and time dependent electrochemical events; or at solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear or lossy dielectrics are present. Here, we demonstrate direct recovery of the bias dependence of the electrostatic force at high temporal resolution using General acquisition Mode (G-Mode) KPFM. G-Mode KPFM utilizes high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates. We show how G-Mode KPFM can be used to capture nanoscale CPD and capacitance information with a temporal resolution much faster than the cantilever bandwidth, determined by the modulation frequency of the AC voltage. In this way, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic electric phenomena in electroactive interfaces as well as a promising route to extend KPFM to the solid-liquid interface. PMID:27514987

  13. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space.

    PubMed

    Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas; Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-12

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the local electronic, ionic and electrochemical functionalities in a broad range of materials and devices. In classical KPFM, which utilizes heterodyne detection and closed loop bias feedback, the cantilever response is down-sampled to a single measurement of the contact potential difference (CPD) per pixel. This level of detail, however, is insufficient for materials and devices involving bias and time dependent electrochemical events; or at solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear or lossy dielectrics are present. Here, we demonstrate direct recovery of the bias dependence of the electrostatic force at high temporal resolution using General acquisition Mode (G-Mode) KPFM. G-Mode KPFM utilizes high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates. We show how G-Mode KPFM can be used to capture nanoscale CPD and capacitance information with a temporal resolution much faster than the cantilever bandwidth, determined by the modulation frequency of the AC voltage. In this way, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic electric phenomena in electroactive interfaces as well as a promising route to extend KPFM to the solid-liquid interface.

  14. A method to provide rapid in situ determination of tip radius in dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Sergio; Guang Li; Souier, Tewfik; Gadelrab, Karim; Chiesa, Matteo; Thomson, Neil H.

    2012-04-15

    We provide a method to characterize the tip radius of an atomic force microscopy in situ by monitoring the dynamics of the cantilever in ambient conditions. The key concept is that the value of free amplitude for which transitions from the attractive to repulsive force regimes are observed, strongly depends on the curvature of the tip. In practice, the smaller the value of free amplitude required to observe a transition, the sharper the tip. This general behavior is remarkably independent of the properties of the sample and cantilever characteristics and shows the strong dependence of the transitions on the tip radius. The main advantage of this method is rapid in situ characterization. Rapid in situ characterization enables one to continuously monitor the tip size during experiments. Further, we show how to reproducibly shape the tip from a given initial size to any chosen larger size. This approach combined with the in situ tip size monitoring enables quantitative comparison of materials measurements between samples. These methods are set to allow quantitative data acquisition and make direct data comparison readily available in the community.

  15. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Collins, Liam; Belianinov, Alex; Somnath, Suhas

    2016-08-12

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the role local electronic, ionic and electrochemical processes play on the global functionality of materials and devices, even down to the atomic scale. Conventional KPFM utilizes heterodyne detection and bias feedback to measure the contact potential difference (CPD) between tip and sample. This measurement paradigm, however, permits only partial recovery of the information encoded in bias- and time-dependent electrostatic interactions between the tip and sample and effectively down-samples the cantilever response to a single measurement of CPD per pixel. This level of detail is insufficient for electroactive materials, devices, or solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear dielectrics are present or spurious electrostatic events are possible. Here, we simulate and experimentally validate a novel approach for spatially resolved KPFM capable of a full information transfer of the dynamic electric processes occurring between tip and sample. General acquisition mode, or G-Mode, adopts a big data approach utilising high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates (> 4 MHz), providing a permanent record of the tip trajectory. We develop a range of methodologies for analysing the resultant large multidimensional datasets involving classical, physics-based and information-based approaches. Physics-based analysis of G-Mode KPFM data recovers the parabolic bias dependence of the electrostatic force for each cycle of the excitation voltage, leading to a multidimensional dataset containing spatial and temporal dependence of the CPD and capacitance channels. We use multivariate statistical methods to reduce data volume and separate the complex multidimensional data sets into statistically significant components that can then be mapped onto separate physical mechanisms. Overall, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study dynamic

  16. Full data acquisition in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy: Mapping dynamic electric phenomena in real space

    DOE PAGES

    Balke, Nina; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2016-08-12

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has provided deep insights into the role local electronic, ionic and electrochemical processes play on the global functionality of materials and devices, even down to the atomic scale. Conventional KPFM utilizes heterodyne detection and bias feedback to measure the contact potential difference (CPD) between tip and sample. This measurement paradigm, however, permits only partial recovery of the information encoded in bias- and time-dependent electrostatic interactions between the tip and sample and effectively down-samples the cantilever response to a single measurement of CPD per pixel. This level of detail is insufficient for electroactive materials, devices, ormore » solid-liquid interfaces, where non-linear dielectrics are present or spurious electrostatic events are possible. Here, we simulate and experimentally validate a novel approach for spatially resolved KPFM capable of a full information transfer of the dynamic electric processes occurring between tip and sample. General acquisition mode, or G-Mode, adopts a big data approach utilising high speed detection, compression, and storage of the raw cantilever deflection signal in its entirety at high sampling rates (> 4 MHz), providing a permanent record of the tip trajectory. We develop a range of methodologies for analysing the resultant large multidimensional datasets involving classical, physics-based and information-based approaches. Physics-based analysis of G-Mode KPFM data recovers the parabolic bias dependence of the electrostatic force for each cycle of the excitation voltage, leading to a multidimensional dataset containing spatial and temporal dependence of the CPD and capacitance channels. We use multivariate statistical methods to reduce data volume and separate the complex multidimensional data sets into statistically significant components that can then be mapped onto separate physical mechanisms. Overall, G-Mode KPFM offers a new paradigm to study

  17. Analysis of Adhesive Characteristics of Asphalt Based on Atomic Force Microscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Yi, Junyan; Feng, Decheng; Huang, Yudong; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-05-18

    Asphalt binder is a very important building material in infrastructure construction; it is commonly mixed with mineral aggregate and used to produce asphalt concrete. Owing to the large differences in physical and chemical properties between asphalt and aggregate, adhesive bonds play an important role in determining the performance of asphalt concrete. Although many types of adhesive bonding mechanisms have been proposed to explain the interaction forces between asphalt binder and mineral aggregate, few have been confirmed and characterized. In comparison with chemical interactions, physical adsorption has been considered to play a more important role in adhesive bonding between asphalt and mineral aggregate. In this study, the silicon tip of an atomic force microscope was used to represent silicate minerals in aggregate, and a nanoscale analysis of the characteristics of adhesive bonding between asphalt binder and the silicon tip was conducted via an atomic force microscopy (AFM) test and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the measurements and simulations could help in better understanding of the bonding and debonding procedures in asphalt-aggregate mixtures during hot mixing and under traffic loading. MD simulations on a single molecule of a component of asphalt and monocrystalline silicon demonstrate that molecules with a higher atomic density and planar structure, such as three types of asphaltene molecules, can provide greater adhesive strength. However, regarding the real components of asphalt binder, both the MD simulations and AFM test indicate that the colloidal structural behavior of asphalt also has a large influence on the adhesion behavior between asphalt and silicon. A schematic model of the interaction between asphalt and silicon is presented, which can explain the effect of aging on the adhesion behavior of asphalt.

  18. Image Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajapaksa, Indrajith

    In this thesis we describe an enhancement to the Atomic force microscope (AFM) to simultaneously gather topographic features and spectroscopic information .Compared to the current state of the art of near-field excitation and far-field detection AFM imaging techniques our system uses a radical new approach near-field excitation and near-field detection. By placing the detector in the near-field we achieve high signal to noise and single molecular resolution. The origin of our near-field detector signal is the image force gradient due to the interaction of the stimulated molecular dipole with its image on the metal probe. We designed and built an optical and electronic system to capture this signal and simultaneously image nano-scale surface topography and optical image force gradient. By varying the wavelength of the excitation beam we measure the induced optical image force gradient spectra of molecules on surface. These spectra show good agreement with the absorption spectra of the bulk molecules measured by conventional absorption spectroscopy. We show that image force gradient is directly proportional to the optical absorption dipole strength. Using Finite Element 3D electromagnetic simulations and using Lorentz model for the excited molecular dipole we showed that the image force gradient has a decay length of 1nm, making the theoretical resolution of this microscopy technique approximately 1 nm. This rapid decay was measured experimentally .This resolution was seen by the high contrasting spectroscopic images of molecules on the surface. In follow on experiments this technique was extended to provide surface Raman spectroscopy and microscopy at molecular resolution. We create an image force gradient interaction through optical parametric down conversion between stimulated Raman excited molecules on a surface and a cantilevered nanometer scale probe brought very close to it. Spectroscopy and microscopy on clusters of molecules have been performed. Single

  19. Precrystallization structures in supersaturated lysozyme solutions studied by dynamic light scattering and scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaper, Achim; Georgalis, Yannis; Umbach, Patrick; Raptis, Jannis; Saenger, Wolfram

    1997-05-01

    A comparitive study of the nanostructure evolving during aggregation of hen-egg white lysozyme in supersaturated solution was carried out by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning force microscopy (SFM). Lysozyme aggregate (cluster) formation was observed in solution in the presence of NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, and NaNO3 as precipitating agents. The growth kinetics were examined by DLS and revealed fractal growth of the clusters with a fractal dimension of 1.8 obtained independently of the type of inert salt. Such behavior is typical for diffusion-limited cluster-cluster (DLCA) aggregation. Initial lysozyme cluster sizes were in the range of 12-35 nm. SFM images of individual lysozyme clusters at the liquid-solid interface were obtained in the presence of NaCl and NaNO3 under crystallization conditions, and revealed cluster sizes in agreement with those determined by DLS. Extended domains of smaller sized clusters appeared on the mica surface after subjecting supersaturated lysozyme solutions to a dialysis step. The feasibility of DLS and SFM for monitoring the nano- and mesoscopic morphology of lysozyme aggregates in supersatured solutions and at the solid-liquid interface is discussed.

  20. Viewing dynamic interactions of proteins and a model lipid membrane with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Anthony S; Rand, Jacob H; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Taatjes, Douglas J

    2013-01-01

    The information covered in this chapter will present a model homogenous membrane preparation technique and dynamic imaging procedure that can be successfully applied to more than one type of lipid study and atomic force microscope (AFM) instrument setup. The basic procedural steps have been used with an Asylum Research MFP-3D BIO and the Bruker (formerly, Veeco) BioScope. The AFM imaging protocol has been supplemented by procedures (not to be presented in this chapter) of ellipsometry, standardized western blotting, and dot-blots to verify appropriate purity and activity of all experimental molecular components; excellent purity and activity level of the lipids, proteins, and drug(s) greatly influence the success of imaging experiments in the scanning probe microscopy field. The major goal of the chapter is to provide detailed procedures for sample preparation and operation of the Asylum Research MFP-3D BIO AFM. In addition, one should be cognizant that our comprehensive description in the use of the MFP-3D BIO's functions for successful image acquisitions and analyses is greatly enhanced by Asylum Research's (AR's) accompanying extensive manual(s), technical notes, and AR's users forum. Ultimately, the stepwise protocol and information will allow novice personnel to begin acquiring quality images for processing and analysis with minimal supervision.

  1. Toward quantitative estimation of material properties with dynamic mode atomic force microscopy: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sayan; Gannepalli, Anil; Salapaka, Murti

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we explore methods that enable estimation of material properties with the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy suitable for soft matter investigation. The article presents the viewpoint of casting the system, comprising of a flexure probe interacting with the sample, as an equivalent cantilever system and compares a steady-state analysis based method with a recursive estimation technique for determining the parameters of the equivalent cantilever system in real time. The steady-state analysis of the equivalent cantilever model, which has been implicitly assumed in studies on material property determination, is validated analytically and experimentally. We show that the steady-state based technique yields results that quantitatively agree with the recursive method in the domain of its validity. The steady-state technique is considerably simpler to implement, however, slower compared to the recursive technique. The parameters of the equivalent system are utilized to interpret storage and dissipative properties of the sample. Finally, the article identifies key pitfalls that need to be avoided toward the quantitative estimation of material properties.

  2. Measurement of dynamic cell-induced 3D displacement fields in vitro for traction force optical coherence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A; Bordeleau, François; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A; Adie, Steven G

    2017-02-01

    Traction force microscopy (TFM) is a method used to study the forces exerted by cells as they sense and interact with their environment. Cell forces play a role in processes that take place over a wide range of spatiotemporal scales, and so it is desirable that TFM makes use of imaging modalities that can effectively capture the dynamics associated with these processes. To date, confocal microscopy has been the imaging modality of choice to perform TFM in 3D settings, although multiple factors limit its spatiotemporal coverage. We propose traction force optical coherence microscopy (TF-OCM) as a novel technique that may offer enhanced spatial coverage and temporal sampling compared to current methods used for volumetric TFM studies. Reconstructed volumetric OCM data sets were used to compute time-lapse extracellular matrix deformations resulting from cell forces in 3D culture. These matrix deformations revealed clear differences that can be attributed to the dynamic forces exerted by normal versus contractility-inhibited NIH-3T3 fibroblasts embedded within 3D Matrigel matrices. Our results are the first step toward the realization of 3D TF-OCM, and they highlight the potential use of OCM as a platform for advancing cell mechanics research.

  3. Measurement of dynamic cell-induced 3D displacement fields in vitro for traction force optical coherence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mulligan, Jeffrey A.; Bordeleau, François; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.; Adie, Steven G.

    2017-01-01

    Traction force microscopy (TFM) is a method used to study the forces exerted by cells as they sense and interact with their environment. Cell forces play a role in processes that take place over a wide range of spatiotemporal scales, and so it is desirable that TFM makes use of imaging modalities that can effectively capture the dynamics associated with these processes. To date, confocal microscopy has been the imaging modality of choice to perform TFM in 3D settings, although multiple factors limit its spatiotemporal coverage. We propose traction force optical coherence microscopy (TF-OCM) as a novel technique that may offer enhanced spatial coverage and temporal sampling compared to current methods used for volumetric TFM studies. Reconstructed volumetric OCM data sets were used to compute time-lapse extracellular matrix deformations resulting from cell forces in 3D culture. These matrix deformations revealed clear differences that can be attributed to the dynamic forces exerted by normal versus contractility-inhibited NIH-3T3 fibroblasts embedded within 3D Matrigel matrices. Our results are the first step toward the realization of 3D TF-OCM, and they highlight the potential use of OCM as a platform for advancing cell mechanics research. PMID:28271010

  4. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  5. Magnetic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel WCE; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells. PMID:25050758

  6. A high-bandwidth amplitude estimation technique for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Karvinen, K. S. Moheimani, S. O. R.

    2014-02-15

    While often overlooked, one of the prerequisites for high-speed amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy is a high-bandwidth amplitude estimation technique. Conventional techniques, such as RMS to DC conversion and the lock-in amplifier, have proven useful, but offer limited measurement bandwidth and are not suitable for high-speed imaging. Several groups have developed techniques, but many of these are either difficult to implement or lack robustness. In this contribution, we briefly outline existing amplitude estimation methods and propose a new high-bandwidth estimation technique, inspired by techniques employed in microwave and RF circuit design, which utilizes phase cancellation to significantly improve the performance of the lock-in amplifier. We conclude with the design and implementation of a custom circuit to experimentally demonstrate the improvements and discuss its application in high-speed and multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

  7. Finite element modeling of atomic force microscopy cantilever dynamics during video rate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Howard-Knight, J. P.; Hobbs, J. K.

    2011-04-01

    A dynamic finite element model has been constructed to simulate the behavior of low spring constant atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers used for imaging at high speed without active feedback as in VideoAFM. The model is tested against experimental data collected at 20 frame/s and good agreement is found. The complex dynamics of the cantilever, consisting of traveling waves coming from the tip sample interaction, reflecting off the cantilever-substrate junction, and interfering with new waves created at the tip, are revealed. The construction of the image from this resulting nonequilibrium cantilever deflection is also examined. Transient tip-sample forces are found to reach values up to 260 nN on a calibration grid sample, and the maximum forces do not always correspond to the position of steepest features as a result of energy stored in the cantilever.

  8. Dynamics of bacteriorhodopsin in solid-supported purple membranes studied with tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schranz, Michael; Baumann, Roelf-Peter; Rhinow, Daniel; Hampp, Norbert

    2010-07-15

    Purple membrane (PM) from Halobacterium salinarum, which comprises bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and lipids only, has been employed by many groups as a model system to study the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins. Although the conformational dynamics of BR within PM has been extensively analyzed with subnanometer resolution by means of diffraction experiments and spectroscopic methods, as well, structural studies of dynamical transitions within single PMs are rare. In this work, we show that tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) is ideally suited to study dynamical transitions within solid-supported PMs at the nanoscale. Time-dependent AFM analysis of solid-supported PMs shows that redistribution processes take place between a crystalline core region, featuring a height of approximately 5 nm, and a highly mobile rim region (approximately 4 nm in height). Furthermore, we discuss the influence of temperature and substrate on the equilibrium. The experiments are complemented by electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) of PM on mica. Beyond their importance for many physiological processes, dynamical transitions in biological membranes, as observed in this work, are of critical importance for all methods that make use of solid-supported membrane assemblies, either analytical tools or applications.

  9. Role of tip chemical reactivity on atom manipulation process in dynamic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Yurtsever, Ayhan; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo; Ondráček, Martin; Pou, Pablo; Pérez, Ruben; Jelínek, Pavel

    2013-08-27

    The effect of tip chemical reactivity on the lateral manipulation of intrinsic Si adatoms toward a vacancy site on a Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface has been investigated by noncontact atomic force microscopy at room temperature. Here we measure the atom-hopping probabilities associated with different manipulation processes as a function of the tip-surface distance by means of constant height scans with chemically different types of tips. The interactions between different tips and Si atoms are evaluated by force spectroscopic measurements. Our results demonstrate that the ability to manipulate Si adatoms depends extremely on the chemical nature of the tip apex and is correlated with the maximal attractive force measured over Si adatoms. We rationalize the observed dependence of the atom manipulation process on tip-apex chemical reactivity by means of density functional theory calculations. The results of these calculations suggest that the ability to reduce the energy barrier associated with the Si adatom movement depends profoundly on tip chemical reactivity and that the level of energy barrier reduction is higher with tips that exhibit high chemical reactivity with Si adatoms. The results of this study provide a better way to control the efficiency of the atomic manipulation process for chemisorption systems.

  10. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; ...

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q watermore » and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.« less

  11. Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy in liquid using Electrochemical Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Kilpatrick, J.; Tselev, Alexander; Okatan, Mahmut Baris; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Rodriguez, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional closed loop-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) has emerged as a powerful technique for probing electric and transport phenomena at the solid-gas interface. The extension of KPFM capabilities to probe electrostatic and electrochemical phenomena at the solid–liquid interface is of interest for a broad range of applications from energy storage to biological systems. However, the operation of KPFM implicitly relies on the presence of a linear lossless dielectric in the probe-sample gap, a condition which is violated for ionically-active liquids (e.g., when diffuse charge dynamics are present). Here, electrostatic and electrochemical measurements are demonstrated in ionically-active (polar isopropanol, milli-Q water and aqueous NaCl) and ionically-inactive (non-polar decane) liquids by electrochemical force microscopy (EcFM), a multidimensional (i.e., bias- and time-resolved) spectroscopy method. In the absence of mobile charges (ambient and non-polar liquids), KPFM and EcFM are both feasible, yielding comparable contact potential difference (CPD) values. In ionically-active liquids, KPFM is not possible and EcFM can be used to measure the dynamic CPD and a rich spectrum of information pertaining to charge screening, ion diffusion, and electrochemical processes (e.g., Faradaic reactions). EcFM measurements conducted in isopropanol and milli-Q water over Au and highly ordered pyrolytic graphite electrodes demonstrate both sample- and solvent-dependent features. Finally, the feasibility of using EcFM as a local force-based mapping technique of material-dependent electrostatic and electrochemical response is investigated. The resultant high dimensional dataset is visualized using a purely statistical approach that does not require a priori physical models, allowing for qualitative mapping of electrostatic and electrochemical material properties at the solid–liquid interface.

  12. Slip-length measurement of confined air flow using dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-08-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the slip length of air flow close to solid surfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in dynamic mode. The air was confined between a glass surface and a spherical glass particle glued to an AFM cantilever. The Knudsen number was varied continuously over three decades by varying the distance between the two surfaces. Our results show that the effect of confining the air is purely dissipative. The data are described by an isothermal Maxwell slip-boundary condition, and the measured slip-length value was 118 nm .

  13. Dynamic modeling and simulation of rough cylindrical micro/nanoparticle manipulation with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Korayem, Moharam H; Badkoobeh Hezaveh, Hedieh; Taheri, Moein

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the process of pushing rough cylindrical micro/nanoparticles on a surface with an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe is investigated. For this purpose, the mechanics of contact involving adhesion are studied first. Then, a method is presented for estimating the real area of contact between a rough cylindrical particle (whose surface roughness is described by the Rumpf and Rabinovich models) and a smooth surface. A dynamic model is then obtained for the pushing of rough cylindrical particles on a surface with an AFM probe. Afterwards, the process is simulated for different particle sizes and various roughness dimensions. Finally, by reducing the length of the cylindrical particle, the simulation condition is brought closer to the manipulation condition of a smooth spherical particle on a rough substrate, and the simulation results of the two cases are compared. Based on the simulation results, the critical force and time of manipulation diminish for rough particles relative to smooth ones. Reduction in the aspect ratio at a constant cross-section radius and the radius of asperities (height of asperities based on the Rabinovich model) results in an increase in critical force and time of manipulation.

  14. Gaining insight into the physics of dynamic atomic force microscopy in complex environments using the VEDA simulator.

    PubMed

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) continues to grow in popularity among scientists in many different fields, and research on new methods and operating modes continues to expand the resolution, capabilities, and types of samples that can be studied. But many promising increases in capability are accompanied by increases in complexity. Indeed, interpreting modern dAFM data can be challenging, especially on complicated material systems, or in liquid environments where the behavior is often contrary to what is known in air or vacuum environments. Mathematical simulations have proven to be an effective tool in providing physical insight into these non-intuitive systems. In this article we describe recent developments in the VEDA (virtual environment for dynamic AFM) simulator, which is a suite of freely available, open-source simulation tools that are delivered through the cloud computing cyber-infrastructure of nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org). Here we describe three major developments. First, simulations in liquid environments are improved by enhancements in the modeling of cantilever dynamics, excitation methods, and solvation shell forces. Second, VEDA is now able to simulate many new advanced modes of operation (bimodal, phase-modulation, frequency-modulation, etc.). Finally, nineteen different tip-sample models are available to simulate the surface physics of a wide variety different material systems including capillary, specific adhesion, van der Waals, electrostatic, viscoelasticity, and hydration forces. These features are demonstrated through example simulations and validated against experimental data, in order to provide insight into practical problems in dynamic AFM.

  15. Gaining insight into the physics of dynamic atomic force microscopy in complex environments using the VEDA simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic atomic force microscopy (dAFM) continues to grow in popularity among scientists in many different fields, and research on new methods and operating modes continues to expand the resolution, capabilities, and types of samples that can be studied. But many promising increases in capability are accompanied by increases in complexity. Indeed, interpreting modern dAFM data can be challenging, especially on complicated material systems, or in liquid environments where the behavior is often contrary to what is known in air or vacuum environments. Mathematical simulations have proven to be an effective tool in providing physical insight into these non-intuitive systems. In this article we describe recent developments in the VEDA (virtual environment for dynamic AFM) simulator, which is a suite of freely available, open-source simulation tools that are delivered through the cloud computing cyber-infrastructure of nanoHUB (www.nanohub.org). Here we describe three major developments. First, simulations in liquid environments are improved by enhancements in the modeling of cantilever dynamics, excitation methods, and solvation shell forces. Second, VEDA is now able to simulate many new advanced modes of operation (bimodal, phase-modulation, frequency-modulation, etc.). Finally, nineteen different tip-sample models are available to simulate the surface physics of a wide variety different material systems including capillary, specific adhesion, van der Waals, electrostatic, viscoelasticity, and hydration forces. These features are demonstrated through example simulations and validated against experimental data, in order to provide insight into practical problems in dynamic AFM.

  16. A comparison of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods to characterize nanoparticle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoo, Christopher M.; Starostin, Natasha; West, Paul; Mecartney, Martha L.

    2008-12-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of conventional dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for characterizing size distributions of polystyrene nanoparticles in the size range of 20-100 nm. Average DLS values for monosize dispersed particles are slightly higher than the nominal values whereas AFM values were slightly lower than nominal values. Bimodal distributions were easily identified with AFM, but DLS results were skewed toward larger particles. AFM characterization of nanoparticles using automated analysis software provides an accurate and rapid analysis for nanoparticle characterization and has advantages over DLS for non-monodispersed solutions.

  17. High-speed atomic force microscopy reveals structural dynamics of amyloid β1–42 aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Itami, Masahiro; Takahashi, Ryoichi; Teplow, David B.; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. This process involves protein assembly into oligomeric intermediates and fibrils with highly polymorphic molecular structures. These structural differences may be responsible for different disease presentations. For this reason, elucidation of the structural features and assembly kinetics of amyloidogenic proteins has been an area of intense study. We report here the results of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) studies of fibril formation and elongation by the 42-residue form of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ1–42), a key pathogenetic agent of Alzheimer's disease. Our data demonstrate two different growth modes of Aβ1–42, one producing straight fibrils and the other producing spiral fibrils. Each mode depends on initial fibril nucleus structure, but switching from one growth mode to another was occasionally observed, suggesting that fibril end structure fluctuated between the two growth modes. This switching phenomenon was affected by buffer salt composition. Our findings indicate that polymorphism in fibril structure can occur after fibril nucleation and is affected by relatively modest changes in environmental conditions. PMID:27162352

  18. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section is developed and used for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the domain nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field within the material. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  19. Analytical model of the nonlinear dynamics of cantilever tip-sample surface interactions for various acoustic atomic force microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-04-01

    An analytical model is developed of the interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope with the sample surface that treats the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. To maintain equilibrium, the volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any). The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and amplitude modulation-atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) (intermittent contact mode). The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of A-AFM image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample. Applications of the model to measurements of LaRC™-CP2 polyimide film using RDF-AFUM and AM-AFM images predict maximum variations in the Young modulus of 24% and 18%, respectively, over a common scan area. Both predictions are in good agreement with the value of 21% obtained from independent mechanical stretching measurements of the polyimide sheet material.

  20. Magnetic Force Microscopy in Liquids.

    PubMed

    Ares, Pablo; Jaafar, Miriam; Gil, Adriana; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Asenjo, Agustina

    2015-09-01

    In this work, the use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to acquire images of magnetic nanostructures in liquid environments is presented. Optimization of the MFM signal acquisition in liquid media is performed and it is applied to characterize the magnetic signal of magnetite nanoparticles. The ability for detecting magnetic nanostructures along with the well-known capabilities of atomic force microscopy in liquids suggests potential applications in fields such as nanomedicine, nanobiotechnology, or nanocatalysis.

  1. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  2. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lulu; Cai, Mingjun; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy. PMID:28441775

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations and Kelvin probe force microscopy to study of cholesterol-induced electrostatic nanodomains in complex lipid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Drolle, E; Bennett, W F D; Hammond, K; Lyman, E; Karttunen, M; Leonenko, Z

    2017-01-04

    The molecular arrangement of lipids and proteins within biomembranes and monolayers gives rise to complex film morphologies as well as regions of distinct electrical surface potential, topographical and electrostatic nanoscale domains. To probe these nanodomains in soft matter is a challenging task both experimentally and theoretically. This work addresses the effects of cholesterol, lipid composition, lipid charge, and lipid phase on the monolayer structure and the electrical surface potential distribution. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to resolve topographical nanodomains and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) to resolve electrical surface potential of these nanodomains in lipid monolayers. Model monolayers composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(3-lysyl(1-glycerol))] (DOPG), and cholesterol were studied. It is shown that cholesterol changes nanoscale domain formation, affecting both topography and electrical surface potential. The molecular basis for differences in electrical surface potential was addressed with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD). MD simulations are compared the experimental results, with 100 s of mV difference in electrostatic potential between liquid-disordered bilayer (Ld, less cholesterol and lower chain order) and a liquid-ordered bilayer (Lo, more cholesterol and higher chain order). Importantly, the difference in electrostatic properties between Lo and Ld phases suggests a new mechanism by which membrane composition couples to membrane function.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations and Kelvin probe force microscopy to study of cholesterol-induced electrostatic nanodomains in complex lipid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drolle, E.; Bennett, W. F. D.; Hammond, K.; Lyman, E.; Karttunen, M.; Leonenko, Z.

    The molecular arrangement of lipids and proteins within biomembranes and monolayers gives rise to complex film morphologies as well as regions of distinct electrical surface potential, topographical and electrostatic nanoscale domains. To probe these nanodomains in soft matter is a challenging task both experimentally and theoretically. This work addresses the effects of cholesterol, lipid composition, lipid charge, and lipid phase on the monolayer structure and the electrical surface potential distribution. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to resolve topographical nanodomains and Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) to resolve electrical surface potential of these nanodomains in lipid monolayers. Model monolayers composed of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(3-lysyl(1-glycerol))] (DOPG), sphingomyelin, and cholesterol were studied. It is shown that cholesterol changes nanoscale domain formation, affecting both topography and electrical surface potential. The molecular basis for differences in electrical surface potential was addressed with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD). MD simulations qualitatively match the experimental results, with 100s of mV difference in electrostatic potential between liquid-disordered bilayer (Ld, less cholesterol and lower chain order) and a liquid-ordered bilayer (Lo, more cholesterol and higher chain order). Importantly, the difference in electrostatic properties between Lo and Ld phases suggests a new mechanism by which membrane composition couples to membrane function.

  5. Phase imaging with intermodulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Hutter, Carsten; von Bieren, Arndt C; Haviland, David B

    2010-05-01

    Intermodulation atomic force microscopy (IMAFM) is a dynamic mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with two-tone excitation. The oscillating AFM cantilever in close proximity to a surface experiences the nonlinear tip-sample force which mixes the drive tones and generates new frequency components in the cantilever response known as intermodulation products (IMPs). We present a procedure for extracting the phase at each IMP and demonstrate phase images made by recording this phase while scanning. Amplitude and phase images at intermodulation frequencies exhibit enhanced topographic and material contrast.

  6. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  7. Deep atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, H.; Drake, B.; Randall, C.; Hansma, P. K.

    2013-12-15

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) possesses several desirable imaging features including the ability to produce height profiles as well as two-dimensional images, in fluid or air, at high resolution. AFM has been used to study a vast selection of samples on the scale of angstroms to micrometers. However, current AFMs cannot access samples with vertical topography of the order of 100 μm or greater. Research efforts have produced AFM scanners capable of vertical motion greater than 100 μm, but commercially available probe tip lengths are still typically less than 10 μm high. Even the longest probe tips are below 100 μm and even at this range are problematic. In this paper, we present a method to hand-fabricate “Deep AFM” probes with tips of the order of 100 μm and longer so that AFM can be used to image samples with large scale vertical topography, such as fractured bone samples.

  8. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  9. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  10. Systematic study of the dolomite (104) surface by bimodal dynamic force microscopy in ultra-high vacuum.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shigeki; Pina, Carlos M; Bubendorf, Alexander; Fessler, Gregor; Glatzel, Thilo; Gnecco, Enrico; Meyer, Ernst

    2013-02-08

    We have investigated the morphology and structure of dolomite MgCa(CO(3))(2)(104) surfaces by bimodal dynamic force microscopy with flexural and torsional resonance modes in ultra-high vacuum at room temperature. We found that the surface slowly decomposes by degassing CO(2) in a vacuum and becomes covered by amorphous clusters, presumably MgO and CaO. By choosing an optimal sample preparation procedure (i.e. cleaving in a vacuum and mild annealing for stabilizing clusters for a short time), atomically clean surfaces were obtained. The complex tip-sample interaction, arising from carbonate groups and Mg and Ca atoms of the surface, induces a large variety of atomic-scale imaging features.

  11. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the nuclear pore complex transport barrier resolved by high-speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiyama, Yusuke; Mazur, Adam; Kapinos, Larisa E.; Lim, Roderick Y. H.

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are biological nanomachines that mediate the bidirectional traffic of macromolecules between the cytoplasm and nucleus in eukaryotic cells. This process involves numerous intrinsically disordered, barrier-forming proteins known as phenylalanine-glycine nucleoporins (FG Nups) that are tethered inside each pore. The selective barrier mechanism has so far remained unresolved because the FG Nups have eluded direct structural analysis within NPCs. Here, high-speed atomic force microscopy is used to visualize the nanoscopic spatiotemporal dynamics of FG Nups inside Xenopus laevis oocyte NPCs at timescales of ∼100 ms. Our results show that the cytoplasmic orifice is circumscribed by highly flexible, dynamically fluctuating FG Nups that rapidly elongate and retract, consistent with the diffusive motion of tethered polypeptide chains. On this basis, intermingling FG Nups exhibit transient entanglements in the central channel, but do not cohere into a tightly crosslinked meshwork. Therefore, the basic functional form of the NPC barrier is comprised of highly dynamic FG Nups that manifest as a central plug or transporter when averaged in space and time.

  13. Unraveling the Architecture and Structural Dynamics of Pathogens by High-Resolution in vitro Atomic Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, A J; Plomp, M; Leighton, T J; McPherson, A; Wheeler, K E

    2005-04-12

    Progress in structural biology very much depends upon the development of new high-resolution techniques and tools. Despite decades of study of viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores and their pressing importance in human medicine and biodefense, many of their structural properties are poorly understood. Thus, characterization and understanding of the architecture of protein surface and internal structures of pathogens is critical to elucidating mechanisms of disease, immune response, physicochemical properties, environmental resistance and development of countermeasures against bioterrorist agents. Furthermore, even though complete genome sequences are available for various pathogens, the structure-function relationships are not understood. Because of their lack of symmetry and heterogeneity, large human pathogens are often refractory to X-ray crystallographic analysis or reconstruction by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). An alternative high-resolution method to examine native structure of pathogens is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows direct visualization of macromolecular assemblies at near-molecular resolution. The capability to image single pathogen surfaces at nanometer scale in vitro would profoundly impact mechanistic and structural studies of pathogenesis, immunobiology, specific cellular processes, environmental dynamics and biotransformation.

  14. Spring constant of a tuning-fork sensor for dynamic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Manfred; Schmuck, Merlin; Schmidt, Nico; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Summary We present an overview of experimental and numerical methods to determine the spring constant of a quartz tuning fork in qPlus configuration. The simple calculation for a rectangular cantilever is compared to the values obtained by the analysis of the thermal excitation and by the direct mechanical measurement of the force versus displacement. To elucidate the difference, numerical simulations were performed taking account of the real geometry including the glue that is used to mount the tuning fork. PMID:23365793

  15. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sayan; Salapaka, Murti

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  16. Slow cellular dynamics in MDCK and R5 cells monitored by time-lapse atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Schoenenberger, C A; Hoh, J H

    1994-01-01

    We have examined dynamic events that occur on a time scale of minutes in an epithelial monolayer of Madine-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells and in ras-transformed MDCK cells by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells were imaged under physiological conditions, and time-lapse movies representing approximately 60 s real time per frame were assembled. In normal MDCK cells, two types of protrusions in the apical plasma membrane exhibit dynamic behavior. First, smooth bulges formed transiently over the time scale of minutes to tens of minutes. Second, spike-like protrusions appear initially as bulges, extend well above the apical surface and, finally, seem to detach. R5, an oncogenic transformant derived from MDCK cells, grows very flat on glass. During AFM imaging, these cells sometimes round up and detach from the substrate. In light microscopic observations of parallel preparations, cells rarely detach, suggesting that this is an active response of these cells to irritation by the AFM tip. R5 cells often extend processes that are supported by actin stress fibers. During imaging with the AFM, these processes withdraw at a rate of 1-5 microns/min, similar to that observed by light microscopy. During the withdrawal, movement of the stress fibers can be clearly seen. In the flat periphery of these cells, the transport of intracellular particles along cytoskeletal elements was seen. In addition, we have observed two types of wave-like movements through the cell, which appear to be an organized rearrangement of cytoplasm. One type of wave moves radially out from center of the cell while the other moves circularly along the cell periphery. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:7948707

  17. Enhancing the optical lever sensitivity of microcantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy via integrated low frequency paddles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huda Shaik, Nurul; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Raman, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    A method is presented to enhance the optical lever sensitivity in dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) by nearly an order of magnitude over a wide frequency bandwidth. This is achieved by fabricating or releasing a paddle with a soft hinge close to the free end of the AFM microcantilever such that the paddle resonance frequency is well below the fundamental resonance frequency of the microcantilever. We show a significant increase in signal to noise ratio when cantilever motion is observed at the paddle for AFM systems that are not limited by thermal noise. Also, any effects due to the excitation of the second eigenmode were decoupled by locating the paddle at the node of the second eigenmode. We use these probes for higher harmonic imaging in amplitude modulated AFM (AM-AFM) on a standard polymer blend made of polystyrene and low density polyethylene. We demonstrate significantly improved contrast in higher harmonic images when observing cantilever motion at the paddle. Thus this microcantilever design can improve significantly conventional cantilever performance for dynamic AFM and is compatible with low-cost, high yield microfabrication processes.

  18. Compressed sensing traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Singla-Buxarrais, Guillem; Uroz, Marina; Vincent, Romaric; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Adherent cells exert traction forces on their substrate, and these forces play important roles in biological functions such as mechanosensing, cell differentiation and cancer invasion. The method of choice to assess these active forces is traction force microscopy (TFM). Despite recent advances, TFM remains highly sensitive to measurement noise and exhibits limited spatial resolution. To improve the resolution and noise robustness of TFM, here we adapt techniques from compressed sensing (CS) to the reconstruction of the traction field from the substrate displacement field. CS enables the recovery of sparse signals at higher resolution from lower resolution data. Focal adhesions (FAs) of adherent cells are spatially sparse implying that traction fields are also sparse. Here we show, by simulation and by experiment, that the CS approach enables circumventing the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem to faithfully reconstruct the traction field at a higher resolution than that of the displacement field. This allows reaching state-of-the-art resolution using only a medium magnification objective. We also find that CS improves reconstruction quality in the presence of noise. A great scientific advance of the past decade is the recognition that physical forces determine an increasing list of biological processes. Traction force microscopy which measures the forces that cells exert on their surroundings has seen significant recent improvements, however the technique remains sensitive to measurement noise and severely limited in spatial resolution. We exploit the fact that the force fields are sparse to boost the spatial resolution and noise robustness by applying ideas from compressed sensing. The novel method allows high resolution on a larger field of view. This may in turn allow better understanding of the cell forces at the multicellular level, which are known to be important in wound healing and cancer invasion. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier

  19. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Filamentous Biopolymers on Surfaces: Atomic Force Microscopy Images Compared with Brownian Dynamics Simulation of Filament Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Mücke, Norbert; Klenin, Konstantin; Kirmse, Robert; Bussiek, Malte; Herrmann, Harald; Hafner, Mathias; Langowski, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of filamentous biopolymers, such as the persistence length, may be determined from two-dimensional images of molecules immobilized on surfaces. For a single filament in solution, two principal adsorption scenarios are possible. Both scenarios depend primarly on the interaction strength between the filament and the support: i) For interactions in the range of the thermal energy, the filament can freely equilibrate on the surface during adsorption; ii) For interactions much stronger than the thermal energy, the filament will be captured by the surface without having equilibrated. Such a ‘trapping’ mechanism leads to more condensed filament images and hence to a smaller value for the apparent persistence length. To understand the capture mechanism in more detail we have performed Brownian dynamics simulations of relatively short filaments by taking the two extreme scenarios into account. We then compared these ‘ideal’ adsorption scenarios with observed images of immobilized vimentin intermediate filaments on different surfaces. We found a good agreement between the contours of the deposited vimentin filaments on mica (‘ideal’ trapping) and on glass (‘ideal’ equilibrated) with our simulations. Based on these data, we have developed a strategy to reliably extract the persistence length of short worm-like chain fragments or network forming filaments with unknown polymer-surface interactions. PMID:19888472

  1. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Michael; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively.

  2. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klocke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  3. Quantum state atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Passian, Ali; Siopsis, George

    2017-04-10

    New classical modalities of atomic force microscopy continue to emerge to achieve higher spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution for nanometrology of materials. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum mechanical modality that capitalizes on squeezed states of probe displacement. We show that such squeezing is enabled nanomechanically when the probe enters the van der Waals regime of interaction with a sample. The effect is studied in the non-contact mode, where we consider the parameter domains characterizing the attractive regime of the probe-sample interaction force.

  4. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ulčinas, A; Vaitekonis, Š

    2017-03-10

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  5. Rotational scanning atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulčinas, A.; Vaitekonis, Š.

    2017-03-01

    A non-raster scanning technique for atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging which combines rotational and translational motion is presented. The use of rotational motion for the fast scan axis allows us to significantly increase the scanning speed while imaging a large area (diameter > 30 μm). An image reconstruction algorithm and the factors influencing the resolution of the technique are discussed. The experimental results show the potential of the rotational scanning technique for high-throughput large area AFM investigation.

  6. High-speed atomic force microscopy: imaging and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Eghiaian, Frédéric; Rico, Felix; Colom, Adai; Casuso, Ignacio; Scheuring, Simon

    2014-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the type of scanning probe microscopy that is probably best adapted for imaging biological samples in physiological conditions with submolecular lateral and vertical resolution. In addition, AFM is a method of choice to study the mechanical unfolding of proteins or for cellular force spectroscopy. In spite of 28 years of successful use in biological sciences, AFM is far from enjoying the same popularity as electron and fluorescence microscopy. The advent of high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), about 10 years ago, has provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of membrane proteins and molecular machines from the single-molecule to the cellular level. HS-AFM imaging at nanometer-resolution and sub-second frame rate may open novel research fields depicting dynamic events at the single bio-molecule level. As such, HS-AFM is complementary to other structural and cellular biology techniques, and hopefully will gain acceptance from researchers from various fields. In this review we describe some of the most recent reports of dynamic bio-molecular imaging by HS-AFM, as well as the advent of high-speed force spectroscopy (HS-FS) for single protein unfolding.

  7. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  8. Atomic force microscopy as nanorobot.

    PubMed

    Xi, Ning; Fung, Carmen Kar Man; Yang, Ruiguo; Lai, King Wai Chiu; Wang, Donna H; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sinha, Animesh A; Li, Guangyong; Liu, Lianqing

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful and widely used imaging technique that can visualize single molecules under physiological condition at the nanometer scale. In this chapter, an AFM-based nanorobot for biological studies is introduced. Using the AFM tip as an end effector, the AFM can be modified into a nanorobot that can manipulate biological objects at the single-molecule level. By functionalizing the AFM tip with specific antibodies, the nanorobot is able to identify specific types of receptors on the cell membrane. It is similar to the fluorescent optical microscopy but with higher resolution. By locally updating the AFM image based on interaction force information and objects' model during nanomanipulation, real-time visual feedback is obtained through the augmented reality interface. The development of the AFM-based nanorobotic system enables us to conduct in situ imaging, sensing, and manipulation simultaneously at the nanometer scale (e.g., protein and DNA levels). The AFM-based nanorobotic system offers several advantages and capabilities for studying structure-function relationships of biological specimens. As a result, many biomedical applications can be achieved by the AFM-based nanorobotic system.

  9. Enhanced effects with scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, S.; Chen, T.; Gallagher, M.; Yi, L.; Sarid, D.

    1991-05-01

    A general theory that describes the operation of scanning force microscopy in the contact force regime is presented. It is shown that force derivatives along the surface of a sample produce images that can be dramatically enhanced relative to those of surface topography. For scanning tunneling microscopy atomic force microscopy configurations, the spring constant of the cantilever and the force derivatives perpendicular to the surface of the sample determine the enhancement, respectively.

