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Sample records for dynamically driven evolution

  1. DYNAMICALLY DRIVEN EVOLUTION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN M51

    SciTech Connect

    Koda, Jin; Scoville, Nick; Potts, Ashley E.; Carpenter, John M.; Corder, Stuartt A.; Patience, Jenny; Sargent, Anneila I.; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; La Vigne, Misty A.; Vogel, Stuart N.; White, Stephen M.; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Pound, Marc W.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bock, Douglas C. J.; Hawkins, David; Hodges, Mark; Lamb, James W.; Kemball, Athol

    2009-08-01

    Massive star formation occurs in giant molecular clouds (GMCs); an understanding of the evolution of GMCs is a prerequisite to develop theories of star formation and galaxy evolution. We report the highest-fidelity observations of the grand-design spiral galaxy M51 in carbon monoxide (CO) emission, revealing the evolution of GMCs vis-a-vis the large-scale galactic structure and dynamics. The most massive GMCs (giant molecular associations (GMAs)) are first assembled and then broken up as the gas flow through the spiral arms. The GMAs and their H{sub 2} molecules are not fully dissociated into atomic gas as predicted in stellar feedback scenarios, but are fragmented into smaller GMCs upon leaving the spiral arms. The remnants of GMAs are detected as the chains of GMCs that emerge from the spiral arms into interarm regions. The kinematic shear within the spiral arms is sufficient to unbind the GMAs against self-gravity. We conclude that the evolution of GMCs is driven by large-scale galactic dynamics-their coagulation into GMAs is due to spiral arm streaming motions upon entering the arms, followed by fragmentation due to shear as they leave the arms on the downstream side. In M51, the majority of the gas remains molecular from arm entry through the interarm region and into the next spiral arm passage.

  2. The Evolution of Open Magnetic Flux Driven by Photospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field is of paramount importance in solar and heliospheric physics. Two profoundly different views of the coronal magnetic field have emerged. In quasi-steady models, the predominant source of open magnetic field is in coronal holes. In contrast, in the interchange model, the open magnetic flux is conserved, and the coronal magnetic field can only respond to the photospheric evolution via interchange reconnection. In this view the open magnetic flux diffuses through the closed, streamer belt fields, and substantial open flux is present in the streamer belt during solar minimum. However, Antiochos and co-workers, in the form of a conjecture, argued that truly isolated open flux cannot exist in a configuration with one heliospheric current sheet (HCS) - it will connect via narrow corridors to the polar coronal hole of the same polarity. This contradicts the requirements of the interchange model. We have performed an MHD simulation of the solar corona up to 20R solar to test both the interchange model and the Antiochos conjecture. We use a synoptic map for Carrington Rotation 1913 as the boundary condition for the model, with two small bipoles introduced into the region where a positive polarity extended coronal hole forms. We introduce flows at the photospheric boundary surface to see if open flux associated with the bipoles can be moved into the closed-field region. Interchange reconnection does occur in response to these motions. However, we find that the open magnetic flux cannot be simply injected into closed-field regions - the flux eventually closes down and disconnected flux is created. Flux either opens or closes, as required, to maintain topologically distinct open and closed field regions, with no indiscriminate mixing of the two. The early evolution conforms to the Antiochos conjecture in that a narrow corridor of open flux connects the portion of the coronal hole that is nearly detached by one of the bipoles. In the later evolution, a

  3. Comparative genomic paleontology across plant kingdom reveals the dynamics of TE-driven genome evolution.

    PubMed

    El Baidouri, Moaine; Panaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Long terminal repeat-retrotransposons (LTR-RTs) are the most abundant class of transposable elements (TEs) in plants. They strongly impact the structure, function, and evolution of their host genome, and, in particular, their role in genome size variation has been clearly established. However, the dynamics of the process through which LTR-RTs have differentially shaped plant genomes is still poorly understood because of a lack of comparative studies. Using a new robust and automated family classification procedure, we exhaustively characterized the LTR-RTs in eight plant genomes for which a high-quality sequence is available (i.e., Arabidopsis thaliana, A. lyrata, grapevine, soybean, rice, Brachypodium dystachion, sorghum, and maize). This allowed us to perform a comparative genome-wide study of the retrotranspositional landscape in these eight plant lineages from both monocots and dicots. We show that retrotransposition has recurrently occurred in all plant genomes investigated, regardless their size, and through bursts, rather than a continuous process. Moreover, in each genome, only one or few LTR-RT families have been active in the recent past, and the difference in genome size among the species studied could thus mostly be accounted for by the extent of the latest transpositional burst(s). Following these bursts, LTR-RTs are efficiently eliminated from their host genomes through recombination and deletion, but we show that the removal rate is not lineage specific. These new findings lead us to propose a new model of TE-driven genome evolution in plants.

  4. Dynamic in situ visualization of voltage-driven magnetic domain evolution in multiferroic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Wu, Liang; Nan, C W

    2015-12-23

    Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising solution to the excessive heating in spintronic devices. Direct observation of voltage-modulated magnetic domain evolution dynamics is desirable for studying the mechanism of the voltage control of magnetism at mesoscale, but has remained challenging. Here we explored a characterization method for the dynamic in situ evolution of pure voltage modulated magnetic domains in the heterostructures by employing the scanning Kerr microscopy function in the magneto optic Kerr effect system. The local magnetization reorientation of a Ni/PMN-PT heterostructure were characterized under sweeping applied voltage on the PMN-PT single crystal, and the results show that the magnetization rotation angle in the local regions is much greater than that obtained from macroscopic magnetization hysteresis loops.

  5. Dynamic in situ visualization of voltage-driven magnetic domain evolution in multiferroic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Wu, Liang; Nan, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising solution to the excessive heating in spintronic devices. Direct observation of voltage-modulated magnetic domain evolution dynamics is desirable for studying the mechanism of the voltage control of magnetism at mesoscale, but has remained challenging. Here we explored a characterization method for the dynamic in situ evolution of pure voltage modulated magnetic domains in the heterostructures by employing the scanning Kerr microscopy function in the magneto optic Kerr effect system. The local magnetization reorientation of a Ni/PMN-PT heterostructure were characterized under sweeping applied voltage on the PMN-PT single crystal, and the results show that the magnetization rotation angle in the local regions is much greater than that obtained from macroscopic magnetization hysteresis loops.

  6. Dynamic in situ visualization of voltage-driven magnetic domain evolution in multiferroic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya; Hu, Jia-Mian; Wu, Liang; Nan, C W

    2015-12-23

    Voltage control of magnetism in multiferroic heterostructures provides a promising solution to the excessive heating in spintronic devices. Direct observation of voltage-modulated magnetic domain evolution dynamics is desirable for studying the mechanism of the voltage control of magnetism at mesoscale, but has remained challenging. Here we explored a characterization method for the dynamic in situ evolution of pure voltage modulated magnetic domains in the heterostructures by employing the scanning Kerr microscopy function in the magneto optic Kerr effect system. The local magnetization reorientation of a Ni/PMN-PT heterostructure were characterized under sweeping applied voltage on the PMN-PT single crystal, and the results show that the magnetization rotation angle in the local regions is much greater than that obtained from macroscopic magnetization hysteresis loops. PMID:26613293

  7. Evolution of a new chlorophyll metabolic pathway driven by the dynamic changes in enzyme promiscuous activity.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hisashi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2014-03-01

    Organisms generate an enormous number of metabolites; however, the mechanisms by which a new metabolic pathway is acquired are unknown. To elucidate the importance of promiscuous enzyme activity for pathway evolution, the catalytic and substrate specificities of Chl biosynthetic enzymes were examined. In green plants, Chl a and Chl b are interconverted by the Chl cycle: Chl a is hydroxylated to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a followed by the conversion to Chl b, and both reactions are catalyzed by chlorophyllide a oxygenase. Chl b is reduced to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a by Chl b reductase and then converted to Chl a by 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase (HCAR). A phylogenetic analysis indicated that HCAR evolved from cyanobacterial 3,8-divinyl chlorophyllide reductase (DVR), which is responsible for the reduction of an 8-vinyl group in the Chl biosynthetic pathway. In addition to vinyl reductase activity, cyanobacterial DVR also has Chl b reductase and HCAR activities; consequently, three of the four reactions of the Chl cycle already existed in cyanobacteria, the progenitor of the chloroplast. During the evolution of cyanobacterial DVR to HCAR, the HCAR activity, a promiscuous reaction of cyanobacterial DVR, became the primary reaction. Moreover, the primary reaction (vinyl reductase activity) and some disadvantageous reactions were lost, but the neutral promiscuous reaction (NADH dehydrogenase) was retained in both DVR and HCAR. We also show that a portion of the Chl c biosynthetic pathway already existed in cyanobacteria. We discuss the importance of dynamic changes in promiscuous activity and of the latent pathways for metabolic evolution.

  8. Doping-driven evolution of the superconducting state from a doped Mott insulator: Cluster dynamical mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civelli, M.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the zero-temperature doping-driven evolution of a superconductor toward the Mott insulator in a two-dimensional electron model, relevant for high-temperature superconductivity. To this purpose we use a cluster extension of dynamical mean-field theory. Our results show that a standard d -wave superconductor, realized at high doping, is driven into the Mott insulator via an intermediate superconducting state displaying unconventional physical properties. By restoring the translational invariance of the lattice, we give an interpretation of these findings in momentum space. In particular, we show that at a finite doping a strong momentum-space differentiation takes place: non-Fermi liquid and insulatinglike (pseudogap) characters rise in some regions (antinodes), while Fermi liquid quasiparticles survive in other regions (nodes) of momentum space. We describe the consequence of these happenings on the spectral properties, stressing in particular the behavior of the superconducting gap, which reveals two distinct nodal and antinodal energy scales as a function of doping, detected in photoemission and Raman spectroscopy experiments. We study and compare with experimental results the doping-dependent behavior of other physical quantities, such as for instance, the nodal quasiparticle velocity (extracted in angle-resolved photoemission) and the low-energy slopes of the local density of states and of the Raman scattering response. We then propose a description of the evolution of the electronic structure while approaching the Mott transition. We show that, within our formalism, a strong asymmetry naturally arises in the local density of states, measured in scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We investigate in detail the doping evolution of the electronic bands, focusing on the kinklike quasiparticle dispersion observed with angle-resolved photoemission in specific cuts of the momentum-energy space. We finally show the consequences of the

  9. Ultrafast exciton dynamics and light-driven H2 evolution in colloidal semiconductor nanorods and Pt-tipped nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaifeng; Zhu, Haiming; Lian, Tianquan

    2015-03-17

    distributions. The effect of the exciton dynamics on photoreduction reactions is illustrated using methyl viologen (MV(2+)) as a model electron acceptor. The steady-state MV(2+) photoreduction quantum yield of CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod NRs approaches unity under rod excitation, much larger than CdSe QDs and CdSe/CdS core/shell QDs. Detailed time-resolved studies show that in quasi-type II CdSe/CdS NRs and type II ZnSe/CdS NRs strong quantum confinement in the radial direction facilitates fast electron transfer and hole removal, whereas the fast carrier mobility along the axial direction enables long distance charge separation and slow charge recombination, which is essential for efficient MV(2+) photoreduction. The NR/MV(2+) relay system can be coupled to Pt nanoparticles in solution for light-driven H2 generation. Alternatively, Pt-tipped CdS and CdSe/CdS NRs provide fully integrated all inorganic systems for light-driven H2 generation. In CdS-Pt and CdSe/CdS-Pt hetero-NRs, ultrafast hole trapping on the CdS rod surface or in CdSe core enables efficient electron transfer from NRs to Pt tips by suppressing hole and energy transfer. It is shown that the quantum yields of photodriven H2 generation using these heterostructures correlate well with measured hole transfer rates from NRs to sacrificial donors, revealing that hole removal is the key efficiency-limiting step. These findings provide important insights for designing more efficient quantum confined NR and NR-Pt based systems for solar-to-fuel conversion. PMID:25682713

  10. Metamodel-Driven Evolution with Grammar Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, Barrett R.; Liu, Qichao; Mernik, Marjan

    2010-10-01

    Domain-specific modeling (DSM) has become one of the most popular techniques for incorporating model-driven engineering (MDE) into software engineering. In DSM, domain experts define metamodels to describe the essential problems in a domain. A model conforms to a schema definition represented by a metamodel in a similar manner to a programming language conforms to a grammar. Metamodel-driven evolution is when a metamodel undergoes evolutions to incorporate new concerns in the domain. However, this results in losing the ability to use existing model instances. Grammar inference is the problem of inferring a grammar from sample strings which the grammar should generate. This paper describes our work in solving the problem of metamodel-driven evolution with grammar inference, by inferring the metamodel from model instances.

