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Sample records for dynamical response characteristics

  1. Dynamic response characteristics analysis of the doubly-fed wind power system under grid voltage drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, H. H.; Yang, L.; Chen, W.; Xu, Y. T.

    2016-08-01

    Double-fed induction generator (DFIG) is sensitive to the disturbances of grid, so the security and stability of the grid and the DFIG itself are under threat with the rapid increase of DFIG. Therefore, it is important to study dynamic response of the DFIG when voltage drop failure is happened in power system. In this paper, firstly, mathematical models and the control strategy about mechanical and electrical response processes is respectively introduced. Then through the analysis of response process, it is concluded that the dynamic response characteristics are related to voltage drop level, operating status of DFIG and control strategy adapted to rotor side. Last, the correctness of conclusion is validated by the simulation about mechanical and electrical response processes in different voltage levels drop and different DFIG output levels under DIgSILENT/PowerFactory software platform.

  2. Frequency-response method for determination of dynamic stability characteristics of airplanes with automatic controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Harry

    1947-01-01

    A frequency-response method for determining the critical control-gearing and hunting oscillations of airplanes with automatic pilots is presented. The method is graphical and has several advantages over the standard numerical procedure based on Routh's discriminant. The chief advantage of the method is that direct use can be made of the measured response characteristics of the automatic pilot. This feature is especially useful in determining the existence, amplitude, and frequency of the hunting oscillations that may be present when the automatic pilot has nonlinear dynamic characteristics. Several examples are worked out to illustrate the application of the frequency-response method in determining the effect of automatic-pilot lag or lead on critical control gearing and in determining the amplitude and frequency hunting. It is shown that the method may be applied to the case of a control geared to airplane motions about two axes.

  3. Dynamic response characteristics of the high-temperature superconducting maglev system under lateral eccentric distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zheng, Jun; Si, Shuaishuai; Qian, Nan; Li, Haitao; Li, Jipeng; Deng, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    Off-centre operation of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) maglev systems caused by inevitable conditions such as the misregistration of vehicle, crosswind and curve negotiation, may change the distribution of the trapped flux in the HTS bulks and the magnetic interaction between HTS bulks and the PMG. It impacts on the performance of HTS maglev, and more seriously makes the maglev vehicle overturned. Therefore, understanding the performance of the HTS maglev in off-center operation is very important. In this paper, the dynamic response characteristics of a cryostat with twenty-four onboard YBaCuO superconductor bulks were experimentally investigated at different eccentric distances under loads before the initial FC process. Parameters such as vibration accelerations, displacement, natural frequency and dynamic stiffness were acquired and analyzed via the B&K vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. Results suggest that the natural frequency and dynamic stiffness of the maglev vehicle would be obviously reduced with the eccentric distance, posing negative effects on the stability of HTS maglev.

  4. Dynamic response characteristics of a circulation control rotor model pneumatic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, C. B.; Reader, K. R.; Dutta, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Numerical and experimental simulation of unsteady airflow through the control valve and slotted air duct of a circulation control rotor is described. The numerical analysis involves the solution of the quasi-one-dimensional compressible fluid-dynamic equations in the blade air duct together with the coupled isentropic flow equations for flow into the blade through the valve and out of the blade through the Coanda slot. Numerical solutions are compared with basic experimental results obtained for a mockup of a circulation control rotor and its pneumatic valving system. The pneumodynamic phenomena that were observed are discussed with particular emphasis on the characteristic system time lags associated with the response of the flow variables to transient and periodic control valve inputs.

  5. Dynamic response characteristics of the potentiometric carbon dioxide sensor for the determination of aspartame.

    PubMed

    Nikolelis, D P; Krull, U J

    1990-07-01

    The dynamic response characteristics of a carbon dioxide gas sensor were studied to determine the potential for application of the device to the kinetic assay of substrate(s) under pseudo first-order kinetics. The dependence of the time constant on the concentration of carbon dioxide was determined by using convolution mathematics to analyse potentiometric changes caused by abrupt alterations of gas concentration. The operational conditions of the CO2 sensor were optimised for the development of enzyme electrodes, so that the mass-transport phenomena occurring during the course of the enzymic reactions were enhanced. As a result, the kinetic analysis of substrate(s) was performed more rapidly (2-6 min), with greater sensitivity and with an improved detection limit (10-5 M). A kinetic reaction-rate method for the determination of aspartame in dietary foodstuffs is proposed as a rapid and inexpensive alternative to a classical high-performance liquid chromatographic method.

  6. Nonlinear structural joint model updating based on instantaneous characteristics of dynamic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuo-Cai; Xin, Yu; Ren, Wei-Xin

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new nonlinear joint model updating method for shear type structures based on the instantaneous characteristics of the decomposed structural dynamic responses. To obtain an accurate representation of a nonlinear system's dynamics, the nonlinear joint model is described as the nonlinear spring element with bilinear stiffness. The instantaneous frequencies and amplitudes of the decomposed mono-component are first extracted by the analytical mode decomposition (AMD) method. Then, an objective function based on the residuals of the instantaneous frequencies and amplitudes between the experimental structure and the nonlinear model is created for the nonlinear joint model updating. The optimal values of the nonlinear joint model parameters are obtained by minimizing the objective function using the simulated annealing global optimization method. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, a single-story shear type structure subjected to earthquake and harmonic excitations is simulated as a numerical example. Then, a beam structure with multiple local nonlinear elements subjected to earthquake excitation is also simulated. The nonlinear beam structure is updated based on the global and local model using the proposed method. The results show that the proposed local nonlinear model updating method is more effective for structures with multiple local nonlinear elements. Finally, the proposed method is verified by the shake table test of a real high voltage switch structure. The accuracy of the proposed method is quantified both in numerical and experimental applications using the defined error indices. Both the numerical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method can effectively update the nonlinear joint model.

  7. Characteristics and control response of the TOPAZ II Reactor System Real-time Dynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1993-11-12

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulations of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and casualty conditions.

  8. Non-linear characteristics in the dynamic responses of seated subjects exposed to vertical whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasunao; Griffin, Michael J

    2002-10-01

    The effect of the magnitude of vertical vibration on the dynamic response of the seated human body has been investigated. Eight male subjects were exposed to random vibration in the 0.5 to 20 Hz frequency range at five magnitudes: 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 ms(-2) r.m.s. The dynamic responses of the body were measured at eight locations: at the first, fifth, and tenth thoracic vertebrae (T1, T5, T10), at the first, third, and fifth lumbar vertebrae (L1, L3, L5) and at the pelvis (the posterior-superior iliac spine). At each location, the motions on the body surface were measured in the three orthogonal axes within the sagittal plane (i.e., the vertical, fore-and-aft, and pitch axes). The force at the seat surface was also measured. Frequency response functions (i.e., transmissibilities and apparent mass) were used to represent the responses of the body. Non-linear characteristics were observed in the apparent mass and in the transmissibilities to most measurement locations. Resonance frequencies in the frequency response functions decreased with increases in the vibration magnitude (e.g. for the vertical transmissibility to L3, a reduction from 6.25 to 4.75 Hz when the vibration magnitude increased from 0.125 to 2.0 ms(-2) r.m.s.). The transmission of vibration within the spine also showed some evidence of a non-linear characteristic. It can be concluded from this study that the dynamic responses of seated subjects are clearly non-linear with respect to vibration magnitude, whereas previous studies have reported inconsistent conclusions. More understanding of the dependence on vibration magnitude of both the dynamic responses of the soft tissues of the body and the muscle activity (voluntary and involuntary) is required to identify the causes of the non-linear characteristics observed in this study.

  9. Research of dynamical Characteristics of slow deformation Waves as Massif Responses on Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg; Shipeev, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    The research of massif state with use of approaches of open system theory [1-3] was developed for investigation the criterions of dissipation regimes for real rock massifs, which are under heavy man-caused influence. For realization of that research we used the data of seismic catalogue of Tashtagol mine. As a result of the analyze of that data we defined character morphology of phase trajectories of massif response, which was locally in time in a stable state: on the phase plane with coordinates released by the massif during the dynamic event energy E and lg(dE/dt) there is a local area as a ball of twisted trajectories and some not great bursts from that ball, which are not greater than 105 joules. In some time intervals that burst can be larger, than 105 joules, achieving 106 joules and yet 109 joules. [3]. Evidently there are two reciprocal depend processes: the energy accumulation in the attracted phase trajectories area and resonance fault of the accumulated energy. But after the fault the system returns again to the same attracted phase trajectories area. For analyzing of the thin structure of the chaotic area we decided to add the method of processing of the seismic monitoring data by new parameters. We shall consider each point of explosion as a source of seismic or deformation waves. Using the kinematic approach of seismic information processing we shall each point of the massif response use as a time point of the first arrival of the deformation wave for calculation of the wave velocity, because additionally we know the coordinates of the fixed response and the coordinates of explosion. The use of additional parameter-velocity of slow deformation wave propagation allowed us with use method of phase diagrams identify their hierarchic structure, which allow us to use that information for modeling and interpretation the propagation seismic and deformation waves in hierarchic structures. It is researched with use of that suggested processing method the thin

  10. Quasi-Static and Dynamic Response Characteristics of F-4 Bias-Ply and Radial-Belted Main Gear Tires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Pamela A.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at Langley Research Center to determine the quasi-static and dynamic response characteristics of F-4 military fighter 30x11.5-14.5/26PR bias-ply and radial-belted main gear tires. Tire properties were measured by the application of vertical, lateral, and fore-and-aft loads. Mass moment-of-inertia data were also obtained. The results of the study include quasi-static load-deflection curves, free-vibration time-history plots, energy loss associated with hysteresis, stiffness and damping characteristics, footprint geometry, and inertia properties of each type of tire. The difference between bias-ply and radial-belted tire construction is given, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each tire design. Three simple damping models representing viscous, structural, and Coulomb friction are presented and compared with the experimental data. The conclusions discussed contain a summary of test observations.

  11. Dynamic in vivo response characteristics of three oximeters: Hewlett-Packard 47201A, Biox III, and Nellcor N-100.

    PubMed

    West, P; George, C F; Kryger, M H

    1987-06-01

    Pulse oximeters (Biox III, Nellcor N-100) and a transmittance oximeter [Hewlett-Packard 47201A (HP)] were compared for SaO2 measurement and responsiveness during dynamic changes in arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate. Five sleep apnea syndrome patients were studied because they had large oscillations in SaO2 and heart rate in sleep. During sleep, each patient exhibited a series of rapid (18.0 +/- 8.3 s, mean +/- SD) oscillations in oxygen saturation (92.1 +/- 2.6% to 74.2 +/- 7.7%). Oxygen saturation measurements were sampled simultaneously from each oximeter by computer (at 2 Hz). Accuracy was assessed by comparing pulse and transmittance oxygen saturation measurements at the peak and trough of each apnea-related oscillation. Oximeter response was defined in terms of the "delay" or absolute time difference between the pulse oximeters and the transmittance oximeter for the determination of the peak and trough saturations. Linear regression analysis was used to establish accuracy and response relationships between pulse oximeter sensors (reusable ear, reusable digit, disposable digit, and disposable nasal sensors) and the transmittance oximeter sensor (reusable ear sensor). Pulse oximeter response delay was highly correlated with heart rate. Pulse oximeter SaO2 measurement and response characteristics varied considerably with sensor type (disposable, reusable) and sensor location (ear, nose, and digit). One must be aware of these differences in clinical and research application.

  12. Optimized balance rehabilitation training strategy for the elderly through an evaluation of balance characteristics in response to dynamic motions

    PubMed Central

    Jung, HoHyun; Chun, Keyoung Jin; Hong, Jaesoo; Lim, Dohyung

    2015-01-01

    Balance is important in daily activities and essential for maintaining an independent lifestyle in the elderly. Recent studies have shown that balance rehabilitation training can improve the balance ability of the elderly, and diverse balance rehabilitation training equipment has been developed. However, there has been little research into optimized strategies for balance rehabilitation training. To provide an optimized strategy, we analyzed the balance characteristics of participants in response to the rotation of a base plate on multiple axes. Seven male adults with no musculoskeletal or nervous system-related diseases (age: 25.5±1.7 years; height: 173.9±6.4 cm; body mass: 71.3±6.5 kg; body mass index: 23.6±2.4 kg/m2) were selected to investigate the balance rehabilitation training using customized rehabilitation equipment. Rotation of the base plate of the equipment was controlled to induce dynamic rotation of participants in the anterior–posterior, right-diagonal, medial–lateral, and left-diagonal directions. We used a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras and the Pedar Flexible Insoles System to characterize the major lower-extremity joint angles, center of body mass, and center of pressure. We found statistically significant differences between the changes in joint angles in the lower extremities in response to dynamic rotation of the participants (P<0.05). The maximum was greater with anterior–posterior and medial–lateral dynamic rotation than with that in other directions (P<0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of center of body mass deviations from the base of support (P>0.05). These results indicate that optimizing rotation control of the base plate of balance rehabilitation training equipment to induce anterior–posterior and medial–lateral dynamic rotation preferentially can lead to effective balance training. Additional tests with varied speeds and ranges of

  13. Optimized balance rehabilitation training strategy for the elderly through an evaluation of balance characteristics in response to dynamic motions.

    PubMed

    Jung, HoHyun; Chun, Keyoung Jin; Hong, Jaesoo; Lim, Dohyung

    2015-01-01

    Balance is important in daily activities and essential for maintaining an independent lifestyle in the elderly. Recent studies have shown that balance rehabilitation training can improve the balance ability of the elderly, and diverse balance rehabilitation training equipment has been developed. However, there has been little research into optimized strategies for balance rehabilitation training. To provide an optimized strategy, we analyzed the balance characteristics of participants in response to the rotation of a base plate on multiple axes. Seven male adults with no musculoskeletal or nervous system-related diseases (age: 25.5±1.7 years; height: 173.9±6.4 cm; body mass: 71.3±6.5 kg; body mass index: 23.6±2.4 kg/m(2)) were selected to investigate the balance rehabilitation training using customized rehabilitation equipment. Rotation of the base plate of the equipment was controlled to induce dynamic rotation of participants in the anterior-posterior, right-diagonal, medial-lateral, and left-diagonal directions. We used a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras and the Pedar Flexible Insoles System to characterize the major lower-extremity joint angles, center of body mass, and center of pressure. We found statistically significant differences between the changes in joint angles in the lower extremities in response to dynamic rotation of the participants (P<0.05). The maximum was greater with anterior-posterior and medial-lateral dynamic rotation than with that in other directions (P<0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the frequency of center of body mass deviations from the base of support (P>0.05). These results indicate that optimizing rotation control of the base plate of balance rehabilitation training equipment to induce anterior-posterior and medial-lateral dynamic rotation preferentially can lead to effective balance training. Additional tests with varied speeds and ranges of angles of

  14. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system including auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1993-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotor-dynamic model and assess the dynamic behavior of a magnetic bearing rotor system which includes the effects of auxiliary bearings. Of particular interest is the effects of introducing sideloading into such a system during failure of the magnetic bearing. A model is developed from an experimental test facility and a number of simulation studies are performed. These results are presented and discussed.

  15. Dynamic modelling and response characteristics of a magnetic bearing rotor system with auxiliary bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, April M.; Flowers, George T.; Trent, Victor S.

    1995-01-01

    Auxiliary bearings are a critical feature of any magnetic bearing system. They protect the soft iron core of the magnetic bearing during an overload or failure. An auxiliary bearing typically consists of a rolling element bearing or bushing with a clearance gap between the rotor and the inner race of the support. The dynamics of such systems can be quite complex. It is desired to develop a rotordynamic model which describes the dynamic behavior of a flexible rotor system with magnetic bearings including auxiliary bearings. The model is based upon an experimental test facility. Some simulation studies are presented to illustrate the behavior of the model. In particular, the effects of introducing sideloading from the magnetic bearing when one coil fails is studied.

  16. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zheng, J.; Che, T.; Zheng, B. T.; Si, S. S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2015-12-01

    The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  17. Experimental and analytical study on the flutter and gust response characteristics of a torsion-free-wing airplane model. [in the Langley transonic dynamics tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, A. C.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data and correlative analytical results on the flutter and gust response characteristics of a torsion-free-wing (TFW) fighter airplane model are presented. TFW consists of a combined wing/boom/canard surface and was tested with the TFW free to pivot in pitch and with the TFW locked to the fuselage. Flutter and gust response characteristics were measured in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel with the complete airplane model mounted on a cable mount system that provided a near free flying condition. Although the lowest flutter dynamic pressure was measured for the wing free configuration, it was only about 20 deg less than that for the wing locked configuration. However, no appreciable alleviation of the gust response was measured by freeing the wing.

  18. High Efficiency of Optimization of Response Surface Method for Structure Dynamic Characteristics by Using Perturbation Method with Complementary Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xilu; Terane, Teppei; Shin, Hyunjin; Hagiwara, Ichiro

    In this paper, a new perturbation method is proposed, and is shown that the correction vector can be calculated shorter than ever. And, the computing efficiency of the response surface optimization method could improve greatly by applying perturbation method with complementary term to example analysis in the optimization of vibration characteristics by the response surface methodology and by finishing eigenvalue analysis which takes most computing time just once. Moreover, the validity and effectiveness is examined by examples by inducing approximately estimated formula of the vibration response value based on orthogonal polynomial. Lastly, it is shown that the computing time is shorten greatly compared with former method by applying this method to analysis of optimization problem of vibration characteristics.

  19. Influence of structural parameters on dynamic characteristics and wind-induced buffeting responses of a super-long-span cable-stayed bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Chunchao; Xing, Chenxi; Li, Aiqun

    2014-09-01

    A 3D finite element (FE) model for the Sutong cable-stayed bridge (SCB) is established based on ANSYS. The dynamic characteristics of the bridge are analyzed using a subspace iteration method. Based on recorded wind data, the measured spectra expression is presented using the nonlinear least-squares regression method. Turbulent winds at the bridge site are simulated based on the spectral representation method and the FFT technique. The influence of some key structural parameters and measures on the dynamic characteristics of the bridge are investigated. These parameters include dead load intensity, as well as vertical, lateral and torsional stiffness of the steel box girder. In addition, the influence of elastic stiffness of the connection device employed between the towers and the girder on the vibration mode of the steel box girder is investigated. The analysis shows that all of the vertical, lateral and torsional buffeting displacement responses reduce gradually as the dead load intensity increases. The dynamic characteristics and the structural buffeting displacement response of the SCB are only slightly affected by the vertical and torsional stiffness of the steel box girder, and the lateral and torsional buffeting displacement responses reduce gradually as the lateral stiffness increases. These results provide a reference for dynamic analysis and design of super-long-span cable-stayed bridges.

  20. Dynamic and Performance Characteristics of Baseball Bats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Fred O.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic and performance characteristics of wooden and aluminum baseball bats were investigated in two phases; the first dealing with the velocity of the batted balls, and the second with a study of centers of percussion and impulse response at the handle. (MJB)

  1. Dynamic characteristics of the cutaneous vasodilator response to a local external pressure application detected by the laser Doppler flowmetry technique on anesthetized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koitka, Audrey; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2003-10-01

    The laser Doppler flowmetry technique has recently been used to report a significant transient increase of the cutaneous blood flow signal when a local non-noxious pressure is applied progressively on the skin (11.1 Pa/s). The present work analyses the dynamic characteristics of this vasodilatory reflex response on anaesthetised rats. A de-noising algorithm using wavelets is proposed to obtain accurate values of these dynamic characteristics. The blood flow peak and the time to reach this peak are computed on the de-noised recordings. The results show that the mean time to reach the peak of perfusion is 85.3 s (time t = 0 at the beginning of the pressure application). The mean peak value is 188.3 arbitrary units (a.u.), whereas the mean value of the perfusion before the pressure application is 113.4 a.u. The mean minimum value obtained at the end of the experiment is 60.7 a.u. This latter value is, on the average, reached 841.3 s after the beginning of the pressure application. The comparison of the dynamic characteristics, computed with the de-noising algorithm on signals obtained in other situations, will give a better understanding on some cutaneous lesions such as those present on diabetic people.

  2. Research the dynamical characteristics of slow deformation waves as a rock massif response to explosions during its outworking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Oleg; Shipeev, Oleg

    2015-04-01

    As a result of long-term natural geomechanics and geophysical observation data on mines of complex ore rocks, generalization of the non-linear reaction of rock massif to heavy dynamic influences have been established. In addition, pendulum type waves have been observed and the sources of them have been located inside geoblocks of different hierarchic levels (Oparin et al., 2010). At the same time, these waves propagate with wide low (compared with seismic waves) velocity values (Kurlenja et al., 1993; Oparin et al., 2006). Research into the massif state with the use of the dynamic systems theory approach (Naimark et al., 2009; Chulichkov, 2003; Hachay et al., 2010) has been developed to ascertain the criteria of dissipative regimes changing for real rock massifs, which are under heavy man-caused influence. To realize such research we used the data from the seismic record of the Tashtagol mine for the two-year period from June 2006 up to June 2008. We used the space-time coordinates for all dynamic massif event responses, which occurred during that period inside the mine space and for the explosions - values fixed by seismic station energy (Hachay et al., 2010). The phase diagrams of the massif state for the northern and southern parts of the mine space were plotted in coordinates Ev(t) and d(Ev(t))/dt, t - time - in parts of 24 hours, Ev - the dissipated massive seismic energy - in joules. Hachay et al., (2010) analysed the morphology of seismic response phase trajectories on the explosion influences during different serial intervals in the southern part of the mine. In that period, according to data for different explosions in the mine, the majority of the total energy had been injected into the southern part of the mine. Moreover, at the end of 2007, just in the southern part, the strongest rock burst during the whole history of the working mine happened. We developed a new processing method of seismological information in real, which we can use directly in the

  3. Dynamic characteristics of laser Doppler flowmetry signals obtained in response to a local and progressive pressure applied on diabetic and healthy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koitka, Audrey; Abraham, Pierre; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-09-01

    In the biomedical field, the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) technique is a non-invasive method to monitor skin perfusion. On the skin of healthy humans, LDF signals present a significant transient increase in response to a local and progressive pressure application. This vasodilatory reflex response may have important implications for cutaneous pathologies involved in various neurological diseases and in the pathophysiology of decubitus ulcers. The present work analyses the dynamic characteristics of these signals on young type 1 diabetic patients, and on healthy age-matched subjects. To obtain accurate dynamic characteristic values, a de-noising wavelet-based algorithm is first applied to LDF signals. All the de-noised signals are then normalised to the same value. The blood flow peak and the time to reach this peak are then calculated on each computed signal. The results show that a large vasodilation is present on signals of healthy subjects. The mean peak occurs at a pressure of 3.2 kPa approximately. However, a vasodilation of limited amplitude appears on type 1 diabetic patients. The maximum value is visualised, on the average, when the pressure is 1.1 kPa. The inability for diabetic patients to increase largely their cutaneous blood flow may bring explanations to foot ulcers.

  4. Response characteristics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1992-01-01

    The characteristics of the response dynamics of the human torsional vestibuloocular reflex were studied during controlled rotations about an earth-horizontal axis. The results extended the frequency range to 2 Hz and identified the nonlinearity of the amplitude response.

  5. Dynamic alarm response procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.; Gordon, P.; Fitch, K.

    2006-07-01

    The Dynamic Alarm Response Procedure (DARP) system provides a robust, Web-based alternative to existing hard-copy alarm response procedures. This paperless system improves performance by eliminating time wasted looking up paper procedures by number, looking up plant process values and equipment and component status at graphical display or panels, and maintenance of the procedures. Because it is a Web-based system, it is platform independent. DARP's can be served from any Web server that supports CGI scripting, such as Apache{sup R}, IIS{sup R}, TclHTTPD, and others. DARP pages can be viewed in any Web browser that supports Javascript and Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), such as Netscape{sup R}, Microsoft Internet Explorer{sup R}, Mozilla Firefox{sup R}, Opera{sup R}, and others. (authors)

  6. A Numerical Study on Internal-Blast-Field Characteristics and Dynamic Response of Concrete by Aluminized Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Xiao, C.; Gu, X. H.

    2011-09-01

    Three energy release models of aluminized explosive with combustion effects were compared and analyzed, including Miller-Extension model, Additional energy model, Ignition and growth model (Lee-Tarver model). The Ignition and growth model is one three-form equation of reaction rate, which can describe unsteady detonation process of non-ideal explosives well. So, in this paper, the energy release model of aluminized explosive based on the Lee-Tarver rate equation was utilized and an internal-blast dynamic model of concrete was established. Moreover, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method was adopted to research blast field and damage effects of concrete, which widens SPH method for study on explosion of non-ideal explosive in a confined medium, and provides an important way to evaluate the damage effect of internal-blast of concrete.

  7. Relations between structural and dynamic thermal characteristics of building walls

    SciTech Connect

    Kossecka, E.; Kosny, J.

    1996-10-01

    The effect of internal thermal structure on dynamic characteristics of walls is analyzed. The concept of structure factors is introduced and the conditions they impose on response factors are given. Simple examples of multilayer walls, representing different types of thermal resistance and capacity distribution, are analyzed to illustrate general relations between structure factors and response factors. The idea of the ``thermally equivalent wall``, a plane multilayer structure, with dynamic characteristics similar to those of a complex structure, in which three-dimensional heat flow occurs, is presented.

  8. Dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV. II - Pitching motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Maeda, H.

    The dynamic pitching characteristics of peripheral jet ACV (Air Cushion Vehicle) which have a stability curtain are investigated analytically and experimentally. The measured values of moment, lift and cushion pressure are compared with numerical results noting applicability to the pitching motion. The response of ACV to the sinusoidal pitching oscillation of the ground is also studied.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamic Characteristics of Oil-in-Water Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhaoqi; Han, Yunfeng; Ren, Yingyu; Yang, Qiuyi; Jin, Ningde

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the nonlinear dynamic characteristics of oil-in-water emulsions under the addition of surfactant were experimentally investigated. Firstly, based on the vertical upward oil-water two-phase flow experiment in 20 mm inner diameter (ID) testing pipe, dynamic response signals of oil-in-water emulsions were recorded using vertical multiple electrode array (VMEA) sensor. Afterwards, the recurrence plot (RP) algorithm and multi-scale weighted complexity entropy causality plane (MS-WCECP) were employed to analyse the nonlinear characteristics of the signals. The results show that the certainty is decreasing and the randomness is increasing with the increment of surfactant concentration. This article provides a novel method for revealing the nonlinear dynamic characteristics, complexity, and randomness of oil-in-water emulsions with experimental measurement signals.

  10. A review of dynamic characteristics of magnetically levitated vehicle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.

    1995-11-01

    The dynamic response of magnetically levitated (maglev) ground transportation systems has important consequences for safety and ride quality, guideway design, and system costs. Ride quality is determined by vehicle response and by environmental factors such as humidity and noise. The dynamic response of the vehicles is the key element in determining ride quality, while vehicle stability is an important safety-related element. To design a guideway that provides acceptable ride quality in the stable region, vehicle dynamics must be understood. Furthermore, the trade-off between guideway smoothness and levitation and control systems must be considered if maglev systems are to be economically feasible. The link between the guideway and the other maglev components is vehicle dynamics. For a commercial maglev system, vehicle dynamics must be analyzed and tested in detail. This report, which reviews various aspects of the dynamic characteristics, experiments and analysis, and design guidelines for maglev systems, discusses vehicle stability, motion dependent magnetic force components, guideway characteristics, vehicle/ guideway interaction, ride quality, suspension control laws, aerodynamic loads and other excitations, and research needs.

  11. Dynamic response of aircraft structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The physical and mathematical problems associated with the response of elastic structures to random excitations such as occurs during buffeting and other transonic phenomena were discussed. The following subjects were covered: (1) general dynamic system consisting of the aircraft structure, the aerodynamic driving forces due to separated flow, and the aerodynamic forces due to aircraft structural motion, (2) structural and aerodynamic quantities of the dynamic system with special emphasis given to the description of the aerodynamic forces, and including a treatment of similarity laws, scaling effects, and wind tunnel testing, and (3) methods for data processing of fluctuating pressure recordings and techniques for response analysis for random excitation. A general buffeting flutter model, which takes into account the interactions between the separated and motion induced flows was presented. Relaxations of this model leading to the forced vibration model were explained.

  12. Dynamic response of cavitating turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    Stimulated by the pogo instability encountered in many liquid propellant rockets, the dynamic behavior of cavitating inducers is discussed. An experimental facility where the upstream and downstream flows of a cavitating inducer could be perturbed was constructed and tested. The upstream and downstream pressure and mass flow fluctuations were measured. Matrices representing the transfer functions across the inducer pump were calculated from these measurements and from the hydraulic system characteristics for two impellers in various states of cavitation. The transfer matrices when plotted against the perturbing frequency showed significant departure from steady state or quasi-steady predictions especially at higher frequencies.

  13. Dynamic Metabolism in Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Chakraborty, Paramita; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against “self” or “non-self” antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells. While a number of groups are dwelling into the nuances of the metabolism and its role in immune response at various strata, this review focuses on dynamic state of metabolism that is operational within various cellular compartments that interact to mount an effective immune response to alleviate disease state.

  14. Dynamic and attitude control characteristics of an International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Thomas R.; Cooper, Paul A.; Young, John W.; Mccutchen, Don K.

    1987-01-01

    The structural dynamic characteristics of the International Space Station (ISS), the interim reference configuration established for NASA's Space Station developmental program, are discussed, and a finite element model is described. Modes and frequencies of the station below 2.0 Hz are derived, and the dynamic response of the station is simulated for an external impulse load corresponding to a failed shuttle-docking maneuver. A three-axis attitude control system regulates the ISS orientation, with control moment gyros responding to attitude and attitude rate signals. No instabilities were found in the attitude control system.

  15. Modeling the dynamic characteristics of pneumatic muscle.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, D B; Repperger, D W; Phillips, C A; Bandry, G

    2003-03-01

    A pneumatic muscle (PM) system was studied to determine whether a three-element model could describe its dynamics. As far as the authors are aware, this model has not been used to describe the dynamics of PM. A new phenomenological model consists of a contractile (force-generating) element, spring element, and damping element in parallel. The PM system was investigated using an apparatus that allowed precise and accurate actuation pressure (P) control by a linear servo-valve. Length change of the PM was measured by a linear potentiometer. Spring and damping element functions of P were determined by a static perturbation method at several constant P values. These results indicate that at constant P, PM behaves as a spring and damper in parallel. The contractile element function of P was determined by the response to a step input in P, using values of spring and damping elements from the perturbation study. The study showed that the resulting coefficient functions of the three-element model describe the dynamic response to the step input of P accurately, indicating that the static perturbation results can be applied to the dynamic case. This model is further validated by accurately predicting the contraction response to a triangular P waveform. All three elements have pressure-dependent coefficients for pressure P in the range 207 < or = P < or = 621 kPa (30 < or = P < or = 90 psi). Studies with a step decrease in P (relaxation of the PM) indicate that the damping element coefficient is smaller during relaxation than contraction.

  16. Study of Dynamic Characteristics of Aeroelastic Systems Utilizing Randomdec Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. S.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing the random decrement method in conjunction with a signature analysis procedure to determine the dynamic characteristics of an aeroelastic system for the purpose of on-line prediction of potential on-set of flutter was examined. Digital computer programs were developed to simulate sampled response signals of a two-mode aeroelastic system. Simulated response data were used to test the random decrement method. A special curve-fit approach was developed for analyzing the resulting signatures. A number of numerical 'experiments' were conducted on the combined processes. The method is capable of determining frequency and damping values accurately from randomdec signatures of carefully selected lengths.

  17. The experimental investigation of bounce characteristics of ACV responsive skirt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. L.; Ma, T.

    This paper presents some experimental results on the bounce characteristics of the bag-finger responsive skirt and on skirt frequency response under cushion pressure excitation obtained in a large-scale box facility. The influence of some parameters on the amplitude and frequency of the skirt bounce motion and the amplitude of the cushion pressure oscillation were explored, and the corresponding bounce boundary curves are given. Some interesting nonlinear phenomena related to the skirt instability in the time domain response are presented. The mechanism for skirt bounce and the important parameters affecting skirt dynamic stability are examined, and some means for eliminating skirt bounce are introduced.

  18. Simulated dynamic response of a servovalve controlled hydraulic actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, Dale A.

    1990-01-01

    A general purpose math model of a servovalve controlled hydraulic actuator system is derived. The system consists of a linear actuator with unequal piston areas, a single stage servovalve, a gas charged hydraulic accumulator, and the interconnecting piping. The state equations are integrated using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) for determining the system's dynamic response characteristics. Using this generalized hydraulic actuator system model, response characteristics were determined for various servovalve commands.

  19. Dynamic characteristics of pulsed supersonic fuel sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianthong, K.; Matthujak, A.; Takayama, K.; Milton, B. E.; Behnia, M.

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes the dynamic characteristics of pulsed, supersonic liquid fuel sprays or jets injected into ambient air. Simple, single hole nozzles were employed with the nozzle sac geometries being varied. Different fuel types, diesel fuel, bio-diesel, kerosene, and gasoline were used to determine the effects of fuel properties on the spray characteristics. A vertical two-stage light gas gun was employed as a projectile launcher to provide a high velocity impact to produce the liquid jet. The injection pressure was around 0.88-1.24 GPa in all cases. The pulsed, supersonic fuel sprays were visualized by using a high-speed video camera and shadowgraph method. The spray tip penetration and velocity attenuation and other characteristics were examined and are described here. An instantaneous spray tip velocity of 1,542 m/s (Mach number 4.52) was obtained. However, this spray tip velocity can be sustained for only a very short period (a few microseconds). It then attenuates very quickly. The phenomenon of multiple high frequency spray pulses generated by a single shot impact and the changed in the angle of the shock structure during the spray flight, which had already been observed in previous studies, is again noted. Multiple shock waves from the conical nozzle spray were also clearly captured.

  20. A helicopter handling-qualities study of the effects of engine response characteristics, height-control dynamics, and excess power on nap-of-the-Earth operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corliss, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    The helicopter configuration with an rpm-governed gas-turbine engine was examined. A wide range of engine response time, vehicle damping and sensitivity, and excess power levels was studied. The data are compared with the existing handling-qualities specifications, MIL-F-83300 and AGARD 577, and in general show a need for higher minimums when performing such NOE maneuvers as a dolphin and bob-up task.

  1. Aluminum Honeycomb Characteristics in Dynamic Crush Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, Vesta I.; Swanson, Lloyd H.

    1999-07-01

    Fifteen aluminum honeycomb cubes (3 in.) have been crushed in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory's drop table testing machines. This report summarizes shock experiments with honeycomb densities of 22.1 pcf and 38.0 pcf and with crush weights of 45 lb, 168 lb, and 268 lb. The honeycomb samples were crushed in all three orientations, W, L, and T. Most of the experiments were conducted at an impact velocity of {approx}40 fps, but higher velocities of up to 90 fps were used for selected experiments. Where possible, multiple experiments were conducted for a specific orientation and density of the honeycomb samples. All results are for Hexcel honeycomb except for one experiment with Alcore honeycomb and have been evaluated for validity. This report contains the raw acceleration data measured on the top of the drop table carriage, pictures of the crushed samples, and normalized force-displacement curves for all fifteen experiments. These data are not strictly valid for material characteristics in L and T orientations because the cross-sectional area of the honeycomb changed (split) during the crush. However, these are the best data available at this time. These dynamic crush data do suggest a significant increase in crush strength to 8000 psi ({approximately} 25-30% increase) over quasi-static values of {approximately}6000 psi for the 38.0 pcf Hexcel Honeycomb in the T-orientation. An uncertainty analysis is included and estimates the error in these data.

  2. Dynamical response to a stationary tidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Philippe; Poisson, Eric

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that a slowly rotating compact body subjected to a stationary tidal field undergoes a dynamical response, in which the fluid variables and the interior metric vary on the time scale of the rotation period. This dynamical response requires the tidal field to have a gravitomagnetic component generated by external mass currents; the response to a gravitoelectric tidal field is stationary. We confirm that in a calculation carried out to first order in the body's rotation, the exterior geometry bears no trace of this internal dynamics; it remains stationary in spite of the time-dependent interior.

  3. Morphological characteristics of motile plants for dynamic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kahye; Yeom, Eunseop; Kim, Kiwoong; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-11-01

    Most plants have been considered as non-motile organisms. However, plants move in response to environmental changes for survival. In addition, some species drive dynamic motions in a short period of time. Mimosa pudica is a plant that rapidly shrinks its body in response to external stimuli. It has specialized organs that are omnidirectionally activated due to morphological features. In addition, scales of pinecone open or close up depending on humidity for efficient seed release. A number of previous studies on the dynamic motion of plants have been investigated in a biochemical point of view. In this study, the morphological characteristics of those motile organs were investigated by using X-ray CT and micro-imaging techniques. The results show that the dynamic motions of motile plants are supported by structural features related with water transport. These studies would provide new insight for better understanding the moving mechanism of motile plant in morphological point of view. This research was financially supported by the Creative Research Initiative of the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP) and the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea (Grant Number: 2008-0061991).

  4. Effects of rail dynamics and friction characteristics on curve squeal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B.; Squicciarini, G.; Thompson, D. J.

    2016-09-01

    Curve squeal in railway vehicles is an instability mechanism that arises in tight curves under certain running and environmental conditions. In developing a model the most important elements are the characterisation of friction coupled with an accurate representation of the structural dynamics of the wheel. However, the role played by the dynamics of the rail is not fully understood and it is unclear whether this should be included in a model or whether it can be safely neglected. This paper makes use of previously developed time domain and frequency domain curve squeal models to assess whether the presence of the rail and the falling characteristics of the friction force can modify the instability mechanisms and the final response. For this purpose, the time-domain model has been updated to include the rail dynamics in terms of its state space representation in various directions. Frequency domain and time domain analyses results show that falling friction is not the only reason for squeal and rail dynamics can play an important role, especially under constant friction conditions.

  5. Dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV. III - Coupling motion of heaving and pitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Maeda, H.

    The paper presents the dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV (Air Cushion Vehicle) which has two degrees of freedom, i.e., heaving and pitching motion. The experiments are carried out for an ACV model, noting that the experimental results agree considerably with the analytical values. Furthermore, the response characteristics of ACV induced by the ground board oscillations of various modes are also investigated.

  6. Dynamic electrical response of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catani, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic response of a solar generator is of primary importance as much for the design and development of electrical power conditioning hardware as for the analysis of electromagnetic compatibility. A mathematical model of photo-batteries was developed on the basis of impedance measurements performed under differing conditions of temperature, light intensity, before and after irradiation. This model was compared with that derived from PN junction theory and to static measurements. These dynamic measurements enabled the refinement of an integration method capable of determining, under normal laboratory conditions, the dynamic response of a generator to operational lighting conditions.

  7. The dynamic response of rail support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Gunmo; Choi, Jungyoul

    2013-06-01

    This research reviews principles behind the dynamic response of rail supports, and introduces a method of analysis to find the maximum response in a realistic setting. Assuming a time-dependent, moving mass with massive wheels is essential, because the ratio of the moving mass to the rail mass is significant. However, the dynamic response of the track is not affected by dynamic properties of the train other than its unsprung mass, because the natural frequencies of the train suspension and track are significantly different. A numerical method is developed to model the dynamic response based on these principles, and applied to the Korean urban transit. The dynamic response includes multiple peaks with a large amplitude range, creating noise while the wheel passes the support. The dynamic impact factor (DIF) for the rail support depends mainly on the stiffness and damping of the rail support. The DIF for the rail moment is below the code value, whether this value is based on numerical analysis or on-site measurements. However, our numerical analysis results in a DIF for support settlement that is greater than the code value, if the damping is less than 3%.

  8. The response dynamics of preferential choice.

    PubMed

    Koop, Gregory J; Johnson, Joseph G

    2013-12-01

    The ubiquity of psychological process models requires an increased degree of sophistication in the methods and metrics that we use to evaluate them. We contribute to this venture by capitalizing on recent work in cognitive science analyzing response dynamics, which shows that the bearing information processing dynamics have on intended action is also revealed in the motor system. This decidedly "embodied" view suggests that researchers are missing out on potential dependent variables with which to evaluate their models-those associated with the motor response that produces a choice. The current work develops a method for collecting and analyzing such data in the domain of decision making. We first validate this method using widely normed stimuli from the International Affective Picture System (Experiment 1), and demonstrate that curvature in response trajectories provides a metric of the competition between choice options. We next extend the method to risky decision making (Experiment 2) and develop predictions for three popular classes of process model. The data provided by response dynamics demonstrate that choices contrary to the maxim of risk seeking in losses and risk aversion in gains may be the product of at least one "online" preference reversal, and can thus begin to discriminate amongst the candidate models. Finally, we incorporate attentional data collected via eye-tracking (Experiment 3) to develop a formal computational model of joint information sampling and preference accumulation. In sum, we validate response dynamics for use in preferential choice tasks and demonstrate the unique conclusions afforded by response dynamics over and above traditional methods.

  9. Numerical investigation of bubble nonlinear dynamics characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jie Yang, Desen; Shi, Shengguo; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Haoyang; Jiang, Wei

    2015-10-28

    The complicated dynamical behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave can provide favorable conditions for many engineering applications. On the basis of Keller-Miksis model, the influences of control parameters, including acoustic frequency, acoustic pressure and radius of gas bubble, are discussed by utilizing various numerical analysis methods, Furthermore, the law of power spectral variation is studied. It is shown that the complicated dynamic behaviors of bubble oscillation driven by acoustic wave, such as bifurcation and chaos, further the stimulated scattering processes are revealed.

  10. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  11. Finite element simulation of pipe dynamic response

    SciTech Connect

    Slagis, G.C.; Litton, R.W.

    1996-12-01

    Nonlinear finite element dynamic analyses of the response of a pipe span to controlled-displacement, sinusoidal vibration have been performed. The objective of this preliminary study is to compare strain and acceleration response data to those generated by Beaney in the Berkeley Nuclear Laboratories experiments. Results for an unpressurized, 5 Hz, carbon steel pipe are in good agreement with the experiments. Hence, it appears that analytical simulation will be useful to assess seismic margins. Recommendations for additional studies are provided. The analyses confirm the test results--dynamic response is greatly attenuated by material plasticity. Analytical strains and accelerations are about 30% higher than test data. There are several possible explanations for the differences. To assess the effect of frequency on response, the length of the pipe span was increased. Analysis of the longer, 2 Hz, pipe span shows significantly greater cyclic strains than the 5 Hz span at the same input excitation levels.

  12. Ambient response of a unique performance-based design building with dynamic response modification features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet; Huang, Moh; Shakal, Antony; Hooper, John; Klemencic, Ron

    2012-01-01

    A 64-story, performance-based design building with reinforced concrete core shear-walls and unique dynamic response modification features (tuned liquid sloshing dampers and buckling-restrained braces) has been instrumented with a monitoring array of 72 channels of accelerometers. Ambient vibration data recorded are analyzed to identify modes and associated frequencies and damping. The low-amplitude dynamic characteristics are considerably different than those computed from design analyses, but serve as a baseline against which to compare with future strong shaking responses. Such studies help to improve our understanding of the effectiveness of the added features to the building and help improve designs in the future.

  13. Dynamic characteristics and seismic stability of expanded polystyrene geofoam embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Zahra A.

    Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) geofoam has become a preferred material in various construction applications due to its light weight. Application of EPS accelerates the projects particularly on soft soils. The focus of this research is on the application of the EPS in embankments and its behavior mainly under harmonic vibration. The goal of this study was to investigate dynamic characteristics of freestanding vertical EPS geofoam embankment and address potential seismic issues that result from the distinguished dynamic behavior of such systems due to the layered and discrete block structure. A series of experimental studies on EPS 19 and a commercially available adhesive was conducted. Two-dimensional numerical analyses were performed to replicate the response of EPS geofoam embankment to horizontal and vertical harmonic motions. The results of the analyses have shown that for some acceleration amplitude levels interlayer sliding is expected to occur in EPS geofoam embankments almost immediately after the start of the base excitation; however, as a highly efficient energy dissipation mechanism sliding ceases rapidly. Shear keys and adhesive may be used to prevent interlayer sliding if they cover the proper extent of area of the embankment. EPS blocks placed in the corners of the embankment and at the edges of the segment prohibited from sliding may experience high stress concentrations. The embankment may show horizontal sway and rocking once sliding is prevented.

  14. Dynamic characteristics of observed sudden warmings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dartt, D. G.; Venne, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The planetary wave dynamics of stratospheric sudden warmings in the Northern Hemisphere for a large number of observed events that occurred during winters from 1970 to 1975 and 1978 to 1981 are investigated. The analysis describes wave propagation and zonal flow interaction from the troposphere upwards to near 50 km, and in some years to near 80 km. Three primary topics are covered here: (1) the interaction of zonally propagating and quasi-stationary planetary waves during warming events; (2) planetary wave influence on zonal flow near the stratopause; and (3) planetary wave propagation to near 80 km as seen from Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (SAMS) data.

  15. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG

  16. Dynamical characteristics of Phobos and Deimos.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The orbital properties of the two small Martian satellites, Phobos and Deimos, are discussed, as well as those dynamical constants of Mars that can be determined from the satellite orbits. The secular acceleration of the mean motion of Phobos is shown to be very small. Of mechanisms that could cause any such acceleration, only tidal friction appears to be important. From the orbital evolution of the Martian satellites under tidal forces, Phobos and Deimos seem to have originated in nearly circular orbits of low inclination fairly close to the distance at which a satellite's orbital period is the planet's rotation period. It is proposed that the Martian satellites were born at the same time as Mars from equatorial dust clouds. The satellites are predicted to be locked in synchronous rotation, with their axes of minimum moment of inertia pointing on the average toward Mars, whereas their maximum axes are approximately normal to their orbit planes.

  17. Dynamic characteristics of tweeting and tweet topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyun Woong; Choi, M. Y.; Kim, Ho Sung; Lee, Keumsook

    2012-02-01

    Twitter, having more than 200 million world users and more than 4 million Korean users, is still growing fast. Because Twitter users can `tweet' about any topic within the 140-character limit, and other users who follow the users and see the tweets can `retweet' them, Twitter is regarded as a new medium of transferring and sharing information. Nevertheless, the propensities of Twitter users to tweet or to retweet still remain unclear. In order to investigate these propensities, we propose a simple model for the dynamics of the total number of tweets about specific topics. We then observe that the topics can be categorized into three kinds according to predictability and sustainability: predictable events, unpredictable events, and sustainable events. Comparing model results with real data, we infer the tweet propensities motivated by external causes as well as retweet propensities.

  18. Effective reconstruction of dynamics of medium response spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2008-10-01

    A new algorithm is suggested to visualize the dynamics of medium response spectrum in terahertz diapason by the singly measured set of partially intersected integral characteristics of the signal. The algorithm is based on SVD method and window sliding method. The analysis, we carried out, demonstrates many advantages of the new algorithm in com-parison with the Gabor-Fourier approach, which allows obtaining the dynamics of only one spectral line for one set of measurements. Among which it is necessary to mention the possibility to get the dynamics of many spectral components simultaneously for one set of measurements as well and therefore to get the complete information about the spectrum dynamics. This allows to identify specific materials with known spectral lines and to distinguish materials with similar spectra, which is of great importance for the detection and identification of different chemicals, pharmaceutical substances and explosives. To demonstrate the efficiency of a proposed algorithm, we compare spectrum dynamics of chocolate and soap, which possess the similar spectra. Our investigation shows that their dynamics widely vary in spec-tral lines. The proposed algorithm can be also applied to voice identification and to reconstruction of a laser beam profile with a great number of local maxima. Developed algorithm allows to measure the characteristic time of medium responce. It is very important for various problems of spectroscopy.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Dynamic Response of Beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan P.; Lane, J. Matthew D.; Baskes, Michael I.; Desjarlais, Michael P.

    2009-06-01

    The response of beryllium to dynamic loading has been extensively studied, both experimentally and theoretically, due to its importance in several technological areas. Compared to other metals, it is quite challenging to accurately represent the various anomalous behaviors of beryllium using classical interatomic potentials. The spherically-symmetric EAM potential can not reproduce the observed c/a ratio for α-Be under ambient conditions, which is significantly smaller than the ideal HCP value. The directional-dependence of the MEAM potential overcomes this problem, but introduces additional complexity. We will compare predictions of these classical potentials to experimental measurements of beryllium at ambient conditions, and also to theoretical calculations at high temperatures and pressures. Finally, we will present initial results from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of beryllium under dynamic loading. This work is supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories.

  20. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  1. The contract murderer: patterns, characteristics, and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, L B

    2001-09-01

    A case of an independent professional contract murderer, who killed over 100 people, is reported. After eluding law enforcement for 30 years, the subject killed several associates who he believed could implicate him in various crimes. These homicides eventually led to his arrest, since the victims were individuals who could be linked to him. This hit man had a background of poverty and childhood abuse but, as an adult, had pursued a middle-class lifestyle and kept his family totally separate from his criminal career. In addition, he had a number of characteristics that helped him carry out his crimes in a highly planned, methodical, and organized manner: he had adept social judgment; personality traits of orderliness, control, and paranoid vigilance; useful defense mechanisms of rationalization and reframing; and an exceptional ability to encapsulate emotions. This case is discussed within the context of contract murder, a crime that occurs relatively frequently and is probably increasing; yet it often goes undetected, the arrest rate is low, and the offender is rarely studied.

  2. Characteristics of the infant arousal response.

    PubMed

    McNamara, F; Wulbrand, H; Thach, B T

    1998-12-01

    Arousal is considered to be an important response to a life-threatening stimulus. Recently, it has been shown that the infant arousal response to an elevated inspired CO2 level occurs as a sequence of events involving presumptive brain stem responses before awakening (A. Lijowska, N. Reed, B. Chiodini, and B. T. Thach. Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. 151: A151, 1995; A. S. Lijowska, N. W. Reed, B. A. Mertins Chiodini, and B. T. Thach. J. Appl. Physiol. 83: 219-228, 1997). We wanted to further evaluate the relationship of subcortical reflexes to cortical arousal in infants. We used a nonrespiratory (tactile) stimulus to elicit arousal in infants during non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. We found that a tactile stimulus elicited an arousal sequence that commenced with a spinal withdrawal reflex, was followed by brain stem responses (respiratory and startle responses), and ended in a cortical arousal. The entire pathway or part of it in the order of spinal to cortical responses could be elicited. REM and NREM responses were similar except for significant differences in the latencies of spinal and subcortical reflexes. These observations suggest that the infant arousal response to a tactile stimulus involves a progression of central nervous system activation from the spinal to cortical levels. The different components of the arousal pathway may be important for an infant to respond appropriately to stimuli during sleep without necessarily disturbing sleep.

  3. Dynamics and response of polymer-coated acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we consider the dynamic behavior and the electrical response of a thickness-shear mode resonator with a polymer film coating one face. With glassy polymers (shear stiffness G{prime} {approx} 10{sup 10} dyne/cm{sup 2}), this film tends to move synchronously with the oscillating resonator surface, while with rubbery polymers (G{prime} {approx} 10{sup 7} dyne/cm{sup 2}), the upper portions of the film lag behind the driven resonator/film interface, causing shear deformation of the film. As polymer properties change, interesting dynamic film behavior results, notably a film resonance when the acoustic phase shift across the film is an odd multiple of {pi}2. This dynamic behavior influences the electrical response of the resonator due to the coupling between shear displacement and electric field in the piezoelectric quartz. Utilizing the fact that the polymer shear modulus changes rapidly as a function of temperature, these film behavior trends were demonstrated by measuring the electrical characteristics of a polyisobutylene-coated resonator as a function of frequency and at several temperatures. We show how these changing film dynamics can be correlated with changes in the measured electrical response. 11 refs.

  4. Dynamics and response of polymer-coated acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C.

    1992-06-01

    In this paper we consider the dynamic behavior and the electrical response of a thickness-shear mode resonator with a polymer film coating one face. With glassy polymers (shear stiffness G{prime} {approx} 10{sup 10} dyne/cm{sup 2}), this film tends to move synchronously with the oscillating resonator surface, while with rubbery polymers (G{prime} {approx} 10{sup 7} dyne/cm{sup 2}), the upper portions of the film lag behind the driven resonator/film interface, causing shear deformation of the film. As polymer properties change, interesting dynamic film behavior results, notably a film resonance when the acoustic phase shift across the film is an odd multiple of {pi}2. This dynamic behavior influences the electrical response of the resonator due to the coupling between shear displacement and electric field in the piezoelectric quartz. Utilizing the fact that the polymer shear modulus changes rapidly as a function of temperature, these film behavior trends were demonstrated by measuring the electrical characteristics of a polyisobutylene-coated resonator as a function of frequency and at several temperatures. We show how these changing film dynamics can be correlated with changes in the measured electrical response. 11 refs.

  5. Dynamics and control characteristics of a reference Space Station configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Thomas R.; Cooper, Paul A.; Young, John W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the structural dynamic characteristics of a NASA reference space station configuration as defined in the November 1987 Space Station Program - Systems Engineering and Integration Engineering Data Book. The modes and frequencies of the station below 2.0 Hz were obtained and selected results along with rigid body properties are presented. A three-axis attitude control system using control moment gyros responding to attitude and attitude rate signals is used to regulate the orientation of the station. The stability of the control system with non-collocated sensors is investigated for both compensated and uncompensated control signals. Results from a closed-loop simulation of a commanded attitude change about three axes, and from a closed-loop simulation of the response of the station to an externally applied unit force impulse at the docking port are presented. These simulation results are used to evaluate the possible degree of control/structures interaction which could occur during normal operation of the station.

  6. Solar dynamic heat receiver thermal characteristics in low earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Y. C.; Roschke, E. J.; Birur, G. C.

    1988-01-01

    A simplified system model is under development for evaluating the thermal characteristics and thermal performance of a solar dynamic spacecraft energy system's heat receiver. Results based on baseline orbit, power system configuration, and operational conditions, are generated for three basic receiver concepts and three concentrator surface slope errors. Receiver thermal characteristics and thermal behavior in LEO conditions are presented. The configuration in which heat is directly transferred to the working fluid is noted to generate the best system and thermal characteristics. as well as the lowest performance degradation with increasing slope error.

  7. Design of helicopter rotor blades for optimum dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ko, T.; Korn, A.; Rossow, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    The mass and stiffness distributions for helicopter rotor blades are tailored in such a way to give a predetermined placement of blade natural frequencies. The optimal design is pursued with respect of minimum weight, sufficient inertia, and reasonable dynamic characteristics. Finite element techniques are used as a tool. Rotor types include hingeless, articulated, and teetering.

  8. Spectral characteristics of ventricular response to atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hayano, J; Yamasaki, F; Sakata, S; Okada, A; Mukai, S; Fujinami, T

    1997-12-01

    To investigate the spectral characteristics of the fluctuation in ventricular response during atrial fibrillation (AF), R-R interval time series obtained from ambulatory electrocardiograms were analyzed in 45 patients with chronic AF and in 30 age-matched healthy subjects with normal sinus rhythm (SR). Although the 24-h R-R interval spectrum during SR showed a 1/f noise-like downsloping linear pattern when plotted as log power against log frequency, the spectrum during AF showed an angular shape with a breakpoint at a frequency of 0.005 +/- 0.002 Hz, by which the spectrum was separated into long-term and short-term components with different spectral characteristics. The short-term component showed a white noise-like flat spectrum with a spectral exponent (absolute value of the regression slope) of 0.05 +/- 0.08 and an intercept at 10(-2) Hz of 4.9 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz). The long-term component had a 1/f noise-like spectrum with a spectral exponent of 1.26 +/- 0.40 and an intercept at 10(-4) Hz of 7.0 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz), which did not differ significantly from those for the spectrum during SR in the same frequency range [spectral exponent, 1.36 +/- 0.06; intercept at 10(-4) Hz, 7.1 +/- 0.3 log(ms2/Hz)]. The R-R intervals during AF may be a sequence of uncorrelated values over the short term (within several minutes). Over the longer term, however, the R-R interval fluctuation shows the long-range negative correlation suggestive of underlying regulatory processes, and spectral characteristics indistinguishable from those for SR suggest that the long-term fluctuations during AF and SR may originate from similar dynamics of the cardiovascular regulatory systems. PMID:9435618

  9. The dynamic inelastic response of delaminated plates

    SciTech Connect

    Addessio, F.L.; Williams, T.O.

    1996-12-01

    A generalized theory for laminated plates with delaminations is used to consider the influence of inelastic deformations on the dynamic behavior of composite plates with delaminations. The laminate model is based on a generalized displacement formulation implemented at the layer level. The delamination behavior can be modeled using any general interfacial fracture law: however, for the current work a linear model is employed. The interfacial displacement jumps are expressed in an internally consistent fashion in terms of the fundamental unknown interfacial tractions. The current theory imposes no restrictions on the size, location, distribution, or direction of growth of the delaminations. The proposed theory is used to consider the inelastic, dynamic response of delaminated plates in cylindrical bending subjected to a ramp and hold type of loading. The individual layers in the current study are assumed to be either titanium or aluminum. The inelastic response of both materials is modeled using the unified viscoplastic theory of Bodner and Partom. It is shown that the presence of both inelastic behavior and delamination can have a significant influence on the plate response. In particular it is shown that these mechanisms are strongly interactive. This result emphasizes the need to consider both mechanisms simultaneously.

  10. Structural optimization for nonlinear dynamic response.

    PubMed

    Dou, Suguang; Strachan, B Scott; Shaw, Steven W; Jensen, Jakob S

    2015-09-28

    Much is known about the nonlinear resonant response of mechanical systems, but methods for the systematic design of structures that optimize aspects of these responses have received little attention. Progress in this area is particularly important in the area of micro-systems, where nonlinear resonant behaviour is being used for a variety of applications in sensing and signal conditioning. In this work, we describe a computational method that provides a systematic means for manipulating and optimizing features of nonlinear resonant responses of mechanical structures that are described by a single vibrating mode, or by a pair of internally resonant modes. The approach combines techniques from nonlinear dynamics, computational mechanics and optimization, and it allows one to relate the geometric and material properties of structural elements to terms in the normal form for a given resonance condition, thereby providing a means for tailoring its nonlinear response. The method is applied to the fundamental nonlinear resonance of a clamped-clamped beam and to the coupled mode response of a frame structure, and the results show that one can modify essential normal form coefficients by an order of magnitude by relatively simple changes in the shape of these elements. We expect the proposed approach, and its extensions, to be useful for the design of systems used for fundamental studies of nonlinear behaviour as well as for the development of commercial devices that exploit nonlinear behaviour.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Dynamic Characteristics of Thin-Film Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Leyland G.; Ramanathan, Suresh; Hu, Jia-Zhu; Pai, P. Frank

    2004-01-01

    Presented is a total-Lagrangian displacement-based non-linear finite-element model of thin-film membranes for static and dynamic large-displacement analyses. The membrane theory fully accounts for geometric non-linearities. Fully non-linear static analysis followed by linear modal analysis is performed for an inflated circular cylindrical Kapton membrane tube under different pressures, and for a rectangular membrane under different tension loads at four comers. Finite element results show that shell modes dominate the dynamics of the inflated tube when the inflation pressure is low, and that vibration modes localized along four edges dominate the dynamics of the rectangular membrane. Numerical dynamic characteristics of the two membrane structures were experimentally verified using a Polytec PI PSV-200 scanning laser vibrometer and an EAGLE-500 8-camera motion analysis system.