  10. Local Viscoelastic Properties of Live Cells Investigated Using Dynamic and Quasi-Static Atomic Force Microscopy Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cartagena, Alexander; Raman, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of viscoelasticity of cells in physiological environments with high spatio-temporal resolution is a key goal in cell mechanobiology. Traditionally only the elastic properties have been measured from quasi-static force-distance curves using the atomic force microscope (AFM). Recently, dynamic AFM-based methods have been proposed to map the local in vitro viscoelastic properties of living cells with nanoscale resolution. However, the differences in viscoelastic properties estimated from such dynamic and traditional quasi-static techniques are poorly understood. In this work we quantitatively reconstruct the local force and dissipation gradients (viscoelasticity) on live fibroblast cells in buffer solutions using Lorentz force excited cantilevers and present a careful comparison between mechanical properties (local stiffness and damping) extracted using dynamic and quasi-static force spectroscopy methods. The results highlight the dependence of measured viscoelastic properties on both the frequency at which the chosen technique operates as well as the interactions with subcellular components beyond certain indentation depth, both of which are responsible for differences between the viscoelasticity property maps acquired using the dynamic AFM method against the quasi-static measurements. PMID:24606928

  11. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  12. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-15

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  13. Nanorheology by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Tai-De; Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Ortiz-Young, Deborah; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-12-01

    We present an Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based method to investigate the rheological properties of liquids confined within a nanosize gap formed by an AFM tip apex and a solid substrate. In this method, a conventional AFM cantilever is sheared parallel to a substrate surface by means of a lock-in amplifier while it is approaching and retracting from the substrate in liquid. The normal solvation forces and lateral viscoelastic shear forces experienced by the AFM tip in liquid can be simultaneously measured as a function of the tip-substrate distance with sub-nanometer vertical resolution. A new calibration method is applied to compensate for the linear drift of the piezo transducer and substrate system, leading to a more precise determination of the tip-substrate distance. By monitoring the phase lag between the driving signal and the cantilever response in liquid, the frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of the confined liquid can also be derived. Finally, we discuss the results obtained with this technique from different liquid-solid interfaces. Namely, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane and water on mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  14. Probing the Morphology and Evolving Dynamics of 3D Printed Nanostructures Using High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Winkler, Robert; Dukic, Maja; Zhao, Jie; Plank, Harald; Fantner, Georg E

    2017-07-26

    Focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) has been demonstrated as a promising solution for synthesizing truly three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures. However, the lack of morphological feedback during growth complicates further development toward higher spatial fabrication precision. Here, we show that by combining in situ high speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) with FEBID, morphologies in multistep fabrication process can be accessed. More importantly, the proposed method enables simultaneous imaging and fabrication operation, which opens new possibilities to investigate evolving mechanical properties of the deposit. The experiments indicate an exponential increase law of the mechanical resistance, meaning that a mechanically stable state establishes around 4 min after deposition.

  15. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Borysov, Stanislav S; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B

    2014-01-01

    We present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip-surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip-surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  16. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B

    2014-01-01

    Summary We present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode. PMID:25383301

  17. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  18. Dynamic calibration of higher eigenmode parameters of a cantilever in atomic force microscopy by using tip–surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Borysov, Stanislav S.; Forchheimer, Daniel; Haviland, David B.

    2014-10-29

    Here we present a theoretical framework for the dynamic calibration of the higher eigenmode parameters (stiffness and optical lever inverse responsivity) of a cantilever. The method is based on the tip–surface force reconstruction technique and does not require any prior knowledge of the eigenmode shape or the particular form of the tip–surface interaction. The calibration method proposed requires a single-point force measurement by using a multimodal drive and its accuracy is independent of the unknown physical amplitude of a higher eigenmode.

  19. Single-molecule imaging of dynamic motions of biomolecules in DNA origami nanostructures using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Direct imaging of molecular motions is one of the most fundamental issues for elucidating the physical properties of individual molecules and their reaction mechanisms. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) enables direct molecular imaging, especially for biomolecules in the physiological environment. Because AFM can visualize the molecules at nanometer-scale spatial resolution, a versatile observation scaffold is needed for the precise imaging of molecule interactions in the reactions. The emergence of DNA origami technology allows the precise placement of desired molecules in the designed nanostructures and enables molecules to be detected at the single-molecule level. In our study, the DNA origami system was applied to visualize the detailed motions of target molecules in reactions using high-speed AFM (HS-AFM), which enables the analysis of dynamic motions of biomolecules in a subsecond time resolution. In this system, biochemical properties such as the placement of various double-stranded DNAs (dsDNAs) containing unrestricted DNA sequences, modified nucleosides, and chemical functions can be incorporated. From a physical point of view, the tension and rotation of dsDNAs can be controlled by placement into the DNA nanostructures. From a topological point of view, the orientations of dsDNAs and various shapes of dsDNAs including Holliday junctions can be incorporated for studies on reaction mechanisms. In this Account, we describe the combination of the DNA origami system and HS-AFM for imaging various biochemical reactions including enzymatic reactions and DNA structural changes. To observe the behaviors and reactions of DNA methyltransferase and DNA repair enzymes, the substrate dsDNAs were incorporated into the cavity of the DNA frame, and the enzymes that bound to the target dsDNA were observed using HS-AFM. DNA recombination was also observed using the recombination substrates and Holliday junction intermediates placed in the DNA frame, and the

  20. Magnetic force microscopy of superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Sharon; Savla, Mayur; Pelekhov, Denis V; Iscru, Daniel F; Selcu, Camelia; Hammel, P Chris; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2008-02-01

    The use of magnetic force microscopy (MFM) to detect probe-sample interactions from superparamagnetic nanoparticles in vitro in ambient atmospheric conditions is reported here. By using both magnetic and nonmagnetic probes in dynamic lift-mode imaging and by controlling the direction and magnitude of the external magnetic field applied to the samples, it is possible to detect and identify the presence of superparamagnetic nanoparticles. The experimental results shown here are in agreement with the estimated sensitivity of the MFM technique. The potential and challenges for localizing nanoscale magnetic domains in biological samples is discussed.

  1. Dynamic response of HPV16/anti-HPV16 pairs with unbinding events studied by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiming; Hong, Chung-Hung; Sheu, Bor-Ching; Wu, Long-Xin; Huang, Wan-Chen; Huang, Wei-Chih; Guo, Cheng-Yan

    2016-07-01

    This paper proposes an effective approach to distinguish whether samples include Human Papilloma virus type-16 (HPV16) by Atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is an important instrument in nanobiotechnology field. At first we identified the HPV16 by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and Western blotting from specimen of the HPV patient (E12) and the normal (C2), and then we used an AFM to observe the surface ultrastructure by tapping mode and to measure the unbinding force between HPV16 coupled to an AFM tip and anti-HPV16 L1 coated on the substrate surface by contact mode. The experimental results by tapping mode show that the size of a single HPV viron was similar to its SEM image from the previous literatures; moreover, based on the purposed methods and the analysis, two obvious findings that we can determine whether or not the subject is a HPV patient can be derived from the results; one is based on the distribution of unbinding forces, and the other is based on the distribution of the stiffness. Furthermore, the proposed method could be a useful technique for further investigating the potential role among subtypes of HPVs in the oncogenesis of human cervical cancer.

  2. High-resolution elasticity maps and cytoskeletal dynamics of neurons measured by combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staii, Cristian

    2014-03-01

    Detailed knowledge of mechanical parameters such as cell elasticity, stiffness of the growth substrate, or traction stresses generated during axonal extensions is essential for understanding the mechanisms that control neuronal growth. Here I present results obtained in my research group, which combine Atomic Force Microscopy and Fluorescence Microscopy measurements to produce systematic, high-resolution elasticity maps for different types of live neuronal cells cultured on glass or biopolymer-based substrates. We measure how the stiffness of neurons changes both during neurite outgrowth and upon chemical modification (disruption of the cytoskeleton) of the cell. We find a reversible local stiffening of the cell during growth, and show that the increase in local elastic modulus is primarily due to the formation of microtubules in the cell soma. We also report a reversible shift in the elastic modulus of the cortical neurons cytoskeleton with temperature, from tubulin dominated regions at 37C to actin dominated regions at 25C. We demonstrate that the dominant mechanism by which the elasticity of the neuronal soma changes in response to temperature is the contractile stiffening of the actin component of the cytoskeleton induced by the activity of myosin II motors. We acknowledge financial support from NSF grant CBET 1067093.

  3. Non-contact lateral force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymouth, A. J.

    2017-08-01

    The goal of atomic force microscopy (AFM) is to measure the short-range forces that act between the tip and the surface. The signal recorded, however, includes long-range forces that are often an unwanted background. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is a branch of AFM in which a component of force perpendicular to the surface normal is measured. If we consider the interaction between tip and sample in terms of forces, which have both direction and magnitude, then we can make a very simple yet profound observation: over a flat surface, long-range forces that do not yield topographic contrast have no lateral component. Short-range interactions, on the other hand, do. Although contact-mode is the most common LFM technique, true non-contact AFM techniques can be applied to perform LFM without the tip depressing upon the sample. Non-contact lateral force microscopy (nc-LFM) is therefore ideal to study short-range forces of interest. One of the first applications of nc-LFM was the study of non-contact friction. A similar setup is used in magnetic resonance force microscopy to detect spin flipping. More recently, nc-LFM has been used as a true microscopy technique to systems unsuitable for normal force microscopy.

  4. Non-contact lateral force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weymouth, A J

    2017-08-16

    The goal of atomic force microscopy (AFM) is to measure the short-range forces that act between the tip and the surface. The signal recorded, however, includes long-range forces that are often an unwanted background. Lateral force microscopy (LFM) is a branch of AFM in which a component of force perpendicular to the surface normal is measured. If we consider the interaction between tip and sample in terms of forces, which have both direction and magnitude, then we can make a very simple yet profound observation: over a flat surface, long-range forces that do not yield topographic contrast have no lateral component. Short-range interactions, on the other hand, do. Although contact-mode is the most common LFM technique, true non-contact AFM techniques can be applied to perform LFM without the tip depressing upon the sample. Non-contact lateral force microscopy (nc-LFM) is therefore ideal to study short-range forces of interest. One of the first applications of nc-LFM was the study of non-contact friction. A similar setup is used in magnetic resonance force microscopy to detect spin flipping. More recently, nc-LFM has been used as a true microscopy technique to systems unsuitable for normal force microscopy.

  5. Are the Soft, Liquid-Like Structures Detected around Bacteria by Ambient Dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy Capsules?▿

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Vilas, A.; Labajos-Broncano, L.; Perera-Núñez, J.; González-Martín, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution imaging of bacterial capsules by microscopy is of paramount importance in microbiology due to their role in pathogenesis. This is, however, quite a challenging task due to their delicate nature. In this context, recent reports have claimed successful exploitation of the capacity of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for imaging of extremely deformable (even liquid) surfaces under ambient conditions to detect bacterial capsules in the form of tiny amounts of liquid-like substances around bacteria. In order to further explore this supposed capacity of AFM, in this work, three staphylococcal strains have been scrutinized for the presence of capsules using such an AFM-based approach with a phosphate buffer and water as the suspending liquids. Similar results were obtained with the three strains. AFM showed the presence of liquid-like substances identical to those attributed to bacterial capsules in the previous literature. Extensive imaging and chemical analysis point out the central role of the suspending liquid (buffer) in the formation of these substances. The phenomenon has been reproduced even by using nonliving particles, a finding that refutes the biological origin of the liquid-like substances visualized around the cells. Deliquescence of major components of biological buffers, such as K2HPO4, CaCl2, or HEPES, is proposed as the fundamental mechanism of the formation of these ultrasmall liquid-like structures. Such an origin could explain the high similarity of our results obtained with three very different strains and also the high similarity of these results to others reported in the literature based on other bacteria and suspending liquids. Finally, possible biological/biomedical implications of the presence of these ultrasmall amounts of liquids wrapping microorganisms are discussed. PMID:21398482

  6. Equilibrium capillary forces with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sprakel, J; Besseling, N A M; Leermakers, F A M; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2007-09-07

    We present measurements of equilibrium forces resulting from capillary condensation. The results give access to the ultralow interfacial tensions between the capillary bridge and the coexisting bulk phase. We demonstrate this with solutions of associative polymers and an aqueous mixture of gelatin and dextran, with interfacial tensions around 10 microN/m. The equilibrium nature of the capillary forces is attributed to the combination of a low interfacial tension and a microscopic confinement geometry, based on nucleation and growth arguments.

  7. Polynomial force approximations and multifrequency atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Forchheimer, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Haviland, David B

    2013-01-01

    We present polynomial force reconstruction from experimental intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM) data. We study the tip-surface force during a slow surface approach and compare the results with amplitude-dependence force spectroscopy (ADFS). Based on polynomial force reconstruction we generate high-resolution surface-property maps of polymer blend samples. The polynomial method is described as a special example of a more general approximative force reconstruction, where the aim is to determine model parameters that best approximate the measured force spectrum. This approximative approach is not limited to spectral data, and we demonstrate how it can be adapted to a force quadrature picture.

  8. Super-Resolved Traction Force Microscopy (STFM).

    PubMed

    Colin-York, Huw; Shrestha, Dilip; Felce, James H; Waithe, Dominic; Moeendarbary, Emad; Davis, Simon J; Eggeling, Christian; Fritzsche, Marco

    2016-04-13

    Measuring small forces is a major challenge in cell biology. Here we improve the spatial resolution and accuracy of force reconstruction of the well-established technique of traction force microscopy (TFM) using STED microscopy. The increased spatial resolution of STED-TFM (STFM) allows a greater than 5-fold higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, accessing the nano instead of the micron scale. This improvement is highlighted by computer simulations and an activating RBL cell model system.

  9. Mechanical detection and mode shape imaging of vibrational modes of micro and nanomechanical resonators by dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, A. S.; Black, J.; García-Sanchez, D.; Esplandiu, M. J.; Aguasca, A.; Bokor, J.; Perez-Murano, F.; Bachtold, A.

    2008-03-01

    We describe a method based on the use of higher order bending modes of the cantilever of a dynamic force microscope to characterize vibrations of micro and nanomechanical resonators at arbitrarily large resonance frequencies. Our method consists on using a particular cantilever eigenmode for standard feedback control in amplitude modulation operation while another mode is used for detecting and imaging the resonator vibration. In addition, the resonating sample device is driven at or near its resonance frequency with a signal modulated in amplitude at a frequency that matches the resonance of the cantilever eigenmode used for vibration detection. In consequence, this cantilever mode is excited with an amplitude proportional to the resonator vibration, which is detected with an external lock-in amplifier. We show two different application examples of this method. In the first one, acoustic wave vibrations of a film bulk acoustic resonator around 1.6 GHz are imaged. In the second example, bending modes of carbon nanotube resonators up to 3.1 GHz are characterized. In both cases, the method provides subnanometer-scale sensitivity and the capability of providing otherwise inaccessible information about mechanical resonance frequencies, vibration amplitude values and mode shapes.

  10. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  11. Coffee Cup Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashkenaz, David E.; Hall, W. Paige; Haynes, Christy L.; Hicks, Erin M.; McFarland, Adam D.; Sherry, Leif J.; Stuart, Douglas A.; Wheeler, Korin E.; Yonzon, Chanda R.; Zhao, Jing; Godwin, Hilary A.; Van Duyne, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    In this activity, students use a model created from a coffee cup or cardstock cutout to explore the working principle of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Students manipulate a model of an AFM, using it to examine various objects to retrieve topographic data and then graph and interpret results. The students observe that movement of the AFM…

  12. Atomic force microscopy combined with optical microscopy for cells investigation.

    PubMed

    Cascione, Mariafrancesca; de Matteis, Valeria; Rinaldi, Rosaria; Leporatti, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    This review reports on the combined use of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) and several type of optical/fluorescence/laser scanning microscopy for investigating cells. It is shown that the hybrid systems of AFM with optical-derived microscopies enable to study in detail cell surface properties (such as topography), their mechanical properties (e.g., Young's modulus) mechanotransduction phenomena and allow to gain insight into biological-related pathways and mechanisms in the complex nanoworld of cells. Microsc. Res. Tech. 80:109-123, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Electrostatic interaction in atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Hans-Jüurgen

    1991-01-01

    In atomic force microscopy, the stylus experiences an electrostatic force when imaging in aqueous medium above a charged surface. This force has been calculated numerically with continuum theory for a silicon nitrite or silicon oxide stylus. For comparison, the Van der Waals force was also calculated. In contrast to the Van der Waals attraction, the electrostatic force is repulsive. At a distance of 0.5 nm the electrostatic force is typically 10-12-10-10 N and thus comparable in strength to the Van der Waals force. The electrostatic force increases with increasing surface charge density and decreases roughly exponentially with distance. It can be reduced by imaging in high salt concentrations. Below surface potentials of ≈50 mV, a simple analytical approximation of the electrostatic force is described. PMID:19431803

  14. Differences in zero-force and force-driven kinetics of ligand dissociation from beta-galactoside-specific proteins (plant and animal lectins, immunoglobulin G) monitored by plasmon resonance and dynamic single molecule force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dettmann, W; Grandbois, M; André, S; Benoit, M; Wehle, A K; Kaltner, H; Gabius, H J; Gaub, H E

    2000-11-15

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions are involved in diverse regulatory processes. To help understand the mechanics and kinetics of dissociation of receptor-ligand complexes, we have analyzed the separation of lactose and the N-glycan chains of asialofetuin (ASF) from three lectins and an immunoglobulin G fraction by surface plasmon resonance at zero force and by atomic force microscopy with variations of the external force. While the (AB)2 agglutinins from Ricinus communis (RCA) and Viscum album (VAA) show structural homology, the homodimeric galectin-1 from bovine heart (BHL) has no similarity to the two plant lectins except for sharing this monosaccharide specificity. The beta-galactoside-binding immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction from human serum provides a further model system with distinct binding-site architecture. The k(off) constants for the two plant agglutinins were independent of the nature of the ligand at 1.1-1.3 x 10(-3) s(-1), whereas the geometry of ligand and binding site presentation affected this parameter for BHL (0.5 x 10(-3) s(-1) for lactose and 1 x 10(-3) s(-1) for ASF) and IgG (1.3 x 10(-3) s(-1) for lactose and 0.55 x 10(-3) s(-1) for ASF). When assessing comparatively the rupture forces at a loading rate of 3 nN/s with lactose as ligand, 34 +/- 6 pN (BHL), 36 +/- 4 pN (IgG), 47 +/- 7 pN (VAA), and 58 +/- 9 pN (RCA) were measured. For the same loading rate the rupture forces for the receptor-ASF interactions were found to be 37 +/- 3 pN (BHL), 43 +/- 5 pN (VAA), 45 +/- 6 pN (IgG), and 65 +/- 9 pN (RCA). The variation of the pulling velocity revealed in all cases a linear dependence between the rupture force and the natural logarithm of the loading rate. Performing probability density and Monte Carlo calculations, the potential barrier widths, which determine the inverse dynamic dependence with the rate of force elevation, increased from 4 A (RCA) and 7 A (VAA and IgG) to 10 A (BHL) for the receptor-lactose interactions. Presenting ASF as ligand

  15. Intermodulation Atomic Force Microscopy and Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Carsten; Platz, Daniel; Tholen, Erik; Haviland, David; Hansson, Hans

    2009-03-01

    We present a powerful new method of dynamic AFM, which allows to gain far more information about the tip-surface interaction than standard amplitude or phase imaging, while scanning at comparable speed. Our method, called intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM), employs the manifestly nonlinear phenomenon of intermodulation to extract information about tip-surface forces. ImAFM uses one eigenmode of a mechanical resonator, the latter driven at two frequencies to produce many spectral peaks near its resonace, where sensitivity is highest [1]. We furthermore present a protocol for decoding the combined information encoded in the spectrum of intermodulation peaks. Our theoretical framework suggests methods to enhance the gained information by using a different parameter regime as compared to Ref. [1]. We also discuss strategies for solving the inverse problem, i.e., for extracting the nonlinear tip-surface interaction from the response, also naming limitations of our theoretical analysis. We will further report on latest progress to experimentally employ our new protocol.[3pt] [1] D. Platz, E. A. Tholen, D. Pesen, and D. B. Haviland, Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 153106 (2008).

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenhorn, Albrecht Ludwig

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) was invented by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber in 1986 as an offspring of the very successful scanning tunneling microscope (STM), which Binnig and Rohrer invented in 1982 and for which they shared the Nobel prize. While the STM can only image conducting surfaces, the AFM has overcome this limitation. An AFM creates a three-dimensional image of the sample surface by raster scanning this surface under a sharp tip that is attached to a cantilever. The tip moves the cantilever up and down while going over "hills" and through "valleys" of the surface. The vertical motion of the cantilever deflects a laser beam that is reflected off the back of the cantilever toward a two-segment photodiode. The difference of the intensity of the two segments is used as the deflection signal. A feedback loop is used to keep the deflection signal constant by moving the sample surface up and down accordingly. This vertical motion gives a direct measurement of the surface height. The forces involved in the imaging process have been studied in air and water. Due to adsorbed layers on tip and sample surface when scanning in air (capillary condensation) the imaging forces are >10 ^{-7} N. If the tip and sample surface are immersed in water the forces can be reduced to {~}10^{ -9} N. An AFM with a large scanner can image up to tens of micrometers like an optical microscope. Zooming in allows one to get resolution of a few nanometers, which makes the AFM a natural continuation of the optical microscope towards higher magnification. Integrated circuit chips, photographic film, bacteria, red and white blood cells, purple membrane, polymerized Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, and stoma have been imaged at low and high magnification. The AFM has shown its power by imaging "hard" and "soft" surfaces with atomic and (sub)molecular resolution respectively. The "hard" crystalline surfaces of mica, graphite, RuCl_3, Ge(111), Bi(111), and zeolites (clinoptilolite (010

  17. Magnetic exchange force microscopy with atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Uwe; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2007-03-29

    The ordering of neighbouring atomic magnetic moments (spins) leads to important collective phenomena such as ferromagnetism and antiferromagnetism. A full understanding of magnetism on the nanometre scale therefore calls for information on the arrangement of spins in real space and with atomic resolution. Spin-polarized scanning tunnelling microscopy accomplishes this but can probe only conducting materials. Force microscopy can be used on any sample independent of its conductivity. In particular, magnetic force microscopy is well suited to exploring ferromagnetic domain structures. However, atomic resolution cannot be achieved because data acquisition involves the sensing of long-range magnetostatic forces between tip and sample. Magnetic exchange force microscopy has been proposed for overcoming this limitation: by using an atomic force microscope with a magnetic tip, it should be possible to detect the short-range magnetic exchange force between tip and sample spins. Here we show for a prototypical antiferromagnetic insulator, the (001) surface of nickel oxide, that magnetic exchange force microscopy can indeed reveal the arrangement of both surface atoms and their spins simultaneously. In contrast with previous attempts to implement this method, we use an external magnetic field to align the magnetic polarization at the tip apex so as to optimize the interaction between tip and sample spins. This allows us to observe the direct magnetic exchange coupling between the spins of the tip atom and sample atom that are closest to each other, and thereby demonstrate the potential of magnetic exchange force microscopy for investigations of inter-spin interactions at the atomic level.

  18. Traction force microscopy in physics and biology.

    PubMed

    Style, Robert W; Boltyanskiy, Rostislav; German, Guy K; Hyland, Callen; MacMinn, Christopher W; Mertz, Aaron F; Wilen, Larry A; Xu, Ye; Dufresne, Eric R

    2014-06-21

    Adherent cells, crawling slugs, peeling paint, sessile liquid drops, bearings and many other living and non-living systems apply forces to solid substrates. Traction force microscopy (TFM) provides spatially-resolved measurements of interfacial forces through the quantification and analysis of the deformation of an elastic substrate. Although originally developed for adherent cells, TFM has no inherent size or force scale, and can be applied to a much broader range of mechanical systems across physics and biology. In this paper, we showcase the wide range of applicability of TFM, describe the theory, and provide experimental details and code so that experimentalists can rapidly adopt this powerful technique.

  19. System analysis of force feedback microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Mario S.; Chevrier, Joël; Comin, Fabio

    2014-02-07

    It was shown recently that the Force Feedback Microscope (FFM) can avoid the jump-to-contact in Atomic force Microscopy even when the cantilevers used are very soft, thus increasing force resolution. In this letter, we explore theoretical aspects of the associated real time control of the tip position. We take into account lever parameters such as the lever characteristics in its environment, spring constant, mass, dissipation coefficient, and the operating conditions such as controller gains and interaction force. We show how the controller parameters are determined so that the FFM functions at its best and estimate the bandwidth of the system under these conditions.

  20. High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-07-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  1. Imaging DNA Structure by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pyne, Alice L B; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a microscopy technique that uses a sharp probe to trace a sample surface at nanometre resolution. For biological applications, one of its key advantages is its ability to visualize substructure of single molecules and molecular complexes in an aqueous environment. Here, we describe the application of AFM to determine superstructure and secondary structure of surface-bound DNA. The method is also readily applicable to probe DNA-DNA interactions and DNA-protein complexes.

  2. Pulling angle-dependent force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebíková, L.; Gojzewski, H.; Kieviet, B. D.; Klein Gunnewiek, M.; Vancso, G. J.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we describe a method allowing one to perform three-dimensional displacement control in force spectroscopy by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Traditionally, AFM force curves are measured in the normal direction of the contacted surface. The method described can be employed to address not only the magnitude of the measured force but also its direction. We demonstrate the technique using a case study of angle-dependent desorption of a single poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) chain from a planar silica surface in an aqueous solution. The chains were end-grafted from the AFM tip in high dilution, enabling single macromolecule pull experiments. Our experiments give evidence of angular dependence of the desorption force of single polymer chains and illustrate the added value of introducing force direction control in AFM.

  3. Analytical model of atomic-force-microscopy force curves in viscoelastic materials exhibiting power law relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, J. S.; Santos, J. A. C.; Barros, E. B.; Alencar, L. M. R.; Cruz, W. T.; Ramos, M. V.; Mendes Filho, J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose an analytical model for the force-indentation relationship in viscoelastic materials exhibiting a power law relaxation described by an exponent n, where n = 1 represents the standard viscoelastic solid (SLS) model and n < 1 represents a fractional SLS model. To validate the model, we perform nanoindentation measurements of polyacrylamide gels with atomic force microscopy (AFM) force curves. We found exponents n < 1 that depend on the bisacrylamide concentration. We also demonstrate that the fitting of AFM force curves for varying load speeds can reproduce the dynamic viscoelastic properties of those gels measured with dynamic force modulation methods.

  4. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dokukin, M.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10–70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs. PMID:26218346

  5. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukin, M.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-07-01

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10-70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs.

  6. High-resolution high-speed dynamic mechanical spectroscopy of cells and other soft materials with the help of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dokukin, M; Sokolov, I

    2015-07-28

    Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy (DMS), which allows measuring frequency-dependent viscoelastic properties, is important to study soft materials, tissues, biomaterials, polymers. However, the existing DMS techniques (nanoindentation) have limited resolution when used on soft materials, preventing them from being used to study mechanics at the nanoscale. The nanoindenters are not capable of measuring cells, nanointerfaces of composite materials. Here we present a highly accurate DMS modality, which is a combination of three different methods: quantitative nanoindentation (nanoDMA), gentle force and fast response of atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy. This new spectroscopy (which we suggest to call FT-nanoDMA) is fast and sensitive enough to allow DMS imaging of nanointerfaces, single cells, while attaining about 100x improvements on polymers in both spatial (to 10-70 nm) and temporal resolution (to 0.7 s/pixel) compared to the current art. Multiple frequencies are measured simultaneously. The use of 10 frequencies are demonstrated here (up to 300 Hz which is a rather relevant range for biological materials and polymers, in both ambient conditions and liquid). The method is quantitatively verified on known polymers and demonstrated on cells and polymers blends. Analysis shows that FT-nanoDMA is highly quantitative. The FT-nanoDMA spectroscopy can easily be implemented in the existing AFMs.

  7. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    PubMed

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  8. Spin-Relaxation Dynamics of E' Centers at High Density in SiO2 Thin Films for Single-Spin Tunneling Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambal, K.; Payne, A.; Waters, D. P.; Williams, C. C.; Boehme, C.

    2015-08-01

    The suitability of the spin dynamics of paramagnetic silicon dangling bonds (E' centers) in high-E'-density amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2 ) as probe spins for single-spin tunneling force microscopy (SSTFM) is studied. SSTFM is a spin-selection-rule-based scanning-probe single-spin readout concept. Following the synthesis of SiO2 thin films on (111)-oriented crystalline-silicon substrates with room-temperature stable densities of [E'] >5 ×1018 cm-3 throughout the 60-nm thin film, pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is conducted on the E' centers at temperatures between T =5 K and T =70 K . The measurements reveal that the spin coherence (the transverse spin-relaxation time T2) of these centers is significantly shortened compared to low-E'-density SiO2 films and within error margins not dependent on temperature. In contrast, the spin-flip times (the longitudinal relaxation times T1) are dependent on the temperature but with much weaker dependence than low-density SiO2 , with the greatest deviations from low-density SiO2 seen for T =5 K . These results, discussed in the context of the spin-relaxation dynamics of dangling-bond states of other silicon-based disordered solids, indicate the suitability of E' centers in high-density SiO2 as probe spins for SSTFM.

  9. Direct investigation of silver photodissolution dynamics and reversibility in arsenic trisulphide thin films by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Vincent P.; Kovalskiy, Andriy; Jain, Himanshu; Huey, Bryan D.

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics and reversibility of Ag nanoparticle photodissolution into As2S3 chalcogenide thin films have uniquely been directly measured by continuous AFM imaging during patterned optical illumination. The surface morphology, roughness and particle size distribution have thus been spatially and statistically monitored as a function of time, both during and following optical exposure. Photodissolution was observed to proceed via two mechanisms. In one case, nanoparticles abruptly and nearly completely disappeared along a sharp dissolution front traveling laterally at ˜0.19 μm s-1. Following illumination, similarly sized nanoparticles uniformly reformed on the surface. A more inhomogeneous photodissolution process was separately recorded, clearing irregular ˜1-2 μm patches that grew with time until most of the surface was free of nanoparticles. Post-illumination, surface nanoparticle development and coverage were similarly inhomogeneous, with larger but 50% fewer particles in the final distribution. In every experiment, an initial roughening was detected before the nanoparticle surface coverage visually diminished, indicating the onset of photodissolution at widely distributed energetically and kinetically favored sites which temporarily enhances nanoscale roughness. Such direct studies of surface dynamics are crucial to understanding and ultimately optimizing chalcogenide film applications such as photomasks, optoelectronics media and bio-chemical sensors.

  10. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Allison, David P; Mortensen, Ninell P; Sullivan, Claretta J; Doktycz, Mitchel J

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH). © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Atomic force microscopy of biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The ability to evaluate structural-functional relationships in real time has allowed scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to assume a prominent role in post genomic biological research. In this mini-review, we highlight the development of imaging and ancillary techniques that have allowed SPM to permeate many key areas of contemporary research. We begin by examining the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) by Binnig and Rohrer in 1982 and discuss how it served to team biologists with physicists to integrate high-resolution microscopy into biological science. We point to the problems of imaging nonconductive biological samples with the STM and relate how this led to the evolution of the atomic force microscope (AFM) developed by Binnig, Quate, and Gerber, in 1986. Commercialization in the late 1980s established SPM as a powerful research tool in the biological research community. Contact mode AFM imaging was soon complemented by the development of non-contact imaging modes. These non-contact modes eventually became the primary focus for further new applications including the development of fast scanning methods. The extreme sensitivity of the AFM cantilever was recognized and has been developed into applications for measuring forces required for indenting biological surfaces and breaking bonds between biomolecules. Further functional augmentation to the cantilever tip allowed development of new and emerging techniques including scanning ion-conductance microscopy (SICM), scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM), Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and scanning near field ultrasonic holography (SNFUH).

  12. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  13. Confocal reference free traction force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bergert, Martin; Lendenmann, Tobias; Zündel, Manuel; Ehret, Alexander E.; Panozzo, Daniele; Richner, Patrizia; Kim, David K.; Kress, Stephan J. P.; Norris, David J.; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Mazza, Edoardo; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical wiring between cells and their surroundings is fundamental to the regulation of complex biological processes during tissue development, repair or pathology. Traction force microscopy (TFM) enables determination of the actuating forces. Despite progress, important limitations with intrusion effects in low resolution 2D pillar-based methods or disruptive intermediate steps of cell removal and substrate relaxation in high-resolution continuum TFM methods need to be overcome. Here we introduce a novel method allowing a one-shot (live) acquisition of continuous in- and out-of-plane traction fields with high sensitivity. The method is based on electrohydrodynamic nanodrip-printing of quantum dots into confocal monocrystalline arrays, rendering individually identifiable point light sources on compliant substrates. We demonstrate the undisrupted reference-free acquisition and quantification of high-resolution continuous force fields, and the simultaneous capability of this method to correlatively overlap traction forces with spatial localization of proteins revealed using immunofluorescence methods. PMID:27681958

  14. Confocal reference free traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bergert, Martin; Lendenmann, Tobias; Zündel, Manuel; Ehret, Alexander E; Panozzo, Daniele; Richner, Patrizia; Kim, David K; Kress, Stephan J P; Norris, David J; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Mazza, Edoardo; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-09-29

    The mechanical wiring between cells and their surroundings is fundamental to the regulation of complex biological processes during tissue development, repair or pathology. Traction force microscopy (TFM) enables determination of the actuating forces. Despite progress, important limitations with intrusion effects in low resolution 2D pillar-based methods or disruptive intermediate steps of cell removal and substrate relaxation in high-resolution continuum TFM methods need to be overcome. Here we introduce a novel method allowing a one-shot (live) acquisition of continuous in- and out-of-plane traction fields with high sensitivity. The method is based on electrohydrodynamic nanodrip-printing of quantum dots into confocal monocrystalline arrays, rendering individually identifiable point light sources on compliant substrates. We demonstrate the undisrupted reference-free acquisition and quantification of high-resolution continuous force fields, and the simultaneous capability of this method to correlatively overlap traction forces with spatial localization of proteins revealed using immunofluorescence methods.

  15. Validation tool for traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jorge-Peñas, A; Muñoz-Barrutia, A; de-Juan-Pardo, E M; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, C

    2015-01-01

    Traction force microscopy (TFM) is commonly used to estimate cells' traction forces from the deformation that they cause on their substrate. The accuracy of TFM highly depends on the computational methods used to measure the deformation of the substrate and estimate the forces, and also on the specifics of the experimental set-up. Computer simulations can be used to evaluate the effect of both the computational methods and the experimental set-up without the need to perform numerous experiments. Here, we present one such TFM simulator that addresses several limitations of the existing ones. As a proof of principle, we recreate a TFM experimental set-up, and apply a classic 2D TFM algorithm to recover the forces. In summary, our simulator provides a valuable tool to study the performance, refine experimentally, and guide the extraction of biological conclusions from TFM experiments.

  16. Atomic force microscopy on liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahr, Christian; Schulz, Benjamin

    This chapter provides an introduction to the atomic force microscopy (AFM) on thermotropic liquid crystals. We first give a general introduction to the technique of AFM and then describe the special requirements that have to be met for the imaging of liquid-crystalline surfaces. We also discuss the relation between the quality or reliability of the imaging results and various parameters of the scanning conditions. We briey review the existing work on AFM on liquid crystals and finally describe applications beyond the imaging, such as molecular force spectroscopy or manipulation of surface structures.

  17. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  18. Atomically resolved force microscopy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Seizo

    2014-04-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can now not only image individual atoms but also construct atom letters using atom manipulation method even at room temperature (RT). Therefore, the AFM is the second generation atomic tool following the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). However the AFM can image even insulating atoms, and also directly measure/map the atomic force and potential at the atomic scale. Noting these advantages, we have been developing a bottom-up nanostructuring system at RT based on the AFM. It can identify chemical species of individual atoms and then manipulate selected atom species to the predesigned site one-by-one to assemble complex nanostructures consisted of multi atom species at RT. Here we introduce our results toward atom-by-atom assembly of composite nanostructures based on the AFM at RT including the latest result on atom gating of nano-space for atom-by-atom creation of atom clusters at RT for semiconductor surfaces.

  19. Bacterial adhesion force quantification by fluidic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potthoff, Eva; Ossola, Dario; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2015-02-01

    Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many cells. The contact time and setpoint dependence of the adhesion forces of E. coli and Streptococcus pyogenes, as well as the sequential detachment of bacteria out of a chain, are shown, revealing distinct force patterns in the detachment curves. This study demonstrates the potential of the FluidFM technology for quantitative bacterial adhesion measurements of cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions that are relevant in biofilms and infection biology.Quantification of detachment forces between bacteria and substrates facilitates the understanding of the bacterial adhesion process that affects cell physiology and survival. Here, we present a method that allows for serial, single bacterial cell force spectroscopy by combining the force control of atomic force microscopy with microfluidics. Reversible bacterial cell immobilization under physiological conditions on the pyramidal tip of a microchanneled cantilever is achieved by underpressure. Using the fluidic force microscopy technology (FluidFM), we achieve immobilization forces greater than those of state-of-the-art cell-cantilever binding as demonstrated by the detachment of Escherichia coli from polydopamine with recorded forces between 4 and 8 nN for many

  20. First Steps in the Aggregation Process of Copolymers Based on Thymine Monomers: Characterization by Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garay, A Sergio; Rodrigues, Daniel E; Fuselli, Antonela; Martino, Debora M; Passeggi, Mario C G

    2016-04-07

    Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were performed to study the structure of isolated VBT-VBA (vinylbenzylthymine-vinylbenzyltriethylammonium chloride) copolymer chains in water at different monomeric species ratios (1:1 and 1:4). The geometric parameters of the structure that the copolymers form in equilibrium together with the basic interactions that stabilize them were determined. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of dried diluted concentrations of the two copolymers onto highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) substrates were carried out to study their aggregation arrangement. The experiments show that both copolymers arrange in fiber-like structures. Comparing the diameters predicted by the simulation results and those obtained by AFM, it can be concluded that individual copolymers arrange in bunches of two chains, stabilized by contra-ions-copolymer interactions for the 1:1 copolymerization ratio at the ionic strength of our samples. In contrast, for the 1:4 system the individual copolymer chains do not aggregate in bunches. These results remark the relevance of the copolymerization ratio and ionic strength of the solvent in the mesoscopic structure of these materials.

  1. Automated force controller for amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagi, Atsushi E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr; Scheuring, Simon E-mail: simon.scheuring@inserm.fr

    2016-05-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is widely used in physics, chemistry, and biology to analyze the topography of a sample at nanometer resolution. Controlling precisely the force applied by the AFM tip to the sample is a prerequisite for faithful and reproducible imaging. In amplitude modulation (oscillating) mode AFM, the applied force depends on the free and the setpoint amplitudes of the cantilever oscillation. Therefore, for keeping the applied force constant, not only the setpoint amplitude but also the free amplitude must be kept constant. While the AFM user defines the setpoint amplitude, the free amplitude is typically subject to uncontrollable drift, and hence, unfortunately, the real applied force is permanently drifting during an experiment. This is particularly harmful in biological sciences where increased force destroys the soft biological matter. Here, we have developed a strategy and an electronic circuit that analyzes permanently the free amplitude of oscillation and readjusts the excitation to maintain the free amplitude constant. As a consequence, the real applied force is permanently and automatically controlled with picoNewton precision. With this circuit associated to a high-speed AFM, we illustrate the power of the development through imaging over long-duration and at various forces. The development is applicable for all AFMs and will widen the applicability of AFM to a larger range of samples and to a larger range of (non-specialist) users. Furthermore, from controlled force imaging experiments, the interaction strength between biomolecules can be analyzed.

  2. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    ScienceCinema

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2016-07-12

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  3. Dynamic imaging with electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Geoffrey; McKeown, Joe; Santala, Melissa

    2014-02-20

    Livermore researchers have perfected an electron microscope to study fast-evolving material processes and chemical reactions. By applying engineering, microscopy, and laser expertise to the decades-old technology of electron microscopy, the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) team has developed a technique that can capture images of phenomena that are both very small and very fast. DTEM uses a precisely timed laser pulse to achieve a short but intense electron beam for imaging. When synchronized with a dynamic event in the microscope's field of view, DTEM allows scientists to record and measure material changes in action. A new movie-mode capability, which earned a 2013 R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine, uses up to nine laser pulses to sequentially capture fast, irreversible, even one-of-a-kind material changes at the nanometer scale. DTEM projects are advancing basic and applied materials research, including such areas as nanostructure growth, phase transformations, and chemical reactions.

  4. Dynamic Elastic Modulus of Porcine Articular Cartilage Determined at Two Different Levels of Tissue Organization by Indentation-Type Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stolz, Martin; Raiteri, Roberto; Daniels, A. U.; VanLandingham, Mark R.; Baschong, Werner; Aebi, Ueli

    2004-01-01

    Cartilage stiffness was measured ex vivo at the micrometer and nanometer scales to explore structure-mechanical property relationships at smaller scales than has been done previously. A method was developed to measure the dynamic elastic modulus, |E*|, in compression by indentation-type atomic force microscopy (IT AFM). Spherical indenter tips (radius = ∼2.5 μm) and sharp pyramidal tips (radius = ∼20 nm) were employed to probe micrometer-scale and nanometer-scale response, respectively. |E*| values were obtained at 3 Hz from 1024 unloading response curves recorded at a given location on subsurface cartilage from porcine femoral condyles. With the microsphere tips, the average modulus was ∼2.6 MPa, in agreement with available millimeter-scale data, whereas with the sharp pyramidal tips, it was typically 100-fold lower. In contrast to cartilage, measurements made on agarose gels, a much more molecularly amorphous biomaterial, resulted in the same average modulus for both indentation tips. From results of AFM imaging of cartilage, the micrometer-scale spherical tips resolved no fine structure except some chondrocytes, whereas the nanometer-scale pyramidal tips resolved individual collagen fibers and their 67-nm axial repeat distance. These results suggest that the spherical AFM tip is large enough to measure the aggregate dynamic elastic modulus of cartilage, whereas the sharp AFM tip depicts the elastic properties of its fine structure. Additional measurements of cartilage stiffness following enzyme action revealed that elastase digestion of the collagen moiety lowered the modulus at the micrometer scale. In contrast, digestion of the proteoglycans moiety by cathepsin D had little effect on |E*| at the micrometer scale, but yielded a clear stiffening at the nanometer scale. Thus, cartilage compressive stiffness is different at the nanometer scale compared to the overall structural stiffness measured at the micrometer and larger scales because of the fine

  5. Titration force microscopy on supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Gorostiza, Pau; Sanz, Fausto

    2006-01-01

    The use of chemically modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes allows us to measure the surface charges of supported planar lipid bilayers with high sensitivity through the force spectroscopy operation mode. By controlling the chemistry of the tip, we can perform a classical analytical chemistry titration where the titration agent is a weak acid (attached to the AFM tip) with the particularity of being performed in surface rather than in solution and, especially, at the nanometric scale. Thus, the AFM tip acts as a real "nanosensor". The approaching curves of the force plots reveal that electrostatic interactions between the tip and the supported membrane play a key role. Besides, the plot of the adhesion force (measured from the retracting curve of the force plots) versus pH displays a nonsigmoidal shape with a peak in the adhesion force attributed to high-energy hydrogen bonds. One of these peaks corresponds to the pKa of the surface under study and the other to the pKa of the titrating probe attached to the tip.

  6. Force reconstruction from tapping mode force microscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payam, Amir F.; Martin-Jimenez, Daniel; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and robust nanomechanical measurements are intensely studied in materials science, applied physics, and molecular biology. Amplitude modulation force microscopy (tapping mode) is the most established nanoscale characterization technique of surfaces for air and liquid environments. However, its quantitative capabilities lag behind its high spatial resolution and robustness. We develop a general method to transform the observables into quantitative force measurements. The force reconstruction algorithm has been deduced on the assumption that the observables (amplitude and phase shift) are slowly varying functions of the tip-surface separation. The accuracy and applicability of the method is validated by numerical simulations and experiments. The method is valid for liquid and air environments, small and large free amplitudes, compliant and rigid materials, and conservative and non-conservative forces.

  7. Chromatin Imaging with Time-Lapse Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    Time-lapse atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used for direct visualization of the nanoscale dynamics of various biological systems. The advent of high-speed AFM instrumentation made it possible to image the dynamics of proteins and protein-DNA complexes within millisecond time range. This chapter describes protocols for studies of structure and dynamics of nucleosomes with time-lapse AFM including the high-speed AFM instrument. The necessary specifics for the preparation of chromatin samples for imaging with AFM including the protocols for the surface preparation are provided. PMID:25827873

  8. Scanning force microscopy under aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, C; Rivetti, C; Keller, D J

    1997-10-01

    Merely ten years after its invention, the scanning force microscope is becoming a powerful method to investigate the structure and dynamics of biological molecules under aqueous environments. From the visualization of transcription in real time to the mechanical manipulation of individual proteins, the advances made during the past year open up a vast number of exciting applications of this technique in biology.

  9. High-Resolution Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S.; Waterman, Clare M.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. PMID:24974038

  10. High-resolution traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, Sergey V; Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S; Waterman, Clare M

    2014-01-01

    Cellular forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton and transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through discrete, integrin-based protein assemblies, that is, focal adhesions, are critical to developmental morphogenesis and tissue homeostasis, as well as disease progression in cancer. However, quantitative mapping of these forces has been difficult since there has been no experimental technique to visualize nanonewton forces at submicrometer spatial resolution. Here, we provide detailed protocols for measuring cellular forces exerted on two-dimensional elastic substrates with a high-resolution traction force microscopy (TFM) method. We describe fabrication of polyacrylamide substrates labeled with multiple colors of fiducial markers, functionalization of the substrates with ECM proteins, setting up the experiment, and imaging procedures. In addition, we provide the theoretical background of traction reconstruction and experimental considerations important to design a high-resolution TFM experiment. We describe the implementation of a new algorithm for processing of images of fiducial markers that are taken below the surface of the substrate, which significantly improves data quality. We demonstrate the application of the algorithm and explain how to choose a regularization parameter for suppression of the measurement error. A brief discussion of different ways to visualize and analyze the results serves to illustrate possible uses of high-resolution TFM in biomedical research. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Materials Contrast in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Eliseev, E. A.; Morozovska, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) contrast in transversally isotropic material corresponding to the case of c{sup +}-c{sup -} domains in tetragonal ferroelectrics is analyzed using Green's function theory by Felten et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 96, 563 (2004)]. A simplified expression for PFM signal as a linear combination of relevant piezoelectric constant is obtained. This analysis is extended to piezoelectric material of arbitrary symmetry with weak elastic and dielectric anisotropies. These results provide a framework for interpretation of PFM signals for systems with unknown or poorly known local elastic and dielectric properties, including nanocrystalline materials, ferroelectric polymers, and biopolymers.