  11. The evolution of agricultural intensification and environmental degradation in the UK: a data-driven systems dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong McKay, David I.; Dearing, John A.; Dyke, James G.; Poppy, Guy; Firbank, Les

    2016-04-01

    The world's population continues to grow rapidly, yet the current demand for food is already resulting in environmental degradation in many regions. As a result, an emerging challenge of the 21st century is how agriculture can simultaneously undergo sustainable intensification and be made more resilient to accelerating climate change. Key to this challenge is: a) finding the "safe and just operating space" for the global agri-environment system that both provides sufficient food for humanity and avoids crossing dangerous planetary boundaries, and b) downscaling this framework from a planetary to a regional scale in order to better inform decision making and incorporate regional dynamics within the planetary boundaries framework. Regional safe operating spaces can be defined and explored using a combination of metrics that indicate the changing status of ecosystem services (both provisioning and regulating), statistical techniques that reveal early warning signals and breakpoints, and dynamical system models of the regional agri-environment system. Initial attempts to apply this methodology have been made in developing countries (e.g. China [Dearing et al., 2012, 2014; Zhang et al., 2015]), but have not yet been attempted in more developed countries, for example the UK. In this study we assess the changes in ecosystem services in two contrasting agricultural regions in the UK, arable-dominated East England and pastoral-dominated South-West England, since the middle of the 20th Century. We identify and establish proxies and indices of various provisioning and regulating services in these two regions and analyse how these have changed over this time. We find that significant degradation of regulating services occurred in Eastern England in the early 1980s, reflecting a period of rapid intensification and escalating fertiliser usage, but that regulating services have begun to recover since 2000 mainly as a result of fertiliser usage decoupling from increasing wheat

  12. A Data-driven Model for the Global Coronal Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xueshang; Jiang, Chaowei; Xiang, Changqing; Zhao, Xuepu; Wu, S. T.

    2012-10-01

    This work is devoted to the construction of a data-driven model for the study of the dynamic evolution of the global corona that can respond continuously to the changing of the photospheric magnetic field. The data-driven model consists of a surface flux transport (SFT) model and a global three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) coronal model. The SFT model is employed to produce the global time-varying and self-consistent synchronic snapshots of the photospheric magnetic field as the input to drive our 3D numerical global coronal AMR-CESE-MHD model on an overset grid of Yin-Yang overlapping structure. The SFT model and the 3D global coronal model are coupled through the boundary condition of the projected characteristic method. Numerical results of the coronal evolution from 1996 September 4 to October 29 provide a good comparison with multiply observed coronal images.

  13. A DATA-DRIVEN MODEL FOR THE GLOBAL CORONAL EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Xueshang; Jiang Chaowei; Xiang Changqing; Zhao Xuepu; Wu, S. T. E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: xpzhao@sun.stanford.edu

    2012-10-10

    This work is devoted to the construction of a data-driven model for the study of the dynamic evolution of the global corona that can respond continuously to the changing of the photospheric magnetic field. The data-driven model consists of a surface flux transport (SFT) model and a global three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) coronal model. The SFT model is employed to produce the global time-varying and self-consistent synchronic snapshots of the photospheric magnetic field as the input to drive our 3D numerical global coronal AMR-CESE-MHD model on an overset grid of Yin-Yang overlapping structure. The SFT model and the 3D global coronal model are coupled through the boundary condition of the projected characteristic method. Numerical results of the coronal evolution from 1996 September 4 to October 29 provide a good comparison with multiply observed coronal images.

  14. Noise spectroscopy and decoherence mitigation during free and driven evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, William

    2014-03-01

    Gate operations in a quantum information processor are generally realized by tailoring specific periods of free and driven evolution of a quantum system. Unwanted environmental noise, which may be distinct during these two periods, acts to decohere the system and increase the gate error rate. In this talk, we review our work on noise spectroscopy of superconducting qubits (persistent-current qubits, transmons) undergoing both free and driven evolution, and we present dynamical decoupling methods that can mitigate coherent errors in both cases. We discuss these results in the context of our present work and future directions. This research was funded in part by the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering, under Air Force Contract FA8721-05-C-0002.

  15. Dynamics of secular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, James

    2013-10-01

    The material in this article was presented in five hours of lectures to the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School. The School’s theme was ‘Secular Evolution of Galaxies’ and my task was to present the underlying stellar-dynamical theory. Other lecturers were speaking on the role of bars and chemical evolution, so these topics are avoided here. The material starts with an account of the connections between isolating integrals, quasiperiodicity and angle-action variables - these variables played a prominent and unifying role throughout the lectures. This leads on to the phenomenon of resonant trap- ping and how this can lead to chaos in cuspy potentials and phase-space mixing in slowly evolving potentials. Surfaces of section and frequency analysis are introduced as diagnostics of phase-space structure. Real galactic potentials include a fluctuating part that drives the system towards unattainable thermal equilibrium. Two-body encounters are only one source of fluctuations, and all fluctuations will drive similar evolution. The orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation is derived, as are relations that hold between the second-order diffusion coefficients and both the power spectrum of the fluctuations and the first-order diffusion coefficients. From the observed heating of the solar neighbourhood we show that the second-order diffusion coefficients must scale as ˜ J1/2. We show that periodic spiral structure shifts angular momentum outwards, heating at the Lindblad resonances and mixing at corotation. The equation that would yield the normal modes of a stellar disk is first derived and then used to discuss the propagation of tightly wound spiral waves. The winding up of such waves is described and explains why cool stellar disks are responsive systems that amplify ambient noise. An explanation is offered of why the Lin-Shu-Kalnajs dispersion relation and even global normal-mode calculations provide a very incomplete understanding of the dynamics of stellar disks.

  16. A model of nonautonomous dynamics driven by repeated harmonic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebnov, V. A.; Tamura, H.

    2016-06-01

    We consider an exactly solvable model of nonautonomous W*-dynamics driven by repeated harmonic interaction. The dynamics is Hamiltonian and quasifree. Because of inelastic interaction in the large-time limit, it leads to relaxation of initial states to steady states. We derive the explicit entropy production rate accompanying this relaxation. We also study the evolution of different subsystems to elucidate their eventual correlations and convergence to equilibriums. In conclusion, we prove that the W*-dynamics manifests a universal stationary behavior in a short-time interaction limit.

  17. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.

    2015-11-21

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  18. Storm driven evolution and morphodynamic feedbacks. Sacalin spit, Danube delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zăinescu, Florin I.; Vespremeanu-Stroe, Alfred; Tătui, Florin; Constantinescu, Ştefan

    2015-04-01

    Deltaic spits are among the most highly dynamic and vulnerable coastal landforms rapidly changing their dimension, plan position and morphology. Sacalin barrier spit formed at the southernmost Danube mouth (Sfântu Gheorghe arm), representing the youngest downdrift feature of the Sfântu Gheorghe deltaic lobe (1500 BP - present). Sacalin emerged in 1897 aided by a major flood and developed by backwards migration and by constant elongation (towards south). Its evolution took place during a strongly anthropogenic influenced period of record high (19th century, beginning of the 20th century) and low solid discharge (late 20th century, beginning of 21 century) which reflects large scale land use and hydrotechnical works in the Danube watershed. With the use of an extensive database consisting in: historical maps, satellite imagery, orthophotos, bathymetric and topographic surveys, LIDAR data, long-term wind speed measurements, long-term wave hindcast data and sediment discharge records, the current study sheds new light on the evolution and behavior of transgressive deltaic islands and spits, and also on the evolution of the downdrift part of the Sfantu Gheorghe lobe by linking morphologic change and climatic variation. The Sacalin cycle appears to be different from past cycles by developing further offshore from the river mouth and by achieving in its last stage of evolution, a flying spit morphology. The high shoreline mobility of the narrow and low Sacalin barrier is mainly driven by coastal storms and associated processes: longshore and cross-shore sediment transport, overtopping, washover fan building and sediment transport during breaching. The barrier spit was frequently breached in the central part and, episodically it experiences large elongation and retreat rates (up to 500 m/year and 80 m/year). The in depth analysis performed on the evolution indices in correspondence with the storm climate and storm-induced sediment transport indicate that the long term

  19. The SILCC (SImulating the LifeCycle of molecular Clouds) project - II. Dynamical evolution of the supernova-driven ISM and the launching of outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girichidis, Philipp; Walch, Stefanie; Naab, Thorsten; Gatto, Andrea; Wünsch, Richard; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Clark, Paul C.; Peters, Thomas; Derigs, Dominik; Baczynski, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The SILCC project (SImulating the Life-Cycle of molecular Clouds) aims at a more self-consistent understanding of the interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales and its link to galaxy evolution. We present three-dimensional (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations of the ISM in a vertically stratified box including self-gravity, an external potential due to the stellar component of the galactic disc, and stellar feedback in the form of an interstellar radiation field and supernovae (SNe). The cooling of the gas is based on a chemical network that follows the abundances of H+, H, H2, C+, and CO and takes shielding into account consistently. We vary the SN feedback by comparing different SN rates, clustering and different positioning, in particular SNe in density peaks and at random positions, which has a major impact on the dynamics. Only for random SN positions the energy is injected in sufficiently low-density environments to reduce energy losses and enhance the effective kinetic coupling of the SNe with the gas. This leads to more realistic velocity dispersions (σ _H I≈ 0.8σ _{300{-}8000 K}˜ 10-20 km s^{-1}, σ _H α ≈ 0.6σ _{8000-3× 10^5 K}˜ 20-30 km s^{-1}), and strong outflows with mass loading factors (ratio of outflow to star formation rate) of up to 10 even for solar neighbourhood conditions. Clustered SNe abet the onset of outflows compared to individual SNe but do not influence the net outflow rate. The outflows do not contain any molecular gas and are mainly composed of atomic hydrogen. The bulk of the outflowing mass is dense (ρ ˜ 10-25-10-24 g cm-3) and slow (v ˜ 20-40 km s-1) but there is a high-velocity tail of up to v ˜ 500 km s-1 with ρ ˜ 10-28-10-27 g cm-3.

  20. Genome dynamics during experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Barrick, Jeffrey E; Lenski, Richard E

    2013-12-01

    Evolutionary changes in organismal traits may occur either gradually or suddenly. However, until recently, there has been little direct information about how phenotypic changes are related to the rate and the nature of the underlying genotypic changes. Technological advances that facilitate whole-genome and whole-population sequencing, coupled with experiments that 'watch' evolution in action, have brought new precision to and insights into studies of mutation rates and genome evolution. In this Review, we discuss the evolutionary forces and ecological processes that govern genome dynamics in various laboratory systems in the context of relevant population genetic theory, and we relate these findings to evolution in natural populations.

  1. Genome dynamics during experimental evolution

    PubMed Central

    Barrick, Jeffrey E.; Lenski, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary changes in organismal traits may occur gradually or suddenly. Until recently, however, there has been little direct information about how phenotypic changes are related to the rate and nature of underlying changes in genotype. Technological advances enabling whole-genome and whole-population sequencing coupled with experiments that watch evolution in action have brought new precision and insights to studies of mutation rates and genome evolution. Here, we discuss the evolutionary forces and ecological processes that govern genome dynamics in various laboratory systems in the context of relevant population genetic theory, and we relate these findings to evolution in natural populations. PMID:24166031

  2. Ultrafast laser-driven proton sources and dynamic proton imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, Peter V.; Schnuerer, Matthias; Sokollik, Thomas; Ter-Avetisyan, Sargis; Sandner, Wolfgang; Amin, Munib; Toncian, Toma; Willi, Oswald; Andreev, Alexander

    2008-07-15

    Ion bursts, accelerated by an ultrafast (40 fs) laser-assisted target normal sheath acceleration mechanism, can be adjusted so as to deliver a nearly pure proton beam. Such laser-driven proton bursts have predominantly a low transverse emittance and a broad kinetic spectrum suitable for continuous probing of the temporal evolution of spatially extended electric fields that arise after laser irradiation of thin foils. Fields with a strength of up to 10{sup 10} V/m were measured with a new streaklike proton deflectometry setup. The data show the temporal and spatial evolution of electric fields that are due to target charge-up and ion-front expansion following intense laser-target interaction at intensities of 10{sup 17}-10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}. Measurement of the field evolution is important to gain further insight into lateral electron-transport processes and the influence of field dynamics on ion beam properties.