  12. Dynamic Calibration and Verification Device of Measurement System for Dynamic Characteristic Coefficients of Sliding Bearing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Runlin; Wei, Yangyang; Shi, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    The identification accuracy of dynamic characteristics coefficients is difficult to guarantee because of the errors of the measurement system itself. A novel dynamic calibration method of measurement system for dynamic characteristics coefficients is proposed in this paper to eliminate the errors of the measurement system itself. Compared with the calibration method of suspension quality, this novel calibration method is different because the verification device is a spring-mass system, which can simulate the dynamic characteristics of sliding bearing. The verification device is built, and the calibration experiment is implemented in a wide frequency range, in which the bearing stiffness is simulated by the disc springs. The experimental results show that the amplitude errors of this measurement system are small in the frequency range of 10 Hz-100 Hz, and the phase errors increase along with the increasing of frequency. It is preliminarily verified by the simulated experiment of dynamic characteristics coefficients identification in the frequency range of 10 Hz-30 Hz that the calibration data in this frequency range can support the dynamic characteristics test of sliding bearing in this frequency range well. The bearing experiments in greater frequency ranges need higher manufacturing and installation precision of calibration device. Besides, the processes of calibration experiments should be improved. PMID:27483283

  13. Dynamic Calibration and Verification Device of Measurement System for Dynamic Characteristic Coefficients of Sliding Bearing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Runlin; Wei, Yangyang; Shi, Zhaoyang; Yuan, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    The identification accuracy of dynamic characteristics coefficients is difficult to guarantee because of the errors of the measurement system itself. A novel dynamic calibration method of measurement system for dynamic characteristics coefficients is proposed in this paper to eliminate the errors of the measurement system itself. Compared with the calibration method of suspension quality, this novel calibration method is different because the verification device is a spring-mass system, which can simulate the dynamic characteristics of sliding bearing. The verification device is built, and the calibration experiment is implemented in a wide frequency range, in which the bearing stiffness is simulated by the disc springs. The experimental results show that the amplitude errors of this measurement system are small in the frequency range of 10 Hz–100 Hz, and the phase errors increase along with the increasing of frequency. It is preliminarily verified by the simulated experiment of dynamic characteristics coefficients identification in the frequency range of 10 Hz–30 Hz that the calibration data in this frequency range can support the dynamic characteristics test of sliding bearing in this frequency range well. The bearing experiments in greater frequency ranges need higher manufacturing and installation precision of calibration device. Besides, the processes of calibration experiments should be improved. PMID:27483283

  14. Dynamic energy absorption characteristics of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Chen, X

    2014-10-01

    Hollow microlattice structures are promising candidates for advanced energy absorption and their characteristics under dynamic crushing are explored. The energy absorption can be significantly enhanced by inertial stabilization, shock wave effect and strain rate hardening effect. In this paper we combine theoretical analysis and comprehensive finite element method simulation to decouple the three effects, and then obtain a simple model to predict the overall dynamic effects of hollow microlattice structures. Inertial stabilization originates from the suppression of sudden crushing of the microlattice and its contribution scales with the crushing speed, v. Shock wave effect comes from the discontinuity across the plastic shock wave front during dynamic loading and its contribution scales with e. The strain rate effect increases the effective yield strength upon dynamic deformation and increases the energy absorption density. A mechanism map is established that illustrates the dominance of these three dynamic effects at a range of crushing speeds. Compared with quasi-static loading, the energy absorption capacity a dynamic loading of 250 m/s can be enhanced by an order of magnitude. The study may shed useful insight on designing and optimizing the energy absorption performance of hollow microlattice structures under various dynamic loads. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  16. Dynamic Response and Dynamic Failure Mode of a Weak Intercalated Rock Slope Using a Shaking Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Gang; Zhang, Jianjing; Wu, Jinbiao; Yan, Kongming

    2016-08-01

    A large-scale shaking table test was performed to study the dynamic response of slopes parallel to geological bedding (bedding slopes) and slopes that cross-cut geological bedding (counter-bedding slopes). The test results show that the acceleration amplification coefficients increase with increasing elevation and, when the input earthquake amplitude is greater than 0.3 g, both bedding and counter-bedding slopes begin to show nonlinear dynamic response characteristics. With increasing elevation, the displacement of the bedding slope surface increases greatly. Conversely, the displacement of the counter-bedding slope surface increases first and then decreases; the slope develops a bulge at the relative elevation of 0.85. The displacement of the bedding slope surface is greater than that of the counter-bedding slope. The counter-bedding slope is more seismically stable compared with the bedding slope. Based on the Hilbert-Huang transform and marginal spectrum theories, the processes that develop dynamic damage of the bedding and counter-bedding slopes are identified. It is shown that the dynamic failure mode of the bedding slope is mainly represented by vertical tensile cracks at the rear of the slope, bedding slide of the strata along the weak intercalation, and rock collapse from the slope crest. However, the dynamic failure mode of the counter-bedding slope is mainly represented by staggered horizontal and vertical fissures, extrusion of the weak intercalation, and breakage at the slope crest.

  17. Dynamic characteristics of double tunneling-injection quantum dot lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asryan, Levon V.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic characteristics of double tunneling-injection (DTI) quantum dot (QD) lasers are studied. To reveal the potential of such lasers for high-speed direct modulation of their optical output by pump current, fast carrier injection into QDs and no carrier leakage from QDs are assumed. The small-signal analysis of rate equations is applied. The modulation bandwidth is calculated as a function of the dc component of the injection current density and parameters of the laser structure.

  18. Evaluation of allergic response using dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Rok, T.; Tatoń, G.

    2015-03-01

    Skin dynamic termography supplemented by a mathematical model is presented as an objective and sensitive indicator of the skin prick test result. Termographic measurements were performed simultaneously with routine skin prick tests. The IR images were acquired every 70 s up to 910 s after skin prick. In the model histamine is treated as the principal mediator of the allergic reaction. Histamine produces vasolidation and the engorged vessels are responsible for an increase in skin temperature. The model parameters were determined by fitting the analytical solutions to the spatio-temporal distributions of the differences between measured and baseline temperatures. The model reproduces experimental data very well (coefficient of determination = 0.805÷0.995). The method offers a set of parameters to describe separately skin allergic reaction and skin reactivity. The release of histamine after allergen injection is the best indicator of allergic response. The diagnostic parameter better correlates with the standard evaluation of a skin prick test (correlation coefficient = 0.98) than the result of the thermographic planimetric method based on temperature and heated area determination (0.81). The high sensitivity of the method allows for determination of the allergic response in patients with the reduced skin reactivity.

  19. Comparisons of the dynamic characteristics of magnetorheological and hydraulic dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Oyadiji, S. O.

    2015-04-01

    A magnetorheological (MR) damper can adapt its dynamic performance to the vibration environment by controlling the current applied. Compared to other types of dampers, the MR damper has a wider range of dynamic characteristics. Two different dampers: hydraulic, and MR dampers were tested under forced sinusoidal excitations of low to high frequencies. Also, different currents were applied on the MR damper to investigate its performance under varying electromagnetic fields. The results reveal that the two dampers have nonlinear dynamic characteristics and that characteristics of the hydraulic damper are different from those of the MR damper. The hydraulic damper provides slight nonlinear damping force whereas the MR damper shows a strong nonlinear property. In addition, the hydraulic damper is designed to provide an asymmetric damping force of rebound and compression whereas the MR damper provides a symmetric damping force. In the experiments conducted, the excitation frequency was varied from 3 Hz to 11 Hz and the amplitude from 2.5 mm to 12 mm. For the hydraulic damper, the lowest compression damping force only increases by about 0.54 kN while the rebound force increases by about 1.9 kN. In contrast, the variations of compression and rebound forces of the MR damper are 1.9 and 2.0 kN, respectively. Furthermore, the damping force of the MR damper increases as the current increases from 0 to 0.75 A.

  20. Effects of fundamental structure parameters on dynamic responses of submerged floating tunnel under hydrodynamic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xu; Ge, Fei; Wang, Lei; Hong, Youshi

    2009-06-01

    This paper investigates the effects of structure parameters on dynamic responses of submerged floating tunnel (SFT) under hydrodynamic loads. The structure parameters includes buoyancy-weight ratio (BWR), stiffness coefficients of the cable systems, tunnel net buoyancy and tunnel length. First, the importance of structural damp in relation to the dynamic responses of SFT is demonstrated and the mechanism of structural damp effect is discussed. Thereafter, the fundamental structure parameters are investigated through the analysis of SFT dynamic responses under hydrodynamic loads. The results indicate that the BWR of SFT is a key structure parameter. When BWR is 1.2, there is a remarkable trend change in the vertical dynamic response of SFT under hydrodynamic loads. The results also indicate that the ratio of the tunnel net buoyancy to the cable stiffness coefficient is not a characteristic factor affecting the dynamic responses of SFT under hydrodynamic loads.

  1. Evaluating the Dynamic Characteristics of Retrofitted RC Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ghods, Amir S.; Esfahani, Mohamad R.; Moghaddasie, Behrang

    2008-07-08

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the relationship between the damage and changes in dynamic characteristics of reinforced concrete members strengthened with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP). Modal analysis is a popular non-destructive method for evaluating health of structural systems. A total of 8 reinforced concrete beams with similar dimensions were made using concrete with two different compressive strengths and reinforcement ratios. Monotonic loading was applied with four-point-bending setup in order to generate different damage levels in the specimens while dynamic testing was conducted to monitor the changes in dynamic characteristics of the specimens. In order to investigate the effect of CFRP on static and dynamic properties of specimens, some of the beams were loaded to half of their ultimate load carrying capacity and then were retrofitted using composite laminates with different configuration. Retrofitted specimens demonstrated elevated load carrying capacity, higher flexural stiffness and lower displacement ductility. By increasing the damage level in specimens, frequencies of the beams were decreased and after strengthening these values were improved significantly. The intensity of the damage level in each specimen affects the shape of its mode as well. Fixed points and curvatures of mode shapes of beams tend to move toward the location of the damage in each case.

  2. Evaluating the Dynamic Characteristics of Retrofitted RC Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Amir S.; Esfahani, Mohamad R.; Moghaddasie, Behrang

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the relationship between the damage and changes in dynamic characteristics of reinforced concrete members strengthened with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP). Modal analysis is a popular non-destructive method for evaluating health of structural systems. A total of 8 reinforced concrete beams with similar dimensions were made using concrete with two different compressive strengths and reinforcement ratios. Monotonic loading was applied with four-point-bending setup in order to generate different damage levels in the specimens while dynamic testing was conducted to monitor the changes in dynamic characteristics of the specimens. In order to investigate the effect of CFRP on static and dynamic properties of specimens, some of the beams were loaded to half of their ultimate load carrying capacity and then were retrofitted using composite laminates with different configuration. Retrofitted specimens demonstrated elevated load carrying capacity, higher flexural stiffness and lower displacement ductility. By increasing the damage level in specimens, frequencies of the beams were decreased and after strengthening these values were improved significantly. The intensity of the damage level in each specimen affects the shape of its mode as well. Fixed points and curvatures of mode shapes of beams tend to move toward the location of the damage in each case.

  3. Photonic water dynamically responsive to external stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Koki; Kim, Youn Soo; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Aida, Takuzo

    2016-08-01

    Fluids that contain ordered nanostructures with periodic distances in the visible-wavelength range, anomalously exhibit structural colours that can be rapidly modulated by external stimuli. Indeed, some fish can dynamically change colour by modulating the periodic distance of crystalline guanine sheets cofacially oriented in their fluid cytoplasm. Here we report that a dilute aqueous colloidal dispersion of negatively charged titanate nanosheets exhibits structural colours. In this `photonic water', the nanosheets spontaneously adopt a cofacial geometry with an ultralong periodic distance of up to 675 nm due to a strong electrostatic repulsion. Consequently, the photonic water can even reflect near-infrared light up to 1,750 nm. The structural colour becomes more vivid in a magnetic flux that induces monodomain structural ordering of the colloidal dispersion. The reflective colour of the photonic water can be modulated over the entire visible region in response to appropriate physical or chemical stimuli.

  4. Dynamic response of damaged angleplied fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of low level damage induced by monotonic load, cyclic load and/or residual stresses on the vibration frequencies and damping factors of fiber composite angleplied laminates were investigated. Two different composite systems were studied - low modulus fiber and ultra high modulus fiber composites. The results obtained show that the frequencies and damping factors of angleplied laminates made from low modulus fiber composites are sensitive to low level damage while those made from ultra high modulus composites are not. Vibration tests may not be sufficiently sensitive to assess concentrated local damage in angleplied laminates. Dynamic response determined from low-velocity impact coupled with the Fast Fourier Transform and packaged in a minicomputer can be a convenient procedure for assessing low-level damage.

  5. Dynamic Assessment and Response to Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2013-01-01

    This article compares and contrasts the main features of dynamic testing and assessment (DT/A) and response to intervention (RTI). The comparison is carried out along the following lines: (a) historical and empirical roots of both concepts, (b) premises underlying DT/A and RTI, (c) terms used in these concepts, (d) use of these concepts, (e) evidence in support of DT/A and RTI, and (f) expectations associated with each of the concepts. The main outcome of this comparison is a conclusion that both approaches belong to one family of methodologies in psychology and education whose key feature is in blending assessment and intervention in one holistic activity. Because DT/A has been around much longer than RTI, it makes sense for the proponents of RTI to consider both the accomplishments and frustrations that have accumulated in the field of DT/A. PMID:19073895

  6. Photonic water dynamically responsive to external stimuli.

    PubMed

    Sano, Koki; Kim, Youn Soo; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Aida, Takuzo

    2016-01-01

    Fluids that contain ordered nanostructures with periodic distances in the visible-wavelength range, anomalously exhibit structural colours that can be rapidly modulated by external stimuli. Indeed, some fish can dynamically change colour by modulating the periodic distance of crystalline guanine sheets cofacially oriented in their fluid cytoplasm. Here we report that a dilute aqueous colloidal dispersion of negatively charged titanate nanosheets exhibits structural colours. In this 'photonic water', the nanosheets spontaneously adopt a cofacial geometry with an ultralong periodic distance of up to 675 nm due to a strong electrostatic repulsion. Consequently, the photonic water can even reflect near-infrared light up to 1,750 nm. The structural colour becomes more vivid in a magnetic flux that induces monodomain structural ordering of the colloidal dispersion. The reflective colour of the photonic water can be modulated over the entire visible region in response to appropriate physical or chemical stimuli. PMID:27572806

  7. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surfacemore » contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.« less

  8. Static & Dynamic Response of 2D Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jerry

    1996-07-15

    NIKE2D is an implicit finite-element code for analyzing the finite deformation, static and dynamic response of two-dimensional, axisymmetric, plane strain, and plane stress solids. The code is fully vectorized and available on several computing platforms. A number of material models are incorporated to simulate a wide range of material behavior including elasto-placicity, anisotropy, creep, thermal effects, and rate dependence. Slideline algorithms model gaps and sliding along material interfaces, including interface friction, penetration and single surface contact. Interactive-graphics and rezoning is included for analyses with large mesh distortions. In addition to quasi-Newton and arc-length procedures, adaptive algorithms can be defined to solve the implicit equations using the solution language ISLAND. Each of these capabilities and more make NIKE2D a robust analysis tool.

  9. Photonic water dynamically responsive to external stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Koki; Kim, Youn Soo; Ishida, Yasuhiro; Ebina, Yasuo; Sasaki, Takayoshi; Hikima, Takaaki; Aida, Takuzo

    2016-01-01

    Fluids that contain ordered nanostructures with periodic distances in the visible-wavelength range, anomalously exhibit structural colours that can be rapidly modulated by external stimuli. Indeed, some fish can dynamically change colour by modulating the periodic distance of crystalline guanine sheets cofacially oriented in their fluid cytoplasm. Here we report that a dilute aqueous colloidal dispersion of negatively charged titanate nanosheets exhibits structural colours. In this ‘photonic water', the nanosheets spontaneously adopt a cofacial geometry with an ultralong periodic distance of up to 675 nm due to a strong electrostatic repulsion. Consequently, the photonic water can even reflect near-infrared light up to 1,750 nm. The structural colour becomes more vivid in a magnetic flux that induces monodomain structural ordering of the colloidal dispersion. The reflective colour of the photonic water can be modulated over the entire visible region in response to appropriate physical or chemical stimuli. PMID:27572806

  10. Cell death: a dynamic response concept.

    PubMed

    Loos, Benjamin; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2009-07-01

    Autophagy, apoptosis and necrosis have previously been described as distinct static processes that induce and execute cell death. Due to an increased use of novel techniques in mapping cellular death-techniques which allow for reporting of real-time data-the existence of "grey zones" between cell death modes and the existence of the "point of no return" within these have been revealed. This revelation demands the integration of new concepts in describing the cellular death process. Furthermore, since the contribution of autophagy in cell death or cell survival is still poorly understood, it is important to accurately describe its function within the dynamic framework of cell death. In this review cell death is viewed as a dynamic and integrative cellular response to ensure the highest likelihood of self-preservation. Suggestions are offered for conceptualizing cell death modes and their morphological features, both individually and in relation to one another. It addresses the need for distinguishing between dying cells and dead cells so as to better locate and control the onset of cell death. Most importantly, the fundamental role of autophagy, autophagic flux, and the effects of the intracellular metabolic environment on the kinetics of the cell death modes are stressed. It also contextualizes the kinetic dimension of cell death as a process and aims to contribute towards a better understanding of autophagy as a key mechanism within this process. Understanding the dynamic nature of the cell death process and autophagy's central role can reveal new insight for therapeutic intervention in preventing cell death.

  11. Dynamic response of Hovercraft lift fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, D. D.

    1981-08-01

    Hovercraft lift fans are subjected to varying back pressure due to wave action and craft motions when these vehicles are operating in a seaway. The oscillatory back pressure causes the fans to perform dynamically, exhibiting a hysteresis type of response and a corresponding degradation in mean performance. Since Hovercraft motions are influenced by variations in lift fan pressure and discharge, it is important to understand completely the nature of the dynamic performance of lift fans in order to completely solve the Hovercraft seakeeping problem. The present study was performed to determine and classify the instabilities encountered in a centrifugal fan operating against time-varying back pressure. A model-scale experiment was developed in which the fan discharge was directed into a flow-measuring device, terminating in a rotating valve which produced an oscillatory back pressure superimposed upon a mean aerodynamic resistance. Pressure and local velocity were measured as functions of time at several locations in the fan volute. The measurements permitted the identification of rotating (or propagating) stall in the impeller. One cell and two cell configurations were classified and the transient condition connecting these two configurations was observed. The mechanisms which lead to rotating stall in a centrifugal compressor are presented and discussed with specific reference to Hovercraft applications.

  12. Dynamic characteristics of a vibrating beam with periodic variation in bending stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed dynamic analysis is performed of a vibrating beam with bending stiffness periodic in the spatial coordinate. Using a perturbation expansion technique the free vibration solution is obtained in a closed-form, and the effects of system parameters on beam response are explored. It is found that periodic stiffness acts to modulate the modal displacements from the characteristic shape of a simple sine wave. The results are verified by a finite element solution and through experimental testing.

  13. Dynamic characteristics of a vibrating beam with periodic variation in bending stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, John S.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed dynamic analysis is performed of a vibrating beam with bending stiffness periodic in the spatial coordinate. The effects of system parameters on beam response are explored with a perturbation expansion technique. It is found that periodic stiffness acts to modulate the modal displacements from the characteristic shape of a simple sine wave. The results are verified by a finite element solution and through experimental testing.

  14. User's Manual for Computer Program ROTOR. [to calculate tilt-rotor aircraft dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasue, M.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed description of a computer program to calculate tilt-rotor aircraft dynamic characteristics is presented. This program consists of two parts: (1) the natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes of the rotor blade and wing are developed from structural data (mass distribution and stiffness distribution); and (2) the frequency response (to gust and blade pitch control inputs) and eigenvalues of the tilt-rotor dynamic system, based on the natural frequencies and mode shapes, are derived. Sample problems are included to assist the user.

  15. Dynamic response of cantilever retaining walls

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1996-10-01

    A critical evaluation is made of the response to horizontal ground shaking of flexible cantilever retaining walls that are elastically constrained against rotation at their base. The retained medium is idealized as a uniform, linear, viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and semi-infinite extent in the horizontal direction. The parameters varied include the flexibilities of the wall and its base, the properties of the retained medium, and the characteristics of the ground motion. In addition to long-period, effectively static excitations, both harmonic base motions and an actual earthquake record are considered. The response quantities examined include the displacements of the wall relative to the moving base, the wall pressures, and the associated shears and bending moments. The method of analysis employed is described only briefly, emphasis being placed on the presentation and interpretation of the comprehensive numerical solutions. It is shown that, for realistic wall flexibilities, the maximum wall forces are significantly lower than those obtained for fixed-based rigid walls and potentially of the same order of magnitude as those computed by the Mononobe-Okabe method.

  16. Hydroelastic dynamic characteristics of a slender axis-symmetric body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weimin; Li, Min; Zheng, Zhongqin; Zhang, Liwu

    2010-07-01

    The slender axis-symmetric submarine body moving in the vertical plane is the object of our investigation. A coupling model is developed where displacements of a solid body as a Euler beam (consisting of rigid motions and elastic deformations) and fluid pressures are employed as basic independent variables, including the interaction between hydrodynamic forces and structure dynamic forces. Firstly the hydrodynamic forces, depending on and conversely influencing body motions, are taken into account as the governing equations. The expressions of fluid pressure are derived based on the potential theory. The characteristics of fluid pressure, including its components, distribution and effect on structure dynamics, are analyzed. Then the coupling model is solved numerically by means of a finite element method (FEM). This avoids the complicacy, combining CFD (fluid) and FEM (structure), of direct numerical simulation, and allows the body with a non-strict ideal shape so as to be more suitable for practical engineering. An illustrative example is given in which the hydroelastic dynamic characteristics, natural frequencies and modes of a submarine body are analyzed and compared with experimental results. Satisfactory agreement is observed and the model presented in this paper is shown to be valid.

  17. The effect of cavitation on the hydrofoil dynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhi, F. L.

    2013-12-01

    Cavitation in hydraulic machinery usually causes a change of fluid dynamic characteristics. In order to predict the effect of cavitation on hydrofoil characteristics, the cavitation around a hydrofoil was studied numerically. The full cavitation model and a modified RNG k ε-turbulence model were used. The finite volume method with the SIMPLEC scheme was used to discretize the time-dependent equations. The second-order upwind scheme was used for the convection terms with the central difference scheme used for the diffusion terms. Fluid dynamic characteristics including cavity's length, shedding frequency, pressure coefficient and lift and drag force coefficients features in a range of cavitation number were analyzed. Computations were made on the three-dimensional flow field around a NACA66 hydrofoil at 8° angle of attack. The recording force signals exhibit periodic behaviours with the time. And the cavity shedding frequency increases with the cavitation number, however the length of cavity decreases with the cavitation number, which result in changing of lift-drag ratio. Especially for larger cavitation numbers, the lift drag ratio of cavitation field is getting closer and closer to that of non-cavitation field.

  18. Study on dynamic characteristics of coupled model for deep-water lifting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yunxia; Lu, Jianhui; Zhang, Chunlei

    2016-10-01

    The underwater installation of marine equipment in deep-water development requires safe lifting and accurate positioning. The heave compensation system is an important technology to ensure normal operation and improve work accuracy. To provide a theoretical basis for the heave compensation system, in this paper, the continuous modeling method is employed to build up a coupled model of deep-water lifting systems in vertical direction. The response characteristics of dynamic movement are investigated. The simulation results show that the resonance problem appears in the process of the whole releasing load, the lifting system generates resonance and the displacement response of the lifting load is maximal when the sinking depth is about 2000 m. This paper also analyzes the main influencing factors on the dynamic response of load including cable stiffness, damping coefficient of the lifting system, mass and added mass of lifting load, among which cable stiffness and damping coefficient of the lifting system have the greatest influence on dynamic response of lifting load when installation load is determined. So the vertical dynamic movement response of the load is reduced by installing a damper on the lifting cable and selecting the appropriate cable stiffness.

  19. Frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error for step response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2012-11-01

    To obtain accurate results in dynamic measurements it is required that the sensors should have good dynamic performance. In practice, sensors have non-ideal dynamic characteristics due to their small damp ratios and low natural frequencies. In this case some dynamic error correction methods can be adopted for dealing with the sensor responses to eliminate the effect of their dynamic characteristics. The frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error is a common method. Using the existing calculation method, however, the correct frequency-domain correction function (FCF) cannot be obtained according to the step response calibration experimental data. This is because of the leakage error and invalid FCF value caused by the cycle extension of the finite length step input-output intercepting data. In order to solve these problems the data splicing preprocessing and FCF interpolation are put forward, and the FCF calculation steps as well as sensor dynamic error correction procedure by the calculated FCF are presented in this paper. The proposed solution is applied to the dynamic error correction of the bar-shaped wind tunnel strain gauge balance so as to verify its effectiveness. The dynamic error correction results show that the adjust time of the balance step response is shortened to 10 ms (shorter than 1/30 before correction) after frequency-domain correction, and the overshoot is fallen within 5% (less than 1/10 before correction) as well. The dynamic measurement accuracy of the balance is improved significantly. PMID:23206091

  20. Frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error for step response.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2012-11-01

    To obtain accurate results in dynamic measurements it is required that the sensors should have good dynamic performance. In practice, sensors have non-ideal dynamic characteristics due to their small damp ratios and low natural frequencies. In this case some dynamic error correction methods can be adopted for dealing with the sensor responses to eliminate the effect of their dynamic characteristics. The frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error is a common method. Using the existing calculation method, however, the correct frequency-domain correction function (FCF) cannot be obtained according to the step response calibration experimental data. This is because of the leakage error and invalid FCF value caused by the cycle extension of the finite length step input-output intercepting data. In order to solve these problems the data splicing preprocessing and FCF interpolation are put forward, and the FCF calculation steps as well as sensor dynamic error correction procedure by the calculated FCF are presented in this paper. The proposed solution is applied to the dynamic error correction of the bar-shaped wind tunnel strain gauge balance so as to verify its effectiveness. The dynamic error correction results show that the adjust time of the balance step response is shortened to 10 ms (shorter than 1/30 before correction) after frequency-domain correction, and the overshoot is fallen within 5% (less than 1/10 before correction) as well. The dynamic measurement accuracy of the balance is improved significantly.

  1. Frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error for step response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang-Long; Xu, Ke-Jun

    2012-11-01

    To obtain accurate results in dynamic measurements it is required that the sensors should have good dynamic performance. In practice, sensors have non-ideal dynamic characteristics due to their small damp ratios and low natural frequencies. In this case some dynamic error correction methods can be adopted for dealing with the sensor responses to eliminate the effect of their dynamic characteristics. The frequency-domain correction of sensor dynamic error is a common method. Using the existing calculation method, however, the correct frequency-domain correction function (FCF) cannot be obtained according to the step response calibration experimental data. This is because of the leakage error and invalid FCF value caused by the cycle extension of the finite length step input-output intercepting data. In order to solve these problems the data splicing preprocessing and FCF interpolation are put forward, and the FCF calculation steps as well as sensor dynamic error correction procedure by the calculated FCF are presented in this paper. The proposed solution is applied to the dynamic error correction of the bar-shaped wind tunnel strain gauge balance so as to verify its effectiveness. The dynamic error correction results show that the adjust time of the balance step response is shortened to 10 ms (shorter than 1/30 before correction) after frequency-domain correction, and the overshoot is fallen within 5% (less than 1/10 before correction) as well. The dynamic measurement accuracy of the balance is improved significantly.

  2. Static and dynamic characteristics of parallel-grooved seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwatsubo, Takuzo; Yang, Bo-Suk; Ibaraki, Ryuji

    1987-01-01

    Presented is an analytical method to determine static and dynamic characteristics of annular parallel-grooved seals. The governing equations were derived by using the turbulent lubrication theory based on the law of fluid friction. Linear zero- and first-order perturbation equations of the governing equations were developed, and these equations were analytically investigated to obtain the reaction force of the seals. An analysis is presented that calculates the leakage flow rate, the torque loss, and the rotordynamic coefficients for parallel-grooved seals. To demonstrate this analysis, we show the effect of changing number of stages, land and groove width, and inlet swirl on stability of the boiler feed water pump seals. Generally, as the number of stages increased or the grooves became wider, the leakage flow rate and rotor-dynamic coefficients decreased and the torque loss increased.

  3. Quantifying dynamic characteristics of human walking for comprehensive gait cycle.

    PubMed

    Mummolo, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Luigi; Kim, Joo H

    2013-09-01

    Normal human walking typically consists of phases during which the body is statically unbalanced while maintaining dynamic stability. Quantifying the dynamic characteristics of human walking can provide better understanding of gait principles. We introduce a novel quantitative index, the dynamic gait measure (DGM), for comprehensive gait cycle. The DGM quantifies the effects of inertia and the static balance instability in terms of zero-moment point and ground projection of center of mass and incorporates the time-varying foot support region (FSR) and the threshold between static and dynamic walking. Also, a framework of determining the DGM from experimental data is introduced, in which the gait cycle segmentation is further refined. A multisegmental foot model is integrated into a biped system to reconstruct the walking motion from experiments, which demonstrates the time-varying FSR for different subphases. The proof-of-concept results of the DGM from a gait experiment are demonstrated. The DGM results are analyzed along with other established features and indices of normal human walking. The DGM provides a measure of static balance instability of biped walking during each (sub)phase as well as the entire gait cycle. The DGM of normal human walking has the potential to provide some scientific insights in understanding biped walking principles, which can also be useful for their engineering and clinical applications.

  4. Response of shrink fitted assemblies to the dynamic torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajakumar, D. Ramesh

    2012-05-01

    Product design is mostly centered around design of different contact pairs. Among contact pairs, interference fit pair is widely used. Design of interference fits, involves not only dimensional interference, but also condition of interface between mating surfaces. Factors such as texture of interface, hardness of interface material and also physical properties of contacting materials influence the functional characteristics of interference shrink fitted assemblies. In actual practice most of such joints are subjected to dynamic loading. Data on torsion response is only limited. So that, detailed investigation on the influence of dimensional interference, contact length and interfacial properties (electroless nickel coating) on torsion capacity of interference fitted assemblies has been carried out. The response of interference fitted assemblies to dynamic torsion load has been evaluated, using L-9 Orthogonal array of experimental conditions to bring down the number of experiments. The results are analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) to find out the individual effects of parameter on dynamic loading. The Torque load carrying capacity of the shrink fitted assemblies is improved by electroless nickel coating. This could be attributed to the increase in actual contact area and tenacity of Nickel plating and presence of strong molecular bonds between the mating parts chosen for the assemblies. But the selection of interference, contact length and hardness of mating parts play a vital role in deciding the performance of these joints. The results clearly indicate that the dynamic performance of the assemblies could be improved by suitably selecting the materials keeping in mind the above factors. It is also found from the ANOVA results that the assemblies with (hardness) coated interlayer performed better. Interference and contact length also has influence on the strength but in this case their influence is not very significant. An expression is obtained using

  5. [Dynamic characteristics of alternate strides in cross-country skiing].

    PubMed

    Gagnon, M

    1980-03-01

    Seven instructors in cross-country skiing were filmed during the performance of the alternate stride at three different velocities: maximal, medium and slow. The dynamic characteristics of the movement were analyzed. On the basis of spatio-temporal analyses, it was found that the alternate stride is a motion essentially propulsive with the predominance of the superior limbs to propulsion. The skier maintains or increases his velocity at the beginning of the glide which is possibly attributed to the transfer of momentum of the recovery leg. A decrease in horizontal velocity is observed at the end of the glide. At maximal speed, the asynchronous character of the actions by the superior and inferior limbs is more important; there is a reduced emphasis in the actions by the superior limbs. At medium speed, the following characteristics are observed: a reduced importance in the asynchronous actions, a larger preponderance to the gliding phase and a smaller elevation of the skier's center of gravity.

  6. Nonlinear characteristics of joints as elements of multi-body dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.

    1989-01-01

    As the connecting elements in multi-body structures, joints play a pivotal role in the overall dynamic response of these systems. Obviously, the linear stiffness of the joint strongly influences the system frequencies, but the joints are also likely to be the dominant sources of damping and nonlinearities, especially in aircraft and space structures. The general characteristics of such joints will be discussed. Then the state of the art in nonlinear joint characterization techniques will be surveyed. Finally, the impact that joints have on the overall response of structures will be evaluated.

  7. Dynamic response of reverse Taylor impact based on DIC technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiancheng; Pi, Aiguo; Wu, Haijun; Huang, Fenglei

    2015-09-01

    Reverse ballistic impact test, which can obtain the response data of rod/projectile more comprehensive and quantitative than forward impact test, was widely used for the measurement of material dynamic and structure response. Based on the DIC technology and traditional optical measurement (high-speed camera measurement), the Taylor experiment of reverse ballistic with different length-diameter ratio and different impact velocities were carried out by 57 mm compression-shear type light-gas gun, which provides the instantaneous response data of the Taylor rod in microsecond level. Then, the transient structural deformation of the specimen and the characteristics of plastic wave propagation were analysed by DIC technology and compared with traditional optical measurement. Applying the theory of reverse Taylor impact deformation and combining with the simulation results by LS-DYNA, the rules of structure deformation and plastic wave propagation were obtained. The method above can be applied for the structure response of penetrator under the condition of reverse ballistic penetration.

  8. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  9. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    PubMed

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  10. Dynamic bioactive stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Heather Marie

    This dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and development of antimicrobial and anticoagulant surfaces of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) polymers. Aliphatic polymeric surfaces of PE and PP polymers functionalized using click chemistry reactions by the attachment of --COOH groups via microwave plasma reactions followed by functionalization with alkyne moieties. Azide containing ampicillin (AMP) was synthesized and subsequently clicked into the alkyne prepared PE and PP surfaces. Compared to non-functionalized PP and PE surfaces, the AMP clicked surfaces exhibited substantially enhanced antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. To expand the biocompatibility of polymeric surface anticoagulant attributes, PE and PTFE surfaces were functionalized with pH-responsive poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polyelectrolyte tethers terminated with NH2 and COOH groups. The goal of these studies was to develop switchable stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces that interact with biological environments and display simultaneous antimicrobial and anticoagulant properties. Antimicrobial AMP was covalently attached to --COOH terminal ends of protected PAA, while anticoagulant heparin (HEP) was attached to terminal --NH2 groups of P2VP. When pH < 2.3, the P2VP segments are protonated and extend, but for pH > 5.5, they collapse while the PAA segments extend. Such surfaces, when exposed to Staphylococcus aureus, inhibit bacterial growth due to the presence of AMP, as well as are effective anticoagulants due to the presence of covalently attached HEP. Comparison of these "dynamic" pH responsive surfaces with "static" surfaces terminated with AMP entities show significant enhancement of longevity and surface activity against microbial film formation. The last portion of this dissertation focuses on the covalent attachment of living T1 and Φ11 bacteriophages (phages) on PE and PTFE surface

  11. Estimating Population Characteristics from Sparse Matrix Samples of Item Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Concepts behind plausible values in estimating population characteristics from sparse matrix samples of item responses are discussed. The use of marginal analyses is described in the context of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, and the approach is illustrated with Scholastic Aptitude Test data for 9,075 high school seniors. (SLD)

  12. Characteristic ion distributions in the dynamic auroral transition region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, W.; Horwitz, J. L.; Tu, J.-N.

    2006-04-01

    A Dynamic Fluid Kinetic (DyFK) simulation is conducted to study the H+/O+ flows and distribution functions in the high-latitude dynamic transition region, specifically from 1000 km to about 4000 km altitude. Here, the collisional-to-collisionless transition region is that region where Coulomb collisions have significant but not dominant effects on the ion distributions. In this study, a simulation flux tube, which extends from 120 km to 3 RE altitude, is assumed to experience a pulse of auroral effects for approximately 20 minutes, including both soft electron precipitation and transverse wave heating, and then according to different geophysical circumstances, either to relax following the cessation of such auroral effects or to be heated further continuously by waves with power at higher frequencies. Our principal purpose in this investigation is to elicit the characteristic ion distribution functions in the auroral transition region, where both collisions and kinetic processes play significant roles. The characteristics of the simulated O+ and H+ velocity distributions, such as kidney bean shaped H+ distributions, and O+ distributions having cold cores with upward folded conic wings, resemble those observed by satellites at similar altitudes and geographic conditions. From the simulated distribution function results under different geophysical conditions, we find that O+-O+ and O+-H+ collisions, in conjunction with the kinetic and auroral processes, are key factors in the velocity distributions up to 4000 km altitude, especially for the low speed portions, for both O+ and H+ ions.

  13. Strength and dynamic characteristics analyses of wound composite axial impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jifeng; Olortegui-Yume, Jorge; Müller, Norbert

    2012-03-01

    A low cost, light weight, high performance composite material turbomachinery impeller with a uniquely designed blade patterns is analyzed. Such impellers can economically enable refrigeration plants to use water as a refrigerant (R718). A strength and dynamic characteristics analyses procedure is developed to assess the maximum stresses and natural frequencies of these wound composite axial impellers under operating loading conditions. Numerical simulation using FEM for two-dimensional and three-dimensional impellers was investigated. A commercially available software ANSYS is used for the finite element calculations. Analysis is done for different blade geometries and then suggestions are made for optimum design parameters. In order to avoid operating at resonance, which can make impellers suffer a significant reduction in the design life, the designer must calculate the natural frequency and modal shape of the impeller to analyze the dynamic characteristics. The results show that using composite Kevlar fiber/epoxy matrix enables the impeller to run at high tip speed and withstand the stresses, no critical speed will be matched during start-up and shut-down, and that mass imbalances of the impeller shall not pose a critical problem.

  14. Experiment of static and dynamic characteristics of spiral grooved seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwatsubo, T.; Sheng, B. C.; Ono, M.

    1991-01-01

    The leakages and the dynamic characteristics of six types of spiral grooved seals are experimentally investigated. The effect of the helix angle of the seal is investigated mainly under the condition of the same nominal clearances, land and groove lengths, and groove depths. The dynamic characteristics are measured for various parameters such as preswirl velocity, pressure difference between inlet and outlet of the seal, whirling amplitude, whirling speed, and rotating speed of the rotor. The results are also compared with leakage increases with the increase of the helix angle, but as the rotating speed increases, the leakages of the larger helix angle seals quickly drop. The leakage of the smooth-stator (SS)/smooth-grooved rotor (SGR) seal drops faster than that of the spiral-grooved stator (SGS)/smooth-rotor (SR) seal. It is found that a circumferential flow can be produced by the flow along the helix angle direction, and this circumferential flow acts as a negative swirl. For the present helix angle range, there is an optimum helix angle with which the seal has a comparatively positive effect on the rotor stability. Compared with the SGS/SR seals, the SS/SGR seal has a worse effect on the rotor stability.

  15. The Dynamic Characteristic and Hysteresis Effect of an Air Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löcken, F.; Welsch, M.

    2015-02-01

    In many applications of vibration technology, especially in chassis, air springs present a common alternative to steel spring concepts. A design-independent and therefore universal approach is presented to describe the dynamic characteristic of such springs. Differential and constitutive equations based on energy balances of the enclosed volume and the mountings are given to describe the nonlinear and dynamic characteristics. Therefore all parameters can be estimated directly from physical and geometrical properties, without parameter fitting. The numerically solved equations fit very well to measurements of a passenger car air spring. In a second step a simplification of this model leads to a pure mechanical equation. While in principle the same parameters are used, just an empirical correction of the effective heat transfer coefficient is needed to handle some simplification on this topic. Finally, a linearization of this equation leads to an analogous mechanical model that can be assembled from two common spring- and one dashpot elements in a specific arrangement. This transfer into "mechanical language" enables a system description with a simple force-displacement law and a consideration of the nonobvious hysteresis and stiffness increase of an air spring from a mechanical point of view.

  16. Experimental and analytical determination of characteristics affecting light aircraft landing-gear dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, E. L.; Mcgehee, J. R.; Pappas, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine which characteristics of a light aircraft landing gear influence gear dynamic behavior significantly. The investigation focused particularly on possible modification for load control. Pseudostatic tests were conducted to determine the gear fore-and-aft spring constant, axial friction as a function of drag load, brake pressure-torque characteristics, and tire force-deflection characteristics. To study dynamic tire response, vertical drops were conducted at impact velocities of 1.2, 1.5, and 1.8 m/s onto a level surface; to determine axial-friction effects, a second series of vertical drops were made at 1.5 m/s onto surfaces inclined 5 deg and 10 deg to the horizontal. An average dynamic axial-friction coefficient of 0.15 was obtained by comparing analytical data with inclined surface drop test data. Dynamic strut bending and associated axial friction were found to be severe for the drop tests on the 10 deg surface.

  17. Dynamic Characteristic Analysis of Spinal Motor Control Between 11- and 15-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Chow, Daniel H; Lau, Newman M

    2016-07-01

    Spinal motor control can provide substantial insight for the causes of spinal musculoskeletal disorders. Its dynamic characteristics however, have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study is to explore the dynamic characteristics of spinal motor control via the fractional Brownian motion mathematical technique. Spinal curvatures and repositioning errors of different spinal regions in 64 children age 11- or 15-years old during upright stance were measured and compared for the effects of age and gender. With the application of the fractional Brownian motion analytical technique to the changes of spinal curvatures, distinct persistent movement behaviors could be determined, which could be interpreted physiologically as open-loop behaviors. Moreover, it was found that the spinal motor control of 15-year-old children was better than that of 11-year-old children with smaller repositioning error and less curvature variability as well as shorter response time and smaller curvature deformation.

  18. Spontaneous Facial Mimicry in Response to Dynamic Facial Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko

    2007-01-01

    Based on previous neuroscientific evidence indicating activation of the mirror neuron system in response to dynamic facial actions, we hypothesized that facial mimicry would occur while subjects viewed dynamic facial expressions. To test this hypothesis, dynamic/static facial expressions of anger/happiness were presented using computer-morphing…

  19. Nonlinear dynamical model and response of avian cranial kinesis.

    PubMed

    Meekangvan, Preeda; A Barhorst, Alan; Burton, Thomas D; Chatterjee, Sankar; Schovanec, Lawrence

    2006-05-01

    All modern birds have kinetic skulls in which the upper bill can move relative to the braincase, but the biomechanics and motion dynamics of cranial kinesis in birds are poorly understood. In this paper, we model the dynamics of avian cranial kinesis, such as prokinesis and proximal rhynchokinesis in which the upper jaw pivots around the nasal-frontal (N-F) hinge. The purpose of this paper is to present to the biological community an approach that demonstrates the application of sophisticated predictive mathematical modeling tools to avian kinesis. The generality of the method, however, is applicable to the advanced study of the biomechanics of other skeletal systems. The paper begins with a review of the relevant biological literature as well as the essential morphology of avian kinesis, especially the mechanical coupling of the upper and lower jaw by the postorbital ligament. A planar model of the described bird jaw morphology is then developed that maintains the closed kinematic topology of the avian jaw mechanism. We then develop the full nonlinear equations of motion with the assumption that the M. protractor pterygoideus and M. depressor mandibulae act on the quadrate as a pure torque, and the nasal frontal hinge is elastic with damping. The mechanism is shown to be a single degree of freedom device due to the holonomic constraints present in the quadrate-jugal bar-upper jaw-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain as well as the quadrate-lower jaw-postorbital ligament-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain. The full equations are verified via simulation and animation using the parameters of a Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea). Next we develop a simplified analytical model of the equations by power series expansion. We demonstrate that this model reproduces the dynamics of the full model to a high degree of fidelity. We proceed to use the harmonic balance technique to develop the frequency response characteristics of the jaw mechanism. It is shown that this avian cranial

  20. Nonlinear dynamical model and response of avian cranial kinesis.

    PubMed

    Meekangvan, Preeda; A Barhorst, Alan; Burton, Thomas D; Chatterjee, Sankar; Schovanec, Lawrence

    2006-05-01

    All modern birds have kinetic skulls in which the upper bill can move relative to the braincase, but the biomechanics and motion dynamics of cranial kinesis in birds are poorly understood. In this paper, we model the dynamics of avian cranial kinesis, such as prokinesis and proximal rhynchokinesis in which the upper jaw pivots around the nasal-frontal (N-F) hinge. The purpose of this paper is to present to the biological community an approach that demonstrates the application of sophisticated predictive mathematical modeling tools to avian kinesis. The generality of the method, however, is applicable to the advanced study of the biomechanics of other skeletal systems. The paper begins with a review of the relevant biological literature as well as the essential morphology of avian kinesis, especially the mechanical coupling of the upper and lower jaw by the postorbital ligament. A planar model of the described bird jaw morphology is then developed that maintains the closed kinematic topology of the avian jaw mechanism. We then develop the full nonlinear equations of motion with the assumption that the M. protractor pterygoideus and M. depressor mandibulae act on the quadrate as a pure torque, and the nasal frontal hinge is elastic with damping. The mechanism is shown to be a single degree of freedom device due to the holonomic constraints present in the quadrate-jugal bar-upper jaw-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain as well as the quadrate-lower jaw-postorbital ligament-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain. The full equations are verified via simulation and animation using the parameters of a Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea). Next we develop a simplified analytical model of the equations by power series expansion. We demonstrate that this model reproduces the dynamics of the full model to a high degree of fidelity. We proceed to use the harmonic balance technique to develop the frequency response characteristics of the jaw mechanism. It is shown that this avian cranial

  1. Dynamic Response Analysis of Microflow Electrochemical Sensors with Two Types of Elastic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiuzhan; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Yongzhi; Chen, Shuozhang; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The Molecular Electric Transducer (MET), widely applied for vibration measurement, has excellent sensitivity and dynamic response at low frequencies. The elastic membrane in the MET is a significant factor with an obvious effect on the performance of the MET in the low frequency domain and is the focus of this paper. In simulation experiments, the elastic membrane and the reaction cavity of the MET were analysed in a model based on the multiphysics finite element method. Meanwhile, the effects caused by the elastic membrane elements are verified in this paper. With the numerical simulation and practical experiments, a suitable elastic membrane can be designed for different cavity structures. Thus, the MET can exhibit the best dynamic response characteristics to measure the vibration signals. With the new method presented in this paper, it is possible to develop and optimize the characteristics of the MET effectively, and the dynamic characteristics of the MET can be improved in a thorough and systematic manner. PMID:27171086

  2. Dynamic Response Analysis of Microflow Electrochemical Sensors with Two Types of Elastic Membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiuzhan; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Yongzhi; Chen, Shuozhang; Lin, Jun

    2016-05-09

    The Molecular Electric Transducer (MET), widely applied for vibration measurement, has excellent sensitivity and dynamic response at low frequencies. The elastic membrane in the MET is a significant factor with an obvious effect on the performance of the MET in the low frequency domain and is the focus of this paper. In simulation experiments, the elastic membrane and the reaction cavity of the MET were analysed in a model based on the multiphysics finite element method. Meanwhile, the effects caused by the elastic membrane elements are verified in this paper. With the numerical simulation and practical experiments, a suitable elastic membrane can be designed for different cavity structures. Thus, the MET can exhibit the best dynamic response characteristics to measure the vibration signals. With the new method presented in this paper, it is possible to develop and optimize the characteristics of the MET effectively, and the dynamic characteristics of the MET can be improved in a thorough and systematic manner.

  3. Dynamic Response Analysis of Microflow Electrochemical Sensors with Two Types of Elastic Membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiuzhan; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Yongzhi; Chen, Shuozhang; Lin, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The Molecular Electric Transducer (MET), widely applied for vibration measurement, has excellent sensitivity and dynamic response at low frequencies. The elastic membrane in the MET is a significant factor with an obvious effect on the performance of the MET in the low frequency domain and is the focus of this paper. In simulation experiments, the elastic membrane and the reaction cavity of the MET were analysed in a model based on the multiphysics finite element method. Meanwhile, the effects caused by the elastic membrane elements are verified in this paper. With the numerical simulation and practical experiments, a suitable elastic membrane can be designed for different cavity structures. Thus, the MET can exhibit the best dynamic response characteristics to measure the vibration signals. With the new method presented in this paper, it is possible to develop and optimize the characteristics of the MET effectively, and the dynamic characteristics of the MET can be improved in a thorough and systematic manner. PMID:27171086

  4. Fluid mechanics of dynamic stall. II - Prediction of full scale characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    Analytical extrapolations are made from experimental subscale dynamics to predict full scale characteristics of dynamic stall. The method proceeds by establishing analytic relationships between dynamic and static aerodynamic characteristics induced by viscous flow effects. The method is then validated by predicting dynamic test results on the basis of corresponding static test data obtained at the same subscale flow conditions, and the effect of Reynolds number on the static aerodynamic characteristics are determined from subscale to full scale flow conditions.

  5. Dynamics and Stability and Control Characteristics of the X-37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Ashwani; Nguyen, Viet; Tran, Hoi; Poladian, David; Falangas, Eric; Turner, Susan G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the stability and control analysis and the control design results for the Boeing/NASA/AFRL X-37. The X-37 is a flight demonstrator vehicle that will go into space and after its mission, autonomously reenter and land on a conventional runway. This paper studies the dynamics and control of the X-37 from atmospheric reentry through landing. A nominal trajectory that lands on the Edwards Air Force Base Lakebed is considered for all the analysis and design. The X-37's longitudinal and lateral/directional bare-airframe characteristics are presented. The level of maneuvering control power is assessed. Vehicle trim with multiple surfaces is discussed. Special challenges where the wings loose roll effectiveness are discussed and solutions are presented. Aerodynamic uncertainties and flexibility modeling issues are presented. Control design results and robustness analysis methods are presented. Results are provided for the Entry, Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM), and Approach and Land phases.

  6. Design of helicopter rotor blades for optimum dynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ko, T.; Korn, A. E.; Rossow, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities and limitations of tailoring blade mass and stiffness distributions to give an optimum blade design in terms of weight, inertia, and dynamic characteristics are discussed. The extent that changes in mass of stiffness distribution can be used to place rotor frequencies at desired locations is determined. Theoretical limits to the amount of frequency shift are established. Realistic constraints on blade properties based on weight, mass, moment of inertia, size, strength, and stability are formulated. The extent that the hub loads can be minimized by proper choice of E1 distribution, and the minimum hub loads which can be approximated by a design for a given set of natural frequencies are determined. Aerodynamic couplings that might affect the optimum blade design, and the relative effectiveness of mass and stiffness distribution on the optimization procedure are investigated.

  7. The dynamic impact characteristics of tennis balls with tennis rackets.

    PubMed

    Haake, S J; Carré, M J; Goodwill, S R

    2003-10-01

    The dynamic properties of six types of tennis balls were measured using a force platform and high-speed digital video images of ball impacts on rigidly clamped tennis rackets. It was found that the coefficient of restitution reduced with velocity for impacts on a rigid surface or with a rigidly clamped tennis racket. Pressurized balls had the highest coefficient of restitution, which decreased by 20% when punctured. Pressureless balls had a coefficient of restitution approaching that of a punctured ball at high speeds. The dynamic stiffness of the ball or the ball-racket system increased with velocity and pressurized balls had the highest stiffness, which decreased by 35% when punctured. The characteristics of pressureless balls were shown to be similar to those of punctured balls at high velocity and it was found that lowering the string tension produced a smaller range of stiffness or coefficient of restitution. It was hypothesized that players might consider high ball stiffness to imply a high coefficient of restitution. Plots of coefficient of restitution versus stiffness confirmed the relationship and it was found that, generally, pressurized balls had a higher coefficient of restitution and stiffness than pressureless balls. The players might perceive these parameters through a combination of sound, vibration and perception of ball speed off the racket. PMID:14620027

  8. Identification of fatigue cracks through separating dynamic responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guirong; Zhao, K.; Feng, R. Q.; Yi, J. R.

    2014-03-01

    During the service life of structures, fatigue cracks may occur in structural components due to dynamic loadings acting on them, such as wind loads, live loads and ground motion. If undetected timely, these fatigue cracks may lead to a catastrophic failure of the overall structure. Although a number of approaches to detecting fatigue cracks have been proposed, some of them appear rather sophisticated or expensive (requiring complicated equipment), and others suffer from a lack of sensitivity. In this study, a simple approach to detecting fatigue cracks is developed based on the bilinear behavior of fatigue cracks. First, a simple system identification method for bilinear systems is proposed by using the dynamic characteristics of bilinear systems. This method transfers nonlinear system identification into linear system identification by dividing impulse or free-vibration responses into different parts corresponding to each stiffness region according to the stiffness interface. In this way, the natural frequency of each region can be identified using any modal identification approach applicable to linear systems. Second, the procedure for identifying the existence of breathing fatigue cracks and quantifying the cracks qualitatively is proposed by looking for the difference in the identified natural frequency between regions. The proposed system identification method and crack detection procedure have been successfully validated by numerical simulations.

  9. Dynamical Response of Networks Under External Perturbations: Exact Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinellato, David D.; Epstein, Irving R.; Braha, Dan; Bar-Yam, Yaneer; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    2015-04-01

    We give exact statistical distributions for the dynamic response of influence networks subjected to external perturbations. We consider networks whose nodes have two internal states labeled 0 and 1. We let nodes be frozen in state 0, in state 1, and the remaining nodes change by adopting the state of a connected node with a fixed probability per time step. The frozen nodes can be interpreted as external perturbations to the subnetwork of free nodes. Analytically extending and to be smaller than 1 enables modeling the case of weak coupling. We solve the dynamical equations exactly for fully connected networks, obtaining the equilibrium distribution, transition probabilities between any two states and the characteristic time to equilibration. Our exact results are excellent approximations for other topologies, including random, regular lattice, scale-free and small world networks, when the numbers of fixed nodes are adjusted to take account of the effect of topology on coupling to the environment. This model can describe a variety of complex systems, from magnetic spins to social networks to population genetics, and was recently applied as a framework for early warning signals for real-world self-organized economic market crises.

  10. Dynamical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols over IG region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish; Singh, Ramesh P.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-05-01

    The dynamical characteristics of atmospheric aerosols over the Indo-Gangetic (IG) region are primarily dependent on the geographical settings and meteorological conditions. Detailed analysis of multi satellite data and ground observations have been carried out over three different cities i.e. Kanpur, Greater Noida and Amritsar during 2010-2013. Level-3 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) terra daily global grid product with spatial resolution of 1° × 1° shows the mean AOD at 500 nm wavelength value of 0.73, 0.70 and 0.67 with the standard deviation of 0.43, 0.39 and 0.36 respectively over Amritsar, Greater Noida and Kanpur. Our detailed analysis shows characteristic behavior of aerosols from west to east in the IG region depending upon the proximity of desert regions of Arabia. We have observed large influx of dusts from the Thar desert and Arabia peninsula during pre-monsoon season (April-June), highly affecting Amritsar which is close to the desert region.

  11. Dynamic modeling and experimental results for a head tilt response.

    PubMed

    Geisinger, Dario; Ferreira, Enrique; Suarez, Alejo; Suarez, Hamlet

    2010-01-01

    The estimation of the vertical in humans is important in everyday life although the mechanisms involved are not completely understood yet. This paper presents two sets of experiments with normal subjects, using the same virtual reality setup, aiming to help in this understanding. First, a steady state experiment is presented, which is used to determine the gravitational vertical precision while the second, a dynamical transient response experiment, is used to find dynamic models of each subject response. Results show that the dynamic models are able to reproduce the results of the steady state experiment while having the benefits that a dynamic model brings to evaluate subjects performance.

  12. Parametric Optimization of Ares I Propellant Slosh Characteristics Using Frequency Response Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.; Hall, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel technique for developing propellant slosh damping requirements with respect to the stability characteristics of large flexible launch vehicles is presented. A numerical algorithm is devised which allows an automated software program to rapidly converge to pseudo-optimal solutions that minimize required propellant slosh damping for multiple tanks while maintaining constraints on the frequency response characteristics of a particular open-loop plant transfer function. An implementation of the algorithm using a high-order linear model of the Ares I plant dynamics considers all relevant dynamic interactions of flexible body modes, propellant slosh, and nozzle inertia effects. A high-resolution propellant damping requirements table is produced that can be used for baffle design. The method is demonstrated to provide exceptional speed and accuracy when compared with the alternative human-in-the-loop approach.

  13. Dynamic Characteristics of a Model and Prototype for 3D-RC Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniuddin, Md. Khaja; Vasanthalakshmi, G.; Chethan, K.; Babu, R. Ramesh

    2016-06-01

    Infill walls provide durable and economical partitions that have relatively excellent thermal and sound insulation with high fire resistance. Monolithic infilled walls are provided within RC structures without being analyzed as a combination of concrete and brick elements, although in reality they act as a single unit during earthquakes. The performance of such structures during earthquakes has proved to be superior in comparison to bare frames in terms of stiffness, strength and energy dissipation. To know the dynamic characteristics of monolithic infill wall panels and masonry infill, modal, response spectrum and time history analyses have been carried out on a model and prototype of a 3D RC structure for a comparative study.

  14. Dynamic Characteristics and Stability Analysis of Space Shuttle Main Engine Oxygen Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, Edgar J.; Branagan, Lyle

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of the Space Shuttle high pressure oxygen pump are presented. Experimental data is presented to show the vibration spectrum and response under actual engine operation and also in spin pit testing for balancing. The oxygen pump appears to be operating near a second critical speed and is sensitive to self excited aerodynamic cross coupling forces in the turbine and pump. An analysis is presented to show the improvement in pump stability by the application of turbulent flow seals, preburner seals, and pump shaft cross sectional modifications.

  15. Dynamic characteristics of power-tower space stations with 15-foot truss bays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    A power tower space station concept which generates power with photovoltaic arrays and where the truss structure has a bay size of 15 ft is described. Rigid body and flexible body dynamic characteristics are presented for a 75-kW Initial Operating Capability (IOC) and 150-kW and 300-kW growth stations. The transient response of the IOC and 300-kW growth stations to shuttle dock, orbit reboost, and mobile remote manipulator system translation loads are studied. Displacements, accelerations, and bending moments at various locations on the IOC and 300-kW growth stations are presented.

  16. Static & Dynamic Response of 3D Solids

    1996-07-15

    NIKE3D is a large deformations 3D finite element code used to obtain the resulting displacements and stresses from multi-body static and dynamic structural thermo-mechanics problems with sliding interfaces. Many nonlinear and temperature dependent constitutive models are available.

  17. Dispersion of Response Times Reveals Cognitive Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, John G.; Van Orden, Guy C.; Turvey, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Trial-to-trial variation in word-pronunciation times exhibits 1/f scaling. One explanation is that human performances are consequent on multiplicative interactions among interdependent processes-interaction dominant dynamics. This article describes simulated distributions of pronunciation times in a further test for multiplicative interactions and…

  18. Wind response characteristics of horizontal axis wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thresher, R. W.; Holley, W. E.; Jafarey, N.