  12. Periodicity in bimodal atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chia-Yun; Santos, Sergio Chiesa, Matteo; Barcons, Victor

    2015-07-28

    Periodicity is fundamental for quantification and the application of conservation principles of many important systems. Here, we discuss periodicity in the context of bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM). The relationship between the excited frequencies is shown to affect and control both experimental observables and the main expressions quantified via these observables, i.e., virial and energy transfer expressions, which form the basis of the bimodal AFM theory. The presence of a fundamental frequency further simplifies the theory and leads to close form solutions. Predictions are verified via numerical integration of the equation of motion and experimentally on a mica surface.

  13. Secretion induces cell pH dynamics impacting assembly-disassembly of the fusion protein complex: A combined fluorescence and atomic force microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kenneth T; Naik, Akshata R; Laha, Suvra S; Wang, Sunxi; Mao, Guangzhao; Kuhn, Eric; Jena, Bhanu P

    2017-08-03

    A wide range of cellular activities including protein folding and cell secretion, such as neurotransmission or insulin release, are all governed by intracellular pH homeostasis, underscoring the importance of pH on critical life processes. Nano- scale pH measurements of cells and biomolecules therefore hold great promise in understanding a plethora of cellular functions, in addition to disease detection and therapy. In the current study, a novel approach using cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTeQDs) as pH sensors, combined with fluorescent imaging, spectrofluorimetry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and Western blot analysis, enabled the study of intracellular pH dynamics at 1 milli-pH sensitivity and 80nm pixel resolution, during insulin secretion. Additionally, the pH-dependent interaction between membrane fusion proteins, also called the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor activating protein receptor (SNARE), was determined. Glucose stimulation of CdTeQD-loaded insulin secreting Min-6 mouse insulinoma cell line demonstrated the initial (5-6min) intracellular acidification reflected as a loss in QD fluorescence, followed by alkalization and a return to resting pH in 10min. Analysis of the SNARE complex in insulin secreting Min-6 cells demonstrated an initial gain followed by loss of complexed SNAREs in 10min. Stabilization of the SNARE complex at low intracellular pH is further supported by results from studies utilizing both native and AFM measurements of liposome-reconstituted recombinant neuronal SNAREs, providing a molecular understanding of the role of pH during cell secretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Atomic Force Microscopy of Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Frederix, Patrick L.T.M.; Bosshart, Patrick D.; Engel, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an ideal method to study the surface topography of biological membranes. It allows membranes that are adsorbed to flat solid supports to be raster-scanned in physiological solutions with an atomically sharp tip. Therefore, AFM is capable of observing biological molecular machines at work. In addition, the tip can be tethered to the end of a single membrane protein, and forces acting on the tip upon its retraction indicate barriers that occur during the process of protein unfolding. Here we discuss the fundamental limitations of AFM determined by the properties of cantilevers, present aspects of sample preparation, and review results achieved on reconstituted and native biological membranes. PMID:19167286

  15. Ultrastable Atomic Force Microscopy for Biophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churnside, Allison B.

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a multifunctional workhorse of nanoscience and molecular biophysics, but instrumental drift remains a critical issue that limits the precision and duration of experiments. We have significantly reduced the two most important types of drift: in position and in force. The first, position drift, is defined as uncontrolled motion between the tip and the sample, which occurs in all three dimensions. By scattering a laser off the apex of a commercial AFM tip, we locally measured and thereby actively controlled its three-dimensional position above a sample surface to <0.4 A (Deltaf = 0.01--10 Hz) in air at room temperature. With this enhanced stability, we demonstrated atomic-scale (˜1 A) tip-sample stability and registration over tens of minutes with a series of AFM images. The second type of drift is force drift. We found that the primary source of force drift for a popular class of soft cantilevers is their gold coating, even though they are coated on both sides to minimize drift. When the gold coating was removed through a simple chemical etch, this drift in deflection was reduced by more than an order of magnitude over the first 2 hours after wetting the tip. Removing the gold also led to ˜ 10-fold reduction in reflected light, yet short-term (0.1--10 s) force precision improved. With both position and force drift greatly reduced, the utility of the AFM is enhanced. These improvements led to several new AFM abilities, including a five-fold increase in the image signal-to-noise ratio; tip-registered, label-free optical imaging; registered tip return to a particular point on the sample; and dual-detection force spectroscopy, which enables a new extension clamp mode. We have applied these abilities to folding of both membrane and soluble proteins. In principle, the techniques we describe can be fully incorporated into many types of scanning probe microscopy, making this work a general improvement to scanning probe techniques.

  16. EDITORIAL: High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy High-resolution noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Rubén; García, Ricardo; Schwarz, Udo

    2009-06-01

    original papers authored by many of the leading groups in the field with the goal of providing a well-balanced overview on the state-of-the-art in this rapidly evolving field. These papers, many of which are based on notable presentations given during the Madrid conference, feature highlights such as (1) the development of sophisticated force spectroscopy procedures that are able to map the complete 3D tip-sample force field on different surfaces; (2) the considerable resolution improvement of Kelvin probe force microscopy (reaching, in some cases, the atomic scale), which is accompanied by a thorough, quantitative understanding of the contrast observed; (3) the perfecting of atomic resolution imaging on insulating substrates, which helps reshape our microscopic understanding of surface properties and chemical activity of these surfaces; (4) the description of instrumental and methodological developments that pave the way to the atomic-scale characterization of magnetic and electronic properties of nanostructures, and last but not least (5) the extension of dynamic imaging modes to high-resolution operation in liquids, ultimately achieving atomic resolution. The latter developments are already having a significant impact in the highly competitive field of biological imaging under physiological conditions. This special issue of Nanotechnology would not have been possible without the highly professional support from Nina Couzin, Amy Harvey, Alex Wotherspoon and the entire Nanotechnology team at IOP Publishing. We are thankful for their help in pushing this project forward. We also thank the authors who have contributed their excellent original articles to this issue, the referees whose comments have helped make the issue an accurate portrait of this rapidly moving field, and the entire NC-AFM community that continues to drive NC-AFM to new horizons.

  17. Chemical identification of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Pou, Pablo; Abe, Masayuki; Jelinek, Pavel; Pérez, Rubén; Morita, Seizo; Custance, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy is a versatile and powerful method that uses sharp tips to image, measure and manipulate matter at surfaces with atomic resolution. At cryogenic temperatures, scanning probe microscopy can even provide electron tunnelling spectra that serve as fingerprints of the vibrational properties of adsorbed molecules and of the electronic properties of magnetic impurity atoms, thereby allowing chemical identification. But in many instances, and particularly for insulating systems, determining the exact chemical composition of surfaces or nanostructures remains a considerable challenge. In principle, dynamic force microscopy should make it possible to overcome this problem: it can image insulator, semiconductor and metal surfaces with true atomic resolution, by detecting and precisely measuring the short-range forces that arise with the onset of chemical bonding between the tip and surface atoms and that depend sensitively on the chemical identity of the atoms involved. Here we report precise measurements of such short-range chemical forces, and show that their dependence on the force microscope tip used can be overcome through a normalization procedure. This allows us to use the chemical force measurements as the basis for atomic recognition, even at room temperature. We illustrate the performance of this approach by imaging the surface of a particularly challenging alloy system and successfully identifying the three constituent atomic species silicon, tin and lead, even though these exhibit very similar chemical properties and identical surface position preferences that render any discrimination attempt based on topographic measurements impossible.

  18. Insights into the regulation of transcription by scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dame, R T; Wyman, C; Goosen, N

    2003-12-01

    The scanning force microscope (SFM) is a valuable tool for the structural analysis of complexes between protein(s) and DNA. In recent years the application of scanning force microscopy to the field of transcription regulation has been reported in numerous studies. Using this technique, novel insights could be obtained into the architecture and dynamics of complexes, which are relevant to the transcription process and the mechanisms by which this process is regulated. In this article an overview is given of SFM studies addressing, in particular, topics in the field of transcription in prokaryotic organisms.

  19. Quantitative analysis of sideband coupling in photoinduced force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahng, Junghoon; Kim, Bongsu; Lee, Eun Seong; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the cantilever motions detected in photoinduced force microscopy (PiFM) using the sideband coupling detection scheme. In sideband coupling, the cantilever dynamics are probed at a combination frequency of a fundamental mechanical eigenmode and the modulation frequency of the laser beam. Using this detection mode, we develop a method for reconstructing the modulated photoinduced force gradient from experimental parameters in a quantitative manner. We show evidence, both theoretically and experimentally, that the sideband coupling detection mode provides PiFM images with superior contrast compared to images obtained when detecting the cantilever motions directly at the laser modulation frequency.

  20. Magnetoelectric force microscopy based on magnetic force microscopy with modulated electric field.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yanan; Wu, Weida

    2014-05-01

    We present the realization of a mesoscopic imaging technique, namely, the Magnetoelectric Force Microscopy (MeFM), for visualization of local magnetoelectric effect. The basic principle of MeFM is the lock-in detection of local magnetoelectric response, i.e., the electric field-induced magnetization, using magnetic force microscopy. We demonstrate MeFM capability by visualizing magnetoelectric domains on single crystals of multiferroic hexagonal manganites. Results of several control experiments exclude artifacts or extrinsic origins of the MeFM signal. The parameters are tuned to optimize the signal to noise ratio.

  1. Single molecule fluorescence and force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schütz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P

    2002-12-01

    The investigation of biomolecules has entered a new age since the development of methodologies capable of studies at the level of single molecules. In biology, most molecules show a complex dynamical behavior, with individual motions and transitions between different states occurring highly correlated in space and time within an arrangement of various elements. Recent advances in the development of new microscopy techniques with sensitivity at the single molecule have gained access to essentially new types of information obtainable from imaging biomolecular samples. These methodologies are described here in terms of their applicability to the in vivo detection and visualization of molecular processes on surfaces, membranes, and cells. First examples of single molecule microscopy on cell membranes revealed new basic insight into the lateral organization of the plasma membrane, providing the captivating perspective of an ultra-sensitive methodology as a general tool to study local processes and heterogeneities in living cells.

  2. Electrostatic-free piezoresponse force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungho; Seol, Daehee; Lu, Xiaoli; Alexe, Marin; Kim, Yunseok

    2017-01-01

    Contact and non-contact based atomic force microscopy (AFM) approaches have been extensively utilized to explore various nanoscale surface properties. In most AFM-based measurements, a concurrent electrostatic effect between the AFM tip/cantilever and sample surface can occur. This electrostatic effect often hinders accurate measurements. Thus, it is very important to quantify as well as remove the impact of the electrostatic effect on AFM-based measurements. In this study, we examine the impact of the electrostatic effect on the electromechanical (EM) response in piezoresponse force microscopy as a model AFM mode. We quantitatively studied the effects of increasing the external electric field and reducing the spring constant of a cantilever. Further, we explored ways to minimize the electrostatic effect. The results provide broad guidelines for quantitatively analyzing the EM response as well as, eventually, for obtaining the electrostatic-free EM response. The conclusions can be applied to other AFM-based measurements that are subject to a strong electrostatic effect between the AFM tip/cantilever and sample surface, regardless of contact and non-contact modes. PMID:28139715

  3. Magnetic force microscopy: quantitative issues in biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Passeri, Daniele; Dong, Chunhua; Reggente, Melania; Angeloni, Livia; Barteri, Mario; Scaramuzzo, Francesca A; De Angelis, Francesca; Marinelli, Fiorenzo; Antonelli, Flavia; Rinaldi, Federica; Marianecci, Carlotta; Carafa, Maria; Sorbo, Angela; Sordi, Daniela; Arends, Isabel Wce; Rossi, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique in which an AFM tip with a magnetic coating is used to probe local magnetic fields with the typical AFM spatial resolution, thus allowing one to acquire images reflecting the local magnetic properties of the samples at the nanoscale. Being a well established tool for the characterization of magnetic recording media, superconductors and magnetic nanomaterials, MFM is finding constantly increasing application in the study of magnetic properties of materials and systems of biological and biomedical interest. After reviewing these latter applications, three case studies are presented in which MFM is used to characterize: (i) magnetoferritin synthesized using apoferritin as molecular reactor; (ii) magnetic nanoparticles loaded niosomes to be used as nanocarriers for drug delivery; (iii) leukemic cells labeled using folic acid-coated core-shell superparamagnetic nanoparticles in order to exploit the presence of folate receptors on the cell membrane surface. In these examples, MFM data are quantitatively analyzed evidencing the limits of the simple analytical models currently used. Provided that suitable models are used to simulate the MFM response, MFM can be used to evaluate the magnetic momentum of the core of magnetoferritin, the iron entrapment efficiency in single vesicles, or the uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells.

  4. Electrostatic-free piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungho; Seol, Daehee; Lu, Xiaoli; Alexe, Marin; Kim, Yunseok

    2017-01-01

    Contact and non-contact based atomic force microscopy (AFM) approaches have been extensively utilized to explore various nanoscale surface properties. In most AFM-based measurements, a concurrent electrostatic effect between the AFM tip/cantilever and sample surface can occur. This electrostatic effect often hinders accurate measurements. Thus, it is very important to quantify as well as remove the impact of the electrostatic effect on AFM-based measurements. In this study, we examine the impact of the electrostatic effect on the electromechanical (EM) response in piezoresponse force microscopy as a model AFM mode. We quantitatively studied the effects of increasing the external electric field and reducing the spring constant of a cantilever. Further, we explored ways to minimize the electrostatic effect. The results provide broad guidelines for quantitatively analyzing the EM response as well as, eventually, for obtaining the electrostatic-free EM response. The conclusions can be applied to other AFM-based measurements that are subject to a strong electrostatic effect between the AFM tip/cantilever and sample surface, regardless of contact and non-contact modes.

  5. Conformational dynamics of single molecules visualized in real time by scanning force microscopy: macromolecular mobility on a substrate surface in different vapours.

    PubMed

    Gallyamov, M O; Tartsch, B; Khokhlov, A R; Sheiko, S S; Borner, H G; Matyjaszewski, K; Möller, M

    2004-09-01

    We describe a technique to visualize and effect in real time motion and conformational transitions of single macromolecules. Two steps are involved. First, scanning force microscopy (SFM) was applied to detect in situ conformational transitions of single polymer molecules adsorbed on a substrate surface. Secondly, these changes were induced by controlled variations of environmental conditions in a microscope environmental chamber. In particular, we have revealed that exposure of a substrate with adsorbed macromolecules to vapours of different nature was able to increase molecular mobility and to stimulate conformational transitions of the polymer chains on the surface. Realization of SFM observation in a variable vapour environment was not as difficult as in liquid media. Variations of the vapour composition affected the oscillation dynamics of the cantilever with the scanning probe only to a small extent, and did not impede continuation of the scanning procedure. In fact, the characteristic times of the observed conformational changes were large enough (minutes to dozens of minutes) for sampling images repeatedly. Although recording of an SFM image was slow and required several minutes, we were able to visualize step-by-step the successive stages of the slow conformational transformation of the macromolecules adhering to the substrate, i.e. to investigate a molecular response to the environment changes in real time. Here, we studied the reversible collapse-decollapse transitions of cylindrical poly(methacrylate)-graft-poly(n-butyl acrylate) brush-like macromolecules exposed to different vapours. Single macromolecules on mica tended to assume a compacted globular conformation when exposed to the vapour of compounds, which due to their amphiphilic nature adsorb on mica and lower the surface energy of the substrate (e.g. alcohols). By contrast, the macromolecules adopted extended two-dimensional worm-like conformations in the vapours of compounds having high values

  6. Electrostatic force microscopy studies of nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Stephen Wayne

    Electrostatic force microscopy has been used to study the electrostatic force on a nanometer length scale. The experimental techniques, implemented to measure electrostatic force, were based on established methods reported in the literature. These measurements were acquired using an electrostatic force microscope (EFM). The EFM consisted of a commercially available atomic force microscope (AFM) that was modified to measure the electrostatic interaction between an AFM tip and a sample substrate. In addition to modifying the commercial AFM, a homebuilt AFM/EFM was constructed at Purdue capable of making electrostatic measurements in an ultra high vacuum environment. After performing several experiments designed to test both the operation and the sensitivity of the EFM, extensive studies of several nanoscale systems were conducted. In particular, the EFM was used to measure the electrostatic potentials of a single nanometer-sized gold cluster and self-assembled arrays of encapsulated gold clusters. The surface potential of the array was found to be at a higher positive potential than the underlying gold substrate, indicating that the encapsulated clusters have a lower work function than bulk gold. In addition, the EFM was used to measure surface potential as a function of time for various LTG:GaAs substrates after the removal of the oxide layer. The behavior of the surface potential with respect to time was found to be dependent on the agent used for the oxide removal. Finally, the EFM was used to measure the surface potential of self-assembled monolayers chemisorb onto Au(111). The monolayers' surface potentials were found to depend on the molecular structure of the molecules forming the monolayer.

  7. Visualizing enantioselective optical forces with chiral force microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Saleh, Amr; van de Haar, Marie-Anne; Polman, Albert; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2016-09-01

    Enantiomer separation is a critical step in many chemical syntheses, particularly for pharmaceuticals, but prevailing chemical methods remain inefficient. Here, we introduce an optical technique to sort chiral specimens using coaxial plasmonic apertures. These apertures are composed of a deeply subwavelength dielectric channel embedded in silver (or gold) and can stably trap sub-20-nm dielectric specimens. Using both full-field simulations and analytic calculations, we first show that selective trapping of enantiomers can be achieved with circularly polarized illumination and proper index-matching of the immersed liquid with the particles being trapped. Opposite enantiomers experience distinct trapping forces in both sign and magnitude: one is trapped in a deep potential well while the other is repelled with a potential barrier. These potentials maintain opposite signs across a range of chiral polarizabilities and enantiomer-aperture separations. We also demonstrate how atomic force microscopy can be used to directly probe the near field optical forces from our coaxial nano-aperture. Our measurement reveals the spatial distribution of the optical near-field forces on a nanometer-sized dielectric specimen. To directly visualize the enantio-selective optical forces, we pattern silicon AFM-probes with chiral patterns. Our near-field force mapping indicates a differentiable force in the piconewton range on the chiral probes, exerted by our coaxial aperture with circularly polarized illumination. Our theoretical and experimental demonstrations indicate that the interaction of chiral light and chiral specimens can be mediated by achiral plasmonic apertures, providing a possible route toward all-optical enantiopure syntheses.

  8. Investigating cell mechanics with atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Kristina; Pelling, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of mechanical force is crucial for normal cell development and functioning. However, the process of mechanotransduction cannot be studied in isolation from cell mechanics. Thus, in order to understand how cells ‘feel’, we must first understand how they deform and recover from physical perturbations. Owing to its versatility, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a popular tool to study intrinsic cellular mechanical properties. Used to directly manipulate and examine whole and subcellular reactions, AFM allows for top-down and reconstitutive approaches to mechanical characterization. These studies show that the responses of cells and their components are complex, and largely depend on the magnitude and time scale of loading. In this review, we generally describe the mechanotransductive process through discussion of well-known mechanosensors. We then focus on discussion of recent examples where AFM is used to specifically probe the elastic and inelastic responses of single cells undergoing deformation. We present a brief overview of classical and current models often used to characterize observed cellular phenomena in response to force. Both simple mechanistic models and complex nonlinear models have been used to describe the observed cellular behaviours, however a unifying description of cell mechanics has not yet been resolved. PMID:25589563

  9. Investigating cell mechanics with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Haase, Kristina; Pelling, Andrew E

    2015-03-06

    Transmission of mechanical force is crucial for normal cell development and functioning. However, the process of mechanotransduction cannot be studied in isolation from cell mechanics. Thus, in order to understand how cells 'feel', we must first understand how they deform and recover from physical perturbations. Owing to its versatility, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a popular tool to study intrinsic cellular mechanical properties. Used to directly manipulate and examine whole and subcellular reactions, AFM allows for top-down and reconstitutive approaches to mechanical characterization. These studies show that the responses of cells and their components are complex, and largely depend on the magnitude and time scale of loading. In this review, we generally describe the mechanotransductive process through discussion of well-known mechanosensors. We then focus on discussion of recent examples where AFM is used to specifically probe the elastic and inelastic responses of single cells undergoing deformation. We present a brief overview of classical and current models often used to characterize observed cellular phenomena in response to force. Both simple mechanistic models and complex nonlinear models have been used to describe the observed cellular behaviours, however a unifying description of cell mechanics has not yet been resolved.

  10. Atomic Force Microscopy for Soil Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gazze, andrea; doerr, stefan; dudley, ed; hallin, ingrid; matthews, peter; quinn, gerry; van keulen, geertje; francis, lewis

    2016-04-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is a high-resolution surface-sensitive technique, which provides 3-dimensional topographical information and material properties of both stiff and soft samples in their natural environments. Traditionally AFM has been applied to samples with low roughness: hence its use for soil analysis has been very limited so far. Here we report the optimization settings required for a standardization of high-resolution and artefact-free analysis of natural soil with AFM: soil immobilization, AFM probe selection, artefact recognition and minimization. Beyond topography, AFM can be used in a spectroscopic mode to evaluate nanomechanical properties, such as soil viscosity, stiffness, and deformation. In this regards, Bruker PeakForce-Quantitative NanoMechanical (QNM) AFM provides a fast and convenient way to extract physical properties from AFM force curves in real-time to obtain soil nanomechanical properties. Here we show for the first time the ability of AFM to describe the topography of natural soil at nanometre resolution, with observation of micro-components, such as clays, and of nano-structures, possibly of biotic origin, the visualization of which would prove difficult with other instrumentations. Finally, nanomechanical profiling has been applied to different wettability states in soil and the respective physical patterns are discussed.

  11. Backscattering position detection for photonic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, Giovanni; Kozyreff, Gregory; Petrov, Dmitri

    2007-10-15

    An optically trapped particle is an extremely sensitive probe for the measurement of pico- and femto-Newton forces between the particle and its environment in microscopic systems (photonic force microscopy). A typical setup comprises an optical trap, which holds the probe, and a position sensing system, which uses the scattering of a beam illuminating the probe. Usually the position is accurately determined by measuring the deflection of the forward-scattered light transmitted through the probe. However, geometrical constraints may prevent access to this side of the trap, forcing one to make use of the backscattered light instead. A theory is presented together with numerical results that describes the use of the backscattered light for position detection. With a Mie-Debye approach, we compute the total (incident plus scattered) field and follow its evolution as it is collected by the condenser lenses and projected onto the position detectors and the responses of position sensitive detectors and quadrant photodetectors to the displacement of the probe in the optical trap, both in forward and backward configurations. We find out that in the case of backward detection, for both types of detectors the displacement sensitivity can change sign as a function of the probe size and is null for some critical sizes. In addition, we study the influence of the numerical aperture of the detection system, polarization, and the cross talk between position measurements in orthogonal directions. We finally discuss how these features should be taken into account in experimental designs.

  12. Atomic force microscopy of Precambrian microscopic fossils

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, André; Schopf, J. William; Altermann, Wladyslaw; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B.; Heckl, Wolfgang M.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique used routinely in material science to image substances at a submicron (including nm) scale. We apply this technique to analysis of the fine structure of organic-walled Precambrian fossils, microscopic sphaeromorph acritarchs (cysts of planktonic unicellular protists) permineralized in ≈650-million-year-old cherts of the Chichkan Formation of southern Kazakhstan. AFM images, backed by laser-Raman spectroscopic analysis of individual specimens, demonstrate that the walls of these petrified fossils are composed of stacked arrays of ≈200-nm-sized angular platelets of polycyclic aromatic kerogen. Together, AFM and laser-Raman spectroscopy provide means by which to elucidate the submicron-scale structure of individual microscopic fossils, investigate the geochemical maturation of ancient organic matter, and, potentially, distinguish true fossils from pseudofossils and probe the mechanisms of fossil preservation by silica permineralization. PMID:12089337

  13. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nievergelt, Adrian P; Adams, Jonathan D; Odermatt, Pascal D

    2014-01-01

    Summary Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples. PMID:25671141

  14. Measuring molecular weight by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheiko, Sergei S; da Silva, Marcelo; Shirvaniants, David; LaRue, Isaac; Prokhorova, Svetlana; Moeller, Martin; Beers, Kathryn; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2003-06-04

    Absolute-molecular-weight distribution of cylindrical brush molecules were determined using a combination of the Langmuir Blodget (LB) technique and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The LB technique gives mass density of a monolayer, i.e., mass per unit area, whereas visualization of individual molecules by AFM enables accurate measurements of the molecular density, i.e., number of molecules per unit area. From the ratio of the mass density to the molecular density, one can determine the absolute value for the number average molecular weight. Assuming that the structure of brush molecules is uniform along the backbone, the length distribution should be virtually identical to the molecular weight distribution. Although we used only brush molecules for demonstration purpose, this approach can be applied for a large variety of molecular and colloidal species that can be visualized by a microscopic technique.

  15. Atomic force microscopy of model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Morandat, Sandrine; Azouzi, Slim; Beauvais, Estelle; Mastouri, Amira; El Kirat, Karim

    2013-02-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are biomimetic model systems that are now widely used to address the biophysical and biochemical properties of biological membranes. Two main methods are usually employed to form SLBs: the transfer of two successive monolayers by Langmuir-Blodgett or Langmuir-Schaefer techniques, and the fusion of preformed lipid vesicles. The transfer of lipid films on flat solid substrates offers the possibility to apply a wide range of surface analytical techniques that are very sensitive. Among them, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened new opportunities for determining the nanoscale organization of SLBs under physiological conditions. In this review, we first focus on the different protocols generally employed to prepare SLBs. Then, we describe AFM studies on the nanoscale lateral organization and mechanical properties of SLBs. Lastly, we survey recent developments in the AFM monitoring of bilayer alteration, remodeling, or digestion, by incubation with exogenous agents such as drugs, proteins, peptides, and nanoparticles.

  16. Atomic force microscopy of Precambrian microscopic fossils.

    PubMed

    Kempe, André; Schopf, J William; Altermann, Wladyslaw; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy B; Heckl, Wolfgang M

    2002-07-09

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a technique used routinely in material science to image substances at a submicron (including nm) scale. We apply this technique to analysis of the fine structure of organic-walled Precambrian fossils, microscopic sphaeromorph acritarchs (cysts of planktonic unicellular protists) permineralized in approximately 650-million-year-old cherts of the Chichkan Formation of southern Kazakhstan. AFM images, backed by laser-Raman spectroscopic analysis of individual specimens, demonstrate that the walls of these petrified fossils are composed of stacked arrays of approximately 200-nm-sized angular platelets of polycyclic aromatic kerogen. Together, AFM and laser-Raman spectroscopy provide means by which to elucidate the submicron-scale structure of individual microscopic fossils, investigate the geochemical maturation of ancient organic matter, and, potentially, distinguish true fossils from pseudofossils and probe the mechanisms of fossil preservation by silica permineralization.

  17. Atomic Force Microscopy for DNA SNP Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valbusa, Ugo; Ierardi, Vincenzo

    The knowledge of the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome greatly contributes to better comprehension of the relation between genetic factors and diseases. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA in different individuals reveals positions where variations that involve individual base substitutions can occur. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms are highly abundant and can have different consequences at phenotypic level. Several attempts were made to apply atomic force microscopy (AFM) to detect and map SNP sites in DNA strands. The most promising approach is the study of DNA mutations producing heteroduplex DNA strands and identifying the mismatches by means of a protein that labels the mismatches. MutS is a protein that is part of a well-known complex of mismatch repair, which initiates the process of repairing when the MutS binds to the mismatched DNA filament. The position of MutS on the DNA filament can be easily recorded by means of AFM imaging.

  18. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  19. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds.

  20. Atomic force microscopy study of tooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Farina, M; Schemmel, A; Weissmüller, G; Cruz, R; Kachar, B; Bisch, P M

    1999-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study tooth surfaces in order to compare the pattern of particle distribution in the outermost layer of the tooth surfaces. Human teeth and teeth from a rodent (Golden hamster), from a fish (piranha), and from a grazing mollusk (chiton) with distinct feeding habits were analyzed in terms of particle arrangement, packing, and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for comparison. It was found that AFM gives high-contrast, high-resolution images and is an important tool as a source of complementary and/or new structural information. All teeth were cleaned and some were etched with acidic solutions before analysis. It was observed that human enamel (permanent teeth) presents particles tightly packed in the outer surface, whereas enamel from the hamster (continuously growing teeth) shows particles of less dense packing. The piranha teeth have a thin cuticle covering the long apatite crystals of the underlying enameloid. This cuticle has a rough surface of particles that have a globular appearance after the brief acidic treatment. The similar appearance of the in vivo naturally etched tooth surface suggests that the pattern of globule distribution may be due to the presence of an organic material. Elemental analysis of this cuticle indicated that calcium, phosphorus, and iron are the main components of the structure while electron microdiffraction of pulverized cuticle particles showed a pattern consistent with hydroxyapatite. The chiton mineralized tooth cusp had a smooth surface in an unabraded region and a very rough structure with the magnetite crystals (already known to make part of the structure) protruding from the surface. It was concluded that the structures analyzed are optimized for efficiency in feeding mechanism and life span of the teeth.

  1. Atomic force microscopy of virus shells.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Madrid, Francisco; Martín-González, Natalia; Llauró, Aida; Ortega-Esteban, Alvaro; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Douglas, Trevor; Schaap, Iwan A T; de Pablo, Pedro J

    2017-04-15

    Microscopes are used to characterize small objects with the help of probes that interact with the specimen, such as photons and electrons in optical and electron microscopies, respectively. In atomic force microscopy (AFM), the probe is a nanometric tip located at the end of a microcantilever which palpates the specimen under study just as a blind person manages a walking stick. In this way, AFM allows obtaining nanometric resolution images of individual protein shells, such as viruses, in a liquid milieu. Beyond imaging, AFM also enables not only the manipulation of single protein cages, but also the characterization of every physicochemical property capable of inducing any measurable mechanical perturbation to the microcantilever that holds the tip. In the present revision, we start revising some recipes for adsorbing protein shells on surfaces. Then, we describe several AFM approaches to study individual protein cages, ranging from imaging to spectroscopic methodologies devoted to extracting physical information, such as mechanical and electrostatic properties. We also explain how a convenient combination of AFM and fluorescence methodologies entails monitoring genome release from individual viral shells during mechanical unpacking.

  2. Atomic force microscopy investigation of viruses.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Yurii G

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven to be a valuable approach to delineate the architectures and detailed structural features of a wide variety of viruses. These have ranged from small plant satellite viruses of only 17 nm to the giant mimivirus of 750 nm diameter, and they have included diverse morphologies such as those represented by HIV, icosahedral particles, vaccinia, and bacteriophages. Because it is a surface technique, it provides images and information that are distinct from those obtained by electron microscopy, and in some cases, at even higher resolution. By enzymatic and chemical dissection of virions, internal structures can be revealed, as well as DNA and RNA. The method is relatively rapid and can be carried out on both fixed and unfixed samples in either air or fluids, including culture media. It is nondestructive and even non-perturbing. It can be applied to individual isolated virus, as well as to infected cells. AFM is still in its early development and holds great promise for further investigation of biological systems at the nanometer scale.

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  4. Full information acquisition in piezoresponse force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas Belianinov, Alexei E-mail: sergei2@ornl.gov Kalinin, Sergei V. E-mail: sergei2@ornl.gov Jesse, Stephen E-mail: sergei2@ornl.gov

    2015-12-28

    The information flow from the tip-surface junction to the detector electronics during the piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) imaging is explored using the recently developed general mode (G-mode) detection. Information-theory analysis suggests that G-mode PFM in the non-switching regime, close to the first resonance mode, contains a relatively small (100–150) number of components containing significant information. The first two primary components are similar to classical PFM images, suggesting that classical lock-in detection schemes provide high veracity information in this case. At the same time, a number of transient components exhibit contrast associated with surface topography, suggesting pathway to separate the two. The number of significant components increases considerably in the non-linear and switching regimes and approaching cantilever resonances, precluding the use of classical lock-in detection and necessitating the use of band excitation or G-mode detection schemes. The future prospects of full information imaging in scanning probe microscopy are discussed.

  5. 3D Viscoelastic traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Hannen, Erin; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Darling, Eric M; Henann, David L; Franck, Christian

    2014-10-28

    Native cell-material interactions occur on materials differing in their structural composition, chemistry, and physical compliance. While the last two decades have shown the importance of traction forces during cell-material interactions, they have been almost exclusively presented on purely elastic in vitro materials. Yet, most bodily tissue materials exhibit some level of viscoelasticity, which could play an important role in how cells sense and transduce tractions. To expand the realm of cell traction measurements and to encompass all materials from elastic to viscoelastic, this paper presents a general, and comprehensive approach for quantifying 3D cell tractions in viscoelastic materials. This methodology includes the experimental characterization of the time-dependent material properties for any viscoelastic material with the subsequent mathematical implementation of the determined material model into a 3D traction force microscopy (3D TFM) framework. Utilizing this new 3D viscoelastic TFM (3D VTFM) approach, we quantify the influence of viscosity on the overall material traction calculations and quantify the error associated with omitting time-dependent material effects, as is the case for all other TFM formulations. We anticipate that the 3D VTFM technique will open up new avenues of cell-material investigations on even more physiologically relevant time-dependent materials including collagen and fibrin gels.

  6. Nanoscale chemical imaging by photoinduced force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Derek; Morrison, William; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Jahng, Junghoon; Potma, Eric; Wan, Lei; Ruiz, Ricardo; Albrecht, Thomas R.; Schmidt, Kristin; Frommer, Jane; Sanders, Daniel P.; Park, Sung

    2016-01-01

    Correlating spatial chemical information with the morphology of closely packed nanostructures remains a challenge for the scientific community. For example, supramolecular self-assembly, which provides a powerful and low-cost way to create nanoscale patterns and engineered nanostructures, is not easily interrogated in real space via existing nondestructive techniques based on optics or electrons. A novel scanning probe technique called infrared photoinduced force microscopy (IR PiFM) directly measures the photoinduced polarizability of the sample in the near field by detecting the time-integrated force between the tip and the sample. By imaging at multiple IR wavelengths corresponding to absorption peaks of different chemical species, PiFM has demonstrated the ability to spatially map nm-scale patterns of the individual chemical components of two different types of self-assembled block copolymer films. With chemical-specific nanometer-scale imaging, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials. PMID:27051870

  7. Imaging mechanisms of force detected FMR microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Midzor, M. M.; Wigen, P. E.; Pelekhov, D.; Chen, W.; Hammel, P. C.; Roukes, M. L.

    2000-05-01

    We demonstrate spatial resolution of ferromagnetic resonance in a microscopic sample of YIG using ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy (FMRFM). Measurements were performed on a small single crystal YIG film grown on a GGG substrate, roughly rectangular in shape 20 {mu}mx{approx}150 {mu}m and 3 {mu}m thick. The perpendicular and parallel force geometries of FMRFM, in conjunction with an external bias field both parallel and perpendicular to the film, were used to scan the sample. This enabled the detection of strong signals, even at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The fundamental and higher-order magnetostatic modes were observed to have 26-29 Gauss separation. The intensity of these modes exhibited spatial variation as the magnetic tip was scanned over the sample, and this behavior is qualitatively explained by DE theory. An improved fabrication method for magnet on cantilever was employed, which yielded a spatial resolution of 15 {mu}m. These results demonstrate the potential of FMRFM for investigating the spatial dependence of ferromagnetic resonance, and for studying the anisotropy fields and exchange coupling effects within multilayer films and small magnetic systems. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Observation of multicellular spinning behavior of Proteus mirabilis by atomic force microscopy and multifunctional microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanxia; Deng, Yuanxin; Luo, Shuxiu; Deng, Yu; Guo, Linming; Xu, Weiwei; Liu, Lei; Liu, Junkang

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to observe the multicellular spinning behavior of Proteus mirabilis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifunctional microscopy in order to understand the mechanism underlying this spinning movement and its biological significance. Multifunctional microscopy with charge-coupled device (CCD) and real-time AFM showed changes in cell structure and shape of P. mirabilis during multicellular spinning movement. Specifically, the morphological characteristics of P. mirabilis, multicellular spinning dynamics, and unique movement were observed. Our findings indicate that the multicellular spinning behavior of P. mirabilis may be used to collect nutrients, perform colonization, and squeeze out competitors. The movement characteristics of P. mirabilis are vital to the organism's biological adaptability to the surrounding environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a paramagnetic probe

    DOE PAGES

    Berman, G. P.; Gorshkov, V. N.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2017-04-01

    Here, we consider theoretically extension of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) replacing a ferromagnetic probe on a cantilever tip (CT) with a paramagnetic one (PMRFM). The dynamics of the interaction between the paramagnetic probe and a local magnetic moment in a sample is analyzed, using a quasi-classical approach. We show that the application of a proper sequence of electromagnetic pulses provides a significant deflection of the CT from the initial equilibrium position. Periodic application of these sequences of pulses results in quasi-periodic CT deflections from the equilibrium, which can be used for detection of the magnetic moment in a sample.

  10. Magnetic resonance force microscopy with a paramagnetic probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, G. P.; Gorshkov, V. N.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2017-04-01

    We consider theoretically extension of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) replacing a ferromagnetic probe on a cantilever tip (CT) with a paramagnetic one (PMRFM). The dynamics of the interaction between the paramagnetic probe and a local magnetic moment in a sample is analyzed, using a quasi-classical approach. We show that the application of a proper sequence of electromagnetic pulses provides a significant deflection of the CT from the initial equilibrium position. Periodic application of these sequences of pulses results in quasi-periodic CT deflections from the equilibrium, which can be used for detection of the magnetic moment in a sample.

  11. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy-magnetic force microscopy combination.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria; Asenjo, Agustina

    2011-01-01

    The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25-50 nm such that the long range tip-sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip-sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample.

  12. Mapping the interaction sites of Mucin 1 and DNA aptamer by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Zhang, Miaomiao; Chen, Xuejuan; Ma, Xingxing; Li, Chen; Zhang, Zhe; Tang, Jilin

    2017-10-09

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) is an attractive tumor marker for cancer diagnosis. An advanced atomic force microscopy (AFM) mode, peak-force tapping AFM with an aptamer functionalized tip, was introduced to map the specific interaction sites of an aptamer and MUC1. Single molecular force spectroscopy (SMFS) was used to investigate dynamic parameters of the aptamer-MUC1.

  13. Atomic force microscopy study of enamel remineralization.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Lombardini, Marco; Colombo, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was the evaluation of two products: a CPP-ACP paste (GC Tooth Mousse, GC Corp.) and a desensitizing toothpaste (Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief, Colgate-Palmolive) on preventing enamel erosion produced by a soft drink (Coca Cola) by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Thirty enamel specimens were assigned to 6 groups of 5 specimens each. 1: intact enamel, 2: enamel + soft drink, 3: intact enamel + Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief, 4: enamel + soft drink + Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief, 5: intact enamel + GC Tooth Mousse, 6: enamel + soft drink + GC Tooth Mousse. The surface of each specimen was imaged by AFM. The root mean-square roughness (Rrms) was obtained from the AFM images and the differences in the averaged values among the groups were analyzed by ANOVA test. Comparing groups 4 and 6 (soft drink + toothpastes) with group 2 (eroded enamel) a statistical difference (P<0.05) was registered, suggesting effectiveness in protecting enamel against erosion of the products investigated. The use of new formulation toothpastes can prevent enamel demineralization.

  14. Atomic force microscopy study of enamel remineralization

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Ceci, Matteo; Beltrami, Riccardo; Lombardini, Marco; Colombo, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of the present in vitro study was the evaluation of two products: a CPP-ACP paste (GC Tooth Mousse, GC Corp.) and a desensitizing toothpaste (Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief, Colgate-Palmolive) on preventing enamel erosion produced by a soft drink (Coca Cola) by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Methods Thirty enamel specimens were assigned to 6 groups of 5 specimens each. 1: intact enamel, 2: enamel + soft drink, 3: intact enamel + Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief, 4: enamel + soft drink + Colgate Sensitive Pro Relief, 5: intact enamel + GC Tooth Mousse, 6: enamel + soft drink + GC Tooth Mousse. The surface of each specimen was imaged by AFM. The root mean-square roughness (Rrms) was obtained from the AFM images and the differences in the averaged values among the groups were analyzed by ANOVA test. Results Comparing groups 4 and 6 (soft drink + toothpastes) with group 2 (eroded enamel) a statistical difference (P<0.05) was registered, suggesting effectiveness in protecting enamel against erosion of the products investigated. Conclusions The use of new formulation toothpastes can prevent enamel demineralization. PMID:25506414

  15. Investigating bioconjugation by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnological applications increasingly exploit the selectivity and processivity of biological molecules. Integration of biomolecules such as proteins or DNA into nano-systems typically requires their conjugation to surfaces, for example of carbon-nanotubes or fluorescent quantum dots. The bioconjugated nanostructures exploit the unique strengths of both their biological and nanoparticle components and are used in diverse, future oriented research areas ranging from nanoelectronics to biosensing and nanomedicine. Atomic force microscopy imaging provides valuable, direct insight for the evaluation of different conjugation approaches at the level of the individual molecules. Recent technical advances have enabled high speed imaging by AFM supporting time resolutions sufficient to follow conformational changes of intricately assembled nanostructures in solution. In addition, integration of AFM with different spectroscopic and imaging approaches provides an enhanced level of information on the investigated sample. Furthermore, the AFM itself can serve as an active tool for the assembly of nanostructures based on bioconjugation. AFM is hence a major workhorse in nanotechnology; it is a powerful tool for the structural investigation of bioconjugation and bioconjugation-induced effects as well as the simultaneous active assembly and analysis of bioconjugation-based nanostructures. PMID:23855448

  16. Single molecule atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Kocun, Marta; Grandbois, Michel; Cuccia, Louis A

    2011-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM-based force spectroscopy was used to study the desorption of individual chitosan polymer chains from substrates with varying chemical composition. AFM images of chitosan adsorbed onto a flat mica substrate show elongated single strands or aggregated bundles. The aggregated state of the polymer is consistent with the high level of flexibility and mobility expected for a highly positively charged polymer strand. Conversely, the visualization of elongated strands indicated the presence of stabilizing interactions with the substrate. Surfaces with varying chemical composition (glass, self-assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid/decanethiol and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)) were probed with chitosan modified AFM tips and the corresponding desorption energies, calculated from plateau-like features, were attributed to the desorption of individual polymer strands. Desorption energies of 2.0±0.3×10(-20)J, 1.8±0.3×10(-20)J and 3.5±0.3×10(-20)J were obtained for glass, SAM of mercaptoundecanoic/dodecanethiol and PTFE, respectively. These single molecule level results can be used as a basis for investigating chitosan and chitosan-based materials for biomaterial applications.

  17. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  18. Harnessing bifurcations in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy to calibrate time-varying tip-sample force measurements.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ozgur

    2007-10-01

    Torsional harmonic cantilevers allow measurement of time-varying tip-sample forces in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy. Accuracy of these force measurements is important for quantitative nanomechanical measurements. Here we demonstrate a method to convert the torsional deflection signals into a calibrated force wave form with the use of nonlinear dynamical response of the tapping cantilever. Specifically the transitions between steady oscillation regimes are used to calibrate the torsional deflection signals.

  19. Toward optical-tweezers-based force microscopy for airborne microparticles.

    PubMed

    Power, Rory M; Burnham, Daniel R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-12-20

    Optical tweezers have found widespread application in biological and colloidal physics for the measurement of pN forces over nanometer to micrometer length scales. Similar aerosol-phase measurements of interparticle force have not been reported in spite of the potential to better resolve particle coagulation kinetics. Various refractive index mismatches in the beam path as well as the need to explicitly account for gravity and inertial particle motion provide a number of challenges that must be overcome to make such measurements tractable. In this regard, we demonstrate schemes by which the particle position and trap stiffness may be unambiguously measured using bright-field microscopy with resolution comparable with analogous condensed-phase measurements. Moreover, some of the challenges of working with highly dynamic aqueous particles are introduced and exploited to observe size-dependent phenomena in aerosol optical tweezers. Notably, when combined with cavity-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, this provides a unique opportunity to explore trapping forces over a continuum of particle size and refractive index. It is expected that the methods developed will provide a basis for the measurement of pairwise interaction forces in aerosol optical tweezers while providing a probe of fundamental airborne particle trapping dynamics.