  3. Microscopic dynamics of synchronization in driven colloids

    PubMed Central

    Juniper, Michael P.N.; Straube, Arthur V.; Besseling, Rut; Aarts, Dirk G.A.L.; Dullens, Roel P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of coupled oscillators has been scrutinized for over three centuries, from Huygens' pendulum clocks to physiological rhythms. One such synchronization phenomenon, dynamic mode locking, occurs when naturally oscillating processes are driven by an externally imposed modulation. Typically only averaged or integrated properties are accessible, leaving underlying mechanisms unseen. Here, we visualize the microscopic dynamics underlying mode locking in a colloidal model system, by using particle trajectories to produce phase portraits. Furthermore, we use this approach to examine the enhancement of mode locking in a flexible chain of magnetically coupled particles, which we ascribe to breathing modes caused by mode-locked density waves. Finally, we demonstrate that an emergent density wave in a static colloidal chain mode locks as a quasi-particle, with microscopic dynamics analogous to those seen for a single particle. Our results indicate that understanding the intricate link between emergent behaviour and microscopic dynamics is key to controlling synchronization. PMID:25994921

  4. Dynamics of the L {yields} H transition, VH-mode evolution, edge localized modes and R.F. driven confinement control in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, P.H.; Lebedev, V.B.; Liang, Y.M.; Gruzinov, A.V.; Gruzinov, I.; Medvedev, M.; Carreras, B.A.; Newman, D.E.; Charlton, L.; Sidikman, K.L.

    1995-02-01

    Several novel theoretical results related to L {yields} H transition physics, VH-mode evolution, Edge Localized Modes and active confinement control are presented. Critical issues are identified, results are discussed and important unresolved questions are listed. The basic physics is discussed in the contexts of current experiments and of ITER.

  5. Target-Driven Evolution of Scorpion Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shangfei; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2015-01-01

    It is long known that peptide neurotoxins derived from a diversity of venomous animals evolve by positive selection following gene duplication, yet a force that drives their adaptive evolution remains a mystery. By using maximum-likelihood models of codon substitution, we analyzed molecular adaptation in scorpion sodium channel toxins from a specific species and found ten positively selected sites, six of which are located at the core-domain of scorpion α-toxins, a region known to interact with two adjacent loops in the voltage-sensor domain (DIV) of sodium channels, as validated by our newly constructed computational model of toxin-channel complex. Despite the lack of positive selection signals in these two loops, they accumulated extensive sequence variations by relaxed purifying selection in prey and predators of scorpions. The evolutionary variability in the toxin-bound regions of sodium channels indicates that accelerated substitutions in the multigene family of scorpion toxins is a consequence of dealing with the target diversity. This work presents an example of atypical co-evolution between animal toxins and their molecular targets, in which toxins suffered from more prominent selective pressure from the channels of their competitors. Our discovery helps explain the evolutionary rationality of gene duplication of toxins in a specific venomous species. PMID:26444071

  6. Target-Driven Evolution of Scorpion Toxins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shangfei; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2015-10-07

    It is long known that peptide neurotoxins derived from a diversity of venomous animals evolve by positive selection following gene duplication, yet a force that drives their adaptive evolution remains a mystery. By using maximum-likelihood models of codon substitution, we analyzed molecular adaptation in scorpion sodium channel toxins from a specific species and found ten positively selected sites, six of which are located at the core-domain of scorpion α-toxins, a region known to interact with two adjacent loops in the voltage-sensor domain (DIV) of sodium channels, as validated by our newly constructed computational model of toxin-channel complex. Despite the lack of positive selection signals in these two loops, they accumulated extensive sequence variations by relaxed purifying selection in prey and predators of scorpions. The evolutionary variability in the toxin-bound regions of sodium channels indicates that accelerated substitutions in the multigene family of scorpion toxins is a consequence of dealing with the target diversity. This work presents an example of atypical co-evolution between animal toxins and their molecular targets, in which toxins suffered from more prominent selective pressure from the channels of their competitors. Our discovery helps explain the evolutionary rationality of gene duplication of toxins in a specific venomous species.

  7. Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Garcia, Alejandro L.; Alder, Berni J.

    2008-02-01

    A novel Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics (SEDMD) algorithm is developed for the simulation of polymer chains suspended in a solvent. SEDMD combines event-driven molecular dynamics (EDMD) with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The polymers are represented as chains of hard-spheres tethered by square wells and interact with the solvent particles with hard-core potentials. The algorithm uses EDMD for the simulation of the polymer chain and the interactions between the chain beads and the surrounding solvent particles. The interactions between the solvent particles themselves are not treated deterministically as in EDMD, rather, the momentum and energy exchange in the solvent is determined stochastically using DSMC. The coupling between the solvent and the solute is consistently represented at the particle level retaining hydrodynamic interactions and thermodynamic fluctuations. However, unlike full MD simulations of both the solvent and the solute, in SEDMD the spatial structure of the solvent is ignored. The SEDMD algorithm is described in detail and applied to the study of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a hard-wall subjected to uniform shear. SEDMD closely reproduces results obtained using traditional EDMD simulations with two orders of magnitude greater efficiency. Results question the existence of periodic (cycling) motion of the polymer chain.

  8. Sustainability of culture-driven population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ghirlanda, Stefano; Enquist, Magnus; Perc, Matjaz

    2010-05-01

    We consider models of the interactions between human population dynamics and cultural evolution, asking whether they predict sustainable or unsustainable patterns of growth. Phenomenological models predict either unsustainable population growth or stabilization in the near future. The latter prediction, however, is based on extrapolation of current demographic trends and does not take into account causal processes of demographic and cultural dynamics. Most existing causal models assume (or derive from simplified models of the economy) a positive feedback between cultural evolution and demographic growth, and predict unlimited growth in both culture and population. We augment these models taking into account that: (1) cultural transmission is not perfect, i.e., culture can be lost; (2) culture does not always promote population growth. We show that taking these factors into account can cause radically different model behavior, such as population extinction rather than stability, and extinction rather than growth. We conclude that all models agree that a population capable of maintaining a large amount of culture, including a powerful technology, runs a high risk of being unsustainable. We suggest that future work must address more explicitly both the dynamics of resource consumption and the cultural evolution of beliefs implicated in reproductive behavior (e.g., ideas about the preferred family size) and in resource use (e.g., environmentalist stances).

  9. The evolution of information-driven safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Budlong-sylvester, Kory W; Pilat, Joseph F

    2010-10-14

    From the adoption of the Model Additional Protocol and integrated safeguards in the 1990s, to current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) efforts to deal with cases of noncompliance, the question of how the Agency can best utilize all the information available to it remains of great interest and increasing importance. How might the concept of 'information-driven' safeguards (IDS) evolve in the future? The ability of the Agency to identify and resolve anomalies has always been important and has emerged as a core Agency function in recent years as the IAEA has had to deal with noncompliance in Iran and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK). Future IAEA safeguards implementation should be designed with the goal of facilitating and enhancing this vital capability. In addition, the Agency should utilize all the information it possesses, including its in-house assessments and expertise, to direct its safeguards activities. At the State level, knowledge of proliferation possibilities is currently being used to guide the analytical activities of the Agency and to develop inspection plans. How far can this approach be extended? Does it apply across State boundaries? Should it dictate a larger fraction of safeguards activities? Future developments in IDS should utilize the knowledge resident within the Agency to ensure that safeguards resources flow to where they are most needed in order to address anomalies first and foremost, but also to provide greater confidence in conclusions regarding the absence of undeclared nuclear activities. The elements of such a system and related implementation issues are assessed in this paper.

  10. Fitness-driven deactivation in network evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin-Jian; Peng, Xiao-Long; Small, Michael; Fu, Xin-Chu

    2010-12-01

    Individual nodes in evolving real-world networks typically experience growth and decay—that is, the popularity and influence of individuals peaks and then fades. In this paper, we study this phenomenon via an intrinsic nodal fitness function and an intuitive ageing mechanism. Each node of the network is endowed with a fitness which represents its activity. All the nodes have two discrete stages: active and inactive. The evolution of the network combines the addition of new active nodes randomly connected to existing active ones and the deactivation of old active nodes with a possibility inversely proportional to their fitnesses. We obtain a structured exponential network when the fitness distribution of the individuals is homogeneous and a structured scale-free network with heterogeneous fitness distributions. Furthermore, we recover two universal scaling laws of the clustering coefficient for both cases, C(k) ~ k - 1 and C ~ n - 1, where k and n refer to the node degree and the number of active individuals, respectively. These results offer a new simple description of the growth and ageing of networks where intrinsic features of individual nodes drive their popularity, and hence degree.

  11. Evolution of cooperation driven by incremental learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Duan, Haibin

    2015-02-01

    It has been shown that the details of microscopic rules in structured populations can have a crucial impact on the ultimate outcome in evolutionary games. So alternative formulations of strategies and their revision processes exploring how strategies are actually adopted and spread within the interaction network need to be studied. In the present work, we formulate the strategy update rule as an incremental learning process, wherein knowledge is refreshed according to one's own experience learned from the past (self-learning) and that gained from social interaction (social-learning). More precisely, we propose a continuous version of strategy update rules, by introducing the willingness to cooperate W, to better capture the flexibility of decision making behavior. Importantly, the newly gained knowledge including self-learning and social learning is weighted by the parameter ω, establishing a strategy update rule involving innovative element. Moreover, we quantify the macroscopic features of the emerging patterns to inspect the underlying mechanisms of the evolutionary process using six cluster characteristics. In order to further support our results, we examine the time evolution course for these characteristics. Our results might provide insights for understanding cooperative behaviors and have several important implications for understanding how individuals adjust their strategies under real-life conditions.

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium-driven cardiac alternans.

    PubMed

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Karma, Alain; Restrepo, Juan G

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of spatially discordant alternans (SDA) driven by an instability of intracellular calcium cycling using both amplitude equations [P. S. Skardal, A. Karma, and J. G. Restrepo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 108103 (2012)] and ionic model simulations. We focus on the common case where the bidirectional coupling of intracellular calcium concentration and membrane voltage dynamics produces calcium and voltage alternans that are temporally in phase. We find that, close to the alternans bifurcation, SDA is manifested as a smooth wavy modulation of the amplitudes of both repolarization and calcium transient (CaT) alternans, similarly to the well-studied case of voltage-driven alternans. In contrast, further away from the bifurcation, the amplitude of CaT alternans jumps discontinuously at the nodes separating out-of-phase regions, while the amplitude of repolarization alternans remains smooth. We identify universal dynamical features of SDA pattern formation and evolution in the presence of those jumps. We show that node motion of discontinuous SDA patterns is strongly hysteretic even in homogeneous tissue due to the novel phenomenon of "unidirectional pinning": node movement can only be induced towards, but not away from, the pacing site in response to a change of pacing rate or physiological parameter. In addition, we show that the wavelength of discontinuous SDA patterns scales linearly with the conduction velocity restitution length scale, in contrast to the wavelength of smooth patterns that scales sublinearly with this length scale. Those results are also shown to be robust against cell-to-cell fluctuations due to the property that unidirectional node motion collapses multiple jumps accumulating in nodal regions into a single jump. Amplitude equation predictions are in good overall agreement with ionic model simulations. Finally, we briefly discuss physiological implications of our findings. In particular, we suggest that due to the tendency of

  13. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    PubMed

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry. PMID:26871188

  14. Computational dynamics of acoustically driven microsphere systems.

    PubMed

    Glosser, Connor; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Li, Jie; Dault, Dan; Shanker, B

    2016-01-01

    We propose a computational framework for the self-consistent dynamics of a microsphere system driven by a pulsed acoustic field in an ideal fluid. Our framework combines a molecular dynamics integrator describing the dynamics of the microsphere system with a time-dependent integral equation solver for the acoustic field that makes use of fields represented as surface expansions in spherical harmonic basis functions. The presented approach allows us to describe the interparticle interaction induced by the field as well as the dynamics of trapping in counter-propagating acoustic pulses. The integral equation formulation leads to equations of motion for the microspheres describing the effect of nondissipative drag forces. We show (1) that the field-induced interactions between the microspheres give rise to effective dipolar interactions, with effective dipoles defined by their velocities and (2) that the dominant effect of an ultrasound pulse through a cloud of microspheres gives rise mainly to a translation of the system, though we also observe both expansion and contraction of the cloud determined by the initial system geometry.