    1981-01-01

    It was the objective of the work reported here, and in the companion paper 1 . A broader examination of wind turbine dynamic response to turbulence, and attempts to ascertain the features of turbulence that wind turbines are most sensitive to were made. A statistical description of the wind input including all three wind components and allowing linear wind gradients across the rotor disk, was used together with quasi-static aerodynamic theory and an elementary structural model involving only a few degrees of freedom. The idea was to keep the turbine model simple and show the benefits of this type of statistical wind representation before attempting to use a more complex turbine model. As far as possible, the analysis was kept in the simplest form, while still preserving key physical responses.

  19. Modal combination in response spectrum modal dynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, C.R.; Singhal, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    UCRL-15910 does not give explicit requirements for combining the values of the resonse of individual modes in a response spectrum modal dynamic analysis. Since UCRL-15910 references ASE 4-86, modal combination methods given in ASCE 4-86 are described in this paper. Efficient use of typical dynamic analysis computer programs while complying with ASCE 4-86 is also described.

  20. Dynamic response and noise transmission of discretely stiffened composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyrintzis, Constantinos S.; Vaicatis, Rimas

    The surface protection systems of aerospace and aircraft structures are often constructed from discretely stiffened composite panels. This paper presents an analytical study of the dynamic response and structure-borne sound transmission of these structures due to random loading conditions. A generalized transfer matrix procedure is developed to obtain the required dynamic response solution. Modal decomposition is used to predict the interior noise transmission. Numerical results are presented for acousto-structural applications.

  1. DYNAMICAL RESPONSE OF QUASI ID MOTT INSULATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    ESSLER,F.H.L.TSVELIK,A.M.

    2004-01-14

    At low energies certain one dimensional Mott insulators can be described in terms of an exactly solvable quantum field theory, the U(1) Thirring model. Using exact results derived from integrability we determine dynamical properties like the frequency dependent optical conductivity and the single-particle Green's function. We discuss the effects of a small temperature and the effects on interchain tunneling in a model of infinitely many weakly coupled chains.

  2. Measurement of human pilot dynamic characteristics in flight simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, James T.

    1987-01-01

    Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Least Square Error (LSE) estimation techniques were applied to the problem of identifying pilot-vehicle dynamic characteristics in flight simulation. A brief investigation of the effects of noise, input bandwidth and system delay upon the FFT and LSE techniques was undertaken using synthetic data. Data from a piloted simulation conducted at NASA Ames Research Center was then analyzed. The simulation was performed in the NASA Ames Research Center Variable Stability CH-47B helicopter operating in fixed-basis simulator mode. The piloting task consisted of maintaining the simulated vehicle over a moving hover pad whose motion was described by a random-appearing sum of sinusoids. The two test subjects used a head-down, color cathode ray tube (CRT) display for guidance and control information. Test configurations differed in the number of axes being controlled by the pilot (longitudinal only versus longitudinal and lateral), and in the presence or absence of an important display indicator called an 'acceleration ball'. A number of different pilot-vehicle transfer functions were measured, and where appropriate, qualitatively compared with theoretical pilot- vehicle models. Some indirect evidence suggesting pursuit behavior on the part of the test subjects is discussed.

  3. The dynamical characteristics and wave structure of typhoon Rananim (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Jie; Ni, Yunqi; Shen, Xinyong

    2009-05-01

    Typhoon Rananim (2004) was one of the severest typhoons landfalling the Chinese mainland from 1996 to 2004. It brought serious damage and induced prodigious economical loss. Using a new generation of mesoscale model, named the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modeling system, with 1.667 km grid horizontal spacing on the finest nested mesh, Rananim was successfully simulated in terms of track, intensity, eye, eyewall, and spiral rainbands. We compared the structures of Rananim to those of hurricanes in previous studies and observations to assess the validity of simulation. The three-dimensional (3D) dynamic and thermal structures of eye and eyewall were studied based on the simulated results. The focus was investigation of the characteristics of the vortex Rossby waves in the inner-core region. We found that the Rossby vortex waves propagate azimuthally upwind against the azimuthal mean tangential flow around the eyewall, and their period was longer than that of an air parcel moving within the azimuthal mean tangential flow. They also propagated outward against the boundary layer inflow of the azimuthal mean vortex. Futhermore, we studied the connection between the spiral potential vorticity (PV) bands and spiral rainbands, and found that the vortex Rossby waves played an important role in the formation process of spiral rainbands.

  4. Response characteristics of a low-dimensional model neuron.

    PubMed

    Cartling, B

    1996-11-15

    It is shown that a low-dimensional model neuron with a response time constant smaller than the membrane time constant closely reproduces the activity and excitability behavior of a detailed conductance-based model of Hodgkin-Huxley type. The fast response of the activity variable also makes it possible to reduce the model to a one-dimensional model, in particular for typical conditions. As an example, the reduction to a single-variable model from a multivariable conductance-based model of a neocortical pyramidal cell with somatic input is demonstrated. The conditions for avoiding a spurious damped oscillatory response to a constant input are derived, and it is shown that a limit-cycle response cannot occur. The capability of the low-dimensional model to approximate higher-dimensional models accurately makes it useful for describing complex dynamics of nets of interconnected neurons. The simplicity of the model facilitates analytic studies, elucidations of neurocomputational mechanisms, and applications to large-scale systems.

  5. Response of DP 600 products to dynamic impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Deidra Darcell

    The objective of this study was to compare the microstructural response of various DP 600 products subjected to low velocity, dynamic impact tests, typically encountered in a car crash. Since the response of steel is sensitive to its microstructure as controlled by the alloying elements, phase content, and processing; various DP 600 products may respond differently to crashes. The microstructure before and after dynamic impact deformation at 5 and 10 mph was characterized with regards to grain size, morphology, and phase content among vendors A, B, and C to evaluate efficiency in absorbing energy mechanisms during a crash simulated by dynamic impact testing in a drop tower.

  6. Response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade using latex and nonlatex materials

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Troy J; Lalande, Sophie; Hyatt, Robert E; Johnson, Bruce D

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of esophageal pressure allows for the calculation of several important and clinically useful parameters of respiratory mechanics. Esophageal pressure is often measured with balloon-tipped catheters. These catheters may be handmade from natural latex condoms and polyethylene tubing. Given the potential of natural latex to cause allergic reaction, it is important to determine whether esophageal catheter balloons can be fabricated, by hand, using nonlatex condoms as construction materials. To determine the static and dynamic response characteristics of esophageal balloon catheters handmade from latex and nonlatex materials, six esophageal catheter balloons were constructed from each of the following condom materials: natural latex, synthetic polyisoprene, and polyurethane (18 total). Static compliance and working volume range of each balloon catheter was obtained from their pressure-volume characteristics in water. The dynamic response of balloon catheters were measured via a pressure “step” test, from which a third-order underdamped transfer function was modeled. The dynamic ranges of balloon catheters were characterized by the frequencies corresponding to ±5% amplitude- and phase-distortion (fA5% and fφ5%). Balloon catheters handmade from polyurethane condoms displayed the smallest working volume range and lowest static balloon compliance. Despite this lower compliance, fA5% and fφ5% were remarkably similar between all balloon materials. Our findings suggest that polyisoprene condoms are an ideal nonlatex construction material to use when fabricating esophageal catheter balloons by hand. PMID:26077619

  7. Monitoring response to disturbance in dynamic rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arid and semi-arid rangelands worldwide provide important ecosystem services and see a diversity of land uses. To maintain the health of these lands, it is necessary to monitor rangeland conditions in response to management and disturbance. Spatial patterns from disturbance are superimposed on patte...

  8. A novel approach to detecting breathing-fatigue cracks based on dynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Guirong; De Stefano, Alessandro; Matta, Emiliano; Feng, Ruoqiang

    2013-01-01

    During the service life of structures, breathing-fatigue cracks may occur in structural members due to dynamic loadings acting on them. These fatigue cracks, if undetected, might lead to a catastrophic failure of the whole structural system. Although a number of approaches have been proposed to detect breathing-fatigue cracks, some of them appear rather sophisticated or expensive (requiring complicated equipment), and others suffer from a lack of sensitivity. In this study, a simple and efficient approach to detecting breathing-fatigue cracks is developed based on dynamic characteristics of breathing cracks. First, considering that breathing cracks introduce bilinearity into structures, a simple system identification method for bilinear systems is proposed by taking best advantage of dynamic characteristics of bilinear systems. This method transfers nonlinear system identification into linear system identification by dividing impulse or free-vibration responses into different parts corresponding to each stiffness region according to the stiffness interface. In this way, the natural frequency of each region can be identified using any modal identification approach applicable to linear systems. Second, the procedure for identifying the existence of breathing fatigue cracks and quantifying the cracks qualitatively is proposed by looking for the difference in the identified natural frequency between regions. Third, through introducing Hilbert transform, the proposed procedure is extended to identify fatigue cracks in piecewise-nonlinear systems. The proposed system identification method and crack detection procedure have been successfully validated by numerical simulations and experimental tests.

  9. Simulation and experimental validation of vehicle dynamic characteristics for displacement-sensitive shock absorber using fluid-flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choon-Tae; Moon, Byung-Young

    2006-02-01

    In this study, a new mathematical dynamic model of shock absorber is proposed to predict the dynamic characteristics of an automotive system. The performance of shock absorber is directly related to the car behaviours and performance, both for handling and ride comfort. Damping characteristics of automotive can be analysed by considering the performance of displacement-sensitive shock absorber (DSSA) for the ride comfort. The proposed model of the DSSA is considered as two modes of damping force (i.e. soft and hard) according to the position of piston. For the simulation validation of vehicle-dynamic characteristics, the DSSA is mathematically modelled by considering the fluid flow in chamber and valve in accordance with the hard, transient and soft zone. And the vehicle dynamic characteristic of the DSSA is analysed using quarter car model. To show the effectiveness of the proposed damper, the analysed results of damping characteristics were compared with the experimental results, which showed similar behaviour with the corresponding experimental one. The simulation results of frequency response are compared with the ones of passive shock absorber. From the simulation results of the DSSA, it can be concluded that the ride comfort of the DSSA increased at the low-amplitude road condition and the driving safety was increased partially at the high-amplitude road condition. The results reported herein will provide a better understanding of the shock absorber. Moreover, it is believed that those properties of the results can be utilised in the dynamic design of the automotive system.

  10. Analysis of dynamic system response to product random processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidwell, K.

    1978-01-01

    The response of dynamic systems to the product of two independent Gaussian random processes is developed by use of the Fokker-Planck and associated moment equations. The development is applied to the amplitude modulated process which is used to model atmospheric turbulence in aeronautical applications. The exact solution for the system response is compared with the solution obtained by the quasi-steady approximation which omits the dynamic properties of the random amplitude modulation. The quasi-steady approximation is valid as a limiting case of the exact solution for the dynamic response of linear systems to amplitude modulated processes. In the nonlimiting case the quasi-steady approximation can be invalid for dynamic systems with low damping.

  11. Dynamic brittle material response based on a continuum damage model

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The response of brittle materials to dynamic loads was studied in this investigation based on a continuum damage model. Damage mechanism was selected to be interaction and growth of subscale cracks. Briefly, the cracks are activated by bulk tension and the density of activated cracks are described by a Weibull statistical distribution. The moduli of a cracked solid derived by Budiansky and O`Connell are then used to represent the global material degradation due to subscale cracking. This continuum damage model was originally developed to study rock fragmentation and was modified in the present study to improve on the post-limit structural response. The model was implemented into a transient dynamic explicit finite element code PRONTO 2D and then used for a numerical study involving the sudden stretching of a plate with a centrally located hole. Numerical results characterizing the dynamic responses of the material were presented. The effect of damage on dynamic material behavior was discussed.

  12. The Response Dynamics of Recognition Memory: Sensitivity and Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koop, Gregory J.; Criss, Amy H.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in theories of memory are hampered by insufficient metrics for measuring memory. The goal of this paper is to further the development of model-independent, sensitive empirical measures of the recognition decision process. We evaluate whether metrics from continuous mouse tracking, or response dynamics, uniquely identify response bias and…

  13. Kinematic/Dynamic Characteristics for Visual and Kinesthetic Virtual Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortolussi, Michael R. (Compiler); Adelstein, B. D.; Gold, Miriam

    1996-01-01

    Work was carried out on two topics of principal importance to current progress in virtual environment research at NASA Ames and elsewhere. The first topic was directed at maximizing the temporal dynamic response of visually presented Virtual Environments (VEs) through reorganization and optimization of system hardware and software. The final results of this portion of the work was a VE system in the Advanced Display and Spatial Perception Laboratory at NASA Ames capable of updating at 60 Hz (the maximum hardware refresh rate) with latencies approaching 30 msec. In the course of achieving this system performance, specialized hardware and software tools for measurement of VE latency and analytic models correlating update rate and latency for different system configurations were developed. The second area of activity was the preliminary development and analysis of a novel kinematic architecture for three Degree Of Freedom (DOF) haptic interfaces--devices that provide force feedback for manipulative interaction with virtual and remote environments. An invention disclosure was filed on this work and a patent application is being pursued by NASA Ames. Activities in these two areas are expanded upon below.

  14. Bistable responses in bacterial genetic networks: Designs and dynamical consequences

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Ray, J. Christian J.; Narula, Jatin; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    A key property of living cells is their ability to react to stimuli with specific biochemical responses. These responses can be understood through the dynamics of underlying biochemical and genetic networks. Evolutionary design principles have been well studied in networks that display graded responses, with a continuous relationship between input signal and system output. Alternatively, biochemical networks can exhibit bistable responses so that over a range of signals the network possesses two stable steady states. In this review, we discuss several conceptual examples illustrating network designs that can result in a bistable response of the biochemical network. Next, we examine manifestations of these designs in bacterial master-regulatory genetic circuits. In particular, we discuss mechanisms and dynamic consequences of bistability in three circuits: two-component systems, sigma-factor networks, and a multistep phosphorelay. Analyzing these examples allows us to expand our knowledge of evolutionary design principles for networks with bistable responses. PMID:21385588

  15. Dynamic response of graphene to thermal impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingchao; Huang, Xiaopeng; Yue, Yanan; Wang, Jianmei; Wang, Xinwei

    2011-12-01

    A transient molecular dynamics technique is developed to characterize the thermophysical properties of two-dimensional graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). By directly tracking the thermal-relaxation history of a GNR that is heated by a thermal impulse, we are able to determine its thermal diffusivity quickly and accurately. We study the dynamic thermal conductivity of various length GNRs of 1.99 nm width. Quantum correction is applied in all of the temperature calculations and is found to have a critical role in the thermal-transport study of graphene. The calculated specific heat of GNRs agrees well with that of graphite at 300.6 and 692.3 K, showing little effect of the unique graphene structure on its ability to store thermal energy. A strong size effect on GNR's thermal conductivity is observed and its theoretical values for an infinite-length limit are evaluated by data fitting and extrapolation. With infinite length, the 1.99-nm-wide GNR has a thermal conductivity of 149 W m-1 K-1 at 692.3 K, and 317 W m-1 K-1 at 300.6 K. Our study of the temperature distribution and evolution suggests that diffusive transport is dominant in the studied GNRs. Non-Fourier heat conduction is observed at the beginning of the thermal-relaxation procedure. Thermal waves in GNR's in-plane direction are observed only for phonons in the flexural direction (ZA mode). The observed propagation speed (c = 4.6 km s-1) of the thermal wave follows the relation of c=vg/2 (vg is the ZA phonon group velocity). Our thermal-wave study reveals that in graphene, the ZA phonons transfer thermal energy much faster than longitudinal (LA) and transverse (TA) modes. Also, ZA↔ZA energy transfer is much faster than the ZA↔LA/TA phonon energy transfer.

  16. Triple Langmuir Probe Circuit Response to Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surla, Vijay; Jaworski, Michael; Kallman, Joshua; Kaita, Robert; Kugel, Henry; Ruzic, David

    2010-11-01

    Recently, an array of Langmuir probes was installed in the divertor region of the National Spherical Tokomak eXperiment (NSTX) and has been successfully tested [1]. The array is backed by a custom designed electronics system that allows biasing the probes, collecting the signals, reducing noise and amplifying circuitry and is suited to operate both as a single Langmuir probe and as a triple Langmuir probe (TLP). While the probe data has been useful in understanding the plasma characteristics during steady plasma discharges in NSTX, certain modifications aid interpretation of the transient events (˜μs scale) such as during Edge Localized Modes (ELMs). During high-flux transients, the bias circuit may drift from the nominal values before on-board control circuitry can respond. The details of the circuit, its response to dynamic loading and the resulting impact on signal interpretation is presented. [1] M.A. Jaworski, J. Kallman, R. Kaita, H. Kugel, B. LeBlanc, R. Marsala, and D.N. Ruzic, ``Biasing, acquisition and interpretation of a dense Langmuir probe array in NSTX,'' 18th Topical Conference on High Temperature Plasma Diagnsotics, 2010.

  17. Effects of cockpit lateral stick characteristics on handling qualities and pilot dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David G.; Aponso, Bimal L.; Klyde, David H.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of analysis of cockpit lateral control feel-system studies. Variations in feel-system natural frequency, damping, and command sensing reference (force and position) were investigated, in combination with variations in the aircraft response characteristics. The primary data for the report were obtained from a flight investigation conducted with a variable-stability airplane, with additional information taken from other flight experiments and ground-based simulations for both airplanes and helicopters . The study consisted of analysis of handling qualities ratings and extraction of open-loop, pilot-vehicle describing functions from sum-of-sines tracking data, including, for a limited subset of these data, the development of pilot models. The study confirms the findings of other investigators that the effects on pilot opinion of cockpit feel-system dynamics are not equivalent to a comparable level of added time delay, and until a more comprehensive set of criteria are developed, it is recommended that feel-system dynamics be considered a delay-inducing element in the aircraft response. The best correlation with time-delay requirements was found when the feel-system dynamics were included in the delay measurements, regardless of the command reference. This is a radical departure from past approaches.

  18. Frequency-response identification of XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    The timely design and development of the next generation of tilt-rotor aircraft (JVX) depend heavily on the in-depth understanding of existing XV-15 dynamics and the availability of fully validated simulation models. Previous studies have considered aircraft and simulation trim characteristics, but analyses of basic flight vehicle dynamics were limited to qualitative pilot evaluation. The present study has the following objectives: documentation and evaluation of XV-15 bare-airframe dynamics; comparison of aircraft and simulation responses; and development of a validated transfer-function description of the XV-15 needed for future studies. A nonparametric frequency-response approach is used which does not depend on assumed model order or structure. Transfer-function representations are subsequently derived which fit the frequency responses in the bandwidth of greatest concern for piloted handling-qualities and control-system applications.

  19. Dynamic response of a piezoelectric flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alok; Khandwekar, Gaurang; Venkatesh, S.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Dutta, S.

    2015-03-01

    Piezo-composite membranes have advantages over motorized flapping where frequencies are high and certain coupling between bending and twisting is useful to generate lift and forward flight. We draw examples of fruit fly and bumble bee. Wings with Piezo ceramic PZT coating are realized. The passive mechanical response of the wing is characterized experimentally and validated using finite element simulation. Piezoelectric actuation with uniform electrode coating is characterized and optimal frequencies for flapping are identified. The experimental data are used in an empirical model and advanced ratio for a flapping insect like condition for various angular orientations is estimated.

  20. Analysis of the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Zeng, Jin; Lang, Ziqiang; Zhang, Long; Guo, Yuzhu; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic characteristics of a slant-cracked cantilever beam are studied based on a new finite element (FE) model where both plane and beam elements are used to reduce the computational costs. Simulation studies show that the proposed model has the same system natural frequencies and vibration responses as those in the pure plane element model but is computationally more efficient. Based on the new model, the effects of loads such as gravity Fg, excitation force amplitude F0 and direction angles of excitation force φ, and crack parameters including slant crack angle θ, dimensionless crack depth s and dimensionless crack location p, on system dynamics have been analyzed. The results indicate that (1) the gravity has a more significant effect on the sub-harmonic resonance responses than on the super-harmonic resonance and resonance responses; (2) The amplitudes of the system responses at both excitation force frequencies fe and its harmonics such as 2fe and 3fe increase almost linearly with the increase of the excitation force amplitude F0; (3) Under the constant excitation force in the flexural direction, the tensile and compressive forces along the longitudinal direction can lead to opposite breathing behaviors of the crack within the super-harmonic and sub-harmonic resonance frequency regions; (4) Vibration is most severe under the straight crack angle (θ=90°) and near the straight crack angle such as θ=100° and 110°, and the vibration responses under smaller or larger crack angles such as θ=30° and θ=150° become weaker; (5) The resonance at 2fe is sensitive to the faint crack signals when s is small and p is large. In addition, the significant vibration responses at the multiple frequency of 3fe and the fractional frequency of 0.5fe can be regarded as a distinguishable feature of the serious crack with large s and small p.

  1. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  2. Slow dynamics in features of synchronized neural network responses

    PubMed Central

    Haroush, Netta; Marom, Shimon

    2015-01-01

    In this report trial-to-trial variations in the synchronized responses of neural networks are explored over time scales of minutes, in ex-vivo large scale cortical networks. We show that sub-second measures of the individual synchronous response, namely—its latency and decay duration, are related to minutes-scale network response dynamics. Network responsiveness is reflected as residency in, or shifting amongst, areas of the latency-decay plane. The different sensitivities of latency and decay durations to synaptic blockers imply that these two measures reflect aspects of inhibitory and excitatory activities. Taken together, the data suggest that trial-to-trial variations in the synchronized responses of neural networks might be related to effective excitation-inhibition ratio being a dynamic variable over time scales of minutes. PMID:25926787

  3. Maternal characteristics influence response to DHA during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gould, J F; Anderson, A J; Yelland, L N; Gibson, R A; Makrides, M

    2016-05-01

    We explored the degree to which maternal and offspring outcomes resulting from consuming prenatal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 800mg/day) in a clinical trial were influenced by maternal characteristics. Among non-smokers, women who received DHA had heavier babies (adjusted mean difference (MD)=99g 95% CI 45-153, p<0.01; interaction p=0.01) and fewer low birth weight babies than control women (adjusted relative risk=0.43 95% CI 0.25-0.74, p<0.01; interaction p=0.01). From women who had not completed further education, children in the DHA group had higher cognitive scores at 18 months compared with control children (adjusted MD=3.15 95% CI 0.93-5.37, p=0.01; interaction p<0.01). Conversely, the children of women who completed further education in the DHA group had lower language scores than control children (adjusted MD -2.82 95% CI -4.90 to -0.73, p=0.01; interaction p=0.04). Our results support the notion that responsiveness to prenatal DHA may depend on the characteristics of specific population subgroups. PMID:27154359

  4. Dismissing Attachment Characteristics Dynamically Modulate Brain Networks Subserving Social Aversion.

    PubMed

    Krause, Anna Linda; Borchardt, Viola; Li, Meng; van Tol, Marie-José; Demenescu, Liliana Ramona; Strauss, Bernhard; Kirchmann, Helmut; Buchheim, Anna; Metzger, Coraline D; Nolte, Tobias; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    direct prediction of neuronal responses by individual attachment and trauma characteristics and reversely prediction of subjective experience by intrinsic functional connections. We consider these findings of activation of within-network and between-network connectivity modulated by inter-individual differences as substantial for the understanding of interpersonal processes, particularly in clinical settings.

  5. Dismissing Attachment Characteristics Dynamically Modulate Brain Networks Subserving Social Aversion

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Anna Linda; Borchardt, Viola; Li, Meng; van Tol, Marie-José; Demenescu, Liliana Ramona; Strauss, Bernhard; Kirchmann, Helmut; Buchheim, Anna; Metzger, Coraline D.; Nolte, Tobias; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    our observation of direct prediction of neuronal responses by individual attachment and trauma characteristics and reversely prediction of subjective experience by intrinsic functional connections. We consider these findings of activation of within-network and between-network connectivity modulated by inter-individual differences as substantial for the understanding of interpersonal processes, particularly in clinical settings. PMID:27014016

  6. Dynamic response of trapped ultracold bosons on optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Batrouni, G.G.; Assaad, F.F.; Scalettar, R.T.; Denteneer, P.J.H.

    2005-09-15

    We study the dynamic response of ultracold bosons trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices using Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the boson Hubbard model with a confining potential. The dynamic structure factor reveals the inhomogeneous nature of the low temperature state, which contains coexisting Mott insulator and superfluid regions. We present new evidence for local quantum criticality and discuss implications for the experimental excitation spectrum of {sup 87}Rb atoms confined in one dimension.

  7. Localized measurements of composite dynamic response for health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Sean; Oman, Kyle; Peters, Kara; Stan, Nikola; Chadderdon, Spencer; Selfridge, Richard; Schultz, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the measurement of and applications for full-spectral measurements collected from FBG sensors in dynamic loading environments. The measurement of the dynamic response of a laminated plate to an impact event highlights the information gained during the event as compared to after the event. The measurement of damage induced spectral distortion in a thin plate during vibration loading demonstrates the capability of separating spectral distortion due to multiple effects, including damage and vibration loading. Finally, the measurement of the change in dynamic response of an adhesively bonded joint highlights the capability to measure the progression of fatigue damage. Confirmation that the change in FBG response is due to fatigue damage is performed through independent pulsed phase thermography imaging of the adhesively bonded joint.

  8. Sediment characteristics and transportation dynamics of the Ganga River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Munendra; Singh, Indra Bir; Müller, German

    2007-04-01

    Understanding of river systems that have experienced various forcing mechanisms such as climate, tectonics, sea level fluctuations and their linkages is a major concern for fluvial scientists. The 2525-km-long Ganga River derives its fluvial flux from northern part of the Indian subcontinent and drops in the Ganga-Brahmaputra delta and the Bengal fan regions. This paper presents a study of the Ganga River sediments for their textural properties, grainsize characteristics, and transportation dynamics. A suite of recently deposited sediments (189 bedload samples and 27 suspended load samples) of the river and its tributaries was collected from 63 locations. Dry and wet sieve methods of grainsize analysis were performed and Folk and Ward's parameters were calculated. Transportation dynamics of the sediment load was assessed by means of channel hydrology, flow/sediment rating curves, bedform mechanics, grainsize images, and cumulative curves. Textural properties of the bedload sediments of the Ganga River tributaries originating from the Himalaya orogenic belt, the northern Indian craton and the Ganga alluvial plain regions are characterised by the predominance of fine to very fine sand, medium to fine sand, and very fine sand to clay, respectively. Downstream textural variations in the bedload and suspended load sediments of the Ganga River are, therefore, complex and are strongly influenced by lateral sediment inputs by the tributaries and channel slope. At the base of the Himalaya, a very sharp gravel-sand transition is present in which median grainsize of bedload sediments decreases from over - 0.16 Φ to 2.46 Φ within a distance of 35 km. Downstream decline in mean grainsize of bedload sediments in the upper Ganga River within the alluvial plain can be expressed by an exponential formula as: mean grainsize (in Φ) = 0.0024 × Distance (in kilometres from the Himalayan front) + 1.29. It is a result of selective transport phenomena rather than of abrasion, the

  9. Characteristics of dynamic triaxial testing of asphalt mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulloa Calderon, Alvaro

    Due to the increasing traffic loads and tire pressures, a serious detrimental impact has occurred on flexible pavements in the form of excessive permanent deformation once the critical combination of loading and environmental conditions are reached. This distress, also known as rutting, leads to an increase in road roughness and ultimately jeopardizes the road users' safety. The flow number (FN) simple performance test for asphalt mixtures was one of the final three tests selected for further evaluation from the twenty-four test/material properties initially examined under the NCHRP 9-19 project. Currently, no standard triaxial testing conditions in terms of the magnitude of the deviator and confining stresses have been specified. In addition, a repeated haversine axial compressive load pulse of 0.1 second and a rest period of 0.9 second are commonly used as part of the triaxial testing conditions. The overall objective of this research was to define the loading conditions that created by a moving truck load in the hot mixed asphalt (HMA) layer. The loading conditions were defined in terms of the triaxial stress levels and the corresponding loading time. Dynamic mechanistic analysis with circular stress distribution was used to closely simulate field loading conditions. Extensive mechanistic analyses of three different asphalt pavement structures subjected to moving traffic loads at various speeds and under braking and non-braking conditions were conducted using the 3D-Move model. Prediction equations for estimating the anticipated deviator and confining stresses along with the equivalent deviator stress pulse duration as a function of pavement temperature, vehicle speed, and asphalt mixture's stiffness have been developed. The magnitude of deviator stress, sigmad and confining stress, sigmac, were determined by converting the stress tensor computed in the HMA layer at 2" below pavement surface under a moving 18-wheel truck using the octahedral normal and shear

  10. Dynamic response analysis procedure for landfills with geosynthetic liners

    SciTech Connect

    Yegian, M.K.; Harb, J.N.; Kadakal, U.

    1998-10-01

    The dynamic response of geosynthetic interfaces commonly encountered in municipal solid waste landfills were investigated using a shaking table facility. The force-slip relationships for the tested interfaces showed almost rigid and then plastic deformation where the maximum shear force transmitted through the interface increases slightly with increasing slip. The force-slip relationships were modeled with equivalent stiffness and damping ratios. These equivalent parameters were established as a function of slip displacements to account for the nonlinear behavior of the interfaces. Using the equivalent stiffness and damping, the dynamic properties of an equivalent soil layer were established such that the dynamic response of the equivalent soil layer is similar to that of the geosynthetic interface it represents. The purpose of this representation was to allow the modeling of geosynthetic interfaces in wave propagation analysis, such as SHAKE analysis. The properties of the equivalent soil layer were validated by comparing the measured dynamic response of a rigid block placed on geosynthetics with that computed using the SHAKEW program and the properties of the equivalent soil layer developed. A procedure for analysis of the dynamic response of landfills with geosynthetic liners is proposed.

  11. Frequency response characteristics of cerebral blood flow autoregulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Brittany; Rotella, Diane L; Stauss, Harald M

    2007-01-01

    Transfer function analysis of blood pressure and cerebral blood flow in humans demonstrated that cerebrovascular autoregulation operates most effectively for slow fluctuations in perfusion pressure, not exceeding a frequency of approximately 0.15 Hz. No information on the dynamic properties of cerebrovascular autoregulation is available in rats. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that cerebrovascular autoregulation in rats is also most effective for slow fluctuations in perfusion pressure below 0.15 Hz. Normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (n = 10) were instrumented with catheters in the left common carotid artery and jugular vein and flow probes around the right internal carotid artery. During isoflurane anesthesia, fluctuations in cerebral perfusion pressure were elicited by periodically occluding the abdominal aorta at eight frequencies ranging from 0.008 Hz to 0.5 Hz. The protocol was repeated during inhibition of myogenic vascular function (nifedipine, 0.25 mg/kg body wt iv). Increases in cerebral perfusion pressure elicited initial increases in cerebrovascular conductance and decreases in resistance. At low occlusion frequencies (<0.1 Hz), these initial responses were followed by decreases in conductance and increases in resistance that were abolished by nifedipine. At occlusion frequencies of 0.1 Hz and above, the gains of the transfer functions between pressure and blood flow and between pressure and resistance were equally high in the control and nifedipine trial. At occlusion frequencies below 0.1 Hz, the gains of the transfer functions decreased twice as much under control conditions than during nifedipine application. We conclude that dynamic autoregulation of cerebral blood flow is restricted to very low frequencies (<0.1 Hz) in rats.

  12. Study on Dynamic Response Measurement of the Submarine Pipeline by Full-Term FBG Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jinghai; Sun, Li; Li, Hongnan

    2014-01-01

    The field of structural health monitoring is concerned with accurately and reliably assessing the integrity of a given structure to reduce ownership costs, increase operational lifetime, and improve safety. In structural health monitoring systems, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is a promising measurement technology for its superior ability of explosion proof, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and high accuracy. This paper is a study on the dynamic characteristics of fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors applied to a submarine pipeline, as well as an experimental investigation on a laboratory model of the pipeline. The dynamic response of a submarine pipeline under seismic excitation is a coupled vibration of liquid and solid interaction. FBG sensors and strain gauges are used to monitor the dynamic response of a submarine pipeline model under a variety of dynamic loading conditions and the maximum working frequency of an FBG strain sensor is calculated according to its dynamic strain responses. Based on the theoretical and experimental results, it can be concluded that FBG sensor is superior to strain gauge and satisfies the demand of dynamic strain measurement. PMID:24971391

  13. Dynamic Characteristics of Penor Peat Using MASW Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainorabidin, A.; Said, M. J. M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic behaviour of soil affected the mechanical properties of soil such as shear wave velocity, shear modulus, damping ratio and poisson's ratio [1] which is becoming important aspect need to be considered for structures influences by dynamic movement. This study is to determine the dynamic behaviour of Penor peat such as shear wave velocity using MASW and estimation its shear modulus. Peat soils are very problematic soils since it's have high compressibility, low shear strength, high moisture content and low bearing capacity which is very not suitable materials to construct any foundation structures. Shear wave velocity ranges between 32.94 - 95.89 m/s and shear modulus are ranging between 0.93 - 8.01 MPa. The differences of both dynamic properties are due to the changes of peat density and affected by the fibre content, organic content, degree of degradation and moisture content.

  14. Polar cusp: optical and particle characteristics-dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sandholt, P.E.; Egeland, A.; Asheim, S.; Lybekk, B.; Hardy, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Photometric observations from two stations on Svalbard, Norway, were used to map the location and dynamics of polar-cusp auroras. Coordinated observations of low-energy electron precipitation from satellite HILAT and optical observations from the ground are discussed. Cases are presented showing the dynamical behavior of cusp auroras and the local magnetic field related to changes in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and irregularities in the solar wind plasma. Dynamical phenomena with different time scales are studied. South and northward expansions of the midday sector of the auroral oval are discussed in relation to IMF variations and geomagnetic substorm activity. Intensifications and rapid poleward motions of discrete auroral structures in the cusp region are shown to be associated with local Pi type magnetic pulsations, each event lasting a few minutes. These small scale dynamical phenomena are discussed in relation to different models of plasma penetration across the dayside magnetopause, from the magnetosheath to the polar cusp region of the magnetosphere.

  15. Estimating the ride quality characteristics of vehicles with random decrement analysis of on-the-road vibration response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainalis, Daniel; Rouillard, Vincent; Sek, Michael

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the application of a practical analytical technique based on the random decrement method to estimate the rigid sprung mass dynamic characteristics (frequency response function) of road vehicles using only vibration response data during constant-speed operation. A brief history and development of the random decrement technique is presented, along with a summary of work undertaken on optimal parameter selection to establish the random decrement signature. Two approaches to estimate the dynamic characteristics from the random decrement signature are described and evaluated. A custom, single-wheeled vehicle (physical quarter car) was commissioned to undertake a series of on-the-road experiments at various nominally constant operating speeds. The vehicle, also instrumented as an inertial profilometer, simultaneously measured the longitudinal pavement profile to establish the vehicle's actual dynamic characteristics during operation. The main outcome of the paper is that the random decrement technique can be used to provide accurate estimates of the sprung mass mode of the vehicle's dynamic characteristics for both linear and nonlinear suspension systems of an idealised vehicle.

  16. Responsiveness of muscle tone characteristics to progressive force production.

    PubMed

    Mustalampi, Sirpa; Häkkinen, Arja; Kautiainen, Hannu; Weir, Adam; Ylinen, Jari

    2013-01-01

    It is possible to measure muscle tone reliably, quickly and objectively using tonometers although they are not yet widely used. In clinical practice, it may be helpful if clinicians could assess the degree of contraction in different parts of a muscle without having to perform time-consuming electromyography measurements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of different muscle tone characteristics to progressively increased contraction force of quadriceps muscle. Twenty healthy subjects (mean age 39.9 years, 50% women) volunteered. Using 2 different tonometers various muscle viscoelastic properties were measured. The frequency (hertz), logarithmic decrement, and stiffness (newtons per meter) of damped mechanical oscillation of the muscle tissue and tissue compliance (millijoules) were registered from rectus femoris muscle at rest and 20, 40, 60, 80% of maximal voluntary contraction determined using dynamometry. All the values changed linearly with increasing force level. Compliance, oscillation stiffness, and frequency parameters showed large effect sizes (ESs ≥ 0.8). The standardized respoknse mean for compliance was 5.3 (4.8-5.7) mJ, for oscillation stiffness 1.8 (1.3-2.2) N·m(-1), frequency 1.1 (0.6-1.5) Hz, and decrement -0.6 (-1.0 to -0.2). The results indicate that the compliance and oscillation stiffness parameters showed the highest responsiveness and can thus best detect changes in muscle contraction state. The additional value of using tonometers to measure these properties in clinical practice should be investigated further.

  17. Ultrafast Dynamic Piezoresistive Response of Graphene-Based Cellular Elastomers.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Bulut Coskun, M; Tang, Yue; Liu, Jefferson Z; Alan, Tuncay; Ding, Jie; Truong, Van-Tan; Li, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Ultralight graphene-based cellular elastomers are found to exhibit nearly frequency-independent piezoresistive behaviors. Surpassing the mechanoreceptors in the human skin, these graphene elastomers can provide an instantaneous and high-fidelity electrical response to dynamic pressures ranging from quasi-static up to 2000 Hz, and are capable of detecting ultralow pressures as small as 0.082 Pa.

  18. Investigation of dynamic characteristics of an elastic wing model by using corrections of mass and stiffness matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi-Kia, M.; Cutchins, M. A.; Tinker, M. L.

    1988-02-01

    The effects of theoretical changes in mass and stiffness matrices on the dynamic characteristics of a model wing are considered. The NASTRAN computer code is utilized to find theoretical mass and stiffness matrices with their corresponding natural frequencies and mode shapes. The dynamic response is then calculated by using theoretical mass and stiffness matrices and theoretical modal data. Experimentally measured mode shapes and natural frequencies are used to improve the stiffness and mass matrices. The resulting improved stiffness and mass matrices are further used to calculate again the dynamic response for the model. Analysis of the computational results and experimental data show that the improved theoretical model represents the experimental model better than the original theoretical model. Other means of improving the theoretical model are summarized.

  19. Dynamic response and stability analysis of flexible, multibody systems. [spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodley, C. S.; Park, A. C.; Devers, A. D.; Frisch, H. P.

    1977-01-01

    A general version of Lagrange's equations, including auxiliary nonholonomic, rheonomic conditions of constraint, is used in the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of interconnected flexible bodies. Modeling of the nonlinear flexible/rigid dynamic coupling effects, the interaction forces/torques, and the elastic deformation effects is discussed. A digital computer program is developed to obtain time-domain solution for the nonlinear response of systems represented as a collection of individual bodies, numerical linearization of system-governing equations, time-domain solution for the perturbation response about a nominal state, and a frequency-domain stability analysis corresponding to the linearization. The digital simulation code is employed to study the dynamic behavior of a typical satellite and a spacecraft with deployable experiment booms.

  20. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Earl, David J.; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-09-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self-antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely, gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system’s search for antibodies, a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity.

  1. Wind tunnel tests of the dynamic characteristics of the fluidic rudder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belsterling, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The fourth phase is given of a continuing program to develop the means to stabilize and control aircraft without moving parts or a separate source of power. Previous phases have demonstrated the feasibility of (1) generating adequate control forces on a standard airfoil, (2) controlling those forces with a fluidic amplifier and (3) cascading non-vented fluidic amplifiers operating on ram air supply pressure. The foremost objectives of the fourth phase covered under Part I of this report were to demonstrate a complete force-control system in a wind tunnel environment and to measure its static and dynamic control characteristics. Secondary objectives, covered under Part II, were to evaluate alternate configurations for lift control. The results demonstrate an overall response time of 150 msec, confirming this technology as a viable means for implementing low-cost reliable flight control systems.

  2. Dynamic Stall Characteristics of Drooped Leading Edge Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Lakshmi N.; Sahin, Mehmet; Gopal, Naveen

    2000-01-01

    Helicopters in high-speed forward flight usually experience large regions of dynamic stall over the retreating side of the rotor disk. The rapid variations in the lift and pitching moments associated with the stall process can result in vibratory loads, and can cause fatigue and failure of pitch links. In some instances, the large time lag between the aerodynamic forces and the blade motion can trigger stall flutter. A number of techniques for the alleviation of dynamic stall have been proposed and studied by researchers. Passive and active control techniques have both been explored. Passive techniques include the use of high solidity rotors that reduce the lift coefficients of individual blades, leading edge slots and leading edge slats. Active control techniques include steady and unsteady blowing, and dynamically deformable leading edge (DDLE) airfoils. Considerable amount of experimental and numerical data has been collected on the effectiveness of these concepts. One concept that has not received as much attention is the drooped-leading edge airfoil idea. It has been observed in wind tunnel studies and flight tests that drooped leading edge airfoils can have a milder dynamic stall, with a significantly milder load hysteresis. Drooped leading edge airfoils may not, however, be suitable at other conditions, e.g. in hover, or in transonic flow. Work needs to be done on the analysis and design of drooped leading edge airfoils for efficient operation in a variety of flight regimes (hover, dynamic stall, and transonic flow). One concept that is worthy of investigation is the dynamically drooping airfoil, where the leading edge shape is changed roughly once-per-rev to mitigate the dynamic stall.

  3. Dynamic differential imaging of intrinsic optical responses in the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Li, Yang-Guo; Liu, Lei; Amthor, Frank

    2010-02-01

    High resolution monitoring of stimulus-evoked retinal neural activities is important for understanding retinal neural mechanisms, and for diagnosis of retinal disease and evaluation of treatment. Fast intrinsic optical signals (IOSs), which have the time courses comparable to retinal electrophysiological responses, hold the promise for high resolution imaging of retinal neural activities. However, application of fast IOS imaging has been hindered by contamination of slow, high magnitude, optical responses associated with transient hemodynamic and metabolic changes. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of separating fast IOSs from slow optical responses by combined dynamic differential imaging and high frequency flicker stimulation.

  4. Navier-Stokes Simulation of the Canard-Wing-Body Longitudinal Dynamic Stability Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene L.; VanDalsem, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Many modern aircraft are canard-configured for aircraft control and improved aerodynamic performance. Canards can often enhance aircraft cruise performance, maneuverability and agility. For close-coupled canard configurations, the aerodynamic interaction between the canard and wing significantly changes the flow characteristics of the wing. In unsteady flow, such changes in the flow structure and performance of wings can be quite pronounced. Accurate modeling of the unsteady aerodynamics is essential for potential CFD design and analysis of such configurations. A time-accurate numerical simulation is performed to study the unsteady aerodynamic interaction between a canard and wing with emphasis on the effects of the canard on the configuration's dynamic response characteristics. The thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes Equations with various turbulence models are used in this study. Computations are made on a generic, analytically-defined, close-coupled canard-wing-body configuration which has been the subject of numerous previously published experimental studies during the 1970's to mid-80's. More recently, a series of steady-flow simulations has been performed and published by the author. In the current study, the configuration is given prescribed ramp and oscillatory motions in order to predict characteristics such as the damping-in-pitch and oscillatory longitudinal stability parameters. The current computations are made at high-subsonic and transonic Mach numbers, moderate angles-of- attack from -4 to 20 degrees, and at various pitch rates and reduced frequencies. Comparisons of pressures and integrated force quantities (e.g. lift, drag, pitching moment and selected dynamic parameters) are made with other published computational results and available experimental data. Results showing the unsteady effects of the canard on surface pressures, integrated forces, canard-wing vortex interaction and vortex breakdown will be presented.

  5. Studies of TLP dynamic response under wind, waves and current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jia-yang; Yang, Jian-min; Lv, Hai-ning

    2012-09-01

    Investigated is the coupled response of a tension leg platform (TLP) for random waves. Inferred are the mass matrix, coupling stiffness matrix, damping matrix in the vibration differential equation and external load of TLP in moving coordinating system. Infinitesimal method is applied to divide columns and pontoons into small parts. Time domain motion equation is solved by Runge-Kutta integration scheme. Jonswap spectrum is simulated in the random wave, current is simulated by linear interpolation, and NPD spectrum is applied as wind spectrum. The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate random waves and fluctuated wind. Coupling dynamic response, change of tendon tension and riser tension in different sea conditions are analyzed by power spectral density (PSD). The influence of approach angle on dynamic response of TLP and tendon tension is compared.

  6. Loudness Change in Response to Dynamic Acoustic Intensity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Kirk N.; Stevens, Catherine J.; Tardieu, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments investigate psychological, methodological, and domain-specific characteristics of loudness change in response to sounds that continuously increase in intensity (up-ramps), relative to sounds that decrease (down-ramps). Timbre (vowel, violin), layer (monotone, chord), and duration (1.8 s, 3.6 s) were manipulated in Experiment 1.…

  7. Mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic characteristics in flight dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobak, M.; Chapman, G. T.; Schiff, L. B.

    1984-01-01

    Basic concepts involved in the mathematical modeling of the aerodynamic response of an aircraft to arbitrary maneuvers are reviewed. The original formulation of an aerodynamic response in terms of nonlinear functionals is shown to be compatible with a derivation based on the use of nonlinear functional expansions. Extensions of the analysis through its natural connection with ideas from bifurcation theory are indicated.

  8. Dynamic Response Research of U Shaped Pipe with Viscoelastic Damping Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yajuan; Meng, Guang; Li, Hongguang

    The frequency dependency property of viscoelastic material leads to the dynamic analysis of compound structures which are complex and costly. Furthermore, using commercial finite element software, it is difficult to carry out the dynamic response analysis with this characteristic. Based on finite element iterative and modal strain energy (MSE) method, a mode superposition algorithm was proposed to solve the dynamic response of viscoelastic damping structure in this paper. Through iterative and MSE method, the modal frequency and loss factor for each mode can be obtained. Before calculating the next order modal frequency, the modal mode and corresponding load are extracted and the response of node was calculated at first in this algorithm. As a consequence, the node displacement response can be solved by summarizing the response results of each independent mode in the required frequency range. Numerical calculation of U shaped pipe with viscoelastic damping layer illustrates that the method is simple and practical. Moreover, the simulations with this method agree quite well with the experimental derived results. In the meantime, the damping layer parameters study shows that the position of the damping layer has an obvious effect of reducing the vibration response of U shaped pipe, but the width of the damping layer has little influence. The procedure proposed in this paper can be extended to analyze other more complex structures with viscoelastic material.

  9. Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs in Wildfire Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Nada; Alderson, David L.; Carlson, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Challenges associated with the allocation of limited resources to mitigate the impact of natural disasters inspire fundamentally new theoretical questions for dynamic decision making in coupled human and natural systems. Wildfires are one of several types of disaster phenomena, including oil spills and disease epidemics, where (1) the disaster evolves on the same timescale as the response effort, and (2) delays in response can lead to increased disaster severity and thus greater demand for resources. We introduce a minimal stochastic process to represent wildfire progression that nonetheless accurately captures the heavy tailed statistical distribution of fire sizes observed in nature. We then couple this model for fire spread to a series of response models that isolate fundamental tradeoffs both in the strength and timing of response and also in division of limited resources across multiple competing suppression efforts. Using this framework, we compute optimal strategies for decision making scenarios that arise in fire response policy. PMID:22514605

  10. Auditory virtual environment with dynamic room characteristics for music performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Daniel Dhaham

    A room-adaptive system was designed to simulate an electro-acoustic space that changes room characteristics in real-time according to the content of sound. In this specific case, the focus of the sound components is on the different styles and genres of music. This system is composed of real-time music recognition algorithms that analyze the different elements of music, determine the desired room characteristics, and output the acoustical parameters via multi-channel room simulation mechanisms. The system modifies the acoustic properties of a space and enables it to "improvise" its acoustical parameters based on the sounds of the music performances.

  11. Dynamic response tests of inertial and optical wind-tunnel model attitude measurement devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, R. D.; Young, C. P., Jr.; Burner, A. W.; Tripp, J. S.; Tcheng, P.; Finley, T. D.; Popernack, T. G., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study of the response of inertial and optical wind-tunnel model attitude measurement systems in a wind-off simulated dynamic environment. This study is part of an ongoing activity at the NASA Langley Research Center to develop high accuracy, advanced model attitude measurement systems that can be used in a dynamic wind-tunnel environment. This activity was prompted by the inertial model attitude sensor response observed during high levels of model vibration which results in a model attitude measurement bias error. Significant bias errors in model attitude measurement were found for the measurement using the inertial device during wind-off dynamic testing of a model system. The amount of bias present during wind-tunnel tests will depend on the amplitudes of the model dynamic response and the modal characteristics of the model system. Correction models are presented that predict the vibration-induced bias errors to a high degree of accuracy for the vibration modes characterized in the simulated dynamic environment. The optical system results were uncorrupted by model vibration in the laboratory setup.

  12. The dynamic response of a viscoelastic biological tissue simulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Christopher; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Hazell, Paul; Allsop, Derek

    2009-06-01

    The development and optimisation of new projectiles requires comparative techniques to assess ballistic performance. Porcine gelatin has found a substantial niche in the ballistics community as a tissue mimic. Primarily due to its elasticity, gelatin has been shown to deform in a similar manner to biological tissues. Bullet impacts typically occur in the 350-850 m/s range and consequently, knowledge of the high strain rate dynamic properties of both the projectile constituents and target materials is desirable if simulations are to allow the optimisation of projectile design. A large body of knowledge exists on the dynamic properties of projectiles, however relatively little data exists in the literature on the dynamic response of flesh simulants. The Hugoniot for a 20 wt% porcine gelatin, which exhibits a ballistic response similar to that of human tissues at room temperature, is determined in this paper using the plate impact technique. Up-Us and Up-P relationships are determined for impact velocities in the range of 200-900 m/s. Good agreement with the limited available data from the literature for similar concentrations is found and the dynamic response established at impact stresses up to 3 times higher than that observed elsewhere. Additionally, high frequency elastic properties are investigated using ultrasound and compared to those observed elsewhere.

  13. Internal Dynamics and Boundary Forcing Characteristics Associated with Interannual Variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K.- M.; Kim, K.-M.; Yang, S.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we present a description of the internal dynamics and boundary forcing characteristics of two major components of the Asian summer monsoon (ASM), i.e., the South Asian (SAM) and the Southeast-East Asian monsoon (SEAM). The description is based on a new monsoon-climate paradigm in which the variability of ASM is considered as the outcome of the interplay of a "fast" and an "intermediate" monsoon subsystem, under the influenced of the "slow" varying external forcings. Two sets of regional monsoon indices derived from dynamically consistent rainfall and wind data are used in this study. For SAM, the internal dynamics is represented by that of a "classical" monsoon system where the anomalous circulation is governed by Rossby-wave dynamics, i.e., generation of anomalous vorticity induced by an off-equatorial heat source is balanced by planetary vorticity advection. On the other hand, the internal dynamics of SEAM is characterized by a "hybrid" monsoon system featuring multi-cellular meridional circulation over the East Asian section, extending from the deep tropics to midlatitudes. These meridional-cells link tropical heating to extratropical circulation system via the East Asian jetstream, and are responsible for the characteristic occurrences of zonally oriented anomalous rainfall patterns over East Asian and the subtropical western Pacific. In the extratropical regions, the major upper level vorticity balance is by anomalous vorticity advection and generation by the anomalous divergent circulation. A consequence of this is that compared to SAM, the SEAM is associated with stronger teleconnection patterns to regions outside the ASM. A strong SAM is linked to basin-scale sea surface temperature (SST) fluctuation with significant signal in the equatorial eastern Pacific. During the boreal spring SST warming in the Arabian Sea and the subtropical western Pacific may lead to a strong SAM. For SEAM, interannual variability is tied to SSTA over the Sea of

  14. Fluctuation-response relation unifies dynamical behaviors in neural fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, C. C. Alan; Wong, K. Y. Michael; Mao, Hongzi; Wu, Si

    2015-08-01

    Anticipation is a strategy used by neural fields to compensate for transmission and processing delays during the tracking of dynamical information and can be achieved by slow, localized, inhibitory feedback mechanisms such as short-term synaptic depression, spike-frequency adaptation, or inhibitory feedback from other layers. Based on the translational symmetry of the mobile network states, we derive generic fluctuation-response relations, providing unified predictions that link their tracking behaviors in the presence of external stimuli to the intrinsic dynamics of the neural fields in their absence.

  15. Heterogeneous nodal responses in cascade dynamics on multiplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Min; Brummitt, Charles D.; Goh, Kwang-Il

    2014-03-01

    Structure and dynamics of multiplex network systems have been intensively studied recently, revealing nontrivial results such as facilitated cascading failures and new type of phase transitions unforeseen in the single-level systems. However, most studies about multi-layered, network of networks have mainly considered the case of single nodal response to multiple layers, that is, every node responds to the multiple layers in identical way. Most complex systems like human society, however, function not only through various kinds of relations but also through heterogeneous response behavior across agents, indicating a new level of complexity. To address it, here we formulate a threshold cascade model on multiplex networks with a mixture of two response functions: OR and AND rules. For the OR response, nodes are activated if enough neighbors in any layer are active, whereas for the AND response, the nodes activate only if enough neighbors in all layers are active. Coexistence of these two response rules is shown to control between facilitation and inhibition of cascading failures, and moreover, it can also control the type of transitions to global cascades between continuous and discontinuous ones. We will discuss the implication of the results in the context of social dynamics.

  16. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  17. Nike Black Brant V high altitude dynamic instability characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montag, W. H.; Walker, L. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Flight experience on the Nike Black Brant V has demonstrated the existence of plume induced flow separation over the fins and aft body of the Black Brant V motor. Modelling of the forces associated with this phenomenon as well as analysis of the resultant vehicle coning motion and its effect on the velocity vector heading are presented. A summary of Nike Black Brant V flight experience with high altitude dynamic instability is included.

  18. Analysis of the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers. Influence of the rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusquiza, Eduard; Valero, Carme; Presas, Alex; Huang, Xingxing; Guardo, Alfredo; Seidel, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers. A pump-turbine impeller is a complex structure attached to a rotor and rotating inside a casing full of water with very small clearances between the rotating and the stationary parts. The dynamic response of this type of structures is very complex and it is very much affected by the connection to the rotor as well as by the added mass and boundary conditions. As a consequence its calculation presents several uncertainties. First, the dynamic response of pump-turbine impellers is introduced. Second an experimental investigation in a real impeller attached to the rotor and inside the machine was carried out. For this investigation, the impeller of an existing pump-turbine unit with an installed power of 110 MW and a diameter of 2.87 m was studied. For a better analysis of the experimental results a numerical model using FEM was also built-up. Frequencies and mode-shapes were identified numerically and experimentally and the characteristics of the structural response analyzed. To determine the influence of the rotor and supporting structures on the impeller response the results were compared with the ones obtained with the same impeller but suspended (non-connected to the rotor). Experimental and numerical simulation were also used for this case. The changes in the dynamic response due to the rotor connection were determined. Finally the results obtained are compared with the results from other pump-turbine impellers of different designs and general conclusions about the dynamics of this type of structures are given.

  19. Dynamic Monitoring Reveals Motor Task Characteristics in Prehistoric Technical Gestures

    PubMed Central

    Pfleging, Johannes; Stücheli, Marius; Iovita, Radu; Buchli, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing ancient technical gestures associated with simple tool actions is crucial for understanding the co-evolution of the human forelimb and its associated control-related cognitive functions on the one hand, and of the human technological arsenal on the other hand. Although the topic of gesture is an old one in Paleolithic archaeology and in anthropology in general, very few studies have taken advantage of the new technologies from the science of kinematics in order to improve replicative experimental protocols. Recent work in paleoanthropology has shown the potential of monitored replicative experiments to reconstruct tool-use-related motions through the study of fossil bones, but so far comparatively little has been done to examine the dynamics of the tool itself. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can statistically differentiate gestures used in a simple scraping task through dynamic monitoring. Dynamics combines kinematics (position, orientation, and speed) with contact mechanical parameters (force and torque). Taken together, these parameters are important because they play a role in the formation of a visible archaeological signature, use-wear. We present our new affordable, yet precise methodology for measuring the dynamics of a simple hide-scraping task, carried out using a pull-to (PT) and a push-away (PA) gesture. A strain gage force sensor combined with a visual tag tracking system records force, torque, as well as position and orientation of hafted flint stone tools. The set-up allows switching between two tool configurations, one with distal and the other one with perpendicular hafting of the scrapers, to allow for ethnographically plausible reconstructions. The data show statistically significant differences between the two gestures: scraping away from the body (PA) generates higher shearing forces, but requires greater hand torque. Moreover, most benchmarks associated with the PA gesture are more highly variable than in the PT gesture

  20. Dynamic Monitoring Reveals Motor Task Characteristics in Prehistoric Technical Gestures.

    PubMed

    Pfleging, Johannes; Stücheli, Marius; Iovita, Radu; Buchli, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing ancient technical gestures associated with simple tool actions is crucial for understanding the co-evolution of the human forelimb and its associated control-related cognitive functions on the one hand, and of the human technological arsenal on the other hand. Although the topic of gesture is an old one in Paleolithic archaeology and in anthropology in general, very few studies have taken advantage of the new technologies from the science of kinematics in order to improve replicative experimental protocols. Recent work in paleoanthropology has shown the potential of monitored replicative experiments to reconstruct tool-use-related motions through the study of fossil bones, but so far comparatively little has been done to examine the dynamics of the tool itself. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can statistically differentiate gestures used in a simple scraping task through dynamic monitoring. Dynamics combines kinematics (position, orientation, and speed) with contact mechanical parameters (force and torque). Taken together, these parameters are important because they play a role in the formation of a visible archaeological signature, use-wear. We present our new affordable, yet precise methodology for measuring the dynamics of a simple hide-scraping task, carried out using a pull-to (PT) and a push-away (PA) gesture. A strain gage force sensor combined with a visual tag tracking system records force, torque, as well as position and orientation of hafted flint stone tools. The set-up allows switching between two tool configurations, one with distal and the other one with perpendicular hafting of the scrapers, to allow for ethnographically plausible reconstructions. The data show statistically significant differences between the two gestures: scraping away from the body (PA) generates higher shearing forces, but requires greater hand torque. Moreover, most benchmarks associated with the PA gesture are more highly variable than in the PT gesture

  1. Dynamic Monitoring Reveals Motor Task Characteristics in Prehistoric Technical Gestures.

    PubMed

    Pfleging, Johannes; Stücheli, Marius; Iovita, Radu; Buchli, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing ancient technical gestures associated with simple tool actions is crucial for understanding the co-evolution of the human forelimb and its associated control-related cognitive functions on the one hand, and of the human technological arsenal on the other hand. Although the topic of gesture is an old one in Paleolithic archaeology and in anthropology in general, very few studies have taken advantage of the new technologies from the science of kinematics in order to improve replicative experimental protocols. Recent work in paleoanthropology has shown the potential of monitored replicative experiments to reconstruct tool-use-related motions through the study of fossil bones, but so far comparatively little has been done to examine the dynamics of the tool itself. In this paper, we demonstrate that we can statistically differentiate gestures used in a simple scraping task through dynamic monitoring. Dynamics combines kinematics (position, orientation, and speed) with contact mechanical parameters (force and torque). Taken together, these parameters are important because they play a role in the formation of a visible archaeological signature, use-wear. We present our new affordable, yet precise methodology for measuring the dynamics of a simple hide-scraping task, carried out using a pull-to (PT) and a push-away (PA) gesture. A strain gage force sensor combined with a visual tag tracking system records force, torque, as well as position and orientation of hafted flint stone tools. The set-up allows switching between two tool configurations, one with distal and the other one with perpendicular hafting of the scrapers, to allow for ethnographically plausible reconstructions. The data show statistically significant differences between the two gestures: scraping away from the body (PA) generates higher shearing forces, but requires greater hand torque. Moreover, most benchmarks associated with the PA gesture are more highly variable than in the PT gesture

  2. Using the dynamic bond to access macroscopically responsive structurally dynamic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtecki, Rudy J.; Meador, Michael A.; Rowan, Stuart J.