  20. Advanced atomic force microscopy: Development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Deron A.

    Over the decade since atomic force microscopy (AFM) was invented, development of new microscopes has been closely intertwined with application of AFM to problems of interest in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. New techniques such as tapping mode AFM move quickly in our lab from the designer's bench to the user's table-since this is often the same piece of furniture. In return, designers get ample feedback as to what problems are limiting current instruments, and thus need most urgent attention. Tip sharpness and characterization are such a problem. Chapter 1 describes an AFM designed to operate in a scanning electron microscope, whose electron beam is used to deposit sharp carbonaceous tips. These tips can be tested and used in situ. Another limitation is addressed in Chapter 2: the difficulty of extracting more than just topographic information from a sample. A combined AFM/confocal optical microscope was built to provide simultaneous, independent images of the topography and fluorescence of a sample. In combination with staining or antibody labelling, this could provide submicron information about the composition of a sample. Chapters 3 and 4 discuss two generations of small cantilevers developed for lower-noise, higher-speed AFM of biological samples. In Chapter 4, a 26 mum cantilever is used to image the process of calcite growth from solution at a rate of 1.6 sec/frame. Finally, Chapter 5 explores in detail a biophysics problem that motivates us to develop fast, quiet, and gentle microscopes; namely, the control of crystal growth in seashells by the action of soluble proteins on a growing calcite surface.

  1. Characterization of asphaltene structure using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sabbaghi, S; Shariaty-Niassar, M; Ayatollahi, Sh; Jahanmiri, A

    2008-09-01

    In this study, at the first stage, asphaltene was extracted. The roughness of asphaltene coating at different rpm was studied using an image analysis confocal microscopy. The basics of quantum mechanics and statistical thermodynamics are used to predict the potential energy and the intermolecular forces of asphaltene molecules. The functional forms for the potential energy and intermolecular forces are evaluated. Our final goal is to be able to observe and determine the surface structures of asphaltene micelles with scanning probe microscopes. So, the focus of the work on these unusual molecules is to characterize their structure, dynamics and thermodynamics and to establish the relationship between these properties and petroleum fluid behaviour. The existence of various nanostructures of asphaltene in petroleum has been extensively discussed. A set of fitted data is used to check the validity of the calculated results. The good agreement between the proposed models and the data is promising.

  2. Accurate force spectroscopy in tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Existing force spectroscopy methods in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) such as higher harmonic inversion [M. Stark, R. W. Stark, W. M. Heckl, and R. Guckenberger, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 8473 (2002)] or scanning probe acceleration microscopy [J. Legleiter, M. Park, B. Cusick, and T. Kowalewski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 4813 (2006)] or integral relations [M. Lee and W. Jhe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 036104 (2006); S. Hu and A. Raman, Nanotechnology 19, 375704 (2008); H. Hölscher, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 123109 (2006); A. J. Katan, Nanotechnology 20, 165703 (2009)] require and assume as an observable the tip dynamics in a single eigenmode of the oscillating microcantilever. We demonstrate that this assumption can distort significantly the extracted tip-sample interaction forces when applied to tapping mode AFM with soft cantilevers in liquid environments. This exception is due to the fact that under these conditions the second eigenmode is momentarily excited and the observed tip dynamics clearly contains contributions from the fundamental and second eigenmodes. To alleviate this problem, a simple experimental method is proposed to screen the second eigenmode contributions in the observed tip deflection signal to allow accurate tip-sample force reconstruction in liquids. The method is implemented experimentally to reconstruct interaction forces on polymer, bacteriorhodopsin membrane, and mica samples in buffer solutions.

  3. Application of magnetic force microscopy in nanomaterials characterization.

    PubMed

    de Lozanne, Alex

    2006-07-01

    This review describes the basic technical aspects of magnetic force microscopy and how this technique has been applied to the study of colossal magnetoresistance materials, superconductors, and patterned magnetic materials. Recently, current distribution in a patterned aluminum strip has been measured by magnetic force microscopy, opening the possibility of measuring currents in buried interconnects in integrated circuits.

  4. Interpreting motion and force for narrow-band intermodulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Platz, Daniel; Forchheimer, Daniel; Tholén, Erik A; Haviland, David B

    2013-01-01

    Intermodulation atomic force microscopy (ImAFM) is a mode of dynamic atomic force microscopy that probes the nonlinear tip-surface force by measurement of the mixing of multiple modes in a frequency comb. A high-quality factor cantilever resonance and a suitable drive comb will result in tip motion described by a narrow-band frequency comb. We show, by a separation of time scales, that such motion is equivalent to rapid oscillations at the cantilever resonance with a slow amplitude and phase or frequency modulation. With this time-domain perspective, we analyze single oscillation cycles in ImAFM to extract the Fourier components of the tip-surface force that are in-phase with the tip motion (F(I)) and quadrature to the motion (F(Q)). Traditionally, these force components have been considered as a function of the static-probe height only. Here we show that F(I) and F(Q) actually depend on both static-probe height and oscillation amplitude. We demonstrate on simulated data how to reconstruct the amplitude dependence of F(I) and F(Q) from a single ImAFM measurement. Furthermore, we introduce ImAFM approach measurements with which we reconstruct the full amplitude and probe-height dependence of the force components F(I) and F(Q), providing deeper insight into the tip-surface interaction. We demonstrate the capabilities of ImAFM approach measurements on a polystyrene polymer surface.

  5. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-21

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  6. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-01

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  7. Development and testing of hyperbaric atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy for biological applications.

    PubMed

    D'Agostino, D P; McNally, H A; Dean, J B

    2012-05-01

    A commercially available atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscope were installed and tested inside a custom-designed hyperbaric chamber to provide the capability to study the effects of hyperbaric gases on biological preparations, including cellular mechanism of oxidative stress. In this report, we list details of installing and testing atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy inside a hyperbaric chamber. The pressure vessel was designed to accommodate a variety of imaging equipment and ensures full functionality at ambient and hyperbaric conditions (≤85 psi). Electrical, gas and fluid lines were installed to enable remote operation of instrumentation under hyperbaric conditions, and to maintain viable biological samples with gas-equilibrated superfusate and/or drugs. Systems were installed for vibration isolation and temperature regulation to maintain atomic force microscopy performance during compression and decompression. Results of atomic force microscopy testing demonstrate sub-nanometre resolution at hyperbaric pressure in dry scans and fluid scans, in both contact mode and tapping mode. Noise levels were less when measurements were taken under hyperbaric pressure with air, helium (He) and nitrogen (N(2) ). Atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy measurements were made on a variety of living cell cultures exposed to hyperbaric gases (He, N(2) , O(2) , air). In summary, atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were installed and tested for use at hyperbaric pressures and enables the study of cellular and molecular effects of hyperbaric gases and pressure per se in biological preparations. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Lateral force microscopy of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lievonen, J; Ahlskog, M

    2009-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are usually imaged with the atomic force microscope (AFM) in non-contact mode. However, in many applications, such as mechanical manipulation or elasticity measurements, contact mode is used. The forces affecting the nanotube are then considerable and not fully understood. In this work lateral forces were measured during contact mode imaging with an AFM across a carbon nanotube. We found that, qualitatively, both magnitude and sign of the lateral forces to the AFM tip were independent of scan direction and can be concluded to arise from the tip slipping on the round edges of the nanotube. The dependence on the normal force applied to the tip and on the ratio between nanotube diameter and tip radius was studied. We show that for small values of this ratio, the lateral force signal can be explained with a simple geometrical model.

  9. Characterization of fragile nanostructures using scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Michael Richard

    1998-12-01

    The possibility of using scanning force microscopy (SFM) to image monolayer arrays of nanometer diameter gold clusters on flat substrates has been investigated. A major difficulty in SFM studies of supported cluster arrays is the interaction force between the SFM probe and the clusters which results in the clusters moving on the substrate during imaging. The addition of a carbon nanotube to the tip of the SFM probe reduces this interaction force, resulting in stable, tapping mode height images of the supported cluster arrays. However, resolution of individual nanometer-size cluster in an array requires reduction of the endform radius of the nanotubes. In an attempt to reduce the effects of image dilation, the endform shape of the nanotube has been modified by spark etching. Also, metal atoms have been deposited onto the tip endform by sparking the tip of the nanotube by sparking the tip against a metal substrate and by electro-depositing metal onto the tip. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using embedded-atom-method (EAM) potentials have been used to model the compression behavior of nanometer-size gold clusters. The simulations examined the behavior of free and supported gold particles compressed with normal and shear forces. These results have been used to explain previously observed descrepencies between the calculated and measured elastic modulus of nanometer-size gold clusters.

  10. DHMI: dynamic holographic microscopy interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xuefei; Zheng, Yujie; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a powerful in-vitro biological imaging tool. In this paper, we report a fully automated off-axis digital holographic microscopy system completed with a graphical user interface in the Matlab environment. The interface primarily includes Fourier domain processing, phase reconstruction, aberration compensation and autofocusing. A variety of imaging operations such as region of interest selection, de-noising mode (filtering and averaging), low frame rate imaging for immediate reconstruction and high frame rate imaging routine ( 27 fps) are implemented to facilitate ease of use.

  11. Force feedback microscopy based on an optical beam deflection scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Vitorino, Miguel V.; Rodrigues, Mario S.; Carpentier, Simon; Costa, Luca

    2014-07-07

    Force feedback microscopy circumvents the jump to contact in atomic force microscopy when using soft cantilevers and quantitatively measures the interaction properties at the nanoscale by simultaneously providing force, force gradient, and dissipation. The force feedback microscope developed so far used an optical cavity to measure the tip displacement. In this Letter, we show that the more conventional optical beam deflection scheme can be used to the same purpose. With this instrument, we have followed the evolution of the Brownian motion of the tip under the influence of a water bridge.

  12. Cross-bridge cycling gives rise to spatiotemporal heterogeneity of dynamic subcellular mechanics in cardiac myocytes probed with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Azeloglu, Evren U; Costa, Kevin D

    2010-03-01

    To study how the dynamic subcellular mechanical properties of the heart relate to the fundamental underlying process of actin-myosin cross-bridge cycling, we developed a novel atomic force microscope elastography technique for mapping spatiotemporal stiffness of isolated, spontaneously beating neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Cells were indented repeatedly at a rate close but unequal to their contractile frequency. The resultant changes in pointwise apparent elastic modulus cycled at a predictable envelope frequency between a systolic value of 26.2 +/- 5.1 kPa and a diastolic value of 7.8 +/- 4.1 kPa at a representative depth of 400 nm. In cells probed along their major axis, spatiotemporal changes in systolic stiffness displayed a heterogeneous pattern, reflecting the banded sarcomeric structure of underlying myofibrils. Treatment with blebbistatin eliminated contractile activity and resulted in a uniform apparent modulus of 6.5 +/- 4.8 kPa. This study represents the first quantitative dynamic mechanical mapping of beating cardiomyocytes. The technique provides a means of probing the micromechanical effects of disease processes and pharmacological treatments on beating cardiomyocytes, providing new insights and relating subcellular cardiac structure and function.

  13. Dual-frequency resonance-tracking atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Brian J.; Callahan, Clint; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Proksch, Roger

    2007-11-01

    A dual-excitation method for resonant-frequency tracking in scanning probe microscopy based on amplitude detection is developed. This method allows the cantilever to be operated at or near resonance for techniques where standard phase locked loops are not possible. This includes techniques with non-acoustic driving where the phase of the driving force is frequency and/or position dependent. An example of the latter is piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), where the resonant frequency of the cantilever is strongly dependent on the contact stiffness of the tip-surface junction and the local mechanical properties, but the spatial variability of the drive phase rules out the use of a phase locked loop. Combined with high-voltage switching and imaging, dual-frequency, resonance-tracking PFM allows reliable studies of electromechanical and elastic properties and polarization dynamics in a broad range of inorganic and biological systems, and is illustrated using lead zirconate-titanate, rat tail collagen, and native and switched ferroelectric domains in lithium niobate.

  14. Quantitative measurements of shear displacement using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Weida; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Yonggang

    2016-03-21

    We report a method to quantitatively measure local shear deformation with high sensitivity using atomic force microscopy. The key point is to simultaneously detect both torsional and buckling motions of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers induced by the lateral piezoelectric response of the sample. This requires the quantitative calibration of torsional and buckling response of AFM. This method is validated by measuring the angular dependence of the in-plane piezoelectric response of a piece of piezoelectric α-quartz. The accurate determination of the amplitude and orientation of the in-plane piezoelectric response, without rotation, would greatly enhance the efficiency of lateral piezoelectric force microscopy.

  15. Neuron Biomechanics Probed by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Spedden, Elise; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical interactions play a key role in many processes associated with neuronal growth and development. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in our understanding of the role played by the substrate stiffness in neuronal growth, of the cell-substrate adhesion forces, of the generation of traction forces during axonal elongation, and of the relationships between the neuron soma elastic properties and its health. The particular capabilities of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), such as high spatial resolution, high degree of control over the magnitude and orientation of the applied forces, minimal sample damage, and the ability to image and interact with cells in physiologically relevant conditions make this technique particularly suitable for measuring mechanical properties of living neuronal cells. This article reviews recent advances on using the AFM for studying neuronal biomechanics, provides an overview about the state-of-the-art measurements, and suggests directions for future applications. PMID:23921683

  16. Observation of silicon carbide Schottky barrier diode under applied reverse bias using atomic force microscopy/Kelvin probe force microscopy/scanning capacitance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruma, Takeshi; Satoh, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hidekazu

    2017-08-01

    We have observed a commercial silicon-carbide Schottky barrier diode (SiC-SBD) using our novel analysis system, in which atomic force microscopy (AFM) is combined with both Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM; for surface-potential measurement) and scanning capacitance force microscopy (SCFM; for differential-capacitance measurement). The results obtained for the SiC-SBD under an applied reverse bias indicate both the scan area in the sample and a peak value of the SCFM signal in the region where the existence of trapped electrons is deduced from the KFM analysis. Thus, our measurement system can be used to examine commercial power devices; however, novel polishing procedures are required in order to investigate the Schottky contact region.

  17. Imaging of nucleic acids with atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Ando, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a key tool of nanotechnology with great importance in applications to DNA nanotechnology and to the recently emerging field of RNA nanotechnology. Advances in the methodology of AFM now enable reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA of various structures, topologies, and DNA and RNA nanostructures. These advances are reviewed here with emphasis on methods utilizing modification of mica to prepare the surfaces enabling reliable and reproducible imaging of DNA and RNA nanostructures. Since the AFM technology for DNA is more mature, AFM imaging of DNA is introduced in this review to provide experience and background for the improvement of AFM imaging of RNA. Examples of imaging different structures of RNA and DNA are discussed and illustrated. Special attention is given to the potential use of AFM to image the dynamics of nucleic acids at the nanometer scale. As such, we review recent advances with the use of time-lapse AFM. PMID:21310240

  18. Nanometrology of delignified Populus using mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, R H; Davison, Brian H; Jung, S; Ragauskas, A J; Lereu, Aude; Thundat, Thomas George

    2011-01-01

    The study of the spatially resolved physical and compositional properties of materials at the nanoscale is increasingly challenging due to the level of complexity of biological specimens such as those of interest in bioenergy production. Mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) has emerged as a promising metrology tool for such studies. It is shown that, by tuning the mechanical excitation of the probe-sample system, MSAFM can be used to dynamically investigate the multifaceted complexity of plant cells. The results are argued to be of importance both for the characteristics of the invoked synthesized modes and for accessing new features of the samples. As a specific system to investigate, we present images of Populus, before and after a holopulping treatment, a crucial step in the biomass delignification process.

  19. Correct height measurement in noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sadewasser, Sascha; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch

    2003-12-31

    We demonstrate that topography measurements by noncontact atomic force microscopy are subject to residual electrostatic forces. On highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) with a submonolayer coverage of C60, we monitor the step height from C60 to HOPG as a function of dc bias between tip and sample. Because of the different contact potential of C60 and HOPG ( approximately 50 mV), the step height is strongly dependent on the dc bias. The presented results and additional simulations demonstrate clearly that for correct height measurements it is mandatory to use a Kelvin probe force microscopy method with active compensation of electrostatic forces.

  20. Ferritin protein imaging and detection by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Zheng, Bin; Hsieh, Shuchen

    2010-03-14

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to image and detect ferritin proteins and the strength of the magnetic signal is discussed, revealing a large workable lift height between the magnetic tip and the ferritin sample.

  1. Nanonet force microscopy for measuring forces in single smooth muscle cells of the human aorta.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alexander; Chan, Patrick; Sheets, Kevin; Apperson, Matthew; Delaughter, Christopher; Gleason, Thomas G; Phillippi, Julie A; Nain, Amrinder

    2017-07-07

    A number of innovative methods exist to measure cell-matrix adhesive forces, but they have yet to accurately describe and quantify the intricate interplay of a cell and its fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM). In cardiovascular pathologies, such as aortic aneurysm, new knowledge on the involvement of cell-matrix forces could lead to elucidation of disease mechanisms. To better understand this dynamics, we measured primary human aortic single smooth muscle cell (SMC) forces using nanonet force microscopy in both inside-out (I-O intrinsic contractility) and outside-in (O-I external perturbation) modes. For SMC populations, we measured the I-O and O-I forces to be 12.9 ± 1.0 and 57.9 ± 2.5 nN, respectively. Exposure of cells to oxidative stress conditions caused a force decrease of 57 and 48% in I-O and O-I modes, respectively, and an increase in migration rate by 2.5-fold. Finally, in O-I mode, we cyclically perturbed cells at constant strain of varying duration to simulate in vivo conditions of the cardiac cycle and found that I-O forces decrease with increasing duration and O-I forces decreased by half at shorter cycle times. Thus our findings highlight the need to study forces exerted and felt by cells simultaneously to comprehensively understand force modulation in cardiovascular disease. © 2017 Hall et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  2. Grain size quantification by optical microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hansheng; Yao, Yin; Warner, Jacob A; Qu, Jiangtao; Yun, Fan; Ye, Zhixiao; Ringer, Simon P; Zheng, Rongkun

    2017-06-13

    Quantification of microstructure, especially grain size, in polycrystalline materials is a vital aspect to understand the structure-property relationships in these materials. In this paper, representative characterization techniques for determining the grain size, including optical microscopy (OM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy/magnetic force microscopy (AFM/MFM), are thoroughly evaluated in comparison, illustrated by rare-earth sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. Potential applications and additional information achieved by using aforementioned characterization techniques have been discussed and summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Measurement methods in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Torre, Bruno; Canale, Claudio; Ricci, Davide; Braga, Pier Carlo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is introductory to the measurements: it explains different measurement techniques both for imaging and for force spectroscopy, on which most of the AFM experiments rely. It gives a general overview of the different techniques and of the output expected from the instrument; therefore it is, at a basic level, a good tool to properly start a new experiment. Concepts introduced in this chapter give the base for understanding the applications shown in the following chapters. Subheading 1 introduces the distinction between spectroscopy and imaging experiments and, within the last ones, between DC and AC mode. Subheading 2 is focused on DC mode (contact), explaining the topography and the lateral force channel. Subheading 3 introduces AC mode, both in noncontact and intermittent contact case. Phase imaging and force modulation are also discussed. Subheading 4 explains how the AFM can be used to measure local mechanical and adhesive properties of specimens by means of force spectroscopy technique. An overview on the state of the art and future trends in this field is also given.

  4. Evaluation of Polymer-Filler Interaction Characteristics by Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T; Saab, A

    2007-04-23

    Silicone polymers are frequently used as cushions and inserts between load bearing parts. In this capacity, they must act to position their associated parts and distribute mechanical force as appropriate. One type of failure is specific to silicones that are filled with high surface area particulates for purposes of tailoring the polymer compressive properties. Additives such as fumed silicon oxide are presumed to have a high degree of surface interaction with the polymer matrix, thus causing the polymer to stiffen and to display greater dimensional stability as a function of temperature. However, it has been observed that the compressive behavior of these materials is not always invariant over long times. There is evidence that suggests changes in humidity and temperature can irreversibly alter the silicone-filler interaction, thereby changing the overall characteristics of parts made from such materials. As before, changes in compressive or shear stability can have serious effects on the ability of these materials to effectively position precision parts or distribute high mechanical loads. We approach the analysis of the filled systems by creating controlled layers of silicone polymers attached to silicon oxide substrates. Straight chain vinyl-silicone polymers identical to those used in the formulation of pads for stockpile systems are chemically appended to a substrate surface, and cross-linked to form a three dimensional network. This type of structure serves as a model of silicone polymer coating a silicon oxide filler particle. We study these model systems first by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image the samples with nanometer resolution, and then by measuring the forces of interactions between single model silica filler particles and polymer-coated surfaces. We use normal longitudinal force AFM to measure adhesion, and a relatively newly developed technique, lateral force AFM, to determine the frictional forces between the silica particles and the

  5. Mutable polyelectrolyte tube arrays: mesoscale modeling and lateral force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Cranford, Steven W; Han, Lin; Ortiz, Christine; Buehler, Markus J

    2017-08-23

    In this study, the pH-dependent friction of layer-by-layer assemblies of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAH/PAA) are quantified for microtube array structures via experimental and simulated lateral force microscopy (LFM). A novel coarse-grain tube model is developed, utilizing a molecular dynamics (MD) framework with a Hertzian soft contact potential (such that F ∼ δ(3/2)) to allow the efficient dynamic simulation of 3D arrays consisting of hundreds of tubes at micrometer length scales. By quantitatively comparing experimental LFM and computational results, the coupling between geometry (tube spacing and swelling) and material properties (intrinsic stiffness) results in a transition from bending dominated deformation to bending combined with inter-tube contact, independent of material adhesion assumptions. Variation of tube spacing (and thus control of contact) can be used to exploit the normal and lateral resistance of the tube arrays as a function of pH (2.0/5.5), beyond the effect of areal tube density, with increased resistances (potential mutability) up to a factor of ∼60. This study provides a novel modeling platform to assess and design dynamic polyelectrolyte-based substrates/coatings with tailorable stimulus-responsive surface friction. Our results show that micro-geometry can be used alongside stimulus-responsive material changes to amplify and systematically tune mutability.

  6. Calibration of frictional forces in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ogletree, D.F.; Carpick, R.W.; Salmeron, M.

    1996-09-01

    The atomic force microscope can provide information on the atomic-level frictional properties of surfaces, but reproducible quantitative measurements are difficult to obtain. Parameters that are either unknown or difficult to precisely measure include the normal and lateral cantilever force constants (particularly with microfabricated cantilevers), the tip height, the deflection sensor response, and the tip structure and composition at the tip-surface contact. We present an {ital in} {ital situ} experimental procedure to determine the response of a cantilever to lateral forces in terms of its normal force response. This procedure is quite general. It will work with any type of deflection sensor and does not require the knowledge or direct measurement of the lever dimensions or the tip height. In addition, the shape of the tip apex can be determined. We also discuss a number of specific issues related to force and friction measurements using optical lever deflection sensing. We present experimental results on the lateral force response of commercially available V-shaped cantilevers. Our results are consistent with estimates of lever mechanical properties using continuum elasticity theory. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Detected Long-Lived Spin Magnetization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Longenecker, Jonilyn G; Moore, Eric W; Marohn, John A

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM), which combines magnetic resonance imaging with scanning probe microscopy together, is capable of performing ultra-sensitive detection of spin magnetization. In an attempt to observe dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in an MRFM experiment, which could possibly further improve its sensitivity towards a single proton spin, a film of perdeuterated polystyrene doped with a nitroxide electron-spin probe was prepared. A high-compliance cantilever with a 4 μm diameter magnetic tip was brought near the film at a temperature of 7.3 K and in a background magnetic field of ~0.6 T. The film was irradiated with 16.7 GHz microwaves while the resulting transient change in cantilever frequency was recorded in real time. In addition to observing the expected prompt change in cantilever frequency due to saturation of the nitroxide's electron-spin magnetization, we observed a persistent cantilever frequency change. Based on its magnitude, lifetime, and field dependence, we tentatively attribute the persistent signal to polarized deuteron magnetization created via transfer of magnetization from electron spins. Further measurements of the persistent signal's dependence on the cantilever amplitude and tip-sample separation are presented and explained by the cross-effect DNP mechanism in high magnetic field gradients.

  8. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  9. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Keir C; Nagy, Attila

    2008-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. Here we describe these techniques and illustrate them with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations.

  10. Surface Biology of DNA by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Helen G.

    2001-10-01

    The atomic force microscope operates on surfaces. Since surfaces occupy much of the space in living organisms, surface biology is a valid and valuable form of biology that has been difficult to investigate in the past owing to a lack of good technology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of DNA has been used to investigate DNA condensation for gene therapy, DNA mapping and sizing, and a few applications to cancer research and to nanotechnology. Some of the most exciting new applications for atomic force microscopy of DNA involve pulling on single DNA molecules to obtain measurements of single-molecule mechanics and thermodynamics.

  11. Microfluidics, Chromatography, and Atomic-Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A Raman-and-atomic-force microscope (RAFM) has been shown to be capable of performing several liquid-transfer and sensory functions essential for the operation of a microfluidic laboratory on a chip that would be used to perform rapid, sensitive chromatographic and spectro-chemical analyses of unprecedentedly small quantities of liquids. The most novel aspect of this development lies in the exploitation of capillary and shear effects at the atomic-force-microscope (AFM) tip to produce shear-driven flow of liquids along open microchannels of a microfluidic device. The RAFM can also be used to perform such functions as imaging liquids in microchannels; removing liquid samples from channels for very sensitive, tip-localized spectrochemical analyses; measuring a quantity of liquid adhering to the tip; and dip-pen deposition from a chromatographic device. A commercial Raman-spectroscopy system and a commercial AFM were integrated to make the RAFM so as to be able to perform simultaneous topographical AFM imaging and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) at the AFM tip. The Raman-spectroscopy system includes a Raman microprobe attached to an optical microscope, the translation stage of which is modified to accommodate the AFM head. The Raman laser excitation beam, which is aimed at the AFM tip, has a wavelength of 785 nm and a diameter of about 5 m, and its power is adjustable up to 10 mW. The AFM is coated with gold to enable tip-localized SERS.

  12. Microscale friction investigation of polysilicon surface using scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flueraru, C.; Cobianu, C.; Dascalu, D.; Flueraru, M.

    1998-07-01

    Microscale phenomena between the surface of chemically vapour deposited silicon films and a silicon nitride tip was investigated using Scanning Force Microscopy. An analysis of friction forces for different scan directions is presented. For different applied forces, the friction forces were measured and consequently the friction coefficient was calculated. We found that the average friction force linearly increases with the applied force and is reversible when unloading. Connection between the surface roughness and the friction coefficient was experimentally demonstrated. On a étudié par Microscopie à Force Atomique des phénomènes à échelle microscopique au niveau de la jonction pointe de nitrure de silicium et surface de films de silicium, obtenus par déposition chimique en phase vapeur. Dans cet article, nous présentons une analyse des forces de friction pour différentes directions de balayage. On a déterminé les forces de friction et, en conséquence, nous avons calculé le coefficient de friction pour différentes forces appliquées. Les résultats montrent que la force moyenne de friction augmente en fonction de la force appliquée, et qu'elle est reversible lorsque la charge diminue. Une dépendance entre la rugosité de la surface et le coefficient de friction est déduite.

  13. The unfolding of native laminin investigated by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemes, Cs.; Ramsden, J. J.; Rozlosnik, N.

    2002-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to directly measure the forces required to unfold individual domains of the extracellular matrix protein laminin. The approach-retraction cycles display a characteristic saw-tooth motif. Tooth heights and separations were used to establish a statistical relation between domain unfolding force and domain extension. The extensible domains of laminin require an unfolding force intermediate between previously established values for α-helical and β-sheet domains in other proteins. The relationship between unfolding force and extension for a given domain is not smooth; discrete steps are observed, interpreted as originating from the modularity of the protein structure.

  14. Microrheology of growing Escherichia coli biofilms investigated by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gan, Tiansheng; Gong, Xiangjun; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Guangzhao

    2016-12-01

    Microrheology of growing biofilms provides insightful information about its structural evolution and properties. In this study, the authors have investigated the microrheology of Escherichia coli (strain HCB1) biofilms at different indentation depth (δ) by using magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy as a function of disturbing frequency (f). As δ increases, the dynamic stiffness (ks) for the biofilms in the early stage significantly increases. However, it levels off when the biofilms are matured. The facts indicate that the biofilms change from inhomogeneous to homogeneous in structure. Moreover, ks is scaled to f, which coincides with the rheology of soft glasses. The exponent increases with the incubation time, indicating the fluidization of biofilms. In contrast, the upper layer of the matured biofilms is solidlike in that the storage modulus is always larger than the loss modulus, and its viscoelasticity is slightly influenced by the shear stress.

  15. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  16. Observation of DNA Molecules Using Fluorescence Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    This article describes experiments for an undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory that aim to observe individual double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules using fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). dsDNA molecules are observed under several different conditions to discuss their chemical and physical properties. In…

  17. Quantitative surface parameter maps using Intermodulation Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Platz, Daniel; Tholén, Erik; Hutter, Carsten; Haviland, David

    2011-03-01

    It is well known that the phase image in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) is sensitive to material properties of the surface. However that information is not enough to fully quantify the tip-surface interaction. We have developed Intermodulation AFM, based on a spectral analysis of the cantilever's nonlinear dynamics, which increases the amount of information obtained without increasing scan time. We show how it is possible to extract quantitative material properties of the surface from this additional information. The method works under the assumption of a tip-surface force model, such as the DMT model, fitting the model parameters to the measured spectral data. The parameters are obtained at each pixel of the AFM image and form surface property maps which can be displayed together with topography. We demonstrate this on different surfaces such as polymer blends, extracting stiffness and adhesive properties. D. Platz, E. A. Tholen, D. Pesen, and D. B. Haviland, Appl. Phys. Lett., 92, 153106 (2008)

  18. Atomic force microscopy study of living diatoms in ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Gebeshuber, I C; Kindt, J H; Thompson, J B; Del Amo, Y; Stachelberger, H; Brzezinski, M A; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    2003-12-01

    We present the first in vivo study of diatoms using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three chain-forming, benthic freshwater species -Eunotia sudetica, Navicula seminulum and a yet unidentified species - are directly imaged while growing on glass slides. Using the AFM, we imaged the topography of the diatom frustules at the nanometre range scale and we determined the thickness of the organic case enveloping the siliceous skeleton of the cell (10 nm). Imaging proved to be stable for several hours, thereby offering the possibility to study long-term dynamic changes, such as biomineralization or cell movement, as they occur. We also focused on the natural adhesives produced by these unicellular organisms to adhere to other cells or the substratum. Most man-made adhesives fail in wet conditions, owing to chemical modification of the adhesive or its substrate. Diatoms produce adhesives that are extremely strong and robust both in fresh- and in seawater environments. Our phase-imaging and force-pulling experiments reveal the characteristics of these natural adhesives that might be of use in designing man-made analogues that function in wet environments. Engineering stable underwater adhesives currently poses a major technical challenge.

  19. Single-Molecule Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy of Membrane Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas; Janovjak, Harald; Fotiadis, Dimtrios; Kedrov, Alexej; Cisneros, David; Müller, Daniel J.

    Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides novel ways to characterize the structure-function relationship of native membrane proteins. High-resolution AFM topographs allow observing the structure of single proteins at sub-nanometer resolution as well as their conformational changes, oligomeric state, molecular dynamics and assembly. We will review these feasibilities illustrating examples of membrane proteins in native and reconstituted membranes. Classification of individual topographs of single proteins allows understanding the principles of motions of their extrinsic domains, to learn about their local structural flexibilities and to find the entropy minima of certain conformations. Combined with the visualization of functionally related conformational changes these insights allow understanding why certain flexibilities are required for the protein to function and how structurally flexible regions allow certain conformational changes. Complementary to AFM imaging, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) experiments detect molecular interactions established within and between membrane proteins. The sensitivity of this method makes it possible to measure interactions that stabilize secondary structures such as transmembrane α-helices, polypeptide loops and segments within. Changes in temperature or protein-protein assembly do not change the locations of stable structural segments, but influence their stability established by collective molecular interactions. Such changes alter the probability of proteins to choose a certain unfolding pathway. Recent examples have elucidated unfolding and refolding pathways of membrane proteins as well as their energy landscapes.

  20. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  1. The Dynamic Force Table

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geddes, John B.; Black, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    We examine an experimental apparatus that is used to motivate the connections between the basic properties of vectors, potential functions, systems of nonlinear equations, and Newton's method for nonlinear systems of equations. The apparatus is an adaptation of a force table where we remove the center-pin and allow the center-ring to move freely.…

  2. Atomic force microscopy of biochemically tagged DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M N; Hansma, H G; Bezanilla, M; Sano, T; Ogletree, D F; Kolbe, W; Smith, C L; Cantor, C R; Spengler, S; Hansma, P K

    1993-01-01

    Small fragments of DNA of known length were made with the polymerase chain reaction. These fragments had biotin molecules covalently attached at their ends. They were subsequently labeled with a chimeric protein fusion between streptavidin and two immunoglobulin G-binding domains of staphylococcal protein A. This tetrameric species was expected to bind up to four DNA molecules via their attached biotin moieties. The DNA-protein complex was deposited on mica and imaged with an atomic force microscope. The images revealed the protein chimera at the expected location at the ends of the strands of DNA as well as the expected dimers, trimers, and tetramers of DNA bound to a single protein. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8483898

  3. Pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy: Principle of operation and resolution limits

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, J.; Graupner, T.; Milde, P. Raupach, R.; Zerweck-Trogisch, U.; Eng, L. M.

    2015-10-21

    Knowledge on surface potential dynamics is crucial for understanding the performance of modern-type nanoscale devices. We describe an electrical pump-probe approach in Kelvin-probe force microscopy that enables a quantitative measurement of dynamic surface potentials at nanosecond-time and nanometer-length scales. Also, we investigate the performance of pump-probe Kelvin-probe force microscopy with respect to the relevant experimental parameters. We exemplify a measurement on an organic field effect transistor that verifies the undisturbed functionality of our pump-probe approach in terms of simultaneous and quantitative mapping of topographic and electronic information at a high lateral and temporal resolution.

  4. Atomic Force Microscopy: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Scot A. C.

    When the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) was invented in 1980, it was hoped that all scientists would benefit from a device that could image surfaces with atomic resolution. Unfortunately while conductors and semiconductors could be imaged with the STM, the vast number of non-conductors, for examples, most ceramics, proteins and cells were virtually unobservable. With the invention of a new device, the atomic force microscope (AFM) suddenly scientists could image the topography of all samples, including non-conductors. The basic construction and operation of the AFM consists of placing a small probe at the end of a spring and measuring the deflection of the spring. Along with the STM, the AFM has revolutionized the study of surfaces in air, water and vacuum. This dissertation reports some of the work I have been involved in. Specifically: (1) building an AFM that used an STM to measure the deflection of the cantilever, (2) building an improved AFM that used an optical level to measure the deflection of the cantilever, microfabricated tips and a water cell, (3) adding a force modulation imaging mode for imaging the surface elasticity, (4) the creation of a theoretical model to help explain atomic imaging, and (5) the creation of image processing techniques that filter out noise inherent in the system and enhance the topographical features of the surface. Using these techniques, we have imaged and analyzed (1) the amino acid crystal DL-leucine and noted that the surface represents an extension of the bulk crystal, (2) imaged polyalanine demonstrating the ability of the microscope to image polymers with molecular resolution, (3) observed the process of blood clotting at the molecular level, (4) imaged important samples including germanium and graphite with atomic resolution and large scale objects including red and white blood cells with nanometer resolution, (5) imaged photographic film as an example of industrial quality control, (6) demonstrated through

  5. CO Tip Functionalization Inverts Atomic Force Microscopy Contrast via Short-Range Electrostatic Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Emmrich, Matthias; Weymouth, Alfred J.; Giessibl, Franz J.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate insulating Cu2N islands grown on Cu(100) by means of combined scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy with two vastly different tips: a bare metal tip and a CO-terminated tip. We use scanning tunneling microscopy data as proposed by Choi, Ruggiero, and Gupta to unambiguously identify atomic positions. Atomic force microscopy images taken with the two different tips show an inverted contrast over Cu2N. The observed force contrast can be explained with an electrostatic model, where the two tips have dipole moments of opposite directions. This highlights the importance of short-range electrostatic forces in the formation of atomic contrast on polar surfaces in noncontact atomic force microscopy.

  6. CO tip functionalization inverts atomic force microscopy contrast via short-range electrostatic forces.

    PubMed

    Schneiderbauer, Maximilian; Emmrich, Matthias; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-04-25

    We investigate insulating Cu2N islands grown on Cu(100) by means of combined scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy with two vastly different tips: a bare metal tip and a CO-terminated tip. We use scanning tunneling microscopy data as proposed by Choi, Ruggiero, and Gupta to unambiguously identify atomic positions. Atomic force microscopy images taken with the two different tips show an inverted contrast over Cu2N. The observed force contrast can be explained with an electrostatic model, where the two tips have dipole moments of opposite directions. This highlights the importance of short-range electrostatic forces in the formation of atomic contrast on polar surfaces in noncontact atomic force microscopy.

  7. Atomic force microscopy of gastric mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasan, Bernard; Hong, Zhenning; Bansil, Rama; Turner, Bradley; Ramakrishnan Bhaskar, K.; Afdhal, Nezam

    2001-03-01

    We report on the first results from an AFM study of porcine gastric mucin employing the tapping mode technique in aqueous solution. This glycoprotein is responsible for protecting the stomach epithelium from acid damage. Mucin was imaged on a mica substrate at pH7, and at pH2. At the higher pH we detected individual molecules in disordered configuration, with characteristic lengths of 20-40 nm. At the lower pH the mucin forms extended rod-like clusters that, at high concentrations, are aligned into planar arrays. Individual clusters are of order 50 nm long and 20 nm wide while the entire array is of order several hundred nm both in length and width. The clustering behavior at low pH is consistent with that previously detected in dynamic light scattering experiments by Cao et. al. (Biophysical J. 76:120-1258 1999).

  8. Atom world based on nano-forces: 25 years of atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morita, Seizo

    2011-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has opened up the new nanoworlds of scanning probe microscopy. STM is the first-generation atomic tool that can image, evaluate and manipulate individual atoms and consequently can create nanostructures by true bottom-up methods based on atom-by-atom manipulation. Atomic force microscopy is a second-generation atomic tool that has followed the footsteps of STM, and which is now opening doors to a new atom world based on using nanoscale forces.

  9. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  10. Force measurement enabling precise analysis by dynamic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) makes it possible to investigate specific interactions between two molecules such as ligand-receptor pairs at the single-molecule level. In the DFS method based on the Bell-Evans model, the unbinding force applied to a molecular bond is increased at a constant rate, and the force required to rupture the molecular bond is measured. By analyzing the relationship between the modal rupture force and the logarithm of the loading rate, microscopic potential barrier landscapes and the lifetimes of bonds can be obtained. However, the results obtained, for example, in the case of streptavidin/biotin complexes, have differed among previous studies and some results have been inconsistent with theoretical predictions. In this study, using an atomic force microscopy technique that enables the precise analysis of molecular interactions on the basis of DFS, we investigated the effect of the sampling rate on DFS analysis. The shape of rupture force histograms, for example, was significantly deformed at a sampling rate of 1 kHz in comparison with that of histograms obtained at 100 kHz, indicating the fundamental importance of ensuring suitable experimental conditions for further advances in the DFS method.

  11. Indirect modulation of nonmagnetic probes for force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie-Ren; Garno, Jayne C

    2009-02-15

    Frequency-dependent changes for phase and amplitude images are demonstrated with test platforms of organosilane ring patterns, using force modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) with an alternate instrument configuration. The imaging setup using indirect magnetic modulation (IMM) is based on indirect oscillation of soft, nonmagnetic cantilevers, with spring constants <1 N m(-1). The tip is driven to vibrate by the motion of a tip holder assembly which contains ferromagnetic materials. The entire tip assembly is induced to vibrate with the flux of an external ac electromagnetic field, supplied by a wire coil solenoid placed underneath the sample plate. With the use of IMM, dynamic parameters of the driving frequencies and amplitude of the tip motion can be optimized to sensitively map the elastic response of samples. An advantage of this instrument setup is that a magnetic coating is not required to drive the periodic oscillation of the tip. The instrument configuration for IMM may not be practical for intermittent imaging modes, which often work best with stiff cantilevers. However, indirect actuation provides an effective approach for imaging with low force setpoints and is well-suited for dynamic AFM modes using continuous contact imaging.

  12. Magnetic Field Observation around Current Path by Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saida, Daisuke; Takahashi, Takuji

    2004-07-01

    The magnetic field around a GaAs/AlGaAs mesa stripe induced by an AC current in the range of 0.3-15.6 μA was observed by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). To confirm the possibility of the vector decomposition of the current-induced magnetic field gradient, we compared the magnetic force signals in the cases of parallel and perpendicular configurations between the MFM cantilever and the current path. In addition, we proposed a novel way of eliminating some effects of electrostatic force, by which a good linearity in the magnetic force signals against the currents was achieved. The spatial resolution of this method was also discussed.

  13. Single ricin detection by atomic force microscopy chemomechanical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guojun; Zhou, Jianfeng; Park, Bosoon; Xu, Bingqian

    2009-07-01

    The authors report on a study of detecting ricin molecules immobilized on chemically modified Au (111) surface by chemomechanically mapping the molecular interactions with a chemically modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip. AFM images resolved the different fold-up conformations of single ricin molecule as well as their intramolecule structure of A- and B-chains. AFM force spectroscopy study of the interaction indicates that the unbinding force has a linear relation with the logarithmic force loading rate, which agrees well with calculations using one-barrier bond dissociation model.

  14. Friction of ice measured using lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Inoue, Takahito; Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-03-15

    The friction of nanometer thin ice films grown on mica substrates is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Friction was found to be of similar magnitude as the static friction of ice reported in macroscopic experiments. The possible existence of a lubricating film of water due to pressure melting, frictional heating, and surface premelting is discussed based on the experimental results using noncontact, contact, and lateral force microscopy. We conclude that AFM measures the dry friction of ice due to the low scan speed and the squeezing out of the water layer between the sharp AFM tip and the ice surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Surface modifications with Lissajous trajectories using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report a method for atomic force microscopy surface modifications with single-tone and multiple-resolution Lissajous trajectories. The tip mechanical scratching experiments with two series of Lissajous trajectories were carried out on monolayer films. The scratching processes with two scan methods have been illustrated. As an application, the tip-based triboelectrification phenomenon on the silicon dioxide surface with Lissajous trajectories was investigated. The triboelectric charges generated within the tip rubbed area on the surface were characterized in-situ by scanning Kelvin force microscopy. This method would provide a promising and cost-effective approach for surface modifications and nanofabrication.

  16. Dynamic properties of force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitalini, F.; Mey, A. S. J. S.; Noé, F.; Keller, B. G.

    2015-02-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations are increasingly used to study dynamic properties of biological systems. With this development, the ability of force fields to successfully predict relaxation timescales and the associated conformational exchange processes moves into focus. We assess to what extent the dynamic properties of model peptides (Ac-A-NHMe, Ac-V-NHMe, AVAVA, A10) differ when simulated with different force fields (AMBER ff99SB-ILDN, AMBER ff03, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM27, and GROMOS43a1). The dynamic properties are extracted using Markov state models. For single-residue models (Ac-A-NHMe, Ac-V-NHMe), the slow conformational exchange processes are similar in all force fields, but the associated relaxation timescales differ by up to an order of magnitude. For the peptide systems, not only the relaxation timescales, but also the conformational exchange processes differ considerably across force fields. This finding calls the significance of dynamic interpretations of molecular-dynamics simulations into question.

  17. Hydrogen-related contrast in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, René; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2009-07-01

    We study the effect of hydrogen adsorption on gadolinium islands epitaxially grown on W(110) utilizing atomic force microscopy operated in the non-contact regime. In constant force images, gadolinium islands exhibit two height levels, corresponding to hydrogen covered and clean gadolinium areas, respectively. The experimentally measured height differences are strongly bias dependent, showing that the contrast pattern is dominated by electrostatic tip-sample forces. We interpret our experimental findings in terms of a local reduction of the work function and the presence of localized charges on hydrogen covered areas. Both effects lead to a variation of the contact potential difference between tip and surface areas, which are clean or hydrogen covered gadolinium. After clarifying the electrostatic contrast formation, we can unambiguously identify regions of clean gadolinium on the islands. These results are important for further magnetic exchange force microscopy based studies, because hydrogen also alters the magnetic properties locally.