  15. Birth and evolution of the Rio Grande-Rio Chama fluvial system: The influence of magma-driven dynamic topography on fluvial systems over the last 8 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasch, M. N.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Heizler, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    The Rio Grande-Rio Chama (RG-RC) fluvial system of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico preserves a record of southern Rocky Mountain erosion and sediment transport over the last 8 Ma. During this time the two rivers have evolved wildly, undergoing channel migrations, drainage capture and integration events, carving and refilling of paleocanyons, lake spill-overs, and reshaping of drainage divides. New 40Ar/39Ar basalt ages coupled with new detrital grain age population data for fluvial sediments are beginning to reconstruct the birth of the RG-RC fluvial system and elucidate the processes that drove its evolution over the last ~8 Ma. Twenty-three detrital grain samples have been collected from RG-RC river deposits ranging in age from ~8 Ma (RC) and 4.5 Ma (RG) to modern fluvial sediment. Detrital zircon age spectra for the RG reveal peaks at 25 Ma, 28 Ma, 30-35 Ma (San Juan volcanic), and 70-90Ma (San Juan Basin) in sediments deposited from 4.5 to 0 Ma. RC spectra are richer in San Juan Basin and San Juan volcanic detritus. A 2.6 Ma Totavi Lentil deposit downstream of today's RG-RC confluence is similar to the ancestral RG, while a 1.6 Ma Totavi Lentil is similar to the combined RG-RC, suggesting northward shift of the RG-RC confluence by 1.6 Ma due to Jemez Mountain volcanism. A 4.5 Ma basalt age from Black Mesa and occurrence of San Juan volcanic detritus in 3 to 5 Ma sediment suggests birth of an ancestral RG as early as 4.5 Ma. There is no record of an ancestral RG north of the Red River confluence for the 3.0 to 0.5 Ma time period, supporting prior work that northern San Luis Basin became integrated after 0.5 Ma spill-over of Lake Alamosa. We plan to add detrital sanidine dating to refine the age spectra and help further delineate drainage patterns. The RG-RC system drains a highly tectonically active region. Changes in the fluvial regime suggest: 1) long-lived source of detritus (some recycled) from the San Juan volcanic field, 2) downstream integration

  16. Ultrafast electronic dynamics driven by nuclear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrell, Oriol

    2016-05-01

    The transfer of electrical charge on a microscopic scale plays a fundamental role in chemistry, in biology, and in technological applications. In this contribution, we will discuss situations in which nuclear motion plays a central role in driving the electronic dynamics of photo-excited or photo-ionized molecular systems. In particular, we will explore theoretically the ultrafast transfer of a double electron hole between the functional groups of glycine after K-shell ionization and subsequent Auger decay. Although a large energy gap of about 15 eV initially exists between the two electronic states involved and coherent electronic dynamics play no role in the hole transfer, we will illustrate how the double hole can be transferred within 3 to 4 fs between both functional ends of the glycine molecule driven solely by specific nuclear displacements and non-Born-Oppenheimer effects. This finding challenges the common wisdom that nuclear dynamics of the molecular skeleton are unimportant for charge transfer processes at the few-femtosecond time scale and shows that they can even play a prominent role. We thank the Hamburg Centre for Ultrafast Imaging and the Volkswagen Foundation for financial support.

  17. Dynamical Critical Phenomena in Driven-Dissipative Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieberer, L. M.; Huber, S. D.; Altman, E.; Diehl, S.

    2013-05-01

    We explore the nature of the Bose condensation transition in driven open quantum systems, such as exciton-polariton condensates. Using a functional renormalization group approach formulated in the Keldysh framework, we characterize the dynamical critical behavior that governs decoherence and an effective thermalization of the low frequency dynamics. We identify a critical exponent special to the driven system, showing that it defines a new dynamical universality class. Hence critical points in driven systems lie beyond the standard classification of equilibrium dynamical phase transitions. We show how the new critical exponent can be probed in experiments with driven cold atomic systems and exciton-polariton condensates.

  18. Dynamic landscapes: a model of context and contingency in evolution.

    PubMed

    Foster, David V; Rorick, Mary M; Gesell, Tanja; Feeney, Laura M; Foster, Jacob G

    2013-10-01

    Although the basic mechanics of evolution have been understood since Darwin, debate continues over whether macroevolutionary phenomena are driven by the fitness structure of genotype space or by ecological interaction. In this paper we propose a simple model capturing key features of fitness-landscape and ecological models of evolution. Our model describes evolutionary dynamics in a high-dimensional, structured genotype space with interspecies interaction. We find promising qualitative similarity with the empirical facts about macroevolution, including broadly distributed extinction sizes and realistic exploration of the genotype space. The abstraction of our model permits numerous applications beyond macroevolution, including protein and RNA evolution.

  19. Laser-driven nonlinear cluster dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fennel, Th.; Meiwes-Broer, K.-H.; Tiggesbaeumker, J.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Dinh, P. M.; Suraud, E.

    2010-04-15

    Laser excitation of nanometer-sized atomic and molecular clusters offers various opportunities to explore and control ultrafast many-particle dynamics. Whereas weak laser fields allow the analysis of photoionization, excited-state relaxation, and structural modifications on these finite quantum systems, large-amplitude collective electron motion and Coulomb explosion can be induced with intense laser pulses. This review provides an overview of key phenomena arising from laser-cluster interactions with focus on nonlinear optical excitations and discusses the underlying processes according to the current understanding. A general survey covers basic cluster properties and excitation mechanisms relevant for laser-driven cluster dynamics. Then, after an excursion in theoretical and experimental methods, results for single-photon and multiphoton excitations are reviewed with emphasis on signatures from time- and angular-resolved photoemission. A key issue of this review is the broad spectrum of phenomena arising from clusters exposed to strong fields, where the interaction with the laser pulse creates short-lived and dense nanoplasmas. The implications for technical developments such as the controlled generation of ion, electron, and radiation pulses will be addressed along with corresponding examples. Finally, future prospects of laser-cluster research as well as experimental and theoretical challenges are discussed.

  20. Microstructural evolution during dynamic deformation of cubic metals: copper

    SciTech Connect

    Cerreta, Ellen K; Koller, Darcie D; Bronkhorst, Curt A; Excobedo, Juan P; Hansen, Benjamin L; Patterson, Brian M; Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Livescu, Veronica; Tonks, Davis; Mourad, Hashem M; Germann, Timothy C; Perez - Bergquist, Alex; Gray Ill, George T

    2010-12-22

    Shockwave shape can influence dynamic damage evolution. Features such as rise time, pulse duration, peak shock pressure, pull back, and release rate are influenced as wave shape changes. However, their individual influence on dynamic damage evolution is not well understood. Specifically, changing from a square to triangular or Taylor wave loading profile can alter the release kinetics from peak shock pressure and the volume of material sampled during release. This creates a spatial influence. In high purity metals, because damage is often linked to boundaries within the microstructure (grain or twin), changing the volume of material sampled during release, can have a drastic influence on dynamic damage evolution as the number of boundaries or defects sampled is altered. In this study, model-driven dynamic experiments have been conducted on eu with four different grain sizes to examine, for a given shockwave shape, how the spatial effect of boundary distribution influences dynamic damage evolution. Both two and three dimensional damage characterization techniques have been utilized. This study shows the critical influence of spatial effects, in this case boundary density, on dynamic damage evolution. As the boundary density decreases, the damage evolution transitions from nucleation controlled to growth controlled. It also shows that specific boundaries, those with high Schmid factor orientations on either side, maybe a necessary condition for void formation.

  1. Evolution models with extremal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kärenlampi, Petri P

    2016-08-01

    The random-neighbor version of the Bak-Sneppen biological evolution model is reproduced, along with an analogous model of random replicators, the latter eventually experiencing topology changes. In the absence of topology changes, both types of models self-organize to a critical state. Species extinctions in the replicator system degenerates the self-organization to a random walk, as does vanishing of species interaction for the BS-model. A replicator model with speciation is introduced, experiencing dramatic topology changes. It produces a variety of features, but self-organizes to a possibly critical state only in a few special cases. Speciation-extinction dynamics interfering with self-organization, biological macroevolution probably is not a self-organized critical system. PMID:27626090

  2. Chemical evolution of galaxies with radiation-driven dust wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekki, Kenji; Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2014-11-01

    We discuss how the removal of interstellar dust by radiation pressure of stars influences the chemical evolution of galaxies by using a new one-zone chemical evolution models with dust wind. The removal efficiency of an element (e.g. Fe, Mg, and Ca) through radiation-driven dust wind in a galaxy is assumed to depend both on the dust depletion level of the element in interstellar medium and the total luminosity of the galaxy in the new model. We particularly focus on the time evolution of [α/Fe] and its dependence on model parameters for dust wind in this study. The principal results are as follows. The time evolution of [Ca/Fe] is significantly different between models with and without dust wind in the sense that [Ca/Fe] can be systematically lower in the models with dust wind. The time evolution of [Mg/Fe], on the other hand, cannot be so different between the models with and without dust wind owing to the lower level of dust depletion for Mg. As a result of this, [Mg/Ca] can be systematically higher in the models with dust wind. We compare these results with the observed elemental features of stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), because a growing number of observational studies on [α/Fe] for the LMC have been recently accumulated for a detailed comparison. Based on the present new results, we also discuss the origins of [α/Fe] in the Fornax dwarf galaxy and elliptical galaxies in the context of radiation-driven dust wind.

  3. Evolution of dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cougnon, Fabien B L; Sanders, Jeremy K M

    2012-12-18

    Since its inception in the mid-1990s, dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC), the chemistry of complex systems under thermodynamic control, has proved valuable in identifying unexpected molecules with remarkable binding properties and in providing effective synthetic routes to complex species. Essentially, in this approach, one designs the experiment rather than the molecule. DCC has also provided us with insights into how some chemical systems respond to external stimuli. Using examples from the work of our laboratory and others, this Account shows how the concept of DCC, inspired by the evolution of living systems, has found an increasing range of applications in diverse areas and has evolved conceptually and experimentally. A dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) is a thermodynamically controlled mixture of interconverting species that can respond to various stimuli. The Cambridge version of dynamic combinatorial chemistry was initially inspired by the mammalian immune system and was conceived as a way to create and identify new unpredictable receptors. For example, an added template can select and stabilize a strongly binding member of the library which is then amplified at the expense of the unsuccessful library members, minimizing the free energy of the system. But researchers have exploited DCC in a variety of other ways: over the past two decades, this technique has contributed to the evolution of chemistry and to applications in the diverse fields of catalysis, fragrance release, and responsive materials. Among these applications, researchers have built intricate and well-defined architectures such as catenanes or hydrogen-bonded nanotubes, using the ability of complex chemical systems to reach a high level of organization. In addition, DCC has proved a powerful tool for the study of complex molecular networks and systems. The use of DCC is improving our understanding of chemical and biological systems. The study of folding or self-replicating macrocycles in

  4. A combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven molecular dynamics algorithm for the simulation of shock waves in rarefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paolo; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2009-12-01

    A novel combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven (ED/TD) algorithm to speed-up the Molecular Dynamics simulation of rarefied gases using realistic spherically symmetric soft potentials is presented. Due to the low density regime, the proposed method correctly identifies the time that must elapse before the next interaction occurs, similarly to Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics. However, each interaction is treated using Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics, thereby integrating Newton's Second Law using the sufficiently small time step needed to correctly resolve the atomic motion. Although infrequent, many-body interactions are also accounted for with a small approximation. The combined ED/TD method is shown to correctly reproduce translational relaxation in argon, described using the Lennard-Jones potential. For densities between ρ=10-4 kg/m and ρ=10-1 kg/m, comparisons with kinetic theory, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, and pure Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics demonstrate that the ED/TD algorithm correctly reproduces the proper collision rates and the evolution toward thermal equilibrium. Finally, the combined ED/TD algorithm is applied to the simulation of a Mach 9 shock wave in rarefied argon. Density and temperature profiles as well as molecular velocity distributions accurately match DSMC results, and the shock thickness is within the experimental uncertainty. For the problems considered, the ED/TD algorithm ranged from several hundred to several thousand times faster than conventional Time-Driven MD. Moreover, the force calculation to integrate the molecular trajectories is found to contribute a negligible amount to the overall ED/TD simulation time. Therefore, this method could pave the way for the application of much more refined and expensive interatomic potentials, either classical or first-principles, to Molecular Dynamics simulations of shock waves in rarefied gases, involving vibrational nonequilibrium and chemical reactivity.