    2011-01-01

    New materials that have the ability to reversibly adapt to their environment and possess a wide range of responses ranging from self-healing to mechanical work are continually emerging. These adaptive systems have the potential to revolutionize technologies such as sensors and actuators, as well as numerous biomedical applications. We will describe the emergence of a new trend in the design of adaptive materials that involves the use of reversible chemistry (both non-covalent and covalent) to programme a response that originates at the most fundamental (molecular) level. Materials that make use of this approach - structurally dynamic polymers - produce macroscopic responses from a change in the material's molecular architecture (that is, the rearrangement or reorganization of the polymer components, or polymeric aggregates). This design approach requires careful selection of the reversible/dynamic bond used in the construction of the material to control its environmental responsiveness.

  3. Parameter-less approaches for interpreting dynamic cellular response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cellular response such as cell signaling is an integral part of information processing in biology. Upon receptor stimulation, numerous intracellular molecules are invoked to trigger the transcription of genes for specific biological purposes, such as growth, differentiation, apoptosis or immune response. How complex are such specialized and sophisticated machinery? Computational modeling is an important tool for investigating dynamic cellular behaviors. Here, I focus on certain types of key signaling pathways that can be interpreted well using simple physical rules based on Boolean logic and linear superposition of response terms. From the examples shown, it is conceivable that for small-scale network modeling, reaction topology, rather than parameter values, is crucial for understanding population-wide cellular behaviors. For large-scale response, non-parametric statistical approaches have proven valuable for revealing emergent properties. PMID:25183996

  4. Using dissipative particle dynamics to model micromechanics of responsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The ability of responsive hydrogels to undergo complex and reversible shape transformations in response to external stimuli such as temperature, magnetic/electric fields, pH levels, and light intensity has made them the material of choice for tissue scaffolding, drug delivery, bio-adhesive, bio-sensing, and micro-sorting applications. The complex micromechanics and kinetics of these responsive networks however, currently hinders developments in the aforementioned areas. In order to better understand the mechanical properties of these systems and how they change during the volume transition we have developed a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for responsive polymer networks. We use this model to examine the impact of the Flory-Huggins parameter on the bulk and shear moduli. In this fashion we evaluate how environmental factors can affect the micromechanical properties of these networks. Support from NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) is gratefully acknowledged.

  5. Insights into the Dynamic Response of Tunnels in Jointed Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F E

    2004-11-01

    Tunnels in jointed rocks can be subjected to severe dynamic loads because of rock bursts, coal bumps, and large earthquakes. A series of 3-dimensional simulations was performed, based on discrete element analysis to gain insights into the parameters that influence the response of such tunnels. The simulations looked at the effect of joint set orientation, the effect of joint spacing, the effect of pulse shape for a given displacement, and the influence of using rigid versus deformable blocks in the analyses. The results of this modeling were also compared to field evidence of dynamic tunnel failures. This comparison reinforced the notion that 3-dimensional discrete element analysis can capture very well the kinematics of structures in jointed rock under dynamic loading.

  6. Dynamical Buildup of a Quantized Hall Response from Nontopological States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ying; Zoller, Peter; Budich, Jan Carl

    2016-09-01

    We consider a two-dimensional system initialized in a topologically trivial state before its Hamiltonian is ramped through a phase transition into a Chern insulator regime. This scenario is motivated by current experiments with ultracold atomic gases aimed at realizing time-dependent dynamics in topological insulators. Our main findings are twofold. First, considering coherent dynamics, the non-equilibrium Hall response is found to approach a topologically quantized time averaged value in the limit of slow but non-adiabatic parameter ramps, even though the Chern number of the state remains trivial. Second, adding dephasing, the destruction of quantum coherence is found to stabilize this Hall response, while the Chern number generically becomes undefined. We provide a geometric picture of this phenomenology in terms of the time-dependent Berry curvature.

  7. About efficiency of identification of materials using spectrum dynamics of medium response under the action of THz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2009-05-01

    A method, suggested by us earlier for identification of materials with close spectra in terahertz range of frequencies and based on the analysis of medium response spectral lines dynamics, is verified experimentally. The temporal dynamics of spectral lines allows to determine relaxation time of rotational transitions as well. A question about measurement time, that is sufficient for determining of material response characteristic time, is discussed. To demonstrate the efficiency of proposed method, we treat the response of soap and chocolate under the action of terahertz pulse with a few cycles. Our investigation shows that it is possible to identify these materials with high probability.

  8. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-01-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening. PMID:27004604

  9. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-01-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening. PMID:27004604

  10. Transcriptome dynamics of the microRNA inhibition response.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiayu; Leucci, Elenora; Vendramin, Roberto; Kauppinen, Sakari; Lund, Anders H; Krogh, Anders; Parker, Brian J

    2015-07-27

    We report a high-resolution time series study of transcriptome dynamics following antimiR-mediated inhibition of miR-9 in a Hodgkin lymphoma cell-line-the first such dynamic study of the microRNA inhibition response-revealing both general and specific aspects of the physiological response. We show miR-9 inhibition inducing a multiphasic transcriptome response, with a direct target perturbation before 4 h, earlier than previously reported, amplified by a downstream peak at ∼32 h consistent with an indirect response due to secondary coherent regulation. Predictive modelling indicates a major role for miR-9 in post-transcriptional control of RNA processing and RNA binding protein regulation. Cluster analysis identifies multiple co-regulated gene regulatory modules. Functionally, we observe a shift over time from mRNA processing at early time points to translation at later time points. We validate the key observations with independent time series qPCR and we experimentally validate key predicted miR-9 targets. Methodologically, we developed sensitive functional data analytic predictive methods to analyse the weak response inherent in microRNA inhibition experiments. The methods of this study will be applicable to similar high-resolution time series transcriptome analyses and provides the context for more accurate experimental design and interpretation of future microRNA inhibition studies. PMID:26089393

  11. A comparison of results from dynamic-response field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Susan M.; Thresher, Robert W.; Wright, Alan D.

    1988-11-01

    The dynamic response of Howden's 330-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) and the Northern Power Systems 100-kW North Wind 100 HAWT has been measured. The Howden machine incorporates a 26-m-diameter, upwind, three-bladed, wood/epoxy rotor that operates at 42 rpm and is a rigid-hub design. The North Wind 100 rotor has a diameter of 17.8 m, is upwind, two-bladed, and constructed of fiberglass, and has a teetered hub. The Northern Power turbine's blades are fully pitchable, while the Howden machine uses pitchable blade tips. This paper will present the results from each of these test programs in an effort to compare the dynamic response of each turbine. The analysis will focus on rotor bending loads in terms of both time domain and frequency response. The FLAP code will be used to explore sensitivity to teeter stiffness and natural frequency placement to provide a better understanding of the differences in behavior caused by configuration alone. The results are presented in the form of normalized azimuth-averaged plots of the deterministic loads, and spectral density plots of the stochastic responses. This presentation of the results will contrast major response differences due to design configurations.

  12. Thermo-dynamic characteristics of NITINOL-reinforced composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baz, A.; Ro, J.

    The fundamental principles governing the operation of NITINOL-reinforced composite beams are investigated by determining the individual contributions of the composite matrix, the NITINOL fibers, and the shape memory effect to the overall dynamic performance of the beams. The effect of the temperature distribution inside the composite, which results from the activation of a small subset of the NITINOL fibers, on the overall performance of the entire beam was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Particular attention was given to the effects of intentional electrical heating of a selected subset of NITINOL fibers, and the associated thermal energy propagating through the composite, on the unintentional thermal activation of additional subsets of the fibers.

  13. Simulation of dynamic material response with the PAGOSA code

    SciTech Connect

    Holian, K.S.; Adams, T.F.

    1993-08-01

    The 3D Eulerian PAGOSA hydrocode is being run on the massively parallel Connection Machine (CM) to simulate the response of materials to dynamic loading, such as by high explosives or high velocity impact. The code has a variety of equation of state forms, plastic yield models, and fracture and fragmentation models. The numerical algorithms in PAGOSA and the implementation of material models are discussed briefly.

  14. Dynamic structure of joint-action stimulus-response activity.

    PubMed

    Malone, MaryLauren; Castillo, Ramon D; Kloos, Heidi; Holden, John G; Richardson, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The mere presence of a co-actor can influence an individual's response behavior. For instance, a social Simon effect has been observed when two individuals perform a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimuli in the presence of each other, but not when they perform the same task alone. Such effects are argued to provide evidence that individuals co-represent the task goals and the to-be-performed actions of a co-actor. Motivated by the complex-systems approach, the present study was designed to investigate an alternative hypothesis--that such joint-action effects are due to a dynamical (time-evolving) interpersonal coupling that operates to perturb the behavior of socially situated actors. To investigate this possibility, participants performed a standard Go/No-Go Simon task in joint and individual conditions. The dynamic structure of recorded reaction times was examined using fractal statistics and instantaneous cross-correlation. Consistent with our hypothesis that participants responding in a shared space would become behaviorally coupled, the analyses revealed that reaction times in the joint condition displayed decreased fractal structure (indicative of interpersonal perturbation processes modulating ongoing participant behavior) compared to the individual condition, and were more correlated across a range of time-scales compared to the reaction times of pseudo-pair controls. Collectively, the findings imply that dynamic processes might underlie social stimulus-response compatibility effects and shape joint cognitive processes in general.

  15. Spectral Response of Multilayer Optical Structures to Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scripka, David; Lecroy, Garrett; Lee, Gyuhyon; Sun, Changyan; Kang, Zhitao; Summers, Christopher J.; Thadhani, Naresh N.

    2015-06-01

    Distributed Bragg Reflectors and optical microcavities are multilayer optical structures with spectral properties that are intrinsically sensitive to external perturbations. With nanometer to micrometer dimensions and near instantaneous optical response, these structures show significant potential as the basis for mesoscale time-resolved diagnostics that can be used to probe the dynamic behavior of mesoscale heterogeneous materials. In order to characterize the optical and mechanical behavior of the multilayer structures, a coupled computational-experimental study is underway. A mechanistic analysis of the spectral response of the structures to dynamic loading will be presented, along with computational simulations illustrating the observable spectral effects of 1D shock compression. Results from fabrication of specific multilayer designs and initial laser-driven shock loading experiments will be shown and compared to the simulation results. Preliminary results indicate that the magnitude of dynamic loading can be directly correlated to the altered spectral response. Potential applications of the theoretical diagnostics and challenges associated with spatially resolved data collection methodology will also be discussed. DTRA grant HDTRA-1-12-1-0052 is acknowledged. David Scripka is supported by the Department of Defense through the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship Program.

  16. Dynamic characteristics of an active coastal spreading area using ambient noise measurements—Anchor Bay, Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galea, Pauline; D'Amico, Sebastiano; Farrugia, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    Anchor Bay and surrounding regions are located on the northwest coast of the island of Malta, Central Mediterranean. The area is characterized by a coastal cliff environment having an outcropping layer of hard coralline limestone (UCL) resting on a thick (up to 50 m) layer of clays and marls (Blue Clay, BC). This configuration gives rise to coastal instability effects, in particular lateral spreading phenomena and rock falls. Previous and ongoing studies have identified both lateral spreading rates and vertical motions of several millimetres per year. The area is an interesting natural laboratory as coastal detachment processes in a number of different stages can be identified and are easily accessible. We investigate the site dynamic characteristics of this study area by recording ambient noise time-series at more than 30 points, over an area of 0.07 km2, using a portable three-component seismograph. The time-series are processed to give both horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio graphs (H/V) as well as frequency-dependent polarisation analysis. The H/V graphs illustrate and quantify aspects of site resonance effects due both to underlying geology as well as to mechanical resonance of partly or wholly detached blocks. The polarization diagrams indicate the degree of linearity and predominant directions of vibrational effects. H/V curves closer to the cliff edge show complex responses at higher frequencies, characteristic of the dynamic behaviour of individual detached blocks. Particle motion associated with the higher frequencies shows strongly directional polarization and a high degree of linearity at well-defined frequencies, indicative of normal-mode vibration. The stable plateau areas, on the other hand, show simple, single-peak H/V curves representative of the underlying stratification and no predominant polarization direction. These results, which will be compared with those from other experiments in the area, have important implications for the

  17. Dynamic characteristics of a magnetorheological pin joint for civil structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun

    2014-03-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) pin joint is a novel device in which its joint moment resistance can be controlled in real-time by altering the applied magnetic field. The smart pin joint is intended to be used as a controllable connector between the columns and beams of a civil structure to instantaneously shift the structural natural frequencies in order to avoid resonance and therefore to reduce unwanted vibrations and hence prevent structural damage. As an intrinsically nonlinear device, modelling of this MR fluid based device is a challenging task and makes the design of a suitable control algorithm a cumbersome situation. Aimed at its application in civil structure, the main purpose of this paper is to test and characterise the hysteretic behaviour of MR pin joint. A test scheme is designed to obtain the dynamic performance of MR pin joint in the dominant earthquake frequency range. Some unique phenomena different from those of MR damper are observed through the experimental testing. A computationally-efficient model is proposed by introducing a hyperbolic element to accurately reproduce its dynamic behaviour and to further facilitate the design of a suitable control algorithm. Comprehensive investigations on the model accuracy and dependences of the proposed model on loading condition (frequency and amplitude) and input current level are reported in the last section of this paper.

  18. Chemistry in interstellar space. [environment characteristics influencing reaction dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, B.

    1973-01-01

    The particular characteristics of chemistry in interstellar space are determined by the unique environmental conditions involved. Interstellar matter is present at extremely low densities. Large deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium are, therefore, to be expected. A relatively intense ultraviolet radiation is present in many regions. The temperatures are in the range from 5 to 200 K. Data concerning the inhibiting effect of small activation energies in interstellar clouds are presented in a table. A summary of measured activation energies or barrier heights for exothermic exchange reactions is also provided. Problems of molecule formation are discussed, taking into account gas phase reactions and surface catalyzed processes.

  19. Tone-mapping and dynamic range compression using dynamic cone response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Byoung-Ju; Hong, Hee-Dong; Park, Jinhyoung; Kim, Hyun-Deok; Choi, Ho-Hyoung

    2013-11-01

    Over the last several decades, the tone-mapping and color correction methods have been incorporated into the display device such as LCD/LED display device or the photographic print. However, conventional methods are based on Gray-World Assumption using spatial smoothing filter to estimate the local illumination component. For this reason, most of these methods have several problems like visual perception problem, scale the contrast, gray-out, color distortion (dominate color, halo-artifact) and so on. Accordingly, this paper presents a color correction method using the dynamic cone response function based on human visual perception. The proposed method consists of tone-mapping and dynamic cone response. The tone-mapped image is obtained by using chromatic and achromatic colors. Thereafter, the resultant image is processed through the dynamic cone response function, and it is to estimate the dynamic response of human eye as well as to deal with mismatch between a real scene and the rendered image. The experimental results show that the proposed method yields better performance of color correction over the conventional methods.

  20. Uncertainty quantification of a containment vessel dynamic response subjected to high-explosive detonation impulse loading

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, E. A.; Pepin, J. E.; Thacker, B. H.; Riha, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in cooperation with Southwest Research Institute, has been developing capabilities to provide reliability-based structural evaluation techniques for performing weapon component and system reliability assessments. The development and applications of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) is an important ingredient in the overall weapon reliability assessments. Focus, herein, is placed on the uncertainty quantification associated with the structural response of a containment vessel for high-explosive (HE) experiments. The probabilistic dynamic response of the vessel is evaluated through the coupling of the probabilistic code NESSUS with the non-linear structural dynamics code, DYNA-3D. The probabilistic model includes variations in geometry and mechanical properties, such as Young's Modulus, yield strength, and material flow characteristics. Finally, the probability of exceeding a specified strain limit, which is related to vessel failure, is determined.

  1. Dynamic characteristics of vibration isolation platforms considering the joints of the struts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Guo, Zixi; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the dynamic characteristics of the impacts and corresponding frictions generated by the clearances of joints of vibration isolation platforms for control moment gyroscopes (CMGs) on spacecraft. A contact force model is applied using a nonlinear contact force model, and the frictions in the joints are considered in the dynamic analysis. First, the dynamic characteristics of a single isolation strut with spherical joints were studied, and joints with different initial clearance sizes were separately analyzed. Then, dynamic models of the vibration isolation platform for a CMG cluster with both perfect joints and joints with clearances were established. During the numeral simulation, joints with different elastic moduli were used to study the nonlinear characteristics. Finally, the distributions of the collision points, which can serve as a reference for the reliability and lifetime of a platform, were given.

  2. Effect of drive mechanisms on dynamic characteristics of spacecraft tracking-drive flexible systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shi-yao; Lei, Yong-jun; Wu, Xin-feng; Zhang, Da-peng

    2015-05-01

    Spacecraft tracking-drive flexible systems (STFS) consist of drive mechanisms and flexible structures, including solar array and a variety of large-scale antennas. The electromechanical interaction inside drive mechanisms makes it quite complicated to directly analyze the dynamic characteristics of an STFS. In this paper, an indirect dynamic characteristic analysis method for operating-state STFS is presented. The proposed method utilizes the structure dynamics approximation of drive mechanisms that converts the electromechanical model of an STFS into a structure dynamic model with elastic boundary conditions. The structure dynamics approximation and the dynamic characteristic analysis method are validated by experimental and analytical results, respectively. The analysis results indicate that the gear transmission ratio and viscous friction coefficient are the primary factors in approximating boundary stiffness and damping. Dynamic characteristics of an STFS with a large gear transmission ratio are close to that of a flexible structure with a cantilever boundary. Otherwise, torsion-mode natural frequencies of the STFS become smaller and corresponding modal damping ratios become larger, as a result of the local stiffness and damping features of drive mechanisms.

  3. Seismic characterization and dynamic site response of a municipal solid waste landfill in Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Anbazhagan, P; SivakumarBabu, G L; Lakshmikanthan, P; VivekAnand, K S

    2016-03-01

    Seismic design of landfills requires an understanding of the dynamic properties of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the dynamic site response of landfill waste during seismic events. The dynamic response of the Mavallipura landfill situated in Bangalore, India, is investigated using field measurements, laboratory studies and recorded ground motions from the intraplate region. The dynamic shear modulus values for the MSW were established on the basis of field measurements of shear wave velocities. Cyclic triaxial testing was performed on reconstituted MSW samples and the shear modulus reduction and damping characteristics of MSW were studied. Ten ground motions were selected based on regional seismicity and site response parameters have been obtained considering one-dimensional non-linear analysis in the DEEPSOIL program. The surface spectral response varied from 0.6 to 2 g and persisted only for a period of 1 s for most of the ground motions. The maximum peak ground acceleration (PGA) obtained was 0.5 g and the minimum and maximum amplifications are 1.35 and 4.05. Amplification of the base acceleration was observed at the top surface of the landfill underlined by a composite soil layer and bedrock for all ground motions. Dynamic seismic properties with amplification and site response parameters for MSW landfill in Bangalore, India, are presented in this paper. This study shows that MSW has less shear stiffness and more amplification due to loose filling and damping, which need to be accounted for seismic design of MSW landfills in India. PMID:26759434

  4. Seismic characterization and dynamic site response of a municipal solid waste landfill in Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Anbazhagan, P; SivakumarBabu, G L; Lakshmikanthan, P; VivekAnand, K S

    2016-03-01

    Seismic design of landfills requires an understanding of the dynamic properties of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the dynamic site response of landfill waste during seismic events. The dynamic response of the Mavallipura landfill situated in Bangalore, India, is investigated using field measurements, laboratory studies and recorded ground motions from the intraplate region. The dynamic shear modulus values for the MSW were established on the basis of field measurements of shear wave velocities. Cyclic triaxial testing was performed on reconstituted MSW samples and the shear modulus reduction and damping characteristics of MSW were studied. Ten ground motions were selected based on regional seismicity and site response parameters have been obtained considering one-dimensional non-linear analysis in the DEEPSOIL program. The surface spectral response varied from 0.6 to 2 g and persisted only for a period of 1 s for most of the ground motions. The maximum peak ground acceleration (PGA) obtained was 0.5 g and the minimum and maximum amplifications are 1.35 and 4.05. Amplification of the base acceleration was observed at the top surface of the landfill underlined by a composite soil layer and bedrock for all ground motions. Dynamic seismic properties with amplification and site response parameters for MSW landfill in Bangalore, India, are presented in this paper. This study shows that MSW has less shear stiffness and more amplification due to loose filling and damping, which need to be accounted for seismic design of MSW landfills in India.

  5. FE analysis of dynamic characteristics for mill's liners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xianzhang; Cui, Yanmei; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Hou, Tao

    2009-07-01

    Slab side pressing is an online regulation width technology for continuous casting slab, the liner at the bottom of the framework under the larger impact force, it often can occurrence accident of liner Board broken during working of sizing press rolling mill. In order to analyze force distribution and its peak in the liner of rolling mill during side pressing, liner dynamics model is established using nonlinear function of finite element software, and the contact mode is established for liner and wheel by Hertz law theory. It yields the relations between maximal stress and tap hole in the liner, the design scheme is extracted for improving condition of linerboard's stress, and the calculated results were much inosculated with the measured values. The studied results indicated that the liner's life gets improve obviously in field.

  6. Dynamic characteristics of gas-water interfacial plasma under water

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, Y. C.; Ke, B.; Ding, F.; Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Zhu, X. D.

    2012-06-15

    Gas-water interfacial plasmas under water were generated in a compact space in a tube with a sandglass-like structure, where two metal wires were employed as electrodes with an applied 35 kHz ac power source. The dynamic behaviors of voltage/current were investigated for the powered electrode with/without water cover to understand the effect of the gas-water interface. It is found that the discharge exhibits periodic pulsed currents after breakdown as the powered electrode is covered with water, whereas the electrical current reveals a damped oscillation with time with a frequency about 10{sup 6} Hz as the powered electrode is in a vapor bubble. By increasing water conductivity, a discharge current waveform transition from pulse to oscillation presents in the water covering case. These suggest that the gas-water interface has a significant influence on the discharge property.

  7. Dynamic characteristics of peripheral jet ACV. I - Heaving motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.; Maeda, H.

    The theory of the dynamics of peripheral jet ACV is presented. The flow patterns under the bottom of the ACV are classified into two types, i.e. underfed and overfed regimes. The mathematical models associated with such regimes are presented and the equations of those models are derived. The forced heaving oscillation of a two-dimensional ACV model is investigated experimentally and variations of cushion pressure and lift force are measured and compared with the results obtained by the numerical calculation. The coincidence of these two results seems to be reasonable. The heaving motion of ACV which is induced by the simple harmonic oscillation of the ground board is also analyzed numerically.

  8. COMMUNICATION: Electrophysiological response dynamics during focal cortical infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiganos, Terry C., Jr.; Jensen, Winnie; Rousche, Patrick J.

    2006-12-01

    While the intracellular processes of hypoxia-induced necrosis and the intercellular mechanisms of post-ischemic neurotoxicity associated with stroke are well documented, the dynamic electrophysiological (EP) response of neurons within the core or periinfarct zone remains unclear. The present study validates a method for continuous measurement of the local EP responses during focal cortical infarction induced via photothrombosis. Single microwire electrodes were acutely implanted into the primary auditory cortex of eight rats. Multi-unit neural activity, evoked via a continuous 2 Hz click stimulus, was recorded before, during and after infarction to assess neuronal function in response to local, permanent ischemia. During sham infarction, the average stimulus-evoked peak firing rate over 20 min remained stable at 495.5 ± 14.5 spikes s-1, indicating temporal stability of neural function under normal conditions. Stimulus-evoked peak firing was reliably reduced to background levels (firing frequency in the absence of stimulus) following initiation of photothrombosis over a period of 439 ± 92 s. The post-infarction firing patterns exhibited unique temporal degradation of the peak firing rate, suggesting a variable response to ischemic challenge. Despite the inherent complexity of cerebral ischemia secondary to microvascular occlusion, complete loss of EP function consistently occurred 300-600 s after photothrombosis. The results suggest that microwire recording during photothrombosis provides a simple and highly efficacious strategy for assessing the electrophysiological dynamics of cortical infarction.

  9. Health Insurance Coverage at Midlife: Characteristics, Costs, and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard W.; Crystal, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Recent data from the first two waves of the Health and Retirement Study are analyzed to evaluate prevalence of different types of health insurance, characteristics of different plan types, and changes in coverage as individuals approach retirement age. Although overall rates of coverage are quite high among the middle-aged, the risk of non-coverage is high within many disadvantaged groups, including Hispanics, low-wage earners, and the recently disabled. Sixty percent of individuals with health benefits are enrolled in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) or preferred provider organizations (PPOs). In addition, one-fourth of enrollees in fee-for-service (FFS) plans report restrictions in their access to specialists. PMID:10170345

  10. Hydrologic characteristics and suspended sediment dynamics in the Gradašica river basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogoj, Mojca; Rusjan, Simon; Vidmar, Andrej; Mikoš, Matjaž

    2013-04-01

    Sediment transport in catchments is an important aspect of environmental research because of its role in the transport of sediment-associated nutrients, pesticides and other contaminants. High turbidity levels in water bodies affect stream morphology, aquatic organisms and their habitats, cause siltation of water reservoirs and have other side effects. For maintaining adequate water quality, reducing excessive soil erosion and proper estimation of the amount of transported material it is necessary to define and understand main factors that control sediment production and transport in rivers. Understanding the hydrological response of catchments on hydrometeorological phenomena and their influences on changes in suspended sediment concentrations require measurements of the processes at time scales that correspond to hydrological dynamics of a catchment. Our research aims to investigate hydrological and seasonal controls over suspended sediment production and obtain an insight into a suspended sediment concentration dynamics and total loads in a forested catchment. For this purpose, we study several factors actively controlling suspended sediment mobilization and transport in a small experimental catchment in Polhov Gradec mountainous area in the central part of Slovenia, drained by the Gradaščica river. Steep slopes, relatively high altitudes and abundance of precipitation (average yearly sums between 1600 to 1700 mm) result in a quick rise in the water level and consequently, in torrential response of the Gradaščica river. The studied headwaters lay on dolomite and limestone with a mainly natural land cover. The area is a subject to erosion with debris sources in the dolomite and additional catchment characteristics that contribute to high sediment transport rates. The main categories of factors that actively control sediment mobilization and transport from catchments, studied in our research, are hydrological and meteorological controls, physiographic factors

  11. SMA Hybrid Composites for Dynamic Response Abatement Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2000-01-01

    A recently developed constitutive model and a finite element formulation for predicting the thermomechanical response of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures is briefly described. Attention is focused on constrained recovery behavior in this study, but the constitutive formulation is also capable of modeling restrained or free recovery. Numerical results are shown for glass/epoxy panel specimens with embedded Nitinol actuators subjected to thermal and acoustic loads. Control of thermal buckling, random response, sonic fatigue, and transmission loss are demonstrated and compared to conventional approaches including addition of conventional composite layers and a constrained layer damping treatment. Embedded SMA actuators are shown to be significantly more effective in dynamic response abatement applications than the conventional approaches and are attractive for combination with other passive and/or active approaches.

  12. Neural dynamics in response to binary taste mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Donald B.

    2013-01-01

    Taste stimuli encountered in the natural environment are usually combinations of multiple tastants. Although a great deal is known about how neurons in the taste system respond to single taste stimuli in isolation, less is known about how the brain deals with such mixture stimuli. Here, we probe the responses of single neurons in primary gustatory cortex (GC) of awake rats to an array of taste stimuli including 100% citric acid (100 mM), 100% sodium chloride (100 mM), 100% sucrose (100 mM), and a range of binary mixtures (90/10, 70/30, 50/50, 30/70, and 10/90%). We tested for the presence of three different hypothetical response patterns: 1) responses varying monotonically as a function of concentration of sucrose (or acid) in the mixture (the “monotonic” pattern); 2) responses increasing or decreasing as a function of degree of mixture of the stimulus (the “mixture” pattern); and 3) responses that change abruptly from being similar to one pure taste to being similar the other (the “categorical” pattern). Our results demonstrate the presence of both monotonic and mixture patterns within responses of GC neurons. Specifically, further analysis (that included the presentation of 50 mM sucrose and citric acid) made it clear that mixture suppression reliably precedes a palatability-related pattern. The temporal dynamics of the emergence of the palatability-related pattern parallel the temporal dynamics of the emergence of preference behavior for the same mixtures as measured by a brief access test. We saw no evidence of categorical coding. PMID:23365178

  13. Experimental investigation of fuel cell dynamic response and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Keith A.; Keith, Warren T.; Marcel, Michael J.; Haskew, Timothy A.; Shepard, W. Steve; Todd, Beth A.

    An experimental study of the dynamic response of a commercial fuel cell system is presented in this work. The primary goal of the research is an examination of the feasibility for using fuel cells in a load-following mode for vehicular applications, where load-following implies that the fuel cell system provides the power necessary for transient responses without the use of additional energy storage elements, such as batteries or super-capacitors. The dynamic response of fuel cell systems used in the load-following mode may have implications for safe and efficient operation of vehicles. To that end, a DC-DC converter was used to port the power output of the fuel cell to a resistive load using a pulse-width-modulating circuit. Frequency responses of the system were evaluated at a variety of DC offsets and AC amplitudes of the PWM duty cycle from 1 out to 400 Hz. Open-loop transient responses are then evaluated using transitions from 10% to 90% duty cycle levels, followed by dwells at the 90% level and then transitions back to the 10% level. A classical proportional-integral controller was then developed and used to close the loop around the system, with the result that the fuel cell system was driven to track the same transient. The controller was then used to drive the fuel cell system according to a reference power signal, which was a scaled-down copy of the simulated power output from an internal combustion engine powering a conventional automobile through the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS). The results showed that the fuel cell system is capable of tracking transient signals with sufficient fidelity such that it should be applicable for use in a load-following mode for vehicular applications. The results also highlight important issues that must be addressed in considering vehicular applications of fuel cells, such as the power conditioning circuit efficiency and the effect of stack heating on the system response.

  14. The dynamics of parabolic flight: Flight characteristics and passenger percepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmali, Faisal; Shelhamer, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Flying a parabolic trajectory in an aircraft is one of the few ways to create freefall on Earth, which is important for astronaut training and scientific research. Here we review the physics underlying parabolic flight, explain the resulting flight dynamics, and describe several counterintuitive findings, which we corroborate using experimental data. Typically, the aircraft flies parabolic arcs that produce approximately 25 s of freefall (0 g) followed by 40 s of enhanced force (1.8 g), repeated 30-60 times. Although passengers perceive gravity to be zero, in actuality acceleration, and not gravity, has changed, and thus we caution against the terms "microgravity" and "zero gravity." Despite the aircraft trajectory including large (45°) pitch-up and pitch-down attitudes, the occupants experience a net force perpendicular to the floor of the aircraft. This is because the aircraft generates appropriate lift and thrust to produce the desired vertical and longitudinal accelerations, respectively, although we measured moderate (0.2 g) aft-ward accelerations during certain parts of these trajectories. Aircraft pitch rotation (average 3°/s) is barely detectable by the vestibular system, but could influence some physics experiments. Investigators should consider such details in the planning, analysis, and interpretation of parabolic-flight experiments.

  15. The dynamics of parabolic flight: flight characteristics and passenger percepts.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Faisal; Shelhamer, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Flying a parabolic trajectory in an aircraft is one of the few ways to create freefall on Earth, which is important for astronaut training and scientific research. Here we review the physics underlying parabolic flight, explain the resulting flight dynamics, and describe several counterintuitive findings, which we corroborate using experimental data. Typically, the aircraft flies parabolic arcs that produce approximately 25 seconds of freefall (0 g) followed by 40 seconds of enhanced force (1.8 g), repeated 30-60 times. Although passengers perceive gravity to be zero, in actuality acceleration, and not gravity, has changed, and thus we caution against the terms "microgravity" and "zero gravity. " Despite the aircraft trajectory including large (45°) pitch-up and pitch-down attitudes, the occupants experience a net force perpendicular to the floor of the aircraft. This is because the aircraft generates appropriate lift and thrust to produce the desired vertical and longitudinal accelerations, respectively, although we measured moderate (0.2 g) aft-ward accelerations during certain parts of these trajectories. Aircraft pitch rotation (average 3°/s) is barely detectable by the vestibular system, but could influence some physics experiments. Investigators should consider such details in the planning, analysis, and interpretation of parabolic-flight experiments.

  16. Fluid dynamic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Yamane, T; Nishida, M; Asztalos, B; Tsutsui, T; Jikuya, T

    1997-01-01

    A monopivot magnetic suspension blood pump is a centrifugal pump under development with a magnetic suspension and a ceramic pivot to support the impeller with minimum contact. The pump size has been reduced by implementing a direct impeller drive mechanism in place of a magnetic coupling and motor. Flow visualization studies revealed that high shear, which seems to be closely related to hemolysis, concentrates in boundary layers near the walls. This implies that fluid dynamic shear can be reduced not by widening the gap, but by reducing the impeller velocity. Therefore, compared with the results of the previous semi-open curved vane impeller model, impeller velocity was reduced by 30% with a closed impeller having radial straight vanes, and smaller impeller/housing gaps. The volute shape around the impeller tip was also changed such that the outflow from the impeller enters along the center plane of the volute. To examine the effect of the improvements, hemolysis testing was conducted and found that the newly developed closed impeller model generated a lower level of hemolysis than the previous semi-open impeller model. PMID:9360122

  17. The dynamics of parabolic flight: flight characteristics and passenger percepts

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Faisal; Shelhamer, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Flying a parabolic trajectory in an aircraft is one of the few ways to create freefall on Earth, which is important for astronaut training and scientific research. Here we review the physics underlying parabolic flight, explain the resulting flight dynamics, and describe several counterintuitive findings, which we corroborate using experimental data. Typically, the aircraft flies parabolic arcs that produce approximately 25 seconds of freefall (0 g) followed by 40 seconds of enhanced force (1.8 g), repeated 30–60 times. Although passengers perceive gravity to be zero, in actuality acceleration, and not gravity, has changed, and thus we caution against the terms "microgravity" and "zero gravity. " Despite the aircraft trajectory including large (45°) pitch-up and pitch-down attitudes, the occupants experience a net force perpendicular to the floor of the aircraft. This is because the aircraft generates appropriate lift and thrust to produce the desired vertical and longitudinal accelerations, respectively, although we measured moderate (0.2 g) aft-ward accelerations during certain parts of these trajectories. Aircraft pitch rotation (average 3°/s) is barely detectable by the vestibular system, but could influence some physics experiments. Investigators should consider such details in the planning, analysis, and interpretation of parabolic-flight experiments. PMID:19727328

  18. Electrokinetically induced alterations in dynamic response of viscoelastic fluids in narrow confinements.

    PubMed

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-05-01

    We investigate a dynamical interplay between interfacial electrokinetics and a combined dissipative and elastic behavior of flow through narrow confinements, in analogy with spatiotemporal hydrodynamics of porous media. In particular, we investigate the effects of streaming potential on the pertinent dynamic responses, by choosing a Maxwell fluid model for representing the consequent electro-hydrodynamic characteristics. We transform the pertinent governing equation to the frequency domain, so that a dynamic generalization of Darcy's law in the presence of streaming potential effects can be effectively realized. We show that the frequencies corresponding to local maxima in the dynamic permeability also correspond to local maxima in the induced streaming potential. We also bring out the effects of Stern layer conductivity on the dynamic permeability. Our analytical estimates do reveal that serious overestimations in the commonly portrayed notion of massive amplifications of dynamic permeability at resonating frequencies may be possible, if interactions between spontaneous electrochemical interfacial phenomena and pulsating pressure-gradient-driven viscoelastic transport are trivially ignored. PMID:23004858

  19. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  20. HAWT dynamic stall response asymmetries under yawed flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, S.; Robinson, M.; Hand, M.; Simms, D.

    2000-10-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbines can experience significant time-varying aerodynamic loads, potentially causing adverse effects on structures, mechanical components and power production. As designers attempt lighter and more flexible wind energy machines, greater accuracy and robustness will become even more critical in future aerodynamics models. Aerodynamics modelling advances, in turn, will rely on more thorough comprehension of the three-dimensional, unsteady, vortical flows that dominate wind turbine blade aerodynamics under high-load conditions. To experimentally characterize these flows, turbine blade surface pressures were acquired at multiple span locations via the NREL Phase IV Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment. Surface pressures and associated normal force histories were used to characterize dynamic stall vortex kinematics and normal force amplification. Dynamic stall vortices and normal force amplification were confirmed to occur in response to angle-of-attack excursions above the static stall threshold. Stall vortices occupied approximately one-half of the blade span and persisted for nearly one-fourth of the blade rotation cycle. Stall vortex convection varied along the blade, resulting in dramatic deformation of the vortex. Presence and deformation of the dynamic stall vortex produced corresponding amplification of normal forces. Analyses revealed consistent alterations to vortex kinematics in response to changes in reduced frequency, span location and yaw error. Finally, vortex structures and kinematics not previously documented for wind turbine blades were isolated. Published in 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Dynamic characteristics of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus consumption by bacterivorous nanoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Christaki, U; Courties, C; Karayanni, H; Giannakourou, A; Maravelias, C; Kormas, K Ar; Lebaron, P

    2002-04-01

    We compared the characteristics of ingestion of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus by the marine heterotrophic nanoflagellate Pseudobodo sp. and by a mixed nanoflagellate culture (around 3 microm in size) obtained from an open sea oligotrophic area. Maximum ingestion rate on Synechococcus (2.7 Syn flagellate(-1) h(-1)) was reached at concentrations of 5 x 10(5) Syn mL(-1) and decreased between 6 x 10(5) and 1.5 x 10(6) Syn mL(-1). In order to validate laboratory data, one set of data on Synechococcus grazing was obtained during a field study in the oligotrophic northeastern Mediterranean Sea. Ingestion rates by heterotrophic nanoflagellates were related to Synechococcus abundance in the water, and the feeding rate showed a clear diel rhythm with consumption being highest during the night, declining during the day hours, and being lowest at dusk. Ingestion rates on Prochlorococcus increased linearly for the whole range of prey density used (i.e., from 1 x 10(3) to 3 x 10(6) Proc mL(-1)), with maximum ingestion of 6.7 Proc flagellate(-1) h(-1). However, for prey concentrations in the range of 10(3)-10(5), which are usually encountered in aquatic systems, ingestion rates were significantly less than on Synechococcus. In our experiments, both Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus proved to be poor food items for support of nanoflagellate growth.

  2. Dynamic loading characteristics of an intradural spinal cord stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliynyk, M. S.; Gillies, G. T.; Oya, H.; Wilson, S.; Reddy, C. G.; Howard, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the forces that act on the electrode-bearing surface of an intradural neuromodulator designed to be in direct contact with the pial surface of the spinal cord, as part of our effort to develop a new method for treating intractable pain. The goal was to investigate the pressures produced by this device on the spinal cord and compare them with normal intrathecal pressure. For this purpose, we employed a dual-sensor arrangement that allowed us to measure the response of a custom-designed silicone spinal cord surrogate to the forces applied by the device. We found that the device had a mean compliance of ≈63 μN μm-1, and that over a 3 mm range of compression, the mid-span pressure it exerted on the spinal cord was ≈1.88 × 103 Pa = 14.1 mm Hg, which lies within the range of normal intrathecal pressure in humans.

  3. Characteristics of near response cells projecting to the oculomotor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Mays, L E; Gamlin, P D

    1992-04-01

    1. Previous work has shown neurons just dorsal and lateral to the oculomotor nucleus that increase their firing rate with increases in the angle of ocular convergence. It has been suggested that the output of these midbrain near response cells might provide the vergence command needed by the medial rectus motoneurons. However, lens accommodation ordinarily accompanies convergence, and a subsequent study showed that only about one-half of these midbrain near response cells carried a signal related exclusively to vergence. One hypothesis suggested by this finding is that this subgroup of neurons might have a unique role in providing a "pure" vergence signal to the medial rectus motoneurons. 2. In the present study extracellular recordings were made from midbrain near response cells in monkeys while eye position and lens accommodation were measured. The monkeys viewed targets through an optical system that allowed the accommodative and ocular vergence demands to be manipulated independently. This approach was used to produce a partial dissociation of accommodative and vergence responses, so that an accommodative and vergence coefficient could be determined for each cell, by the use of the following equation FR = R0 + kda x AR + kdv x CR where FR is the firing rate of the near response cell, R0 is the predicted firing rate for a distant target, kda is the (dissociated) accommodation coefficient, AR is the accommodative response, kdv is the (dissociated) vergence coefficient, and CR is the convergence response. 3. The vergence and accommodation coefficients were determined for a large number of midbrain near response cells, including a subset that could be antidromically activated from the medial rectus subdivisions of the oculomotor nucleus. Some near response neurons were found with signals related exclusively to convergence (i.e., kdv greater than 0 and kda = 0), whereas several others had signals related exclusively to lens accommodation (i.e., kda greater than 0

  4. [Response characteristics of neurons to tone in dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of the mouse].

    PubMed

    Si, Wen-Juan; Cheng, Yan-Ling; Yang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Xin

    2016-02-25

    The dorsal nucleus of lateral lemniscus (DNLL) is a nucleus in the auditory ascending pathway, and casts inhibitory efferent projections to the inferior colliculus. Studies on the DNLL are less than studies on the auditory brain stem and inferior colliculus. To date, there is no information about response characteristics of neurons in DNLL of albino mouse. Under free field conditions, we used extracellular single unit recording to study the acoustic signal characteristics of DNLL neurons in Kunming mice (Mus musculus). Transient (36%) and ongoing (64%) firing patterns were found in 96 DNLL neurons. Neurons with different firing patterns have significant differences in characteristic frequency and minimal threshold. We recorded frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of 87 DNLL neurons. All of the FTCs exhibit an open "V" shape. There is no significant difference in FTCs between transient and ongoing neurons, but among the ongoing neurons, the FTCs of sustained neurons are sharper than those of onset plus sustained neurons and pauser neurons. Our results showed that the characteristic frequency of DNLL neurons of mice was not correlated with depth, supporting the view that the DNLL of mouse has no frequency topological organization through dorsal-ventral plane, which is different from cats and some other animals. Furthermore, by using rate-intensity function (RIF) analysis the mouse DNLL neurons can be classified as monotonic (60%), saturated (31%) and non-monotonic (8%) types. Each RIF type includes transient and ongoing firing patterns. Dynamic range of the transient firing pattern is smaller than that of ongoing firing ones (P < 0.01), suggesting that the inhibitory inputs may underlie the formation of transient firing pattern. Multiple firing patterns and intensity coding of DNLL neurons may derive from the projections from multiple auditory nuclei, and play different roles in auditory information processing. PMID:26915316

  5. [Response characteristics of neurons to tone in dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus of the mouse].

    PubMed

    Si, Wen-Juan; Cheng, Yan-Ling; Yang, Dan-Dan; Wang, Xin

    2016-02-25

    The dorsal nucleus of lateral lemniscus (DNLL) is a nucleus in the auditory ascending pathway, and casts inhibitory efferent projections to the inferior colliculus. Studies on the DNLL are less than studies on the auditory brain stem and inferior colliculus. To date, there is no information about response characteristics of neurons in DNLL of albino mouse. Under free field conditions, we used extracellular single unit recording to study the acoustic signal characteristics of DNLL neurons in Kunming mice (Mus musculus). Transient (36%) and ongoing (64%) firing patterns were found in 96 DNLL neurons. Neurons with different firing patterns have significant differences in characteristic frequency and minimal threshold. We recorded frequency tuning curves (FTCs) of 87 DNLL neurons. All of the FTCs exhibit an open "V" shape. There is no significant difference in FTCs between transient and ongoing neurons, but among the ongoing neurons, the FTCs of sustained neurons are sharper than those of onset plus sustained neurons and pauser neurons. Our results showed that the characteristic frequency of DNLL neurons of mice was not correlated with depth, supporting the view that the DNLL of mouse has no frequency topological organization through dorsal-ventral plane, which is different from cats and some other animals. Furthermore, by using rate-intensity function (RIF) analysis the mouse DNLL neurons can be classified as monotonic (60%), saturated (31%) and non-monotonic (8%) types. Each RIF type includes transient and ongoing firing patterns. Dynamic range of the transient firing pattern is smaller than that of ongoing firing ones (P < 0.01), suggesting that the inhibitory inputs may underlie the formation of transient firing pattern. Multiple firing patterns and intensity coding of DNLL neurons may derive from the projections from multiple auditory nuclei, and play different roles in auditory information processing.

  6. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2010-08-02

    This study examines the use of OpenADR communications specification, related data models, technologies, and strategies to send dynamic prices (e.g., real time prices and peak prices) and Time of Use (TOU) rates to commercial and industrial electricity customers. OpenADR v1.0 is a Web services-based flexible, open information model that has been used in California utilities' commercial automated demand response programs since 2007. We find that data models can be used to send real time prices. These same data models can also be used to support peak pricing and TOU rates. We present a data model that can accommodate all three types of rates. For demonstration purposes, the data models were generated from California Independent System Operator's real-time wholesale market prices, and a California utility's dynamic prices and TOU rates. Customers can respond to dynamic prices by either using the actual prices, or prices can be mapped into"operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different methods for mapping actual prices. Some of these methods were implemented in demonstration projects. The study results demonstrate show that OpenADR allows interoperability with existing/future systems/technologies and can be used within related dynamic pricing activities within Smart Grid.

  7. Cosine response characteristics of radiometric and photometric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C.; Berkheiser, W.E. III

    1992-05-01

    Global and diffuse irradiance and illuminance are measured with instruments that are assumed to have true cosine responses. It is known, largely from reports with a limited distribution or by word of mouth, that no instrument is perfect in this regard. This paper reports on measurements of cosine responses for several instrument types and manufacture familiar to the solar radiation measurement community. The measurements were made with an automated cosine response test bench using the same protocol for each instrument. The cosine bench measures with variable angular resolution as fine as 0.25 degrees. The automated rotation is in one plane. A manual rotation allows measurements for other azimuths. 6 refs.

  8. Cosine response characteristics of radiometric and photometric sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C.; Berkheiser, W.E. III.

    1992-01-01

    Global and diffuse irradiance and illuminance are measured with instruments that are assumed to have true cosine responses. It is known, largely from reports with a limited distribution or by word of mouth, that no instrument is perfect in this regard. This paper reports on measurements of cosine responses for several instrument types and manufacture familiar to the solar radiation measurement community. The measurements were made with an automated cosine response test bench using the same protocol for each instrument. The cosine bench measures with variable angular resolution as fine as 0.25 degrees. The automated rotation is in one plane. A manual rotation allows measurements for other azimuths. 6 refs.

  9. Method for determining the frequency-response characteristics of an element or system from the system transient output response to a known input function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curfman, Howard J; Gardiner, Robert A

    1950-01-01

    A method is presented for the determination of the frequency-response characteristics of an element or system by utilizing the transient output response to a known but arbitrary input to the system. Since the application of special inputs, such as step functions or sinusoids, is often imperfect or impractical, a method for utilizing arbitrary inputs is desirable. Simple flight-test data may be reduced by this method to give the frequency response of an aircraft. Examples are given as determinations of aircraft frequency responses; however, the method can be applied to any type of dynamic system, such as automatic-control components, vibration-absorption equipment, and many types of instruments. The method requires that the arbitrary input function tend to a finite value after a finite time and that the system or element output be measured as a representative quantity having a static sensitivity. (author)

  10. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  11. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period. PMID:27368770

  12. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  13. Responsive Guest Encapsulation of Dynamic Conjugated Microporous Polymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lai; Li, Youyong

    2016-06-30

    The host-guest complexes of conjugated microporous polymers encapsulating C60 and dye molecules have been investigated systematically. The orientation of guest molecules inside the cavities, have different terms: inside the open cavities of the polymer, or inside the cavities formed by packing different polymers. The host backbone shows responsive dynamic behavior in order to accommodate the size and shape of incoming guest molecule or guest aggregates. Simulations show that the host-guest binding of conjugated polymers is stronger than that of non-conjugated polymers. This detailed study could provide a clear picture for the host-guest interaction for dynamic conjugated microporous polymers. The mechanism obtained could guide designing new conjugated microporous polymers.

  14. Responsive Guest Encapsulation of Dynamic Conjugated Microporous Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lai; Li, Youyong

    2016-01-01

    The host-guest complexes of conjugated microporous polymers encapsulating C60 and dye molecules have been investigated systematically. The orientation of guest molecules inside the cavities, have different terms: inside the open cavities of the polymer, or inside the cavities formed by packing different polymers. The host backbone shows responsive dynamic behavior in order to accommodate the size and shape of incoming guest molecule or guest aggregates. Simulations show that the host-guest binding of conjugated polymers is stronger than that of non-conjugated polymers. This detailed study could provide a clear picture for the host-guest interaction for dynamic conjugated microporous polymers. The mechanism obtained could guide designing new conjugated microporous polymers. PMID:27356483

  15. Responsive Guest Encapsulation of Dynamic Conjugated Microporous Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lai; Li, Youyong

    2016-06-01

    The host-guest complexes of conjugated microporous polymers encapsulating C60 and dye molecules have been investigated systematically. The orientation of guest molecules inside the cavities, have different terms: inside the open cavities of the polymer, or inside the cavities formed by packing different polymers. The host backbone shows responsive dynamic behavior in order to accommodate the size and shape of incoming guest molecule or guest aggregates. Simulations show that the host-guest binding of conjugated polymers is stronger than that of non-conjugated polymers. This detailed study could provide a clear picture for the host-guest interaction for dynamic conjugated microporous polymers. The mechanism obtained could guide designing new conjugated microporous polymers.

  16. Responsive Guest Encapsulation of Dynamic Conjugated Microporous Polymers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lai; Li, Youyong

    2016-01-01

    The host-guest complexes of conjugated microporous polymers encapsulating C60 and dye molecules have been investigated systematically. The orientation of guest molecules inside the cavities, have different terms: inside the open cavities of the polymer, or inside the cavities formed by packing different polymers. The host backbone shows responsive dynamic behavior in order to accommodate the size and shape of incoming guest molecule or guest aggregates. Simulations show that the host-guest binding of conjugated polymers is stronger than that of non-conjugated polymers. This detailed study could provide a clear picture for the host-guest interaction for dynamic conjugated microporous polymers. The mechanism obtained could guide designing new conjugated microporous polymers. PMID:27356483

  17. Desk-top model buildings for dynamic earthquake response demonstrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, A. Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Models of buildings that illustrate dynamic resonance behavior when excited by hand are designed and built. Two types of buildings are considered, one with columns stronger than floors, the other with columns weaker than floors. Combinations and variations of these two types are possible. Floor masses and column stiffnesses are chosen in order that the frequency of the second mode is approximately five cycles per second, so that first and second modes can be excited manually. The models are expected to be resonated by hand by schoolchildren or persons unfamiliar with the dynamic resonant response of tall buildings, to gain an understanding of structural behavior during earthquakes. Among other things, this experience will develop a level of confidence in the builder and experimenter should they be in a high-rise building during an earthquake, sensing both these resonances and other violent shaking.

  18. Characteristics, Responsibilities, and Qualities of Urban School Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guyton, Edith; Hidalgo, Francisco

    1995-01-01

    Teacher mentors in urban schools need particular characteristics to promote development in beginning teachers because the urban school is a unique environment. Urban mentor teachers need to be able to articulate their beliefs and practices, and they need well-developed coaching skills. (SLD)

  19. Influence of atomic vacancies on the dynamic characteristics of nanoresonators based on double walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic analysis of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with different boundary conditions has been performed using atomistic finite element method. The double walled carbon nanotube is modeled considering it as a space frame structure similar to a three dimensional beam. The elastic properties of beam element are calculated by considering mechanical characteristics of covalent bonds between the carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Spring elements are used to describe the interlayer interactions between the inner and outer tubes caused due to the van der Waals forces. The mass of each beam element is assumed as point mass at nodes coinciding with carbon atoms at inner and outer wall of DWCNT. It has been reported that atomic vacancies are formed during the manufacturing process in DWCNT which tend to migrate leading to a change in the mechanical characteristics of the same. Simulations have been carried out to visualize the behavior of such defective DWCNTs subjected to different boundary conditions and when used as mass sensing devices. The variation of such atomic vacancies in outer wall of Zigzag and Armchair DWCNT is performed along the length and the change in response is noted. Moreover, as CNTs have been used as mass sensors extensively, the present approach is focused to explore the use of zigzag and armchair DWCNT as sensing device with a mono-atomic vacancy in it. The results clearly state that the dynamic characteristics are greatly influenced by defects like vacancies in it. A higher frequency shift is observed when the vacancy is located away from the fixed end for both Armchair as well as zigzag type of CNTs. A higher frequency shift is reported for armchair CNT for a mass of 10-22 g which remains constant for 10-21 g and then decreases gradually. Comparison with the other experimental and theoretical studies exhibits good association which suggests that defective DWCNTs can further be explored for mass sensing. This investigation is helpful

  20. Characteristics of response factors of coaxial gaseous rocket injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janardan, B. A.; Daniel, B. R.; Zinn, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation undertaken to determine the frequency dependence of the response factors of various gaseous propellant rocket injectors subject to axial instabilities are presented. The injector response factors were determined, using the modified impedance-tube technique, under cold-flow conditions simulating those observed in unstable rocket motors. The tested injectors included a gaseous-fuel injector element, a gaseous-oxidizer injector element and a coaxial injector with both fuel and oxidizer elements. Emphasis was given to the determination of the dependence of the injector response factor upon the open-area ratio of the injector, the length of the injector orifice, and the pressure drop across the injector orifices. The measured data are shown to be in reasonable agreement with the corresponding injector response factor data predicted by the Feiler and Heidmann model.

  1. Genetically engineered protein in hydrogels tailors stimuli-responsive characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrick, Jason D.; Deo, Sapna K.; Browning, Tyler W.; Bachas, Leonidas G.; Madou, Marc J.; Daunert, Sylvia

    2005-04-01

    Certain proteins undergo a substantial conformational change in response to a given stimulus. This conformational change can manifest in different manners and result in an actuation, that is, catalytic or signalling event, movement, interaction with other proteins, and so on. In all cases, the sensing-actuation process of proteins is initiated by a recognition event that translates into a mechanical action. Thus, proteins are ideal components for designing new nanomaterials that are intelligent and can perform desired mechanical actions in response to target stimuli. A number of approaches have been undertaken to mimic nature's sensing-actuating process. We now report a new hybrid material that integrates genetically engineered proteins within hydrogels capable of producing a stimulus-responsive action mechanism. The mechanical effect is a result of an induced conformational change and binding affinities of the protein in response to a stimulus. The stimuli-responsive hydrogel exhibits three specific swelling stages in response to various ligands offering additional fine-tuned control over a conventional two-stage swelling hydrogel. The newly prepared material was used in the sensing, and subsequent gating and transport of biomolecules across a polymer network, demonstrating its potential application in microfluidics and miniaturized drug-delivery systems.

  2. Empathic behavioral and physiological responses to dynamic stimuli in depression.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Daniel; Regenbogen, Christina; Kellermann, Thilo; Finkelmeyer, Andreas; Kohn, Nils; Derntl, Birgit; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute

    2012-12-30

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is strongly linked to social withdrawal and interpersonal problems which characterize the disorder and further aggravate symptoms. Investigating the nature of impaired emotional-social functioning as a basis of interpersonal functioning in MDD has been widely restricted to static stimuli and behavioral emotion recognition accuracy. The present study aimed at examining higher order emotional processes, namely empathic responses and its components, emotion recognition accuracy and affective responses in 28 MDD patients and 28 healthy control participants. The dynamic stimulus material included 96 short video clips depicting actors expressing basic emotions by face, voice prosody, and sentence content. Galvanic skin conductance measurements revealed implicit processes in the multimethod assessment of empathy. Overall, patients displayed lower empathy, emotion accuracy, and affective response rates than controls. Autonomous arousal was higher in patients. A generalized emotion processing deficit is in line with the "emotional context insensitivity" (ECI) theory which proposes decreased overall responsiveness to emotional stimuli. The dissociation between hypo-reactivity in explicit and hyper-reactivity in implicit measures of emotion processing can be related to the "limbic-cortical dysregulation" model of depression. Our findings support the dissociation of autonomic and subjective emotional responses which may account for interpersonal as well as emotional deficits in depression. PMID:22560057

  3. Dynamic Transcriptional Response of Escherichia coli to Inclusion Body Formation

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Faraz; Fernando, Lawrence P.; Salazar, Mary Alice; Powell, Rhonda R.; Bruce, Terri F.; Harcum, Sarah W.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is used intensively for recombinant protein production, but one key challenge with recombinant E. coli is the tendency of recombinant proteins to misfold and aggregate into insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs). IBs contain high concentrations of inactive recombinant protein that require recovery steps to salvage a functional recombinant protein. Currently, no universally effective method exists to prevent IB formation in recombinant E. coli. In this study, DNA microarrays were used to compare the E. coli gene expression response dynamics to soluble and insoluble recombinant protein production. As expected and previously reported, the classical heat-shock genes had increased expression due to IB formation, including protein folding chaperones and proteases. Gene expression levels for protein synthesis-related and energy-synthesis pathways were also increased. Many transmembrane transporter and corresponding catabolic pathways genes had decreased expression for substrates not present in the culture medium. Additionally, putative genes represented over one-third of the genes identified to have significant expression changes due to IB formation, indicating many important cellular responses to IB formation still need to be characterized. Interestingly, cells grown in 3% ethanol had significantly reduced gene expression responses due to IB formation. Taken together, these results indicate that IB formation is complex, stimulates the heat-shock response, increases protein and energy synthesis needs, and streamlines transport and catabolic processes, while ethanol diminished all of these responses. PMID:24338599

  4. Study on dynamic characteristics' change of hippocampal neuron reduced models caused by the Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yueping; Wang, Jue; Zheng, Chongxun

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, based on the electrophysiological experimental data, the Hippocampal neuron reduced model under the pathology condition of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been built by modifying parameters' values. The reduced neuron model's dynamic characteristics under effect of AD are comparatively studied. Under direct current stimulation, compared with the normal neuron model, the AD neuron model's dynamic characteristics have obviously been changed. The neuron model under the AD condition undergoes supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation from the rest state to the continuous discharge state. It is different from the neuron model under the normal condition, which undergoes saddle-node bifurcation. So, the neuron model changes into a resonator with monostable state from an integrator with bistable state under AD's action. The research reveals the neuron model's dynamic characteristics' changing under effect of AD, and provides some theoretic basis for AD research by neurodynamics theory.