  18. Hydrogen-related contrast in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, René; Schwarz, Alexander; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2009-07-01

    We study the effect of hydrogen adsorption on gadolinium islands epitaxially grown on W(110) utilizing atomic force microscopy operated in the non-contact regime. In constant force images, gadolinium islands exhibit two height levels, corresponding to hydrogen covered and clean gadolinium areas, respectively. The experimentally measured height differences are strongly bias dependent, showing that the contrast pattern is dominated by electrostatic tip-sample forces. We interpret our experimental findings in terms of a local reduction of the work function and the presence of localized charges on hydrogen covered areas. Both effects lead to a variation of the contact potential difference between tip and surface areas, which are clean or hydrogen covered gadolinium. After clarifying the electrostatic contrast formation, we can unambiguously identify regions of clean gadolinium on the islands. These results are important for further magnetic exchange force microscopy based studies, because hydrogen also alters the magnetic properties locally.

  19. Imaging proteins with atomic force microscopy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciano Paulino

    2005-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become a common tool for biophysical studies of proteins; mainly due its property to perform characterizations near physiological conditions. The tertiary and quaternary structures, forces driving folding-unfolding processes, and secondary structure elements can be studied in their native environments allowing high resolution level associated with small distortions. This review outlines the operational principles and applications of AFM for protein biophysics.

  20. Can Atomic Force Microscopy Achieve Atomic Resolution in Contact Mode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvis, M. R.; Pérez, Rubén; Payne, M. C.

    2001-02-01

    Atomic force microscopy operating in the contact mode is studied using total-energy pseudopotential calculations. It is shown that, in the case of a diamond tip and a diamond surface, it is possible for a tip terminated by a single atom to sustain forces in excess of 30 nN. It is also shown that imaging at atomic resolution may be limited by blunting of the tip during lateral scanning.

  1. Silicon Carbide Epitaxial Films Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    imaged. Away from local defects, step bunching was observed to yield step heights of hundreds of angstroms, with possible implications for the uniformity of dopants incorporated in SiC devices during fabrication. The quantitative topographic data from the AFM allow the relevant defect information to be extracted, such as the size and distribution of step bunching and the Burgers vector of screw dislocations. These atomic force microscopy results have furthered the understanding of the dynamic epitaxial SiC growth process. A model describing the observed hillock step bunching has been proposed. This cooperation between researchers involved in crystal growth, electronic device fabrication, and surface structural characterization is likely to continue as atomic force microscopy is used to improve SiC films for high-temperature electronic devices for NASA's advanced turbine engines and space power devices, as well as for future applications in the automotive industry.

  2. Vectorial scanning force microscopy using a nanowire sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Nicola; Braakman, Floris R.; Cadeddu, Davide; Vasyukov, Denis; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Fontcuberta I Morral, Anna; Poggio, Martino

    2016-10-01

    Self-assembled nanowire (NW) crystals can be grown into nearly defect-free nanomechanical resonators with exceptional properties, including small motional mass, high resonant frequency and low dissipation. Furthermore, by virtue of slight asymmetries in geometry, a NW's flexural modes are split into doublets oscillating along orthogonal axes. These characteristics make bottom-up grown NWs extremely sensitive vectorial force sensors. Here, taking advantage of its adaptability as a scanning probe, we use a single NW to image a sample surface. By monitoring the frequency shift and direction of oscillation of both modes as we scan above the surface, we construct a map of all spatial tip-sample force derivatives in the plane. Finally, we use the NW to image electric force fields distinguishing between forces arising from the NW charge and polarizability. This universally applicable technique enables a form of atomic force microscopy particularly suited to mapping the size and direction of weak tip-sample forces.

  3. Microrheology of cells with magnetic force modulation atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rebêlo, L M; de Sousa, J S; Mendes Filho, J; Schäpe, J; Doschke, H; Radmacher, M

    2014-04-07

    We propose a magnetic force modulation method to measure the stiffness and viscosity of living cells using a modified AFM apparatus. An oscillating magnetic field makes a magnetic cantilever oscillate in contact with the sample, producing a small AC indentation. By comparing the amplitude of the free cantilever motion (A0) with the motion of the cantilever in contact with the sample (A1), we determine the sample stiffness and viscosity. To test the method, the frequency-dependent stiffness of 3T3 fibroblasts was determined as a power law k(s)(f) = α + β(f/f¯)(γ) (α = 7.6 × 10(-4) N m(-1), β = 1.0 × 10(-4) N m(-1), f¯ = 1 Hz, γ = 0.6), where the coefficient γ = 0.6 is in good agreement with rheological data of actin solutions with concentrations similar to those in cells. The method also allows estimation of the internal friction of the cells. In particular we found an average damping coefficient of 75.1 μN s m(-1) for indentation depths ranging between 1.0 μm and 2.0 μm.

  4. Poroelasticity of cell nuclei revealed through atomic force microscopy characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Fanan; Lan, Fei; Liu, Bin; Liu, Lianqing; Li, Guangyong

    2016-11-01

    With great potential in precision medical application, cell biomechanics is rising as a hot topic in biology. Cell nucleus, as the largest component within cell, not only contributes greatly to the cell's mechanical behavior, but also serves as the most vital component within cell. However, cell nucleus' mechanics is still far from unambiguous up to now. In this paper, we attempted to characterize and evaluate the mechanical property of isolated cell nuclei using Atomic Force Microscopy with a tipless probe. As indicated from typical indentation, changing loading rate and stress relaxation experiment results, cell nuclei showed significant dynamically mechanical property, i.e., time-dependent mechanics. Furthermore, through theoretical analysis, finite element simulation and stress relaxation experiment, the nature of nucleus' mechanics was better described by poroelasticity, rather than viscoelasticity. Therefore, the essence of nucleus' mechanics was clarified to be poroelastic through a sophisticated analysis. Finally, we estimated the poroelastic parameters for nuclei of two types of cells through a combination of experimental data and finite element simulation.

  5. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Joseph L; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-06-03

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  6. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  7. Low temperature magnetic force microscopy on ferromagnetic and superconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirohi, Anshu; Sheet, Goutam

    2016-05-01

    We report the observation of complex ferromagnetic domain structures on thin films of SrRuO3 and superconducting vortices in high temperature superconductors through low temperature magnetic force microscopy. Here we summarize the experimental details and results of magnetic imaging at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. We discuss these data in the light of existing theoretical concepts.

  8. Atomic force microscopy of torus-bearing pit membranes

    Treesearch

    Roland R. Dute; Thomas Elder

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to compare the structures of dried, torus-bearing pit membranes from four woody species, three angiosperms and one gymnosperm. Tori of Osmanthus armatus are bipartite consisting of a pustular zone overlying parallel sets of microfibrils that form a peripheral corona. Microfibrils of the corona form radial spokes as they traverse the...

  9. Unifying theory of tapping-mode atomic-force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Álvaro San; García, Ricardo

    2002-07-01

    We propose a general method for describing tapping-mode atomic-force microscopy. The combined participation of attractive and repulsive interactions determines the multivalued nature of the resonance curve. This, in turn, implies the coexistence of two different stable oscillations for some excitation frequencies. The coexistence of two stable oscillations depends on the driving force and tip-surface separation. Increasing the driving force inhibits the low-amplitude oscillation state. Because resolution depends on the oscillation state, we propose that the absence of the low amplitude solution is responsible for the inconsistencies observed in high-resolution imaging of biomolecules.

  10. Resolving amorphous solid-liquid interfaces by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burson, Kristen M.; Gura, Leonard; Kell, Burkhard; Büchner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian L.; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-01

    Recent advancements in liquid atomic force microscopy make it an ideal technique for probing the structure of solid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present a structural study of a two-dimensional amorphous silica bilayer immersed in an aqueous solution utilizing liquid atomic force microscopy with sub-nanometer resolution. Structures show good agreement with atomically resolved ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy images obtained on the same sample system, owing to the structural stability of the silica bilayer and the imaging clarity from the two-dimensional sample system. Pair distance histograms of ring center positions are utilized to develop quantitative metrics for structural comparison, and the physical origin of pair distance histogram peaks is addressed by direct assessment of real space structures.

  11. Resolving amorphous solid-liquid interfaces by atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burson, Kristen M.; Gura, Leonard; Kell, Burkhard; Büchner, Christin; Lewandowski, Adrian L.; Heyde, Markus Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-05-16

    Recent advancements in liquid atomic force microscopy make it an ideal technique for probing the structure of solid-liquid interfaces. Here, we present a structural study of a two-dimensional amorphous silica bilayer immersed in an aqueous solution utilizing liquid atomic force microscopy with sub-nanometer resolution. Structures show good agreement with atomically resolved ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy images obtained on the same sample system, owing to the structural stability of the silica bilayer and the imaging clarity from the two-dimensional sample system. Pair distance histograms of ring center positions are utilized to develop quantitative metrics for structural comparison, and the physical origin of pair distance histogram peaks is addressed by direct assessment of real space structures.

  12. Anharmonicity, solvation forces, and resolution in atomic force microscopy at the solid-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2013-08-01

    Solid-liquid interfaces are central to nanoscale science and technology and control processes as diverse as self-assembly, heterogeneous catalysis, wetting, electrochemistry, or protein function. Experimentally, measuring the structure and dynamics of solid-liquid interfaces with molecular resolution remains a challenge. This task can, in principle, be achieved with atomic force microscopy (AFM), which functions locally, and with nanometer precision. When operated dynamically and at small amplitudes, AFM can provide molecular-level images of the liquid solvation layers at the interfaces. At larger amplitudes, results in the field of multifrequency AFM have shown that anharmonicities in the tip motion can provide quantitative information about the solid's mechanical properties. The two approaches probe opposite aspects of the interface and are generally seen as distinct. Here it is shown that, for amplitudes Aforces. For A>d, the tip trajectory becomes rapidly anharmonic due to the tip tapping the solid, and the resolution decreases. A nonlinear transition between the two regimes occurs for A˜d and can be quantified with the second harmonic of the tip oscillation. These results, confirmed by computer simulations, remain valid in most experimental conditions. Significantly, they provide an objective criterion to enhance resolution and to decide whether the results are dominated by the properties of the solid or of the liquid.

  13. Non-contact atomic-level interfacial force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J.E.; Fleming, J.G.

    1997-02-01

    The scanning force microscopies (notably the Atomic Force Microscope--AFM), because of their applicability to nearly all materials, are presently the most widely used of the scanning-probe techniques. However, the AFM uses a deflection sensor to measure sample/probe forces which suffers from an inherent mechanical instability that occurs when the rate of change of the force with respect to the interfacial separation becomes equal to the spring constant of the deflecting member. This instability dramatically limits the breadth of applicability of AFM-type techniques to materials problems. In the course of implementing a DOE sponsored basic research program in interfacial adhesion, a self-balancing force sensor concept has been developed and incorporated into an Interfacial Force Microscopy (IFM) system by Sandia scientists. This sensor eliminates the instability problem and greatly enhances the applicability of the scanning force-probe technique to a broader range of materials and materials parameters. The impact of this Sandia development was recognized in 1993 by a Department of Energy award for potential impact on DOE programs and by an R and D 100 award for one of the most important new products of 1994. However, in its present stage of development, the IFM is strictly a research-level tool and a CRADA was initiated in order to bring this sensor technology into wide-spread availability by making it accessible in the form of a commercial instrument. The present report described the goals, approach and results of this CRADA effort.

  14. Elasticity measurement of breast cancer cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chaoxian; Wang, Yuhua; Jiang, Ningcheng; Yang, Hongqin; Lin, Juqiang; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Mechanical properties of living cells play an important role in understanding various cells' function and state. Therefore cell biomechanics is expected to become a useful tool for cancer diagnosis. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a square pyramid probe was performed to investigate cancerous (MCF-7) and benign (MCF-10A) human breast epithelial cells. The new QITM mode was used to acquire high-resolution topographic images and elasticity of living cells. Furthermore, individual force curves were recorded at maximum loads of 0.2, 0.5 and 1 nN, and the dependence of cell's elasticity with loading force was discussed. It was showed that the cancerous cells exhibited smaller elasticity modulus in comparison to non-cancerous counterparts. The elasticity modulus increased as the loading force increased from 0.2 nN to 1 nN. This observation indicates that loading force affects the cell's apparent elasticity and it is important to choose the appropriate force applied to cells in order to distinguish normal and cancer cells. The results reveal that the mechanical properties of living cells measured by atomic force microscopy may be a useful indicator of cell type and disease.

  15. Novel scanning force microscopy methods for investigation of transcription complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthold, Martin

    1997-11-01

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) methods were developed to investigate the structure and the dynamics of E. coli transcription complexes. The described techniques will also be applicable to the study of other protein-nucleic acid complexes. First, the deposition process of DNA molecules onto a mica surface was investigated using polymer chain statistics. Conditions were found in which DNA molecules, and also protein-DNA complexes, are able to equilibrate on the surface. These findings imply that DNA and protein-DNA complexes attain a lowest energy state on the surface, and that meaningful structural information can, therefore, be obtained from the corresponding SFM images. Using these imaging conditions, SFM was then used to investigate various transcription complexes. The structures of crucial intermediates in the transcriptional activation of RNA polymeraseċsigma54 by NtrC were visualized and analyzed. Moreover, a new method was pioneered to identify the position of specific subunits in multi- protein assemblies. In this method, a specific subunit is tagged with a short piece of DNA which renders it easily recognizable in SFM images. This technique was employed to determine the positions of the two α subunits and the βsp/prime subunit in RNA polymerase-DNA complexes. Finally, SFM imaging in liquid was used to investigate the dynamics of the specific and non-specific interactions between RNA polymerase and DNA. Image sequences of an RNA polymerase actively transcribing a DNA template were obtained and analyzed. Image sequences of non-specific complexes were also obtained, and showed the RNA polymerase moving along the DNA in a one- dimensional random walk. The latter experiments provide some of the first direct evidence that RNA polymerase diffuses along DNA to facilitate promoter location. Chapters II, III, V and VI of this dissertation include material which has been previously published with co- authors. The co-authors are acknowledged at the beginning of

  16. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  17. Atomic force microscopy to study intermolecular forces and bonds associated with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lower, Steven K

    2011-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) operates on a very different principle than other forms of microscopy, such as optical microscopy or electron microscopy. The key component of an AFM is a cantilever that bends in response to forces that it experiences as it touches another surface. Forces as small as a few picoNewtons can be detected and probed with AFM. AFM has become very useful in biological sciences because it can be used on living cells that are immersed in water. AFM is particularly useful when the cantilever is modified with chemical groups (e.g. amine or carboxylic groups), small beads (e.g. glass or latex), or even a bacterium. This chapter describes how AFM can be used to measure forces and bonds between a bacterium and another surface. This paper also provides an example of the use of AFM on Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterium that is often associated with biofilms in humans.

  18. Drive frequency dependent phase imaging in piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Huifeng; Kan, Yi; Lu, Xiaomei; Liu, Yunfei; Peng, Song; Wang, Xiaofei; Cai, Wei; Xue, Ruoshi; Zhu, Jinsong

    2010-08-01

    The drive frequency dependent piezoresponse (PR) phase signal in near-stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals is studied by piezoresponse force microscopy. It is clearly shown that the local and nonlocal electrostatic forces have a great contribution to the PR phase signal. The significant PR phase difference of the antiparallel domains are observed at the contact resonances, which is related to the electrostatic dominated electromechanical interactions of the cantilever and tip-sample system. Moreover, the modulation voltage induced frequency shift at higher eigenmodes could be attributed to the change of indention force depending on the modulation amplitude with a piezoelectric origin. The PR phase of the silicon wafer is also measured for comparison. It is certificated that the electrostatic interactions are universal in voltage modulated scanning probe microscopy and could be extended to other phase imaging techniques.

  19. Resolving the Pinning Force of Nanobubbles with Optical Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Beng Hau; An, Hongjie; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2017-02-01

    Many of the remarkable properties of surface nanobubbles, such as unusually small contact angles and long lifetimes, are related to the force that pins them onto their substrates. This pinning force is yet to be quantified experimentally. Here, surface-attached nanobubbles are pulled with an atomic force microscope tip while their mechanical responses are observed with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We estimate that a pinning force on the order of 0.1 μ N is required to unpin a nanobubble from its substrate. The maximum force that the tip can exert on the nanobubble is limited by the stability of the neck pulled from the bubble and is enhanced by the hydrophobicity of the tip.

  20. Room Temperature Single-Spin Tunneling Force Microscopy for Characterization of Paramagnetic Defects in Electronic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-08

    atomic   scale  spatial  resolution,  using  tunneling   force   microscopy .  To achieve this goal, an electron must spontaneously shuttle back and...trap states imaged by Dynamic  Tunneling   Force   Microscopy  line  scans .  Previous evidence for trap states created by AFM probe tip voltage pulses involved...Payne, K. Ambal, C. Boehme and C.C. Williams, “A concept for room temperature single‐ spin  tunneling   force   microscopy  with  atomic  resolution,” to be

  1. Photoinduced force microscopy: A technique for hyperspectral nanochemical mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdick, Ryan A.; Morrison, William; Nowak, Derek; Albrecht, Thomas R.; Jahng, Junghoon; Park, Sung

    2017-08-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have intensified the need for tools that can characterize newly synthesized nanomaterials. A variety of techniques has recently been shown which combines atomic force microscopy (AFM) with optical illumination including tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (sSNOM), and photothermal induced resonance microscopy (PTIR). To varying degrees, these existing techniques enable optical spectroscopy with the nanoscale spatial resolution inherent to AFM, thereby providing nanochemical interrogation of a specimen. Here we discuss photoinduced force microscopy (PiFM), a recently developed technique for nanoscale optical spectroscopy that exploits image forces acting between an AFM tip and sample to detect wavelength-dependent polarization within the sample to generate absorption spectra. This approach enables ∼10 nm spatial resolution with spectra that show correlation with macroscopic optical absorption spectra. Unlike other techniques, PiFM achieves this high resolution with virtually no constraints on sample or substrate properties. The applicability of PiFM to a variety of archetypal systems is reported here, highlighting the potential of PiFM as a useful tool for a wide variety of industrial and academic investigations, including semiconducting nanoparticles, nanocellulose, block copolymers, and low dimensional systems, as well as chemical and morphological mixing at interfaces.

  2. Single-shell carbon nanotubes imaged by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höper, Ralf; Workman, Richard K.; Chen, Dong; Sarid, Dror; Yadav, Tapesh; Withers, James C.; Loutfy, Raouf O.

    1994-05-01

    Single-shell carbon nanotubes, approximately 1 nm in diameter, have been imaged for the first time by atomic force microscopy operating in both the contact and tapping modes. For the contact mode, the height of the imaged nanotubes has been calibrated using the atomic steps of the silicon substrate on which the nanotubes were deposited. For the tapping mode, the calibration was performed using an industry-standard grating. The paper discusses substrate and sample preparation methods for the characterization by scanning probe microscopy of nanotubes deposited on a substrate.

  3. Quantification of cell-substratum interactions by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Becker, Thomas; Sand, Wolfgang

    2017-08-30

    Microorganisms adhere to surfaces and, subsequently, form biofilms. This process is of major interest in biotechnology, environmental sciences and medicine. It is crucial to understand the mechanisms of interactions between substratum and cells or biofilms. By combining force mapping-based atomic force microscopy (AFM) with pyrite-modified cantilevers we quantified the adhesion forces between undenatured planktonic or biofilm cells of Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans and the substratum pyrite with values of 2.6±0.3nN and 77.3±7.1pN, respectively. This was achieved under natural conditions without any artefact resulting from the use of denaturing chemicals such as glutaraldehyde. This new technique is unique for quantifying the real interaction forces between cells or biofilms and their substrata. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. High-sensitivity quantitative Kelvin probe microscopy by noncontact ultra-high-vacuum atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommerhalter, Ch.; Matthes, Th. W.; Glatzel, Th.; Jäger-Waldau, A.; Lux-Steiner, M. Ch.

    1999-07-01

    We present quantitative measurements of the work function of semiconductor and metal surfaces prepared in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using a combination of UHV noncontact atomic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy. High energetic and lateral resolution is achieved by using the second resonance frequency of the cantilever to measure the electrostatic forces, while the first resonance frequency is used to simultaneously obtain topographic images by the frequency modulation technique. Spatially resolved work-function measurements reveal a reduced work function in the vicinity of steps on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. On the GaAs(110) surface it could be demonstrated that defect states in the forbidden band gap cause a local pinning of the Fermi level along monolayer steps. On p-WSe2(0001) work-function variations due to the Coulomb potential of single dopant sites were resolved.

  5. Protrusion force microscopy reveals oscillatory force generation and mechanosensing activity of human macrophage podosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labernadie, Anna; Bouissou, Anaïs; Delobelle, Patrick; Balor, Stéphanie; Voituriez, Raphael; Proag, Amsha; Fourquaux, Isabelle; Thibault, Christophe; Vieu, Christophe; Poincloux, Renaud; Charrière, Guillaume M.; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    Podosomes are adhesion structures formed in monocyte-derived cells. They are F-actin-rich columns perpendicular to the substrate surrounded by a ring of integrins. Here, to measure podosome protrusive forces, we designed an innovative experimental setup named protrusion force microscopy (PFM), which consists in measuring by atomic force microscopy the deformation induced by living cells onto a compliant Formvar sheet. By quantifying the heights of protrusions made by podosomes onto Formvar sheets, we estimate that a single podosome generates a protrusion force that increases with the stiffness of the substratum, which is a hallmark of mechanosensing activity. We show that the protrusive force generated at podosomes oscillates with a constant period and requires combined actomyosin contraction and actin polymerization. Finally, we elaborate a model to explain the mechanical and oscillatory activities of podosomes. Thus, PFM shows that podosomes are mechanosensing cell structures exerting a protrusive force.

  6. Ubiquitous mechanisms of energy dissipation in noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, S Alireza; Goedecker, Stefan; Baratoff, Alexis; Lenosky, Thomas; Meyer, Ernst; Hug, Hans J

    2008-06-13

    Atomistic simulations considering larger tip structures than hitherto assumed reveal novel dissipation mechanisms in noncontact atomic force microscopy. The potential energy surfaces of realistic silicon tips exhibit many energetically close local minima that correspond to different structures. Most of them easily deform, thus causing dissipation arising from hysteresis in force versus distance characteristics. Furthermore, saddle points which connect local minima can suddenly switch to connect different minima. Configurations driven into metastability by the tip motion can thus suddenly access lower energy structures when thermal activation becomes allowed within the time required to detect the resulting average dissipation.

  7. Variable magnetic field and temperature magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, J.; Engel-Herbert, R.; Hesjedal, T.

    2005-11-01

    Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) studies of epitaxial MnAs films on GaAs(001) have been performed as a function of the applied magnetic field and the sample temperature. For this purpose, we combined a stable variable-temperature sample stage with a compact magnet assembly to fit a commercial magnetic force microscope. In order to keep the thermal drift that affects MFM measurements low, we employed a permanent magnet that can be rotated in a yoke assembly guiding the magnetic flux to the sample.

  8. Intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy for imaging surface photo-voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Borgani, Riccardo Forchheimer, Daniel; Thorén, Per-Anders; Haviland, David B.; Bergqvist, Jonas; Inganäs, Olle

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate an alternative to Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for imaging surface potential. The open-loop, single-pass technique applies a low-frequency AC voltage to the atomic force microscopy tip while driving the cantilever near its resonance frequency. Frequency mixing due to the nonlinear capacitance gives intermodulation products of the two drive frequencies near the cantilever resonance, where they are measured with high signal to noise ratio. Analysis of this intermodulation response allows for quantitative reconstruction of the contact potential difference. We derive the theory of the method, validate it with numerical simulation and a control experiment, and we demonstrate its utility for fast imaging of the surface photo-voltage on an organic photo-voltaic material.

  9. Cautions to predicate multiferroic by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen; Ma, Jing; Ma, Ji; Zhang, Yujun; Chen, Jiahui; Nan, Ce-Wen

    2017-05-01

    With the ever-increasing research activities in multiferroic driven by its profound physics and enormous potential for application, magnetic force microscopy (MFM), as a variety of atomic force microscope (AFM), has been brought to investigate the magnetic properties and the voltage controlled magnetism, especially in thin films and heterostructures. Here by taking a representative multiferroic system BiFeO3/La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 heterostructure and a ferroelectric PMN-PT single crystal for examples, we demonstrated that the MFM image is prone to be seriously interfered by the electrostatic interaction between the tip and sample surface, and misleads the predication of multiferroic. Assisted by the scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM), the origin and mechanism were discussed and an effective solution was proposed.

  10. A relationship between three-dimensional surface hydration structures and force distribution measured by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Watkins, Matthew; Shluger, Alexander L.; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent tip approximation (STA) model and from explicit molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the simulated STA force map describes the major features of the experimentally obtained force image. The agreement between the STA data and the experiment establishes the correspondence between the water density used as an input to the STA model and the experimental hydration structure and thus provides a tool to bridge the experimental force data and atomistic solvation structures. Further applications of this method should improve the accuracy and reliability of both interpretation of 3D-SFM force maps and atomistic simulations in a wide range of solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent

  11. Nuclear pore function viewed with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Danker, T; Oberleithner, H

    2000-04-01

    In this review we focus on studies using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to describe the function of nuclear pore complexes (NPC). After a short introduction of AFM we follow the route of cargo molecules from the cytosol into the nucleus. AFM visualizes cargo before translocation into the nucleoplasm, cargo docking at the cytoplasmic NPC surface, cargo passing through the NPC and changes in NPC conformation in response to ATP, Calcium and pH. We discuss AFM experiments on nuclear envelopes on the basis of previous data obtained with more conventional techniques such as electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and other imaging techniques. Finally we draw attention to the recently developed nuclear hourglass technique that serves as a new electrophysiological approach to studying the structure-function relationship of NPC in combination with AFM at a molecular level.

  12. Atomic Force Microscopy of the Nacreous Layer in Mollusc Shells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-25

    studies of the nacreous layers of molluscan shells . In particular, our studies of native and treated samples have highlighted significant morphological...sUnh S. PUNOWNG NUMIEMS Atomic Force Microscopy of the Nacreous Layer N00014-90-J-1159 in Mollusc Shells -. AUThORtS) S. Manne, C. M. Zaremba, R. Giles...tablets which comprise the mineral portion of nacre, in two types of molluscs, a bivalve (Arrina serrate) and a gastropod (Haliois rufescens). By

  13. Probing starch-iodine interaction by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiongwei; An, Hongjie; Liu, Zhongdong; Yang, Hongshun; Wei, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    We explored the interaction of iodine with three crystalline type starches, corn, potato, and sweet potato starches using atomic force microscopy. Results revealed that starch molecules aggregated through interaction with iodine solution as well as iodine vapor. Detailed fine structures such as networks, chains, and super-helical structures were found in iodide solution tests. The nanostructures formed due to iodine adsorption could help to understand the formation and properties of the starch-iodine complex. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Probing stem cell differentiation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Wu, Hongkai; Nakajima, Ken

    2016-03-01

    A real-time method using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was developed to probe stem cell differentiation by measuring the mechanical properties of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of stem cells and their ECMs can be used to clearly distinguish specific stem cell-differentiated lineages. It is clear that AFM is a facile and useful tool for monitoring the differentiation of stem cells in a non-invasive manner.

  15. A simple method for producing flattened atomic force microscopy tips.

    PubMed

    Biagioni, P; Farahani, J N; Mühlschlegel, P; Eisler, H-J; Pohl, D W; Hecht, B

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and reliable procedure for obtaining a flat plateau on top of standard silicon nitride atomic force microscopy tips by scanning them over the focus of a high-numerical-aperture objective illuminated by near-infrared ultrashort laser pulses. Flattened tips produced this way exhibit a plateau that is parallel to the substrate when the cantilever is mounted. They represent a valid and cost-effective alternative to commercially available plateau tips.

  16. Multifrequency Force Microscopy of Helical Protein Assembly on a Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Annalisa; Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Stoliar, Pablo; de Sancho, David; Santos, Sergio; Verdaguer, Albert; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-02-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been extensively used to investigate the structure of soft, biological matter at the nanoscale, from very thin membranes to small objects, like viruses. Electron microscopy techniques allow for obtaining extraordinary resolution by averaging signals from multiple identical structures. In contrast, atomic force microscopy (AFM) collects data from single entities. Here, it is possible to finely modulate the interaction with the samples, in order to be sensitive to their top surface, avoiding mechanical deformations. However, most biological surfaces are highly curved, such as fibers or tubes, and ultimate details of their surface are in the vicinity of steep height variations. This limits lateral resolution, even when sharp probes are used. We overcome this problem by using multifrequency force microscopy on a textbook example, the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV). We achieved unprecedented resolution in local maps of amplitude and phase shift of the second excited mode, recorded together with sample topography. Our data, which combine multifrequency imaging and Fourier analysis, confirm the structure deduced from averaging techniques (XRD, cryoEM) for surface features of single virus particles, down to the helical pitch of the coat protein subunits, 2.3 nm. Remarkably, multifrequency AFM images do not require any image postprocessing.

  17. Multifrequency Force Microscopy of Helical Protein Assembly on a Virus

    PubMed Central

    Calò, Annalisa; Eleta-Lopez, Aitziber; Stoliar, Pablo; De Sancho, David; Santos, Sergio; Verdaguer, Albert; Bittner, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution microscopy techniques have been extensively used to investigate the structure of soft, biological matter at the nanoscale, from very thin membranes to small objects, like viruses. Electron microscopy techniques allow for obtaining extraordinary resolution by averaging signals from multiple identical structures. In contrast, atomic force microscopy (AFM) collects data from single entities. Here, it is possible to finely modulate the interaction with the samples, in order to be sensitive to their top surface, avoiding mechanical deformations. However, most biological surfaces are highly curved, such as fibers or tubes, and ultimate details of their surface are in the vicinity of steep height variations. This limits lateral resolution, even when sharp probes are used. We overcome this problem by using multifrequency force microscopy on a textbook example, the Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV). We achieved unprecedented resolution in local maps of amplitude and phase shift of the second excited mode, recorded together with sample topography. Our data, which combine multifrequency imaging and Fourier analysis, confirm the structure deduced from averaging techniques (XRD, cryoEM) for surface features of single virus particles, down to the helical pitch of the coat protein subunits, 2.3 nm. Remarkably, multifrequency AFM images do not require any image postprocessing. PMID:26915629

  18. Cutting forces related with lattice orientations of graphene using an atomic force microscopy based nanorobot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yang; Liu, Lianqing; Xi, Ning; Wang, Yuechao; Ma, Laipeng; Dong, Zaili; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C.

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between cutting forces and lattice orientations of monolayer graphene is investigated by using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanorobot. In the beginning, the atomic resolution image of the graphene lattice is obtained by using an AFM. Then, graphene cutting experiments are performed with sample rotation method, which gets rid of the tip effect completely. The experimental results show that the cutting force along the armchair orientation is larger than the force along the zigzag orientation, and the cutting forces are almost identical every 60°, which corresponds well with the 60° symmetry in graphene honeycomb lattice structure. By using Poisson analysis method, the single cutting force along zigzag orientation is 3.9 nN, and the force along armchair is 20.5 nN. This work lays the experimental foundation to build a close-loop fabrication strategy with real-time force as a feedback sensor to control the cutting direction.

  19. Polymer Filler Aging and Failure Studied by Lateral Force Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ratto, T; Saab, A P

    2009-05-27

    In the present work, we study, via force microscopy, the basic physical interactions of a single bead of silica filler with a PDMS matrix both before and after exposure to gamma radiation. Our goal was to confirm our results from last year, and to explore force microscopy as a means of obtaining particle-scale polymer/filler interactions suitable for use as empirical inputs to a computational model consisting of an ensemble of silica beads embedded in a PDMS matrix. Through careful calibration of a conventional atomic force microscope, we obtained both normal and lateral force data that was fitted to yield adhesion, surface shear modulus, and friction of a 1 {micro}m silica bead in contact with PDMS layers of various thickness. Comparison of these terms before and after gamma exposure indicated that initially, radiation exposure lead to softening of the PDMS, but eventually resulted in stiffening. Simultaneously, adhesion between the polymer and silica decreased. This could indicate a serious failure path for filled PDMS exposed to radiation, whereby stiffening of the bulk polymer leads to loss of compressive elastic behavior, while a decrease in polymer filler adhesion results in an increased likelihood of stress failure under load. In addition to further testing of radiation damaged polymers, we also performed FEA modeling of silica beads in a silicone matrix using the shear modulus and adhesion values isolated from the force microscopy experiments as model inputs. The resulting simulation indicated that as a polymer stiffens due to impinging radiation, it also undergoes weakening of adhesion to the filler. The implication is that radiation induces a compound failure mode in filled polymer systems.

  20. Video force microscopy reveals the mechanics of ventral furrow invagination in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Brodland, G Wayne; Conte, Vito; Cranston, P Graham; Veldhuis, Jim; Narasimhan, Sriram; Hutson, M Shane; Jacinto, Antonio; Ulrich, Florian; Baum, Buzz; Miodownik, Mark

    2010-12-21

    The absence of tools for mapping the forces that drive morphogenetic movements in embryos has impeded our understanding of animal development. Here we describe a unique approach, video force microscopy (VFM), that allows detailed, dynamic force maps to be produced from time-lapse images. The forces at work in an embryo are considered to be decomposed into active and passive elements, where active forces originate from contributions (e.g., actomyosin contraction) that do mechanical work to the system and passive ones (e.g., viscous cytoplasm) that dissipate energy. In the present analysis, the effects of all passive components are considered to be subsumed by an effective cytoplasmic viscosity, and the driving forces are resolved into equivalent forces along the edges of the polygonal boundaries into which the region of interest is divided. Advanced mathematical inverse methods are used to determine these driving forces. When applied to multiphoton sections of wild-type and mutant Drosophila melanogaster embryos, VFM is able to calculate the equivalent driving forces acting along individual cell edges and to do so with subminute temporal resolution. In the wild type, forces along the apical surface of the presumptive mesoderm are found to be large and to vary parabolically with time and angular position, whereas forces along the basal surface of the ectoderm, for example, are found to be smaller and nearly uniform with position. VFM shows that in mutants with reduced junction integrity and myosin II activity, the driving forces are reduced, thus accounting for ventral furrow failure.

  1. Photothermally excited force modulation microscopy for broadband nanomechanical property measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan Killgore, Jason P.

    2015-11-16

    We demonstrate photothermally excited force modulation microscopy (PTE FMM) for mechanical property characterization across a broad frequency range with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Photothermal excitation allows for an AFM cantilever driving force that varies smoothly as a function of drive frequency, thus avoiding the problem of spurious resonant vibrations that hinder piezoelectric excitation schemes. A complication of PTE FMM is that the sub-resonance cantilever vibration shape is fundamentally different compared to piezoelectric excitation. By directly measuring the vibrational shape of the cantilever, we show that PTE FMM is an accurate nanomechanical characterization method. PTE FMM is a pathway towards the characterization of frequency sensitive specimens such as polymers and biomaterials with frequency range limited only by the resonance frequency of the cantilever and the low frequency limit of the AFM.

  2. Dielectric constants by multifrequency non-contact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bharat; Bonvallet, Joseph C; Crittenden, Scott R

    2012-01-20

    We present a method to obtain capacitive forces and dielectric constants of ultra-thin films on metallic substrates using multifrequency non-contact atomic force microscopy with amplitude feedback in air. Capacitive forces are measured via cantilever oscillations induced at the second bending mode and dielectric constants are calculated by fitting an analytic expression for the capacitance (Casuso et al 2007 Appl. Phys. Lett. 91 063111) to the experimental data. Dielectric constants for self-assembled monolayers of thiol molecules on gold (2.0±0.1) and sputtered SiO2 (3.6±0.07) were obtained under dry conditions, in good agreement with previous measurements. The high Q-factor of the second bending mode of the cantilever increases the accuracy of the capacitive measurements while the low applied potentials minimize the likelihood of variation of the dielectric constants at high field strength and of damage from dielectric breakdown of air.

  3. Heterodyne technique in photoinduced force microscopy with photothermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanishi, J.; Naitoh, Y.; Li, Y. J.; Sugawara, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The heterodyne technique is used to detect short-range forces. Using the heterodyne technique, we demonstrate photoinduced force microscopy (PiFM) imaging and z-spectroscopy without the artifact of photothermal vibration. The rejection ratio was at least 99.975% under a high-scattering condition. In addition, the heterodyne technique employs the optimal amplitude at the first resonance frequency of the cantilever to detect the photoinduced force sensitively. According to our calculation, the optimal ratio of the amplitude to the distance between the dipole of the tip and that of the sample is 0.4448. The heterodyne technique can be employed to perform PiFM without the artifact by using the optimal amplitude.

  4. Magnetic force microscopy using tip magnetization modulated by ferromagnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Arima, Eiji; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Yoshimura, Satoru; Saito, Hitoshi; Nomura, Hikaru; Nakatani, Ryoichi; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2015-03-27

    In magnetic force microscopy (MFM), the tip-sample distance should be reduced to analyze the microscopic magnetic domain structure with high spatial resolution. However, achieving a small tip-sample distance has been difficult because of superimposition of interaction forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces induced by the sample surface. In this study, we propose a new method of MFM using ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) to extract only the magnetic field near the sample surface. In this method, the magnetization of a magnetic cantilever is modulated by FMR to separate the magnetic field and topographic structure. We demonstrate the modulation of the magnetization of the cantilever and the identification of the polarities of a perpendicular magnetic medium.

  5. Chemical Force Microscopy: Probing Chemical Origin of Interfacial Forces and Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Vezenov, D V; Noy, A; Ashby, P

    2005-03-21

    Experimental methods of measuring intermolecular interactions have had several recent developments which have improved our understanding of chemical forces. First, they allowed direct exploration of the role that different functionalities, solvents and environmental variables play in shaping the strength of intermolecular interactions. Chemical force microscopy approach, in particular, became an extremely effective tool for exploring the contributions of each of these factors. Second, CFM studies clearly debunked the naive notion that intermolecular interaction strength is determined only by the nature of the interacting groups. These studies showed that the interaction strength between two chemical species must always considered in context of the environment surrounding these species. Third, CFM studies highlighted the critical role solvent plays in shaping intermolecular interactions in condensed phases. Emerging kinetic view of the intermolecular interactions introduced a completely new paradigm for understanding these interactions. Kinetic modeling showed that the measured interactions strength depends not only on the energy landscape of the system, but also on the loading history prior to the bond break-up. This new paradigm refocused our attention to the energy landscape as a fundamental characteristic of the interaction. Moreover, dynamic force spectroscopy, derived from kinetic models, allowed direct characterization of the geometry of the potential energy barrier, while some other methods attempt to probe the equilibrium energy landscape directly. Further investigations of the interactions in different systems, especially interactions between biomolecules, will uncover many interesting characteristics of intermolecular potentials. These studies have the potential to reveal, for the first time, a true picture of the energy landscapes of adhesion processes in complex chemical and biological systems.

  6. Relative microelastic mapping of living cells by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    A-Hassan, E; Heinz, W F; Antonik, M D; D'Costa, N P; Nageswaran, S; Schoenenberger, C A; Hoh, J H

    1998-01-01

    The spatial and temporal changes of the mechanical properties of living cells reflect complex underlying physiological processes. Following these changes should provide valuable insight into the biological importance of cellular mechanics and their regulation. The tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to indent soft samples, and the force versus indentation measurement provides information about the local viscoelasticity. By collecting force-distance curves on a time scale where viscous contributions are small, the forces measured are dominated by the elastic properties of the sample. We have developed an experimental approach, using atomic force microscopy, called force integration to equal limits (FIEL) mapping, to produce robust, internally quantitative maps of relative elasticity. FIEL mapping has the advantage of essentially being independent of the tip-sample contact point and the cantilever spring constant. FIEL maps of living Madine-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells show that elasticity is uncoupled from topography and reveal a number of unexpected features. These results present a mode of high-resolution visualization in which the contrast is based on the mechanical properties of the sample. PMID:9512052

  7. Detection of secondary phases in duplex stainless steel by magnetic force microscopy and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Salgado, J.; Domínguez-Aguilar, M.A.; Castro-Domínguez, B.; Hernández-Hernández, P.; Newman, R.C.

    2013-12-15

    The secondary phase transformations in a commercial super duplex stainless steel were investigated by micro-chemical analyses and high resolution scanning probe microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray and electron probe detected ferrite and austenite as well as secondary phases in unetched aged duplex stainless steel type 25Cr-7Ni-3Mo. Volta potential indicated that nitride and sigma appeared more active than ferrite, while secondary austenite and austenite presented a nobler potential. Reversal order in nobility is thought to be attributable to the potential ranking provided by oxide nature diversity as a result of secondary phase surface compositions on steel. After eutectoid transformation, secondary austenite was detected by electron probe microanalysis, whereas atomic force microscopy distinguished this phase from former austenite by image contrast. Magnetic force microscopy revealed a “ghosted” effect on the latter microstructure probably derived from metal memory reminiscence of mechanical polishing at passivity and long range magnetic forces of ferrite phase. - Highlights: • Nobility detection of secondary phases by SKPFM in DSS particles is not a straightforward procedure. • As Volta potential and contrast are not always consistent SKPFM surface oxides is thought played an important role in detection. • AFM distinguished secondary austenite from former austenite by image contrast though SEM required EPMA.

  8. Comparison of scanning ion conductance microscopy with atomic force microscopy for cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Geisse, Nicholas A; Proksch, Roger; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2011-01-18

    We present the first direct comparison of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) for cell imaging. By imaging the same fibroblast or myoblast cell with both technologies in series, we highlight their advantages and disadvantages with respect to cell imaging. The finite imaging force applied to the sample in AFM imaging results in a coupling of mechanical sample properties into the measured sample topography. For soft samples such as cells this leads to artifacts in the measured topography and to elastic deformation, which we demonstrate by imaging whole fixed cells and cell extensions at high resolution. SICM imaging, on the other hand, has a noncontact character and can provide the true topography of soft samples at a comparable resolution.

  9. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-02

    In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. Finally, the comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  10. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; ...

    2016-09-02

    In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements aremore » sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. Finally, the comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.« less

  11. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  12. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  13. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  14. Modifications of the structure of the pericellular matrix measured via optical force probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, Louis; Kramer, Anthony; Chang, Patrick; Curtis, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    The pericellular matrix is a large protein and polysaccharide rich polymer layer attached to the surface of many cells, and which often extends several microns out from the cell surface into the surrounding extracellular space. Here we study the intrinsic nature and modifications of the structure of the pericellular coat on rat chondrocytes with the use of optical force probe microscopy. Optical force probe studies allow us to make both dynamic force measurements as well as equilibrium force measurements throughout the coat. These force measurements are used to observe the structural change in the coat with the addition of exogenous aggrecan. Not only does addition of exogenous aggrecan dramatically swell our coat to well over twice in size, our analysis indicates that the addition of exogenous aggrecan decreases the mesh size throughout the coat. We speculate that the added aggrecan binds to available binding sites along the hyaluronan chain, both enlarging the coat's size as well as tightening up the opening within the coat. We further suggest that the available binding sites for the exogenous aggrecan are abundant in the outer edges of the coat, as both the dynamic and equilibrium forces in this region are changed. Here, both force measurements show that forces closest to the cell membrane remain relatively unchanged, while the forces in the outer region of the coat are increased. These results are consistent with those obtained with complementary measurements using quantitative particle exclusion assays.

  15. Investigating biomolecular recognition at the cell surface using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congzhou; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2014-05-01

    Probing the interaction forces that drive biomolecular recognition on cell surfaces is essential for understanding diverse biological processes. Force spectroscopy has been a widely used dynamic analytical technique, allowing measurement of such interactions at the molecular and cellular level. The capabilities of working under near physiological environments, combined with excellent force and lateral resolution make atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based force spectroscopy a powerful approach to measure biomolecular interaction forces not only on non-biological substrates, but also on soft, dynamic cell surfaces. Over the last few years, AFM-based force spectroscopy has provided biophysical insight into how biomolecules on cell surfaces interact with each other and induce relevant biological processes. In this review, we focus on describing the technique of force spectroscopy using the AFM, specifically in the context of probing cell surfaces. We summarize recent progress in understanding the recognition and interactions between macromolecules that may be found at cell surfaces from a force spectroscopy perspective. We further discuss the challenges and future prospects of the application of this versatile technique.

  16. Voltage preamplifier for extensional quartz sensors used in scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Blicharski, Józef; Voigtländer, Bert

    2011-06-01

    Extensional-mode quartz resonators are being increasingly used as force sensors in dynamic scanning force microscopy or atomic force microscopy (AFM). We propose a voltage preamplifier in order to amplify the charge induced on quartz electrodes. The proposed solution has some advantages over the typically used current-to-voltage converters. First, the gain does not depend on the inner parameters of the quartz resonator, which are usually unknown for the specific resonator and may even vary during the measurement. Second, with such an amplifier a better signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved. Finally, we present AFM images of the Si(111) and the SiO(2) surfaces obtained by the voltage preamplifier with simultaneously recorded tunneling current.