  5. A combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven molecular dynamics algorithm for the simulation of shock waves in rarefied gases

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, Paolo Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2009-12-10

    A novel combined Event-Driven/Time-Driven (ED/TD) algorithm to speed-up the Molecular Dynamics simulation of rarefied gases using realistic spherically symmetric soft potentials is presented. Due to the low density regime, the proposed method correctly identifies the time that must elapse before the next interaction occurs, similarly to Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics. However, each interaction is treated using Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics, thereby integrating Newton's Second Law using the sufficiently small time step needed to correctly resolve the atomic motion. Although infrequent, many-body interactions are also accounted for with a small approximation. The combined ED/TD method is shown to correctly reproduce translational relaxation in argon, described using the Lennard-Jones potential. For densities between {rho}=10{sup -4}kg/m{sup 3} and {rho}=10{sup -1}kg/m{sup 3}, comparisons with kinetic theory, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo, and pure Time-Driven Molecular Dynamics demonstrate that the ED/TD algorithm correctly reproduces the proper collision rates and the evolution toward thermal equilibrium. Finally, the combined ED/TD algorithm is applied to the simulation of a Mach 9 shock wave in rarefied argon. Density and temperature profiles as well as molecular velocity distributions accurately match DSMC results, and the shock thickness is within the experimental uncertainty. For the problems considered, the ED/TD algorithm ranged from several hundred to several thousand times faster than conventional Time-Driven MD. Moreover, the force calculation to integrate the molecular trajectories is found to contribute a negligible amount to the overall ED/TD simulation time. Therefore, this method could pave the way for the application of much more refined and expensive interatomic potentials, either classical or first-principles, to Molecular Dynamics simulations of shock waves in rarefied gases, involving vibrational nonequilibrium and chemical reactivity.

  6. Field-driven dynamics of nematic microcapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayyatzadeh, Pouya; Fu, Fred; Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin

    2015-12-01

    Polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (PDLC) composites long have been a focus of study for their unique electro-optical properties which have resulted in various applications such as switchable (transparent or translucent) windows. These composites are manufactured using desirable "bottom-up" techniques, such as phase separation of a liquid-crystal-polymer mixture, which enable production of PDLC films at very large scales. LC domains within PDLCs are typically spheroidal, as opposed to rectangular for an LCD panel, and thus exhibit substantially different behavior in the presence of an external field. The fundamental difference between spheroidal and rectangular nematic domains is that the former results in the presence of nanoscale orientational defects in LC order while the latter does not. Progress in the development and optimization of PDLC electro-optical properties has progressed at a relatively slow pace due to this increased complexity. In this work, continuum simulations are performed in order to capture the complex formation and electric field-driven switching dynamics of approximations of PDLC domains. Using a simplified elliptic cylinder (microcapillary) geometry as an approximation of spheroidal PDLC domains, the effects of geometry (aspect ratio), surface anchoring, and external field strength are studied through the use of the Landau-de Gennes model of the nematic LC phase.

  7. Towards a Model-Driven Approach to Information System Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulsamh, Mohammed; Davies, Jim

    Models have always played an important role in information systems (IS) design: typically, entity-relationship diagrams or object models have been used to describe data structures and the relationships between them. Model transformation and code generation technologies have given models an even more important role: as part of the source code for the system. This "model-driven" approach, however, has application beyond initial implementation. This chapter shows how subsequent changes to a design, captured as an "evolution model", can be used to generate the data transformations required for the migration of data between different versions of the same system. The intention is to facilitate the adaptation of systems to changing requirements, using model-driven technologies for the rapid development of new versions, by reducing the cost and increasing the reliability of each migration step.

  8. Spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium-driven cardiac alternans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Karma, Alain; Restrepo, Juan G.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of spatially discordant alternans (SDA) driven by an instability of intracellular calcium cycling using both amplitude equations [P. S. Skardal, A. Karma, and J. G. Restrepo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 108103 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.108103] and ionic model simulations. We focus on the common case where the bidirectional coupling of intracellular calcium concentration and membrane voltage dynamics produces calcium and voltage alternans that are temporally in phase. We find that, close to the alternans bifurcation, SDA is manifested as a smooth wavy modulation of the amplitudes of both repolarization and calcium transient (CaT) alternans, similarly to the well-studied case of voltage-driven alternans. In contrast, further away from the bifurcation, the amplitude of CaT alternans jumps discontinuously at the nodes separating out-of-phase regions, while the amplitude of repolarization alternans remains smooth. We identify universal dynamical features of SDA pattern formation and evolution in the presence of those jumps. We show that node motion of discontinuous SDA patterns is strongly hysteretic even in homogeneous tissue due to the novel phenomenon of "unidirectional pinning": node movement can only be induced towards, but not away from, the pacing site in response to a change of pacing rate or physiological parameter. In addition, we show that the wavelength of discontinuous SDA patterns scales linearly with the conduction velocity restitution length scale, in contrast to the wavelength of smooth patterns that scales sublinearly with this length scale. Those results are also shown to be robust against cell-to-cell fluctuations due to the property that unidirectional node motion collapses multiple jumps accumulating in nodal regions into a single jump. Amplitude equation predictions are in good overall agreement with ionic model simulations. Finally, we briefly discuss physiological implications of our findings. In particular, we

  9. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Calcium-Driven Cardiac Alternans

    PubMed Central

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Karma, Alain; Restrepo, Juan G.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of spatially discordant alternans (SDA) driven by an instability of intracellular calcium cycling using both amplitude equations [P. S. Skardal, A. Karma, and J. G. Restrepo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 108103 (2012)] and ionic model simulations. We focus on the common case where the bi-directional coupling of intracellular calcium concentration and membrane voltage dynamics produces calcium and voltage alternans that are temporally in phase. We find that, close to the alternans bifurcation, SDA is manifested as a smooth wavy modulation of the amplitudes of both repolarization and calcium transient (CaT) alternans, similarly to the well-studied case of voltage-driven alternans. In contrast, further away from the bifurcation, the amplitude of CaT alternans jumps discontinuously at the nodes separating out-of-phase regions, while the amplitude of repolarization alternans remains smooth. We identify universal dynamical features of SDA pattern formation and evolution in the presence of those jumps. We show that node motion of discontinuous SDA patterns is strongly hysteretic even in homogeneous tissue due to the novel phenomenon of “unidirectional pinning”: node movement can only be induced towards, but not away from, the pacing site in response to a change of pacing rate or physiological parameter. In addition, we show that the wavelength of discontinuous SDA patterns scales linearly with the conduction velocity restitution length scale, in contrast to the wavelength of smooth patterns that scales sub-linearly with this length scale. Those results are also shown to be robust against cell-to-cell fluctuations owing to the property that unidirectional node motion collapses multiple jumps accumulating in nodal regions into a single jump. Amplitude equation predictions are in good overall agreement with ionic model simulations. Finally, we briefly discuss physiological implications of our findings. In particular, we suggest that due to the

  10. Driven Dynamics and Rotary Echo of a Qubit Tunably Coupled to a Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, S.; Bylander, J.; Yan, F.; Forn-Díaz, P.; Bolkhovsky, V.; Braje, D.; Fitch, G.; Harrabi, K.; Lennon, D.; Miloshi, J.; Murphy, P.; Slattery, R.; Spector, S.; Turek, B.; Weir, T.; Welander, P. B.; Yoshihara, F.; Cory, D. G.; Nakamura, Y.; Orlando, T. P.; Oliver, W. D.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the driven dynamics of a superconducting flux qubit that is tunably coupled to a microwave resonator. We find that the qubit experiences an oscillating field mediated by off-resonant driving of the resonator, leading to strong modifications of the qubit Rabi frequency. This opens an additional noise channel, and we find that low-frequency noise in the coupling parameter causes a reduction of the coherence time during driven evolution. The noise can be mitigated with the rotary-echo pulse sequence, which, for driven systems, is analogous to the Hahn-echo sequence.

  11. Driven Dynamics and Rotary Echo of a Qubit Tunably Coupled to a Harmonic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, William; Gustavsson, Simon; Bylander, Jonas; Yan, Fei; Forn-Diaz, Pol; Bolkhovsky, Vlad; Braje, Danielle; Fitch, George; Harrabi, Khalil; Lennon, Donna; Miloshi, Jovi; Murphy, Peter; Slattery, Rick; Spector, Steven; Turek, Ben; Weir, Terry; Welander, Paul; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Cory, David; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Orlando, Terry

    2013-03-01

    We have investigated the driven dynamics of a superconducting flux qubit that is tunably coupled to a microwave resonator. We find that the qubit experiences an oscillating field mediated by off-resonant driving of the resonator, leading to strong modifications of the qubit Rabi frequency. This opens an additional noise channel, and we find that low-frequency noise in the coupling parameter causes a reduction of the coherence time during driven evolution. The noise can be mitigated with the rotary-echo pulse sequence, which, for driven systems, is analogous to the Hahn-echo sequence.

  12. Dynamical evolution of cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchet, F.R.

    1988-05-11

    The author have studied by means of numerical simulations the dynamical evolution of a network of cosmic strings, both in the radiation and matter era. Our basic conclusion is that a scaling solution exists, i.e., the string energy density evolves as t/sup -2/. This means that the process by which long strings dump their energy into closed loops (which can gravitationally radiate away) is efficient enough to prevent the string domination over other forms of energy. This conclusion does not depend on the initial string energy density, nor on the various numerical parameters. On the other hand, the generated spectrum of loop sizes does depend on the value of our numerical lower cutoff (i.e., the minimum length of loop we allow to be chopped off the network). Furthermore, the network evolution is very different from what was assumed before), namely the creation of a few horizon sized loops per horizon volume and per hubble time, which subsequently fragment into about 10 smaller daughter loops. Rather, many tiny loops are directly cut from the network of infinite strings, and it appears that the only fundamental scale (the horizon) has been lost. This is probably because a fundamental ingredient had been overlooked, namely the kinks. These kinks are created in pairs at each intercommutation, and very rapidly, the long strings appear to be very kinky. Thus the number of long strings per horizon is still of the order of a few, but their total length is fairly large. Furthermore, a large number of kinks favors the formation of small loops, and their sizes might well be governed by the kink density along the long strings. Finally, we computed the two-point correlation function of the loops and found significant differences from the work of Turok.

  13. How Evolution May Work Through Curiosity-Driven Developmental Process.

    PubMed

    Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Smith, Linda B

    2016-04-01

    Infants' own activities create and actively select their learning experiences. Here we review recent models of embodied information seeking and curiosity-driven learning and show that these mechanisms have deep implications for development and evolution. We discuss how these mechanisms yield self-organized epigenesis with emergent ordered behavioral and cognitive developmental stages. We describe a robotic experiment that explored the hypothesis that progress in learning, in and for itself, generates intrinsic rewards: The robot learners probabilistically selected experiences according to their potential for reducing uncertainty. In these experiments, curiosity-driven learning led the robot learner to successively discover object affordances and vocal interaction with its peers. We explain how a learning curriculum adapted to the current constraints of the learning system automatically formed, constraining learning and shaping the developmental trajectory. The observed trajectories in the robot experiment share many properties with those in infant development, including a mixture of regularities and diversities in the developmental patterns. Finally, we argue that such emergent developmental structures can guide and constrain evolution, in particular with regard to the origins of language. PMID:26969919

  14. Spin-Torque Driven Macrospin Dynamics subject to Thermal Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Daniele

    This thesis considers the general Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert theory underlying the magnetization dynamics of a macrospin subject to spin-torque effects and thermal fluctuations, as a function of the spin-polarization angle. The macrospin has biaxial magnetic anisotropy, typical of thin film magnetic elements, with an easy axis in the film plane and a hard axis out of the plane. When magnetic diffusion due to spin-torque and thermal noise effects occurs on a timescale that is much larger than the conservative precessional timescale due to magnetic anisotropies, it is possible to explore steady-state dynamics perturbatively by averaging the magnetization dynamics over constant energy orbits. This simplifies the magnetization dynamics to a 1D stochastic differential equation governing the evolution of the macropsin's energy. Current induced steady-state motions are then found to appear whenever the magnetization settles onto a stable constant energy trajectory where a balance of spin-torque and damping effects is achieved: with the remaining gyromagnetic motion due to anisotropy fields driving precessions. After averaging, all the relevant dynamical scenarios are found to depend on the ratio between hard and easy axis anisotropies. We derive the range of currents for which in-plane and out-of-plane limit cycles exist and discuss the regimes in which the constant energy orbit averaging technique is applicable. We find that there is a critical angle of the spin-polarization necessary for the occurrence of such states and predict a hysteretic response to applied current. This model can be tested in experiments on orthogonal spin-transfer devices, which consist of both an in-plane and out-of-plane magnetized spin-polarizers, effectively leading to an angle between the easy and spin-polarization axes. The technique developed allows for a detailed study of thermally driven macrospin escape phenomena within a stochastic Langevin framework. By employing Friedlin- Wentzell theory

  15. Dynamics of Lane Formation in Driven Binary Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Suetterlin, K. R.; Ivlev, A. V.; Raeth, C.; Thomas, H. M.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Morfill, G. E.; Wysocki, A.; Loewen, H.; Goedheer, W. J.; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.

    2009-02-27

    The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane-formation process is in good agreement with computer simulations of a binary Yukawa model with Langevin dynamics. The laning is quantified in terms of the anisotropic scaling index, leading to a universal order parameter for driven systems.