  5. Compressibility effects on the dynamic characteristics of gas lubricated mechanical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arghir, Mihai; Matta, Pierre

    2009-11-01

    The present Note deals with the effects of compressibility on the linearized dynamic characteristics of gas lubricated mechanical components (journal and thrust bearings). Although the effect of compressibility on the static characteristics is well known, its influence on the dynamic characteristics is still not clearly understood. The present Note uses Lubrication's simplest model problems (the 1D slider) to qualitatively describe this effect. An analytic solution obtained for the parallel 1D slider depicts the variation of stiffness and damping with the excitation frequency and shows that this nonlinearity must be taken into account for squeeze number larger than 1. A convenient way of handling this nonlinearity in a dynamic system is described for an aerodynamic thrust bearing. To cite this article: M. Arghir, P. Matta, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  6. Experiment study of dynamics response for wind turbine system of floating foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, You-gang; Song, Kai; Wang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The floating foundation is designed to support a 1.5 MW wind turbine in 30 m water depth. With consideration of the viscous damping of foundation and heave plates, the amplitude-frequency response characteristics of the foundation are studied. By taking into account the elastic effect of blades and tower, the classic quasi-steady blade-element/momentum (BEM) theory is used to calculate the aerodynamic elastic loads. A coupled dynamic model of the turbine-foundationmooring lines is established to calculate the motion response of floating foundation under Kaimal wind spectrum and regular wave by using the FAST codes. The model experiment is carried out to test damping characteristics and natural motion behaviors of the wind turbine system. The dynamics response is tested by considering only waves and the joint action of wind and waves. It is shown that the wind turbine system can avoid resonances under the action of wind and waves. In addition, the heave motion of the floating foundation is induced by waves and the surge motion is induced by wind. The action of wind and waves is of significance for pitch.

  7. Experimental benchmark for piping system dynamic-response analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the scope and status of a piping system dynamics test program. A 0.20 m(8 in.) nominal diameter test piping specimen is designed to be representative of main heat transport system piping of LMFBR plants. Particular attention is given to representing piping restraints. Applied loadings consider component-induced vibration as well as seismic excitation. The principal objective of the program is to provide a benchmark for verification of piping design methods by correlation of predicted and measured responses. Pre-test analysis results and correlation methods are discussed.

  8. Autonomic responses to dynamic displays of facial expressions in adolescents and adults with Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Borum, L.; Verbalis, A.; Schofield, C.; Crawford, N.; Ciciolla, L.; Tager-Flusberg, H.

    2009-01-01

    The behavioral phenotype characteristic of Williams syndrome (WS) is marked by strong interest in social interaction, manifested in attention to human faces, empathy, approach behavior and social disinhibition, often coexisting with generalized anxiety. Despite their heightened social interest, people with WS show deficits in explicit emotion recognition tasks similar to those of people with other developmental disabilities. In the current study we explored whether individuals with WS show distinctive autonomic responsiveness to social-emotional information, using skin conductance response and heart rate measures. Autonomic activation was investigated in response to facial expressions of emotion in adolescents and adults with WS, compared to age-matched normal controls and to age-, IQ- and language-matched individuals with learning or intellectual disabilities (LID). Overall participants with WS were less electrodermally responsive to dynamically presented face stimuli than the age- and IQ-matched LID group, and showed more heart rate deceleration when viewing emotional faces than the controls. These findings, indicating hypoarousal but increased interest in response to the dynamic presentation of facial emotions in WS, are consistent with the behavioral profile of high approachability toward social stimuli in this population. PMID:19047076

  9. Use of Generalized Mass in the Interpretation of Dynamic Response of BENDING-TORSION Coupled Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESLIMY-ISFAHANY, S. H. R.; BANERJEE, J. R.

    2000-11-01

    The interpretation of mode shapes and dynamic response of bending-torsion coupled beams is assessed by using the concept of generalized mass. In the first part of this investigation, the free vibratory motion of bending-torsion coupled beams is studied in detail. The conventional method of interpreting the normal modes of vibration consisting of bending displacements and torsional rotations is shown to be inadequate and replaced by an alternative method which is focussed on the constituent parts of the generalized mass arising from bending and torsional displacements. Basically, the generalized mass in a particular mode is identified and examined in terms of bending, torsion and bending-torsion coupling effects. It is demonstrated that the contribution of individual components in the expression of the generalized mass of a normal mode is a much better indicator in characterizing a coupled mode. It is also shown that the usually adopted criteria of plotting bending displacement and torsional rotations to describe a coupled mode can be deceptive and misleading. In the second part of the investigation, attention is focussed on the dynamic response characteristics of bending-torsion coupled beams when subjected to random bending or torsional loads. A normal mode approach is used to establish the total response. The input random excitation is assumed to be stationary and ergodic so that with the linearity assumption, the output spectrum of the response is obtained by using the frequency response function. The contribution of each normal mode to the overall response is isolated. Particular emphasis is placed on bending-induced torsional response and torsion-induced bending response. A number of case studies involving different types of bending-torsion coupled beams with Cantilever end conditions are presented. The limitations of existing methods of modal interpretation are highlighted, and an insight into the mode selection for response analysis is provided.

  10. Polymerization Parameters Influencing the QCM Response Characteristics of BSA MIP

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Nam V. H.; Sussitz, Hermann F.; Lieberzeit, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Designing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for sensing proteins is still a somewhat empirical process due to the inherent complexity of protein imprinting. Based on Bovine Serum Albumin as a model analyte, we explored the influence of a range of experimental parameters on the final sensor responses. The optimized polymer contains 70% cross linker. Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance—QCM). However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses. Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity. PMID:25587416

  11. Proceedings of Workshop XVI; The dynamic characteristics of faulting inferred from recordings of strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, John; Jacobson, Muriel L.

    1982-01-01

    The strong ground motions radiated by earthquake faulting are controlled by the dynamic characteristics of the faulting process. Although this assertion seems self-evident, seismologists have only recently begun to derive and test quantitative relations between common measures of strong ground motion and the dynamic characteristics of faulting. Interest in this problem has increased dramatically in past several years, however, resulting in a number of important advances. The research presented in this workshop is a significant part of this scientific development. Watching this development occur through the work of many scientists is exciting; to be able to gather a number of these scientists together in one workshop is a remarkable opportunity.

  12. Shading responses of carbon allocation dynamics in mountain grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, M.; Lattanzi, F. A.; Brueggemann, N.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon (C) allocation strongly influences plant and soil processes. Global environmental changes can alter source - sink relations of plants with potential implications for C allocation. Short-term C allocation dynamics in ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes are still poorly understood. To analyze effects of assimilate supply (i.e. C source strength) on ecosystem C allocation dynamics and the role of non-structural carbohydrates, canopy sections of a mountain meadow were pulse labeled with 13CO2 and subsequently shaded for a week or left unshaded (control). Tracer dynamics in above- and belowground sucrose and starch pools were analysed and coupled using compartmental modelling. The hypothesis was tested that shading affects tracer dynamics in non-structural carbohydrates and diminishes the transfer of recently assimilated C to roots and their storage pools. In unshaded plots up to 40% of assimilated C was routed through short-term storage in shoot starch and sucrose to buffer day / night cycles in photosynthesis. Shoot- and root sucrose and shoot starch were kinetically closely related pools. The tracer dynamics of the modelled root sucrose pool corresponded well with those in soil CO2 efflux. Root starch played no role in buffering day / night cycles and likely acted as a seasonal store. Shading strongly reduced sucrose and starch concentrations in shoots but not roots and resulted in a massive reduction of leaf respiration, while root respiration was much less diminished. Shading affected tracer dynamics in sucrose and starch of shoots: shoot starch rapidly lost tracer, while sucrose transiently increased its tracer content. Surprisingly, shading did not alter the dynamics of root carbohydrates. Even under severe C limitation after one week of shading, tracer C continued to be incorporated in root starch. Also the amount of 13C incorporated in phospholipid fatty acids of soil microbial communities was not reduced by shading, though its

  13. Nonlinear dynamic failure process of tunnel-fault system in response to strong seismic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhihua; Lan, Hengxing; Zhang, Yongshuang; Gao, Xing; Li, Langping

    2013-03-01

    Strong earthquakes and faults have significant effect on the stability capability of underground tunnel structures. This study used a 3-Dimensional Discrete Element model and the real records of ground motion in the Wenchuan earthquake to investigate the dynamic response of tunnel-fault system. The typical tunnel-fault system was composed of one planned railway tunnel and one seismically active fault. The discrete numerical model was prudentially calibrated by means of the comparison between the field survey and numerical results of ground motion. It was then used to examine the detailed quantitative information on the dynamic response characteristics of tunnel-fault system, including stress distribution, strain, vibration velocity and tunnel failure process. The intensive tunnel-fault interaction during seismic loading induces the dramatic stress redistribution and stress concentration in the intersection of tunnel and fault. The tunnel-fault system behavior is characterized by the complicated nonlinear dynamic failure process in response to a real strong seismic event. It can be qualitatively divided into 5 main stages in terms of its stress, strain and rupturing behaviors: (1) strain localization, (2) rupture initiation, (3) rupture acceleration, (4) spontaneous rupture growth and (5) stabilization. This study provides the insight into the further stability estimation of underground tunnel structures under the combined effect of strong earthquakes and faults.

  14. Coupled dynamic response analysis of a multi-column tension-leg-type floating wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong-sheng; Yang, Jian-min; He, Yan-ping; Gu, Min-tong

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a coupled dynamic response analysis of a multi-column tension-leg-type floating wind turbine (WindStar TLP system) under normal operation and parked conditions. Wind-only load cases, wave-only load cases and combined wind and wave load cases were analyzed separately for the WindStar TLP system to identify the dominant excitation loads. Comparisons between an NREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine installed on land and the WindStar TLP system were performed. Statistics of selected response variables in specified design load cases (DLCs) were obtained and analyzed. It is found that the proposed WindStar TLP system has small dynamic responses to environmental loads and it thus has almost the same mean generator power output under operating conditions as the land-based system. The tension mooring system has a sufficient safety factor, and the minimum tendon tension is always positive in all selected DLCs. The ratio of ultimate load of the tower base fore-aft bending moment for the WindStar TLP system versus the land-based system can be as high as 1.9 in all of the DLCs considered. These results will help elucidate the dynamic characteristics of the proposed WindStar TLP system, identify the difference in load effect between it and land-based systems, and thus make relevant modifications to the initial design for the WindStar TLP system.

  15. Dynamic response and robust control of coupled maglev vehicle and guideway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Eunho; Song, Ji-Seok; Kang, Bu-Byoung; Na, Sungsoo

    2011-12-01

    This study develops a computational model of the dynamic characteristics of the actively controlled, magnetically levitated (maglev) system moving on a flexible guideway. The 5-dof (degree-of-freedom) vehicle model, the modeling of the EMS (electromagnetic suspension ), guideway, and guideway irregularity are described, respectively. In this sense, the dynamic response of a coupled vehicle and guideway system is investigated with different vehicle speeds and masses. Furthermore, the formulation of SMC (sliding mode control) based on the Kalman filter is addressed for the control of the dynamic response of the maglev system for various prescribed running speeds. For numerical simulation, the Runge-Kutta method is used to solve the state-space equation, which includes information about the vehicle, guideway and controller. The results reveal that both the air gap fluctuation and the cabin CG (center of gravity) vertical acceleration are strongly affected by the vehicle speed and guideway irregularity, but only slightly affected by the vehicle mass. Moreover, SMC based on the Kalman filter considerably reduces the air gap fluctuation and cabin CG vertical acceleration responses, and the efficiency of the adopted control methodology is demonstrated even at higher critical speed conditions.

  16. Numerical simulation of dynamic processes in biomechanics using the grid-characteristic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beklemysheva, K. A.; Vasyukov, A. V.; Petrov, I. B.

    2015-08-01

    Results of the numerical simulation of mechanical processes occurring in biological tissues under dynamic actions are presented. The grid-characteristic method on unstructured grids is used to solve the system of equations of mechanics of deformable solids; this method takes into account the characteristic properties of the constitutive system of partial differential equations and produces adequate algorithms on interfaces between media and on the boundaries of integration domains.

  17. Dynamic characteristics and mechanisms of compressible metallic vapor plume behaviors in transient keyhole during deep penetration fiber laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Shao, Xinyu; Li, Wen; Chen, Xin; Gong, Shuili

    2016-07-01

    The compressible metallic vapor plume or plasma plume behaviors in the keyhole during deep penetration laser welding have significant effects on the joint quality. However, these behaviors and their responses to process parameter variations have not been well understood. In this paper, we first systematically study the dynamic characteristics and mechanisms of compressible metallic vapor plume behaviors in transient keyhole during fiber laser welding of 304 stainless steels based on a multiple timescale multiphase model. The time-dependent temperature, pressure, velocity and Mach number distributions of vapor plume under different process parameters are theoretically predicted. It is found that the distributions of the main physical characteristics of vapor plume such as pressure, velocity as well as Mach number in keyhole are usually highly uneven and highly time dependent. The peak difference of the velocity, pressure, temperature and Mach number of the vapor plume in a keyhole could be greater than 200 m/s, 20 kPa, 1000 K and 0.6 Mach, respectively. The vapor plume characteristics in a transient keyhole can experience significant changes within several hundreds of nanoseconds. The formation mechanisms of these dynamic characteristics are mainly due to the mesoscale keyhole hump (sized in several tens of microns) dynamics. It is also demonstrated that it is possible to suppress the oscillations of compressible vapor plume in the keyhole by improving the keyhole stability through decreasing the heat input. However, stabilizing the keyhole could only weaken, but not eliminate, the observed highly uneven and transient characteristics. This finding may pose new challenges for accurate experimental measurements of vapor plume induced by laser welding.

  18. Catchment dynamics and social response during flash floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutin, J. D.; Lutoff, C.; Ruin, I.; Scolobig, A.; Créton-Cazanave, L.

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study is to examine how the current techniques for flash-flood monitoring and forecasting can meet the requirements of the population at risk to evaluate the severity of the flood and anticipate its danger. To this end, we identify the social response time for different social actions in the course of two well studied flash flood events which occurred in France and Italy. We introduce a broad characterization of the event management activities into three types according to their main objective (information, organisation and protection). The activities are also classified into three other types according to the scale and nature of the human group involved (individuals, communities and institutions). The conclusions reached relate to i) the characterisation of the social responses according to watershed scale and to the information available, and ii) to the appropriateness of the existing surveillance and forecasting tools to support the social responses. Our results suggest that representing the dynamics of the social response with just one number representing the average time for warning a population is an oversimplification. It appears that the social response time exhibits a parallel with the hydrological response time, by diminishing in time with decreasing size of the relevant watershed. A second result is that the human groups have different capabilities of anticipation apparently based on the nature of information they use. Comparing watershed response times and social response times shows clearly that at scales of less than 100 km2, a number of actions were taken with response times comparable to the catchment response time. The implications for adapting the warning processes to social scales (individual or organisational scales) are considerable. At small scales and for the implied anticipation times, the reliable and high-resolution description of the actual rainfall field becomes the major source of information for decision

  19. Significant characteristics of social response to noise and vibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishinomiya, G.

    1979-01-01

    Several surveys made since 1971 to investigate annoyance resulting from noise and vibration, from various sources were studied in order to quantify the relation between annoyance response to noise or vibration and properties of the respondent including factors such as noise exposure, etc. Samples collected by the social surveys and physical measurements were analyzed by multi-dimensional analysis.

  20. Temporal characteristics of gustatory responses in rat parabrachial neurons vary by stimulus and chemosensitive neuron type.

    PubMed

    Geran, Laura; Travers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN) neurons elicited by multiple applications of "sweet" (sucrose), "salty" (NaCl), "sour" (citric acid), and "bitter" (quinine and cycloheximide) stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500 ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H) afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H) compared to the later response (9.5%). Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H) in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best). Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs.

  1. Cardiovascular response to dynamic aerobic exercise: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Magosso, E; Ursino, M

    2002-11-01

    An original mathematical model of the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. It includes the pulsating heart, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, a separate description of the vascular bed in active tissues, the local metabolic vasodilation in these tissues and the mechanical effects of muscular contractions on venous return. Moreover, the model provides a description of the ventilatory response to exercise and various neural regulatory mechanisms working on cardiovascular parameters. These mechanisms embrace the so-called central command, the arterial baroreflex and the lung inflation reflex. All parameters in the model have been given in accordance with physiological data from the literature. In this work, the model has been used to simulate the steady-state value of the main cardiorespiratory quantities at different levels of aerobic exercise and the temporal pattern in the transient phase from rest to moderate exercise. Results suggest that, with suitable parameter values the model is able accurately to simulate the cardiorespiratory response in the overall range of aerobic exercise. This response is characterised by a moderate hypertension (10-30%) and by a conspicuous increase in systemic conductance (80-130%), heart rate (64-150%) and cardiac output (100-200%). The transient pattern exhibits three distinct phases (lasting approximately 5s, 15s and 2 min), that reflect the temporal heterogeneity of the mechanisms involved. The model may be useful to improve understanding of exercise physiology and as an educational tool to analyse the complexity of cardiovascular and respiratory regulation.

  2. Cardiovascular response to dynamic aerobic exercise: a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Magosso, E; Ursino, M

    2002-11-01

    An original mathematical model of the cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented. It includes the pulsating heart, the pulmonary and systemic circulation, a separate description of the vascular bed in active tissues, the local metabolic vasodilation in these tissues and the mechanical effects of muscular contractions on venous return. Moreover, the model provides a description of the ventilatory response to exercise and various neural regulatory mechanisms working on cardiovascular parameters. These mechanisms embrace the so-called central command, the arterial baroreflex and the lung inflation reflex. All parameters in the model have been given in accordance with physiological data from the literature. In this work, the model has been used to simulate the steady-state value of the main cardiorespiratory quantities at different levels of aerobic exercise and the temporal pattern in the transient phase from rest to moderate exercise. Results suggest that, with suitable parameter values the model is able accurately to simulate the cardiorespiratory response in the overall range of aerobic exercise. This response is characterised by a moderate hypertension (10-30%) and by a conspicuous increase in systemic conductance (80-130%), heart rate (64-150%) and cardiac output (100-200%). The transient pattern exhibits three distinct phases (lasting approximately 5s, 15s and 2 min), that reflect the temporal heterogeneity of the mechanisms involved. The model may be useful to improve understanding of exercise physiology and as an educational tool to analyse the complexity of cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. PMID:12507317

  3. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  4. Cortical response field dynamics in cat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sharon, Dahlia; Jancke, Dirk; Chavane, Frédéric; Na'aman, Shmuel; Grinvald, Amiram

    2007-12-01

    Little is known about the "inverse" of the receptive field--the region of cortical space whose spatiotemporal pattern of electrical activity is influenced by a given sensory stimulus. We refer to this activated area as the cortical response field, the properties of which remain unexplored. Here, the dynamics of cortical response fields evoked in visual cortex by small, local drifting-oriented gratings were explored using voltage-sensitive dyes. We found that the cortical response field was often characterized by a plateau of activity, beyond the rim of which activity diminished quickly. Plateau rim location was largely independent of stimulus orientation. However, approximately 20 ms following plateau onset, 1-3 peaks emerged on it and were amplified for 25 ms. Spiking was limited to the peak zones, whose location strongly depended on stimulus orientation. Thus, alongside selective amplification of a spatially restricted suprathreshold response, wider activation to just below threshold encompasses all orientation domains within a well-defined retinotopic vicinity of the current stimulus, priming the cortex for processing of subsequent stimuli. PMID:17395608

  5. Input-response relationships in the dynamics of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Markus, M; Hess, B

    1985-12-01

    The dynamic response of glycolysis is investigated using a two-enzyme model with three different type of input flux time dependences: constant, sinusoidal, and amplitude or frequency modulated (AM or FM) input flux. The analysis reveals that the system acts as a device which transduces amplitudes and frequencies of the input function into complex and remarkably diverse response patterns. This device may have more than one response possibilities for a single input function, owing to the coexistence of attractors in phase space. In such a case one response function can be switched over into the other by short substrate pulses. Stroboscopic plots reveal that chaotic regimes obtained under sinusoidal input flux obey a stretch-fold-press process, similar to the baker's transformation, upon a change of the stroboscoping phase. Chaotic oscillations obtained under AM or FM conditions often show a much higher degree of randomness than those obtained under sinusoidal input. This is expressed quantitatively by an enhanced Liapunov dimension of the attractors.

  6. Wave characteristic and morphologic effects on the onshore hydrodynamic response of tsunamis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apotsos, A.; Jaffe, B.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2011-01-01

    While the destruction caused by a tsunami can vary significantly owing to near- and onshore controls, we have only a limited quantitative understanding of how different local parameters influence the onshore response of tsunamis. Here, a numerical model based on the non-linear shallow water equations is first shown to agree well with analytical expressions developed for periodic long waves inundating over planar slopes. More than 13,000 simulations are then conducted to examine the effects variations in the wave characteristics, bed slopes, and bottom roughness have on maximum tsunami run-up and water velocity at the still water shoreline. While deviations from periodic waves and planar slopes affect the onshore dynamics, the details of these effects depend on a combination of factors. In general, the effects differ for breaking and non-breaking waves, and are related to the relative shift of the waves along the breaking–non-breaking wave continuum. Variations that shift waves toward increased breaking, such as steeper wave fronts, tend to increase the onshore impact of non-breaking waves, but decrease the impact of already breaking waves. The onshore impact of a tsunami composed of multiple waves can be different from that of a single wave tsunami, with the largest difference occurring on long, shallow onshore topographies. These results demonstrate that the onshore response of a tsunami is complex, and that using analytical expressions derived from simplified conditions may not always be appropriate.

  7. INSIGHTS INTO THE DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF TUNNELS IN JOINTED ROCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F E; Morris, J P

    2005-02-17

    Tunnels in jointed rocks can be subjected to severe dynamic loads because of rock bursts, coal bumps, and large earthquakes. A series of 3-dimensional simulations was performed, based on discrete element analysis to gain insights into the parameters that influence the response of such tunnels. The simulations looked at the effect of joint set orientation, the effect of joint spacing, the effect of peak displacement for a given peak velocity, the effect of pulse peak velocity for a given displacement, the influence of using rigid versus deformable blocks in the analyses, and the effect of repeated loading. The results of this modeling were also compared to field evidence of dynamic tunnel failures. This comparison reinforced the notion that 3-dimensional discrete element analysis can capture very well the kinematics of structures in jointed rocks under dynamic loading. The paper concludes with a glimpse into the future. Results are shown for a 3-dimensional discrete element massively parallel simulation with 100 million contact elements, performed with the LLNL LDEC code.

  8. A Dynamic Photovoltaic Model Incorporating Capacitive and Reverse-Bias Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, KA; Xu, CY; Jin, L; Krein, PT

    2013-10-01

    Photovoltaics (PVs) are typically modeled only for their forward-biased dc characteristics, as in the commonly used single-diode model. While this approach accurately models the I-V curve under steady forward bias, it lacks dynamic and reverse-bias characteristics. The dynamic characteristics, primarily parallel capacitance and series inductance, affect operation when a PV cell or string interacts with switching converters or experiences sudden transients. Reverse-bias characteristics are often ignored because PV devices are not intended to operate in the reverse-biased region. However, when partial shading occurs on a string of PVs, the shaded cell can become reverse biased and develop into a hot spot that permanently degrades the cell. To fully examine PV behavior under hot spots and various other faults, reverse-bias characteristics must also be modeled. This study develops a comprehensive mathematical PV model based on circuit components that accounts for forward bias, reverse bias, and dynamic characteristics. Using a series of three experimental tests on an unilluminated PV cell, all required model parameters are determined. The model is implemented in MATLAB Simulink and accurately models the measured data.

  9. Deconstructing the hydrologic response: pattern and dynamics of water age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, Markus; Savenije, Hubert; Soulsby, Chris; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2013-04-01

    The water storage and release dynamics at the catchment scale are still incompletely understood. This is in particular true when considering actual particle transport rather than only the hydraulic response. The use of environmental tracers is frequently instructive for getting insights into these transport process patterns. However, the potential of tracers is frequently underexploited. Although known since the early days of tracer hydrology that the composition of water in the runoff, i.e. the water age distribution can be highly variable as a function of flow volumes, it is often treated as being time- and thus flow-invariant. Here we use long term (< 20 years) precipitation, flow and tracer (chloride) data of three contrasting upland catchments in the Scottish Highlands to inform integrated conceptual models. Using the models as virtual laboratories, water and tracer fluxes were tracked through the system in order to get a better understanding of the patterns and temporal, wetness induced dynamics in the composition of stream water and its age distributions. Tracking fluxes through the system showed that the various components of a model, representing individual flow processes, such as preferential or groundwater flow, can be characterized by fundamentally different water age distributions. As a consequence, the wetness dependent dynamics and connectivity patterns of these distinct pools of water are responsible for potentially fast and substantial switches in water age distributions. Further, modeled flux water age distributions were found to be highly sensitive to variable catchment wetness conditions and exhibited considerable hysteresis effects, depending on the catchment wetness history. While the water age during wetting-up conditions is controlled by fast processes (e.g. preferential flow), it is controlled by slow processes (e.g. groundwater flow) under drying-up conditions. This non-linearity is caused by the fact that water age distributions are not

  10. Dynamic response of one-dimensional bosons in a trap

    SciTech Connect

    Golovach, Vitaly N.; Minguzzi, Anna; Glazman, Leonid I.

    2009-10-15

    We calculate the dynamic structure factor S(q,{omega}) of a one-dimensional (1D) interacting Bose gas confined in a harmonic trap. The effective interaction depends on the strength of the confinement enforcing the (1D) motion of atoms; interaction may be further enhanced by superimposing an optical lattice on the trap potential. In the compressible state, we find that the smooth variation in the gas density around the trap center leads to softening of the singular behavior of S(q,{omega}) at the first Lieb excitation mode compared to the behavior predicted for homogeneous 1D systems. Nevertheless, the density-averaged response S(q,{omega}) remains a nonanalytic function of q and {omega} at the first Lieb excitation mode in the limit of weak trap confinement. The exponent of the power-law nonanalyticity is modified due to the inhomogeneity in a universal way and thus bears unambiguously the information about the (homogeneous) Lieb-Liniger model. A strong optical lattice causes formation of Mott phases. Deep in the Mott regime, we predict a semicircular peak in S(q,{omega}) centered at the on-site repulsion energy, {omega}=U. Similar peaks of smaller amplitudes exist at multiples of U as well. We explain the suppression of the dynamic response with entering into the Mott regime, observed recently by Clement et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 155301 (2009)], based on an f-sum rule for the Bose-Hubbard model.

  11. Dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; Song, Bo

    2010-03-01

    There has been a very high demand in developing efficient soft body armors to protect the military and law enforcement personnel from ballistic or explosive attack. As a basic component in the soft body armor, fibers or fiber bundles play a key role in the performance against ballistic impact. In order to study the ballistic-resistant mechanism of the soft body armor, it is desirable to understand the dynamic response of the fiber bundle under transverse impact. Transverse wave speed is one important parameter because a faster transverse wave speed can make the impact energy dissipate more quickly. In this study, we employed split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to generate constant high-speed impact on a Kevlar fiber bundle in the transverse direction. The deformation of the fiber bundle was photographed with high-speed digital cameras. The transverse wave speeds were experimentally measured at various transverse impact velocities. The experimental results can also be used to quantitatively verify the current analytical models or to develop new models to describe the dynamic response of fiber bundle under transverse impact.

  12. Thermal response and ablation characteristics of light weight ceramic ablators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy K.; Rasky, Daniel J.; Esfahani, Lili

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the thermal performance and ablation characteristics of the NASA-Ames Lightweight Ceramic Ablators (LCAs) in supersonic, high-enthalpy convective environments, which use low density ceramic or carbon fiber matrices as substrates for main structural support, with organic resin fillers. LCA densities are in the 0.224-1.282 g/cu cm range. In-depth temperature data have been obtained to determine thermal penetration depths and conductivity. The addition of SiC and PPMA is noted to significantly improve the ablation performance of LCAs with silica substrates. Carbon-based LCAs are the most mass-efficient at high flux levels.

  13. Dynamics of the Murine Humoral Immune Response to Neisseria meningitidis Group B Capsular Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Colino, Jesús; Outschoorn, Ingrid

    1998-01-01

    Immunization with Neisseria meningitidis group B capsular polysaccharide (CpsB) elicited responses in adult mice that showed the typical dynamic characteristics of the response to a thymus-independent antigen, in contrast to the thymus-dependent behavior of antibody responses to CpsC. The former had a short latent period and showed a rapid increase in serum antibodies that peaked at day 5, and immunoglobulin M (IgM) was the major isotype even though IgG (mainly IgG2a and IgG2b) was also detectable. This response was of short duration, and the specific antibodies were rapidly cleared from the circulation. The secondary responses were similar in magnitude, kinetics, IgM predominance, and IgG distribution. Nevertheless, a threefold IgG increase, a correlation between IgM and IgG levels, and dose-dependent secondary responses were observed. Hyperimmunization considerably reinforced these responses: 10-fold for IgM and 300-fold for IgG. This favored isotype switch was accompanied by a progressive change in the subclass distribution to IgG3 (62%) and IgG1 (28%), along with the possible generation of B-cell memory. The results indicate that CpsB is being strictly thymus independent and suggest that unresponsiveness to purified CpsB is due to tolerance. PMID:9453603

  14. The Impact of Item Format and Examinee Characteristics on Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Brian J.; Johnston, Mary M.; Lipner, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Current research on examination response time has focused on tests comprised of traditional multiple-choice items. Consequently, the impact of other innovative or complex item formats on examinee response time is not understood. The present study used multilevel growth modeling to investigate examinee characteristics associated with response time…

  15. Intra-arterial pressure measurement in neonates: dynamic response requirements.

    PubMed

    van Genderingen, H R; Gevers, M; Hack, W W

    1995-02-01

    A computer simulation of a catheter manometer system was used to quantify measurement errors in neonatal blood pressure parameters. Accurate intra-arterial pressure recordings of 21 critically ill newborns were fed into this simulated system. The dynamic characteristics, natural frequency and damping coefficient, were varied from 2.5 to 60 Hz and from 0.1 to 1.4, respectively. As a result, errors in systolic, diastolic and pulse arterial pressure were obtained as a function of natural frequency and damping coefficient. Iso-error curves for 2%, 5% and 10% were constructed. Using these curves, the maximum inaccuracy of any neonatal catheter manometer system can be determined and used in the clinical setting.

  16. Architectural Surety Applications for Building Response to Dynamic Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Matalucci, R.V.; Mayrhofer, C.

    1999-02-10

    This paper provides a summary introduction to the emerging area of Architectural Surety{trademark} applications for buildings and infrastructures that are subjected to dynamic loads from blast and naturally occurring events. This technology area has been under investigation to assist with the definition of risks associated with dynamic loads and to provide guidance for determining the required upgrading and retrofitting techniques suggested for reducing building and infrastructure vulnerabilities to such dynamic forces. This unique approach involves the application of risk management techniques for solving problems of the as-built environment through the application of security, safety, and reliability principles developed in the nuclear weapons programs of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and through the protective structures programs of the German Ministry of Defense (MOD). The changing responsibilities of engineering design professionals are addressed in light of the increased public awareness of structural and facility systems' vulnerabilities to malevolent, normal, and abnormal environment conditions. Brief discussions are also presented on (1) the need to understand how dynamic pressures are affected by the structural failures they cause, (2) the need to determine cladding effects on columns, walls, and slabs, and (3) the need to establish effective standoff distance for perimeter barriers. A summary description is presented of selected technologies to upgrade and retrofit buildings by using high-strength concrete and energy-absorbing materials and by specifying appropriately designed window glazing and special masonry wall configurations and composites. The technologies, material performance, and design evaluation procedures presented include super-computational modeling and structural simulations, window glass fragmentation modeling, risk assessment procedures, instrumentation and health monitoring systems, three-dimensional CAD virtual reality

  17. Nanomaterials can dynamically steer cell responses to biological ligands.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ram I; Schwarzbauer, Jean E; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2011-01-17

    Traditional tissue regeneration approaches to activate cell behaviors on biomaterials rely on the use of extracellular-matrix-based or soluble growth-factor cues. In this article, a novel approach is highlighted to dynamically steer cellular phenomena such as cell motility based on nanoscale substratum features of biological ligands. Albumin-derived nanocarriers (ANCs) with variable nanoscale-size features are functionalized with fibronectin III9-10 matrix ligands, and their effects on primary human keratinocyte activation are investigated. The presentation of fibronectin fragments from ANCs significantly enhances cell migration as compared to free ligands at equivalent concentrations. Notably, cell migration is influenced by the size of the underlying ANCs even for variably sized ANCs covered in comparable levels of fibronectin fragment. For equivalent ligand concentrations, cell migration on the smaller-sized ANCs (30 and 50 nm) is significantly enhanced as compared to that on larger-sized ANCs (75 and 100 nm). In contrast, the enhancement of cell migration on nanocarriers is abolished by the use of immobilized, biofunctionalized ANCs, indicating that "dynamic" nanocarrier internalization events underlie the role of nanocarrier geometry on the differential regulation of cell migration kinetics. Uptake studies using fluorescent ANCs indicate that larger-sized ANCs cause delayed endocytic kinetics and hence could present barriers for internalization during the cell adhesion and motility processes. Motile cells exhibit diminished migration upon exposure to clathrin inhibitors, but not caveolin inhibitors, suggesting the role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in facilitating cell migratory responsiveness to the nanocarriers. Overall, a monotonic relationship is found between the nanocarrier cytointernalization rate and the cell migration rate, suggesting the possibility of designing biointerfacial features for the dynamic control of cell migration. Thus, the

  18. Dynamic response of cracked rotor-bearing system under time-dependent base movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qinkai; Chu, Fulei

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic response of cracked rotor-bearing system under time-dependent base movements is studied in this paper. Three base angular motions, including the rolling, pitching and yawing motions, are assumed to be sinusoidal perturbations superimposed upon constant terms. Both the open and breathing transverse cracks are considered in the analysis. The finite element model is established for the base excited rotor-bearing system with open or breathing cracks. Considering the time-varying base movements and transverse cracks, the second-order differential equations of the system will not only have time-periodic gyroscopic and stiffness coefficients, but also the multi-frequency external excitations. An improved harmonic balance method is introduced to obtain the steady-state response of the system under both base and unbalance excitations. The response spectra, orbits of shaft center and frequency response characteristics, are analyzed accordingly. The effects of various base angular motions, frequency and amplitude of base excitations, and crack depths on the system dynamic behaviors are considered in the discussions.

  19. Static and dynamic characteristics of angular velocity and acceleration transducers based on optical tunneling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busurin, V. I.; Korobkov, V. V.; Htoo Lwin, Naing; Tuan, Phan Anh

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical and experimental analysis of quasi-linear conversion function of angular velocity and acceleration microoptoelectromechnical (MOEM) transducers based on optical tunneling effect (OTE) are conducted. Equivalent oscillating circuit is developed and dynamic characteristics of angular velocity and acceleration MOEM-transducers are investigated.

  20. Ditching Investigations of Dynamic Models and Effects of Design Parameters on Ditching Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J; Hoffman, Edward L

    1958-01-01

    Data from ditching investigations conducted at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory with dynamic scale models of various airplanes are presented in the form of tables. The effects of design parameters on the ditching characteristics of airplanes, based on scale-model investigations and on reports of full-scale ditchings, are discussed. Various ditching aids are also discussed as a means of improving ditching behavior.

  1. Novel method for estimating the dynamic characteristics of pressure sensor in shock tube calibration test.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhuoran; Yan, Hu

    2015-06-01

    A shock tube is usually used to excite the dynamic characteristics of the pressure sensor used in an aircraft. This paper proposes a novel estimation method for determining the dynamic characteristic parameters of the pressure sensor. A preprocessing operation based on Grey Model [GM(1,1)] and bootstrap method (BM) is employed to analyze the output of a calibrated pressure sensor under step excitation. Three sequences, which include the estimated value sequence, upper boundary, and lower boundary, are obtained. The processing methods on filtering and modeling are used to explore the three sequences independently. The optimal estimated, upper boundary, and lower boundary models are then established. The three models are solved, and a group of dynamic characteristic parameters corresponding to the estimated intervals are obtained. A shock tube calibration test consisting of two experiments is performed to validate the performance of the proposed method. The results show that the relative errors of the dynamic characteristic parameters of time and frequency domains do not exceed 9% and 10%, respectively. Moreover, the nominal and estimated values of the parameters fall into the estimated intervals limited by the upper and lower values. PMID:26133863

  2. Estimating the Single-Trial Characteristics of Event-Related Responses: Evaluation of the MCERP Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Truccolo, W. A.; Ding, M.; Bressler, S. L.; Schroeder, C. E.; Korsmey, Dave (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Single-trial event-related responses collected during the course of an experiment are typically averaged before analysis resulting in a rather crude picture of event-related brain dynamics. It has been quite clear for some time that these responses exhibit trial-to-trial variability: however, the computational techniques necessary to deal with such responses in noisy conditions have not been available. To this end we have developed the multiple-component, event-related potential model (mcERP), which assumes that the each event-related response consists of a sum of multiple evoked components each described by a stereotypical waveshape. These waveshapes are allowed to vary in amplitude and onset latency from trial to trial, which allows us to capture, to first-order, the trial-dependent variations in event-related brain dynamics. We have constructed many sets of synthetic data designed to simulate intracortical recordings from a 15 channel, linear-array multielectrode implanted acutely in V1 of an awake-behaving macaque undergoing visual stimulation with a red light flash. This synthetic data was used to characterize the performance of the mcERP algorithm. First we quantified the degree to which such trial-to-trial variability aids in the identification of multiple components, and we demonstrate that amplitude variability is a more important factor in component separation than latency variability. Second, we quantified the behavior of the algorithm under two distinct signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions: Gaussian noise independently present in each channel, and highly correlated (1/f distributed), far-field noise presented identically in each channel of the array. The mcERP algorithm was found to be robust to noise accurately identifying all component waveshapes and their associated single-trial characteristics down to SNR levels of -20dB for Gaussian noise and -7dB for 1/f far-field noise. Comparisons of the performance of this algorithm with factor analysis (FA

  3. Repeatability and oblique flow response characteristics of current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Thibodeaux, Kirk G.; Kaehrle, William R.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory investigation into the precision and accuracy of various mechanical-current meters are presented. Horizontal-axis and vertical-axis meters that are used for the measurement of point velocities in streams and rivers were tested. Meters were tested for repeatability and response to oblique flows. Both horizontal- and vertical-axis meters were found to under- and over-register oblique flows with errors generally increasing as the velocity and angle of flow increased. For the oblique flow tests, magnitude of errors were smallest for horizontal-axis meters. Repeatability of all meters tested was good, with the horizontal- and vertical-axis meters performing similarly.

  4. Vegetation dynamics--simulating responses to climatic change.

    PubMed

    Woodward, F I; Lomas, M R

    2004-08-01

    A modelling approach to simulating vegetation dynamics is described, incorporating critical processes of carbon sequestration, growth, mortality and distribution. The model has been developed to investigate the responses of vegetation to environmental change, at time scales from days to centuries and from the local to the global scale. The model is outlined and subsequent tests, against independent data sources, are relatively successful, from the small scale to the global scale. Tests against eddy covariance observations of carbon exchange by vegetation indicated significant differences between measured and simulated net ecosystem production (NEP). NEP is the net of large fluxes due to gross primary production and respiration, which are not directly measured and so there is some uncertainty in explaining differences between observations and simulations. In addition it was noted that closer agreement of fluxes was achieved for natural, or long-lived managed vegetation than for recently managed vegetation. The discrepancies appear to be most closely related to respiratory carbon losses from the soil, but this area needs further exploration. The differences do not scale up to the global scale, where simulated and measured global net biome production were similar, indicating that fluxes measured at the managed observed sites are not typical globally. The model (the Sheffield Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, SDGVM) has been applied to contemporary vegetation dynamics and indicates a significant CO2 fertilisation effect on the sequestration of atmospheric CO2. The terrestrial carbon sink for the 20th century is simulated to be widespread between latitudes 40 degrees S and 65 degrees N, but is greatest between 10 degrees S and 6 degrees N, excluding the effects of human deforestation. The mean maximum sink capacity over the 20th century is small, at 25 gC m(-2) year(-1), or approximately 1% of gross primary production. Simulations of vegetation dynamics under a scenario

  5. Roman Catholic beliefs produce characteristic neural responses to moral dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julia F; Flexas, Albert; de Miguel, Pedro; Cela-Conde, Camilo J; Munar, Enric

    2014-02-01

    This study provides exploratory evidence about how behavioral and neural responses to standard moral dilemmas are influenced by religious belief. Eleven Catholics and 13 Atheists (all female) judged 48 moral dilemmas. Differential neural activity between the two groups was found in precuneus and in prefrontal, frontal and temporal regions. Furthermore, a double dissociation showed that Catholics recruited different areas for deontological (precuneus; temporoparietal junction) and utilitarian moral judgments [dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC); temporal poles], whereas Atheists did not (superior parietal gyrus for both types of judgment). Finally, we tested how both groups responded to personal and impersonal moral dilemmas: Catholics showed enhanced activity in DLPFC and posterior cingulate cortex during utilitarian moral judgments to impersonal moral dilemmas and enhanced responses in anterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus during deontological moral judgments to personal moral dilemmas. Our results indicate that moral judgment can be influenced by an acquired set of norms and conventions transmitted through religious indoctrination and practice. Catholic individuals may hold enhanced awareness of the incommensurability between two unequivocal doctrines of the Catholic belief set, triggered explicitly in a moral dilemma: help and care in all circumstances-but thou shalt not kill.

  6. Roman Catholic beliefs produce characteristic neural responses to moral dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Flexas, Albert; de Miguel, Pedro; Cela-Conde, Camilo J.; Munar, Enric

    2014-01-01

    This study provides exploratory evidence about how behavioral and neural responses to standard moral dilemmas are influenced by religious belief. Eleven Catholics and 13 Atheists (all female) judged 48 moral dilemmas. Differential neural activity between the two groups was found in precuneus and in prefrontal, frontal and temporal regions. Furthermore, a double dissociation showed that Catholics recruited different areas for deontological (precuneus; temporoparietal junction) and utilitarian moral judgments [dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC); temporal poles], whereas Atheists did not (superior parietal gyrus for both types of judgment). Finally, we tested how both groups responded to personal and impersonal moral dilemmas: Catholics showed enhanced activity in DLPFC and posterior cingulate cortex during utilitarian moral judgments to impersonal moral dilemmas and enhanced responses in anterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal sulcus during deontological moral judgments to personal moral dilemmas. Our results indicate that moral judgment can be influenced by an acquired set of norms and conventions transmitted through religious indoctrination and practice. Catholic individuals may hold enhanced awareness of the incommensurability between two unequivocal doctrines of the Catholic belief set, triggered explicitly in a moral dilemma: help and care in all circumstances—but thou shalt not kill. PMID:23160812

  7. Experimental measurement of utricle system dynamic response to inertial stimulus.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, M D; Grant, J W

    2014-08-01

    The membranous utricle sac of the red-eared turtle was mounted in a piezoelectric actuated platform mounted on the stage of a light microscope. The piezoelectric actuator oscillated the base of the neuroepithelium along a linear axis. Displacements were in the plane of the utricle and consisted of a linear sinusoidal-sweep signal starting at 0 and increasing to 500 Hz over 5 s. This inertial stimulus caused measurable shear displacement of the otoconial layer's dorsal surface, resulting in shear deformation of the gelatinous and column filament layers. Displacements of the otoconial layer and a reference point on the neuroepithelium were filmed at 2,000 frames/s with a high-speed video camera during oscillations. Image registration was performed on the video to track displacements with a resolution better than 15 nm. The displacement waveforms were then matched to a linear second-order model of the dynamic system. The model match identified two system mechanical parameters-the natural circular frequency ω n and the damping ratio ζ-that characterized the utricle dynamic response. The median values found for the medial-lateral axis on 20 utricles with 95 % confidence intervals in parenthesis were as follows: ω n = 374 (353, 396) Hz and ζ = 0.50 (0.47, 0.53). The anterior-posterior axis values were not significantly different: ω n = 409 (390, 430) Hz and ζ = 0.53 (0.48, 0.57). The results have two relevant and significant dynamic system findings: (1) a higher than expected natural frequency and (2) significant under damping. Previous to this study, utricular systems were treated as overdamped and with natural frequencies much lower that measured here. Both of these system performance findings result in excellent utricle time response to acceleration stimuli and a broad frequency bandwidth up to 100 Hz. This study is the first to establish the upper end of this mechanical system frequency response of the utricle in any animal.

  8. Characteristics of antibody responses in Pigeon Fanciers' Lung.

    PubMed

    Nademi, Zohreh; Todryk, Stephen; Baldwin, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    The aetiology of Pigeon Fanciers' Lung (PFL) is believed to include immune complex formation between inhaled pigeon antigens and antibodies generated against them. However it is unclear why some fanciers are asymptomatic despite the presence of high levels of anti-avian antigen antibodies in their serum. In this study we investigated whether qualitative differences in specific antibodies might contribute to disease. IgG responses among pigeon fanciers were determined by ELISA and the functional affinity of IgG1 and IgG2 against a range of pigeon antigens was determined by inhibition ELISA and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). The median titres of IgG1 and IgG2 against all the pigeon antigens tested was higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic fanciers and these differences were significant for anti-pigeon serum IgG1 (P=0.04), anti-fresh pigeon droppings (PDF) IgG2 (P=0.028), anti-old pigeon droppings (PDO) IgG2 (P=0.04) and anti-pigeon intestinal scrapings IgG2 (P=0.03). The functional affinity of IgG1 and IgG2 against PDO was higher in symptomatic individuals (P=0.006 and P=0.002, respectively) whilst the functional affinity of anti-PDF IgG2 was also significantly higher in these patients (P≤0.001). Symptomatic fanciers were also significantly more likely to have a high reaction enthalphy (ΔH) as measured by ITC and thus had higher affinity antibodies against PDO (P=0.044). This data confirms previous studies showing that the magnitude alone of the antibody response to pigeon antigens cannot determine the presence of PFL, but that antibody affinity may be important. ITC is a rapid method of measuring antibody affinity and has diagnostic potential in PFL, and may be of use in other situations where antibody affinity is important.

  9. Time-Structured and Net Intraindividual Variability: Tools for Examining the Development of Dynamic Characteristics and Processes

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2009-01-01

    The study of intraindividual variability is the study of fluctuations, oscillations, adaptations, and “noise” in behavioral outcomes that manifest on micro-time scales. This paper provides a descriptive frame for the combined study of intraindividual variability and aging/development. At the conceptual level, we highlight that the study of intraindividual variability provides access to dynamic characteristics – construct-level descriptions of individuals' capacities for change (e.g., lability), and dynamic processes – the systematic changes individuals' exhibit in response to endogenous and exogenous influences (e.g., regulation). At the methodological level, we review how quantifications of net intraindividual variability (e.g., iSD) and models of time-structured intraindividual variability (e.g., time-series) are being used to measure and describe dynamic characteristics and processes. At the research design level, we point to the benefits of measurement burst study designs, wherein data are obtained across multiple time scales, for the study of development. PMID:20025395

  10. Dynamic localization of a cytoplasmic signal transduction response regulator controls morphogenesis during the Caulobacter cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Christine; Hung, Dean; Shapiro, Lucy

    2001-01-01

    We present evidence that a bacterial signal transduction cascade that couples morphogenesis with cell cycle progression is regulated by dynamic localization of its components. Previous studies have implicated two histidine kinases, DivJ and PleC, and the response regulator, DivK, in the regulation of morphogenesis in the dimorphic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Here, we show that the cytoplasmic response regulator, DivK, exhibits a dynamic, cyclical localization that culminates in asymmetric distribution of DivK within the two cell types that are characteristic of the Caulobacter cell cycle; DivK is dispersed throughout the cytoplasm of the progeny swarmer cell and is localized to the pole of the stalked cell. The membrane-bound DivJ and PleC histidine kinases, which are asymmetrically localized at the opposite poles of the predivisional cell, control the temporal and spatial localization of DivK. DivJ mediates DivK targeting to the poles whereas PleC controls its release from one of the poles at times and places that are consistent with the activities and location of DivJ and PleC in the late predivisional cell. Thus, dynamic changes in subcellular location of multiple components of a signal transduction cascade may constitute a novel mode of prokaryotic regulation to generate and maintain cellular asymmetry. PMID:11274434

  11. Dynamic response and acoustic fatigue of stiffened composite structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soovere, J.

    1984-01-01

    The results of acoustic fatigue and dynamic response tests performed on L-1011 graphite-epoxy (GrE) aileron and panel components are reported. The aileron featured glass microballoons between the GrE skins. Tests yielded random fatigue data from double and single cantilever coupons and modal data from impedance hammer and loudspeaker impulses. Numerical and sample test data were obtained on combined acoustic and shear loads, acoustic and thermal loads, random fatigue and damping of the integrally stiffened and secondary bonded panels. The fatigue data indicate a fatigue life beyond 10 million cycles. The acoustic data suggested that noise transmission could be enhanced in the integrally stiffened panels, which were more acoustic-fatigue resistant than were the secondary bonded panels.

  12. Dynamic, multiaxial impact response of confined and unconfined ceramic rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.L.; Grady, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    A new configuration for impact testing was implemented which yielded time-resolved measurements of the dynamic response of materials undergoing multiaxial strain. With this`-Method, one end of an initially stationary rod (ie., right circular cylinder) of test material was subjected to planar impact with a flat-faced projectile. The test rod was either free (unconfined) or mounted within a close-fitting sleeve which provided lateral confinement. Velocity interferometer diagnostics monitored the axial (longitudinal) velocity of the rod free end, and the transverse (radial) velocity for one or more points on the periphery of the rod or confinement sleeve. Analysis of the resultant velocity records allowed assessment of material properties, such as wave speeds and compressive yield strength, without the requirement of intact recovery of the rod. Data were obtained for alumina (Coors AD-99.5) rods in a series of tests involving variations in confinement and peak impact stress.

  13. Dynamic response of the cavitating LE-7 LOX pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takashi; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Ujino, Isao

    The dynamic response of the LE-7 engine LOX pump under cavitating conditions was investigated by perturbation tests using cryogenic fluid in order to obtain data for the analysis of the H-II rocket POGO phenomena. Mass flow gain factor, M(sub b), and cavitation compliance, C(sub b), were determined by pressure data using resonant frequency. M(sub b) and C(sub b) show cavity volume change rates due to flow fluctuation and pressure fluctuations, respectively. A large accumulator was installed in the vicinity of the pump inlet in order to eliminate the upstream effects. The test results of M(sub b) agreed well with the values calculated by equations presented in the literature. However, the test results of C(sub b) were quite different from the calculated values.

  14. Dynamic response of shear thickening fluid under laser induced shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xianqian Yin, Qiuyun; Huang, Chenguang; Zhong, Fachun

    2015-02-16

    The dynamic response of the 57 vol./vol. % dense spherical silica particle-polyethylene glycol suspension at high pressure was investigated through short pulsed laser induced shock experiments. The measured back free surface velocities by a photonic Doppler velocimetry showed that the shock and the particle velocities decreased while the shock wave transmitted in the shear thickening fluid (STF), from which an equation of state for the STF was obtained. In addition, the peak stress decreased and the absorbed energy increased rapidly with increasing the thickness for a thin layer of the STF, which should be attributed to the impact-jammed behavior through compression of particle matrix, the deformation or crack of the hard-sphere particles, and the volume compression of the particles and the polyethylene glycol.

  15. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The computational model consists of a sharp-edged delta wing of aspect ratio one and swept-back flexible twin tail with taper ratio of 0.23. The configuration model is statically pitched at 30 deg. angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4 deg. and reduced frequency of pi and 2(pi). The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.3 and 1.25 million, respectively. This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The configuration is investigated for inboard position of the twin tails which corresponds to a separation distance between the twin tails of 33% wing span. The computed results are compared with the results of stationary configuration, which previously have been validated using experimental data. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration.

  16. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  17. Estimating Testing Time: The Effects of Item Characteristics on Response Latency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halkitis, Perry N.; And Others

    The relationship between test item characteristics and testing time was studied for a computer-administered licensing examination. One objective of the study was to develop a model to predict testing time on the basis of known item characteristics. Response latencies (i.e., the amount of time taken by examinees to read, review, and answer items)…

  18. Pressure Dynamic Characteristics of Pressure Controlled Ventilation System of a Lung Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan; Ren, Shuai; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing; Deng, Qiyou

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation is an important life support treatment of critically ill patients, and air pressure dynamics of human lung affect ventilation treatment effects. In this paper, in order to obtain the influences of seven key parameters of mechanical ventilation system on the pressure dynamics of human lung, firstly, mechanical ventilation system was considered as a pure pneumatic system, and then its mathematical model was set up. Furthermore, to verify the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator was proposed for experimental study. Last, simulation and experimental studies on the air flow dynamic of the mechanical ventilation system were done, and then the pressure dynamic characteristics of the mechanical system were obtained. The study can be referred to in the pulmonary diagnostics, treatment, and design of various medical devices or diagnostic systems. PMID:25197318

  19. Response characteristics of DOC flushing in an alpine catchment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyer, E.W.; Hornberger, G.M.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1997-01-01

    The spatial distribution of source areas and associated residence times of water in the catchment are significant factors controlling the annual cycles of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in Deer Creek (Summit County, Colorado). During spring snowmelt (April-August 1992), stream DOC concentrations increased with the rising limb of the hydrograph, peaked before maximum discharge, then declined rapidly as melting continued. We investigated catchment sources of DOC to streamflow, measuring DOC in tension lysimeters, groundwater wells, snow and streamflow. Lysimeter data indicate that near-surface soil horizons are a primary contributor of DOC to streamflow during spring snowmelt. Concentrations of DOC in the lysimeters decrease rapidly during the melt period, supporting the hypothesis that hydrological flushing of catchment soils is the primary mechanism affecting the temporal variation of DOC in Deer Creek. Time constants of DOC flushing, characterizing the exponential decay of DOC concentration in the upper soil horizon, ranged from 10 to 30 days for the 10 lysimeter sites. Differences in the rate of flushing are influenced by topographical position, with near-stream riparian soils flushed more quickly than soils located further upslope. Variation in the amount of distribution of accumulated snow, and asynchronous melting of the snowpack across the landscape, staggered the onset of the spring flush throughout the catchment, prolonging the period of increased concentrations of DOC in the stream. Streamflow integrates the catchment-scale flushing responses, yielding a time constant associated with the recession of DOC in the stream channel (84 days) that is significantly longer than the time constants observed for particular locations in the upper soil. ?? 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Gene Expression Dynamics Accompanying the Sponge Thermal Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Christine; Conaco, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Marine sponges are important members of coral reef ecosystems. Thus, their responses to changes in ocean chemistry and environmental conditions, particularly to higher seawater temperatures, will have potential impacts on the future of these reefs. To better understand the sponge thermal stress response, we investigated gene expression dynamics in the shallow water sponge, Haliclona tubifera (order Haplosclerida, class Demospongiae), subjected to elevated temperature. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, we show that these conditions result in the activation of various processes that interact to maintain cellular homeostasis. Short-term thermal stress resulted in the induction of heat shock proteins, antioxidants, and genes involved in signal transduction and innate immunity pathways. Prolonged exposure to thermal stress affected the expression of genes involved in cellular damage repair, apoptosis, signaling and transcription. Interestingly, exposure to sublethal temperatures may improve the ability of the sponge to mitigate cellular damage under more extreme stress conditions. These insights into the potential mechanisms of adaptation and resilience of sponges contribute to a better understanding of sponge conservation status and the prediction of ecosystem trajectories under future climate conditions. PMID:27788197

  1. Dynamic Visual Acuity Associated With Eye Movements And Pupillary Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suaste, Ernesto; García, Nadia; Rodríguez, Dolores; Zúñiga, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Objectively was evaluate dynamic visual acuity (DVA), using moving optotypes, while monitoring eye movements and pupillary responses. Under controlled conditions of luminance and contrast the viewers were asked to look carefully at a moving alphabetic letter. The letter was moved in the horizontal plane at a determined speed by a sinusoidal frequency generator. The initial frequency was gradually incremented until the viewer reported was not able to distinguish the object. Objective measures of DVA were obtained using video-oculography (VOG) in which, pupillary images and eye movements were analyzed by image processing. We found that when a large dilatation of the pupil is presented coincided with a pause eye movement (0.1s). It was when the viewer leaves to see clearly the letter of Snellen. The changes of pupil diameter of the five viewers were found averages to nasal trajectory from 3.58 mm (0 Hz) to 3.85 mm (1Hz), and to temporal trajectory from 3.54 mm (0 Hz) to 3.96 mm (1 Hz). Also, the bandwidth since 0.6 to 1.2 Hz, of the viewers due to the response at the stimulus (letter of Snellen) with 20° of amplitude, was obtained.

  2. Floating clamping mechanism of PT fuel injector and its dynamic characteristics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinqing; Liang, Sheng; Xia, Tian; Wang, Dong; Qian, Shuhua

    2012-05-01

    PT fuel injector is one of the most important parts of modern diesel engine. To satisfy the requirements of the rapid and accurate test of PT fuel injector, the self-adaptive floating clamping mechanism was developed and used in the relevant bench. Its dynamic characteristics directly influence the test efficiency and accuracy. However, due to its special structure and complex oil pressure signal, related documents for evaluating dynamic characteristics of this mechanism are lack and some dynamic characteristics of this mechanism can't be extracted and recognized effectively by traditional methods. Aiming at the problem above-mentioned, a new method based on Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is presented. Firstly, combining with the actual working process, the dynamic liquid pressure signal of the mechanism is acquired. By analyzing the pressure fluctuation during the whole working process in time domain, oil leakage and hydraulic shock in the clamping chamber are discovered. Secondly, owing to the nonlinearity and nonstationarity of pressure signal, empirical mode decomposition is used, and the signal is decomposed and reconstructed into forced vibration, free vibration and noise. By analyzing forced vibration in the time domain, machining error and installation error of cam are revealed. Finally, free vibration component is analyzed in time-frequency domain with HHT, the traits of free vibration in the time-frequency domain are revealed. Compared with traditional methods, Hilbert spectrum has higher time-frequency resolutions and higher credibility. The improved mechanism based on the above analyses can guarantee the test accuracy of injector injection. This new method based on the analyses of the pressure signal and combined with HHT can provide scientific basis for evaluation, design improvement of the mechanism, and give references for dynamic characteristics analysis of the hydraulic system in the interrelated fields.

  3. Measurement of Soil-Ionization Characteristics of Groundingand its Analysis using Dynamic Grounding Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Yoh; Kondo, Shuhei; Hara, Takehisa; Ikeda, Keiichi; Sonoi, Yasuo; Furuoka, Yoshihiro

    It is well known that grounding resistance has a current-dependent characteristic, whose phenomena and models have been reported and proposed by many investigators as well as Liew and Darveniza. As far as lightning analysis, especially in Japan, the grounding resistance has been simulated as a simple constant lump resistance. The goal of the authors’ investigation is to utilize those characteristics to lightning protection and make a certain methodology to save construction cost for UHV transmission tower on very high resistivity soil. We, therefore, focus on the characteristic of grounding resistance of tower footing for 500 kV transmission line. In this paper, we discuss measurement on high-current injected experiment using an actual tower footing base and its analysis, where we employ dynamic characteristic of the grounding resistance proposed by Liew and Darveniza. Comparison between the observed result and the calculated one is also discussed.