  17. Characterization of new drug delivery nanosystems using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, Ellas; Mourelatou, Elena A.; Demetzos, C.; Makropoulou, Mersini; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes are the most attractive lipid vesicles for targeted drug delivery in nanomedicine, behaving also as cell models in biophotonics research. The characterization of the micro-mechanical properties of drug carriers is an important issue and many analytical techniques are employed, as, for example, optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy. In this work, polyol hyperbranched polymers (HBPs) have been employed along with liposomes for the preparation of new chimeric advanced drug delivery nanosystems (Chi-aDDnSs). Aliphatic polyester HBPs with three different pseudogenerations G2, G3 and G4 with 16, 32, and 64 peripheral hydroxyl groups, respectively, have been incorporated in liposomal formulation. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique was used for the comparative study of the morphology and the mechanical properties of Chi-aDDnSs and conventional DDnS. The effects of both the HBPs architecture and the polyesters pseudogeneration number in the stability and the stiffness of chi-aDDnSs were examined. From the force-distance curves of AFM spectroscopy, the Young's modulus was calculated.

  18. Molecular determinants of bacterial adhesion monitored by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Razatos, Anneta; Ong, Yea-Ling; Sharma, Mukul M.; Georgiou, George

    1998-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and the subsequent formation of biofilm are major concerns in biotechnology and medicine. The initial step in bacterial adhesion is the interaction of cells with a surface, a process governed by long-range forces, primarily van der Waals and electrostatic interactions. The precise manner in which the force of interaction is affected by cell surface components and by the physiochemical properties of materials is not well understood. Here, we show that atomic force microscopy can be used to analyze the initial events in bacterial adhesion with unprecedented resolution. Interactions between the cantilever tip and confluent monolayers of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli mutants exhibiting subtle differences in cell surface composition were measured. It was shown that the adhesion force is affected by the length of core lipopolysaccharide molecules on the E. coli cell surface and by the production of the capsular polysaccharide, colanic acid. Furthermore, by modifying the atomic force microscope tip we developed a method for determining whether bacteria are attracted or repelled by virtually any biomaterial of interest. This information will be critical for the design of materials that are resistant to bacterial adhesion. PMID:9736689

  19. Tissue Contraction Force Microscopy for Optimization of Engineered Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    We developed a high-throughput screening assay that allows for relative comparison of the twitch force of millimeter-scale gel-based cardiac tissues. This assay is based on principles taken from traction force microscopy and uses fluorescent microspheres embedded in a soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate. A gel-forming cell suspension is simply pipetted onto the PDMS to form hemispherical cardiac tissue samples. Recordings of the fluorescent bead movement during tissue pacing are used to determine the maximum distance that the tissue can displace the elastic PDMS substrate. In this study, fibrin gel hemispheres containing human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes were formed on the PDMS and allowed to culture for 9 days. Bead displacement values were measured and compared to direct force measurements to validate the utility of the system. The amplitude of bead displacement correlated with direct force measurements, and the twitch force generated by the tissues was the same in 2 and 4 mg/mL fibrin gels, even though the 2 mg/mL samples visually appear more contractile if the assessment were made on free-floating samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this assay as a screening tool that allows for rapid sample preparation, data collection, and analysis in a simple and cost-effective platform. PMID:26538167

  20. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniël; Calogero, Gaetano; Koster, Rik S.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; van Huis, Marijn A.; Swart, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    Doping graphene by heteroatoms such as nitrogen presents an attractive route to control the position of the Fermi level in the material. We prepared N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111) surfaces via chemical vapor deposition of two different molecules. Using scanning tunneling microscopy images as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Δ f (z ) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene on Cu(111) and Ir(111). The results are corroborated by density functional theory calculations employing a van der Waals functional.

  1. Adhesion Forces between Lewis(X) Determinant Antigens as Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tromas, C; Rojo, J; de la Fuente, J M; Barrientos, A G; García, R; Penadés, S

    2001-01-01

    The adhesion forces between individual molecules of Lewis(X) trisaccharide antigen (Le(X) ) have been measured in water and in calcium solution by using atomic force microscopy (AFM, see graph). These results demonstrate the self-recognition capability of this antigen, and reinforce the hypothesis that carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction could be considered as the first step in the cell-adhesion process in nature. Copyright © 2001 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  2. Application of atomic force microscopy in bacterial research.

    PubMed

    Dorobantu, Loredana S; Gray, Murray R

    2010-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has evolved from an imaging device into a multifunctional and powerful toolkit for probing the nanostructures and surface components on the exterior of bacterial cells. Currently, the area of application spans a broad range of interesting fields from materials sciences, in which AFM has been used to deposit patterns of thiol-functionalized molecules onto gold substrates, to biological sciences, in which AFM has been employed to study the undesirable bacterial adhesion to implants and catheters or the essential bacterial adhesion to contaminated soil or aquifers. The unique attribute of AFM is the ability to image bacterial surface features, to measure interaction forces of functionalized probes with these features, and to manipulate these features, for example, by measuring elongation forces under physiological conditions and at high lateral resolution (<1 A). The first imaging studies showed the morphology of various biomolecules followed by rapid progress in visualizing whole bacterial cells. The AFM technique gradually developed into a lab-on-a-tip allowing more quantitative analysis of bacterial samples in aqueous liquids and non-contact modes. Recently, force spectroscopy modes, such as chemical force microscopy, single-cell force spectroscopy, and single-molecule force spectroscopy, have been used to map the spatial arrangement of chemical groups and electrical charges on bacterial surfaces, to measure cell-cell interactions, and to stretch biomolecules. In this review, we present the fascinating options offered by the rapid advances in AFM with emphasizes on bacterial research and provide a background for the exciting research articles to follow. 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Atomic force microscopy force mapping in the study of supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Li, James K; Sullan, Ruby May A; Zou, Shan

    2011-02-15

    Investigating the structural and mechanical properties of lipid bilayer membrane systems is vital in elucidating their biological function. One route to directly correlate the morphology of phase-segregated membranes with their indentation and rupture mechanics is the collection of atomic force microscopy (AFM) force maps. These force maps, while containing rich mechanical information, require lengthy processing time due to the large number of force curves needed to attain a high spatial resolution. A force curve analysis toolset was created to perform data extraction, calculation and reporting specifically in studying lipid membrane morphology and mechanical stability. The procedure was automated to allow for high-throughput processing of force maps with greatly reduced processing time. The resulting program was successfully used in systematically analyzing a number of supported lipid membrane systems in the investigation of their structure and nanomechanics.

  4. CO tip functionalization in subatomic resolution atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minjung; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2015-10-19

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (nc-AFM) employing a CO-functionalized tip displays dramatically enhanced resolution wherein covalent bonds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon can be imaged. Employing real-space pseudopotential first-principles calculations, we examine the role of CO in functionalizing the nc-AFM tip. Our calculations allow us to simulate full AFM images and ascertain the enhancement mechanism of the CO molecule. We consider two approaches: one with an explicit inclusion of the CO molecule and one without. By comparing our simulations to existing experimental images, we ascribe the enhanced resolution of the CO functionalized tip to the special orbital characteristics of the CO molecule.

  5. Visualizing water molecule distribution by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kenjiro; Ido, Shinichiro; Oyabu, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Kei; Hirata, Yoshiki; Imai, Takashi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2010-05-21

    Hydration structures at biomolecular surfaces are essential for understanding the mechanisms of the various biofunctions and stability of biomolecules. Here, we demonstrate the measurement of local hydration structures using an atomic force microscopy system equipped with a low-noise deflection sensor. We applied this method to the analysis of the muscovite mica/water interface and succeeded in visualizing a hydration structure that is site-specific on a crystal. Furthermore, at the biomolecule/buffer solution interface, we found surface hydration layers that are more packed than those at the muscovite mica/water interface.

  6. Atomic force microscopy of lead iodide crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. A.; Azoulay, M.; Jayatirtha, H. N.; Biao, Y.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface of lead iodide crystals. The high vapor pressure of lead iodide prohibits the use of traditional high resolution surface study techniques that require high vacuum conditions. AFM was used to image numerous insulating surface in various ambients, with very little sample preparation techniques needed. Freshly cleaved and modified surfaces, including, chemical and vacuum etched, and air aged surfaces, were examined. Both intrinsic and induced defects were imaged with high resolution. The results were compared to a similar AFM study of mercuric iodide surfaces and it was found that, at ambient conditions, lead iodide is significantly more stable than mercuric iodide.

  7. Cooling crystallization experiments observed by in situ scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipp, S.; Lacmann, R.

    1996-03-01

    The change in surface morphology of potassium nitrate and potassium alum has been studied in situ by means of scanning force microscopy. The supersaturation and undersaturation were varied in a cooling crystallizer under flow conditions. To keep the crystal growth rate of potassium nitrate low, the specific additive DOW FAX 3B2 had been used in different concentrations. The crystal growth rate of both systems could be determined and the growth and dissolution surface morphologies of potassium alum exhibited structures similar to those of microscopic measurements.

  8. Electrochemical atomic force microscopy: In situ monitoring of electrochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggente, Melania; Passeri, Daniele; Rossi, Marco; Tamburri, Emanuela; Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2017-08-01

    The in-situ electrodeposition of polyaniline (PANI), one of the most attractive conducting polymers (CP), has been monitored performing electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) experiments. The electropolymerization of PANI on a Pt working electrode has been observed performing cyclic voltammetry experiments and controlling the evolution of current flowing through the electrode surface, together with a standard AFM image. The working principle and the potentialities of this emerging technique are briefly reviewed and factors limiting the studying of the in-situ electrosynthesis of organic compounds discussed.

  9. Visualization of the Barkhausen effect by magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Alexander; Liebmann, Marcus; Kaiser, Uwe; Wiesendanger, Roland; Noh, Tae Won; Kim, Dong Wook

    2004-02-20

    By visualization of the Barkhausen effect using magnetic force microscopy we are able to provide detailed information about the physical principles that govern the magnetization reversal of a granular ferromagnetic thin film with perpendicular anisotropy. Individual Barkhausen volumes are localized and distinguished as either newly nucleated or grown by domain wall propagation. The Gaussian size distribution of nucleated Barkhausen volumes indicates an uncorrelated random process, while grown Barkhausen volumes exhibit an inverse power law distribution, which points towards a critical behavior during domain wall motion.

  10. Nanoindentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniasadi, Mahmoud; Xu, Zhe; Gandee, Leah; Du, Yingjie; Lu, Hongbing; Zimmern, Philippe; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a source of many chronic infections. Biofilms and their inherent resistance to antibiotics are attributable to a range of health issues including affecting prosthetic implants, hospital-acquired infections, and wound infection. Mechanical properties of biofilm, in particular, at micro- and nano-scales, are governed by microstructures and porosity of the biofilm, which in turn may contribute to their inherent antibiotic resistance. We utilize atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation and finite element simulation to investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilm. This biofilm was derived from human samples and represents a medically relevant model.

  11. Note: On the deconvolution of Kelvin probe force microscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blümel, A.; Plank, H.; Klug, A.; Fisslthaler, E.; Sezen, M.; Grogger, W.; List, E. J. W.

    2010-05-01

    In Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) proper interpretation of the data is often difficult because the measured surface potential is affected by the interaction of the cantilever with the sample. In this work, the tip's interaction with a modeled surface potential distribution was simulated, leading to a calculated KPFM image. Although simplified, the calculation is capable of showing the influence of the cantilever in the correct qualitative manner, proven by a comparison with experimental data. Additionally, a deconvolution was performed on the simulated image, showing that for simple geometries revealing the "real" surface potential data is possible in principle.

  12. Extrinsic Size Effect in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy of Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Eliseev, E. A.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2007-01-01

    The extrinsic size effect in piezoresponse force microscopy of ferroelectric and piezoelectric thin films on nonpolar dielectric substrate with matching elastic properties is analyzed. Analytical expressions for effective piezoresponse, object transfer function components, and Rayleigh two-point resolution are obtained. These results can be broadly applied for effective piezoelectric response calculations in thin piezoelectric and ferroelectric films as well as surface polar layers in, e.g., organic materials and biopolymers. In particular, the effective piezoresponse strongly decreases with film thickness, whereas the sharpness of domain stripe image increases due to the object transfer function spectrum broadening.

  13. Understanding the plasmonics of nanostructured atomic force microscopy tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, A.; Bowman, R. W.; Zhang, L.; Turek, V.; Sigle, D. O.; Lombardi, A.; Weller, L.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    Structured metallic tips are increasingly important for optical spectroscopies such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, with plasmonic resonances frequently cited as a mechanism for electric field enhancement. We probe the local optical response of sharp and spherical-tipped atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips using a scanning hyperspectral imaging technique to identify the plasmonic behaviour. Localised surface plasmon resonances which radiatively couple with far-field light are found only for spherical AFM tips, with little response for sharp AFM tips, in agreement with numerical simulations of the near-field response. The precise tip geometry is thus crucial for plasmon-enhanced spectroscopies, and the typical sharp cones are not preferred.

  14. Charge transport properties of nanocrystals studied by electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zonghai

    2005-03-01

    Charge transport in semiconductor and metal nanocrystal multilayers between two electrodes is probed by electrostatic force microscopy. The in-plane charge diffusion coefficients are deduced from the charge distribution imaged in real time. Temperature dependence of the transport properties and effects of photoionization and oxidation are also investigated. Implications of these results on the transport mechanisms will be discussed. This work was supported by the ONR Young Investigator Award N000140410489, the American Chemical Society (ACS) PRF award # 41256-G10, and the startup funds at the University of Pennsylvania. MF acknowledges funding from the NSF IGERT program (Grant #DGE-0221664) and SENS.

  15. Atomic force microscopy of electrospun organic-inorganic lipid nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinhong; Cohn, Celine; Qiu, Weiguo; Zha, Zhengbao; Dai, Zhifei; Wu, Xiaoyi

    2011-09-01

    An organic-inorganic hybridization strategy has been proposed to synthesize polymerizable lipid-based materials for the creation of highly stable lipid-mimetic nanostructures. We employ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to analyze the surface morphology and mechanical property of electrospun cholesteryl-succinyl silane (CSS) nanofibers. The AFM nanoindentation of the CSS nanofibers reveals elastic moduli of 55.3 ± 27.6 to 70.8 ± 35 MPa, which is significantly higher than the moduli of natural phospholipids and cholesterols. The study shows that organic-inorganic hybridization is useful in the design of highly stable lipid-based materials.

  16. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocera, Tanya M.; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-01

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Hierarchical Structured Surfaces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, A. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Suchaneck, G.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate the hierarchical surface topography of reactively sputtered nanocrystalline Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and TiO2 thin films as well as plasma-treated antireflective PET films by means of determining the fractal dimension and power spectral density (PSD) of surface topography recorded by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Local fractal dimension was obtained using the triangulation method. The PSDs of all samples were fitted to the k-correlation model (also called ABC model) valid for a self-affine surface topography. Fractal analysis of AFM images was shown to be an appropriate and easy to use tool for the characterization of hierarchical nanostructures.

  18. Distinguishing ferritin from apoferritin using magnetic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Tanya M; Zeng, Yuzhi; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2014-11-21

    Estimating the amount of iron-replete ferritin versus iron-deficient apoferritin proteins is important in biomedical and nanotechnology applications. This work introduces a simple and novel approach to quantify ferritin by using magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We demonstrate how high magnetic moment probes enhance the magnitude of MFM signal, thus enabling accurate quantitative estimation of ferritin content in ferritin/apoferritin mixtures in vitro. We envisage MFM could be adapted to accurately determine ferritin content in protein mixtures or in small aliquots of clinical samples.

  19. Two-axis probing system for atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jayanth, G R; Jhiang, Sissy M; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2008-02-01

    A novel two-axis probing system is proposed for multiaxis atomic force microscopy (AFM). It employs a compliant manipulator that is optimally designed in terms of geometries and kinematics, and is actuated by multiple magnetic actuators to simultaneously control tip position and change tip orientation to achieve greater accessibility of the sample surface when imaging surfaces having large geometric variations. It leads to the creation of a multiaxis AFM system, which is a three-dimensional surface tool rather than a two-dimensional planar surface tool. The use of the system to scan the bottom corner of a grating step is reported.

  20. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    DOE PAGES

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; ...

    2015-03-13

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standardmore » ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. In conclusion, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.« less

  1. Modeling noncontact atomic force microscopy resolution on corrugated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burson, Kristen M; Yamamoto, Mahito; Cullen, William G

    2012-01-01

    Key developments in NC-AFM have generally involved atomically flat crystalline surfaces. However, many surfaces of technological interest are not atomically flat. We discuss the experimental difficulties in obtaining high-resolution images of rough surfaces, with amorphous SiO(2) as a specific case. We develop a quasi-1-D minimal model for noncontact atomic force microscopy, based on van der Waals interactions between a spherical tip and the surface, explicitly accounting for the corrugated substrate (modeled as a sinusoid). The model results show an attenuation of the topographic contours by ~30% for tip distances within 5 Å of the surface. Results also indicate a deviation from the Hamaker force law for a sphere interacting with a flat surface.

  2. Mechanical characterization of cellulose single nanofiber by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Lindong; Kim, Jeong Woong; Lee, Jiyun; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-04-01

    Cellulose fibers are strong natural fibers and they are renewable, biodegradable and the most abundant biopolymer in the world. So to develop new cellulose fibers based products, the mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibers would be a key. The atomic microscope is used to measure the mechanical properties of cellulose nanofibers based on 3-points bending of cellulose nanofiber. The cellulose nanofibers were generated for an aqueous counter collision system. The cellulose microfibers were nanosized under 200 MPa high pressure. The cellulose nanofiber suspension was diluted with DI water and sprayed on the silicon groove substrate. By performing a nanoscale 3-points bending test using the atomic force microscopy, a known force was applied on the center of the fiber. The elastic modulus of the single nanofiber is obtained by calculating the fiber deflection and several parameters. The elastic modulus values were obtained from different resources of cellulose such as hardwood, softwood and cotton.

  3. High Sensitivity Electric Force Microscopy of Pentacene Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Erik; Ruiz, Ricardo; Marohn, John A.

    2004-03-01

    We are investigating charge traps and voltage drops in pentacene devices. There is considerable circumstantial evidence suggesting that charge traps in pentacene correlate with the number of grain boundaries. We are using electric force microscopy to "see" the trap sites directly for the first time. The long-term goal of these studies is to test whether charge traps are an intrinsic property of pentacene or whether they arise instead from interactions of pentacene with the substrate. Experiments are being carried out on a homebuilt variable temperature electric force microscope that operates with the cantilever and sample in high vacuum for highest possible sensitivity. With this microscope we are probing the local voltage distribution in working devices as well.

  4. Atomic force microscopy: From red blood cells to immunohaematology.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; Tabor, Rico F; Garnier, Gil

    2017-05-11

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) offers complementary imaging modes that can provide morphological and structural details of red blood cells (RBCs), and characterize interactions between specific biomolecules and RBC surface antigen. This review describes the applications of AFM in determining RBC health by the observation of cell morphology, elasticity and surface roughness. Measurement of interaction forces between plasma proteins and antibodies against RBC surface antigen using the AFM also brought new information to the immunohaematology field. With constant improvisation of the AFM in resolution and imaging time, the reaction of RBC to changes in the physico-chemistry of its environment and the presence of RBC surface antigen specific-biomolecules is achievable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Surface potential modeling and reconstruction in Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Wu, Yangqing; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun

    2017-09-08

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurement has been extensively applied in metallic, semiconductor and organic electronic or photovoltaic devices, to characterize the local contact potential difference or surface potential of the samples at the nanoscale. Here, a comprehensive modeling of surface potential in KPFM is established, from the well-known single capacitance model to a precise electrodynamic model, considering the long range property of the electrostatic force in KPFM. The limitations and relations of different models are also discussed. Besides, the feedback condition of the KPFM system is reconsidered and modified, showing that the influence of the cantilever has been overestimated by about 20% in previous reports. Afterwards, the surface potential of charged Si-nanocrystals is reconstructed based on the electrodynamic model, and the calculated surface charge density is very consistent with the macroscopic capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement. A deep understanding and correct reconstruction of surface potential is crucial to the quantitative analysis of KPFM results.

  6. Band Excitation Kelvin probe force microscopy utilizing photothermal excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Liam; Jesse, Stephen; Balke, Nina; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Kalinin, Sergei; Li, Qian

    2015-03-13

    A multifrequency open loop Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) approach utilizing photothermal as opposed to electrical excitation is developed. Photothermal band excitation (PthBE)-KPFM is implemented here in a grid mode on a model test sample comprising a metal-insulator junction with local charge-patterned regions. Unlike the previously described open loop BE-KPFM, which relies on capacitive actuation of the cantilever, photothermal actuation is shown to be highly sensitive to the electrostatic force gradient even at biases close to the contact potential difference (CPD). PthBE-KPFM is further shown to provide a more localized measurement of true CPD in comparison to the gold standard ambient KPFM approach, amplitude modulated KPFM. In conclusion, PthBE-KPFM data contain information relating to local dielectric properties and electronic dissipation between tip and sample unattainable using conventional single frequency KPFM approaches.

  7. Subsurface contrast due to friction in heterodyne force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiest, G. J.; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    The nondestructive imaging of subsurface structures on the nanometer scale has been a long-standing desire in both science and industry. A few impressive images were published so far that demonstrate the general feasibility by combining ultrasound with an atomic force microscope. From different excitation schemes, heterodyne force microscopy seems to be the most promising candidate delivering the highest contrast and resolution. However, the physical contrast mechanism is unknown, thereby preventing any quantitative analysis of samples. Here we show that friction at material boundaries within the sample is responsible for the contrast formation. This result is obtained by performing a full quantitative analysis, in which we compare our experimentally observed contrasts with simulations and calculations. Surprisingly, we can rule out all other generally believed responsible mechanisms, like Rayleigh scattering, sample (visco)elasticity, damping of the ultrasonic tip motion, and ultrasound attenuation. Our analytical description paves the way for quantitative subsurface-AFM imaging.

  8. Atomic force microscopy images of lyotropic lamellar phases.

    PubMed

    Garza, C; Thieghi, L T; Castillo, R

    2007-02-07

    For the very first time, atomic force microscope images of lamellar phases were observed combined with a freeze fracture technique that does not involve the use of replicas. Samples are rapidly frozen, fractured, and scanned directly with atomic force microscopy, at liquid nitrogen temperature and in high vacuum. This procedure can be used to investigate micro-structured liquids. The lamellar phases in Sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/water and in C12E5/water systems were used to asses this new technique. Our observations were compared with x-ray diffraction measurements and with other freeze fracture methods reported in the literature. Our results show that this technique is useful to image lyotropic lamellar phases and the estimated repeat distances for lamellar periodicity are consistent with those obtained by x-ray diffraction.

  9. Introduction to atomic force microscopy (AFM) in biology.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire S; Scheuring, Simon; Kreplak, Laurent

    2009-11-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) has the unique capability of imaging biological samples with molecular resolution in buffer solution. In addition to providing topographical images of surfaces with nanometer- to angstrom-scale resolution, forces between single molecules and mechanical properties of biological samples can be investigated from the nanoscale to the microscale. Importantly, the measurements are made in buffer solutions, allowing biological samples to "stay alive" within a physiological-like environment while temporal changes in structure are measured-e.g., before and after addition of chemical reagents. These qualities distinguish AFM from conventional imaging techniques of comparable resolution, e.g., electron microscopy (EM). This unit provides an introduction to AFM on biological systems and describes specific examples of AFM on proteins, cells, and tissues. The physical principles of the technique and methodological aspects of its practical use and applications are also described.

  10. Automated manipulation of carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Sen; Fu, Xing

    2013-01-01

    The manipulation of carbon nanotubes is an important and essential step for carbon-based nanodevice or nanocircuit assembly. However, the conventional push-and-image approach of manipulating carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscopy has low efficiency on account of the reduplicated scanning process during manipulation. In this article, an automated manipulation system is designed and tested. This automated manipulation system, which includes an atomic force microscope platform and a self-developed computer program for one-dimensional manipulation, is capable of automatically moving any assigned individual carbon nanotube to a defined target location without any intermediate scanning procedure. To demonstrate the high-efficiency of this automated manipulation system and its potential applications in nanoassembly, two experiments were conducted. The first experiment used this system to manipulate a carbon nanotube to a defined target location. In the second experiment, this system was used to automatically manipulate several carbon nanotubes for generating and translating a defined pattern of nanotubes.

  11. Surface potential modeling and reconstruction in Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Wu, Yangqing; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurement has been extensively applied in metallic, semiconductor and organic electronic or photovoltaic devices, to characterize the local contact potential difference or surface potential of the samples at the nanoscale. Here, a comprehensive modeling of surface potential in KPFM is established, from the well-known single capacitance model to a precise electrodynamic model, considering the long range property of the electrostatic force in KPFM. The limitations and relations of different models are also discussed. Besides, the feedback condition of the KPFM system is reconsidered and modified, showing that the influence of the cantilever has been overestimated by about 20% in previous reports. Afterwards, the surface potential of charged Si-nanocrystals is reconstructed based on the electrodynamic model, and the calculated surface charge density is very consistent with the macroscopic capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement. A deep understanding and correct reconstruction of surface potential is crucial to the quantitative analysis of KPFM results.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Devices Engineered by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisbrey, Landon

    This dissertation explores the engineering of carbon nanotube electronic devices using atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques. A possible application for such devices is an electronic interface with individual biological molecules. This single molecule biosensing application is explored both experimentally and with computational modeling. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, such as AFM, are ideal to study nanoscale electronics. These techniques employ a probe which is raster scanned above a sample while measuring probe-surface interactions as a function of position. In addition to topographical and electrostatic/magnetic surface characterization, the probe may also be used as a tool to manipulate and engineer at the nanoscale. Nanoelectronic devices built from carbon nanotubes exhibit many exciting properties including one-dimensional electron transport. A natural consequence of onedimensional transport is that a single perturbation along the conduction channel can have extremely large effects on the device's transport characteristics. This property may be exploited to produce electronic sensors with single-molecule resolution. Here we use AFM-based engineering to fabricate atomic-sized transistors from carbon nanotube network devices. This is done through the incorporation of point defects into the carbon nanotube sidewall using voltage pulses from an AFM probe. We find that the incorporation of an oxidative defect leads to a variety of possible electrical signatures including sudden switching events, resonant scattering, and breaking of the symmetry between electron and hole transport. We discuss the relationship between these different electronic signatures and the chemical structure/charge state of the defect. Tunneling through a defect-induced Coulomb barrier is modeled with numerical Verlet integration of Schrodinger's equation and compared with experimental results. Atomic-sized transistors are ideal for single-molecule applications due to their

  13. Atomic force microscopy on phase-control pulsed force mode in water: Imaging and force analysis on a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Shin-ichi; Kohyama, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    We developed phase-control pulsed force mode (p-PFM) as the operation mode for atomic force microscopy (AFM). The p-PFM allowed us to observe soft or weakly adsorbed materials in a liquid environment using a conventional AFM apparatus, and allowed for force curve mapping (FCM) after offline data processing. We applied the p-PFM to a rhodium-octaethylporphyrin (RhOEP) layer on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), which is applicable to anode catalysts of fuel cells. The RhOEP/HOPG system was stably observed in water by this mode. In the p-PFM image, we found both large and small protrusions, which were not observed in the dynamic force mode, in air. The detailed force analysis suggested that these protrusions are nanobubbles located on the HOPG substrate exposed in holes or pits of the RhOEP layer.

  14. Imaging of DNA and Protein-DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein-DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein-DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein-DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein-DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described.

  15. Imaging of DNA and Protein–DNA Complexes with Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of DNA structure and dynamics and protein–DNA complexes, including recent advances in the visualization of protein–DNA complexes with the use of cutting-edge, high-speed AFM. Special emphasis is given to direct nanoscale visualization of dynamics of protein–DNA complexes. In the area of DNA structure and dynamics, structural studies of local non-B conformations of DNA and the interplay of local and global DNA conformations are reviewed. The application of time-lapse AFM nanoscale imaging of DNA dynamics is illustrated by studies of Holliday junction branch migration. Structure and dynamics of protein–DNA interactions include problems related to site-specific DNA recombination, DNA replication, and DNA mismatch repair. Studies involving the structure and dynamics of chromatin are also described. PMID:27278886

  16. Atomic force microscopy imaging and single molecule recognition force spectroscopy of coat proteins on the surface of Bacillus subtilis spore.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jilin; Krajcikova, Daniela; Zhu, Rong; Ebner, Andreas; Cutting, Simon; Gruber, Hermann J; Barak, Imrich; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Coat assembly in Bacillus subtilis serves as a tractable model for the study of the self-assembly process of biological structures and has a significant potential for use in nano-biotechnological applications. In the present study, the morphology of B. subtilis spores was investigated by magnetically driven dynamic force microscopy (MAC mode atomic force microscopy) under physiological conditions. B. subtilis spores appeared as prolate structures, with a length of 0.6-3 microm and a width of about 0.5-2 microm. The spore surface was mainly covered with bump-like structures with diameters ranging from 8 to 70 nm. Besides topographical explorations, single molecule recognition force spectroscopy (SMRFS) was used to characterize the spore coat protein CotA. This protein was specifically recognized by a polyclonal antibody directed against CotA (anti-CotA), the antibody being covalently tethered to the AFM tip via a polyethylene glycol linker. The unbinding force between CotA and anti-CotA was determined as 55 +/- 2 pN. From the high-binding probability of more than 20% in force-distance cycles it is concluded that CotA locates in the outer surface of B. subtilis spores.

  17. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  18. Taking Nanomedicine Teaching into Practice with Atomic Force Microscopy and Force Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Filomena A.; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic…

  19. Two-Layer Elastographic 3-D Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Zhang, Shun; Gómez-González, Manuel; Meili, Ruedi; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular traction force microscopy (TFM) requires knowledge of the mechanical properties of the substratum where the cells adhere to calculate cell-generated forces from measurements of substratum deformation. Polymer-based hydrogels are broadly used for TFM due to their linearly elastic behavior in the range of measured deformations. However, the calculated stresses, particularly their spatial patterns, can be highly sensitive to the substratum’s Poisson’s ratio. We present two-layer elastographic TFM (2LETFM), a method that allows for simultaneously measuring the Poisson’s ratio of the substratum while also determining the cell-generated forces. The new method exploits the analytical solution of the elastostatic equation and deformation measurements from two layers of the substratum. We perform an in silico analysis of 2LETFM concluding that this technique is robust with respect to TFM experimental parameters, and remains accurate even for noisy measurement data. We also provide experimental proof of principle of 2LETFM by simultaneously measuring the stresses exerted by migrating Physarum amoeboae on the surface of polyacrylamide substrata, and the Poisson’s ratio of the substrata. The 2LETFM method could be generalized to concurrently determine the mechanical properties and cell-generated forces in more physiologically relevant extracellular environments, opening new possibilities to study cell-matrix interactions. PMID:28074837

  20. Two-Layer Elastographic 3-D Traction Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Zhang, Shun; Gómez-González, Manuel; Meili, Ruedi; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; Del Álamo, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular traction force microscopy (TFM) requires knowledge of the mechanical properties of the substratum where the cells adhere to calculate cell-generated forces from measurements of substratum deformation. Polymer-based hydrogels are broadly used for TFM due to their linearly elastic behavior in the range of measured deformations. However, the calculated stresses, particularly their spatial patterns, can be highly sensitive to the substratum’s Poisson’s ratio. We present two-layer elastographic TFM (2LETFM), a method that allows for simultaneously measuring the Poisson’s ratio of the substratum while also determining the cell-generated forces. The new method exploits the analytical solution of the elastostatic equation and deformation measurements from two layers of the substratum. We perform an in silico analysis of 2LETFM concluding that this technique is robust with respect to TFM experimental parameters, and remains accurate even for noisy measurement data. We also provide experimental proof of principle of 2LETFM by simultaneously measuring the stresses exerted by migrating Physarum amoeboae on the surface of polyacrylamide substrata, and the Poisson’s ratio of the substrata. The 2LETFM method could be generalized to concurrently determine the mechanical properties and cell-generated forces in more physiologically relevant extracellular environments, opening new possibilities to study cell-matrix interactions.

  1. Two-Layer Elastographic 3-D Traction Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Zhang, Shun; Gómez-González, Manuel; Meili, Ruedi; Firtel, Richard A; Lasheras, Juan C; Del Álamo, Juan C

    2017-01-11

    Cellular traction force microscopy (TFM) requires knowledge of the mechanical properties of the substratum where the cells adhere to calculate cell-generated forces from measurements of substratum deformation. Polymer-based hydrogels are broadly used for TFM due to their linearly elastic behavior in the range of measured deformations. However, the calculated stresses, particularly their spatial patterns, can be highly sensitive to the substratum's Poisson's ratio. We present two-layer elastographic TFM (2LETFM), a method that allows for simultaneously measuring the Poisson's ratio of the substratum while also determining the cell-generated forces. The new method exploits the analytical solution of the elastostatic equation and deformation measurements from two layers of the substratum. We perform an in silico analysis of 2LETFM concluding that this technique is robust with respect to TFM experimental parameters, and remains accurate even for noisy measurement data. We also provide experimental proof of principle of 2LETFM by simultaneously measuring the stresses exerted by migrating Physarum amoeboae on the surface of polyacrylamide substrata, and the Poisson's ratio of the substrata. The 2LETFM method could be generalized to concurrently determine the mechanical properties and cell-generated forces in more physiologically relevant extracellular environments, opening new possibilities to study cell-matrix interactions.

  2. Study of microcontact printed patterns by chemical force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fujihira, M; Furugori, M; Akiba, U; Tani, Y

    2001-01-01

    Patterned self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on sputtered gold films prepared by microcontact printing (microCP) were studied by mapping adhesive forces with pulsed-force-mode atomic force microscopy. A stamp for microCP was fabricated by pouring polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) over a photolithographically prepared master. The patterned SAMs were prepared by two methods. One is called the wet-inking method, in which inking was done by placing a thiol ethanol solution for 30 s on the stamp and then removing the excess ink solution under a stream of nitrogen. The other is called the contact-inking method, in which a pad made of PDMS was dipped overnight in a thiol ethanol solution and then the stamp was placed on the inker pad impregnated with the thiol ethanol solution. The second step for pattern formation was the same for both of the two different microCP methods. Namely, the gold surfaces stamped with alkanethiols were further reacted with a thiol terminating in COOH in ethanol. The resulting patterns with CH3- and COOH-terminated regions were analyzed by imaging the adhesive forces with the chemically modified gold coated AFM tips with a SAM of CH3 or COOH terminal functional groups.

  3. Atomic force microscopy for university students: applications in biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontomaris, S. V.; Stylianou, A.

    2017-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a powerful tool used in the investigation of the structural and mechanical properties of a wide range of materials including biomaterials. It provides the ability to acquire high resolution images of biomaterials at the nanoscale. It also provides information about the response of specific areas under controlled applied force, which leads to the mechanical characterization of the sample at the nanoscale. The wide range of information provided by AFM has established it as a powerful research tool. In this paper, we present a general overview of the basic operation and functions of AFM applications in biomaterials. The basic operation of AFM is explained in detail with a focus on the real interactions that take place at the nanoscale level during imaging. AFM’s ability to provide the mechanical characterization (force curves) of specific areas at the nanoscale is also explained. The basic models of applied mechanics that are used for processing the data obtained by the force curves are presented. The aim of this paper is to provide university students and young scientists in the fields of biophysics and nanotechnology with a better understanding of AFM.

  4. Combining confocal microscopy with precise force-scope optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew C.; Reihani, Nader; Oddershede, Lene B.

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrate an example of 'confocal-tweezers' wherein confocal images and precise optical force measurements, using photodiodes, are obtained simultaneously in the x-y plane without moving the objective lens. The optical trap is produced using a 1.064μm cw laser and is combined with Leica's TCS SP5 broadband confocal microscope to trap and image living cells. The unique method by which the confocal images are created facilitates the acquisition of images in areas far from the trapping location. In addition, because the scanning process involves moving galvanic mirrors independently of the objective, the trap is held stable in position and is not subject to any error in position for the x-y scan. We have successfully trapped and confocally imaged 80nm gold colloids, 150nm gold colloids and 1μm polystyrene beads whilst making quantitative measurements of the force applied by the trap on each bead. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that anyone has combined precise force measuring optical tweezers with confocal microscopy. We also discuss some of the technical challenges involved in advancing the experimental set up to make quantitative force measurements in combination with 3D stacking. Having proven the potential of this system in 2D, we hope to develop it further to investigate the nano-mechanics of cell division through the attachment of gold beads to fluorescently labelled organelles in S. pombe yeast cells.

  5. Atomically resolved graphitic surfaces in air by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wastl, Daniel S; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-05-27

    Imaging at the atomic scale using atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomic resolution of graphite and hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC in air. The main challenges arise from the overall surface cleanliness and the water layers which form on almost all surfaces. To further investigate the influence of the water layers, we compare data taken with a hydrophilic bulk-silicon tip to a hydrophobic bulk-sapphire tip. While atomic resolution can be achieved with both tip materials at moderate interaction forces, there are strong differences in force versus distance spectra which relate to the water layers on the tips and samples. Imaging at very low tip-sample interaction forces results in the observation of large terraces of a naturally occurring stripe structure on the hydrogen-intercalated graphene. This structure has been previously reported on graphitic surfaces that are not covered with disordered adsorbates in ambient conditions (i.e., on graphite and bilayer graphene on SiC, but not on monolayer graphene on SiC). Both these observations indicate that hydrogen-intercalated graphene is close to an ideal graphene sample in ambient environments.

  6. Tip-surface forces, amplitude, and energy dissipation in amplitude-modulation (tapping mode) force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Álvaro San; García, Ricardo

    2001-11-01

    Amplitude-modulation (tapping mode) atomic force microscopy is a technique for high resolution imaging of a wide variety of surfaces in air and liquid environments. Here by using the virial theorem and energy conservation principles we have derived analytical relationships between the oscillation amplitude, phase shift, and average tip-surface forces. We find that the average value of the interaction force and oscillation and the average power dissipated by the tip-surface interaction are the quantities that control the amplitude reduction. The agreement obtained between analytical and numerical results supports the analytical method.

  7. Exploring Local Electrostatic Effects with Scanning Probe Microscopy: Implications for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Triboelectricity

    DOE PAGES

    Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Jesse, Stephen; ...

    2014-09-25

    The implementation of contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) utilizes the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample when the tip and sample are in contact with each other. Surprisingly, the electrostatic forces in contact are large enough to be measured even with tips as stiff as 4.5 N/m. As for traditional non-contact KPFM, the signal depends strongly on electrical properties of the sample, such as the dielectric constant, and the tip-properties, such as the stiffness. Since the tip is in contact with the sample, bias-induced changes in the junction potential between tip and sample can be measured with highermore » lateral and temporal resolution compared to traditional non-contact KPFM. Significant and reproducible variations of tip-surface capacitance are observed and attributed to surface electrochemical phenomena. Lastly, observations of significant surface charge states at zero bias and strong hysteretic electromechanical responses at non-ferroelectric surface have significant implications for fields such as triboelectricity and piezoresponse force microscopy.« less

  8. Exploring Local Electrostatic Effects with Scanning Probe Microscopy: Implications for Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Triboelectricity

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Maksymovych, Petro; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Li, Qian; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-09-25

    The implementation of contact mode Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) utilizes the electrostatic interactions between tip and sample when the tip and sample are in contact with each other. Surprisingly, the electrostatic forces in contact are large enough to be measured even with tips as stiff as 4.5 N/m. As for traditional non-contact KPFM, the signal depends strongly on electrical properties of the sample, such as the dielectric constant, and the tip-properties, such as the stiffness. Since the tip is in contact with the sample, bias-induced changes in the junction potential between tip and sample can be measured with higher lateral and temporal resolution compared to traditional non-contact KPFM. Significant and reproducible variations of tip-surface capacitance are observed and attributed to surface electrochemical phenomena. Lastly, observations of significant surface charge states at zero bias and strong hysteretic electromechanical responses at non-ferroelectric surface have significant implications for fields such as triboelectricity and piezoresponse force microscopy.

  9. Imaging stability in force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung I; Boehm, Ryan D

    2013-02-01

    We studied the stability of force-feedback high-speed atomic force microscopy (HSAFM) by imaging soft, hard, and biological sample surfaces at various applied forces. The HSAFM images showed sudden topographic variations of streaky fringes with a negative applied force when collected on a soft hydrocarbon film grown on a grating sample, whereas they showed stable topographic features with positive applied forces. The instability of HSAFM images with the negative applied force was explained by the transition between contact and noncontact regimes in the force-distance curve. When the grating surface was cleaned, and thus hydrophilic by removing the hydrocarbon film, enhanced imaging stability was observed at both positive and negative applied forces. The higher adhesive interaction between the tip and the surface explains the improved imaging stability. The effects of imaging rate on the imaging stability were tested on an even softer adhesive Escherichia coli biofilm deposited onto the grating structure. The biofilm and planktonic cell structures in HSAFM images were reproducible within the force deviation less than ∼0.5 nN at the imaging rate up to 0.2s per frame, suggesting that the force-feedback HSAFM was stable for various imaging speeds in imaging softer adhesive biological samples.

  10. Multifarious applications of atomic force microscopy in forensic science investigations.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Gaurav; Tharmavaram, Maithri; Rawtani, Deepak; Kumar, Sumit; Agrawal, Y

    2017-04-01

    Forensic science is a wide field comprising of several subspecialties and uses methods derived from natural sciences for finding criminals and other evidence valid in a legal court. A relatively new area; Nano-forensics brings a new era of investigation in forensic science in which instantaneous results can be produced that determine various agents such as explosive gasses, biological agents and residues in different crime scenes and terrorist activity investigations. This can be achieved by applying Nanotechnology and its associated characterization techniques in forensic sciences. Several characterization techniques exist in Nanotechnology and nano-analysis is one such technique that is used in forensic science which includes Electron microscopes (EM) like Transmission (TEM) and Scanning (SEM), Raman microscopy (Micro -Raman) and Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) like Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). Atomic force microscopy enables surface characterization of different materials by examining their morphology and mechanical properties. Materials that are immeasurable such as hair, body fluids, textile fibers, documents, polymers, pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), etc. are often encountered during forensic investigations. This review article will mainly focus on the use of AFM in the examination of different evidence such as blood stains, forged documents, human hair samples, ammunitions, explosives, and other such applications in the field of Forensic Science. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Nanomechanics of Cells and Biomaterials Studied by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Jason I; Revenko, Irène; Rodriguez, Brian J

    2015-11-18

    The behavior and mechanical properties of cells are strongly dependent on the biochemical and biomechanical properties of their microenvironment. Thus, understanding the mechanical properties of cells, extracellular matrices, and biomaterials is key to understanding cell function and to develop new materials with tailored mechanical properties for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as an indispensable technique for measuring the mechanical properties of biomaterials and cells with high spatial resolution and force sensitivity within physiologically relevant environments and timescales in the kPa to GPa elastic modulus range. The growing interest in this field of bionanomechanics has been accompanied by an expanding array of models to describe the complexity of indentation of hierarchical biological samples. Furthermore, the integration of AFM with optical microscopy techniques has further opened the door to a wide range of mechanotransduction studies. In recent years, new multidimensional and multiharmonic AFM approaches for mapping mechanical properties have been developed, which allow the rapid determination of, for example, cell elasticity. This Progress Report provides an introduction and practical guide to making AFM-based nanomechanical measurements of cells and surfaces for tissue engineering applications.

  12. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E.; Neal, Charles R.; Zuo, Yi Y.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinical surfactants currently used throughout the world, i.e., Survanta, Curosurf, Infasurf and BLES. These modified-natural surfactants are further compared to dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a synthetic model surfactant of DPPC:palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (7:3), and endogenous bovine natural surfactant. Atomic force microscopy reveals significant differences in the lateral structure and molecular organization of these surfactant preparations. These differences are discussed in terms of DPPC and cholesterol contents. We conclude that all animal-derived clinical surfactants assume a similar structure of multilayers of fluid phospholipids closely attached to an interfacial monolayer enriched in DPPC, at physiologically relevant surface pressures. This study provides the first comprehensive survey of the lateral structure of clinical surfactants at various surface pressures. It may have clinical implications on future application and development of surfactant preparations. PMID:21439262

  13. Comparative study of clinical pulmonary surfactants using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Fan, Qihui; Wang, Yi E; Neal, Charles R; Zuo, Yi Y

    2011-07-01

    Clinical pulmonary surfactant is routinely used to treat premature newborns with respiratory distress syndrome, and has shown great potential in alleviating a number of neonatal and adult respiratory diseases. Despite extensive study of chemical composition, surface activity, and clinical performance of various surfactant preparations, a direct comparison of surfactant films is still lacking. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to characterize and compare four animal-derived clinical surfactants currently used throughout the world, i.e., Survanta, Curosurf, Infasurf and BLES. These modified-natural surfactants are further compared to dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a synthetic model surfactant of DPPC:palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) (7:3), and endogenous bovine natural surfactant. Atomic force microscopy reveals significant differences in the lateral structure and molecular organization of these surfactant preparations. These differences are discussed in terms of DPPC and cholesterol contents. We conclude that all animal-derived clinical surfactants assume a similar structure of multilayers of fluid phospholipids closely attached to an interfacial monolayer enriched in DPPC, at physiologically relevant surface pressures. This study provides the first comprehensive survey of the lateral structure of clinical surfactants at various surface pressures. It may have clinical implications on future application and development of surfactant preparations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a microlateral force sensor and its evaluation using lateral force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Yasuhisa; Shiraishi, Naoki

    2007-03-01

    A microlateral force sensor (MLFS) was developed and evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The sensor was attached to a sensing table supported by a suspension system. The lateral motion of the sensing table was activated by a comb actuator. The driving voltage to the comb actuator was controlled to maintain a constant position of the sensing table by detecting the tunneling current at a detector, which consisted of two electrodes where the bias voltage was applied. An AFM was used to apply a lateral force to the sensing table of the sensor. When the probe of a cantilever was pressed against the sensing table and a raster scanning was conducted, the driving voltage of the comb actuator changed to compensate the friction force between the probe and sensing table. AFM measurements of an asperity array on the sensing table were conducted, and a lateral force microscopy image (LFM) was obtained from the change in driving voltage. The image by MLFS was very similar to the LFM image that was conventionally obtained from torsion of the cantilever. The LFM image strongly correlated with the gradient image calculated from the AFM topographic image. The force sensitivity of the MLFS was determined by comparing the LFM image obtained by using the MLFS with the tangential force derived from the gradient of the AFM image.