  16. Dynamical evolution of comet pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, Andrea; Fernández, Julio A.

    2016-10-01

    Some Jupiter family comets in near-Earth orbits (thereafter NEJFCs) show a remarkable similarity in their present orbits, like for instance 169P/NEAT and P/2003 T12 (SOHO), or 252P/LINEAR and P/2016 BA14 (PANSTARRS). By means of numerical integrations we studied the dynamical evolution of these objects. In particular, for each pair of presumably related objects, we are interested in assessing the stability of the orbital parameters for several thousand years, and to find a minimum of their relative spatial distance, coincident with a low value of their relative velocity. For those cases for which we find a well defined minimum of their relative orbital separation, we are trying to reproduce the actual orbit of the hypothetical fragment by modeling a fragmentation of the parent body. Some model parameters are the relative ejection velocity (a few m/s), the orbital point at which the fragmentation could have happened (e.g. perihelion), and the elapsed time since fragmentation. In addition, some possible fragmentation mechanisms, like thermal stress, rotational instability, or collisions, could be explored. According to Fernández J.A and Sosa A. 2015 (Planetary and Space Science 118,pp.14-24), some NEJFCs might come from the outer asteroid belt, and then they would have a more consolidated structure and a higher mineral content than that of comets coming from the trans-Neptunian belt or the Oort cloud. Therefore, such objects would have a much longer physical lifetime in the near-Earth region, and could become potential candidates to produce visible meteor showers (as for example 169P/NEAT which has been identified as the parent body of the alpha-Capricornid meteoroid stream, according to Jenniskens, P., Vaubaillon, J., 2010 (Astron. J. 139), and Kasuga, T., Balam, D.D., Wiegert, P.A., 2010 (Astron. J. 139).

  17. A Data-Driven Evolution Model for the Global Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X. S.; Jiang, C.; Xiang, C. Q.; Wu, S.

    2011-12-01

    In this work we have developed a new time-dependent global corona model for the study of dynamic evolution of the global corona that can respond continuously to the changing of the photospheric magnetogram. A surface flux transport (SFT) model is employed to produce the time-varying and self-consistent magnetogram with synoptic map as input. The global corona model is established with our newly-developed numerical code AMR-CESE-MHD on an overset grid of Yin-Yang overlapping structure. The SFT model and the three-dimensional global corona model is coupled through the boundary condition of projected-characteristic method. Numerical study of the coronal evolution from Carrington rotation 1913 to 1915 presents results comparable with multi-observed coronal images.

  18. A User Driven Dynamic Circuit Network Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Guok, Chin; Robertson, David; Chaniotakis, Evangelos; Thompson, Mary; Johnston, William; Tierney, Brian

    2008-10-01

    The requirements for network predictability are becoming increasingly critical to the DoE science community where resources are widely distributed and collaborations are world-wide. To accommodate these emerging requirements, the Energy Sciences Network has established a Science Data Network to provide user driven guaranteed bandwidth allocations. In this paper we outline the design, implementation, and secure coordinated use of such a network, as well as some lessons learned.

  19. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation andmore » dynamics in these systems.« less

  20. Dynamic phases, pinning, and pattern formation for driven dislocation assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Caizhi; Reichhardt, Charles; Olson Reichhardt, Cynthia J.; Beyerlein, Irene J.

    2015-01-23

    We examine driven dislocation assemblies and show that they can exhibit a set of dynamical phases remarkably similar to those of driven systems with quenched disorder such as vortices in superconductors, magnetic domain walls, and charge density wave materials. These phases include pinned-jammed, fluctuating, and dynamically ordered states, and each produces distinct dislocation patterns as well as specific features in the noise fluctuations and transport properties. Lastly, our work suggests that many of the results established for systems with quenched disorder undergoing plastic depinning transitions can be applied to dislocation systems, providing a new approach for understanding pattern formation and dynamics in these systems.

  1. Real-time evolution of strongly coupled fermions driven by dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, E.; Banerjee, D.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the real-time evolution of a strongly coupled system of lattice fermions whose dynamics is driven entirely by dissipative Lindblad processes, with linear or quadratic quantum jump operators. The fermion 2-point functions obey a closed set of differential equations, which can be solved with linear algebra methods. The staggered occupation order parameter of the t- V model decreases exponentially during the dissipative time evolution. The structure factor associated with the various Fourier modes shows the slowing down of low-momentum modes, which is due to particle number conservation. The processes with nearest-neighbor-dependent Lindblad operators have a decay rate that is proportional to the coordination number of the spatial lattice.

  2. Selection-driven evolution of emergent dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Shannon N; Holmes, Edward C; Chirivella, Maritza; Rodriguez, Dania M; Beltran, Manuela; Vorndam, Vance; Gubler, Duane J; McMillan, W Owen

    2003-10-01

    In the last four decades the incidence of dengue fever has increased 30-fold worldwide, and over half the world's population is now threatened with infection from one or more of four co-circulating viral serotypes (DEN-1 through DEN-4). To determine the role of viral molecular evolution in emergent disease dynamics, we sequenced 40% of the genome of 82 DEN-4 isolates collected from Puerto Rico over the 20 years since the onset of endemic dengue on the island. Isolates were derived from years with varying levels of DEN-4 prevalence. Over our sampling period there were marked evolutionary shifts in DEN-4 viral populations circulating in Puerto Rico; viral lineages were temporally clustered and the most common genotype at a particular sampling time often arose from a previously rare lineage. Expressed changes in structural genes did not appear to drive this lineage turnover, even though these regions include primary determinants of viral antigenic properties. Instead, recent dengue evolution can be attributed in part to positive selection on the nonstructural gene 2A (NS2A), whose functions may include replication efficiency and antigenicity. During the latest and most severe DEN-4 epidemic in Puerto Rico, in 1998, viruses were distinguished by three amino acid changes in NS2A that were fixed far faster than expected by drift alone. Our study therefore demonstrates viral genetic turnover within a focal population and the potential importance of adaptive evolution in viral epidemic expansion.

  3. Zonal flow driven by energetic particle during magneto-hydro-dynamic burst in a toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Minami, T.; Isobe, M.; Nishimura, S.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Takahashi, C.; Takeuchi, M.; Ito, T.; Watari, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.

    2007-11-01

    The internal structural measurements of electric field and density using twin heavy ion beam probes have been performed to elucidate the nonlinear evolution of the magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) bursty phenomenon driven by the interaction with high-energy particles in a toroidal plasma. The results have given the finest observation of the internal structure of plasma quantities, such as electric field, density and magnetic field distortion, which nonlinearly develop during the MHD phenomenon. In particular, the finding of a new kind of oscillating zonal flow driven by interaction between energetic particles and MHD modes should be emphasized for burning state plasmas.

  4. Evolution of Neogene Dynamic Topography in Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, J. D.; Roberts, G.; White, N. J.

    2012-12-01

    Madagascar is located on the fringes of the African superswell. Its position and the existence of a +30 mGal long wavelength free-air gravity anomaly suggest that its present-day topography is maintained by convective circulation of the sub-lithospheric mantle. Residual depth anomalies of oceanic crust encompassing the island imply that Madagascar straddles a dynamic topographic gradient. In June-July 2012, we examined geologic evidence for Neogene uplift around the Malagasy coastline. Uplifted coral reef deposits, fossil beach rock, and terraces demonstrate that the northern and southern coasts are probably being uplifted at a rate of ~0.2 mm/yr. Rates of uplift clearly vary around the coastline. Inland, extensive peneplains occur at elevations of 1 - 2 km. These peneplains are underlain by 10 - 20 m thick laterite deposits, and there is abundant evidence for rapid erosion (e.g. lavaka). Basaltic volcanism also occurred during Neogene times. These field observations can be combined with an analysis of drainage networks to determine the spatial and temporal pattern of convectively driven uplift. ~100 longitudinal river profiles were extracted from a digital elevation model of Madagascar. An inverse model is then used to minimize the misfit between observed and calculated river profiles as a function of uplift rate history. During inversion, the residual misfit decreases from ~20 to ~4. Our results suggest that youthful and rapid uplift of 1-2 km occurred at rates of 0.2-0.4 mm/yr during the last ˜15 Myr. The algorithm resolves distinct phases of uplift which generate localized swells of high topography and relief (e.g. the Hauts Plateaux). Our field observations and modeling indicate that the evolution of drainage networks may contain useful information about mantle convective processes.

  5. Three-dimensional evolution of magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities in a compressible magnetized jet

    SciTech Connect

    Bettarini, Lapo; Landi, Simone; Velli, Marco; Londrillo, Pasquale

    2009-06-15

    The problem of three-dimensional combined magnetic and velocity shear driven instabilities of a compressible magnetized jet modeled as a plane neutral/current double vortex sheet in the framework of the resistive magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. The resulting dynamics given by the stream+current sheet interaction is analyzed and the effects of a variable geometry of the basic fields are considered. Depending on the basic asymptotic magnetic field configuration, a selection rule of the linear instability modes can be obtained. Hence, the system follows a two-stage path developing either through a fully three-dimensional dynamics with a rapid evolution of kink modes leading to a final turbulent state, or rather through a driving two-dimensional instability pattern that develops on parallel planes on which a reconnection+coalescence process takes place.

  6. Spin dynamics in driven composite multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zidong; Grimson, Malcolm J.

    2015-09-01

    A spin dynamics approach has been used to study the behavior of the magnetic spins and the electric pseudo-spins in a 1-D composite multiferroic chain with a linear magneto-electric coupling at the interface. The response is investigated with either external magnetic or electric fields driving the system. The spin dynamics is based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. A Gaussian white noise is later added into the dynamic process to include the thermal effects. The interface requires a closer inspection of the magneto-electric effects. Thus, we construct a 2-D ladder model to describe the behavior of the magnetic spins and the electric pseudo-spins with different magneto-electric couplings.

  7. Spin dynamics in driven composite multiferroics

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zidong Grimson, Malcolm J.

    2015-09-28

    A spin dynamics approach has been used to study the behavior of the magnetic spins and the electric pseudo-spins in a 1-D composite multiferroic chain with a linear magneto-electric coupling at the interface. The response is investigated with either external magnetic or electric fields driving the system. The spin dynamics is based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. A Gaussian white noise is later added into the dynamic process to include the thermal effects. The interface requires a closer inspection of the magneto-electric effects. Thus, we construct a 2-D ladder model to describe the behavior of the magnetic spins and the electric pseudo-spins with different magneto-electric couplings.

  8. Vortex core-driven magnetization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Sug-Bong; Acremann, Yves; Scholl, Andreas; Bauer, Andreas; Doran, Andrew; Stohr, Joachim; Padmore, Howard A.

    2004-04-16

    Time-resolved x-ray imaging shows that the magnetization dynamics of a micron-size pattern containing a ferromagnetic vortex is determined by its handedness, or chirality. The out-of-plane magnetization in the nanometer-scale vortex core induces a 3-dimensional handedness in the planar magnetic structure, leading to a precessional motion of the core parallel to a sub-nanosecond field pulse. The core velocity is found to be an order of magnitude higher than expected from the static susceptibility. These results demonstrate that handedness, already well known to be important in biological systems, plays an important role in the dynamics of microscopic magnets.

  9. Vibrational- and Laser-Driven Electronic Dynamics in the Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolow, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Electronic dynamics within molecules can be driven by both motions of the atoms, via non-Born-Oppenheimer coupling, and by applied laser fields, driving electron motions on sub-cycle time scales. The challenging but most general case of Molecular Dynamics is where electronic and vibrational motions are fully coupled, the making and breaking of chemical bonds being the most prominent example. Time-Resolved Coincidence Imaging Spectroscopy (TRCIS) is a ultrafast photoelectron probe of Molecular Frame dynamics in polyatomic molecules. It makes use of full 3D recoil momentum vector determination of coincident photoions and photoelectrons as a function of time, permitting observations of coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics from the Molecular Frame rather than the Lab Frame point of view. Methods in non-resonant quantum control, based on the dynamic Stark effect, have also emerged as important tools for enhancing molecular dynamics studies. In particular, molecular alignment can fix the Molecular Frame within the Lab Frame, avoiding loss of information due to orientational averaging. Provided that the molecular dynamics are fast compared to rotational dephasing, this method also permits time-resolved Molecular Frame observations. As laser fields get stronger, a sub-cycle (attosecond) physics emerges, leading to new probes of driven multi-electron dynamics in polyatomic molecules. Understanding driven multi-electron responses will be central to advancing attosecond science towards polyatomic molecules and complex systems.