  4. Dynamic Docking Test System (DDTS) active table frequency response test results. [Apollo Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of the frequency response test performed on the dynamic docking test system (DDTS) active table. Sinusoidal displacement commands were applied to the table and the dynamic response determined from measured actuator responses and accelerometers mounted to the table and one actuator.

  5. FAST Simulation Tool Containing Methods for Predicting the Dynamic Response of Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Jonkman, Jason

    2015-08-12

    FAST is a simulation tool (computer software) for modeling tlie dynamic response of horizontal-axis wind turbines. FAST employs a combined modal and multibody structural-dynamics formulation in the time domain.

  6. Dynamic characteristics of helium adsorbents. Influence of the heat removal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbachenko, R. I.; Grigor'ev, V. N.

    2008-06-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of the adsorbent SKN-1K at 4.2K are investigated under conditions corresponding to the working conditions of adsorption pumps in dilution refrigerators. It is shown that gluing this adsorbent to the cooled surface leads to a substantial lowering of the pressure in the pump in the dynamic regime. On the basis of experimental data for the glued and free adsorbent an estimate is made of the hydrodynamic contribution to the pressure due to the resistance of the pores of the adsorbent. This estimate falls within the error of measurement.

  7. Plant growth in controlled environments in response to characteristics of nutrient solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Plant growth in controlled environments in response to characteristics of nutrient solutions is discussed. Descriptions of experimental results concerning root acclimation to temperature, root and shoot acclimation to nitrogen stress, and growth response to NH4(+) and NO3(-) nutrition are included. A preliminary model validation to changing temperatures is presented.

  8. Silicon-based dynamic synapse with depressing response.

    PubMed

    Dowrick, Thomas; Hall, Steve; McDaid, Liam J

    2012-10-01

    A compact implementation of a dynamic charge transfer synapse cell, capable of implementing synaptic depression, is presented. The cell is combined with a simple current mirror summing node to produce biologically plausible postsynaptic potentials (PSPs). A single charge packet is effectively transferred from the synapse to the summing node, whenever a presynaptic pulse is applied to one of its terminals. The charge packet is "weighted" by a voltage applied to the second terminal of the synapse. A voltage applied to the third terminal determines the charge recovery time in the synapse, which can be adjusted over several orders of magnitude. This voltage determines the paired pulse ratio for the synapse. The fall time of the PSP is also adjustable and is set by the gate voltage of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor operating in subthreshold. Results extracted from chips fabricated in a 0.35-μm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor process, alongside theoretical and simulation results, confirm the ability of the cell to produce PSPs that are characteristic of real synapses. The concept addresses a key requirement for scalable hardware neural networks. PMID:24807998

  9. The dynamic ergodic divertor in the TEXTOR tokamak: plasma response to dynamic helical magnetic field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Biel, W.; de Bock, M. F. M.; Busch, C.; Farshi, E.; von Hellermann, M.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Jakubowski, M.; Jaspers, R.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kraemer-Flecken, A.; Lazaros, A.; Lehnen, M.; Liang, Y.; Nicolai, A.; Schmitz, O.; Unterberg, B.; Westerhof, E.; Wolf, R.; Zimmermann, O.; de Baar, M.; Bertschinger, G.; Brezinsek, S.; Classen, I. G. J.; Donné, A. J. H.; Esser, H. G.; Gerhauser, H.; Giesen, B.; Harting, D.; Hoekzema, J. A.; Huettemann, P. W.; Jachmich, S.; Jakubowska, K.; Kalupin, D.; Kelly, F.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kirschner, A.; Koch, R.; Korten, M.; Kreter, A.; Krom, J.; Kruezi, U.; Litnovsky, A.; Loozen, X.; Lopes Cardozo, N. J.; Lyssoivan, A.; Marchuk, O.; Mertens, Ph; Messiaen, A.; Neubauer, O.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Reiser, D.; Reiter, D.; Rogister, A. L.; Van Rompuy, T.; Savtchkov, A.; Samm, U.; Schorn, R. P.; Schueller, F. C.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Telesca, K. H. G.; Tokar, M.; Van Oost, G.; Uhlemann, R.; Van Wassenhove, G.; Weynants, R.; Wiesen, S.; Xu, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Recently, the dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) of TEXTOR has been studied in an m/n = 3/1 set-up which is characterized by a relatively deep penetration of the perturbation field. The perturbation field creates (a) a helical divertor, (b) an ergodic pattern and/or (c) excitation of tearing modes, depending on whether the DED current is static, rotating in the co-current direction or in the counter-current direction. Characteristic divertor properties such as the high recycling regime or enhanced shielding have been studied. A strong effect of the ergodization is spin up of the plasma rotation, possibly due to the electric field at the plasma edge. Tearing modes are excited in a rather reproducible way and their excitation threshold value, their motion and their reduction due to the ECRH/ECCD have been studied. The different scenarios are characterized by strong modifications of the toroidal velocity profile and by a reduced or enhanced radial transport.

  10. Effect Of Dynamic Characteristics of Power Supplies on Aerosol Composition While Welding With Coated Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Sadikov, I. D.

    2016-08-01

    In the context of a significant increase in production output and use of welding technologies in the manufacturing of engineering products the problem of hygienic characteristics of working conditions in arc fusion welding is becoming increasingly important. The work represents how the dynamic characteristics of a power supply affect the transfer of alloying elements from a coated electrode into a base metal, a slag phase and a solid component of welding fumes. Short-circuit current limiting in inverters reduces overheating of electrode metal drops by 15%; welding fumes quantitative component - to 38%; manganese - to 30%; thermal radiation intensity - by 37%.

  11. Dynamic characteristics of 4H-SiC drift step recovery diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A. Kon’kov, O. I.; Samsonova, T. P.; Potapov, A. S.; Grekhov, I. V.

    2015-11-15

    The dynamic characteristics of 4H-SiC p{sup +}–p–n{sub 0}–n{sup +} diodes are experimentally studied in the pulsed modes characteristic of the operation of drift step recovery diodes (DSRD-mode). The effect of the subnanosecond termination of the reverse current maintained by electron-hole plasma preliminarily pumped by a forward current pulse is analyzed in detail. The influence exerted on the DSRD effect by the amplitude of reverse-voltage pulses, the amplitude and duration of forward-current pulses, and the time delay between the forward and reverse pulses is demonstrated and accounted for.

  12. Dynamic voltage-current characteristics for a water jet plasma arc

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jiaxiang; Lan Sheng; Xu Zuoming

    2008-05-05

    A virtual instrument technology is used to measure arc current, arc voltage, dynamic V-I characteristics, and nonlinear conductance for a cone-shaped water jet plasma arc under ac voltage. Experimental results show that ac arc discharge mainly happens in water vapor evaporated from water when heated. However, due to water's cooling effect and its conductance, arc conductance, reignition voltage, extinguish voltage, and current zero time are very different from those for ac arc discharge in gas work fluid. These can be valuable to further studies on mechanism and characteristics of plasma ac discharge in water, and even in gas work fluid.

  13. Experimental damage detection of cracked beams by using nonlinear characteristics of forced response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreaus, U.; Baragatti, P.

    2012-08-01

    Experimental evaluation of the flexural forced vibrations of a steel cantilever beam having a transverse surface crack extending uniformly along the width of the beam was performed, where an actual fatigue crack was introduced instead - as usual - of a narrow slot. The nonlinear aspects of the dynamic response of the beam under harmonic excitation were considered and the relevant quantitative parameters were evaluated, in order to relate the nonlinear resonances to the presence and size of the crack. To this end, the existence of sub- and super-harmonic components in the Fourier spectra of the acceleration signals was evidenced, and their amplitudes were quantified. In particular, the acceleration signals were measured in different positions along the beam axis and under different forcing levels at the beam tip. The remarkable relevance of the above mentioned nonlinear characteristics, and their substantial independence on force magnitude and measurement point were worthily noted in comparison with the behavior of the intact beam. Thus, a reliable method of damage detection was proposed which was based on simple tests requiring only harmonically forcing and acceleration measuring in any point non-necessarily near the crack. Then, the time-history of the acceleration recorded at the beam tip was numerically processed in order to obtain the time-histories of velocity and displacement. The nonlinear features of the forced response were described and given a physical interpretation in order to define parameters suitable for damage detection. The efficiency of such parameters was discussed with respect to the their capability of detecting damage and a procedure for damage detection was proposed which was able to detect even small cracks by using simple instruments. A finite element model of the cantilever beam was finally assembled and tuned in order to numerically simulate the results of the experimental tests.

  14. Influence of immobilization strategies on biosensing response characteristics: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Saha, Shibu; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    The immobilization technique plays an important role in fabrication of a biosensor. NiO based cholesterol biosensor has been used to study the effect of various immobilization techniques on the biosensing response characteristics. The biosensors were fabricated by immobilizing cholesterol oxidase on NiO thin films by three different immobilization techniques viz. physisorption, cross-linking and covalent binding. The study reveals a strong dependence of biosensing response on corresponding immobilization technique. The biosensor based on immobilization by covalent bonding shows superior response characteristics as compared to others owing to its zero length. The results highlight the significance of immobilization technique for biosensor fabrication.

  15. Some buffet response characteristics of a twin-vertical-tail configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R.; Moss, Steven W.; Doggett, Robert V., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A rigid, 1/6 size, full span model of an F-18 airplane was fitted with flexible vertical tails of two different levels of stiffness that were buffet tested in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Vertical tail buffet response results that were obtained over the range of angles of attack from -10 to 40 degs, and over the range of Mach numbers from 0.30 to 0.95 are presented. These results indicate the following: (1) the response occurs in the first bending mode; (2) the response increases with increasing dynamic pressure, but changes in response are not linearly proportional to the changes in dynamic pressure; (3) the response is larger at M = 0.30 than it is at the higher Mach numbers; (4) the maximum intensity of the buffeting is described as heavy to severe using an assessment criteria proposed by another investigator; and (5) the data at different dynamic pressures and for the different tails correlate reasonably well using the buffet excitation parameter derived from the dynamic analysis of buffeting.

  16. Dynamic Response of Magnetic Reconnection Due to Current Sheet Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, D. E.; Jahn, J. M.; Burch, J. L.; Hesse, M.; Pollock, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process which regulates the interaction between regions of magnetized plasma. While many factors have an impact on the evolution of this process, there still remains a lack of understanding of the key behaviors involved in the triggering of fast reconnection. Despite an abundance of in-situ measurements, indicating the high degree of variability in the thickness, density and composition along the current sheet, no simulation studies exist which account for such current sheet variations. 2D and 3D simulations have a periodic boundary in the dimension along the current sheet and so tend to neglect these variations in the current sheet originating external to the modeled reconnection region. Here we focus on the effects on reconnection due to the variability in the thickness and density of the current sheet. Using 2.5D kinetic simulations of 2-species plasma, we isolate and explore the dynamic effects on reconnection associated with variations in the current sheet originating externally to the reconnection region. While periodic boundary conditions are still used, in the direction along the current sheet, a step-change perturbation in thickness or density of the current sheet is introduced once a stable reconnection rate is reached. The dynamic response of the overall system, after introducing the perturbation, is then evaluated, with a focus on the reconnection rate. When the reconnection rate is slowed significantly over time, loading of the inflow region occurs (a build-up of plasma and magnetic energy/pressure. This state is indicated by an asymptotic behavior in the reconnection rate over time. If a sudden variation in the current sheet is introduced under these conditions, a resultant triggering of fast reconnection may occur, which could lead to an episode of fast reconnection, saw-tooth-crash condition or even act as a trigger for sub-storms.

  17. Methane dynamics regulated by microbial community response to permafrost thaw.

    PubMed

    McCalley, Carmody K; Woodcroft, Ben J; Hodgkins, Suzanne B; Wehr, Richard A; Kim, Eun-Hae; Mondav, Rhiannon; Crill, Patrick M; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Rich, Virginia I; Tyson, Gene W; Saleska, Scott R

    2014-10-23

    Permafrost contains about 50% of the global soil carbon. It is thought that the thawing of permafrost can lead to a loss of soil carbon in the form of methane and carbon dioxide emissions. The magnitude of the resulting positive climate feedback of such greenhouse gas emissions is still unknown and may to a large extent depend on the poorly understood role of microbial community composition in regulating the metabolic processes that drive such ecosystem-scale greenhouse gas fluxes. Here we show that changes in vegetation and increasing methane emissions with permafrost thaw are associated with a switch from hydrogenotrophic to partly acetoclastic methanogenesis, resulting in a large shift in the δ(13)C signature (10-15‰) of emitted methane. We used a natural landscape gradient of permafrost thaw in northern Sweden as a model to investigate the role of microbial communities in regulating methane cycling, and to test whether a knowledge of community dynamics could improve predictions of carbon emissions under loss of permafrost. Abundance of the methanogen Candidatus 'Methanoflorens stordalenmirensis' is a key predictor of the shifts in methane isotopes, which in turn predicts the proportions of carbon emitted as methane and as carbon dioxide, an important factor for simulating the climate feedback associated with permafrost thaw in global models. By showing that the abundance of key microbial lineages can be used to predict atmospherically relevant patterns in methane isotopes and the proportion of carbon metabolized to methane during permafrost thaw, we establish a basis for scaling changing microbial communities to ecosystem isotope dynamics. Our findings indicate that microbial ecology may be important in ecosystem-scale responses to global change. PMID:25341787

  18. River, delta and coastal morphological response accounting for biological dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, W.; Bernardi, D.; Schippa, L.

    2015-03-01

    Management and construction can increase resilience in the face of climate change, and benefits can be enhanced through integration of biogenic materials including shells and vegetation. Rivers and coastal landforms are dynamic systems that respond to intentional and unintended manipulation of critical factors, often with unforeseen and/or undesirable resulting effects. River management strategies have impacts that include deltas and coastal areas which are increasingly vulnerable to climate change with reference to sea level rise and storm intensity. Whereas conventional assessment and analysis of rivers and coasts has relied on modelling of hydrology, hydraulics and sediment transport, incorporating additional biological factors can offer more comprehensive, beneficial and realistic alternatives. Suitable modelling tools can provide improved decision support. The question has been whether current models can effectively address biological responses with suitable reliability and efficiency. Since morphodynamic evolution exhibits its effects on a large timescale, the choice of mathematical model is not trivial and depends upon the availability of data, as well as the spatial extent, timelines and computation effort desired. The ultimate goal of the work is to set up a conveniently simplified river morphodynamic model, coupled with a biological dynamics plant population model able to predict the long-term evolution of large alluvial river systems managed through bioengineering. This paper presents the first step of the work related to the application of the model accounting for stationary vegetation condition. Sensitivity analysis has been performed on the main hydraulic, sedimentology, and biological parameters. The model has been applied to significant river training in Europe, Asia and North America, and comparative analysis has been used to validate analytical solutions. Data gaps and further areas for investigation are identified.

  19. Influence of ground parameters on the dynamic responses of anchored bedding rock slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhi-xin; Gao, Le; Peng, Ningbo; Gao, Gang

    2013-10-01

    To research the influence of ground parameters on the dynamic responses of anchored bedding rock slope, a dynamic numerical simulation model of bedding rock slope with bolts was established using FLAC3D. The alteration of dynamic response with displacements and accelerations at monitoring points along the slope surface was set as analysis basis. The effects on dynamic responses of slope with different ground parameters, such as waves, frequencies and amplitudes were analyzed. It demonstrated great help for the dynamic stability analysis and slope design when it is supported with anchor under earthquake.

  20. Effects of automobile steering characteristics on driver vehicle system dynamics in regulation tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcruer, D. T.; Klein, R.

    1975-01-01

    A regulation task which subjected the automobile to a random gust disturbance which is countered by driver control action is used to study the effects of various automobile steering characteristics on the driver/vehicle system. The experiments used a variable stability automobile specially configured to permit insertion of the simulated gust disturbance and the measurement of the driver/vehicle system characteristics. Driver/vehicle system dynamics were measured and interpreted as an effective open loop system describing function. Objective measures of system bandwidth, stability, and time delays were deduced and compared. These objective measures were supplemented by driver ratings. A tentative optimum range of vehicle dynamics for the directional regulation task was established.

  1. Aerodynamic characteristics of the standard dynamics model in coning motion at Mach 0.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jermey, C.; Schiff, L. B.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted on the Standard Dynamics Model (a simplified generic fighter aircraft shape) undergoing coning motion at Mach 0.6. Six component force and moment data are presented for a range of angle of attack, sideslip, and coning rates. At the relatively low non-dimensional coning rate employed (omega b/2V less than or equal to 0.04), the lateral aerodynamic characteristics generally show a linear variation with coning rate.

  2. Stress-induced variation in magnetization and the dynamic magnetostrictive characteristic of soft magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonda, P.

    1980-04-01

    The low-field magnetostrictive properties of amorphous ribbons are examined. From the measured hysteresis loops of as-prepared samples of Fe 35Co 32B 20Si 10Al 3, (FeNi) 80B 17.5Al 2Si 0.5 the stress-induced variation of the magnetization is used for the calculation of the dynamic magnetostrictive characteristic Δλ( H) and λ( H). The resulting hysteresis loops may be attributed to the curling magnetization mode.

  3. Loading Dynamics and Characteristics of a Far Off-Resonance Optical Dipole Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickelson, P. G.; Martinez, Y. N.; Nagel, S. B.; Traverso, A. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2007-10-01

    We implement an optical dipole trap in a crossed beam configuration for experiments with ultracold strontium. Strontium atoms cooled to nearly 1 μK are loaded into the optical dipole trap from a magneto-optical trap operating on the 689 nm intercombination line. Loading dynamics and characteristics of the far off-resonance dipole trap are explored as part of our group's study of ultracold collisions in strontium.

  4. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-15

    Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

  5. Comparison of cardiovascular response to combined static-dynamic effort, postprandial dynamic effort and dynamic effort alone in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, J.; McKillip, J.; Savin, W.; Magder, S.; Kraus, R.; Houston, N.; Goris, M.; Haskell, W.; DeBusk, R.

    1982-06-01

    The cardiovascular responses to combined static-dynamic effort, postprandial dynamic effort and dynamic effort alone were evaluated by upright bicycle ergometry during equilibrium-gated blood pool scintigraphy in 24 men, mean age 59 +/- 8 years, with chronic ischemic heart disease. Combined static-dynamic effort and the postprandial state elicited a peak cardiovascular response similar to that of dynamic effort alone. Heart rate, intraarterial systolic and diastolic pressures, rate-pressure product and ejection fraction were similar for the three test conditions at the onset of ischemia and at peak effort. The prevalence and extent of exercise-induced ischemic left ventricular dysfunction, ST-segment depression, angina pectoris and ventricular ectopic activity were also similar during the three test conditions. Direct and indirect measurements of systolic and diastolic blood pressure were highly correlated. The onset of ischemic ST-segment depression and angina pectoris correlated as strongly with heart rate alone as with the rate-pressure product during all three test conditions. The cardiovascular response to combined static-dynamic effort and to postprandial dynamic effort becomes more similar to that of dynamic effort alone as dynamic effort reaches a symptom limit. If significant ischemic and arrhythmic abnormalities are absent during symptom-limited dynamic exercise testing, they are unlikely to appear during combined static-dynamic or postprandial dynamic effort.

  6. Dynamics of the microbiota in response to host infection.

    PubMed

    Belzer, Clara; Gerber, Georg K; Roeselers, Guus; Delaney, Mary; DuBois, Andrea; Liu, Qing; Belavusava, Vera; Yeliseyev, Vladimir; Houseman, Andres; Onderdonk, Andrew; Cavanaugh, Colleen; Bry, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of the microbiota are important for discovering changes in microbial communities that affect the host. The complexity of these ecosystems requires rigorous integrated experimental and computational methods to identify temporal signatures that promote physiologic or pathophysiologic responses in vivo. Employing a murine model of infectious colitis with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, we generated a 2-month time-series of 16S rDNA gene profiles, and quantitatively cultured commensals, from multiple intestinal sites in infected and uninfected mice. We developed a computational framework to discover time-varying signatures for individual taxa, and to automatically group signatures to identify microbial sub-communities within the larger gut ecosystem that demonstrate common behaviors. Application of this model to the 16S rDNA dataset revealed dynamic alterations in the microbiota at multiple levels of resolution, from effects on systems-level metrics to changes across anatomic sites for individual taxa and species. These analyses revealed unique, time-dependent microbial signatures associated with host responses at different stages of colitis. Signatures included a Mucispirillum OTU associated with early disruption of the colonic surface mucus layer, prior to the onset of symptomatic colitis, and members of the Clostridiales and Lactobacillales that increased with successful resolution of inflammation, after clearance of the pathogen. Quantitative culture data validated findings for predominant species, further refining and strengthening model predictions. These findings provide new insights into the complex behaviors found within host ecosystems, and define several time-dependent microbial signatures that may be leveraged in studies of other infectious or inflammatory conditions. PMID:25014551

  7. Dynamic involvement of ATG5 in cellular stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Lin, H H; Lin, S-M; Chung, Y; Vonderfecht, S; Camden, J M; Flodby, P; Borok, Z; Limesand, K H; Mizushima, N; Ann, D K

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy maintains cell and tissue homeostasis through catabolic degradation. To better delineate the in vivo function for autophagy in adaptive responses to tissue injury, we examined the impact of compromised autophagy in mouse submandibular glands (SMGs) subjected to main excretory duct ligation. Blocking outflow from exocrine glands causes glandular atrophy by increased ductal pressure. Atg5f/−;Aqp5-Cre mice with salivary acinar-specific knockout (KO) of autophagy essential gene Atg5 were generated. While duct ligation induced autophagy and the expression of inflammatory mediators, SMGs in Atg5f/−;Aqp5-Cre mice, before ligation, already expressed higher levels of proinflammatory cytokine and Cdkn1a/p21 messages. Extended ligation period resulted in the caspase-3 activation and acinar cell death, which was delayed by Atg5 knockout. Moreover, expression of a set of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors was elevated in the post-ligated glands. Dysregulation of cell-cycle inhibitor CDKN1A/p21 and activation of senescence-associated β-galactosidase were detected in the stressed SMG duct cells. These senescence markers peaked at day 3 after ligation and partially resolved by day 7 in post-ligated SMGs of wild-type (WT) mice, but not in KO mice. The role of autophagy-related 5 (ATG5)-dependent autophagy in regulating the tempo, duration and magnitude of cellular stress responses in vivo was corroborated by in vitro studies using MEFs lacking ATG5 or autophagy-related 7 (ATG7) and autophagy inhibitors. Collectively, our results highlight the role of ATG5 in the dynamic regulation of ligation-induced cellular senescence and apoptosis, and suggest the involvement of autophagy resolution in salivary repair. PMID:25341032

  8. Dynamic response signatures of a scaled model platform for floating wind turbines in an ocean wave basin

    PubMed Central

    Jaksic, V.; O'Shea, R.; Cahill, P.; Murphy, J.; Mandic, D. P.; Pakrashi, V.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of dynamic behaviour of offshore wind floating substructures is extremely important in relation to design, operation, maintenance and management of floating wind farms. This paper presents assessment of nonlinear signatures of dynamic responses of a scaled tension-leg platform (TLP) in a wave tank exposed to different regular wave conditions and sea states characterized by the Bretschneider, the Pierson–Moskowitz and the JONSWAP spectra. Dynamic responses of the TLP were monitored at different locations using load cells, a camera-based motion recognition system and a laser Doppler vibrometer. The analysis of variability of the TLP responses and statistical quantification of their linearity or nonlinearity, as non-destructive means of structural monitoring from the output-only condition, remains a challenging problem. In this study, the delay vector variance (DVV) method is used to statistically study the degree of nonlinearity of measured response signals from a TLP. DVV is observed to create a marker estimating the degree to which a change in signal nonlinearity reflects real-time behaviour of the structure and also to establish the sensitivity of the instruments employed to these changes. The findings can be helpful in establishing monitoring strategies and control strategies for undesirable levels or types of dynamic response and can help to better estimate changes in system characteristics over the life cycle of the structure. PMID:25583866

  9. Dynamic response signatures of a scaled model platform for floating wind turbines in an ocean wave basin.

    PubMed

    Jaksic, V; O'Shea, R; Cahill, P; Murphy, J; Mandic, D P; Pakrashi, V

    2015-02-28

    Understanding of dynamic behaviour of offshore wind floating substructures is extremely important in relation to design, operation, maintenance and management of floating wind farms. This paper presents assessment of nonlinear signatures of dynamic responses of a scaled tension-leg platform (TLP) in a wave tank exposed to different regular wave conditions and sea states characterized by the Bretschneider, the Pierson-Moskowitz and the JONSWAP spectra. Dynamic responses of the TLP were monitored at different locations using load cells, a camera-based motion recognition system and a laser Doppler vibrometer. The analysis of variability of the TLP responses and statistical quantification of their linearity or nonlinearity, as non-destructive means of structural monitoring from the output-only condition, remains a challenging problem. In this study, the delay vector variance (DVV) method is used to statistically study the degree of nonlinearity of measured response signals from a TLP. DVV is observed to create a marker estimating the degree to which a change in signal nonlinearity reflects real-time behaviour of the structure and also to establish the sensitivity of the instruments employed to these changes. The findings can be helpful in establishing monitoring strategies and control strategies for undesirable levels or types of dynamic response and can help to better estimate changes in system characteristics over the life cycle of the structure. PMID:25583866

  10. Dynamic response signatures of a scaled model platform for floating wind turbines in an ocean wave basin.

    PubMed

    Jaksic, V; O'Shea, R; Cahill, P; Murphy, J; Mandic, D P; Pakrashi, V

    2015-02-28

    Understanding of dynamic behaviour of offshore wind floating substructures is extremely important in relation to design, operation, maintenance and management of floating wind farms. This paper presents assessment of nonlinear signatures of dynamic responses of a scaled tension-leg platform (TLP) in a wave tank exposed to different regular wave conditions and sea states characterized by the Bretschneider, the Pierson-Moskowitz and the JONSWAP spectra. Dynamic responses of the TLP were monitored at different locations using load cells, a camera-based motion recognition system and a laser Doppler vibrometer. The analysis of variability of the TLP responses and statistical quantification of their linearity or nonlinearity, as non-destructive means of structural monitoring from the output-only condition, remains a challenging problem. In this study, the delay vector variance (DVV) method is used to statistically study the degree of nonlinearity of measured response signals from a TLP. DVV is observed to create a marker estimating the degree to which a change in signal nonlinearity reflects real-time behaviour of the structure and also to establish the sensitivity of the instruments employed to these changes. The findings can be helpful in establishing monitoring strategies and control strategies for undesirable levels or types of dynamic response and can help to better estimate changes in system characteristics over the life cycle of the structure.

  11. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP).

  12. Experimental investigation on dynamic characteristics and strengthening mechanism of laser-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ren, X D; He, H; Tong, Y Q; Ren, Y P; Yuan, S Q; Liu, R; Zuo, C Y; Wu, K; Sui, S; Wang, D S

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic features of nanosecond laser-induced cavitation bubbles near the light alloy boundary were investigated with the high-speed photography. The shock-waves and the dynamic characteristics of the cavitation bubbles generated by the laser were detected using the hydrophone. The dynamic features and strengthening mechanism of cavitation bubbles were studied. The strengthening mechanisms of cavitation bubble were discussed when the relative distance parameter γ was within the range of 0.5-2.5. It showed that the strengthening mechanisms caused by liquid jet or shock-waves depended on γ much. The research results provided a new strengthening method based on laser-induced cavitation shotless peening (CSP). PMID:27150764

  13. Modelling and analysis on biomechanical dynamic characteristics of knee flexion movement under squatting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Tao, Kun; Li, Huanyi; Wang, Chengtao

    2014-01-01

    The model of three-dimensional (3D) geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE) model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR) and knee prosthesis design.

  14. Modelling and Analysis on Biomechanical Dynamic Characteristics of Knee Flexion Movement under Squatting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Tao, Kun; Li, Huanyi; Wang, Chengtao

    2014-01-01

    The model of three-dimensional (3D) geometric knee was built, which included femoral-tibial, patellofemoral articulations and the bone and soft tissues. Dynamic finite element (FE) model of knee was developed to simulate both the kinematics and the internal stresses during knee flexion. The biomechanical experimental system of knee was built to simulate knee squatting using cadaver knees. The flexion motion and dynamic contact characteristics of knee were analyzed, and verified by comparing with the data from in vitro experiment. The results showed that the established dynamic FE models of knee are capable of predicting kinematics and the contact stresses during flexion, and could be an efficient tool for the analysis of total knee replacement (TKR) and knee prosthesis design. PMID:25013852

  15. Dynamic modeling and response of soil-wall systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.

    1993-10-01

    The study reported herein is the third in a series of investigations motivated by need to gain improved understanding of the responses to earthquakes of deeply embedded and underground tanks storing radioactive wastes, and to develop rational but simple methods of analysis and design for such systems. Following a brief review of the errors that may result from the use of a popular model for evaluating the dynamic soil forces induced in a base-excited rigid wall retaining an elastic stratum, the sources of the errors are identified and a modification is proposed which defines correctly the action of the system. In the proposed modification, the stratum is modeled by a series of elastically supported, semi-infinite horizontal bars with distributed mass instead of massless springs. The concepts involved are introduced by reference to a system composed of a fixed-based wall and a homogeneous elastic stratum, and are then applied to the analysis of more complex soil-wall systems. Both harmonic and transient excitations are considered, and comprehensive numerical solutions are presented which elucidate the actions involved and the effects and relative importance of the relevant parameters.

  16. Dynamic Control of Optical Response in Layered Metal Chalcogenide Nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Tom, Kyle; Wang, Xi; Huang, Chunming; Yuan, Hongtao; Ding, Hong; Ko, Changhyun; Suh, Joonki; Pan, Lawrence; Persson, Kristin A; Yao, Jie

    2016-01-13

    Tunable optical transitions in ultrathin layered 2-dimensional (2D) materials unveil the electronic structures of materials and provide exciting prospects for potential applications in optics and photonics. Here, we present our realization of dynamic optical modulation of layered metal chalcogenide nanoplates using ionic liquid (IL) gating over a wide spectral range. The IL gating significantly increased the tuning range of the Fermi level and, as a result, substantially altered the optical transitions in the nanoplates. Using heavily n-doped Bi2Se3 nanoplates, we substantially modulated the light transmission through the ultrathin layer. A tunable, high-transmission spectral window in the visible to near-infrared region has been observed due to simultaneous shifts of both the plasma edge and absorption edge of the material. On the other hand, optical response of multilayer MoSe2 flakes gated by IL has shown enhanced transmission in both positive and negative biases, which is consistent with their ambipolar electrical behavior. The electrically controlled optical property tuning in metal chalcogenide material systems provides new opportunities for potential applications, such as wide spectral range optical modulators, optical filters, and electrically controlled smart windows with extremely low material consumption.

  17. Induced dynamic nonlinear ground response at Gamer Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Z.; Bodin, P.; Langston, C.A.; Pearce, F.; Gomberg, J.; Johnson, P.A.; Menq, F.-Y.; Brackman, T.

    2008-01-01

    We present results from a prototype experiment in which we actively induce, observe, and quantify in situ nonlinear sediment response in the near surface. This experiment was part of a suite of experiments conducted during August 2004 in Garner Valley, California, using a large mobile shaker truck from the Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) facility. We deployed a dense accelerometer array within meters of the mobile shaker truck to replicate a controlled, laboratory-style soil dynamics experiment in order to observe wave-amplitude-dependent sediment properties. Ground motion exceeding 1g acceleration was produced near the shaker truck. The wave field was dominated by Rayleigh surface waves and ground motions were strong enough to produce observable nonlinear changes in wave velocity. We found that as the force load of the shaker increased, the Rayleigh-wave phase velocity decreased by as much as ???30% at the highest frequencies used (up to 30 Hz). Phase velocity dispersion curves were inverted for S-wave velocity as a function of depth using a simple isotropic elastic model to estimate the depth dependence of changes to the velocity structure. The greatest change in velocity occurred nearest the surface, within the upper 4 m. These estimated S-wave velocity values were used with estimates of surface strain to compare with laboratory-based shear modulus reduction measurements from the same site. Our results suggest that it may be possible to characterize nonlinear soil properties in situ using a noninvasive field technique.

  18. Response of borehole extensometers to explosively generated dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.C.; Brough, W.G.

    1980-08-25

    Commercially available, hydraulically anchored, multiple-point borehole extensometers (MPBX) were evaluated with respect to response to dynamic loads produced by explosions. This study is part of the DOE-funded Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C), currently being conducted in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. The SFT-C is an investigation of the feasibility of short-term storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel assemblies at a plausible repository depth in granitic rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies are stored at a depth of 420 m for three to five years, and will then be retrieved. MPBX units are used in the SFT-C to measure both excavation-induced and thermally induced rock displacements. Long-term reliability of extensometers in this hostile environment is essential in order to obtain valid data during the course of this test. Research to date shows conclusively that extensometers of this type continue to function reliably even though subjected to accelerations of 1.8 g; research also implies that they function well though subjected to accelerations in excess of 100 g. MPBX survivability during the first four months of testing at ambient temperatures was about 90 percent.

  19. Spatially dispersive dynamical response of hot carriers in doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukhtaruk, S. M.; Kochelap, V. A.; Sokolov, V. N.; Kim, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We study theoretically wave-vector and frequency dispersion of the complex dynamic conductivity tensor (DCT), σlm(k , ω), of doped monolayer graphene under a strong dc electric field. For a general analysis, we consider the weak ac field of arbitrary configuration given by two independent vectors, the ac field polarization and the wave vector k. The high-field transport and linear response to the ac field are described on the base of the Boltzmann kinetic equation. We show that the real part of DCT, calculated in the collisionless regime, is not zero due to dissipation of the ac wave, whose energy is absorbed by the resonant Dirac quasiparticles effectively interacting with the wave. The role of the kinematic resonance at ω =vF | k | (vF is the Fermi velocity) is studied in detail taking into account deviation from the linear energy spectrum and screening by the charge carriers. The isopower-density curves and distributions of angle between the ac current density and field vectors are presented as a map which provides clear graphic representation of the DCT anisotropy. Also, the map shows certain ac field configurations corresponding to a negative power density, thereby it indicates regions of terahertz frequency for possible electrical (drift) instability in the graphene system.

  20. EFFECT OF GRAIN SIZE ON DYNAMIC SCRATCH RESPONSE IN ALUMINA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Lance, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The machining and wear of ceramics and ceramic components are obviously influenced by abrasive damage. One parameter that can affect the abrasion process is the grain size of the ceramic material. To investigate this, single-grit pendulum scratch testing was used to investigate the dynamic scratch response in three 99.9% aluminas that each had a tight size distribution about mean grain sizes of 2, 15, or 25 m, respectively. The scratch speeds generated had an order of magnitude of ~ 1 m/s and the maximum scratch depths were several tens of micrometers. Tangential and normal scratch forces were monitored during each test and interpreted in conjunction with postmortem SEM and profilometry results. It was observed that both plastic deformation and brittle fracture participated in the scratching process and the relative activity of each was dependent on depth of penetration. At a specific depth of penetration, the material removal of alumina prevailingly relies on the generation and interaction of oblique radial and lateral cracks. Chip formation is greatly enhanced when the created cracks interact and that interaction itself depends on grain size. Larger grain size gives rise to larger lateral cracks, more severe fracture at the groove's bottom, and larger amplitude of scratch force oscillation. Lastly, the cutting pressure and the scratch hardness of alumina exhibit sensitivity to both grain size and the groove depth.

  1. Dynamic Control of Optical Response in Layered Metal Chalcogenide Nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Tom, Kyle; Wang, Xi; Huang, Chunming; Yuan, Hongtao; Ding, Hong; Ko, Changhyun; Suh, Joonki; Pan, Lawrence; Persson, Kristin A; Yao, Jie

    2016-01-13

    Tunable optical transitions in ultrathin layered 2-dimensional (2D) materials unveil the electronic structures of materials and provide exciting prospects for potential applications in optics and photonics. Here, we present our realization of dynamic optical modulation of layered metal chalcogenide nanoplates using ionic liquid (IL) gating over a wide spectral range. The IL gating significantly increased the tuning range of the Fermi level and, as a result, substantially altered the optical transitions in the nanoplates. Using heavily n-doped Bi2Se3 nanoplates, we substantially modulated the light transmission through the ultrathin layer. A tunable, high-transmission spectral window in the visible to near-infrared region has been observed due to simultaneous shifts of both the plasma edge and absorption edge of the material. On the other hand, optical response of multilayer MoSe2 flakes gated by IL has shown enhanced transmission in both positive and negative biases, which is consistent with their ambipolar electrical behavior. The electrically controlled optical property tuning in metal chalcogenide material systems provides new opportunities for potential applications, such as wide spectral range optical modulators, optical filters, and electrically controlled smart windows with extremely low material consumption. PMID:26599063

  2. Ten minutes of dynamic stretching is sufficient to potentiate vertical jump performance characteristics.

    PubMed

    Turki, Olfa; Chaouachi, Anis; Drinkwater, Eric J; Chtara, Moktar; Chamari, Karim; Amri, Mohamed; Behm, David G

    2011-09-01

    The current literature recommends dynamic rather than static stretching for the athletic warm-up. Dynamic stretching and various conditioning stimuli are used to induce potentiation in subsequent athletic performance. However, it is unknown as to which type of activity in conjunction with dynamic stretching within a warm-up provides the optimal potentiation of vertical jump performance. It was the objective of the study to examine the possible potentiating effect of various types of conditioning stimuli with dynamic stretching. Twenty athletes participated in 6 protocols. All the experimental protocols included 10 minutes of dynamic stretching. After the dynamic stretching, the subjects performed a (a) concentric (DS/CON): 3 sets of 3 repetition maximum deadlift exercise; (b) isometric (DS/ISOM): 3 sets of 3-second maximum voluntary contraction back squats; (c) plyometric (DS/PLYO): 3 sets of 3 tuck jumps; (d) eccentric (DS/ECC): 3 modified drop jumps; (e) dynamic stretching only (DS), and (f) control protocol (CON). Before the intervention and at recovery periods of 15 seconds, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 minutes, the participants performed 1-2 maximal countermovement jumps. The DS and DS/CON protocols generally had a 95-99% likelihood of exceeding the smallest worthwhile change for vertical jump height, peak power, velocity and force. However, the addition of the deadlift to the DS did not augment the potentiating effect. Time-to-peak potentiation was variable between individuals but was most consistent between 3 and 5 minutes. Thus, the volume and the intensity associated with 10 minutes of dynamic stretching were sufficient to provide the potentiation of vertical jump characteristics. Additional conditioning activities may promote fatigue processes, which do not permit further potentiation. PMID:21792071

  3. Flight evaluation of height response characteristics for the hover bob-up task and comparison with proposed criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.; Tucker, G. E.; Lebacqz, J. V.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1986-01-01

    The CH-47B variable-stability helicopter was used to evaluate a range of height-response configurations while performing a precision hover bob-up task. The purpose of the study was to assess the validity of results obtained in previous ground-based and in-flight simulations in the context of a precision bob-up task and to provide additional flight data for inclusion in revisions to specifications for helicopter handling qualities. Height response characteristics were implemented using explicit model-following techniques, and the resulting CH-47B dynamics were validated using time-domain and frequency-domain data-analysis methods. The tests complemented the previous investigations by providing detailed pilot comments and ratings, and performance and control-utilization data that relate exclusively to the hover bob-up task. The results are compared with those from previous investigations and with new criteria that have been proposed for handling qualities requirements for helicopters.

  4. Flight-determined derivatives and dynamic characteristics of the CV-990 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    Flight-determined longitudinal and lateral-directional stability and control derivatives are presented for the CV-990 airplane for various combinations of Mach number, altitude, and flap setting throughout the flight envelope up to a Mach number of 0.87. Also presented are the dynamic characteristics of the aircraft calculated from the flight-obtained derivatives and the measured phugoid characteristics. The derivative characteristics were obtained from flight records of longitudinal and lateral-directional transient oscillation maneuvers by using a modified Newton-Raphson digital derivative determination technique. Generally the derivatives exhibited consistent variation with lift coefficient in the low-speed data and with Mach number and altitude in the high-speed data. Many also varied with flap deflection, notably spoiler effectiveness and directional stability.

  5. Dynamics of lithium ions in borotellurite mixed former glasses: Correlation between the characteristic length scales of mobile ions and glass network structural units

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.; Ghosh, A.

    2014-10-28

    We have studied the mixed network former effect on the dynamics of lithium ions in borotellurite glasses in wide composition and temperature ranges. The length scales of ion dynamics, such as characteristic mean square displacement and spatial extent of sub-diffusive motion of lithium ions have been determined from the ac conductivity and dielectric spectra, respectively, in the framework of linear response theory. The relative concentrations of different network structural units have been determined from the deconvolution of the FTIR spectra. A direct correlation between the ion dynamics and the characteristic length scales and the relative concentration of BO{sub 4} units has been established for different compositions of the borotellurite glasses.

  6. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  7. Investigation on the dynamic responses of a truss spar platform for different mooring line groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Montasir Osman; Yenduri, Anurag; Kurian, V. J.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic responses of any floating platform are dependent on the mass, stiffness and damping characteristics of the body as well as mooring system. Therefore, it is very essential to study the effect of individual contributions to the system that can finally help to economise their cost. This paper focuses on the effect of mooring stiffness on the responses of a truss spar platform, obtained by different grouping of lines. The study is part of our present researches on mooring systems which include the effect of line pretension, diameter and azimuth angles. The platform is modelled as a rigid body with three degrees-of-freedom and its motions are analyzed in time-domain using the implicit Newmark Beta technique. The mooring lines restoring force-excursion relationship is evaluated using a quasi-static approach. It is observed that the mooring system with lines arranged in less number of groups exhibits better performance in terms of the restoring forces as well as mean position of platform. However, the dynamic motions of platform remain unaffected for different line groups.

  8. Field Measurement-Based System Identification and Dynamic Response Prediction of a Unique MIT Building.

    PubMed

    Cha, Young-Jin; Trocha, Peter; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2016-01-01

    Tall buildings are ubiquitous in major cities and house the homes and workplaces of many individuals. However, relatively few studies have been carried out to study the dynamic characteristics of tall buildings based on field measurements. In this paper, the dynamic behavior of the Green Building, a unique 21-story tall structure located on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA), was characterized and modeled as a simplified lumped-mass beam model (SLMM), using data from a network of accelerometers. The accelerometer network was used to record structural responses due to ambient vibrations, blast loading, and the October 16th 2012 earthquake near Hollis Center (ME, USA). Spectral and signal coherence analysis of the collected data was used to identify natural frequencies, modes, foundation rocking behavior, and structural asymmetries. A relation between foundation rocking and structural natural frequencies was also found. Natural frequencies and structural acceleration from the field measurements were compared with those predicted by the SLMM which was updated by inverse solving based on advanced multiobjective optimization methods using the measured structural responses and found to have good agreement. PMID:27376303

  9. Field Measurement-Based System Identification and Dynamic Response Prediction of a Unique MIT Building

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Young-Jin; Trocha, Peter; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2016-01-01

    Tall buildings are ubiquitous in major cities and house the homes and workplaces of many individuals. However, relatively few studies have been carried out to study the dynamic characteristics of tall buildings based on field measurements. In this paper, the dynamic behavior of the Green Building, a unique 21-story tall structure located on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA), was characterized and modeled as a simplified lumped-mass beam model (SLMM), using data from a network of accelerometers. The accelerometer network was used to record structural responses due to ambient vibrations, blast loading, and the October 16th 2012 earthquake near Hollis Center (ME, USA). Spectral and signal coherence analysis of the collected data was used to identify natural frequencies, modes, foundation rocking behavior, and structural asymmetries. A relation between foundation rocking and structural natural frequencies was also found. Natural frequencies and structural acceleration from the field measurements were compared with those predicted by the SLMM which was updated by inverse solving based on advanced multiobjective optimization methods using the measured structural responses and found to have good agreement. PMID:27376303

  10. Dynamic pituitary-adrenal interactions in response to Cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jamie J; Russell, Georgina M; Stevenson, Kirsty; Kershaw, Yvonne; Zhao, Zidong; Henley, David; Angelini, Gianni D; Lightman, Stafford L

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the dynamics of the pituitary-adrenal interaction during the course of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) both on and off pump. Since our data pointed to a major change in adrenal responsiveness to ACTH we used a reverse translation approach to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this change in a rat model of critical illness. Design Clinical studies: Prospective observational study Animal studies: Controlled experimental study Setting Clinical studies: Cardiac surgery operating rooms and critical care units Animal studies: University research laboratory Subjects Clinical studies: Twenty, male patients Animal studies: Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions Clinical studies: Coronary artery bypass graft - both on and off pump Animal studies: Injection of either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline (controls) via a jugular vein cannula Measurements and Results Clinical studies: Blood samples were taken for 24 hours from placement of the first venous access. Cortisol and ACTH were measured every 10 and 60 minutes respectively, and corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) was measured at the beginning and end of the 24 hour period and at the end of operation. There was an initial rise in both levels of ACTH and cortisol to supra-normal values at around the end of surgery. ACTH levels then returned towards pre-operative values. Ultradian pulsatility of both ACTH and cortisol was maintained throughout the peri-operative period in all individuals. The sensitivity of the adrenal gland to ACTH increased markedly at around 8 hours after surgery maintaining very high levels of cortisol in the face of ‘basal’ levels of ACTH. This sensitivity began to return towards pre-operative values at the end of the 24-hour sampling period. Animal studies: Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were either given lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or sterile saline via a jugular vein cannula. Hourly blood samples were subsequently collected for ACTH and

  11. Confinement effects on collective water dynamics: Molecular dynamics study of optical Kerr response in silica nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milischuk, Anatoli; Ladanyi, Branka

    2014-03-01

    We report the results of the study of the effects of confinement on collective dynamical properties of water in model nanopores at ambient conditions. The main focus is on approximately cylindrical pores composed of amorphous silica, with diameters ranging from 20 to 40 Å, designed to represent MCM-41 materials. Results for hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores of similar dimensions, but with roughness reduced compared to silica nanopores, are also considered. The main quantity studied is the polarizability anisotropy time correlation function (TCF), which is related to the experimentally-observed optical Kerr effect (OKE) nuclear response. We investigate the effects on this TCF of the reduced molecular translational and rotational water mobility in the layers near the interface. We find that these effects lead to pore diameter dependent slowdown of polarizability anisotropy relaxation, in agreement with OKE experiments. Support from NSF grant number 1213682 is acknowledged.

  12. Intensity invariant dynamics and odor-specific latencies in olfactory receptor neuron response

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Carlotta; Carlson, John R.; Emonet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Odors elicit spatio-temporal patterns of activity in the brain. Spatial patterns arise from the specificity of the interaction between odorants and odorant receptors expressed in different olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). But the origin of temporal patterns of activity and their role in odor coding remain unclear. We investigate how physiological aspects of ORN response and physical aspects of odor stimuli give rise to diverse responses in Drosophila ORNs. We show that odor stimuli have intrinsic dynamics that depend on odor type and strongly affect ORN response. Using linear-nonlinear modeling to remove the contribution of the stimulus dynamics from the ORN dynamics we study the physiological properties of the response to different odorants and concentrations. For several odorants and receptor types the ORN response dynamics normalized by the peak response are independent of stimulus intensity for a large portion of the neuron’s dynamic range. Adaptation to a background odor changes the gain and dynamic range of the response but does not affect normalized response dynamics. Stimulating ORNs with various odorants reveals significant odor-dependent delays in the ORN response functions. These differences however can be dominated by differences in stimulus dynamics. In one case the response of one ORN to two odorants is predicted solely from measurements of the odor signals. Within a large portion of their dynamic range ORNs can capture information about stimulus dynamics independently from intensity while introducing odor-dependent delays. How insects might use odor-specific stimulus dynamics and ORN dynamics in discrimination and navigation tasks remains an open question. PMID:23575828

  13. Dynamic characteristics of a hydraulic amplification mechanism for large displacement actuators systems.

    PubMed

    Arouette, Xavier; Matsumoto, Yasuaki; Ninomiya, Takeshi; Okayama, Yoshiyuki; Miki, Norihisa

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a hydraulic displacement amplification mechanism (HDAM) and studied its dynamic response when combined with a piezoelectric actuator. The HDAM consists of an incompressible fluid sealed in a microcavity by two largely deformable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes. The geometry with input and output surfaces having different cross-sectional areas creates amplification. By combining the HDAM with micro-actuators, we can amplify the input displacement generated by the actuators, which is useful for applications requiring large deformation, such as tactile displays. We achieved a mechanism offering up to 18-fold displacement amplification for static actuation and 12-fold for 55 Hz dynamic actuation. PMID:22319281

  14. Scaling dynamic response and destructive metabolism in an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system modulated by different external periodic interventions.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuanzhi; Hu, Wenyong; Zhong, Weirong; Li, Li

    2011-01-14

    On the basis of two universal power-law scaling laws, i.e. the scaling dynamic hysteresis in physics and the allometric scaling metabolism in biosystem, we studied the dynamic response and the evolution of an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system subjected to a periodic external intervention, which is equivalent to the scheme of a radiotherapy or chemotherapy, within the framework of the growth dynamics of tumor. Under the modulation of either an abrupt or a gradual change external intervention, the population density of tumors exhibits a dynamic hysteresis to the intervention. The area of dynamic hysteresis loop characterizes a sort of dissipative-therapeutic relationship of the dynamic responding of treated tumors with the dose consumption of accumulated external intervention per cycle of therapy. Scaling the area of dynamic hysteresis loops against the intensity of an external intervention, we deduced a characteristic quantity which was defined as the theoretical therapeutic effectiveness of treated tumor and related with the destructive metabolism of tumor under treatment. The calculated dose-effectiveness profiles, namely the dose cumulant per cycle of intervention versus the therapeutic effectiveness, could be well scaled into a universal quadratic formula regardless of either an abrupt or a gradual change intervention involved. We present a new concept, i.e., the therapy-effect matrix and the dose cumulant matrix, to expound the new finding observed in the growth and regression dynamics of a modulated anti-tumor system.

  15. A brief history of free-response receiver operating characteristic paradigm data analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Dev P

    2013-07-01

    In the receiver operating characteristic paradigm the observer assigns a single rating to each image and the location of the perceived abnormality, if any, is ignored. In the free-response receiver operating characteristic paradigm the observer is free to mark and rate as many suspicious regions as are considered clinically reportable. Credit for a correct localization is given only if a mark is sufficiently close to an actual lesion; otherwise, the observer's mark is scored as a location-level false positive. Until fairly recently there existed no accepted method for analyzing the resulting relatively unstructured data containing random numbers of mark-rating pairs per image. This report reviews the history of work in this field, which has now spanned more than five decades. It introduces terminology used to describe the paradigm, proposed measures of performance (figures of merit), ways of visualizing the data (operating characteristics), and software for analyzing free-response receiver operating characteristic studies.

  16. Flapping response characteristics of hingeless rotor blades by a gereralized harmonic balance method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.; Ormiston, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Linearized equations of motion for the flapping response of flexible rotor blades in forward flight are derived in terms of generalized coordinates. The equations are solved using a matrix form of the method of linear harmonic balance, yielding response derivatives for each harmonic of the blade deformations and of the hub forces and moments. Numerical results and approximate closed-form expressions for rotor derivatives are used to illustrate the relationships between rotor parameters, modeling assumptions, and rotor response characteristics. Finally, basic hingeless rotor response derivatives are presented in tabular and graphical form for a wide range of configuration parameters and operating conditions.

  17. Non-linear dynamic characteristics and optimal control of giant magnetostrictive film subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z. W.; Zhang, W. D. Xu, J.

    2014-03-15

    The non-linear dynamic characteristics and optimal control of a giant magnetostrictive film (GMF) subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation were studied. Non-linear differential items were introduced to interpret the hysteretic phenomena of the GMF, and the non-linear dynamic model of the GMF subjected to in-plane stochastic excitation was developed. The stochastic stability was analysed, and the probability density function was obtained. The condition of stochastic Hopf bifurcation and noise-induced chaotic response were determined, and the fractal boundary of the system's safe basin was provided. The reliability function was solved from the backward Kolmogorov equation, and an optimal control strategy was proposed in the stochastic dynamic programming method. Numerical simulation shows that the system stability varies with the parameters, and stochastic Hopf bifurcation and chaos appear in the process; the area of the safe basin decreases when the noise intensifies, and the boundary of the safe basin becomes fractal; the system reliability improved through stochastic optimal control. Finally, the theoretical and numerical results were proved by experiments. The results are helpful in the engineering applications of GMF.

  18. Numerical investigation of amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials with nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Manimala, James M; Sun, C T

    2016-06-01

    The amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials having nonlinear local oscillator microstructures is studied using numerical simulations on representative discrete mass-spring models. Both cubically nonlinear hardening and softening local oscillator cases are considered. Single frequency, bi-frequency, and wave packet excitations at low and high amplitude levels were used to interrogate the models. The propagation and attenuation characteristics of harmonic waves in a tunable frequency range is found to correspond to the amplitude and nonlinearity-dependent shifts in the local resonance bandgap for such nonlinear acoustic metamaterials. A predominant shift in the propagated wave spectrum towards lower frequencies is observed. Moreover, the feasibility of amplitude and frequency-dependent selective filtering of composite signals consisting of individual frequency components which fall within propagating or attenuating regimes is demonstrated. Further enrichment of these wave manipulation mechanisms in acoustic metamaterials using different combinations of nonlinear microstructures presents device implications for acoustic filters and waveguides.

  19. Dynamic response of a tunable phononic crystal under applied mechanical and magnetic loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, Alireza; Gordaninejad, Faramarz

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic response of a tunable phononic crystal consisting of a porous hyperelastic magnetoelastic elastomer subjected to a macroscopic deformation and an external magnetic field is theoretically investigated. Finite deformations and magnetic induction influence phononic characteristics of the periodic structure through geometrical pattern transformation and material properties. A magnetoelastic energy function is proposed to develop constitutive laws considering large deformations and magnetic induction in the periodic structure. Analytical and finite element methods are utilized to compute the dispersion relation and band structure of the phononic crystal for different cases of deformation and magnetic loadings. It is demonstrated that magnetic induction not only controls the band diagram of the structure but also has a strong effect on preferential directions of wave propagation.

  20. Probing depth and dynamic response of speckles in near infrared region for spectroscopic blood flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Naomichi; Aizu, Yoshihisa

    2016-04-01

    Imaging method based on bio-speckles is a useful means for blood flow visualization of living bodies and, it has been utilized for analyzing the condition or the health state of living bodies. Actually, the sensitivity of blood flow is influenced by tissue optical properties, which depend on the wavelength of illuminating laser light. In the present study, we experimentally investigate characteristics of the blood flow images obtained with two wavelengths of 780 nm and 830 nm in the near-infrared region. Experiments are conducted for sample models using a pork layer, horse blood layer and mirror, and for a human wrist and finger, to investigate optical penetration depth and dynamic response of speckles to the blood flow velocity for two wavelengths.

  1. Numerical investigation of amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials with nonlinear oscillators.

    PubMed

    Manimala, James M; Sun, C T

    2016-06-01

    The amplitude-dependent dynamic response in acoustic metamaterials having nonlinear local oscillator microstructures is studied using numerical simulations on representative discrete mass-spring models. Both cubically nonlinear hardening and softening local oscillator cases are considered. Single frequency, bi-frequency, and wave packet excitations at low and high amplitude levels were used to interrogate the models. The propagation and attenuation characteristics of harmonic waves in a tunable frequency range is found to correspond to the amplitude and nonlinearity-dependent shifts in the local resonance bandgap for such nonlinear acoustic metamaterials. A predominant shift in the propagated wave spectrum towards lower frequencies is observed. Moreover, the feasibility of amplitude and frequency-dependent selective filtering of composite signals consisting of individual frequency components which fall within propagating or attenuating regimes is demonstrated. Further enrichment of these wave manipulation mechanisms in acoustic metamaterials using different combinations of nonlinear microstructures presents device implications for acoustic filters and waveguides. PMID:27369163

  2. Dynamic Antarctic ice-sheet response to deglacial meltwater pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Michael; Clark, Peter U.; Timmermann, Axel; Lohmann, Gerrit; Kuhn, Gerhard; Sprenk, Daniela; Gladstone, Rupert

    2013-04-01

    Reconstruction of the last global sea level rise faces uncertainties because only a few robust data evidences are available for Antarctic ice sheets. Deglacial dynamics have mostly been inferred from shallow-water cores on the shelf, where decisive changes are either erased by grounding ice or occur in condensed, lithologically complex successions with partially reversed and generally unreliable 14C ages. Previous modeling studies reconstruct a late ice-sheet retreat starting around 12 ka BP and ending around 7 ka BP with a large impact of an unstable West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and a small impact of a stable East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). However, new findings from two deepwater cores from the Scotia Sea challenge these reconstructions and call for a principal revision of the Antarctic deglacial history. The well-dated sites (Weber et al., 2012, Quaternary Science Reviews) provide the first integrative and representative record of Antarctic Ice Sheet instability. They are located in the central transport route of virtually all Antarctic icebergs, the so-called Iceberg Alley, and demonstrate a highly dynamic Antarctic Ice Sheet during the last deglaciation with eight distinct phases of enhanced iceberg routing, dubbed Antarctic Ice Sheet Events (AIE), in contrast to existing models of a late and monotonous ice-sheet retreat which implied only little contribution to the last, natural, sea-level rise 19,000 to 9,000 years ago. We found the first direct evidence for an Antarctic contribution to Meltwater Pulse 1A in the flux rates of ice-rafted debris. Using an ensemble of transient deglacial model simulations we could show that increased export of warmer Circumpolar Deep Water towards Antarctica contributed to Antarctic Ice Sheet melt by ocean thermal forcing (Weber et al., Science, in review). These new findings hold the potential to substantially revise and improve our understanding of the transient response of the ice sheet to external and internal forcings

  3. LVP modeling and dynamic characteristics prediction of a hydraulic power unit in deep-sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xue-peng; Ye, Min; Deng, Bin; Zhang, Cui-hong; Yu, Zu-ying

    2013-03-01

    A hydraulic power unit (HPU) is the driving "heart" of deep-sea working equipment. It is critical to predict its dynamic performances in deep-water before being immerged in the seawater, while the experimental tests by simulating deep-sea environment have many disadvantages, such as expensive cost, long test cycles, and difficult to achieve low-temperature simulation, which is only used as a supplementary means for confirmatory experiment. This paper proposes a novel theoretical approach based on the linear varying parameters (LVP) modeling to foresee the dynamic performances of the driving unit. Firstly, based on the varying environment features, dynamic expressions of the compressibility and viscosity of hydraulic oil are derived to reveal the fluid performances changing. Secondly, models of hydraulic system and electrical system are accomplished respectively through studying the control process and energy transfer, and then LVP models of the pressure and flow rate control is obtained through the electro-hydraulic models integration. Thirdly, dynamic characteristics of HPU are obtained by the model simulating within bounded closed sets of varying parameters. Finally, the developed HPU is tested in a deep-sea imitating hull, and the experimental results are well consistent with the theoretical analysis outcomes, which clearly declare that the LVP modeling is a rational way to foresee dynamic performances of HPU. The research approach and model analysis results can be applied to the predictions of working properties and product designs for other deep-sea hydraulic pump.