  15. High resolution atomic force microscopy of double-stranded RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ares, Pablo; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Herrero-Galán, Elías; Valpuesta, José M.; Gil, Adriana; Gomez-Herrero, Julio; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to resolve the A-form sub-helical pitch periodicity. We have employed different high-sensitive force-detection methods and obtained images with similar spatial resolution. Therefore, we show here that the limiting factors for high-resolution AFM imaging of soft materials in liquid medium are, rather than the imaging mode, the force between the tip and the sample and the sharpness of the tip apex.Double-stranded (ds) RNA mediates the suppression of specific gene expression, it is the genetic material of a number of viruses, and a key activator of the innate immune response against viral infections. The ever increasing list of roles played by dsRNA in the cell and its potential biotechnological applications over the last decade has raised an interest for the characterization of its mechanical properties and structure, and that includes approaches using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and other single-molecule techniques. Recent reports have resolved the structure of dsDNA with AFM at unprecedented resolution. However, an equivalent study with dsRNA is still lacking. Here, we have visualized the double helix of dsRNA under near-physiological conditions and at sufficient resolution to

  16. Applications of Atomic Resolution Atomic Force Microscopy to Nanoscience & Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodin, Thor

    2001-03-01

    New developments in nanophysical scanning probe microscopy in terms of its unique relatonship to nanoscience, together with specific applications to nanoelectronic and biotechnology, will be discussed(1).Innovative examples of chemical physics at interfaces are analyzed where state-of-the-art non contact atomic force microscopy(nc-AFM) measurement of a specific physical or chemical property is correlated with position, orientation and/or location with atomic resolution. Analysis of specific current as well as future applications of nc-AFM to the detection, manipulation and fabrication of nanostructures on the molecular scale will be presented.Design features of nano-instrumentation based on carbon nanotube technology, high frequency solid state micro-oscillators and variable temperature applications will be presented.Specific examples pertaining to, (1) chemical bonding interaction on a semiconductor,(2) surface structure of an ionic insulator,(3) structural features in a biological interface and (4) nanofabrication of a quantum electron device, will be reviewed in terms of their innovativeness and significance to nanoscience and nanotechnology. 1 ``Scanning Probe Microscopies,Nanoscience & Nanotechnology" T.N. Rhodin, Proceedings of nc-AFM Workshop, July 2000, Hamburg, Germany. Springer Verlag U. Schwarz, H. Hoelscher and M. Wiesendanger, guest editors.

  17. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy study of MgO(110) surface faceting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, D. R.; Lamelas, F. J.; Owen, H. A.; Plass, R.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, M.

    2000-06-01

    Phosphoric- and nitric-acid etching of the MgO(110) surface generates vicinal faceting in both the <001> and <110> directions. Vacuum annealing (to 1000°C) does not introduce thermal faceting, and does not alter the chemical-etch morphology. Three types of acid-induced faceting (early-stage pits, later-stage grooves, and inverted trapezoidal pyramids) are seen as a function of etching time. Facet-angle analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows the etch morphology to be vicinal, with angles in the range of 9° to 23°, not the low-energy {100} planes expected from minimization of surface energy.

  18. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  19. Quality of corneal lamellar cuts quantified using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ziebarth, Noël M.; Dias, Janice; Hürmeriç, Volkan; Shousha, Mohamed Abou; Yau, Chiyat Ben; Moy, Vincent T.; Culbertson, William; Yoo, Sonia H.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE To quantify the cut quality of lamellar dissections made with the femtosecond laser using atomic force microscopy (AFM). SETTING Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. DESIGN Experimental study. METHODS Experiments were performed on 3 pairs of human cadaver eyes. The cornea was thinned to physiologic levels by placing the globe, cornea side down, in 25% dextran for 24 hours. The eyes were reinflated to normal pressures by injecting a balanced salt solution into the vitreous cavity. The eyes were placed in a holder, the epithelium was removed, and the eyes were cut with a Visumax femtosecond laser. The energy level was 180 nJ for the right eye and 340 nJ for the left eye of each pair. The cut depths were 200 μm, 300 μm, and 400 μm, with the cut depth maintained for both eyes of each pair. A 12.0 mm trephination was then performed. The anterior portion of the lamellar surface was placed in a balanced salt solution and imaged with AFM. As a control, the posterior surface was placed in 2% formalin and imaged with environmental scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Four quantitative parameters (root-mean-square deviation, average deviation, skewness, kurtosis) were calculated from the AFM images. RESULTS From AFM, the 300 μm low-energy cuts were the smoothest. Similar results were seen qualitatively in the environmental SEM images. CONCLUSION Atomic force microscopy provided quantitative information on the quality of lamellar dissections made using a femtosecond laser, which is useful in optimizing patient outcomes in refractive and lamellar keratoplasty surgeries. PMID:23141078

  20. Investigation of human hair fibers using lateral force microscopy.

    PubMed

    McMullen, R L; Kelty, S P

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM) were used to investigate the morphologic and surface changes associated with various surface modifications to human hair. These included extraction with a series of solvents, bleaching, and treatment with a cationic copolymer. The study assessed the ability of these techniques to distinguish the changes in surface properties, including morphology and friction coefficient, as manifested in changes brought about by the indicated surface modifications. While topographic morphology can easily be investigated with contact AFM. LFM offers an additional tool for probing the surface distribution of oils and waxes. The removal of surface lipids from the fiber surface was accomplished using soxhlet extraction with t-butanol and n-hexane, while the free internal lipids (within the fiber structure) were removed by extraction with a mixture of chloroform and methanol (70:30, v/v). In addition, the surface of hair was modified with the cationic polymer, co(vinyl pyrrolidone-methacrylamidopropyl trimethylammonium chloride [PVP/MAPTAC]), and its distribution on the surface was monitored. Ambient AFM and LFM studies of surface modified and native fibers clearly indicate that when investigated as a function of tip loading force, the different modifications result in changes of the friction coefficient, which increase in this order: native, bleached, solvent extracted, and polymer-treated hair. Friction images show surface variations that are interpreted as areas of varying lipid film coverage. In addition, topographic images of the fibers show the presence of small pores, which become increasingly prevalent upon solvent extraction.

  1. Applications of Atomic Force Microscopy in Macromolecular Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPherson, Alexander

    1997-03-01

    A series of protein and virus crystals was investigated, in situ, using atomic force microscopy. Most of the crystals grew principally on steps generated by two dimensional nucleation on surfaces, though some, such as canavalin, grew by development of spiral dislocations. Apoferritin grew by a rarely encountered mechanism, normal growth, usually associated only with melt or vapor phase crystallization. Cubic crystals of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) grew, at moderate to high levels of supersaturation, by the direct addition of three- dimensional nuclei followed by their rapid normal growth and lateral expansion, a mechanism not previously described to promote controlled and reproducible crystal growth from solutions. Biological macromolecules apparently utilize a more diverse range of growth mechanisms in their crystallization than any previously studied material. High resolution AFM analyses have allowed us to record the first, real time, in situ atomic force microscope images, on the nanometer scale, of the incorporation of molecules into the growth steps of crystals grown from solution. The molecular structure of the growth step edge and surface layer on the (101) faces of tetragonal thaumatin crystals were resolved. It was shown that, although the growth step height corresponds to the unit cell containing eight thaumatin molecules, its advancement occurs by the addition of individual protein molecules rather than molecular clusters. Models for the packing of molecules on the surface layer, and of the structure of the step edge were developed which agree well with experimental data. Again, using high resolution, in situ atomic force microscopy, the initial stages of the formation and development of two- and three-dimensional nuclei on the surface of protein crystals were recorded. From these we conclude that non crystalline aggregates, with short range order, present both on the crystal-solution interface, and in the volume of the solution, give rise to

  2. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of mixed quantum classical ensembles: application to noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kantorovich, L N

    2002-08-26

    Using the nonequilibrium statistical operator method, we suggest a new general method of treating dynamics of a combined system consisting of interacting classical and quantum parts. The method is illustrated on the tip dynamics in the noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) where a macroscopic tip interacts with a quantum microscopic system (the surface and the nanotip). The derived general equation of motion for the tip and the Fokker-Planck equation, applicable even at low temperatures, contain memory effects and a friction term which should (at least partially) be responsible for the observed energy dissipation in NC-AFM experiments.

  3. Discriminating short-range from van der Waals forces using total force data in noncontact atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Stefan; Rahe, Philipp

    2014-06-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) features the measurement of forces with highest spatial resolution and sensitivity, resolving forces of the order of pico-Newtons with submolecular resolution. However, the measured total force is a mixture composed of various interactions. While some interactions such as electrostatic or magnetic forces can be excluded by a careful design of the experiment, the subtraction of van der Waals forces, which mainly originate from London dispersion interactions between the macroscopic tip shank and the bulk sample, remains a challenge. We present the determination of the inherently present van der Waals forces in total interaction force data from fitting a suitable model, allowing for extraction of the short-range force component. We compare the applicability of several van der Waals models based on experimental interaction data from the calcite(101¯4) surface. The feasibility to fit these models to experimental data is critically discussed. We furthermore introduce criteria to assess the transition point from pure long-range interaction to mixed short- and long-range forces based on the variance of lateral and vertical force data. This determination allows us to extract the short-range interaction forces, which remained a challenge so far in NC-AFM experiments.

  4. Quantitative force and dissipation measurements in liquids using piezo-excited atomic force microscopy: a unifying theory.

    PubMed

    Kiracofe, Daniel; Raman, Arvind

    2011-12-02

    The use of a piezoelectric element (acoustic excitation) to vibrate the base of microcantilevers is a popular method for dynamic atomic force microscopy. In air or vacuum, the base motion is so small (relative to tip motion) that it can be neglected. However, in liquid environments the base motion can be large and cannot be neglected. Yet it cannot be directly observed in most AFMs. Therefore, in liquids, quantitative force and energy dissipation spectroscopy with acoustic AFM relies on theoretical formulae and models to estimate the magnitude of the base motion. However, such formulae can be inaccurate due to several effects. For example, a significant component of the piezo excitation does not mechanically excite the cantilever but rather transmits acoustic waves through the surrounding liquid, which in turn indirectly excites the cantilever. Moreover, resonances of the piezo, chip and holder can obscure the true cantilever dynamics even in well-designed liquid cells. Although some groups have tried to overcome these limitations (either by theory modification or better design of piezos and liquid cells), it is generally accepted that acoustic excitation is unsuitable for quantitative force and dissipation spectroscopy in liquids. In this paper the authors present a careful study of the base motion and excitation forces and propose a method by which quantitative analysis is in fact possible, thus opening this popular method for quantitative force and dissipation spectroscopy using dynamic AFM in liquids. This method is validated by experiments in water on mica using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, which can measure the actual base motion. Finally, the method is demonstrated by using small-amplitude dynamic AFM to extract the force gradients and dissipation on solvation shells of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) molecules on mica.

  5. Probing physical properties at the nanoscale using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditzler, Lindsay Rachel

    Techniques that measure physical properties at the nanoscale with high sensitivity are significantly limited considering the number of new nanomaterials being developed. The development of atomic force microscopy (AFM) has lead to significant advancements in the ability to characterize physical properties of materials in all areas of science: chemistry, physics, engineering, and biology have made great scientific strides do to the versatility of the AFM. AFM is used for quantification of many physical properties such as morphology, electrical, mechanical, magnetic, electrochemical, binding interactions, and protein folding. This work examines the electrical and mechanical properties of materials applicable to the field of nano-electronics. As electronic devices are miniaturized the demand for materials with unique electrical properties, which can be developed and exploited, has increased. For example, discussed in this work, a derivative of tetrathiafulvalene, which exhibits a unique loss of conductivity upon compression of the self-assembled monolayer could be developed into a molecular switch. This work also compares tunable organic (tetraphenylethylene tetracarboxylic acid and bis(pyridine)s assemblies) and metal-organic (Silver-stilbizole coordination compounds) crystals which show high electrical conductivity. The electrical properties of these materials vary depending on their composition allowing for the development of compositionally tunable functional materials. Additional work was done to investigate the effects of molecular environment on redox active 11-ferroceneyl-1 undecanethiol (Fc) molecules. The redox process of mixed monolayers of Fc and decanethiol was measured using conductive probe atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy. As the concentration of Fc increased large, variations in the force were observed. Using these variations the number of oxidized molecules in the monolayer was determined. AFM is additionally capable of investigating

  6. High Resolution, Large Deformation 3D Traction Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    López-Fagundo, Cristina; Reichner, Jonathan; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Franck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a powerful approach for quantifying cell-material interactions that over the last two decades has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. In addition, recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging and traction force analysis (3D TFM) have highlighted the significance of the third dimension in influencing various cellular processes. Yet irrespective of dimensionality, almost all TFM approaches have relied on a linear elastic theory framework to calculate cell surface tractions. Here we present a new high resolution 3D TFM algorithm which utilizes a large deformation formulation to quantify cellular displacement fields with unprecedented resolution. The results feature some of the first experimental evidence that cells are indeed capable of exerting large material deformations, which require the formulation of a new theoretical TFM framework to accurately calculate the traction forces. Based on our previous 3D TFM technique, we reformulate our approach to accurately account for large material deformation and quantitatively contrast and compare both linear and large deformation frameworks as a function of the applied cell deformation. Particular attention is paid in estimating the accuracy penalty associated with utilizing a traditional linear elastic approach in the presence of large deformation gradients. PMID:24740435

  7. Atomic force microscopy of asymmetric membranes from turtle erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yongmei; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Ding, Bohua; Hao, Xian; Jiang, Junguang; Sun, Yingchun; Wang, Hongda

    2014-08-01

    The cell membrane provides critical cellular functions that rely on its elaborate structure and organization. The structure of turtle membranes is an important part of an ongoing study of erythrocyte membranes. Using a combination of atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy, we characterized the turtle erythrocyte membrane structure with molecular resolution in a quasi-native state. High-resolution images both leaflets of turtle erythrocyte membranes revealed a smooth outer membrane leaflet and a protein covered inner membrane leaflet. This asymmetry was verified by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which detects numerous exposed amino groups of membrane proteins in the inner membrane leaflet but much fewer in the outer leaflet. The asymmetric membrane structure of turtle erythrocytes is consistent with the semi-mosaic model of human, chicken and fish erythrocyte membrane structure, making the semi-mosaic model more widely applicable. From the perspective of biological evolution, this result may support the universality of the semi-mosaic model.

  8. High resolution, large deformation 3D traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; López-Fagundo, Cristina; Reichner, Jonathan; Hoffman-Kim, Diane; Franck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a powerful approach for quantifying cell-material interactions that over the last two decades has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular mechanosensing and mechanotransduction. In addition, recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging and traction force analysis (3D TFM) have highlighted the significance of the third dimension in influencing various cellular processes. Yet irrespective of dimensionality, almost all TFM approaches have relied on a linear elastic theory framework to calculate cell surface tractions. Here we present a new high resolution 3D TFM algorithm which utilizes a large deformation formulation to quantify cellular displacement fields with unprecedented resolution. The results feature some of the first experimental evidence that cells are indeed capable of exerting large material deformations, which require the formulation of a new theoretical TFM framework to accurately calculate the traction forces. Based on our previous 3D TFM technique, we reformulate our approach to accurately account for large material deformation and quantitatively contrast and compare both linear and large deformation frameworks as a function of the applied cell deformation. Particular attention is paid in estimating the accuracy penalty associated with utilizing a traditional linear elastic approach in the presence of large deformation gradients.

  9. Atomic force microscopy application in biological research: a review study.

    PubMed

    Vahabi, Surena; Nazemi Salman, Bahareh; Javanmard, Anahita

    2013-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a three-dimensional topographic technique with a high atomic resolution to measure surface roughness. AFM is a kind of scanning probe microscope, and its near-field technique is based on the interaction between a sharp tip and the atoms of the sample surface. There are several methods and many ways to modify the tip of the AFM to investigate surface properties, including measuring friction, adhesion forces and viscoelastic properties as well as determining the Young modulus and imaging magnetic or electrostatic properties. The AFM technique can analyze any kind of samples such as polymers, adsorbed molecules, films or fibers, and powders in the air whether in a controlled atmosphere or in a liquid medium. In the past decade, the AFM has emerged as a powerful tool to obtain the nanostructural details and biomechanical properties of biological samples, including biomolecules and cells. The AFM applications, techniques, and -in particular- its ability to measure forces, are not still familiar to most clinicians. This paper reviews the literature on the main principles of the AFM modality and highlights the advantages of this technique in biology, medicine, and- especially- dentistry. This literature review was performed through E-resources, including Science Direct, PubMed, Blackwell Synergy, Embase, Elsevier, and Scholar Google for the references published between 1985 and 2010.

  10. Atomic force microscopy-based shape analysis of heart mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important medical and biological tool for the noninvasive imaging of cells and biomaterials in medical, biological, and biophysical research. The major advantages of AFM over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the facts that no special coating is required and that imaging can be done in all environments-air, vacuum, or aqueous conditions. In addition, it can also precisely determine pico-nano Newton force interactions between the probe tip and the sample surface from force-distance curve measurements.It is widely known that mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. As mitochondrial swelling is an ultrastructural change, quantitative analysis of this change requires high-resolution microscopic methods such as AFM. Here, we describe the use of AFM-based shape analysis for the characterization of nanostructural changes in heart mitochondria resulting from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  11. Atomic force microscopy as an advanced tool in neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Jembrek, Maja Jazvinšćak; Šimić, Goran; Hof, Patrick R.; Šegota, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights relevant issues about applications and improvements of atomic force microscopy (AFM) toward a better understanding of neurodegenerative changes at the molecular level with the hope of contributing to the development of effective therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative illnesses. The basic principles of AFM are briefly discussed in terms of evaluation of experimental data, including the newest PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) and the evaluation of Young’s modulus as the crucial elasticity parameter. AFM topography, revealed in imaging mode, can be used to monitor changes in live neurons over time, representing a valuable tool for high-resolution detection and monitoring of neuronal morphology. The mechanical properties of living cells can be quantified by force spectroscopy as well as by new AFM. A variety of applications are described, and their relevance for specific research areas discussed. In addition, imaging as well as non-imaging modes can provide specific information, not only about the structural and mechanical properties of neuronal membranes, but also on the cytoplasm, cell nucleus, and particularly cytoskeletal components. Moreover, new AFM is able to provide detailed insight into physical structure and biochemical interactions in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. PMID:28123795

  12. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  13. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  14. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-15

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H{sub ∞} control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  15. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M.

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H∞ control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  16. Model based control of dynamic atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chibum; Salapaka, Srinivasa M

    2015-04-01

    A model-based robust control approach is proposed that significantly improves imaging bandwidth for the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy. A model for cantilever oscillation amplitude and phase dynamics is derived and used for the control design. In particular, the control design is based on a linearized model and robust H(∞) control theory. This design yields a significant improvement when compared to the conventional proportional-integral designs and verified by experiments.

  17. A novel self-sensing technique for tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, Michael G.; Moheimani, S. O. Reza

    2013-12-15

    This work proposes a novel self-sensing tapping-mode atomic force microscopy operation utilizing charge measurement. A microcantilever coated with a single piezoelectric layer is simultaneously used for actuation and deflection sensing. The cantilever can be batch fabricated with existing micro electro mechanical system processes. The setup enables the omission of the optical beam deflection technique which is commonly used to measure the cantilever oscillation amplitude. Due to the high amount of capacitive feedthrough in the measured charge signal, a feedforward control technique is employed to increase the dynamic range from less than 1 dB to approximately 35 dB. Experiments show that the conditioned charge signal achieves excellent signal-to-noise ratio and can therefore be used as a feedback signal for atomic force microscopy imaging.

  18. Mapping nanomechanical properties of live cells using multi-harmonic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, A.; Trigueros, S.; Cartagena, A.; Stevenson, A. P. Z.; Susilo, M.; Nauman, E.; Contera, S. Antoranz

    2011-12-01

    The nanomechanical properties of living cells, such as their surface elastic response and adhesion, have important roles in cellular processes such as morphogenesis, mechano-transduction, focal adhesion, motility, metastasis and drug delivery. Techniques based on quasi-static atomic force microscopy techniques can map these properties, but they lack the spatial and temporal resolution that is needed to observe many of the relevant details. Here, we present a dynamic atomic force microscopy method to map quantitatively the nanomechanical properties of live cells with a throughput (measured in pixels/minute) that is ~10-1,000 times higher than that achieved with quasi-static atomic force microscopy techniques. The local properties of a cell are derived from the 0th, 1st and 2nd harmonic components of the Fourier spectrum of the AFM cantilevers interacting with the cell surface. Local stiffness, stiffness gradient and the viscoelastic dissipation of live Escherichia coli bacteria, rat fibroblasts and human red blood cells were all mapped in buffer solutions. Our method is compatible with commercial atomic force microscopes and could be used to analyse mechanical changes in tumours, cells and biofilm formation with sub-10 nm detail.

  19. Analysis of intraocular lens surface adhesiveness by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Marco; Carbone, Giovanni; Lombardo, Giuseppe; De Santo, Maria P; Barberi, Riccardo

    2009-07-01

    To analyze intraocular lens (IOL) optic surface adhesiveness using atomic force microscopy (AFM). LiCryL Laboratory, University of Calabria, Rende, Italy. The surface adhesive properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), silicone, hydrophilic acrylic, and hydrophobic acrylic IOLs were evaluated by AFM. Analysis was performed at room temperature (21 degrees C) in a liquid environment using the force-versus-distance mode of a commercial instrument (NanoScope III). Measurements were acquired with rectangular silicon cantilevers of a nominal elastic constant of 10 Newton/m. The nominal value of the tip's radius of curvature was 1 mum, and the scanning speed during the acquisitions ranged from 10 to 400 nm/s. The adhesion force measurements showed different characteristics for the various types of IOLs (P<.001, analysis of variance). The hydrophobic acrylic IOL had the largest mean adhesive force (283.75 nanoNewton [nN] +/- 0.14 [SD]) followed by the hydrophilic acrylic (84.76 +/- 0.94 nN), PMMA (45.77 +/- 0.47 nN), and silicone (2.10 +/- 0.01 nN) IOLs. The surface properties of the biomaterials used to manufacture IOLs are important because they can influence the incidence and severity of posterior capsule opacification (PCO). Although further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism of PCO development and the interface interactions between the IOL and capsule, the results in this study may bolster the theory of manufacturing more-adhesive materials to prevent PCO.

  20. Primate lens capsule elasticity assessed using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ziebarth, Noël M.; Arrieta, Esdras; Feuer, William J.; Moy, Vincent T.; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to measure the elasticity of the human and non-human primate lens capsule at the microscopic scale using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Elasticity measurements were performed using AFM on the excised anterior lens capsule from 9 cynomolgus monkey (5.9–8.0 years), 8 hamadryas baboon (2.8–10.1 years), and 18 human lenses (33–79 years). Anterior capsule specimens were obtained by performing a 5mm continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis and collecting the resulting disk of capsular tissue. To remove the lens epithelial cells the specimen was soaked in 0.1% trypsin and 0.02% EDTA for five minutes, washed, and placed on a Petri dish and immersed in DMEM. Elasticity measurements of the capsule were performed with a laboratory-built AFM system custom designed for force measurements of ophthalmic tissues. The capsular specimens were probed with an AFM cantilever tip to produce force-indentation curves for each specimen. Young’s modulus was calculated from the force-indentation curves using the model of Sneddon for a conical indenter. Young’s modulus of elasticity was 20.1–131kPa for the human lens capsule, 9.19–117kPa for the cynomolgus lens capsule, and 13.1–62.4kPa for the baboon lens capsule. Young’s modulus increased significantly with age in humans (p=0.03). The age range of the monkey and baboon samples was not sufficient to justify an analysis of age dependence. The capsule elasticity of young humans (<45 years) was not statistically different from that of the monkey and baboon. In humans, there is an increase in lens capsule stiffness at the microscale that could be responsible for an increase in lens capsule bulk stiffness. PMID:21420953

  1. Enhanced efficiency in the excitation of higher modes for atomic force microscopy and mechanical sensors operated in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Penedo, M. Hormeño, S.; Fernández-Martínez, I.; Luna, M.; Briones, F.; Raman, A.

    2014-10-27

    Recent developments in dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy where several eigenmodes are simultaneously excited in liquid media are proving to be an excellent tool in biological studies. Despite its relevance, the search for a reliable, efficient, and strong cantilever excitation method is still in progress. Herein, we present a theoretical modeling and experimental results of different actuation methods compatible with the operation of Atomic Force Microscopy in liquid environments: ideal acoustic, homogeneously distributed force, distributed applied torque (MAC Mode™), photothermal and magnetostrictive excitation. From the analysis of the results, it can be concluded that magnetostriction is the strongest and most efficient technique for higher eigenmode excitation when using soft cantilevers in liquid media.

  2. Atomic force microscopy force-distance curves with small amplitude ultrasonic modulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chengfu; Chen, Yuhang; Wang, Tian; Chu, Jiaru

    2015-01-01

    Force-distance curves were acquired on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) specimen and a gold film specimen under ultrasonic modulation in atomic force microscopy (AFM). Measurements demonstrated that small amplitude ultrasonic oscillation of either the cantilever or the sample has significant impacts on the characteristics of force-distance curves. With the increase of excitation amplitude, the apparent pull-off force decreased gradually and the hysteresis between the approach and retraction curves reduced significantly. Furthermore, the decrease of the pull-off force was determined to be also relevant to the excitation frequency. With the assistance of contact resonance spectra, the pull-off force was verified to have a near-linear relationship with the cantilever contact oscillation amplitude. Theoretical analysis and subsequent numerical simulations well interpreted the experimental results. The emergence of large oscillating contact forces under ultrasonic modulation altered the force-distance curves, and such a mechanism was ascertained by further ultrasonic AFM imaging. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  4. Surface-charge differentiation of streptavidin and avidin by atomic force microscopy-force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Lisa; Lopez-Elvira, Elena; Baró, Arturo M

    2014-09-15

    Chemical information can be obtained by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force spectroscopy (FS) with atomic or molecular resolution, even in liquid media. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that single molecules of avidin and streptavidin anchored to a biotinylated bilayer can be differentiated by using AFM, even though AFM topographical images of the two proteins are remarkably alike. At physiological pH, the basic glycoprotein avidin is positively charged, whereas streptavidin is a neutral protein. This charge difference can be determined with AFM, which can probe electrostatic double-layer forces by using FS. The force curves, owing to the electrostatic interaction, show major differences when measured on top of each protein as well as on the lipid substrate. FS data show that the two proteins are negatively charged. Nevertheless, avidin and streptavidin can be clearly distinguished, thus demonstrating the sensitivity of AFM to detect small changes in the charge state of macromolecules.

  5. Minimizing tip-sample forces in jumping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Esteban, A; Horcas, I; Hernando-Pérez, M; Ares, P; Pérez-Berná, A J; San Martín, C; Carrascosa, J L; de Pablo, P J; Gómez-Herrero, J

    2012-03-01

    Control and minimization of tip-sample interaction forces are imperative tasks to maximize the performance of atomic force microscopy. In particular, when imaging soft biological matter in liquids, the cantilever dragging force prevents identification of the tip-sample mechanical contact, resulting in deleterious interaction with the specimen. In this work we present an improved jumping mode procedure that allows detecting the tip-sample contact with high accuracy, thus minimizing the scanning forces (-100 pN) during the approach cycles. To illustrate this method we report images of human adenovirus and T7 bacteriophage particles which are prone to uncontrolled modifications when using conventional jumping mode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Easy and direct method for calibrating atomic force microscopy lateral force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhua; Bonin, Keith; Guthold, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We have designed and tested a new, inexpensive, easy-to-make and easy-to-use calibration standard for atomic force microscopy (AFM) lateral force measurements. This new standard simply consists of a small glass fiber of known dimensions and Young’s modulus, which is fixed at one end to a substrate and which can be bent laterally with the AFM tip at the other end. This standard has equal or less error than the commonly used method of using beam mechanics to determine a cantilever’s lateral force constant. It is transferable, thus providing a universal tool for comparing the calibrations of different instruments. It does not require knowledge of the cantilever dimensions and composition or its tip height. This standard also allows direct conversion of the photodiode signal to force and, thus, circumvents the requirement for a sensor response (sensitivity) measurement. PMID:17614616

  7. Atomic-force microscopy of submicron films of electroactive polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamov, D. D.; Kornilov, V. M.; Lachinov, A. N.; Kraikin, V. A.; Ionova, I. A.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic-force microscopy is used to study the supramolecular structure of submicron films of electroactive thermally stable polymer (polydiphenylenephthalide (PDP)). It has been demonstrated that PDP films produced using centrifuging are solid homogeneous films with thicknesses down to several nanometers, which correspond to two or three monomolecular layers. The film volume is structurized at thicknesses greater than 100 nm. The study of the rheological properties of solutions used for film production yields a crossover point that separates the domains of strongly diluted and semidiluted solutions. A transition from the globular structure to the associate structure is observed in films that are produced using solutions with a boundary concentration. A model of the formation of polymer film that involves the presence of associates in the original solution is discussed.

  8. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale.

  9. GaN nanowire tips for nanoscale atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Behzadirad, Mahmoud; Nami, Mohsen; Rishinaramagalam, Ashwin; Feezell, Daniel; Busani, Tito

    2017-04-07

    Imaging of high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with sharp edges and straight walls in nanoscale metrology by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been challenging due to the mechanical properties and conical geometry of the majority of available commercial tips. Here we report on the fabrication of GaN probes for nanoscale metrology of high-aspect-ratio structures to enhance the resolution of AFM imaging and improve the durability of AFM tips. GaN nanowires (NWs) were fabricated using bottom-up and top-down techniques and bonded to Si cantilevers to scan vertical trenches on Si substrates. Over several scans, the GaN probes demonstrated excellent durability while scanning uneven structures and showed resolution enhancements in topography images, independent of scan direction, compared to commercial Si tips.

  10. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids.

    PubMed

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this "thermal noise method" is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  11. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this "thermal noise method" is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  12. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  13. NMR Spectroscopy for Thin Films by Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Won, Soonho; Saun, Seung-Bo; Lee, Soonchil; Lee, SangGap; Kim, Kiwoong; Han, Yunseok

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a fundamental research tool that is widely used in many fields. Despite its powerful applications, unfortunately the low sensitivity of conventional NMR makes it difficult to study thin film or nano-sized samples. In this work, we report the first NMR spectrum obtained from general thin films by using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). To minimize the amount of imaging information inevitably mixed into the signal when a gradient field is used, we adopted a large magnet with a flat end with a diameter of 336 μm that generates a homogeneous field on the sample plane and a field gradient in a direction perpendicular to the plane. Cyclic adiabatic inversion was used in conjunction with periodic phase inversion of the frequency shift to maximize the SNR. In this way, we obtained the 19F NMR spectrum for a 34 nm-thick CaF2 thin film. PMID:24217000

  14. Atomic force microscopy spring constant determination in viscous liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Pirzer, Tobias; Hugel, Thorsten

    2009-03-15

    The spring constant of cantilever in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is often calibrated from thermal noise spectra. Essential for accurate implementation of this 'thermal noise method' is an appropriate fitting function and procedure. Here, we survey the commonly used fitting functions and examine their applicability in a range of environments. We find that viscous liquid environments are extremely problematic due to the frequency dependent nature of the damping coefficient. The deviations from the true spring constant were sometimes more than 100% when utilizing the fit routines built into the three investigated commercial AFM instruments; similar problems can arise with homebuilt AFMs. We discuss the reasons for this problem, especially the limits of the fitting process. Finally, we present a thermal noise based procedure and an improved fit function to determine the spring constant with AFMs in fluids of various viscosities.

  15. Scanning force microscopy reveals ellipsoid shape of chicken erythrocyte nucleosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, W; Henderson, E

    1996-01-01

    Scanning force microscopy was used to investigate the conformation of hypotonic spread chicken erythrocyte nucleosomes. Nucleosomal chains were prepared in low-salt conditions and fixed before centrifugation onto glass coverslips and air drying. The images of single nucleosomes were isolated by image processing, and the height and geometry of the resulting three-dimensional structures were investigated. An average nucleosome height of 4.2 +/- 1.1 nm was determined. A virtual cross section at half-maximum height of the nucleosome structure was used for a characterization of the nucleosome geometry. The shape of this cross section was best described by an ellipse with an aspect ratio (major/minor axis) of approximately 1.30. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:8889198

  16. Measuring viscoelasticity of soft samples using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, S; Berger, E J

    2009-09-01

    Relaxation indentation experiments using atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to obtain viscoelastic material properties of soft samples. The quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model formulated by Fung (1972, "Stress Strain History Relations of Soft Tissues in Simple Elongation," in Biomechanics, Its Foundation and Objectives, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, pp. 181-207) for uniaxial compression data was modified for the indentation test data in this study. Hertz contact mechanics was used for the instantaneous deformation, and a reduced relaxation function based on continuous spectrum is used for the time-dependent part in the model. The modified QLV indentation model presents a novel method to obtain viscoelastic properties from indentation data independent of relaxation times of the test. The major objective of the present study is to develop the QLV indentation model and implement the model on AFM indentation data for 1% agarose gel and a viscoelastic polymer using spherical indenter.

  17. Nanoprocessing of layered crystalline materials by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Shojiro; Wang, Mei

    2015-01-01

    By taking advantage of the mechanical anisotropy of crystalline materials, processing at a single-layer level can be realized for layered crystalline materials with periodically weak bonds. Mica (muscovite), graphite, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and boron nitride have layered structures, and there is little interaction between the cleavage planes existing in the basal planes of these materials. Moreover, it is easy to image the atoms on the basal plane, where the processed shape can be observed on the atomic level. This study reviews research evaluating the nanometer-scale wear and friction as well as the nanometer-scale mechanical processing of muscovite using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It also summarizes recent AFM results obtained by our research group regarding the atomic-scale mechanical processing of layered materials including mica, graphite, MoS2, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  18. Analyzing piezoresponse force microscopy for reconstruction of probed ferroelectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, K.; Liu, Y. Y.; Liu, Y. M.; Li, J. Y.

    2012-09-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) has emerged as the tool of choice for characterizing piezoelectric and ferroelectric materials at nanoscale, yet the interpretation of PFM remains to be difficult and sometimes ambiguous. Built on earlier works, we developed a numerical integration scheme to analyze the expected PFM response in ferroelectrics with arbitrary domain configurations, with the ultimate goal to accurately reconstruct the underlying ferroelectric structure from PFM measurements. Using such technique, we demonstrated that the relationship between the effective and intrinsic piezoelectric coefficients is sensitive to a variety of factors that are intrinsic to the probed materials, and showed that the PFM mapping is not only influenced by polarization distribution on the sample surface but also three-dimensional polarization distribution inside the material. While relatively simple domain structures were used for demonstration, the approach is general, and can be applied to ferroelectrics with arbitrary polarization distributions.

  19. Pore size of agarose gels by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, N; Maaloum, M; Tinland, B

    1997-01-01

    The pore size of agarose gel in water at different concentrations was directly measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experiment was specially designed to work under aqueous conditions and allows direct observation of the "unperturbed" gel without invasive treatment. The pore size a as a function of gel concentration C shows a power law dependence a approximately C-gamma, where gamma lies between the prediction of the Ogston model for a random array of straight chains, 0.5, and the value predicted by De Gennes for a network of flexible chains, 0.75. We confirm that gels present a wide pore size distribution and show that it narrows as the concentration increases.

  20. Investigation of crossed SAW fields by scanning acoustic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Behme, G; Hesjedal, T

    2001-07-01

    We used multimode scanning acoustic force microscopy (SAFM) for studying noncollinearly propagating Rayleigh and Love wave fields. By analyzing torsion and bending movement of SAFM cantilever, normal and in-plane wave oscillation components are accessible. The SAFM principle is the down-conversion of surface oscillations into cantilever vibrations caused by the nonlinearity of the tip-sample interaction. Through mixing of complementary oscillation components, phase velocities of crossed Rayleigh waves on GaAs and crossed Rayleigh and Love waves on the layered system SiO2/ST-cut quartz were obtained simultaneously. Now, it is possible to investigate elastic properties of submicron areas through multimode SAFM measurements. Finally, we present mixing experiments of four SAWs on GaAs and discuss the various influences on the measured SAFM amplitude and phase contrast.

  1. Atomic force microscopy for the examination of single cell rheology.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Takaharu

    2012-11-01

    Rheological properties of living cells play important roles in regulating their various biological functions. Therefore, measuring cell rheology is crucial for not only elucidating the relationship between the cell mechanics and functions, but also mechanical diagnosis of single cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is becoming a useful technique for single cell diagnosis because it allows us to measure the rheological properties of adherent cells at any region on the surface without any modifications. In this review, we summarize AFM techniques for examining single cell rheology in frequency and time domains. Recent applications of AFM for investigating the statistical analysis of single cell rheology in comparison to other micro-rheological techniques are reviewed, and we discuss what specificity and universality of cell rheology are extracted using AFM.

  2. Atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Membrane proteins comprise 30% of the proteome of higher organisms. They mediate energy conversion, signal transduction, solute transport and secretion. Their native environment is a bilayer in a physiological buffer solution, hence their structure and function are preferably assessed in this environment. The surface structure of single membrane proteins can be determined in buffer solutions by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at a lateral resolution of less than 1 nm and a vertical resolution of 0.1-0.2 nm. Moreover, single proteins can be directly addressed, stuck to the AFM stylus and subsequently unfolded, revealing the molecular interactions of the protein studied. The examples discussed here illustrate the power of AFM in the structural analysis of membrane proteins in a native environment.

  3. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale. PMID:28443645

  4. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-04-26

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale.

  5. Measuring the elasticity of plant cells with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of biological materials impact their functions. This is most evident in plants where the cell wall contains each cell's contents and connects each cell to its neighbors irreversibly. Examining the physical properties of the plant cell wall is key to understanding how plant cells, tissues, and organs grow and gain the shapes important for their respective functions. Here, we present an atomic force microscopy-based nanoindentation method for examining the elasticity of plant cells at the subcellular, cellular, and tissue level. We describe the important areas of experimental design to be considered when planning and executing these types of experiments and provide example data as illustration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Decade of Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: Progress, Challenges, and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Rar, Andrei; Jesse, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is a near-universal characteristic of inorganic and biological systems alike, with examples ranging from piezoelectricity in ferroelectric perovskites to complex, electromechanical couplings in electromotor proteins in cellular membranes. Understanding electromechanical functionality in materials such as ferroelectric nanocrystals and thin films, relaxor ferroelectrics, and biosystems requires probing these properties on the nanometer level of individual grain, domain, or protein fibril. In the last decade, piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) was established as a powerful tool for nanoscale imaging, spectroscopy, and manipulation of ferroelectric materials. Here, we present principles and recent advances in PFM, including vector and frequency-dependent imaging of piezoelectric materials, briefly review applications for ferroelectric materials, discuss prospects for electromechanical imaging of local crystallographic and molecular orientations and disorder, and summarize future challenges and opportunities for PFM emerging in the second decade since its invention.

  7. Characterization of Gorleben groundwater colloids by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Plaschke, M; Römer, J; Kim, J I

    2002-11-01

    Groundwater colloids from the Gorleben site (Lower Saxony, Germany) are characterized in the presence of Eu(III) by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) with phase contrast imaging. Using a liquid cell the method allows investigations of samples being in contact with aqueous solution. This ensures that complex structures are kept in their native hydrated state. Different types of colloids and aggregates are found by AFM, e.g., spherical particles, fibrous structures, and structures which appear to be hollow. A partial coating of the edges of clay particles with humic colloids can be assumed from phase contrast images. Therefore, aquatic colloids and their aggregates found in Gorleben groundwater can be characterized as a complex mixture of components, which may influence the migration of groundwater contaminants in different processes.

  8. Monoclonal antibody aggregation intermediates visualized by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanjoo; Kirchmeier, Marc; Mach, Henryk

    2011-02-01

    Ubiquitous but highly variable processes of therapeutic protein aggregation remain poorly characterized, especially in the context of common infusion reactions and clinical immunogenicity. Among the numerous challenges is the characterization of intermediate steps that lead to the appearance of precipitates. Although the biophysical methods for elucidation of secondary and tertiary structures as well as overall size distribution are typically well established in the development laboratories, the use of molecular scale imaging techniques is still relatively rare due to low throughput and technical complexity. In this work, we present the use of atomic force microscopy to examine morphology of monoclonal antibody aggregates. Despite varying in primary structure as a result of different complementarity defining regions, most antibodies studied exhibited a similar aggregation intermediate consisting of several monomers. However, the manner of subsequent condensation of these oligomers appeared to differ between the antibodies, suggesting stability-dependent mechanisms.

  9. Nanoscale imaging of Bacillus thuringiensis flagella using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Annika; Dupres, Vincent; Delestrait, Guillaume; Mahillon, Jacques; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2012-02-01

    Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in cell surface appendages.Because bacterial flagella play essential roles in various processes (motility, adhesion, host interactions, secretion), studying their expression in relation to function is an important challenge. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to gain insight into the nanoscale surface properties of two wild-type and four mutant strains of Bacillus thuringiensis exhibiting various levels of flagellation. We show that, unlike AFM in liquid, AFM in air is a simple and reliable approach to observe the morphological details of the bacteria, and to quantify the density and dimensions of their flagella. We found that the amount of flagella expressed by the six strains, as observed at the nanoscale, correlates with their microscopic swarming motility. These observations provide novel information on flagella expression in Gram-positive bacteria and demonstrate the power of AFM in genetic studies for the fast assessment of the phenotypic characteristics of bacterial strains altered in

  10. Ultrastructural organization of amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, A K; MacPhee, C E; Zurdo, J; Morozova-Roche, L A; Hill, H A; Dobson, C M; Davis, J J

    2000-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been employed to investigate the structural organization of amyloid fibrils produced in vitro from three very different polypeptide sequences. The systems investigated are a 10-residue peptide derived from the sequence of transthyretin, the 90-residue SH3 domain of bovine phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase, and human wild-type lysozyme, a 130-residue protein containing four disulfide bridges. The results demonstrate distinct similarities between the structures formed by the different classes of fibrils despite the contrasting nature of the polypeptide species involved. SH3 and lysozyme fibrils consist typically of four protofilaments, exhibiting a left-handed twist along the fibril axis. The substructure of TTR(10-19) fibrils is not resolved by atomic force microscopy and their uniform appearance is suggestive of a regular self-association of very thin filaments. We propose that the exact number and orientation of protofilaments within amyloid fibrils is dictated by packing of the regions of the polypeptide chains that are not directly involved in formation of the cross-beta core of the fibrils. The results obtained for these proteins, none of which is directly associated with any human disease, are closely similar to those of disease-related amyloid fibrils, supporting the concept that amyloid is a generic structure of polypeptide chains. The detailed architecture of an individual fibril, however, depends on the manner in which the protofilaments assemble into the fibrillar structure, which in turn is dependent on the sequence of the polypeptide and the conditions under which the fibril is formed. PMID:11106631

  11. Ultrastructural organization of amyloid fibrils by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, A K; MacPhee, C E; Zurdo, J; Morozova-Roche, L A; Hill, H A; Dobson, C M; Davis, J J

    2000-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been employed to investigate the structural organization of amyloid fibrils produced in vitro from three very different polypeptide sequences. The systems investigated are a 10-residue peptide derived from the sequence of transthyretin, the 90-residue SH3 domain of bovine phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase, and human wild-type lysozyme, a 130-residue protein containing four disulfide bridges. The results demonstrate distinct similarities between the structures formed by the different classes of fibrils despite the contrasting nature of the polypeptide species involved. SH3 and lysozyme fibrils consist typically of four protofilaments, exhibiting a left-handed twist along the fibril axis. The substructure of TTR(10-19) fibrils is not resolved by atomic force microscopy and their uniform appearance is suggestive of a regular self-association of very thin filaments. We propose that the exact number and orientation of protofilaments within amyloid fibrils is dictated by packing of the regions of the polypeptide chains that are not directly involved in formation of the cross-beta core of the fibrils. The results obtained for these proteins, none of which is directly associated with any human disease, are closely similar to those of disease-related amyloid fibrils, supporting the concept that amyloid is a generic structure of polypeptide chains. The detailed architecture of an individual fibril, however, depends on the manner in which the protofilaments assemble into the fibrillar structure, which in turn is dependent on the sequence of the polypeptide and the conditions under which the fibril is formed.