  10. Current-driven complex dynamics of single-layer epitaxial islands on substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2015-03-01

    We study theoretically the current-driven dynamics of isolated single-layer epitaxial islands on crystalline substrates, which provides important guidance toward surface nanopatterning approaches based on the current-driven assembly of such islands. We develop and validate a fully nonlinear model for the islands' driven morphological evolution on elastic substrates of face-centered cubic crystals in the regime where diffusional mass transport is limited to the island edge. For islands on <110>-, <100>-, and <111>-oriented substrate surfaces, we report a transition in the asymptotic states reached by such driven island dynamics from steady to oscillatory, mediated by Hopf bifurcation. We characterize the bifurcation and explore the dependence of the stable time-periodic state beyond the Hopf point on the misorientation angle between the applied electric field and fast edge diffusion directions, the strength of the edge diffusional anisotropy, and the island size. For islands larger than a critical size, depending on the orientation of the substrate surface, we observe fingering and necking instabilities in the island morphology. We carry out a comprehensive numerical simulation study and explore the complexity of the driven island dynamics with the variation of the problem parameters.

  11. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of tunnel junctions driven by alternating voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabert, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The theory of the dynamical Coulomb blockade is extended to tunneling elements driven by a time-dependent voltage. It is shown that, for standard setups where an external voltage is applied to a tunnel junction via an impedance, time-dependent driving entails an excitation of the modes of the electromagnetic environment by the applied voltage. Previous approaches for ac driven circuits need to be extended to account for the driven bath modes. A unitary transformation involving also the variables of the electromagnetic environment is introduced which allows us to split off the time dependence from the Hamiltonian in the absence of tunneling. This greatly simplifies perturbation-theoretical calculations based on treating the tunneling Hamiltonian as a perturbation. In particular, the average current flowing in the leads of the tunnel junction is studied. Explicit results are given for the case of an applied voltage with a constant dc part and a sinusoidal ac part. The connection with standard dynamical Coulomb blockade theory for constant applied voltage is established. It is shown that an alternating voltage source reveals significant additional effects caused by the electromagnetic environment. The hallmark of the dynamical Coulomb blockade in ac driven devices is a suppression of higher harmonics of the current by the electromagnetic environment. The theory presented basically applies to all tunneling devices driven by alternating voltages.

  12. Evolution of entanglement under echo dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, Tomaž; Seligman, Thomas H.; Žnidarič, Marko

    2003-04-01

    Echo dynamics and fidelity are often used to discuss stability in quantum-information processing and quantum chaos. Yet fidelity yields no information about entanglement, the characteristic property of quantum mechanics. We study the evolution of entanglement in echo dynamics. We find qualitatively different behavior between integrable and chaotic systems on one hand and between random and coherent initial states for integrable systems on the other. For the latter the evolution of entanglement is given by a classical time scale. Analytic results are illustrated numerically in a Jaynes-Cummings model.

  13. Lie transformation method on quantum state evolution of a general time-dependent driven and damped parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-10-01

    A variety of dynamics in nature and society can be approximately treated as a driven and damped parametric oscillator. An intensive investigation of this time-dependent model from an algebraic point of view provides a consistent method to resolve the classical dynamics and the quantum evolution in order to understand the time-dependent phenomena that occur not only in the macroscopic classical scale for the synchronized behaviors but also in the microscopic quantum scale for a coherent state evolution. By using a Floquet U-transformation on a general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian, we exactly solve the dynamic behaviors of a driven and damped parametric oscillator to obtain the optimal solutions by means of invariant parameters of Ks to combine with Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant method. This approach can discriminate the external dynamics from the internal evolution of a wave packet by producing independent parametric equations that dramatically facilitate the parametric control on the quantum state evolution in a dissipative system. In order to show the advantages of this method, several time-dependent models proposed in the quantum control field are analyzed in detail.

  14. Current-driven spin dynamics of artificially constructed quantum magnets.

    PubMed

    Khajetoorians, Alexander Ako; Baxevanis, Benjamin; Hübner, Christoph; Schlenk, Tobias; Krause, Stefan; Wehling, Tim Oliver; Lounis, Samir; Lichtenstein, Alexander; Pfannkuche, Daniela; Wiebe, Jens; Wiesendanger, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The future of nanoscale spin-based technologies hinges on a fundamental understanding and dynamic control of atomic-scale magnets. The role of the substrate conduction electrons on the dynamics of supported atomic magnets is still a question of interest lacking experimental insight. We characterized the temperature-dependent dynamical response of artificially constructed magnets, composed of a few exchange-coupled atomic spins adsorbed on a metallic substrate, to spin-polarized currents driven and read out by a magnetic scanning tunneling microscope tip. The dynamics, reflected by two-state spin noise, is quantified by a model that considers the interplay between quantum tunneling and sequential spin transitions driven by electron spin-flip processes and accounts for an observed spin-transfer torque effect.

  15. Dynamical transitions of a driven Ising interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Manish K.; Sengupta, Surajit

    2008-03-01

    We study the structure of an interface in a three-dimensional Ising system created by an external nonuniform field H(r,t) . H changes sign over a two-dimensional plane of arbitrary orientation. When the field is pulled with velocity ve , [i.e., H(r,t)=H(r-vet) ], the interface undergoes several dynamical transitions. For low velocities it is pinned by the field profile and moves along with it, the distribution of local slopes undergoing a series of commensurate-incommensurate transitions. For large ve the interface depins and grows with Kardar-Parisi-Zhang exponents.

  16. Chaotic and ballistic dynamics in time-driven quasiperiodic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of classical particles in a driven quasiperiodic lattice based on the Fibonacci sequence. An intricate transient dynamics of extraordinarily long ballistic flights at distinct velocities is found. We argue how these transients are caused and can be understood by a hierarchy of block decompositions of the quasiperiodic lattice. A comparison to the cases of periodic and fully randomized lattices is performed.

  17. Chaotic and ballistic dynamics in time-driven quasiperiodic lattices.

    PubMed

    Wulf, Thomas; Schmelcher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium dynamics of classical particles in a driven quasiperiodic lattice based on the Fibonacci sequence. An intricate transient dynamics of extraordinarily long ballistic flights at distinct velocities is found. We argue how these transients are caused and can be understood by a hierarchy of block decompositions of the quasiperiodic lattice. A comparison to the cases of periodic and fully randomized lattices is performed. PMID:27176301

  18. Dynamic quantum tunneling in mesoscopic driven Duffing oscillators.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lingzhen; Zheng, Zhigang; Li, Xin-Qi; Yan, Yijing

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the dynamic quantum tunneling between two attractors of a mesoscopic driven Duffing oscillator. We find that, in addition to inducing a remarkable quantum shift of the bifurcation point, the mesoscopic nature also results in a perfect linear scaling behavior for the tunneling rate with the driving distance to the shifted bifurcation point. PMID:21867149

  19. Nonlinear dynamics of three-magnon process driven by ferromagnetic resonance in yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, R. O.; Holanda, J.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.; Vilela-Leão, L. H.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.

    2015-05-11

    We report an investigation of the dynamics of the three-magnon splitting process associated with the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in films of the insulating ferrimagnet yttrium iron garnet (YIG). The experiments are performed with a 6 μm thick YIG film close to a microstrip line fed by a microwave generator operating in the 2–6 GHz range. The magnetization precession is driven by the microwave rf magnetic field perpendicular to the static magnetic field, and its dynamics is observed by monitoring the amplitude of the FMR absorption peak. The time evolution of the amplitude reveals that if the frequency is lowered below a critical value of 3.3 GHz, the FMR mode pumps two magnons with opposite wave vectors that react back on the FMR, resulting in a nonlinear dynamics of the magnetization. The results are explained by a model with coupled nonlinear equations describing the time evolution of the magnon modes.

  20. Nonlinear dynamics of three-magnon process driven by ferromagnetic resonance in yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, R. O.; Holanda, J.; Vilela-Leão, L. H.; Azevedo, A.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Rezende, S. M.

    2015-05-01

    We report an investigation of the dynamics of the three-magnon splitting process associated with the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in films of the insulating ferrimagnet yttrium iron garnet (YIG). The experiments are performed with a 6 μm thick YIG film close to a microstrip line fed by a microwave generator operating in the 2-6 GHz range. The magnetization precession is driven by the microwave rf magnetic field perpendicular to the static magnetic field, and its dynamics is observed by monitoring the amplitude of the FMR absorption peak. The time evolution of the amplitude reveals that if the frequency is lowered below a critical value of 3.3 GHz, the FMR mode pumps two magnons with opposite wave vectors that react back on the FMR, resulting in a nonlinear dynamics of the magnetization. The results are explained by a model with coupled nonlinear equations describing the time evolution of the magnon modes.

  1. Groundwater hydrochemistry evolution in cyclone driven hydrological regimes, NW Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypek, G.; Dogramaci, S.; Grierson, P.

    2013-12-01

    lake that existed in the past, as the dynamic fractionation from brine is much different compared to that in fresh and brackish waters. Therefore, deeper brine groundwater under the Marsh developed under a different climatic regime and that the current salt in the Marsh has accumulated over at least 40,000 years but could have been as long as 700,000 years [2]. Our combined chemical and stable isotope analyses confirm the general dominance of vertical over horizontal flow in the region and decoupling of processes that control water evolution from those that control salt evolution in groundwater. [1] Dogramaci S., Skrzypek G., Dodson W., Grierson P.F., 2012, Stable isotope and hydrochemical evolution of groundwater in the semi-arid Hamersley Basin of sub-tropical northwest Australia. Journal of Hydrology 475: 281-293. [2] Skrzypek G., Dogramaci S., Grierson P.F., 2013, Geochemical and hydrological processes controlling groundwater salinity of a large inland wetland of northwest Australia. Chemical Geology (in press).

  2. Feedback-Driven Dynamic Invariant Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Lingming; Yang, Guowei; Rungta, Neha S.; Person, Suzette; Khurshid, Sarfraz

    2014-01-01

    Program invariants can help software developers identify program properties that must be preserved as the software evolves, however, formulating correct invariants can be challenging. In this work, we introduce iDiscovery, a technique which leverages symbolic execution to improve the quality of dynamically discovered invariants computed by Daikon. Candidate invariants generated by Daikon are synthesized into assertions and instrumented onto the program. The instrumented code is executed symbolically to generate new test cases that are fed back to Daikon to help further re ne the set of candidate invariants. This feedback loop is executed until a x-point is reached. To mitigate the cost of symbolic execution, we present optimizations to prune the symbolic state space and to reduce the complexity of the generated path conditions. We also leverage recent advances in constraint solution reuse techniques to avoid computing results for the same constraints across iterations. Experimental results show that iDiscovery converges to a set of higher quality invariants compared to the initial set of candidate invariants in a small number of iterations.

  3. Coupling Dynamical And Collisional Evolution Of Dust In Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnoz, Sebastien

    2010-10-01

    Gaseous circumstellar disks are rich in dust and are thought to be both accretionaly and dynamically active. Unfortunately large bodies that could be embedded in these disks are still difficult to observe and their putative properties are indirectly inferred from the observable small dust content. It is why constraining the size distribution coupled with dust-dynamics is so critical. Unfortunately, coupling effects such as a realistic time-dependant dynamics, fragmentation and coagulation, has been recognized as numerically challenging and almost no attempt really succeeded with a generic approach. In these disks, the dust dynamics is driven by a variety of processes (gravity, gas drag, radiation pressure..) inducing a size-dependant dynamics, and, at the same time collisional evolution changes the local size distributions. These two effects are intimately coupled because the local dynamics and size-distribution determines the local collision rates, that, in-turn, determines the size-distribution and modifies the particle's dynamics. Here we report on a new algorithm that overcomes these difficulties by using a hybrid approach extending the work of Charnoz & Morbidelli (Icarus, 2004, 2007). We will briefly present the method and focus on gaseous protoplanetary disks either laminar or turbulent (the time dependant transport and dust evolution will be shown) . We will show how the taking into account of a 3D dynamics helps to determine disantengle the dust size-distribution in the disk's photosphere and in the midplane and thus may provide observational signatures of accretion. We will show how the coupling of turbulence with fragmentation may significantly affect the dust/ratio for the smallest bodies. Finally, we will show that an accurate description of the time dependant dynamics of larger dusts (those with Stokes numbers >= 1) may provide a possible path to the formation of bodies larger than the accretion barrier, through accretion in a transitory regime.

  4. Nonlinear Phase Dynamics in a Driven Bosonic Josephson Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Boukobza, Erez; Moore, Michael G.; Cohen, Doron; Vardi, Amichay

    2010-06-18

    We study the collective dynamics of a driven two-mode Bose-Hubbard model in the Josephson interaction regime. The classical phase space is mixed, with chaotic and regular components, which determine the dynamical nature of the fringe visibility. For a weak off-resonant drive, where the chaotic component is small, the many-body dynamics corresponds to that of a Kapitza pendulum, with the relative phase {phi} between the condensates playing the role of the pendulum angle. Using a master equation approach we show that the modulation of the intersite potential barrier stabilizes the {phi}={pi} 'inverted pendulum' coherent state, and protects the fringe visibility.