  4. Response dynamics and directional properties of nonspiking local interneurons in the cockroach cercal system.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Y; Arima, T; Okuma, J; Hasegawa, Y

    1993-06-01

    The response properties and directional receptive fields of nonspiking local interneurons in the cercal system of the cockroach are described. Wind-evoked responses were recorded intracellularly, and then analyzed by means of the Wiener kernel method in which a Gaussian white noise signal was used as a stimulus. Cross-correlation between the response and the white noise signal produced first- (linear) and second-order (nonlinear) kernels that were used to define input-output characteristics of the interneurons. Three sets of interneurons were distinguished on the basis of kernel analysis. First, responses in interneurons 101, 107, 111, and 203 were characterized predominantly by a differentiating first-order kernel, which suggests a linear relationship to the stimulus. The amplitude and waveform of the kernel changed with the change in stimulus angle, indicating that these four cells are directionally sensitive. Second, responses in interneurons 102 and 103 were also directionally sensitive but highly nonlinear. The first-order kernel was biphasic, whereas the second-order kernel had an elongated depolarizing peak on the diagonal. The response dynamics were accounted for by a cascade of two filters, a linear band-pass filter and a static nonlinear filter, in which the nonlinearity is a signal compression (or a rectification). Third, responses in interneurons 104 and 201 consist largely of the second-order nonlinear component. The second-order kernel, which had an elongated depolarizing peak or a hyperpolarizing valley on the diagonal, did not show any directional preference. The second-order nonlinearity was dynamic, and could be modeled by a band-pass linear filter-static nonlinearity-low-pass linear filter cascade, where the static nonlinearity is a full-wave rectification. The band-pass filter would simply reflect the mechanical property of cercal hair sensilla, whereas the low-pass filter represents the transfer at synapses between the cercal afferents and the

  5. Experimental determination of dynamic characteristics of the VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Chung, Michael K H; Zhang, Nong; Tansley, Geoff D; Qian, Yi

    2004-12-01

    The VentrAssist implantable rotary blood pump, intended for long-term ventricular assist, is under development and is currently being tested for its rotor-dynamic stability. The pump consists of a shaftless impeller, which also acts as the rotor of the brushless DC motor. The impeller remains passively suspended in the pump cavity by hydrodynamic forces, which result from the small clearances between the outside surfaces of the impeller and the pump cavity. These small clearances range from approximately 50 microm to 230 microm in size in the version of pump reported here. This article presents experimental investigation into the dynamic characteristics of the impeller-bearing-pump housing system of the rotary blood pump for increasing pump speeds at different flow rates. The pump was mounted on a suspension system consisting of a platform and springs, where the natural frequency and damping ratio for the suspension system were determined. Real-time measurements of the impeller's displacement were performed using Hall effect sensors. A vertical disturbance force was exerted onto the pump housing, causing the impeller to be displaced in vertical direction from its dynamic equilibrium position within the pump cavity. The impeller displacement was represented by a decaying sine wave, which indicated the impeller restoring to its equilibrium position. From the decaying sine wave the natural frequency and stiffness coefficient of the system were determined. Furthermore, the logarithmic decrement method was used to determine the damping ratio and eventually the damping coefficient of the system. Results indicate that stiffness and damping coefficients increased as flow rate and pump speed increased, representing an increase in stability with these changing conditions. However, pump speed had a greater influence on the stiffness and damping coefficients than flow rate did, which was evident through dynamic analysis. Overall the experimental method presented in this

  6. Dynamic response of a forward-swept-wing model at angles of attack up to 15 deg at a Mach number of 0.8. [Langley transonic dynamics tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Ricketts, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Root mean square (rms) bending moments for a dynamically scaled, aeroelastic wing of a proposed forward swept wing, flight demonstrator airplane are presented for angles of attack up to 15 deg at a Mach number of 0.8 The 0.6 size semispan model had a leading edge forward sweep of 44 deg and was constructed of composite material. In addition to broad band responses, individual rms responses and total damping ratios are presented for the first two natural modes. The results show that the rms response increases with angle of attack and has a peak value at an angle of attack near 13 deg. In general, the response was characteristic of buffeting and similar to results often observed for aft swept wings. At an angle of attack near 13 deg, however, the response had characteristics associated with approaching a dynamic instability, although no instability was observed over the range of parameters investigated.

  7. Toward an ecological analysis of Bayesian inferences: how task characteristics influence responses

    PubMed Central

    Hafenbrädl, Sebastian; Hoffrage, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    In research on Bayesian inferences, the specific tasks, with their narratives and characteristics, are typically seen as exchangeable vehicles that merely transport the structure of the problem to research participants. In the present paper, we explore whether, and possibly how, task characteristics that are usually ignored influence participants’ responses in these tasks. We focus on both quantitative dimensions of the tasks, such as their base rates, hit rates, and false-alarm rates, as well as qualitative characteristics, such as whether the task involves a norm violation or not, whether the stakes are high or low, and whether the focus is on the individual case or on the numbers. Using a data set of 19 different tasks presented to 500 different participants who provided a total of 1,773 responses, we analyze these responses in two ways: first, on the level of the numerical estimates themselves, and second, on the level of various response strategies, Bayesian and non-Bayesian, that might have produced the estimates. We identified various contingencies, and most of the task characteristics had an influence on participants’ responses. Typically, this influence has been stronger when the numerical information in the tasks was presented in terms of probabilities or percentages, compared to natural frequencies – and this effect cannot be fully explained by a higher proportion of Bayesian responses when natural frequencies were used. One characteristic that did not seem to influence participants’ response strategy was the numerical value of the Bayesian solution itself. Our exploratory study is a first step toward an ecological analysis of Bayesian inferences, and highlights new avenues for future research. PMID:26300791

  8. Dynamic response at altitude of a turbojet engine with variable area exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delio, Gene J; Rosenweig, Solomon

    1952-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of turbojet engine with variable exhaust nozzle area were investigated over a range of altitudes and flight Mach numbers. These characteristics generalize to standard static level condition. Data resulting from approximate step disturbances in either manipulated variable suggested functional relationships from which functions can be derived. The constants of the transfer functions are listed for five combinations of engine speed and exhaust nozzle area. The minimum data needed to completely define the transfer functions were: experimentally determined dynamic characteristics, such as engine time constant and initial rise ratio, resulting from either manipulated variable; static characteristics determined from steady-state performance curves.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness & response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has played an increasing role in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-coupled, nonlinear equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Until recently, such computer power could be found only in CRAY-class supercomputers. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Atmospheric Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Such models have been the cornerstones of the ARAC operational system for the past ten years. Kamada (1992) provides a review of diagnostic models and their applications to dispersion problems. However, because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness and response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has (CFD) has played an increasing in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-couple equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows. We are now embarking on a development program to incorporate prognostic models to generate, in real-time, the meteorological fields for the dispersion models. In contrast to diagnostic models, prognostic models are physically-based and are capable of incorporating many physical processes to treat highly complex flow scenarios.

  11. Ventilatory responses to dynamic exercise elicited by intramuscular sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. A.; Gallagher, K. M.; Norton, K. H.; Querry, R. G.; Welch-O'Connor, R. M.; Raven, P. B.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Eight subjects, aged 27.0+/-1.6 yr, performed incremental workload cycling to investigate the contribution of skeletal muscle mechano- and metaboreceptors to ventilatory control during dynamic exercise. METHODS: Each subject performed four bouts of exercise: exercise with no intervention (CON); exercise with bilateral thigh cuffs inflated to 90 mm Hg (CUFF); exercise with application of lower-body positive pressure (LBPP) to 45 torr (PP); and exercise with 90 mm Hg thigh cuff inflation and 45 torr LBPP (CUFF+PP). Ventilatory responses and pulmonary gas exchange variables were collected breath-by-breath with concomitant measurement of leg intramuscular pressure. RESULTS: Ventilation (VE) was significantly elevated from CON during PP and CUFF+PP at workloads corresponding to > or = 60% CON peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and during CUFF at workloads > or = 80% CON VO2peak, P < 0.05. The VO2 at which ventilatory threshold occurred was significantly reduced from CON (2.17+/-0.28 L x min(-1)) to 1.60+/-0.19 L x min(-1), 1.45+/-0.15 L x min(-1), and 1.15+/-0.11 L x min(-1) during CUFF, PP, and CUFF+PP, respectively. The slope of the linear regression describing the VE/CO2 output relationship was increased from CON by approximately 22% during CUFF, 40% during PP, and 41% during CUFF+PP. CONCLUSIONS: As intramuscular pressure was significantly elevated immediately upon application of LBPP during PP and CUFF+PP without a concomitant increase in VE, it seems unlikely that LBPP-induced increases in VE can be attributed to activation of the mechanoreflex. These findings suggest that LBPP-induced reductions in perfusion pressure and decreases in venous outflow resulting from inflation of bilateral thigh cuffs may generate a metabolite sensitive intramuscular ventilatory stimulus.

  12. Equilibrium and Dynamical Characteristics of Imidazole Langmuir Monolayers on Graphite Sheets.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Javier; Elola, M Dolores; Laria, D

    2015-07-23

    Using molecular dynamics techniques, we examine structural and dynamical characteristics of liquid-like imidazole (Im) monolayers physisorbed onto a planar graphite sheet, at T = 384 K. Our simulations reveal that molecular orientations in the saturated monolayer exhibit a bistable distribution, characterized by an inner parallel arrangement of the molecules in close contact with the substrate and a slanted alignment, in those lying in adjacent, outer locations. Compared to the results found in three-dimensional, bulk phases, the analysis of the spatial correlations between sites participating in hydrogen bonding shows a clear enhancement of the intermolecular interactions, which also leads to stronger dipolar correlations. As a result, the gross structural features of the monolayer can be cast in terms of mesoscopic domains, comprising units articulated via winding hydrogen bonds, that persist along typical time intervals of a few tens of picoseconds. On the dynamical side, a similar comparison of the characteristic decorrelation time for orientational motions shows a 4-fold increment. Contrasting, the reduction of the system dimensionality leads to a larger diffusion constant. Possible substrate-induced anisotropies in the diffusive motions are also investigated.

  13. Response and characteristics of structures subjected to S-H waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the dynamic characteristics of a coupled translational-rotational system is given. The formulation of the problem considers the soil-structure interaction effects by utilizing the impedance functions at the foundation of a structure. Due to the fact that the coefficient matrix in the characteristic equation is frequency dependent in nature, iterations have to be performed to find the nature frequencies of the system. Examples and discussions are presented. Comparisons of the analytical results from various approaches are also given.

  14. Dynamic responses of rotor drops onto double-decker catcher bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yili; Jin, Chaowu; Xu, Longxiang

    2013-01-01

    In an active magnetic bearing (AMB) system, the catcher bearings (CBs) are indispensable to protect the rotor and stator in case the magnetic bearings fail. Most of the former researches associated with CBs are mainly focused on the dynamic responses of the rotor drops onto traditional single-decker catcher bearings (SDCBs). But because of the lower limited speed of SDCB, it cannot withstand the ultra high speed rotation after rotor drop. In this paper, based on the analysis of the disadvantages of SDCBs, a new type of double-decker catcher bearings (DDCBs) is proposed to enhance the CB work performance in AMB system. In order to obtain the accurate rotor movements before AMB failure, the dynamic characteristics of AMB are theoretically derived. Detailed simulation models containing rigid rotor model, contact model between rotor and inner race, DDCB force model as well as heating model after rotor drop are established. Then, using those established models the dynamic responses of rotor drops onto DDCBs and SDCBs are respectively simulated. The rotor orbits, contact forces, spin speeds of various parts and heat energies after AMB failure are mainly analyzed. The simulation results show that DDCBs can effectively improve the CBs limit rotational speed and reduce the following vibrations, impacts and heating. Finally, rotor drop experiments choosing different types of CBs are carried out on the established AMB test bench. Rotor orbits, inner race temperatures as well as the rotating speeds of both inner race and intermediate races after rotor drop are synchronously measured. The experiment results verify the advantages of DDCB and the correctness of theoretical analysis. The studies provide certain theoretical and experimental references for the application of DDCBs in AMB system.

  15. Dynamical characteristics of surface EMG signals of hand grasps via recurrence plot.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Zhu, Xiangyang; Ju, Zhaojie; Liu, Honghai

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing human hand grasp movements through surface electromyogram (sEMG) is a challenging task. In this paper, we investigated nonlinear measures based on recurrence plot, as a tool to evaluate the hidden dynamical characteristics of sEMG during four different hand movements. A series of experimental tests in this study show that the dynamical characteristics of sEMG data with recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) can distinguish different hand grasp movements. Meanwhile, adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is applied to evaluate the performance of the aforementioned measures to identify the grasp movements. The experimental results show that the recognition rate (99.1%) based on the combination of linear and nonlinear measures is much higher than those with only linear measures (93.4%) or nonlinear measures (88.1%). These results suggest that the RQA measures might be a potential tool to reveal the sEMG hidden characteristics of hand grasp movements and an effective supplement for the traditional linear grasp recognition methods. PMID:24403424

  16. Female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, are responsive to visual stimuli but unselective of stimulus characteristics.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Galante, Holland; Höbel, Gerlinde

    2014-09-15

    The visual ecology of nocturnal anurans is poorly understood, but there is growing evidence that vision plays a role in important behaviors such as mate choice. While several recent studies have demonstrated that females are responsive to visual cues when selecting mates, the forces responsible for these preferences are unknown. We investigated the responsiveness of female gray treefrogs, Hyla versicolor, to video playbacks of calling conspecific males in which we varied attributes of the vocal sac, a conspicuous visual characteristic of calling males and a target of female choice in other species. Females responded surprisingly strongly to the video playbacks, but did so indiscriminately with respect to variation in vocal sac characteristics. We followed up on these results with a series of additional tests that examined female responses to abstract stimuli. Females continued to respond to such stimuli, leading us to conclude that their behavior was related to a generalized phototactic response. Because of this, we were unable to make conclusions regarding female preferences for vocal sac characteristics. Nonetheless, our results are significant in two respects. First, we illustrate that despite much effort into improving video playback methodologies, challenges remain, and we offer our experimental design as a method to ensure that appropriate conclusions can be drawn from such studies. Second, we argue that the female phototactic response has potentially significant behavioral implications and in general the consequences of anuran visual preferences deserve further investigation. PMID:25013111

  17. Total dynamic response of a PSS vehicle negotiating asymmetric road excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jian Jun; Khajepour, Amir; Esmailzadeh, Ebrahim

    2012-12-01

    A planar suspension system (PSS) is a novel automobile suspension system in which an individual spring-damper strut is implemented in both the vertical and longitudinal directions, respectively. The wheels in a vehicle with such a suspension system can move back and forth relative to the chassis. When a PSS vehicle experiences asymmetric road excitations, the relative longitudinal motion of wheels with respect to the chassis in two sides of the same axle are not identical, and thus the two wheels at one axle will not be aligned in the same axis. The total dynamic responses, including those of the bounce, pitch and the roll of the PSS vehicle, to the asymmetric road excitation may exhibit different characteristics from those of a conventional vehicle. This paper presents an investigation into the comprehensive dynamic behaviour of a vehicle with the PSS, in such a road condition, on both the straight and curved roads. The study was carried out using an 18 DOF full-car model incorporating a radial-spring tyre-ground contact model and a 2D tyre-ground dynamic friction model. Results demonstrate that the total dynamic behaviour of a PSS vehicle is generally comparable with that of the conventional vehicle, while PSS exhibits significant improvement in absorbing the impact forces along the longitudinal direction when compared to the conventional suspension system. The PSS vehicle is found to be more stable than the conventional vehicle in terms of the directional performance against the disturbance of the road potholes on a straight line manoeuvre, while exhibiting a very similar handling performance on a curved line.

  18. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digital image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.

  19. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digitalmore » image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.« less

  20. Structural and dynamic basis of a supercoiling-responsive DNA element

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung-Hun; Yun, Sang Hoon; Sun, Dawei; Lim, Heon M.; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2006-01-01

    In both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, negative supercoiling of chromosomal DNA acts locally to regulate a variety of cellular processes, such as transcription, replication, recombination and response to environmental stresses. While studying the interaction between the Hin recombinase and mutated versions of its cognate DNA-binding site, we identified a mutated DNA site that binds Hin only when the DNA is supercoiled. To understand the mechanism of this supercoiling-responsive DNA site, we used NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine the solution structures and dynamics of three related DNA oligonucleotides. The supercoiling-responsive DNA site formed a partially unwound and stretched helix and showed significant flexibility and base pair opening kinetics. The single CAG/CTG triplet contained in this DNA sequence displayed the same characteristics as do multiple CAG/CTG repeats, which are associated with several hereditary neuromuscular diseases. It is known that short DNA sequence motifs that have either very high or low bending flexibility occur preferentially at supercoiling-sensitive bacterial and eukaryotic promoters. From our results and these previous data, we propose a model in which supercoiling utilizes the intrinsic flexibility of a short DNA site to switch the local DNA structure from an inefficient conformation for protein binding to an efficient one, or vice versa. PMID:16414956

  1. Neural heterogeneities determine response characteristics to second-, but not first-order stimulus features.

    PubMed

    Metzen, Michael G; Chacron, Maurice J

    2015-02-18

    Neural heterogeneities are seen ubiquitously, but how they determine neural response properties remains unclear. Here we show that heterogeneities can either strongly, or not at all, influence neural responses to a given stimulus feature. Specifically, we recorded from peripheral electroreceptor neurons, which display strong heterogeneities in their resting discharge activity, in response to naturalistic stimuli consisting of a fast time-varying waveform (i.e., first-order) whose amplitude (i.e., second-order or envelope) varied slowly in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Although electroreceptors displayed relatively homogeneous responses to first-order stimulus features, further analysis revealed two subpopulations with similar sensitivities that were excited or inhibited by increases in the envelope, respectively, for stimuli whose frequency content spanned the natural range. We further found that a linear-nonlinear cascade model incorporating the known linear response characteristics to first-order features and a static nonlinearity accurately reproduced experimentally observed responses to both first- and second-order features for all stimuli tested. Importantly, this model correctly predicted that the response magnitude is independent of either the stimulus waveform's or the envelope's frequency content. Further analysis of our model led to the surprising prediction that the mean discharge activity can be used to determine whether a given neuron is excited or inhibited by increases in the envelope. This prediction was validated by our experimental data. Thus, our results provide key insight as to how neural heterogeneities can determine response characteristics to some, but not other, behaviorally relevant stimulus features.

  2. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O2 in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments. PMID:26404294

  3. Step Response Characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anshuman; Gregory, James W

    2015-09-03

    Experiments and numerical simulations have been used in this work to understand the step response characteristics of Polymer/Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PC-PSP). A recently developed analytical model describing the essential physics in PC-PSP quenching kinetics is used, which includes the effect of both diffusion time scale and luminescent lifetime on the net response of PC-PSP. Step response simulations using this model enables an understanding of the effects of parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of O₂ in the polymer/ceramic coating, attenuation of excitation light, ambient luminescent lifetime, sensitivity, and the magnitude and direction of pressure change on the observed response time scales of PC-PSP. It was found that higher diffusion coefficient and greater light attenuation lead to faster response, whereas longer ambient lifetime and larger sensitivity lead to slower response characteristics. Due to the inherent non-linearity of the Stern-Volmer equation, response functions also change with magnitude and direction of the pressure change. Experimental results from a shock tube are presented where the effects of varying the roughness, pressure jump magnitude and luminophore probe have been studied. Model parameters have been varied to obtain a good fit to experimental results and this optimized model is then used to obtain the response time for a step decrease in pressure, an estimate of which is currently not obtainable from experiments.

  4. Estimation of Response Functions Based on Variational Bayes Algorithm in Dynamic Images Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a nonparametric Bayesian model based on variational Bayes algorithm to estimate the response functions in dynamic medical imaging. In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the impulse response or retention functions are rather complicated and finding a suitable parametric form is problematic. In this paper, we estimated the response functions using nonparametric Bayesian priors. These priors were designed to favor desirable properties of the functions, such as sparsity or smoothness. These assumptions were used within hierarchical priors of the variational Bayes algorithm. We performed our algorithm on the real online dataset of dynamic renal scintigraphy. The results demonstrated that this algorithm improved the estimation of response functions with nonparametric priors. PMID:27631007

  5. Estimation of Response Functions Based on Variational Bayes Algorithm in Dynamic Images Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a nonparametric Bayesian model based on variational Bayes algorithm to estimate the response functions in dynamic medical imaging. In dynamic renal scintigraphy, the impulse response or retention functions are rather complicated and finding a suitable parametric form is problematic. In this paper, we estimated the response functions using nonparametric Bayesian priors. These priors were designed to favor desirable properties of the functions, such as sparsity or smoothness. These assumptions were used within hierarchical priors of the variational Bayes algorithm. We performed our algorithm on the real online dataset of dynamic renal scintigraphy. The results demonstrated that this algorithm improved the estimation of response functions with nonparametric priors.

  6. The articulatory characteristics of the tongue in anterior openbite: observation by use of dynamic palatography.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, N; Sakuma, T; Michi, K; Ueno, T

    1981-01-01

    The tongue movements during the production of Japanese speech sounds in five patients with anterior openbite associated with 1-5 mm of overjet were investigated using dynamic palatography and cinematography. The dynamic palatograph is an electric device capable of recording constantly changing palatolingual contact as a function of time by use of a thin plastic artificial palate equipped with 63 electrodes. As a result, the following articulatory characteristics were observed during the utterance of the Japanese sounds /s/,/f/,/t/,/d/,/n/,/r/,/ts/,/tf/,/dz/,/d3/. (1) The area of maximal palatolingual contacts was smaller than the normal. (2) Forward positioning of the tongue was confirmed in all cases. (3) The interruption of the breath stream was made with the dorsal surface of the tongue and the maxillary anterior teeth. (4) The sounds /s/,/f/,/dz/,/d3/, were recognized as distorted sound as /theta/, in English.

  7. Subsonic static and dynamic stability characteristics of the test technique demonstrator NASP configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyden, Richmond P.; Dress, David A.; Fox, Charles H., Jr.; Huffman, Jarrett K.; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the procedure used for and the results obtained of wind-tunnel tests of the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) configuration, which were conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center High Speed Tunnel using a blended body NASP configuration designed by the research center. Static and dynamic stability characteristics were measured at Mach numbers 0.3, 0.6, and 0.8. In addition to tests of the baseline configuration, component buildup tests with a canard surface and with a body flap were carried out. Results demonstrated a positive static stability of the baseline configuration, except at the higher angles of attack at Mach 0.8. A good agreement was found between the inphase dynamic parameters and the corresponding static data.

  8. Dynamic characteristics of an axially polarized multilayer piezoelectric/elastic composite cylindrical transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianjun; Shi, Zhifei

    2013-10-01

    An analytical model of the dynamic characteristics of an axially polarized multilayer piezoelectric/elastic composite cylindrical transducer is proposed in this paper. Based on the plane stress assumption, the dynamic analytical solution of the transducer under an external harmonic voltage load is obtained, and the electric admittance is also derived analytically. Inherent properties of the transducer, such as resonance and anti-resonance frequencies, are presented and discussed. In addition, comparisons with other related investigations are also given, and good agreement is found. The present investigation is very helpful for the design of axially polarized multilayer piezoelectric/elastic composite cylindrical transducers, which can be used in applications related to ultrasonic and underwater sound waves.

  9. Stability and Load Sharing Characteristics of a Posterior Dynamic Stabilization Device

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Daniel J.; Yeager, Matthew S.; Thampi, Shankar S.; Whiting, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar interbody fusion is a common treatment for a variety of spinal pathologies. It has been hypothesized that insufficient mechanical loading of the interbody graft can prevent proper fusion of the joint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mechanical stability and anterior column loading sharing characteristics of a posterior dynamic system compared to titanium rods in an anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) model. Methods Range of motion, interpedicular kinematics and interbody graft loading were measured in human cadaveric lumbar segments tested under a pure moment flexibility testing protocol. Results Both systems provided significant fixation compared to the intact condition and to an interbody spacer alone in flexion extension and lateral bending. No significant differences in fixation were detected between the devices. A significant decrease in graft loading was detected in flexion for the titanium rod treatment compared to spacer alone. No significant differences in graft loading were detected between the spacer alone and posterior dynamic system or between the posterior dynamic system and the titanium rod. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that the posterior dynamic system provides similar fixation compared to that of a titanium rod, however, studies designed to evaluate the efficacy of fixation in a cadaver model may not be sufficiently powered to establish differences in load sharing using the techniques described here. PMID:26131403

  10. Damage identification method based on structural dynamic characteristics and strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Jun; Lu, Wei

    2009-03-01

    More and more large span structures have been built or are being built and their health is concerned about by civil engineers and investors, which arises to the problem of studying on several damage identification methods to give estimation on the health of the structure and the identification on damage location and damage degree. The damage identification methods in civil engineering are mostly based on dynamic characteristics, which have difficulties when applied to practical structures. Meanwhile, the strains of the structural important elements can give more exactly and more directly information for damage identification on damage location and damage degree. The information fusion for acceleration sensors and strain sensors is used for making a strategic decision on damage identification and the Dempster-Shafer evidence theory is used as the information fusion strategic decision, in which the strategic decision information fusion is a method to give the final decision based on the decision made by each kind of sensors according to some principle and some synthesized evaluation, that is, the final damage identification results are given based on the damage identification results using the structural dynamic characteristics and strain measurements. In addition, a finite element model of large span space shell structure is built and several damage cases of it are simulated, in the example, the structural dynamic characteristics damage index and strain measurements damage index are used to give the damage identification results, combining which the final damage identification result by strategic decision fusion is given too, while the method presented in the paper is proofed to be reliable and effective according to comparing the three kinds of damage identification results mentioned above.

  11. Design and construction of miniature artificial ecosystem based on dynamic response optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dawei; Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Li, Ming; Hu, Enzhu

    The miniature artificial ecosystem (MAES) is a combination of man, silkworm, salad and mi-croalgae to partially regenerate O2 , sanitary water and food, simultaneously dispose CO2 and wastes, therefore it have a fundamental life support function. In order to enhance the safety and reliability of MAES and eliminate the influences of internal variations and external dis-turbances, it was necessary to configure MAES as a closed-loop control system, and it could be considered as a prototype for future bioregenerative life support system. However, MAES is a complex system possessing large numbers of parameters, intricate nonlinearities, time-varying factors as well as uncertainties, hence it is difficult to perfectly design and construct a prototype through merely conducting experiments by trial and error method. Our research presented an effective way to resolve preceding problem by use of dynamic response optimiza-tion. Firstly the mathematical model of MAES with first-order nonlinear ordinary differential equations including parameters was developed based on relevant mechanisms and experimental data, secondly simulation model of MAES was derived on the platform of MatLab/Simulink to perform model validation and further digital simulations, thirdly reference trajectories of de-sired dynamic response of system outputs were specified according to prescribed requirements, and finally optimization for initial values, tuned parameter and independent parameters was carried out using the genetic algorithm, the advanced direct search method along with parallel computing methods through computer simulations. The result showed that all parameters and configurations of MAES were determined after a series of computer experiments, and its tran-sient response performances and steady characteristics closely matched the reference curves. Since the prototype is a physical system that represents the mathematical model with reason-able accuracy, so the process of designing and

  12. Effects of vehicle impact velocity and front-end structure on dynamic responses of child pedestrians.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Yang, Jikuang

    2003-12-01

    To investigate the effects of vehicle impact velocity and front-end structure on the dynamic responses of child pedestrians, an extensive parametric study was carried out using two child mathematical models at 6 and 15 years old. The effect of the vehicle impact velocity was studied at 30, 40, and 50 km/h in terms of the head linear velocity, impact angle, and head angular velocity as well as various injury parameters concerning the head, chest, pelvis, and lower extremities. The variation of vehicle front-end shape was determined according to the shape corridors of modern vehicles, while the stiffness characteristics of the bumper, hood edge, and hood were varied within stiffness corridors obtained from dynamic component tests. The simulation results show that the vehicle impact speed is of great importance on the kinematics and resulting injury severity of child pedestrians. A significant reduction in all injury parameters can be achieved as the vehicle impact speed decreases to 30 km/h. The head and lower extremities of children are at higher injury risks than other body regions. Older children are exposed to higher injury risks to the head and lower leg, whereas younger ones sustain more severe impact loads to the pelvis and upper leg. The results from factorial analysis indicate that the hood-edge height has a significant effect on the kinematics and head impact responses of children. A higher hood edge could reduce the severity of head impact for younger children, but aggravate the risks of head injury for older ones. A significant interaction exists between the bumper height and the hood-edge height on the head impact responses of younger child. Nevertheless, improving the energy absorption performance of the hood seems effective for mitigating the severity of head injuries for children.

  13. Are Child Cognitive Characteristics Strong Predictors of Responses to Intervention? A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuebing, Karla K.; Barth, Amy E.; Trahan, Lisa H.; Reddy, Radhika R.; Miciak, Jeremy; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising 39 samples to ask the question, "What is the magnitude of the association between various baseline child cognitive characteristics and response to reading intervention?" Studies were located via literature searches, contact with researchers in the field, and review of references from…

  14. Preference for Anonymous Classroom Participation: Linking Student Characteristics and Reactions to Electronic Response Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Alyson; Hill, N. Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Electronic response systems (ERS) are a means to foster class participation by students who are reluctant to participate in class. In this study, we identify individual characteristics that relate to students' preference for anonymous classroom participation, and we also examine the extent to which preference for anonymity is related to their…

  15. Relationships of Examinee Pair Characteristics and Item Response Similarity. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (8)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    Detecting unusual similarity in the item responses of a pair of examinees usually conditions on the pair's overall test performance (e.g., raw scores). Doing this, however, often requires assumptions about the invariance of other examinee pair characteristics. In this study, we examined the appropriateness of such assumptions about selected…

  16. Evolution of taxis responses in virtual bacteria: non-adaptive dynamics.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Richard A; Soyer, Orkun S

    2008-05-23

    Bacteria are able to sense and respond to a variety of external stimuli, with responses that vary from stimuli to stimuli and from species to species. The best-understood is chemotaxis in the model organism Escherichia coli, where the dynamics and the structure of the underlying pathway are well characterised. It is not clear, however, how well this detailed knowledge applies to mechanisms mediating responses to other stimuli or to pathways in other species. Furthermore, there is increasing experimental evidence that bacteria integrate responses from different stimuli to generate a coherent taxis response. We currently lack a full understanding of the different pathway structures and dynamics and how this integration is achieved. In order to explore different pathway structures and dynamics that can underlie taxis responses in bacteria, we perform a computational simulation of the evolution of taxis. This approach starts with a population of virtual bacteria that move in a virtual environment based on the dynamics of the simple biochemical pathways they harbour. As mutations lead to changes in pathway structure and dynamics, bacteria better able to localise with favourable conditions gain a selective advantage. We find that a certain dynamics evolves consistently under different model assumptions and environments. These dynamics, which we call non-adaptive dynamics, directly couple tumbling probability of the cell to increasing stimuli. Dynamics that are adaptive under a wide range of conditions, as seen in the chemotaxis pathway of E. coli, do not evolve in these evolutionary simulations. However, we find that stimulus scarcity and fluctuations during evolution results in complex pathway dynamics that result both in adaptive and non-adaptive dynamics depending on basal stimuli levels. Further analyses of evolved pathway structures show that effective taxis dynamics can be mediated with as few as two components. The non-adaptive dynamics mediating taxis responses

  17. A planar shock isolation system with high-static-low-dynamic-stiffness characteristic based on cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yanhui; He, Minghua; Shen, Wenhou; Ren, Gexue

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a simple and designable shock isolation system with ideal high-static-low-dynamic-stiffness (HSLDS) is proposed, which is intended for the horizontal plane shock isolation application. In this system, the isolated object is suspended by several bearing cables and constrained by a number of uniformly distributed pretensioned cables in the horizontal plane, where the low dynamic stiffness of the system is main controlled by the pretension of the planar cables, whilst the high static stiffness is determined by the axial stiffness of the planar cables and their geometric settings. To obtain the HSLDS characteristic of the system, a brief theoretical description of the relationship between the restoring force and displacement is derived. By obtaining the three-order Taylor expansion with sufficient accuracy of the restoring force, influence of planar cable parameters on the low dynamic and high static stiffness is thus given, therefore, the required HSLDS isolator can be easily designed by adjusting the planar cable length, pretension and tensile stiffness. Finally, the isotropy characteristic of the restoring force of the system with different numbers of planar cables is investigated. To evaluate the performance of the system, a rigid isolated object and flexible cables coupling simulation model considering the contacts of the system is established by using multibody dynamics approach. In this model, flexible cables are simulated by 3-node cable element based on the absolute nodal coordinate formulation; the contact between cable and isolated object is simulated based on Hertz contact theory. Finally, the time-domain shock excitation is converted from the design shock spectrum on the basis of BV043/85 criterion. The design procedure of this isolator and some useful guidelines for choosing cable parameters are presented. In addition, a summary about the performance of the isolators with different numbers of cables shocking in an arbitrary direction is

  18. Spin-Entry Characteristics of a Large Supersonic Bomber as Determined by Dynamic Model Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, James S.

    1965-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley spin tunnel and at a catapult launch facility of a 1/60-scale dynamic model to determine the spin-entry characteristics of a large supersonic bomber. Catapult tests indicated that spin-entry motions were obtainable for a center-of-gravity location of 0.21 mean aerodynamic chord but were not obtainable at a center-of-gravity location of 0.25 mean aerodynamic chord. Deflected ailerons were effective in promoting or preventing the spin- entry motion and this effect was qualitatively the same as it was for the fully developed spin. Varying the configuration had little significant effect on the spin-entry characteristics. Brief tests conducted with the model in the Langley spin tunnel indicated that fully developed spins were obtainable at the forward center-of-gravity location and that spins were highly unlikely at the rearward center-of-location.

  19. Air Dispersion Characteristics and Thermal Comparison of Traditional and Fabric Ductwork using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreopoulou, Areti

    This thesis research compares the air dispersion and thermal comfort characteristics of conventional diffuser and fabric-based ductwork systems. Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings produce and regulate airflow traveling through ductwork. The performance characteristics of conventional ductwork are compared with recent advancements in fabric-based ductwork. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis, thermal and air distribution flow patterns are compared between the two types of ductwork and preliminary thermal comfort and efficiency conclusions are drawn. Results of the Air Distribution Performance Index (ADPI) for both ducting systems reflect that, under the given test conditions, the fabric duct system is approximately 23% more comfortable than the traditional diffuser system in terms of air speed flow uniformity into the space, while staying within the Effective Draft Temperature comfort zone of -3 to +2°F.

  20. Kinematic, Dynamic, and Energy Characteristics of Diastolic Flow in the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Khalafvand, Seyed Saeid; Hung, Tin-Kan; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Zhong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Blood flow characteristics in the normal left ventricle are studied by using the magnetic resonance imaging, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the work-energy equation. Vortices produced during the mitral valve opening and closing are modeled in a two-dimensional analysis and correlated with temporal variations of the Reynolds number and pressure drop. Low shear stress and net pressures on the mitral valve are obtained for flow acceleration and deceleration. Bernoulli energy flux delivered to blood from ventricular dilation is practically balanced by the energy influx and the rate change of kinetic energy in the ventricle. The rates of work done by shear and energy dissipation are small. The dynamic and energy characteristics of the 2D results are comparable to those of a 3D model. PMID:26417381

  1. Lightning Surge Analysis for 500-kV Transmission Lines using Grounding Model with Dynamic Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Yoh; Kondo, Shuhei; Hara, Takehisa; Ikeda, Keiichi; Sonoi, Yasuo; Furuoka, Yoshihiro

    It is well known that grounding resistance under huge lightning current injection has current-dependent characteristics, whose mathematical model was already proposed by Liew and Darveniza in 1974. In this paper, where our final goal is reasonable design for lightning protection of 500-kV transmission tower, we adopt the dynamic grounding-resistance model to MODELS-ATP simulation. The effect of the model for the lightning surge analysis on 500-kV transmission line systems is discussed in detail.

  2. Dynamical Characteristics of Rydberg Electrons Released by a Weak Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Diesen, Elias; Saalmann, Ulf; Richter, Martin; Kunitski, Maksim; Dörner, Reinhard; Rost, Jan M

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of ultraslow electrons in the combined potential of an ionic core and a static electric field is discussed. With state-of-the-art detection it is possible to create such electrons through strong intense-field photoabsorption and to detect them via high-resolution time-of-flight spectroscopy despite their very low kinetic energy. The characteristic feature of their momentum spectrum, which emerges at the same position for different laser orientations, is derived and could be revealed experimentally with an energy resolution of the order of 1 meV. PMID:27104706

  3. Dynamical characteristics of Rydberg electrons released by a weak electric field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Diesen, Elias; Saalmann, Ulf; Richter, Martin; Kunitski, Maksim; Dorner, Reinhard; Rost, Jan M.

    2016-04-08

    This paper discuss the dynamics of ultraslow electrons in the combined potential of an ionic core and a static electric field. With state-of-the-art detection it is possible to create such electrons through strong intense-field photoabsorption and to detect them via high-resolution time-of-flight spectroscopy despite their very low kinetic energy. The characteristic feature of their momentum spectrum, which emerges at the same position for different laser orientations, is derived and could be revealed experimentally with an energy resolution of the order of 1 meV.

  4. Dynamical Characteristics of Rydberg Electrons Released by a Weak Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesen, Elias; Saalmann, Ulf; Richter, Martin; Kunitski, Maksim; Dörner, Reinhard; Rost, Jan M.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of ultraslow electrons in the combined potential of an ionic core and a static electric field is discussed. With state-of-the-art detection it is possible to create such electrons through strong intense-field photoabsorption and to detect them via high-resolution time-of-flight spectroscopy despite their very low kinetic energy. The characteristic feature of their momentum spectrum, which emerges at the same position for different laser orientations, is derived and could be revealed experimentally with an energy resolution of the order of 1 meV.

  5. Are Child Cognitive Characteristics Strong Predictors of Responses to Intervention? A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    STUEBING, KARLA K.; BARTH, AMY E.; TRAHAN, LISA H.; REDDY, RADHIKA R.; MICIAK, JEREMY; FLETCHER, JACK M.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 28 studies comprising 39 samples to ask the question, “What is the magnitude of the association between various baseline child cognitive characteristics and response to reading intervention?” Studies were located via literature searches, contact with researchers in the field, and review of references from the National Reading Panel Report. Eligible participant populations included at-risk elementary school children enrolled in the third grade or below. Effects were analyzed using a shifting unit of analysis approach within three statistical models: cognitive characteristics predicting growth curve slope (Model 1, mean r = .31), gain (Model 2, mean r = .21), or postintervention reading controlling for preintervention reading (Model 3, mean r = .15). Effects were homogeneous within each model when effects were aggregated within study. The small size of the effects calls into question the practical significance and utility of using cognitive characteristics for prediction of response when baseline reading is available. PMID:26535015

  6. Review of the dynamic characteristics of AlGaInAs/InP microlasers subject to optical injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Zhen; Ma, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long

    2016-11-01

    Semiconductor lasers subject to optical injection exhibit many nonlinear dynamic behaviors that can be applied to enhance the modulation speed and generate a microwave signal. In this paper, the dynamic characteristics of AlGaInAs/InP microdisk lasers subject to optical injection are investigated numerically and experimentally. The different dynamic states and bifurcation and stability diagrams are simulated using rate equations, and a greatly enhanced modulation bandwidth is expected based on small-signal analysis of microlasers in the injection locking state. Four-wave mixing, period-one and period-two oscillations, and injection locking states are demonstrated experimentally from the lasing spectra and photonic generation microwaves for a microdisk laser subject to optical injection at different detuning frequencies, and enhancement of the modulation bandwidth is realized for the optical injection locking state. Furthermore, low-noise photonically generated microwaves are obtained for microdisk lasers subject to optical injection and optoelectronic feedback, with the beating signal obtained from a high-speed photodetector being applied to the microdisk laser as sideband injection locking is realized in the period-one state. In addition to external optical injection, dynamic optical injection behaviors are realized for integrated twin-microdisk lasers with mutually internal optical injection, similar to semiconductor microdisk lasers subject to external optical injection. As well as obtaining microwaves by light beating at a high-speed photodetector, microwave signals are obtained from the electrode of a square microlaser subject to optical injection related to carrier density oscillation, with the microwave power versus frequency being in good agreement with the small-signal modulation response curve. It is expected that low-noise tunable microwave signals and enhanced modulation speed microlasers will be obtained from photonic integrated circuits, with the

  7. Flight-determined derivatives and dynamic characteristics for the HL-10 lifting body vehicle at subsonic and transonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strutz, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    The HL-10 lifting body stability and control derivatives were determined by using an analog-matching technique and compared with derivatives obtained from wind-tunnel results. The flight derivatives were determined as a function of angle of attack for a subsonic configuration at Mach 0.7 and for a transonic configuration at Mach 0.7, 0.9, and 1.2. At an angle of attack of 14 deg, data were obtained for a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.4. The flight and wind-tunnel derivatives were in general agreement, with the possible exception of the longitudinal and lateral damping derivatives. Some differences were noted between the vehicle dynamic response characteristics calculated from flight-determined derivatives and those predicted by the wind-tunnel results. However, the only difference the pilots noted between the response of the vehicle in flight and the response of a simulator programed with wind-tunnel-predicted data was that the damping generally was higher in the flight vehicle.

  8. Two spatio-temporal filters in human vision. 1. Temporal and spatial frequency response characteristics.

    PubMed

    Holliday, I E; Ruddock, K H

    1983-01-01

    We have studied visual detection of a circular target moving across a spatially and/or temporally modulated background. Illumination, It, for threshold detection of the target has been measured as a function of background modulation frequency and changes in It associated with background modulation provide a means of determining the frequency response characteristics of visual channels. Temporal frequency responses obtained with temporally modulated, spatially uniform backgrounds have pass-band characteristics and the temporal frequency for peak response increases with increase in mean background illumination. These temporal frequency responses resemble those of the de Lange (1954) filter, but the latter incorporates the incremental thresholds for steady backgrounds. The amplitude of this temporal response saturates at low (approximately 40%) background modulation, decreases to zero as the target velocity falls to zero, and is maximum for a circular target of diameter 2 degrees. The spatial characteristics of this temporal filter were measured with a background field consisting of alternate steady and flickering bars. The resulting spatial frequency curve peaks at 1 cycle deg-1 for all background illuminations and is independent of the background grating orientation. This spatial response differs significantly from the IMG spatial functions observed with a background grating (Barbur and Ruddock, 1980). The spatial and temporal responses reviewed above exhibit similar parametric variations and we therefore associate them with a single spatio-temporal filter, ST2. A second temporal response, with low-pass frequency characteristics, was observed with a background field consisting of two matched gratings, presented in spatial and temporal antiphase. This response has parametric properties similar to those of the IMG spatial response described previously by Barbur and Ruddock (1980), thus we associated the two sets of data with a single spatio-temporal filter, ST1. We

  9. Determinants and repeatability of the specific dynamic response of the corn snake, Pantherophis guttatus.

    PubMed

    Crocker-Buta, Sarah P; Secor, Stephen M

    2014-03-01

    Ingesting, digesting, absorbing, and assimilating a meal are all energy consuming processes that accumulate to form the specific dynamic action (SDA) of the meal. Sensitive to digestive demand, SDA is theoretically fixed to a given meal size and type. In this study, we altered relative meal size to explore the effects of digestive demand on the postprandial metabolic profile and SDA of the corn snake, Pantherophis guttatus. We also examined the effects of body temperature on the SDA response while controlling for meal size and type and assessed whether these responses are highly repeatable under the same conditions. Additionally, the effects of body mass on SDA were investigated by feeding snakes the same relative and absolute meal size. With increases in digestive demand (meals from 5% to 45% of body mass), P. guttatus responded with incremental increases in the postprandial peak in oxygen consumption (VO2), the duration of the significantly elevated VO2, and SDA. Body temperature had an observable impact on the postprandial metabolic profile, decreasing the duration and increasing the peak VO2, however, body temperature did not significantly alter SDA. Regardless of temperature, and hence duration, snakes expended the same amount of energy in digesting a given meal. This was additionally borne out when testing the individual repeatability of the SDA response, individual P. guttatus exhibited nearly identical postprandial responses to the same meal. Over a 90-fold range in body mass, and fed meals equaling 25% of body mass, P. guttatus exhibited an isometric relationship between SDA and body mass. When fed a set 10-gram meal, snakes regardless of body size expended the same amount of energy on digestion and assimilation. Characteristically, P. guttatus experience a rapid postprandial increase in metabolic rate that peaks and gradually descends to prefeeding levels. The magnitude of that response (quantified as SDA) varies as a function of digestive demand (i

  10. Intracellular characteristics and responses of taste bud and lingual cells of the mudpuppy

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Intracellular recordings of membrane potentials of mudpuppy lingual cells were made with micropipette electrodes. Three types of cells were distinguished by their responses to chemical stimulation. Surface epithelial (SE) cells outside of taste buds responded with large membrane potential and resistance changes to a variety of stimuli representing the four taste qualities. Salts and acids evoked particularly large potential changes, and MgCl2, acids, and quinine greatly increased the membrane resistance. One type of taste bud cell (TB-1) was characterized by large depolarizations to K salts, and the other type of taste bud cell (TB-2) characteristically hyperpolarized to MgCl2, acid, and sugar solutions. Membrane resistance changes accompanying TB-1 and TB-2 cell responses were relatively small compared to those of SE cells. Electrotonic coupling was observed between pairs of SE and TB-2 cells but not for pairs of TB-1 cells nor cells of different types. After recording cell responses, dye-marking allowed verification of results in situ and histologically. From the identification of cells in section, it is hypothesized the TB-1 and TB- 2 cells correspond to light and dark cells, respectively. Responses of TB-1 cells imply a taste receptive function; wheras TB 2-cell responses suggest secretory, supportive, and (or) receptive functions. Factors affecting cellular characteristics, non-taste bud cell responsiveness, response mechanisms, and function of electrotonic coupling are discussed in relation to taste reception. PMID:702111

  11. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Wataru; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1) and 30 (Experiment 2) ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing. PMID:25250001

  12. Enhanced subliminal emotional responses to dynamic facial expressions

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Wataru; Kubota, Yasutaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2014-01-01

    Emotional processing without conscious awareness plays an important role in human social interaction. Several behavioral studies reported that subliminal presentation of photographs of emotional facial expressions induces unconscious emotional processing. However, it was difficult to elicit strong and robust effects using this method. We hypothesized that dynamic presentations of facial expressions would enhance subliminal emotional effects and tested this hypothesis with two experiments. Fearful or happy facial expressions were presented dynamically or statically in either the left or the right visual field for 20 (Experiment 1) and 30 (Experiment 2) ms. Nonsense target ideographs were then presented, and participants reported their preference for them. The results consistently showed that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induced more evident emotional biases toward subsequent targets than did static ones. These results indicate that dynamic presentations of emotional facial expressions induce more evident unconscious emotional processing. PMID:25250001

  13. Dynamic response of Permian brachiopod communities to long-term environmental change.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Thomas D; Erwin, Douglas H

    2004-04-15

    The fossil record preserves numerous natural experiments that can shed light on the response of ecological communities to environmental change. However, directly observing the community dynamics of extinct organisms is not possible. As an alternative, neutral ecological models suggest that species abundance distributions reflect dynamical processes like migration, competition, recruitment, and extinction. Live-dead comparisons suggest that such distributions can be faithfully preserved in the rock record. Here we use a maximum-likelihood approach to show that brachiopod (lamp shell) abundance distributions from four temporally distinct ecological landscapes from the Glass Mountains, Texas (of the Permian period), exhibit significant differences. Further, all four are better fitted by zero-sum multinomial distributions, characteristic of Hubbell's neutral model, than by log-normal distributions, as predicted by the traditional ecological null hypothesis. Using the neutral model as a guide, we suggest that sea level fluctuations spanning about 10 Myr altered the degrees of isolation and exchange among local communities within these ecological landscapes. Neither these long-term environmental changes nor higher-frequency sea level fluctuations resulted in wholesale extinction or major innovation within evolutionary lineages.

  14. Dynamic response of Permian brachiopod communities to long-term environmental change.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Thomas D; Erwin, Douglas H

    2004-04-15

    The fossil record preserves numerous natural experiments that can shed light on the response of ecological communities to environmental change. However, directly observing the community dynamics of extinct organisms is not possible. As an alternative, neutral ecological models suggest that species abundance distributions reflect dynamical processes like migration, competition, recruitment, and extinction. Live-dead comparisons suggest that such distributions can be faithfully preserved in the rock record. Here we use a maximum-likelihood approach to show that brachiopod (lamp shell) abundance distributions from four temporally distinct ecological landscapes from the Glass Mountains, Texas (of the Permian period), exhibit significant differences. Further, all four are better fitted by zero-sum multinomial distributions, characteristic of Hubbell's neutral model, than by log-normal distributions, as predicted by the traditional ecological null hypothesis. Using the neutral model as a guide, we suggest that sea level fluctuations spanning about 10 Myr altered the degrees of isolation and exchange among local communities within these ecological landscapes. Neither these long-term environmental changes nor higher-frequency sea level fluctuations resulted in wholesale extinction or major innovation within evolutionary lineages. PMID:15085129

  15. An Experimental and Theoretical Approach on the Modeling of Sliding Response of Rock Wedges under Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydan, Ömer; Kumsar, Halil

    2010-11-01

    The stability of rock slopes under dynamic loading in mining and civil engineering depends upon the slope geometry, mechanical properties of rock mass and discontinuities, and the characteristics of dynamic loads with time. The wedge failure is one of the common forms of slope failures. The authors presented some stability conditions for rock wedges under dynamic loading and they confirmed their validity through the laboratory experimental studies in a previous paper in 2000, which is often quoted by others to validate their softwares, including some commercial software. In this study, the authors investigate the sliding responses of rock wedges under dynamic loads rather than the initiation of wedge sliding. First, some laboratory model tests are described. On the basis of these model tests on rock wedges, the theoretical model proposed previously is extended to compute the sliding responses of rock wedges in time domain. The proposed theoretical model is applied to simulate the sliding responses of rock wedge model tests and its validity is discussed. In the final part, the method proposed is applied to actual wedge failures observed in 1995 Dinar earthquake and 2005 Pakistan-Kashmir earthquake, and the results are discussed.

  16. Comparison of Dynamic Characteristics for an Inflatable Solar Concentrator in Atmospheric and Thermal Vacuum Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slade, Kara N.; Tinker, Michael L.; Lassiter, John O.; Engberg, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic testing of an inflatable solar concentrator structure in a thermal vacuum chamber as well as in ambient laboratory conditions is described in detail. Unique aspects of modal testing for the extremely lightweight inflatable are identified, including the use of a noncontacting laser vibrometer measurement system. For the thermal vacuum environment, mode shapes and frequency response functions are compared for three different test article inflation pressures at room temperature. Modes that persist through all the inflation pressure regimes are identified, as well as modes that are unique for each pressure. In atmospheric pressure and room temperature conditions, dynamic measurements were obtained for the expected operational inflation pressure of 0.5 psig. Experimental mode shapes and frequency response functions for ambient conditions are described and compared to the 0.5 psig results from the thermal vacuum tests. Only a few mode shapes were identified that occurred in both vacuum and atmospheric environments. This somewhat surprising result is discussed in detail, and attributed at least partly to 1.) large differences in modal damping, and 2.) significant differences in the mass of air contained by the structure, in the two environments. Results of this investigation point out the necessity of testing inflatable space structures in vacuum conditions before they can be launched. Ground testing in atmospheric pressure is not sufficient for predicting on-orbit dynamics of non-rigidized inflatable systems.

  17. Determination of thermal/dynamic characteristics of lava flow from surface thermal measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander; Tsepelev, Igor; Kovtunov, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    Rapid development of ground based thermal cameras, drones and satellite data allows getting repeated thermal images of the surface of the lava flow. Available instrumentation allows getting a large amount of data during a single lava flow eruption. These data require development of appropriate quantitative techniques to link subsurface dynamics with observations. We present a new approach to assimilation of thermal measurements at lava's surface to the bottom of the lava flow to determine lava's thermal and dynamic characteristics. Mathematically this problem is reduced to solving an inverse boundary problem. Namely, using known conditions at one part of the model boundary we determine the missing condition at the remaining part of the boundary. Using an adjoint method we develop a numerical approach to the mathematical problem based on the determination of the missing boundary condition and lava flow characteristics. Numerical results show that in the case of smooth input data lava temperature and velocity can be determined with a high accuracy. A noise imposed on the smooth input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level. The proposed approach to assimilate measured data brings an opportunity to estimate thermal budget of the lava flow.

  18. Effect of temperature on the dynamic characteristics of the glass-carbon fiber hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Yon Afif; Susilo, Didik Djoko; Raharjo, Wijang W.

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of temperature on the dynamic characteristics of hybrid composites. Hybrid composites consisting of unsaturated polyester resin and glass fiber reinforced with carbon fiber. The volume fraction used in this study was 0.4. The hybrid composite was made using hand lay-up technique. The dynamic characteristics were obtained through vibration testing. The testing was conducted according to ASTM E756. The variables studied were composite without heating, heating at 100 °C, 200 °C and 280 °C. The experiments were done in three mounting configurations, i.e. upright, downward and horizontal configurations. The natural frequency and damping ratio was determined using half-power bandwidth method. The results showed that heating of composite structure affects the natural frequency and damping ratio of the hybrid composite. Heating until 100 °C will increase the natural frequency of the hybrid composite and decrease the damping ratio, but heating at the temperature above 100 °C will decrease the natural frequency and will damage the hybrid composite structure. The composite mounting configurations do not give significant effect to natural frequency and damping ratio of the hybrid composites.

  19. Dynamic modeling and characteristics analysis of a modal-independent linear ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yao, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Shengli; Lv, Qibao; Liu, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an integrated model is developed to analyze the fundamental characteristics of a modal-independent linear ultrasonic motor with double piezoelectric vibrators. The energy method is used to model the dynamics of the two piezoelectric vibrators. The interface forces are coupled into the dynamic equations of the two vibrators and the moving platform, forming a whole machine model of the motor. The behavior of the force transmission of the motor is analyzed via the resulting model to understand the drive mechanism. In particular, the relative contact length is proposed to describe the intermittent contact characteristic between the stator and the mover, and its role in evaluating motor performance is discussed. The relations between the output speed and various inputs to the motor and the start-stop transients of the motor are analyzed by numerical simulations, which are validated by experiments. Furthermore, the dead-zone behavior is predicted and clarified analytically using the proposed model, which is also observed in experiments. These results are useful for designing servo control scheme for the motor.

  20. Dynamic modeling and characteristics analysis of a modal-independent linear ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Yao, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Shengli; Lv, Qibao; Liu, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an integrated model is developed to analyze the fundamental characteristics of a modal-independent linear ultrasonic motor with double piezoelectric vibrators. The energy method is used to model the dynamics of the two piezoelectric vibrators. The interface forces are coupled into the dynamic equations of the two vibrators and the moving platform, forming a whole machine model of the motor. The behavior of the force transmission of the motor is analyzed via the resulting model to understand the drive mechanism. In particular, the relative contact length is proposed to describe the intermittent contact characteristic between the stator and the mover, and its role in evaluating motor performance is discussed. The relations between the output speed and various inputs to the motor and the start-stop transients of the motor are analyzed by numerical simulations, which are validated by experiments. Furthermore, the dead-zone behavior is predicted and clarified analytically using the proposed model, which is also observed in experiments. These results are useful for designing servo control scheme for the motor. PMID:27518427

  1. Modeling Vegetation Dynamics in Response to Hydrological Changes in a Small Urban Tropical Freshwater Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, T. M.; Palanisamy, B.; Mohanadas, H.

    2011-12-01

    Wetlands worldwide face drastic degradation from human-induced changes. A small freshwater wetland located within the dense urbanized island state of Singapore---the Nee Soon Wetland---is no exception. It is the only significant locality in Singapore of peat swamp forest and is home to a wide range of rare and endangered floral and faunal species. Unfortunately, changes in downstream land use and surrounding reservoirs' operations may pose threats to the coupled hydrological and vegetation systems. This study develops and applies coupled hydrological-vegetation models to understand the dynamic relationships between hydrology and vegetation systems, and simulates vegetation responses to hydrological changes in Nee Soon. The models combine a hydrological component with a vegetation component. The hydrological component accounts for both saturated and unsaturated flows, and incorporates evapotranspiration, rainfall infiltration and recharge from streams and reservoirs. The vegetation component is described by Lokta-Volterra equations that are tailored for plant growth, to simulate the vegetation dynamics of up to three species that thrive in different flooding conditions. Important findings include: (1) groundwater levels within Nee Soon are not highly sensitive to the operating levels of the surrounding reservoirs. However, (2) downstream drainage results in a localized zone of influence with significant adverse impacts, especially on the less flood-tolerant species. In addition, (3) the severely impacted less flood-tolerant species is unable to recover even when previous hydrological conditions are restored, unless the downstream drainage duration is reduced, or the plant characteristics such as maximum assimilation rates or competitiveness are increased. Finally, (4) hydrological conditions and species competitiveness supersede any other plant growth characteristics in determining the stable coexistence of different species. The developed models and modeling

  2. Health systems' responsiveness and its characteristics: a cross-country comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Robone, Silvana; Rice, Nigel; Smith, Peter C

    2011-12-01

    OBJECTIVES. Responsiveness has been identified as one of the intrinsic goals of health care systems. Little is known, however, about its determinants. Our objective is to investigate the potential country-level drivers of health system responsiveness. DATA SOURCE. Data on responsiveness are taken from the World Health Survey. Information on country-level characteristics is obtained from a variety of sources including the United Nations Development Program (UNDP). STUDY DESIGN. A two-step procedure. First, using survey data we derive a country-level measure of system responsiveness purged of differences in individual reporting behavior. Secondly, we run cross-sectional country-level regressions of responsiveness on potential drivers. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Health care expenditures per capita are positively associated with responsiveness, after controlling for the influence of potential confounding factors. Aspects of responsiveness are also associated with public sector spending (negatively) and educational development (positively). CONCLUSIONS. From a policy perspective, improvements in responsiveness may require higher spending levels. The expansion of nonpublic sector provision, perhaps in the form of increased patient choice, may also serve to improve responsiveness. However, these inferences are tentative and require further study.