  12. Mapping buried nanostructures using subsurface ultrasonic resonance force microscopy.

    PubMed

    van Es, Maarten H; Mohtashami, Abbas; Thijssen, Rutger M T; Piras, Daniele; van Neer, Paul L M J; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2017-09-23

    Nondestructive subsurface nanoimaging of buried nanostructures is considered to be extremely challenging and is essential for the reliable manufacturing of nanotechnology products such as three-dimensional (3D) transistors, 3D NAND memory, and future quantum electronics. In scanning probe microscopy (SPM), a microcantilever with a sharp tip can measure the properties of a surface with nanometer resolution. SPM combined with ultrasound excitation, known as ultrasound SPM, has shown the capability to image buried nanoscale features. In this paper, the development of a modified type of ultrasound SPM called subsurface ultrasonic resonance force microscopy (SSURFM) is reported. The capability and versatility of this method is demonstrated by the subsurface imaging of various samples including rigid structures buried under a soft matrix (aluminum under a polymer), rigid structures buried under multiple layers (aluminum under a polymer and titanium layer), and rigid structures under a rigid matrix (aluminum under silicon oxide). Furthermore, tuning and optimization of the image contrast are reported. The experimental results provide possible new industrial metrology and inspection solutions for nanostructures buried below the surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Hydrodynamic damping of tip oscillation in pulsed-force atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Davies, M. C.; Roberts, C. J.; Tendler, S. J. B.; Williams, P. M.

    2000-11-01

    Although proven a powerful technique for mapping adhesion and surface mechanical properties at high lateral resolution, pulsed-force (PF) atomic force microscopy (AFM) is problematic in liquid, due to heavy hydrodynamic damping of cantilever vibration. We present computer simulations using the simple harmonic oscillation model to explore the changes of deflection signal profile that occur from air to liquid environment. In agreement with experimental results, we find that oscillation phase lag plays a key role in the signal profile. When imaging in liquid, the deflection caused by liquid oscillation may exceed that caused by tip-sample contact repulsion and adhesion, which brings particular consideration for PF-AFM imaging in liquid.

  14. Note: Electrical resolution during conductive atomic force microscopy measurements under different environmental conditions and contact forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lanza, M.; Porti, M.; Nafria, M.; Aymerich, X.; Whittaker, E.; Hamilton, B.

    2010-10-15

    Conductive atomic force microscopy experiments on gate dielectrics in air, nitrogen, and UHV have been compared to evaluate the impact of the environment on topography and electrical measurements. In current images, an increase of the lateral resolution and a reduction of the conductivity were observed in N{sub 2} and, especially, in UHV (where current depends also on the contact force). Both effects were related to the reduction/elimination of the water layer between the tip and the sample in N{sub 2}/UHV. Therefore, since current measurements are very sensitive to environmental conditions, these factors must be taken into consideration when comparisons between several experiments are performed.

  15. Atomic species identification at the (101) anatase surface by simultaneous scanning tunnelling and atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Todorović, Milica; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Moreno, César; Ryan, James William; León, Carmen Pérez; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Palomares, Emilio; Matolín, Vladimír; Fujita, Daisuke; Perez, Ruben; Custance, Oscar

    2015-06-01

    Anatase is a pivotal material in devices for energy-harvesting applications and catalysis. Methods for the accurate characterization of this reducible oxide at the atomic scale are critical in the exploration of outstanding properties for technological developments. Here we combine atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), supported by first-principles calculations, for the simultaneous imaging and unambiguous identification of atomic species at the (101) anatase surface. We demonstrate that dynamic AFM-STM operation allows atomic resolution imaging within the material's band gap. Based on key distinguishing features extracted from calculations and experiments, we identify candidates for the most common surface defects. Our results pave the way for the understanding of surface processes, like adsorption of metal dopants and photoactive molecules, that are fundamental for the catalytic and photovoltaic applications of anatase, and demonstrate the potential of dynamic AFM-STM for the characterization of wide band gap materials.

  16. Atomic species identification at the (101) anatase surface by simultaneous scanning tunnelling and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Todorović, Milica; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Moreno, César; Ryan, James William; León, Carmen Pérez; Sagisaka, Keisuke; Palomares, Emilio; Matolín, Vladimír; Fujita, Daisuke; Perez, Ruben; Custance, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Anatase is a pivotal material in devices for energy-harvesting applications and catalysis. Methods for the accurate characterization of this reducible oxide at the atomic scale are critical in the exploration of outstanding properties for technological developments. Here we combine atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), supported by first-principles calculations, for the simultaneous imaging and unambiguous identification of atomic species at the (101) anatase surface. We demonstrate that dynamic AFM-STM operation allows atomic resolution imaging within the material's band gap. Based on key distinguishing features extracted from calculations and experiments, we identify candidates for the most common surface defects. Our results pave the way for the understanding of surface processes, like adsorption of metal dopants and photoactive molecules, that are fundamental for the catalytic and photovoltaic applications of anatase, and demonstrate the potential of dynamic AFM-STM for the characterization of wide band gap materials. PMID:26118408

  17. Physical mechanisms of megahertz vibrations and nonlinear detection in ultrasonic force and related microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Bosse, J. L.; Huey, B. D.; Tovee, P. D.; Kolosov, O. V.

    2014-04-14

    Use of high frequency (HF) vibrations at MHz frequencies in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) advanced nanoscale property mapping to video rates, allowed use of cantilever dynamics for mapping nanomechanical properties of stiff materials, sensing μs time scale phenomena in nanostructures, and enabled detection of subsurface features with nanoscale resolution. All of these methods critically depend on the generally poor characterized HF behaviour of AFM cantilevers in contact with a studied sample, spatial and frequency response of piezotransducers, and transfer of ultrasonic vibrations between the probe and a specimen. Focusing particularly on Ultrasonic Force Microscopy (UFM), this work is also applicable to waveguide UFM, heterodyne force microscopy, and near-field holographic microscopy, all methods that exploit nonlinear tip-surface force interactions at high frequencies. Leveraging automated multidimensional measurements, spectroscopic UFM (sUFM) is introduced to investigate a range of common experimental parameters, including piezotransducer excitation frequency, probed position, ultrasonic amplitude, cantilever geometry, spring constant, and normal force. Consistent with studies of influence of each of these factors, the data-rich sUFM signatures allow efficient optimization of ultrasonic-AFM based measurements, leading to best practices recommendations of using longer cantilevers with lower fundamental resonance, while at the same time increasing the central frequency of HF piezo-actuators, and only comparing results within areas on the order of few μm{sup 2} unless calibrated directly or compared with in-the-imaged area standards. Diverse materials such as Si, Cr, and photoresist are specifically investigated. This work thereby provides essential insight into the reliable use of MHz vibrations with AFM and provides direct evidence substantiating phenomena such as sensitivity to adhesion, diminished friction for certain ultrasonic conditions, and the

  18. Multimodal microscopy using ‘half and half’ contact mode and ultrasonic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skilbeck, M. S.; Marsden, A. J.; Cao, G.; Kinloch, I. A.; Young, R. J.; Edwards, R. S.; Wilson, N. R.

    2014-08-01

    Advances in the design and fabrication of multifunctional nanostructured materials require characterization techniques capable of simultaneously mapping multiple material properties with nanoscale resolution. We show that this can be achieved by combining nanomechanical information from ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) with simultaneously acquired friction force and conductivity measurements from contact mode scanning. This utilizes a ‘half and half’ approach, where the AFM is operated alternatively in UFM and contact mode, with the switching rate sufficiently fast that simultaneous contact mode and UFM information is acquired at each pixel of an image. We demonstrate the potential of such a multimodal approach through its application to composite systems consisting of graphene islands on a copper surface, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a silicon oxide substrate, and a graphene epoxy composite. The half and half approach enables the friction force to be measured without topographical cross-talk. Application to the SWNT sample reveals a further advantage; due to the superlubricity of UFM it enables standard contact mode imaging techniques to be applied to delicate samples.

  19. Multimodal microscopy using 'half and half' contact mode and ultrasonic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Skilbeck, M S; Marsden, A J; Cao, G; Kinloch, I A; Young, R J; Edwards, R S; Wilson, N R

    2014-08-22

    Advances in the design and fabrication of multifunctional nanostructured materials require characterization techniques capable of simultaneously mapping multiple material properties with nanoscale resolution. We show that this can be achieved by combining nanomechanical information from ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) with simultaneously acquired friction force and conductivity measurements from contact mode scanning. This utilizes a 'half and half' approach, where the AFM is operated alternatively in UFM and contact mode, with the switching rate sufficiently fast that simultaneous contact mode and UFM information is acquired at each pixel of an image. We demonstrate the potential of such a multimodal approach through its application to composite systems consisting of graphene islands on a copper surface, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a silicon oxide substrate, and a graphene epoxy composite. The half and half approach enables the friction force to be measured without topographical cross-talk. Application to the SWNT sample reveals a further advantage; due to the superlubricity of UFM it enables standard contact mode imaging techniques to be applied to delicate samples.

  20. Single-Crystal Diamond Nanowire Tips for Ultrasensitive Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Degen, C L

    2015-12-09

    We report the fabrication, integration, and assessment of sharp diamond tips for ultrasensitive force microscopy experiments. Two types of tips, corresponding to the upper and lower halves of a diamond nanowire, were fabricated by top-down plasma etching from a single-crystalline substrate. The lower, surface-attached halves can be directly integrated into lithographically defined nanostructures, like cantilevers. The upper, detachable halves result in diamond nanowires with a tunable diameter (50-500 nm) and lengths of a few microns. Tip radii were around 10 nm and tip apex angles around 15°. We demonstrate the integration of diamond nanowires for use as scanning tips onto ultrasensitive pendulum-style silicon cantilevers. We find the noncontact friction and frequency jitter to be exceptionally low, with no degradation in the intrinsic mechanical quality factor (Q ≈ 130,000) down to tip-to-surface distances of about 10 nm. Our results are an encouraging step toward further improvement of the sensitivity and resolution of force-detected magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Mechanics of proteins with a focus on atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rico, Felix; Rigato, Annafrancesca; Picas, Laura; Scheuring, Simon

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of proteins to function relies on a balance between molecular stability to maintain their folded state and structural flexibility allowing conformational changes related to biological function. Among many others, four different examples can be chosen. The giant protein titin is stretched and can unfold during muscle contraction providing passive elasticity to muscle tissue; myoglobin adsorbs and releases oxygen molecules thank to conformational changes in its structure; the outer membrane protein G (OmpG) is a bacterial porin with a long and flexible loop that modulates gating; and the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin adapts its cytosolic half to allow proton pumping. All these conformational changes triggered either by chemical or by physical cues, require mechanical flexibility or elasticity of certain protein domains. While the methods to determine protein structure, X-ray crystallography above all, have been dramatically improved over the last decades, the number of tools that directly measure the mechanical flexibility of proteins and protein domains is still limited. In this tutorial, after a brief introduction to protein structure, we present some of the available techniques to estimate protein flexibility, then focusing on atomic force microscopy (AFM). We describe the principles of the technique and its various imaging and force spectroscopy modes of operation that allow probing the elasticity of proteins, protein domains and their surrounding environment.

  2. On mapping subangstrom electron clouds with force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wright, C Alan; Solares, Santiago D

    2011-11-09

    In 2004 Hembacher et al. (Science 2004, 305, 380-383) reported simultaneous higher-harmonics atomic force mocroscopy (AFM)/scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images acquired while scanning a graphite surface with a tungsten tip. They interpreted the observed subatomic features in the AFM images as the signature of lobes of increased electron density at the tungsten tip apex. Although these intriguing images have stirred controversy, an in-depth theoretical feasibility study has not yet been produced. Here we report on the development of a method for simulating higher harmonics AFM images and its application to the same system. Our calculations suggest that four lobes of increased electron density are expected to be present at a W(001) tip apex atom and that the corresponding higher harmonics AFM images of graphite can exhibit 4-fold symmetry features. Despite these promising results, open questions remain since the calculated amplitudes of the higher harmonics generated by the short-range forces are on the order of hundredths of picometers, leading to very small corrugations in the theoretical images. Additionally, the complex, intermittent nature of the tip-sample interaction, which causes constant readjustment of the tip and sample orbitals as the tip approaches and retracts from the surface, prevents a direct quantitative connection between the electron density and the AFM image features.

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy and pharmacology: from microbiology to cancerology.

    PubMed

    Pillet, Flavien; Chopinet, Louise; Formosa, Cécile; Dague, Etienne

    2014-03-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been extensively used to study biological samples. Researchers take advantage of its ability to image living samples to increase our fundamental knowledge (biophysical properties/biochemical behavior) on living cell surface properties, at the nano-scale. AFM, in the imaging modes, can probe cells morphological modifications induced by drugs. In the force spectroscopy mode, it is possible to follow the nanomechanical properties of a cell and to probe the mechanical modifications induced by drugs. AFM can be used to map single molecule distribution at the cell surface. We will focus on a collection of results aiming at evaluating the nano-scale effects of drugs, by AFM. Studies on yeast, bacteria and mammal cells will illustrate our discussion. Especially, we will show how AFM can help in getting a better understanding of drug mechanism of action. This review demonstrates that AFM is a versatile tool, useful in pharmacology. In microbiology, it has been used to study the drugs fighting Candida albicans or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The major conclusions are a better understanding of the microbes' cell wall and of the drugs mechanism of action. In cancerology, AFM has been used to explore the effects of cytotoxic drugs or as an innovative diagnostic technology. AFM has provided original results on cultured cells, cells extracted from patient and directly on patient biopsies. This review enhances the interest of AFM technologies for pharmacology. The applications reviewed range from microbiology to cancerology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Atomic force microscopy-based characterization and design of biointerfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Gaub, Hermann E.; Newton, Richard; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Gerber, Christoph; Müller, Daniel J.

    2017-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based methods have matured into a powerful nanoscopic platform, enabling the characterization of a wide range of biological and synthetic biointerfaces ranging from tissues, cells, membranes, proteins, nucleic acids and functional materials. Although the unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio of AFM enables the imaging of biological interfaces from the cellular to the molecular scale, AFM-based force spectroscopy allows their mechanical, chemical, conductive or electrostatic, and biological properties to be probed. The combination of AFM-based imaging and spectroscopy structurally maps these properties and allows their 3D manipulation with molecular precision. In this Review, we survey basic and advanced AFM-related approaches and evaluate their unique advantages and limitations in imaging, sensing, parameterizing and designing biointerfaces. It is anticipated that in the next decade these AFM-related techniques will have a profound influence on the way researchers view, characterize and construct biointerfaces, thereby helping to solve and address fundamental challenges that cannot be addressed with other techniques.

  5. Generation of living cell arrays for atomic force microscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Cécile; Pillet, Flavien; Schiavone, Marion; Duval, Raphaël E; Ressier, Laurence; Dague, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful tool for studying the morphology or the nanomechanical and adhesive properties of live microorganisms under physiological conditions. However, to perform AFM imaging, living cells must be immobilized firmly enough to withstand the lateral forces exerted by the scanning tip, but without denaturing them. This protocol describes how to immobilize living cells, ranging from spores of bacteria to yeast cells, into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamps, with no chemical or physical denaturation. This protocol generates arrays of living cells, allowing statistically relevant measurements to be obtained from AFM measurements, which can increase the relevance of results. The first step of the protocol is to generate a microstructured silicon master, from which many microstructured PDMS stamps can be replicated. Living cells are finally assembled into the microstructures of these PDMS stamps using a convective and capillary assembly. The complete procedure can be performed in 1 week, although the first step is done only once, and thus repeats can be completed within 1 d.

  6. Mechanics of proteins with a focus on atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of proteins to function relies on a balance between molecular stability to maintain their folded state and structural flexibility allowing conformational changes related to biological function. Among many others, four different examples can be chosen. The giant protein titin is stretched and can unfold during muscle contraction providing passive elasticity to muscle tissue; myoglobin adsorbs and releases oxygen molecules thank to conformational changes in its structure; the outer membrane protein G (OmpG) is a bacterial porin with a long and flexible loop that modulates gating; and the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin adapts its cytosolic half to allow proton pumping. All these conformational changes triggered either by chemical or by physical cues, require mechanical flexibility or elasticity of certain protein domains. While the methods to determine protein structure, X-ray crystallography above all, have been dramatically improved over the last decades, the number of tools that directly measure the mechanical flexibility of proteins and protein domains is still limited. In this tutorial, after a brief introduction to protein structure, we present some of the available techniques to estimate protein flexibility, then focusing on atomic force microscopy (AFM). We describe the principles of the technique and its various imaging and force spectroscopy modes of operation that allow probing the elasticity of proteins, protein domains and their surrounding environment. PMID:24565326

  7. Isoelectric point of fluorite by direct force measurements using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Assemi, Shoeleh; Nalaskowski, Jakub; Miller, Jan D; Johnson, William P

    2006-02-14

    Interaction forces between a fluorite (CaF2) surface and colloidal silica were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in 1 x 10(-3) M NaNO3 at different pH values. Forces between the silica colloid and fluorite flat were measured at a range of pH values above the isoelectric point (IEP) of silica so that the forces were mainly controlled by the fluorite surface charge. In this way, the IEP of the fluorite surface was deduced from AFM force curves at pH approximately 9.2. Experimental force versus separation distance curves were in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on long-range electrostatic interactions, allowing the potential of the fluorite surface to be estimated from the experimental force curves. AFM-deduced surface potentials were generally lower than the published zeta potentials obtained from electrokinetic methods for powdered samples. Differences in methodology, orientation of the fluorite, surface carbonation, and equilibration time all could have contributed to this difference.

  8. Nanoscale Characterization and Determination of Adhesion Forces of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pili by Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Touhami, Ahmed; Jericho, Manfred H.; Boyd, Jessica M.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    2006-01-01

    Type IV pili play an important role in bacterial adhesion, motility, and biofilm formation. Here we present high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of type IV pili from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. An individual pilus ranges in length from 0.5 to 7 μm and has a diameter from 4 to 6 nm, although often, pili bundles in which the individual filaments differed in both length and diameter were seen. By attaching bacteria to AFM tips, it was possible to fasten the bacteria to mica surfaces by pili tethers. Force spectra of tethered pili gave rupture forces of 95 pN. The slopes of force curves close to the rupture force were nearly linear but showed little variation with pilus length. Furthermore, force curves could not be fitted with wormlike-chain polymer stretch models when using realistic persistence lengths for pili. The observation that the slopes near rupture did not depend on the pili length suggests that they do not represent elastic properties of the pili. It is possible that this region of the force curves is determined by an elastic element that is part of the bacterial wall, although further experiments are needed to confirm this. PMID:16385026

  9. A constant compliance force modulation technique for scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging of polymer surface elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Stroup, E.W.; Pungor, A/

    2012-01-01

    A new method of force modulation scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging based on a constant compliance feedback loop is presented. The feedback adjusts the loading force applied by the SFM tip to the surface in order to maintain a constant compliance beneath the tip. The new method, constant compliance force modulation (CCFM), has the advantage of being able to quantify the loading force exerted by the tip onto the sample surface and thus to estimate the elastic modulus of the material probed by the SFM tip. Once the elastic modulus of one region is known, the elastic moduli of other surface regions can be estimated from the spatial map of loading forces using the Hertz model of deformation. Force vs. displacement measurements made on one surface locality could also be used to estimate the local modulus. Several model surfaces, including a rubber-toughened epoxy polymer blend which showed clearly resolved compliant rubber phases within the harder epoxy matrix, were analyzed with the CCFM technique to illustrate the method’s application. PMID:9195751

  10. A constant compliance force modulation technique for scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging of polymer surface elasticity.

    PubMed

    Stroup, E W; Pungor, A; Hlady, V

    1996-12-01

    A new method of force modulation scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging based on a constant compliance feedback loop is presented. The feedback adjusts the loading force applied by the SFM tip to the surface in order to maintain a constant compliance beneath the tip. The new method, constant compliance force modulation (CCFM), has the advantage of being able to quantify the loading force exerted by the tip onto the sample surface and thus to estimate the elastic modulus of the material probed by the SFM tip. Once the elastic modulus of one region is known, the elastic moduli of other surface regions can be estimated from the spatial map of loading forces using the Hertz model of deformation. Force vs. displacement measurements made on one surface locality could also be used to estimate the local modulus. Several model surfaces, including a rubber-toughened epoxy polymer blend which showed clearly resolved compliant rubber phases within the harder epoxy matrix, were analyzed with the CCFM technique to illustrate the method's application.

  11. Multidimensional traction force microscopy reveals out-of-plane rotational moments about focal adhesions.

    PubMed

    Legant, Wesley R; Choi, Colin K; Miller, Jordan S; Shao, Lin; Gao, Liang; Betzig, Eric; Chen, Christopher S

    2013-01-15

    Recent methods have revealed that cells on planar substrates exert both shear (in-plane) and normal (out-of-plane) tractions against the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the location and origin of the normal tractions with respect to the adhesive and cytoskeletal elements of cells have not been elucidated. We developed a high-spatiotemporal-resolution, multidimensional (2.5D) traction force microscopy to measure and model the full 3D nature of cellular forces on planar 2D surfaces. We show that shear tractions are centered under elongated focal adhesions whereas upward and downward normal tractions are detected on distal (toward the cell edge) and proximal (toward the cell body) ends of adhesions, respectively. Together, these forces produce significant rotational moments about focal adhesions in both protruding and retracting peripheral regions. Temporal 2.5D traction force microscopy analysis of migrating and spreading cells shows that these rotational moments are highly dynamic, propagating outward with the leading edge of the cell. Finally, we developed a finite element model to examine how rotational moments could be generated about focal adhesions in a thin lamella. Our model suggests that rotational moments can be generated largely via shear lag transfer to the underlying ECM from actomyosin contractility applied at the intracellular surface of a rigid adhesion of finite thickness. Together, these data demonstrate and probe the origin of a previously unappreciated multidimensional stress profile associated with adhesions and highlight the importance of new approaches to characterize cellular forces.

  12. Distinguishing magnetic and electrostatic interactions by a Kelvin probe force microscopy–magnetic force microscopy combination

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Iglesias-Freire, Oscar; Serrano-Ramón, Luis; Ibarra, Manuel Ricardo; de Teresa, Jose Maria

    2011-01-01

    Summary The most outstanding feature of scanning force microscopy (SFM) is its capability to detect various different short and long range interactions. In particular, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) is used to characterize the domain configuration in ferromagnetic materials such as thin films grown by physical techniques or ferromagnetic nanostructures. It is a usual procedure to separate the topography and the magnetic signal by scanning at a lift distance of 25–50 nm such that the long range tip–sample interactions dominate. Nowadays, MFM is becoming a valuable technique to detect weak magnetic fields arising from low dimensional complex systems such as organic nanomagnets, superparamagnetic nanoparticles, carbon-based materials, etc. In all these cases, the magnetic nanocomponents and the substrate supporting them present quite different electronic behavior, i.e., they exhibit large surface potential differences causing heterogeneous electrostatic interaction between the tip and the sample that could be interpreted as a magnetic interaction. To distinguish clearly the origin of the tip–sample forces we propose to use a combination of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) and MFM. The KPFM technique allows us to compensate in real time the electrostatic forces between the tip and the sample by minimizing the electrostatic contribution to the frequency shift signal. This is a great challenge in samples with low magnetic moment. In this work we studied an array of Co nanostructures that exhibit high electrostatic interaction with the MFM tip. Thanks to the use of the KPFM/MFM system we were able to separate the electric and magnetic interactions between the tip and the sample. PMID:22003461

  13. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons. PMID:25735540

  14. Long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy for nanometer-scale imaging in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-03-01

    Visualization of morphological dynamics of live cells with nanometer resolution under physiological conditions is highly desired, but challenging. It has been demonstrated that high-speed atomic force microscopy is a powerful technique for visualizing dynamics of biomolecules under physiological conditions. However, application of high-speed atomic force microscopy for imaging larger objects such as live mammalian cells has been complicated because of the collision between the cantilever and samples. Here, we demonstrate that attaching an extremely long (~3 μm) and thin (~5 nm) tip by amorphous carbon to the cantilever allows us to image the surface structure of live cells with the spatiotemporal resolution of nanometers and seconds. We demonstrate that long-tip high-speed atomic force microscopy is capable of imaging morphogenesis of filopodia, membrane ruffles, pit formation, and endocytosis in COS-7, HeLa cells and hippocampal neurons.

  15. Techniques for imaging human metaphase chromosomes in liquid conditions by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushiki, Tatsuo; Shigeno, Masatsugu; Hoshi, Osamu

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain three-dimensional images of wet chromosomes by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions. Human metaphase chromosomes—obtained either by chromosome spreads or by an isolation technique—were observed in a dynamic mode by AFM in a buffer solution. Under suitable operating conditions with a soft triangular cantilever (with the spring constant of 0.08-0.4 N m-1), clear images of fixed chromosomes in the chromosome spread were obtained by AFM. For imaging isolated chromosomes with the height of more than 400 nm, a cantilever with a high aspect ratio probing tip was required. The combination of a Q-control system and the sampling intelligent scan (SIS) system in dynamic force mode AFM was useful for obtaining high-quality images of the isolated chromosomes, in which globular or cord-like structures about 50 nm thick were clearly observed on the surface of each chromatid.

  16. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Adam; Stannard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired 'short-range' force from the experimental observable (frequency shift) is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip-sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the 'on-minus-off' method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method.

  17. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired ‘short-range’ force from the experimental observable (frequency shift) is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip–sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the ‘on-minus-off’ method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method. PMID:24778964

  18. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids.

    PubMed

    Jaafar, Miriam; Martínez-Martín, David; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind; Gómez-Herrero, Julio

    2012-01-01

    We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode.

  19. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  20. Drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy: From vacuum to liquids

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Miriam; Cuenca, Mariano; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Summary We introduce drive-amplitude-modulation atomic force microscopy as a dynamic mode with outstanding performance in all environments from vacuum to liquids. As with frequency modulation, the new mode follows a feedback scheme with two nested loops: The first keeps the cantilever oscillation amplitude constant by regulating the driving force, and the second uses the driving force as the feedback variable for topography. Additionally, a phase-locked loop can be used as a parallel feedback allowing separation of the conservative and nonconservative interactions. We describe the basis of this mode and present some examples of its performance in three different environments. Drive-amplutide modulation is a very stable, intuitive and easy to use mode that is free of the feedback instability associated with the noncontact-to-contact transition that occurs in the frequency-modulation mode. PMID:22563531

  1. Segmented nanofibers of spider dragline silk: Atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oroudjev, E.; Soares, J.; Arcidiacono, S.; Thompson, J. B.; Fossey, S. A.; Hansma, H. G.

    2002-01-01

    Despite its remarkable materials properties, the structure of spider dragline silk has remained unsolved. Results from two probe microscopy techniques provide new insights into the structure of spider dragline silk. A soluble synthetic protein from dragline silk spontaneously forms nanofibers, as observed by atomic force microscopy. These nanofibers have a segmented substructure. The segment length and amino acid sequence are consistent with a slab-like shape for individual silk protein molecules. The height and width of nanofiber segments suggest a stacking pattern of slab-like molecules in each nanofiber segment. This stacking pattern produces nano-crystals in an amorphous matrix, as observed previously by NMR and x-ray diffraction of spider dragline silk. The possible importance of nanofiber formation to native silk production is discussed. Force spectra for single molecules of the silk protein demonstrate that this protein unfolds through a number of rupture events, indicating a modular substructure within single silk protein molecules. A minimal unfolding module size is estimated to be around 14 nm, which corresponds to the extended length of a single repeated module, 38 amino acids long. The structure of this spider silk protein is distinctly different from the structures of other proteins that have been analyzed by single-molecule force spectroscopy, and the force spectra show correspondingly novel features. PMID:11959907

  2. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  3. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-01

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  4. Combined frequency modulated atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy detection for multi-tip scanning probe microscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morawski, Ireneusz; Spiegelberg, Richard; Korte, Stefan; Voigtländer, Bert

    2015-12-15

    A method which allows scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) tip biasing independent of the sample bias during frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (AFM) operation is presented. The AFM sensor is supplied by an electronic circuit combining both a frequency shift signal and a tunneling current signal by means of an inductive coupling. This solution enables a control of the tip potential independent of the sample potential. Individual tip biasing is specifically important in order to implement multi-tip STM/AFM applications. An extensional quartz sensor (needle sensor) with a conductive tip is applied to record simultaneously topography and conductivity of the sample. The high resonance frequency of the needle sensor (1 MHz) allows scanning of a large area of the surface being investigated in a reasonably short time. A recipe for the amplitude calibration which is based only on the frequency shift signal and does not require the tip being in contact is presented. Additionally, we show spectral measurements of the mechanical vibration noise of the scanning system used in the investigations.

  5. Wettability and surface forces measured by atomic force microscopy: the role of roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavoille, J.; Takadoum, J.; Martin, N.; Durand, D.

    2009-10-01

    Thin films of titanium, copper and silver with various roughnesses were prepared by physical vapour deposition technique: dc magnetron sputtering. By varying the deposition time from few minutes to one hour it was possible to obtain metallic films with surface roughness average ranging from 1 to 20 nm. The wettability of these films was studied by measuring the contact angle using the sessile drop method and surface forces were investigated using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) by measuring the pull-off force between the AFM tip and the surfaces. Experimental results have been mainly discussed in terms of metal surface reactivity, Young modulus of the materials and real surface of contact between the AFM tip and the film surfaces.

  6. Subatomic-scale force vector mapping above a Ge(001) dimer using bimodal atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Turanský, Robert; Brndiar, Ján; Li, Yan Jun; Štich, Ivan; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2017-07-01

    Probing physical quantities on the nanoscale that have directionality, such as magnetic moments, electric dipoles, or the force response of a surface, is essential for characterizing functionalized materials for nanotechnological device applications. Currently, such physical quantities are usually experimentally obtained as scalars. To investigate the physical properties of a surface on the nanoscale in depth, these properties must be measured as vectors. Here we demonstrate a three-force-component detection method, based on multi-frequency atomic force microscopy on the subatomic scale and apply it to a Ge(001)-c(4 × 2) surface. We probed the surface-normal and surface-parallel force components above the surface and their direction-dependent anisotropy and expressed them as a three-dimensional force vector distribution. Access to the atomic-scale force distribution on the surface will enable better understanding of nanoscale surface morphologies, chemical composition and reactions, probing nanostructures via atomic or molecular manipulation, and provide insights into the behaviour of nano-machines on substrates.

  7. Localization and force analysis at the single virus particle level using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Horng, Jim-Tong; Chang, Jeng-Shian; Hsieh, Chung-Fan; Tseng, You-Chen; Lin, Shiming

    2012-01-06

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a vital instrument in nanobiotechnology. In this study, we developed a method that enables AFM to simultaneously measure specific unbinding force and map the viral glycoprotein at the single virus particle level. The average diameter of virus particles from AFM images and the specificity between the viral surface antigen and antibody probe were integrated to design a three-stage method that sets the measuring area to a single virus particle before obtaining the force measurements, where the influenza virus was used as the object of measurements. Based on the purposed method and performed analysis, several findings can be derived from the results. The mean unbinding force of a single virus particle can be quantified, and no significant difference exists in this value among virus particles. Furthermore, the repeatability of the proposed method is demonstrated. The force mapping images reveal that the distributions of surface viral antigens recognized by antibody probe were dispersed on the whole surface of individual virus particles under the proposed method and experimental criteria; meanwhile, the binding probabilities are similar among particles. This approach can be easily applied to most AFM systems without specific components or configurations. These results help understand the force-based analysis at the single virus particle level, and therefore, can reinforce the capability of AFM to investigate a specific type of viral surface protein and its distributions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dissection of mechanical force in living cells by super-resolved traction force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Colin-York, Huw; Eggeling, Christian; Fritzsche, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Cells continuously exert or respond to mechanical force. Measurement of these nanoscale forces is a major challenge in cell biology; yet such measurement is essential to the understanding of cell regulation and function. Current methods for examining mechanical force generation either necessitate dedicated equipment or limit themselves to coarse-grained force measurements on the micron scale. In this protocol, we describe stimulated emission depletion traction force microscopy-STED-TFM (STFM), which allows higher sampling of the forces generated by the cell than conventional TFM, leading to a twofold increase in spatial resolution (of up to 500 nm). The procedure involves the preparation of functionalized polyacrylamide gels loaded with fluorescent beads, as well as the acquisition of STED images and their analysis. We illustrate the approach using the example of HeLa cells expressing paxillin-EGFP to visualize focal adhesions. Our protocol uses widely available laser-scanning confocal microscopes equipped with a conventional STED laser, open-source software and common molecular biology techniques. The entire STFM experiment preparation, data acquisition and analysis require 2-3 d and could be completed by someone with minimal experience in molecular biology or biophysics.

  9. Atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy on the assessment of protein folding and functionality.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Martins, Ivo C; Santos, Nuno C

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) applied to biological systems can, besides generating high-quality and well-resolved images, be employed to study protein folding via AFM-based force spectroscopy. This approach allowed remarkable advances in the measurement of inter- and intramolecular interaction forces with piconewton resolution. The detection of specific interaction forces between molecules based on the AFM sensitivity and the manipulation of individual molecules greatly advanced the understanding of intra-protein and protein-ligand interactions. Apart from the academic interest in the resolution of basic scientific questions, this technique has also key importance on the clarification of several biological questions of immediate biomedical relevance. Force spectroscopy is an especially appropriate technique for "mechanical proteins" that can provide crucial information on single protein molecules and/or domains. Importantly, it also has the potential of combining in a single experiment spatial and kinetic measurements. Here, the main principles of this methodology are described, after which the ability to measure interactions at the single-molecule level is discussed, in the context of relevant protein-folding examples. We intend to demonstrate the potential of AFM-based force spectroscopy in the study of protein folding, especially since this technique is able to circumvent some of the difficulties typically encountered in classical thermal/chemical denaturation studies.

  10. Engineering and Characterization of Collagen Networks Using Wet Atomic Force Microscopy and Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Jenna; Coffey, Tonya; Conrad, Brad; Burris, Jennifer; Hester, Brooke

    2014-03-01

    Collagen is an abundant protein and its monomers covalently crosslink to form fibrils which form fibers which contribute to forming macrostructures like tendon or bone. While the contribution is well understood at the macroscopic level, it is not well known at the fibril level. We wish to study the mechanical properties of collagen for networks of collagen fibers that vary in size and density. We present here a method to synthesize collagen networks from monomers and that allows us to vary the density of the networks. By using biotynilated collagen and a surface that is functionalized with avidin, we generate two-dimensional collagen networks across the surface of a silicon wafer. During network synthesis, the incubation time is varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours or temperature is varied from 25°C to 45°C. The two-dimensional collagen network created in the process is characterized using environmental atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The network density is measured by the number of strands in one frame using SPIP software. We expect that at body temperature (37°C) and with longer incubation times, the network density should increase.

  11. Full L1-regularized Traction Force Microscopy over whole cells.

    PubMed

    Suñé-Auñón, Alejandro; Jorge-Peñas, Alvaro; Aguilar-Cuenca, Rocío; Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Van Oosterwyck, Hans; Muñoz-Barrutia, Arrate

    2017-08-10

    Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) is a widespread technique to estimate the tractions that cells exert on the surrounding substrate. To recover the tractions, it is necessary to solve an inverse problem, which is ill-posed and needs regularization to make the solution stable. The typical regularization scheme is given by the minimization of a cost functional, which is divided in two terms: the error present in the data or data fidelity term; and the regularization or penalty term. The classical approach is to use zero-order Tikhonov or L2-regularization, which uses the L2-norm for both terms in the cost function. Recently, some studies have demonstrated an improved performance using L1-regularization (L1-norm in the penalty term) related to an increase in the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the recovered traction field. In this manuscript, we present a comparison between the previous two regularization schemes (relying in the L2-norm for the data fidelity term) and the full L1-regularization (using the L1-norm for both terms in the cost function) for synthetic and real data. Our results reveal that L1-regularizations give an improved spatial resolution (more important for full L1-regularization) and a reduction in the background noise with respect to the classical zero-order Tikhonov regularization. In addition, we present an approximation, which makes feasible the recovery of cellular tractions over whole cells on typical full-size microscope images when working in the spatial domain. The proposed full L1-regularization improves the sensitivity to recover small stress footprints. Moreover, the proposed method has been validated to work on full-field microscopy images of real cells, what certainly demonstrates it is a promising tool for biological applications.

  12. Development of Tuning Fork Based Probes for Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilian, Romaneh; Yazdanpanah, Mehdi M.; Torrez, Neil; Alizadeh, Amirali; Askari, Davood

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the development of tuning fork-based AFM/STM probes in NaugaNeedles LLC for use in atomic force microscopy. These probes can be mounted on different carriers per customers' request. (e.g., RHK carrier, Omicron carrier, and tuning fork on a Sapphire disk). We are able to design and engineer tuning forks on any type of carrier used in the market. We can attach three types of tips on the edge of a tuning fork prong (i.e., growing Ag2Ga nanoneedles at any arbitrary angle, cantilever of AFM tip, and tungsten wire) with lengths from 100-500 μm. The nanoneedle is located vertical to the fork. Using a suitable insulation and metallic coating, we can make QPlus sensors that can detect tunneling current during the AFM scan. To make Qplus sensors, the entire quartz fork will be coated with an insulating material, before attaching the nanoneedle. Then, the top edge of one prong is coated with a thin layer of conductive metal and the nanoneedle is attached to the fork end of the metal coated prong. The metal coating provides electrical connection to the tip for tunneling current readout and to the electrodes and used to read the QPlus current. Since the amount of mass added to the fork is minimal, the resonance frequency spectrum does not change and still remains around 32.6 KHz and the Q factor is around 1,200 in ambient condition. These probes can enhance the performance of tuning fork based atomic microscopy.

  13. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction.

    PubMed

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A; Loring, Roger F

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  14. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    SciTech Connect

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  15. Three-dimensional atomic force microscopy: interaction force vector by direct observation of tip trajectory.

    PubMed

    Sigdel, Krishna P; Grayer, Justin S; King, Gavin M

    2013-11-13

    The prospect of a robust three-dimensional atomic force microscope (AFM) holds significant promise in nanoscience. Yet, in conventional AFM, the tip-sample interaction force vector is not directly accessible. We scatter a focused laser directly off an AFM tip apex to rapidly and precisely measure the tapping tip trajectory in three-dimensional space. This data also yields three-dimensional cantilever spring constants, effective masses, and hence, the tip-sample interaction force components via Newton's second law. Significant lateral forces representing 49 and 13% of the normal force (Fz = 152 ± 17 pN) were observed in common tapping mode conditions as a silicon tip intermittently contacted a glass substrate in aqueous solution; as a consequence, the direction of the force vector tilted considerably more than expected. When addressing the surface of a lipid bilayer, the behavior of the force components differed significantly from that observed on glass. This is attributed to the lateral mobility of the lipid membrane coupled with its elastic properties. Direct access to interaction components Fx, Fy, and Fz provides a more complete view of tip dynamics that underlie force microscope operation and can form the foundation of a three-dimensional AFM in a plurality of conditions.

  16. Live cell response to mechanical stimulation studied by integrated optical and atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Trache, Andreea; Lim, Soon-Mi

    2010-10-04

    To understand the mechanism by which living cells sense mechanical forces, and how they respond and adapt to their environment, a new technology able to investigate cells behavior at sub-cellular level with high spatial and temporal resolution was developed. Thus, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was integrated with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fast-spinning disk (FSD) confocal microscopy. The integrated system is broadly applicable across a wide range of molecular dynamic studies in any adherent live cells, allowing direct optical imaging of cell responses to mechanical stimulation in real-time. Significant rearrangement of the actin filaments and focal adhesions was shown due to local mechanical stimulation at the apical cell surface that induced changes into the cellular structure throughout the cell body. These innovative techniques will provide new information for understanding live cell restructuring and dynamics in response to mechanical force. A detailed protocol and a representative data set that show live cell response to mechanical stimulation are presented.

  17. Microrheology of Human Lung Epithelial Cells Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Buscemi, Lara; Grabulosa, Mireia; Trepat, Xavier; Fabry, Ben; Farré, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Lung epithelial cells are subjected to large cyclic forces from breathing. However, their response to dynamic stresses is poorly defined. We measured the complex shear modulus (G*(ω)) of human alveolar (A549) and bronchial (BEAS-2B) epithelial cells over three frequency decades (0.1–100 Hz) and at different loading forces (0.1–0.9 nN) with atomic force microscopy. G*(ω) was computed by correcting force-indentation oscillatory data for the tip-cell contact geometry and for the hydrodynamic viscous drag. Both cell types displayed similar viscoelastic properties. The storage modulus G′(ω) increased with frequency following a power law with exponent ∼0.2. The loss modulus G″(ω) was ∼2/3 lower and increased similarly to G′(ω) up to ∼10 Hz, but exhibited a steeper rise at higher frequencies. The cells showed a weak force dependence of G′(ω) and G″(ω). G*(ω) conformed to the power-law model with a structural damping coefficient of ∼0.3, indicating a coupling of elastic and dissipative processes within the cell. Power-law behavior implies a continuum distribution of stress relaxation time constants. This complex dynamics is consistent with the rheology of soft glassy materials close to a glass transition, thereby suggesting that structural disorder and metastability may be fundamental features of cell architecture. PMID:12609908

  18. A quantitative lateral force Microscopy study of the dolomite (104)-water interface.

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, S. R.; Hu, X.; Fentert, P.; Wright State Univ.

    2007-08-14

    The friction and lateral stiffness of the contact between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and an atomically flat dolomite (104) surface were investigated in contact with two aqueous solutions that were in equilibrium and supersaturated with respect to dolomite, respectively. The two aqueous solutions yielded negligible differences in friction at the native dolomite-water interface. However, the growth of a Ca-rich film from the supersaturated solution, revealed by X-ray reflectivity measurements, altered the probe-dolomite contact region sufficiently to observe distinct friction forces on the native dolomite and the film-covered surface regions. Quantitative friction-load relationships demonstrated three physically distinct load regimes for applied loads up to 200 nN. Similar friction forces were observed on both surfaces below 50 nN load and above 100 nN load. The friction forces on the two surfaces diverged at intermediate loads. Quantitative measurements of dynamic friction forces at low load were consistent with the estimated energy necessary to dehydrate the surface ions, whereas differences in mechanical properties of the Ca-rich film and dolomite surfaces were evidently important above 50 nN load. Attempts to fit the quantitative stiffness-load data using a Hertzian contact mechanical model based on bulk material properties yielded physically unrealistic fitting coefficients, suggesting that the interfacial contact region must be explicitly considered in describing the static and dynamic contact mechanics of this and similar systems.

  19. Quantitative lateral force microscopy study of the dolomite (104)-water interface.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Steven R; Hu, Xiaoming; Fenter, Paul

    2007-08-14

    The friction and lateral stiffness of the contact between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe tip and an atomically flat dolomite (104) surface were investigated in contact with two aqueous solutions that were in equilibrium and supersaturated with respect to dolomite, respectively. The two aqueous solutions yielded negligible differences in friction at the native dolomite-water interface. However, the growth of a Ca-rich film from the supersaturated solution, revealed by X-ray reflectivity measurements, altered the probe-dolomite contact region sufficiently to observe distinct friction forces on the native dolomite and the film-covered surface regions. Quantitative friction-load relationships demonstrated three physically distinct load regimes for applied loads up to 200 nN. Similar friction forces were observed on both surfaces below 50 nN load and above 100 nN load. The friction forces on the two surfaces diverged at intermediate loads. Quantitative measurements of dynamic friction forces at low load were consistent with the estimated energy necessary to dehydrate the surface ions, whereas differences in mechanical properties of the Ca-rich film and dolomite surfaces were evidently important above 50 nN load. Attempts to fit the quantitative stiffness-load data using a Hertzian contact mechanical model based on bulk material properties yielded physically unrealistic fitting coefficients, suggesting that the interfacial contact region must be explicitly considered in describing the static and dynamic contact mechanics of this and similar systems.

  20. Combined X-ray Microfluorescence and Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Mg Distribution in Whole Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lagomarsino, S.; Farruggia, G.; Trapani, V.; Mastrototaro, L.; Wolf, F.; Cedola, A.; Fratini, M.; Notargiacomo, A.; Bukreeva, I.; McNulty, I.; Vogt, S.; Kim, S.; Legnini, D.; Maier, J. A. M.

    2011-09-09

    We present in this paper a novel methodology that combines scanning x-ray fluorescencee microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The combination of these two techniques allows the determination of a concentration map of Mg in whole (not sectioned) cells.