  3. The Magnetospheric Constellation Mission. Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (DRACO): Understanding the Global Dynamics of the Structured Magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetospheric Constellation Dynamic Response and Coupling Observatory (DRACO) is the Solar Terrestrial Probe (STP) designed to understand the nonlinear dynamics, responses, and connections within the Earth's structured magnetotail, using a constellation of approximately 50 to 100 distributed vector measurement spacecraft. DRACO will reveal magnetotail processes operating within a domain extending 20 Earth radii (R(sub E)) across the tail and 40 R(sub E)down the tail, on spatial and time scales accessible to global circulation models, i.e., approximately 2 R(sub E) and 10 seconds.

  4. Postprandial glycaemic response: how is it influenced by characteristics of cereal products?

    PubMed

    Meynier, Alexandra; Goux, Aurélie; Atkinson, Fiona; Brack, Olivier; Vinoy, Sophie

    2015-06-28

    Cereal products exhibit a wide range of glycaemic indexes (GI), but the interaction of their different nutrients and starch digestibility on blood glucose response is not well known. The objective of this analysis was to evaluate how cereal product characteristics can contribute to GI and insulinaemic index and to the parameters describing glycaemic or insulinaemic responses (incremental AUC, maximum concentration and Δpeak). Moreover, interactions between the different cereal products characteristics and glycaemic response parameters were assessed for the first time. Relationships between the cereal products characteristics and the glycaemic response were analysed by partial least square regressions, followed by modelling. A database including 190 cereal products tested by the usual GI methodology was used. The model on glycaemic responses showed that slowly digestible starch (SDS), rapidly digestible starch (RDS) and fat and fibres, and several interactions involving them, significantly explain GI by 53 % and Δpeak of glycaemia by 60 %. Fat and fibres had important contributions to glycaemic response at low and medium SDS contents in cereal products, but this effect disappears at high SDS levels. We showed also for the first time that glycaemic response parameters are dependent on interactions between starch digestibility (interaction between SDS and RDS) and nutritional composition (interaction between fat and fibres) of the cereal products. We also demonstrated the non-linear effect of fat and fibres (significant effect of their quadratic terms). Hence, optimising both the formula and the manufacturing process of cereal products can improve glucose metabolism, which is recognised as strongly influential on human health.

  5. Protein Dynamics and the Diversity of an Antibody Response*

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved. PMID:22685303

  6. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a "segmented" thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed "segmented" model shows more precise than the "non-segmented" model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the "segmented" model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  7. Improving the dynamic characteristics of body-in-white structure using structural optimization.

    PubMed

    Yahaya Rashid, Aizzat S; Ramli, Rahizar; Mohamed Haris, Sallehuddin; Alias, Anuar

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a body-in-white (BIW) structure has significant influence on the noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) and crashworthiness of a car. Therefore, by improving the dynamic characteristics of BIW, problems and failures associated with resonance and fatigue can be prevented. The design objectives attempt to improve the existing torsion and bending modes by using structural optimization subjected to dynamic load without compromising other factors such as mass and stiffness of the structure. The natural frequency of the design was modified by identifying and reinforcing the structure at critical locations. These crucial points are first identified by topology optimization using mass and natural frequencies as the design variables. The individual components obtained from the analysis go through a size optimization step to find their target thickness of the structure. The thickness of affected regions of the components will be modified according to the analysis. The results of both optimization steps suggest several design modifications to achieve the target vibration specifications without compromising the stiffness of the structure. A method of combining both optimization approaches is proposed to improve the design modification process. PMID:25101312

  8. Vulcanization characteristics and dynamic mechanical behavior of natural rubber reinforced with silane modified silica.

    PubMed

    Chonkaew, Wunpen; Minghvanish, Withawat; Kungliean, Ulchulee; Rochanawipart, Nutthaya; Brostow, Witold

    2011-03-01

    Two silane coupling agents were used for hydrolysis-condensation reaction modification of nanosilica surfaces. The surface characteristics were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The vulcanization kinetics of natural rubber (NR) + silica composites was studied and compared to behavior of the neat NR using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in the dynamic scan mode. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was performed to evaluate the effects of the surface modification. Activation energy E(a) values for the reaction are obtained. The presence of silica, modified or otherwise, inhibits the vulcanization reaction of NR. The neat silica containing system has the lowest cure rate index and the highest activation energy for the vulcanization reaction. The coupling agent with longer chains causes more swelling and moves the glass transition temperature T(g) downwards. Below the glass transition region, silica causes a lowering of the dynamic storage modulus G', a result of hindering the cure reaction. Above the glass transition, silica-again modified or otherwise-provides the expected reinforcement effect. PMID:21449342

  9. Evaporation characteristics of thin film liquid argon in nano-scale confinement: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Shavik, Sheikh Mohammad; Rabbi, Kazi Fazle; Haque, Mominul

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to explore the evaporation characteristics of thin liquid argon film in nano-scale confinement. The present study has been conducted to realize the nano-scale physics of simultaneous evaporation and condensation inside a confined space for a three phase system with particular emphasis on the effect of surface wetting conditions. The simulation domain consisted of two parallel platinum plates; one at the top and another at the bottom. The fluid comprised of liquid argon film at the bottom plate and vapor argon in between liquid argon and upper plate of the domain. Considering hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature of top and bottom surfaces, two different cases have been investigated: (i) Case A: Both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophilic, (ii) Case B: both top and bottom surfaces are hydrophobic. For all cases, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) was performed to reach equilibrium state at 90 K. Then the lower wall was set to four different temperatures such as 110 K, 120 K, 130 K and 140 K to perform non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD). The variation of temperature and density as well as the variation of system pressure with respect to time were closely monitored for each case. The heat fluxes normal to top and bottom walls were estimated and discussed to illuminate the effectiveness of heat transfer in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic confinement at various boundary temperatures of the bottom plate.

  10. Vulcanization characteristics and dynamic mechanical behavior of natural rubber reinforced with silane modified silica.

    PubMed

    Chonkaew, Wunpen; Minghvanish, Withawat; Kungliean, Ulchulee; Rochanawipart, Nutthaya; Brostow, Witold

    2011-03-01

    Two silane coupling agents were used for hydrolysis-condensation reaction modification of nanosilica surfaces. The surface characteristics were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The vulcanization kinetics of natural rubber (NR) + silica composites was studied and compared to behavior of the neat NR using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in the dynamic scan mode. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was performed to evaluate the effects of the surface modification. Activation energy E(a) values for the reaction are obtained. The presence of silica, modified or otherwise, inhibits the vulcanization reaction of NR. The neat silica containing system has the lowest cure rate index and the highest activation energy for the vulcanization reaction. The coupling agent with longer chains causes more swelling and moves the glass transition temperature T(g) downwards. Below the glass transition region, silica causes a lowering of the dynamic storage modulus G', a result of hindering the cure reaction. Above the glass transition, silica-again modified or otherwise-provides the expected reinforcement effect.

  11. Improving the Dynamic Characteristics of Body-in-White Structure Using Structural Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Yahaya Rashid, Aizzat S.; Mohamed Haris, Sallehuddin; Alias, Anuar

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a body-in-white (BIW) structure has significant influence on the noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) and crashworthiness of a car. Therefore, by improving the dynamic characteristics of BIW, problems and failures associated with resonance and fatigue can be prevented. The design objectives attempt to improve the existing torsion and bending modes by using structural optimization subjected to dynamic load without compromising other factors such as mass and stiffness of the structure. The natural frequency of the design was modified by identifying and reinforcing the structure at critical locations. These crucial points are first identified by topology optimization using mass and natural frequencies as the design variables. The individual components obtained from the analysis go through a size optimization step to find their target thickness of the structure. The thickness of affected regions of the components will be modified according to the analysis. The results of both optimization steps suggest several design modifications to achieve the target vibration specifications without compromising the stiffness of the structure. A method of combining both optimization approaches is proposed to improve the design modification process. PMID:25101312

  12. Improving the dynamic characteristics of body-in-white structure using structural optimization.

    PubMed

    Yahaya Rashid, Aizzat S; Ramli, Rahizar; Mohamed Haris, Sallehuddin; Alias, Anuar

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a body-in-white (BIW) structure has significant influence on the noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) and crashworthiness of a car. Therefore, by improving the dynamic characteristics of BIW, problems and failures associated with resonance and fatigue can be prevented. The design objectives attempt to improve the existing torsion and bending modes by using structural optimization subjected to dynamic load without compromising other factors such as mass and stiffness of the structure. The natural frequency of the design was modified by identifying and reinforcing the structure at critical locations. These crucial points are first identified by topology optimization using mass and natural frequencies as the design variables. The individual components obtained from the analysis go through a size optimization step to find their target thickness of the structure. The thickness of affected regions of the components will be modified according to the analysis. The results of both optimization steps suggest several design modifications to achieve the target vibration specifications without compromising the stiffness of the structure. A method of combining both optimization approaches is proposed to improve the design modification process.

  13. Middle ear dynamics in response to seismic stimuli in the Cape golden mole (Chrysochloris asiatica).

    PubMed

    Willi, U B; Bronner, G N; Narins, P M

    2006-01-01

    The hypertrophied malleus in the middle ear of some golden moles has been assumed to be an adaptation for sensing substrate vibrations by inertial bone conduction, but this has never been conclusively demonstrated. The Cape golden mole (Chrysochloris asiatica) exhibits this anatomical specialization, and the dynamic properties of its middle ear response to vibrations were the subjects of this study. Detailed three-dimensional middle ear anatomy was obtained by x-ray microcomputed tomography (muCT) at a resolution of 12 microm. The ossicular chain exhibits large malleus mass, selective reduction of stiffness and displacement of the center of mass from the suspension points, all favoring low-frequency tuning of the middle ear response. Orientation of the stapes relative to the ossicular chain and the structure of the stapes footplate enable transmission of substrate vibrations arriving from multiple directions to the inner ear. With the long axes of the mallei aligned parallel to the surface, the animal's head was stimulated by a vibration exciter in the vertical and lateral directions over a frequency range from 10 to 600 Hz. The ossicular chain was shown to respond to both vertical and lateral vibrations. Resonant frequencies were found between 71 and 200 Hz and did not differ significantly between the two stimulation directions. Below resonance, the ossicular chain moves in phase with the skull. Near resonance and above, the malleus moves at a significantly larger mean amplitude (5.8+/-2.8 dB) in response to lateral vs vertical stimuli and is 180 degrees out of phase with the skull in both cases. A concise summary of the propagation characteristics of both seismic body (P-waves) and surface (R-waves) is provided. Potential mechanisms by which the animal might exploit the differential response of the ossicular chain to vertical and lateral excitation are discussed in relation to the properties of surface seismic waves.

  14. Dynamic response of a pair of walls retaining a viscoelastic solid

    SciTech Connect

    Veletsos, A.S.; Parikh, V.H.; Younan, A.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1995-01-01

    Making use of a previously reported, simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and forces induced by horizontal ground shaking on a pair of infinitely long, parallel walls retaining a uniform viscoelastic solid. The walls are presumed to be rigid but elastically constrained against rotation at their base. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. The accuracy of the method is assessed by comparing its predictions for the special case of fixed-based walls with those obtained by an exact method, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the underlying response mechanisms, and the effects and relative importance of the parameters involved. The parameters examined include the characteristics of the ground motion, the ratio of the distance between walls to the height of the contained material, and the flexibility of the rotational wall constraints. In addition to valuable insights into the responses of the systems investigated, the results presented provide a convenient framework for the analysis of more complex systems as well.

  15. Programmable biomaterials for dynamic and responsive drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Stejskalová, Anna; Kiani, Mehrdad T

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials are continually being designed that enable new methods for interacting dynamically with cell and tissues, in turn unlocking new capabilities in areas ranging from drug delivery to regenerative medicine. In this review, we explore some of the recent advances being made in regards to programming biomaterials for improved drug delivery, with a focus on cancer and infection. We begin by explaining several of the underlying concepts that are being used to design this new wave of drug delivery vehicles, followed by examining recent materials systems that are able to coordinate the temporal delivery of multiple therapeutics, dynamically respond to changing tissue environments, and reprogram their bioactivity over time. PMID:27190245

  16. Oscillatory shear response of dilute ferrofluids: predictions from rotational Brownian dynamics simulations and ferrohydrodynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Soto-Aquino, D; Rosso, D; Rinaldi, C

    2011-11-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles that exhibit normal liquid behavior in the absence of magnetic fields but respond to imposed magnetic fields by changing their viscosity without loss of fluidity. The response of ferrofluids to constant shear and magnetic fields has received a lot of attention, but the response of ferrofluids to oscillatory shear remains largely unexplored. In the present work we used rotational Brownian dynamics to study the dynamic properties of ferrofluids with thermally blocked nanoparticles under oscillatory shear and constant magnetic fields. Comparisons between simulations and modeling using the ferrohydrodynamics equations were also made. Simulation results show that, for small rotational Péclet number, the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the complex viscosity depend on the magnitude of the magnetic field and frequency of the shear, following a Maxwell-like model with field-dependent viscosity and characteristic time equal to the field-dependent transverse magnetic relaxation time of the nanoparticles. Comparison between simulations and the numerical solution of the ferrohydrodynamic equations shows that the oscillatory rotational magnetoviscosity for an oscillating shear field obtained using the kinetic magnetization relaxation equation quantitatively agrees with simulations for a wide range of Péclet number and Langevin parameter but has quantitative deviations from the simulations at high values of the Langevin parameter. These predictions indicate an apparent elastic character to the rheology of these suspensions, even though we are considering the infinitely dilute limit in which there are negligible particle-particle interactions and, as such, chains do not form. Additionally, an asymptotic analytical solution of the ferrohydrodynamics equations, valid for Pe<2, was used to demonstrate that the Cox-Merz rule applies for dilute ferrofluids under conditions of small shear rates. At higher shear

  17. Oscillatory shear response of dilute ferrofluids: Predictions from rotational Brownian dynamics simulations and ferrohydrodynamics modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto-Aquino, D.; Rosso, D.; Rinaldi, C.

    2011-11-01

    Ferrofluids are colloidal suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles that exhibit normal liquid behavior in the absence of magnetic fields but respond to imposed magnetic fields by changing their viscosity without loss of fluidity. The response of ferrofluids to constant shear and magnetic fields has received a lot of attention, but the response of ferrofluids to oscillatory shear remains largely unexplored. In the present work we used rotational Brownian dynamics to study the dynamic properties of ferrofluids with thermally blocked nanoparticles under oscillatory shear and constant magnetic fields. Comparisons between simulations and modeling using the ferrohydrodynamics equations were also made. Simulation results show that, for small rotational Péclet number, the in-phase and out-of-phase components of the complex viscosity depend on the magnitude of the magnetic field and frequency of the shear, following a Maxwell-like model with field-dependent viscosity and characteristic time equal to the field-dependent transverse magnetic relaxation time of the nanoparticles. Comparison between simulations and the numerical solution of the ferrohydrodynamic equations shows that the oscillatory rotational magnetoviscosity for an oscillating shear field obtained using the kinetic magnetization relaxation equation quantitatively agrees with simulations for a wide range of Péclet number and Langevin parameter but has quantitative deviations from the simulations at high values of the Langevin parameter. These predictions indicate an apparent elastic character to the rheology of these suspensions, even though we are considering the infinitely dilute limit in which there are negligible particle-particle interactions and, as such, chains do not form. Additionally, an asymptotic analytical solution of the ferrohydrodynamics equations, valid for Pe≪2, was used to demonstrate that the Cox-Merz rule applies for dilute ferrofluids under conditions of small shear rates. At higher shear

  18. Data mining methods for predicting event runoff coefficients in ungauged basins using static and dynamic catchment characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loritz, Ralf; Weiler, Markus; Seibert, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Transferring hydrological information into ungauged basin by regionalisation approaches is an ongoing field of research. Usually regionalisation techniques use physical landscape descriptors to transfer either model parameters or hydrological characteristics from a catchment to another. A common problem of these approaches is the high degree of uncertainty associated to their results. One reason is that often solely static (structural) catchment characteristics such as catchment area, physiographic properties or land use data are used for regionalisation. However, it is well known that the hydrological response of a 'natural' system is a complex and a non-linear interaction of its structure, state and forcing. Here it is important to note, that only structure is a static property. State and forcing are highly dynamic when considering the temporal and spatial scale of a rainfall-runoff event. To overcome the limitations associated with 'static' regionalisation techniques we propose a regionalisation technique for event runoff coefficients combining static and dynamic catchment properties. The approach is based on the two data mining algorithms 'random forests' and 'quantile regression forests'. The static catchment characteristics include standard variables such as physiographic properties, land cover and soil data. The dynamic variables include event based properties of the forcing (i.e. rainfall amount, intensity,...) and proxies for the initial state of the catchment (i.e. initial soil moisture). Together with the runoff coefficient these quantities were extracted form hydro-meteorological time series (precipitation, discharge and soil moisture) using an automated rainfall-runoff event detection technique. We tested our method using a set of 60 meso-scale catchments (3.1 to 205,6 km2, covering a range of different geologies and land uses) from Southwest Germany. We randomly separated the catchments in two groups. The first group (30 donor catchments) was used to

  19. Dynamic Response and Ground-Motion Effects of Building Clusters During Large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbiliroglu, Y. D.; Taborda, R.; Bielak, J.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the response of building clusters during earthquakes, the effect that they have on the ground motion, and how individual buildings interact with the surrounding soil and with each other. We conduct a series of large-scale, physics-based simulations that synthesize the earthquake source and the response of entire building inventories. The configuration of the clusters, defined by the total number of buildings, their number of stories, dynamic properties, and spatial distribution and separation, is varied for each simulation. In order to perform these simulations efficiently while recurrently modifying these characteristics without redoing the entire "source to building structure" simulation every time, we use the Domain Reduction Method (DRM). The DRM is a modular two-step finite-element methodology for modeling wave propagation problems in regions with localized features. It allows one to store and reuse the background motion excitation of subdomains without loss of information. Buildings are included in the second step of the DRM. Each building is represented by a block model composed of additional finite-elements in full contact with the ground. These models are adjusted to emulate the general geometric and dynamic properties of real buildings. We conduct our study in the greater Los Angeles basin, using the main shock of the 1994 Northridge earthquake for frequencies up to 5Hz. In the first step of the DRM we use a domain of 82 km x 82 km x 41 km. Then, for the second step, we use a smaller sub-domain of 5.12 km x 5.12 km x 1.28 km, with the buildings. The results suggest that site-city interaction effects are more prominent for building clusters in soft-soil areas. These effects consist in changes in the amplitude of the ground motion and dynamic response of the buildings. The simulations are done using Hercules, the parallel octree-based finite-element earthquake simulator developed by the Quake Group at Carnegie

  20. Characteristics of a dynamic holographic sensor for shape control of a large reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Cox, David E.

    1991-01-01

    Design of a distributed holographic interferometric sensor for measuring the surface displacement of a large segmented reflector is proposed. The reflector's surface is illuminated by laser light of two wavelengths and volume holographic gratings are formed in photorefractive crystals of the wavefront returned from the surface. The sensor is based on holographic contouring with a multiple frequency source. It is shown that the most stringent requirement of temporal stability affects both the temporal resolution and the dynamic range. Principal factor which limit the sensor performance include the response time of photorefractive crystal, laser power required to write a hologram, and the size of photorefractive crystal.

  1. Dynamic metabolic engineering: New strategies for developing responsive cell factories

    PubMed Central

    Brockman, Irene M.; Prather, Kristala L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering strategies have enabled improvements in yield and titer for a variety of valuable small molecules produced naturally in microorganisms, as well as those produced via heterologous pathways. Typically, the approaches have been focused on up- and downregulation of genes to redistribute steady-state pathway fluxes, but more recently a number of groups have developed strategies for dynamic regulation, which allows rebalancing of fluxes according to changing conditions in the cell or the fermentation medium. This review highlights some of the recently published work related to dynamic metabolic engineering strategies and explores how advances in high-throughput screening and synthetic biology can support development of new dynamic systems. Dynamic gene expression profiles allow trade-offs between growth and production to be better managed and can help avoid build-up of undesired intermediates. The implementation is more complex relative to static control, but advances in screening techniques and DNA synthesis will continue to drive innovation in this field. PMID:25868062

  2. Response Characteristics of Bisphenols on a Metal-Organic Framework-Based Tyrosinase Nanosensor.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xianbo; Wang, Xue; Wu, Lidong; Wu, Lingxia; Dhanjai; Fu, Lei; Gao, Yuan; Chen, Jiping

    2016-06-29

    Bisphenols (BPs), which have more than ten kinds of structural analogues, are emerging as the most important endocrine disrupting chemicals that adversely affect human health and aquatic life. A tyrosinase nanosensor based on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and chitosan was developed to investigate the electrochemical response characteristics and mechanisms of nine kinds of BPs for the first time. The developed tyrosinase nanosensor showed a sensitive response to bisphenol A, bisphenol F, bisphenol E, bisphenol B, and bisphenol Z, and the responsive sensitivities were highly dependent on their respective log Kow values. However, the nanosensor showed no response to bisphenol S (BPS), bisphenol AP (BPAP), bisphenol AF (BPAF), or tetrabromobisphenol A, although BPS, BPAP, and BPAF have structures similar to those of the responsive BPs. The obtained results reveal that the electrochemical response of different BPs is affected not only by the molecular structure, especially the available ortho positions of phenolic hydroxyl groups, but also by the substituent group properties (electron acceptor or electron donor) on the bisphenol framework. The electronic cloud distribution of the phenolic hydroxyl groups, which is affected by the substituent group, determines whether the available ortho positions of phenolic hydroxyl groups can be oxidized by the tyrosinase biosensor. These response mechanisms are very significant as they can be used for predicting the response characteristics of many BPs and their various derivatives and metabolites on biosensors. The unexpected anti-interference ability of the biosensor to nine heavy metal ions was also discovered and discussed. The MOF-chitosan nanocomposite proves to be a promising sensing platform for the construction of diverse biosensors for selective detection of targets even in the presence of a high concentration of heavy metal ions.

  3. Experimental and Predicted Longitudinal and Lateral-Directional Response Characteristics of a Large Flexible 35 Degree Swept-Wing Airplane at an Altitude of 35,000 Feet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Henry A , Jr; Brown, Stuart C; Holleman, Euclid C

    1957-01-01

    Measured and predicted dynamic response characteristics of a large flexible swept-wing airplane to control surface inputs are presented for flight conditions of 0.6 to 0.85 Mach number at an altitude of 35,000 feet. The report is divided into two parts. The first part deals with the response of the airplane to elevator control inputs with principal responses contained in a band of frequencies including the longitudinal short-period mode and several symmetrical structural modes. The second part deals with the response of the airplane to aileron and rudder control inputs with principal responses contained in a band of frequencies including the dutch roll mode, the rolling mode, and three antisymmetrical structural modes.

  4. Integrated response to the dynamic threat of school violence.

    PubMed

    Callaway, David W; Westmoreland, Ted C; Baez, Alejandro A; McKay, Sean A; Raja, Ali S

    2010-01-01

    A terrorist attack on US schools no longer can be considered a Black Swan event. Mounting evidence suggests that extremist organizations actively are targeting US schools. Equally disturbing are data suggesting that schools, universities, and communities are unprepared for large-scale violence. The Operational Medicine Institute Conference on an Integrated Response to the Modern Urban Terrorist Threat revealed significant variations in the perceived threats and critical response gaps among emergency medical providers, law enforcement personnel, politicians, and security specialists. The participants recommended several steps to address these gaps in preparedness, training, responses, and recovery. PMID:21053197

  5. A dynamic [1]catenane with pH-responsiveness formed via threading-followed-by-complexation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xuzhou; Wei, Peifa; Li, Zhengtao; Zheng, Bo; Dong, Shengyi; Huang, Feihe; Zhou, Qizhong

    2013-03-28

    Driven by orthogonal pillar[5]arene-based and crown ether-based molecular recognitions, a dynamic [1]catenane with pH-responsiveness was constructed via threading-followed-by-complexation. PMID:23423220

  6. Displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of the displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors in a general format to establish their dependence on fiber sizes, optoelectronic detector specifications, input power, and other relevant parameters. The formations for the normalized reflected optical power change are derived for the evaluation of the optimal sensor response, the linearity range, and the minimum detectable displacement. The theoretical models are verified by an experiment which determines sensor response, modulation index, reflected optical power change, and linear response range through dynamic measurement. The application of this theoretical model to the study of a fiber-optic microphone for acoustic pressure detection is considered.

  7. TRPM8-Dependent Dynamic Response in a Mathematical Model of Cold Thermoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Erick; Salgado, Simón; Maidana, Jean Paul; Herrera, Gaspar; Campos, Matías; Madrid, Rodolfo; Orio, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Cold-sensitive nerve terminals (CSNTs) encode steady temperatures with regular, rhythmic temperature-dependent firing patterns that range from irregular tonic firing to regular bursting (static response). During abrupt temperature changes, CSNTs show a dynamic response, transiently increasing their firing frequency as temperature decreases and silencing when the temperature increases (dynamic response). To date, mathematical models that simulate the static response are based on two depolarizing/repolarizing pairs of membrane ionic conductance (slow and fast kinetics). However, these models fail to reproduce the dynamic response of CSNTs to rapid changes in temperature and notoriously they lack a specific cold-activated conductance such as the TRPM8 channel. We developed a model that includes TRPM8 as a temperature-dependent conductance with a calcium-dependent desensitization. We show by computer simulations that it appropriately reproduces the dynamic response of CSNTs from mouse cornea, while preserving their static response behavior. In this model, the TRPM8 conductance is essential to display a dynamic response. In agreement with experimental results, TRPM8 is also needed for the ongoing activity in the absence of stimulus (i.e. neutral skin temperature). Free parameters of the model were adjusted by an evolutionary optimization algorithm, allowing us to find different solutions. We present a family of possible parameters that reproduce the behavior of CSNTs under different temperature protocols. The detection of temperature gradients is associated to a homeostatic mechanism supported by the calcium-dependent desensitization.

  8. TRPM8-Dependent Dynamic Response in a Mathematical Model of Cold Thermoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, Erick; Salgado, Simón; Maidana, Jean Paul; Herrera, Gaspar; Campos, Matías; Madrid, Rodolfo; Orio, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Cold-sensitive nerve terminals (CSNTs) encode steady temperatures with regular, rhythmic temperature-dependent firing patterns that range from irregular tonic firing to regular bursting (static response). During abrupt temperature changes, CSNTs show a dynamic response, transiently increasing their firing frequency as temperature decreases and silencing when the temperature increases (dynamic response). To date, mathematical models that simulate the static response are based on two depolarizing/repolarizing pairs of membrane ionic conductance (slow and fast kinetics). However, these models fail to reproduce the dynamic response of CSNTs to rapid changes in temperature and notoriously they lack a specific cold-activated conductance such as the TRPM8 channel. We developed a model that includes TRPM8 as a temperature-dependent conductance with a calcium-dependent desensitization. We show by computer simulations that it appropriately reproduces the dynamic response of CSNTs from mouse cornea, while preserving their static response behavior. In this model, the TRPM8 conductance is essential to display a dynamic response. In agreement with experimental results, TRPM8 is also needed for the ongoing activity in the absence of stimulus (i.e. neutral skin temperature). Free parameters of the model were adjusted by an evolutionary optimization algorithm, allowing us to find different solutions. We present a family of possible parameters that reproduce the behavior of CSNTs under different temperature protocols. The detection of temperature gradients is associated to a homeostatic mechanism supported by the calcium-dependent desensitization. PMID:26426259

  9. A modified hybrid uncertain analysis method for dynamic response field of the LSOAAC with random and interval parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zi, Bin; Zhou, Bin

    2016-07-01

    For the prediction of dynamic response field of the luffing system of an automobile crane (LSOAAC) with random and interval parameters, a hybrid uncertain model is introduced. In the hybrid uncertain model, the parameters with certain probability distribution are modeled as random variables, whereas, the parameters with lower and upper bounds are modeled as interval variables instead of given precise values. Based on the hybrid uncertain model, the hybrid uncertain dynamic response equilibrium equation, in which different random and interval parameters are simultaneously included in input and output terms, is constructed. Then a modified hybrid uncertain analysis method (MHUAM) is proposed. In the MHUAM, based on random interval perturbation method, the first-order Taylor series expansion and the first-order Neumann series, the dynamic response expression of the LSOAAC is developed. Moreover, the mathematical characteristics of extrema of bounds of dynamic response are determined by random interval moment method and monotonic analysis technique. Compared with the hybrid Monte Carlo method (HMCM) and interval perturbation method (IPM), numerical results show the feasibility and efficiency of the MHUAM for solving the hybrid LSOAAC problems. The effects of different uncertain models and parameters on the LSOAAC response field are also investigated deeply, and numerical results indicate that the impact made by the randomness in the thrust of the luffing cylinder F is larger than that made by the gravity of the weight in suspension Q . In addition, the impact made by the uncertainty in the displacement between the lower end of the lifting arm and the luffing cylinder a is larger than that made by the length of the lifting arm L .

  10. Dynamic torsional response analysis of mechanoluminescent paint and its application to non-contacting automotive torque transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Gi-Woo; Kim, Ji-Sik

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the result of a preliminary experimental study on the dynamic torsional response analysis of mechanoluminescent (ML) paint for potential development as a new type of non-contacting torque transducer. The torsional torque applied to a transmission shaft is measured by sensing the ML intensity emitting from an ML paint coating a transmission shaft. This study provides the fundamental knowledge for the development of new non-contacting torque sensing technology based on the ML intensity detection. The proposed measurement principle appears to offer potential applications in automotive torque measurement systems, even though the loading rate-dependent characteristics of the ML intensity needs to be examined further.

  11. Finite Mixture Dynamic Regression Modeling of Panel Data with Implications for Dynamic Response Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, David

    2005-01-01

    This article considers the problem of estimating dynamic linear regression models when the data are generated from finite mixture probability density function where the mixture components are characterized by different dynamic regression model parameters. Specifically, conventional linear models assume that the data are generated by a single…

  12. Meta-analysis of digital game and study characteristics eliciting physiological stress responses.

    PubMed

    van der Vijgh, Benny; Beun, Robbert-Jan; Van Rood, Maarten; Werkhoven, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Digital games have been used as stressors in a range of disciplines for decades. Nonetheless, the underlying characteristics of these stressors and the study in which the stressor was applied are generally not recognized for their moderating effect on the measured physiological stress responses. We have therefore conducted a meta-analysis that analyzes the effects of characteristics of digital game stressors and study design on heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in studies carried out from 1976 to 2012. In order to assess the differing quality between study designs, a new scale is developed and presented, coined reliability of effect size. The results show specific and consistent moderating functions of both game and study characteristics, on average accounting for around 43%, and in certain cases up to 57% of the variance found in physiological stress responses. Possible cognitive and physiological processes underlying these moderating functions are discussed, and a new model integrating these processes with the moderating functions is presented. These findings indicate that a digital game stressor does not act as a stressor by virtue of being a game, but rather derives its stressor function from its characteristics and the methodology in which it is used. This finding, together with the size of the associated moderations, indicates the need for a standardization of digital game stressors.

  13. The Relationship of Learning Traits, Motivation and Performance-Learning Response Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Chang, Chen-Bin; Chen, Gan-Jung

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a model of learning dynamics and learning energy, one that analyzes learning systems scientifically. This model makes response to the learner action by means of some equations relating to learning dynamics, learning energy, learning speed, learning force, and learning acceleration, which is analogous to the notion of Newtonian…

  14. Response of mountain plovers to plague-driven dynamics of black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sylvatic plague is a major factor influencing prairie dog colony dynamics in the western Great Plains. We studied the nesting response of the mountain plover (Charadrius montanus), a grassland bird that nests on prairie dog colonies, to plague-driven dynamics of prairie dog colonies at three sites i...

  15. Experimental study on the dynamic characteristics of kW-scale molten carbonate fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Byoung Sam; Koh, Joon-Ho; Lim, Hee Chun

    The aim of this work is to develop dynamic models for two types of kW-scale molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) systems on the basis of experimental data. The dynamic models are represented as a 3×3 transfer function matrix for a multi-input and multi-output (MIMO) system with three inputs and three outputs. The three controlled variables which severely affect the stack performance and lifetime are the temperature difference in the stack and the pressure drop at the anode and the cathode. Three manipulated variables, namely, current load, fuel and oxidant utilization, are selected to keep the three controlled variables within their safety limits for the reliable operation and protection of the system in case of emergency. Each element in the transfer function matrix is in the form of a first-order model using a simple, unit step, response test during operation. The non-zero off-diagonal elements in the transfer function matrix show that some interactions exist among the operating variables, and two zeros show no interaction between fuel and oxidant flow without gas cross-over. The stability of both dynamic models is analyzed using the relative gain array (RGA) method. Large diagonal elements in the RGA matrix show that the pairing between the manipulated and controlled variables is appropriate. Proper pairing is also proven by the singular value analysis (SVA) method with a smaller singular value in each system.

  16. Modeling of the dynamic response of a Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennacchi, Paolo; Chatterton, Steven; Vania, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents a detailed numerical model of the dynamic behaviour of a Francis turbine installed in a hydroelectric plant. The model considers in detail the Francis turbine with all the electromechanical subsystems, such as the main speed governor, the controller and the servo actuator of the turbine distributor, and the electrical generator. In particular, it reproduces the effects of pipeline elasticity in the penstock, the water inertia and the water compressibility on the turbine behaviour. The dynamics of the surge tank on low frequency pressure waves is also modelled together with the main governor speed loop and the position controllers of the distributor actuator and of the hydraulic electrovalve. Model validation has been made by means of experimental data of a 75 MW—470 m hydraulic head—Francis turbine acquired during some starting tests after a partial revamping, which also involved the control system of the distributor.

  17. Glycemic responses and sensory characteristics of whole yellow pea flour added to novel functional foods.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Kassis, Amira N; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental understanding regarding postprandial glycemic responses to foods containing whole yellow-pea flour (WYPF) remains unknown. This, alongside concerns that WYPF possesses unfavorable sensory characteristics has limited the incorporation of WYPF into new functional food products as a healthy novel ingredient. The objective of this study was to evaluate how WYPF modulates postprandial glycemic responses as well as sensory characteristics in novel foods. In a single-blind crossover trial, the present study assessed postprandial glycemic responses of banana bread, biscotti, and spaghetti containing either WYPF or whole wheat flour (WWF). Boiled yellow peas (BYP) and white bread (WB) were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. On day 1, subjects evaluated appearance, taste, texture, smell as well as overall acceptance of each WYPF and WWF food on a 5-point hedonic scale. WYPF banana bread (97.9 +/- 17.8 mmol x min/L) and biscotti (83 +/- 13 mmol x min/L), as well as BYP (112.3 +/- 19.9 mmol x min/L), reduced (P < 0.05) glycemic responses compared to WB (218.1 +/- 29.5 mmol x min/L). The glycemic response of WYPF pasta (160.7 +/- 19.4 mmol x min/L) was comparable to WB. WYPF biscotti produced a lower (P = 0.019) postprandial glycemic response compared to WWF biscotti (117.2 +/- 13.1 mmol x min/L). Hedonic responses between corresponding foods were similar except for the WYPF pasta (2.9 +/- 0.9) which possessed a lower sensory score (P = 0.02) for smell compared to WWF pasta (3.6 +/- 1). WYPF can be used to produce low-glycemic functional foods possessing sensory attributes that are comparable to identical food products containing WWF.

  18. Dynamics of Bouncing-vs.-Merging Responses in Jet Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minglei; Saha, Abhishek; Zhu, Delin L.; Sun, Chao; Law, Chung K.

    2015-11-01

    Collision of two fluid masses is a common natural and industrial phenomenon. Many kinds of noncoalescence phenomena of collisional fluid masses, such as droplet & droplet, droplet & liquid film, have been studied, and the dynamics of the gas layer between the colliding liquid surfaces was found to play a crucial role. However, many fluid mass collision processes are nonstationary, making it difficult to study this air layer dynamics in detail. Jet bouncing can be in a stationary state with a geometrically simple gas layer, providing an ideal system to investigate the dynamics of the air film between the colliding interfaces. In this work, we observe an entire suite of possible jet collision outcomes of (soft) merging, bouncing and (hard) merging with increasing impact inertia. These transitions between these different regimes are characterized through scaling analysis by considering the competing effects of impact inertia, surface tension and viscous thinning of the interfacial air-gap leading to activate the van der Waals force to effect merging.

  19. Epidemic dynamics and host immune response: a nested approach.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Alberto; Pugliese, Andrea; Sinisgalli, Carmela

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes an approach for building epidemiological models that incorporate the intra-host pathogen-immunity dynamics. The infected population is structured in terms of pathogen load and level of immunity, and the initial infection load may depend on the load of the individual from whom the infection is acquired. In particular, we focus on the case in which the initial inoculum is taken proportional to the load of the infectant. Possible reinfections are disregarded. Such an approach is applied to formulate an epidemic model with isolation in a closed population by introducing a specific intra-host dynamics. A numerical scheme for the solution of model equations is developed, and some numerical results illustrating the role of the initial inoculum, of the isolation threshold and of the pathogen dynamics on the epidemic evolution are presented. From the simulations the distributions of latency, infectivity, and isolation times can be also derived; however the predictions of the present models differ qualitatively from those of traditional SEIHR models with distributed latency, infectivity and isolation periods.

  20. Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-07-01

    We describe a method to generate statistical models of electricity demand from Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities including their response to dynamic pricing signals. Models are built with historical electricity demand data. A facility model is the sum of a baseline demand model and a residual demand model; the latter quantifies deviations from the baseline model due to dynamic pricing signals from the utility. Three regression-based baseline computation methods were developed and analyzed. All methods performed similarly. To understand the diversity of facility responses to dynamic pricing signals, we have characterized the response of 44 C&I facilities participating in a Demand Response (DR) program using dynamic pricing in California (Pacific Gas and Electric's Critical Peak Pricing Program). In most cases, facilities shed load during DR events but there is significant heterogeneity in facility responses. Modeling facility response to dynamic price signals is beneficial to the Independent System Operator for scheduling supply to meet demand, to the utility for improving dynamic pricing programs, and to the customer for minimizing energy costs.

  1. Acquisition and Analysis of Dynamic Responses of a Historic Pedestrian Bridge using Video Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Schoefs, Franck; O'Donnell, Deirdre; Wright, Robert; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    Video based tracking is capable of analysing bridge vibrations that are characterised by large amplitudes and low frequencies. This paper presents the use of video images and associated image processing techniques to obtain the dynamic response of a pedestrian suspension bridge in Cork, Ireland. This historic structure is one of the four suspension bridges in Ireland and is notable for its dynamic nature. A video camera is mounted on the river-bank and the dynamic responses of the bridge have been measured from the video images. The dynamic response is assessed without the need of a reflector on the bridge and in the presence of various forms of luminous complexities in the video image scenes. Vertical deformations of the bridge were measured in this regard. The video image tracking for the measurement of dynamic responses of the bridge were based on correlating patches in time-lagged scenes in video images and utilisinga zero mean normalisedcross correlation (ZNCC) metric. The bridge was excited by designed pedestrian movement and by individual cyclists traversing the bridge. The time series data of dynamic displacement responses of the bridge were analysedto obtain the frequency domain response. Frequencies obtained from video analysis were checked against accelerometer data from the bridge obtained while carrying out the same set of experiments used for video image based recognition.

  2. Acquisition and Analysis of Dynamic Responses of a Historic Pedestrian Bridge using Video Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Byrne, Michael; Ghosh, Bidisha; Schoefs, Franck; O'Donnell, Deirdre; Wright, Robert; Pakrashi, Vikram

    2015-07-01

    Video based tracking is capable of analysing bridge vibrations that are characterised by large amplitudes and low frequencies. This paper presents the use of video images and associated image processing techniques to obtain the dynamic response of a pedestrian suspension bridge in Cork, Ireland. This historic structure is one of the four suspension bridges in Ireland and is notable for its dynamic nature. A video camera is mounted on the river-bank and the dynamic responses of the bridge have been measured from the video images. The dynamic response is assessed without the need of a reflector on the bridge and in the presence of various forms of luminous complexities in the video image scenes. Vertical deformations of the bridge were measured in this regard. The video image tracking for the measurement of dynamic responses of the bridge were based on correlating patches in time-lagged scenes in video images and utilisinga zero mean normalised cross correlation (ZNCC) metric. The bridge was excited by designed pedestrian movement and by individual cyclists traversing the bridge. The time series data of dynamic displacement responses of the bridge were analysedto obtain the frequency domain response. Frequencies obtained from video analysis were checked against accelerometer data from the bridge obtained while carrying out the same set of experiments used for video image based recognition.

  3. Dynamic characteristics of dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal with quasi-homeotropic twist structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konshina, E. A.; Fedorov, M. A.; Amosova, L. P.

    2010-07-01

    Dynamic characteristics of a liquid crystal (LC) cell with a quasi-homeotropic twist structure formed in a dual-frequency nematic liquid crystal (DFNLC) layer with the director pretilt angle increased to 60° have been experimentally studied. The cell was switched from the off to on state using a 30-kHz electric field, while the reverse (off/on) switching was effected by a 1-kHz field. An increase in the director pretilt angle allowed the switch-on time of a 6.4-μm-thick DFNLC cell to be reduced to 1 ms and the relaxation (switch-off) time, to 0.5 ms.

  4. Crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid zinc during isothermal relaxation: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li-li; Liu, Rang-su; Tian, Ze-an; Liu, Hai-rong; Hou, Zhao-yang; Peng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid Zn during isothermal relaxation were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations by adopting the cluster-type index method (CTIM) and the tracing method. Results showed that the crystallization process undergo three different stages. The size of the critical nucleus was found to be approximately 90–150 atoms in this system; the growth of nuclei proceeded via the successive formation of hcp and fcc structures with a layered distribution; and finally, the system evolved into a much larger crystal with a distinct layered distribution of hcp and fcc structures with an 8R stacking sequence of ABCBACAB by adjusting all of the atoms in the larger clusters according to a certain rule. PMID:27526660

  5. Crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid zinc during isothermal relaxation: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Rang-Su; Tian, Ze-An; Liu, Hai-Rong; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Peng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid Zn during isothermal relaxation were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations by adopting the cluster-type index method (CTIM) and the tracing method. Results showed that the crystallization process undergo three different stages. The size of the critical nucleus was found to be approximately 90-150 atoms in this system; the growth of nuclei proceeded via the successive formation of hcp and fcc structures with a layered distribution; and finally, the system evolved into a much larger crystal with a distinct layered distribution of hcp and fcc structures with an 8R stacking sequence of ABCBACAB by adjusting all of the atoms in the larger clusters according to a certain rule. PMID:27526660

  6. An opportunity for directly estimating the characteristics of zero-point dynamics in polyethylene crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren, V. I.; Slutsker, A. I.; Titenkov, L. S.; Kulik, V. B.; Gilyarov, V. L.

    2007-02-01

    For large polyethylene crystallites (100 × 60 × 60 nm), the width of the Raman band at 1129 cm-1 and the angular position of the x-ray equatorial 110 reflection were measured as a function of temperature over the range 5-300 K. It is found that the Raman bandwidth has an athermic (zero-point) component at low temperatures. This component is used to estimate the zero-point energies of torsional and bending vibrations of polyethylene molecules. These energies are close to those obtained from analyzing the x-ray diffraction data. It is concluded that the characteristics of zero-point dynamics can be determined directly from measuring the zero-point width of a Raman band.

  7. Crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid zinc during isothermal relaxation: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li-Li; Liu, Rang-Su; Tian, Ze-An; Liu, Hai-Rong; Hou, Zhao-Yang; Peng, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The crystallization characteristics in supercooled liquid Zn during isothermal relaxation were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations by adopting the cluster-type index method (CTIM) and the tracing method. Results showed that the crystallization process undergo three different stages. The size of the critical nucleus was found to be approximately 90–150 atoms in this system; the growth of nuclei proceeded via the successive formation of hcp and fcc structures with a layered distribution; and finally, the system evolved into a much larger crystal with a distinct layered distribution of hcp and fcc structures with an 8R stacking sequence of ABCBACAB by adjusting all of the atoms in the larger clusters according to a certain rule.

  8. Temporal response dynamics of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons depends on receptor type and response polarity

    PubMed Central

    Getahun, Merid N.; Wicher, Dieter; Hansson, Bill S.; Olsson, Shannon B.

    2012-01-01

    Insect olfactory sensory neurons (OSN) express a diverse array of receptors from different protein families, i.e. ionotropic receptors (IR), gustatory receptors (GR) and odorant receptors (OR). It is well known that insects are exposed to a plethora of odor molecules that vary widely in both space and time under turbulent natural conditions. In addition to divergent ligand specificities, these different receptors might also provide an increased range of temporal dynamics and sensitivities for the olfactory system. To test this, we challenged different Drosophila OSNs with both varying stimulus durations (10–2000 ms), and repeated stimulus pulses of key ligands at various frequencies (1–10 Hz). Our results show that OR-expressing OSNs responded faster and with higher sensitivity to short stimulations as compared to IR- and Gr21a-expressing OSNs. In addition, OR-expressing OSNs could respond to repeated stimulations of excitatory ligands up to 5 Hz, while IR-expressing OSNs required ~5x longer stimulations and/or higher concentrations to respond to similar stimulus durations and frequencies. Nevertheless, IR-expressing OSNs did not exhibit adaptation to longer stimulations, unlike OR- and Gr21a-OSNs. Both OR- and IR-expressing OSNs were also unable to resolve repeated pulses of inhibitory ligands as fast as excitatory ligands. These differences were independent of the peri-receptor environment in which the receptors were expressed and suggest that the receptor expressed by a given OSN affects both its sensitivity and its response to transient, intermittent chemical stimuli. OR-expressing OSNs are better at resolving low dose, intermittent stimuli, while IR-expressing OSNs respond more accurately to long-lasting odor pulses. This diversity increases the capacity of the insect olfactory system to respond to the diverse spatiotemporal signals in the natural environment. PMID:23162431

  9. Zonal Wind Speeds, Vortex Characteristics, and Wave Dynamics in Saturn's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blalock, John J.; Draham, R. L.; Holmes, J. A.; Sayanagi, K. M.

    2013-10-01

    We examine images returned from Cassini spacecraft's ISS camera between 2007 and 2012 to analyze zonal wind speeds, vortex characteristics, and wave dynamics in Saturn's northern hemisphere. Our analysis focused on datasets that provided near-simultaneous coverage in the near-infrared continuum band at 752 nm (CB2 filter) and the methane bands at 727 and 890 nm (MT2 and MT3 filters). We measure the zonal wind speeds by analyzing cloud motions using one-dimensional correlation method similar to Limaye (1986). Our goal is to determine the vertical wind shear on Saturn in a manner similar to that done for Jupiter by Li et al (2006). Because the images captured in the methane bands are sensitive to higher altitudes than those in the continuum band, we are able to measure wind speeds at different altitudes. Next, we study the characteristics of multiple northern hemisphere vortices using methods similar to the analysis of a long-lived cyclonic spot in the southern hemisphere of Saturn (del Rio-Gatztelurrutia et al, 2010). We analyze the interactions and evolutions of the vortices, and compare them with the Voyager-era northern hemisphere study (Sromovsky et al, 1983). Finally, we analyze the dynamics of the wave propagating at 45 degree N planetocentric latitude in the northern flank of an eastward zonal jet that peaks at 42 degree N. This new wave is located to the north of the Ribbon wave at 42 degree N originally found during Voyager (Sromovsky et al, 1983; Godfrey and Moore, 1986); the Ribbon wave was not present in our 2007-2012 images. We calculate the Fourier components of the new wave, and compare our findings with previous analyses and prediction of the Ribbon wave (Sromovsky et al, 1983; Godfrey and Moore, 1986; Sanchez-Lavega, 2002; Sayanagi et al, 2010).

  10. Optimal rheological characteristics in dynamic stability of polymer flow through porous media: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.W.; French, T.R.

    1988-04-01

    To identify the optimal rheological characteristics for maintaining the dynamic stability of polymer solutions flowing through porous media, displacement tests with a Newtonian fluid and a non-Newtonian fluid were performed in a 4-ft Berea sandstone core. A solution of 63 wt pct gylcerin in 53 meg/1 NaCL and a solution of 1500 ppM Pusher 500 in 53 meq/1 NaCl were used as the Newtonian fluid and non-Newtonian fluid, respectively. Two flow rates one in the purely viscous regime and one in the viscoelastic flow regime of Pusher 500 in Berea sandstone, were used in the displacement tests. The effluents collected were analyzed to determine polymer and tracer concentrations. The viscosities of the effluents were also measured with a Contraves viscometer. By comparing the concentration profiles obtained in tests with Pusher 500 and in those with gylcerin, the effects of flow rate, mobility ratio, and rheological characteristics on the dynamic stability of polymer flow in porous media were determined. At both leading and trailing edges of the polymer slug, stability increases with decreasing mobility ratio. At both high and low flow rates, a Newtonian fluid gives a more stable displacement at the fluid front than does a non-Newtonian fluid. Measurements on the mixing lengths at the back edge show that the size of the mobility buffer bank required for a flow rate at reservior conditions (viscous flow regime) would be less for a Newtonian fluid than for a non-Newtonian fluid. At a flow rate in the viscoelastic flow regime, the required size of the mobility buffer bank is less for a non-Newtonian fluid than for a Newtonian fluid. 39 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Neutron Transport Characteristics of a Nuclear Reactor Based Dynamic Neutron Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Khaial, Anas M.; Harvel, Glenn D.; Chang, Jen-Shih

    2006-07-01

    An advanced dynamic neutron imaging system has been constructed in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) for nondestructive testing and multi-phase flow studies in energy and environmental applications. A high quality neutron beam is required with a thermal neutron flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}-s and a collimation ratio of 120 at image plane to promote high-speed neutron imaging up to 2000 frames per second. Neutron source strength and neutron transport have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance was evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and simple analytical neutron transport calculations were performed based upon these measured neutron fluxes to predict facility components in accordance with high-speed dynamic neutron imaging and operation safety requirements. Monte-Carlo simulations (using MCNP-4B code) with multiple neutron energy groups have also been used to validate neutron beam parameters and to ensure shielding capabilities of facility shutter and cave walls. Neutron flux distributions at the image plane and the neutron beam characteristics were experimentally measured by irradiating a two-dimensional array of Copper foils and using a real-time neutron radiography system. The neutron image characteristics -- such as neutron flux, image size, beam quality -- measured experimentally and predicted numerically for beam tube, beam shutter and radiography cave are compared and discussed in detail in this paper. The experimental results show that thermal neutron flux at image plane is nearly uniform over an imaging area of 20.0-cm diameter and its magnitude ranges from 8.0 x 10{sup 6} - 1.0 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}-sec while the neutron-to-gamma ratio is 6.0 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}-{mu}Sv. (authors)

  12. On the characteristics of aerosol indirect effect based on dynamic regimes in global climate models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Shipeng; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Hailong; Zhang, Kai; Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Ferrachat, Sylvaine; Takeamura, Toshihiko; et al

    2016-03-04

    Aerosol–cloud interactions continue to constitute a major source of uncertainty for the estimate of climate radiative forcing. The variation of aerosol indirect effects (AIE) in climate models is investigated across different dynamical regimes, determined by monthly mean 500 hPa vertical pressure velocity (ω500), lower-tropospheric stability (LTS) and large-scale surface precipitation rate derived from several global climate models (GCMs), with a focus on liquid water path (LWP) response to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations. The LWP sensitivity to aerosol perturbation within dynamic regimes is found to exhibit a large spread among these GCMs. It is in regimes of strong large-scale ascentmore » (ω500  <  −25 hPa day−1) and low clouds (stratocumulus and trade wind cumulus) where the models differ most. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing is also found to differ significantly among different regimes. Shortwave aerosol indirect forcing in ascending regimes is close to that in subsidence regimes, which indicates that regimes with strong large-scale ascent are as important as stratocumulus regimes in studying AIE. It is further shown that shortwave aerosol indirect forcing over regions with high monthly large-scale surface precipitation rate (> 0.1 mm day−1) contributes the most to the total aerosol indirect forcing (from 64 to nearly 100 %). Results show that the uncertainty in AIE is even larger within specific dynamical regimes compared to the uncertainty in its global mean values, pointing to the need to reduce the uncertainty in AIE in different dynamical regimes.« less

  13. A preliminary look at control augmented dynamic response of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.; Jewell, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The augmentation of structural characteristics, mass, damping, and stiffness through the use of control theory in lieu of structural redesign or augmentation was reported. The standard single-degree-of-freedom system was followed by a treatment of the same system using control augmentation. The system was extended to elastic structures using single and multisensor approaches and concludes with a brief discussion of potential application to large orbiting space structures.

  14. Crossfit analysis: a novel method to characterize the dynamics of induced plant responses

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Many plant species show induced responses that protect them against exogenous attacks. These responses involve the production of many different bioactive compounds. Plant species belonging to the Brassicaceae family produce defensive glucosinolates, which may greatly influence their favorable nutritional properties for humans. Each responding compound may have its own dynamic profile and metabolic relationships with other compounds. The chemical background of the induced response is therefore highly complex and may therefore not reveal all the properties of the response in any single model. Results This study therefore aims to describe the dynamics of the glucosinolate response, measured at three time points after induction in a feral Brassica, by a three-faceted approach, based on Principal Component Analysis. First the large-scale aspects of the response are described in a 'global model' and then each time-point in the experiment is individually described in 'local models' that focus on phenomena that occur at specific moments in time. Although each local model describes the variation among the plants at one time-point as well as possible, the response dynamics are lost. Therefore a novel method called the 'Crossfit' is described that links the local models of different time-points to each other. Conclusions Each element of the described analysis approach reveals different aspects of the response. The crossfit shows that smaller dynamic changes may occur in the response that are overlooked by global models, as illustrated by the analysis of a metabolic profiling dataset of the same samples. PMID:20015363

  15. Response characteristics of laser diffraction particle size analyzers - Optical sample volume extent and lens effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The response characteristics of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments were studied theoretically and experimentally. In particular, the extent of optical sample volume and the effects of receiving lens properties were investigated in detail. The experimental work was performed with a particle size analyzer using a calibration reticle containing a two-dimensional array of opaque circular disks on a glass substrate. The calibration slide simulated the forward-scattering characteristics of a Rosin-Rammler droplet size distribution. The reticle was analyzed with collection lenses of 63 mm, 100 mm, and 300 mm focal lengths using scattering inversion software that determined best-fit Rosin-Rammler size distribution parameters. The data differed from the predicted response for the reticle by about 10 percent. A set of calibration factor for the detector elements was determined that corrected for the nonideal response of the instrument. The response of the instrument was also measured as a function of reticle position, and the results confirmed a theoretical optical sample volume model presented here.

  16. Response margins of the dynamic analysis of piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.J.; Benda, B.J.; Chuang, T.Y.; Smith, P.D.

    1984-04-01

    This report is organized as follows: Section 2 describes the three piping systems of the Zion nuclear power plant which formed the basis of the present study. The auxiliary feedwater (AFW) piping from steam generator to containment, the residual heat removal (RHR) and safety injection piping in the auxiliary building, and the reactor coolant loops (RCL) including a portion of the branch lines were analyzed. Section 3 describes the analysis methods and the analyses performed. Section 4 presents the numerical results; the principal results presented as comparisons of response calculated by best estimate time history analysis methods vs. the SRP response spectrum technique. Section 5 draws conclusions from the results. Appendix A contains a brief description of the mathematical models that defined the structures containing the three piping systems. Response from these models provided input to the piping models. Appendix B provides a detailed derivation of the pseudostatic mode approach to the multisupport time history analysis method used in this study.

  17. The effect of nonsymmetric pressure stiffness on the dynamic characteristics of Solid Rocket Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the dynamics of pre-stiffened structures such as the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM). Previous work in which the stiffness terms resulting from constant pressure were derived has been extended to enable modeling of nonconstant pressure applied over nonenclosed volumes. These conditions will result in nonsymmetric terms in the global stiffness matrix which will not cancel out. Three new pressure stiffness elements incorporating these nonsymmetric terms have been implemented as dummy elements in COSMIC NASTRAN and have been tested on various simple examples as well as an existing ASRM NASTRAN finite element model. The results indicate that for all load cases of practical interest to the ASRM program, the nonsymmetric terms have very little effect on the dynamic characteristics. In addition, the pressure stiffness elements developed in the previous work which assumed constant pressure gave virtually the same results as the new elements even for problems in which the pressures are not constant. The original elements appear to work well as long as the pressure gradient across any individual element is no larger than about 0.75 psi/inch. The new elements are therefore most useful for determining the conditions under which the original pressure stiffness elements can be used.

  18. Theoretical approach to obtaining dynamic characteristics of noncontacting spiral-grooved seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwatsubo, Takuzo; Yang, Bo-Suk; Ibaraki, Ryuji

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of spiral-grooved seals are theoretically obtained by using the Navier-Stokes equation. First, with the inertia term of the fluid considered, the flow and pressure in the steady state are obtained for the directions parallel to and perpendicular to the groove. Next, the dynamic character is obtained by analyzing the steady state and by analyzing the labyrinth seal. As a result, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) As the land width becomes shorter or the helix angle decreases, the cross-coupling stiffness, direct and cross-coupling damping, and add mass coefficients decrease; (2) As the axial Reynolds number increases, the stiffness and damping coefficients increase. But the add mass coefficient is not influenced by the axial Reynolds number; (3) The rotational Reynolds number influences greatly the direct and cross-coupling stiffness and direct damping coefficients; and (4) As the journal rotating frequency increases, the leakage flow decreases. Therefore zero net leakage flow is possible at a particular rotating frequency.

  19. Dynamic secondary electron emission characteristics of polymers in negative charging process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Ming; Hu, Tian-Cun; Zhang, Na; Cao, Meng

    2016-04-01

    We studied the dynamic secondary electron emission (SEE) characteristics of a polyimide sample in negative charging process under electron bombardment. The time evolution of secondary electron yield (SEY) has been measured with a pulsed electron gun. The dynamic SEY, as well as the surface potential have been analyzed using a capacitance model. The shift in surface potential caused by the negative charge accumulation on the sample reduces the landing energy of the primary electrons (PEs), which in turn alters the SEY. The charging process tends to be stable when the landing energy of PEs reaches the secondary crossover energy where the corresponding SEY is 1. The surface potential has an approximately negative exponential relationship with the irradiation time. The total accumulated charge at the stable state is found to be proportional to the product of the sample capacitance and the difference between initial incident energy and the secondary crossover energy. The time constant of the exponential function is proportional to the ratio of final accumulated charge to the incident current.

  20. Oscillatory dynamics in nanocavities with noninstantaneous Kerr response

    SciTech Connect

    Armaroli, Andrea; Malaguti, Stefania; Bellanca, Gaetano; Trillo, Stefano; Rossi, Alfredo de; Combrie, Sylvain

    2011-11-15

    We investigate the impact of a finite response time of Kerr nonlinearities over the onset of spontaneous oscillations (self-pulsing) occurring in a nanocavity. The complete characterization of the underlying Hopf bifurcation in the full parameter space allows us to show the existence of a critical value of the response time and to envisage different regimes of competition with bistability. The transition from a stable oscillatory state to chaos is found to occur only in cavities which are detuned far off-resonance, which turns out to be mutually exclusive with the region where the cavity can operate as a bistable switch.