  5. Evolution of a Driven Quantum System Toward a Quasi-Thermal State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotso, Herbert; Mikelsons, Karlis; Freericks, James; Department of Physics, Georgetown Univeristy Team

    2013-05-01

    We study the relaxation of an interacting system driven out of equilibrium by a constant electric field using Non-Equilibrium Dynamical Mean Field Theory. We use on the one hand a DMFT method which solves the steady state problem directly in frequency space, and on the other hand, a DMFT method that follows the transient time evolution of the system on the Keldysh contour. The system is described by the Falicov Kimball model which we follow across the metal - insulator transition. We find that the retarded Green's function quickly approaches that of the steady state while the lesser Green's function and, as a result the distribution function, slowly approach that of a steady state with an increased temperature due to the additional energy transferred to the system by the electric field. Analyses of this type can help understand the results of some experiments involving ultracold atomic gases.

  6. Thermochemically Driven Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TDGF)

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Goodwin

    2008-12-31

    This report concerns efforts to increase oil well productivity and efficiency via a method of heating the oil-bearing rock of the well, a technique known as Thermochemical Gas-Dynamic Fracturing (TGDF). The technique uses either a chemical reaction or a combustion event to raise the temperature of the rock of the well, thereby increasing oil velocity, and oil pumping rate. Such technology has shown promise for future application to both older wellheads and also new sites. The need for such technologies in the oil extraction field, along with the merits of the TGDF technology is examined in Chapter 1. The theoretical basis underpinning applications of TGDF is explained in Chapter 2. It is shown that productivity of depleted well can be increased by one order of magnitude after heating a reservoir region of radius 15-20 m around the well by 100 degrees 1-2 times per year. Two variants of thermal stimulation are considered: uniform heating and optimal temperature distribution in the formation region around the perforation zone. It is demonstrated that the well productivity attained by using equal amounts of thermal energy is higher by a factor of 3 to 4 in the case of optimal temperature distribution as compared to uniform distribution. Following this theoretical basis, two practical approaches to applying TDGF are considered. Chapter 3 looks at the use of chemical intiators to raise the rock temperature in the well via an exothermic chemical reaction. The requirements for such a delivery device are discussed, and several novel fuel-oxidizing mixtures (FOM) are investigated in conditions simulating those at oil-extracting depths. Such FOM mixtures, particularly ones containing nitric acid and a chemical initiator, are shown to dramatically increase the temperature of the oil-bearing rock, and thus the productivity of the well. Such tests are substantiated by preliminary fieldwork in Russian oil fields. A second, more cost effective approach to TGDF is considered in

  7. Relaxation to equilibrium driven via indirect control in Markovian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Raffaele

    2007-11-15

    We prove that it is possible to modify the stationary states of a quantum dynamical semigroup, describing the irreversible evolution of a two-level system, by means of an auxiliary two-level system, a quantum probe that can be suitably prepared. The target system and the probe can be initially entangled or uncorrelated. We find that this indirect control of the stationary states is possible, even if there are no initial correlations, under suitable conditions on the dynamical parameters characterizing the evolution of the joint system.

  8. Quantum dynamics of light-driven chiral molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Yamaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Shin-ichiro; Hoki, Kunihito; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2009-03-21

    The results of theoretical studies on quantum dynamics of light-driven molecular motors with internal rotation are presented. Characteristic features of chiral motors driven by a non-helical, linearly polarized electric field of light are explained on the basis of symmetry argument. The rotational potential of the chiral motor is characterized by a ratchet form. The asymmetric potential determines the directional motion: the rotational direction is toward the gentle slope of the asymmetric potential. This direction is called the intuitive direction. To confirm the unidirectional rotational motion, results of quantum dynamical calculations of randomly-oriented molecular motors are presented. A theoretical design of the smallest light-driven molecular machine is presented. The smallest chiral molecular machine has an optically driven engine and a running propeller on its body. The mechanisms of transmission of driving forces from the engine to the propeller are elucidated by using a quantum dynamical treatment. The results provide a principle for control of optically-driven molecular bevel gears. Temperature effects are discussed using the density operator formalism. An effective method for ultrafast control of rotational motions in any desired direction is presented with the help of a quantum control theory. In this method, visible or UV light pulses are applied to drive the motor via an electronic excited state. A method for driving a large molecular motor consisting of an aromatic hydrocarbon is presented. The molecular motor is operated by interactions between the induced dipole of the molecular motor and the electric field of light pulses. PMID:19290336

  9. Shock dynamics of two-lane driven lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffmann, Christoph; Appert-Rolland, Cécile; Santen, Ludger

    2010-06-01

    Driven lattice gases such as those of the ASEP model are useful tools for the modelling of various stochastic transport processes carried out by self-driven particles, such as molecular motors or vehicles in road traffic. Often these processes take place in one-dimensional systems offering several tracks to the particles, and in many cases the particles are able to change track with a given rate. In this work we consider the case of strong coupling where the rate of hopping along the tracks and the exchange rates are of the same order, and show how a phenomenological approach based on a domain wall theory can be used to describe the dynamics of the system. In particular, the domain walls on the different tracks form pairs, whose dynamics dominate the behaviour of the system.

  10. THE DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF STELLAR BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Morscher, Meagan; Pattabiraman, Bharath; Rodriguez, Carl; Rasio, Frederic A.; Umbreit, Stefan

    2015-02-10

    Our current understanding of the stellar initial mass function and massive star evolution suggests that young globular clusters (GCs) may have formed hundreds to thousands of stellar-mass black holes (BHs), the remnants of stars with initial masses from ∼20-100 M {sub ☉}. Birth kicks from supernova explosions may eject some BHs from their birth clusters, but most should be retained. Using a Monte Carlo method we investigate the long-term dynamical evolution of GCs containing large numbers of stellar BHs. We describe numerical results for 42 models, covering a broad range of realistic initial conditions, including up to 1.6 × 10{sup 6} stars. In almost all models we find that significant numbers of BHs (up to ∼10{sup 3}) are retained all the way to the present. This is in contrast to previous theoretical expectations that most BHs should be ejected dynamically within a few gigayears The main reason for this difference is that core collapse driven by BHs (through the Spitzer {sup m}ass segregation instability{sup )} is easily reverted through three-body processes, and involves only a small number of the most massive BHs, while lower-mass BHs remain well-mixed with ordinary stars far from the central cusp. Thus the rapid segregation of stellar BHs does not lead to a long-term physical separation of most BHs into a dynamically decoupled inner core, as often assumed previously. Combined with the recent detections of several BH X-ray binary candidates in Galactic GCs, our results suggest that stellar BHs could still be present in large numbers in many GCs today, and that they may play a significant role in shaping the long-term dynamical evolution and the present-day dynamical structure of many clusters.

  11. Evolution and adaptation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms driven by mismatch repair system-deficient mutators.

    PubMed

    Luján, Adela M; Maciá, María D; Yang, Liang; Molin, Søren; Oliver, Antonio; Smania, Andrea M

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen causing chronic airway infections, especially in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The majority of the CF patients acquire P. aeruginosa during early childhood, and most of them develop chronic infections resulting in severe lung disease, which are rarely eradicated despite intensive antibiotic therapy. Current knowledge indicates that three major adaptive strategies, biofilm development, phenotypic diversification, and mutator phenotypes [driven by a defective mismatch repair system (MRS)], play important roles in P. aeruginosa chronic infections, but the relationship between these strategies is still poorly understood. We have used the flow-cell biofilm model system to investigate the impact of the mutS associated mutator phenotype on development, dynamics, diversification and adaptation of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Through competition experiments we demonstrate for the first time that P. aeruginosa MRS-deficient mutators had enhanced adaptability over wild-type strains when grown in structured biofilms but not as planktonic cells. This advantage was associated with enhanced micro-colony development and increased rates of phenotypic diversification, evidenced by biofilm architecture features and by a wider range and proportion of morphotypic colony variants, respectively. Additionally, morphotypic variants generated in mutator biofilms showed increased competitiveness, providing further evidence for mutator-driven adaptive evolution in the biofilm mode of growth. This work helps to understand the basis for the specific high proportion and role of mutators in chronic infections, where P. aeruginosa develops in biofilm communities.

  12. THE MORPHOLOGY AND DYNAMICS OF JET-DRIVEN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS: THE CASE OF W49B

    SciTech Connect

    González-Casanova, Diego F.; De Colle, Fabio; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-02-01

    The circumstellar medium (CSM) of a massive star is modified by its winds before a supernova (SN) explosion occurs, and thus the evolution of the resulting supernova remnant (SNR) is influenced by both the geometry of the explosion as well as the complex structure of the CSM. Motivated by recent work suggesting the SNR W49B was a jet-driven SN expanding in a complex CSM, we explore how the dynamics and the metal distributions in a jet-driven explosion are modified by the interaction with the surrounding environment. In particular, we perform hydrodynamical calculations to study the dynamics and explosive nucleosynthesis of a jet-driven SN triggered by the collapse of a 25 M {sub ☉} Wolf-Rayet star and its subsequent interaction with the CSM up to several hundred years following the explosion. We find that although the CSM has small-scale effects on the structure of the SNR, the overall morphology and abundance patterns are reflective of the initial asymmetry of the SN explosion. Thus, we predict that jet-driven SNRs, such as W49B, should be identifiable based on morphology and abundance patterns at ages up to several hundred years, even if they expand into a complex CSM environment.

  13. A data driven nonlinear stochastic model for blood glucose dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Holt, Tim A; Khovanova, Natalia

    2016-03-01

    The development of adequate mathematical models for blood glucose dynamics may improve early diagnosis and control of diabetes mellitus (DM). We have developed a stochastic nonlinear second order differential equation to describe the response of blood glucose concentration to food intake using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data. A variational Bayesian learning scheme was applied to define the number and values of the system's parameters by iterative optimisation of free energy. The model has the minimal order and number of parameters to successfully describe blood glucose dynamics in people with and without DM. The model accounts for the nonlinearity and stochasticity of the underlying glucose-insulin dynamic process. Being data-driven, it takes full advantage of available CGM data and, at the same time, reflects the intrinsic characteristics of the glucose-insulin system without detailed knowledge of the physiological mechanisms. We have shown that the dynamics of some postprandial blood glucose excursions can be described by a reduced (linear) model, previously seen in the literature. A comprehensive analysis demonstrates that deterministic system parameters belong to different ranges for diabetes and controls. Implications for clinical practice are discussed. This is the first study introducing a continuous data-driven nonlinear stochastic model capable of describing both DM and non-DM profiles.

  14. Extended event driven molecular dynamics for simulating dense granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, S.; Risso, D.; Soto, R.

    2009-12-01

    A new numerical method is presented to efficiently simulate the inelastic hard sphere (IHS) model for granular media, when fluid and frozen regions coexist in the presence of gravity. The IHS model is extended by allowing particles to change their dynamics into either a frozen state or back to the normal collisional state, while computing the dynamics only for the particles in the normal state. Careful criteria, local in time and space, are designed such that particles become frozen only at mechanically stable positions. The homogeneous deposition over a static surface and the dynamics of a rotating drum are studied as test cases. The simulations agree with previous experimental results. The model is much more efficient than the usual event driven method and allows to overcome some of the difficulties of the standard IHS model, such as the existence of a static limit.

  15. Upper-Mantle Flow Driven Dynamic Topography in Eastern Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengul Uluocak, Ebru; Pysklywec, Russell; Eken, Tuna; Hakan Gogus, Oguz

    2016-04-01

    Eastern Anatolia is characterized by 2 km plateau uplift -in the last 10 Myrs-, high surface heat flow distribution, shallow Curie-point depth, anomalous gravity field. Seismological observations indicate relatively high Pn and Sn attenuation and significant low seismic velocity anomalies in the region. Moreover, the surface geology is associated predominantly with volcanic rocks in which melt production through mantle upwelling (following lithospheric delamination) has been suggested. It has been long known that the topographic loading in the region cannot be supported by crustal thickness (~45 km) based on the principle of Airy isostasy. Recent global geodynamic studies carried out for evaluating the post-collisional processes imply that there is an explicit dynamic uplift in Eastern Anatolia and its adjacent regions. In this study we investigate the instantaneous dynamic topography driven by 3-D upper-mantle flow in Eastern Anatolia. For this purpose we conducted numerous thermo-mechanical models using a 2-D Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) finite element method. The available P-wave tomography data extracted along 10 profiles were used to obtain depth-dependent density anomalies in the region. We present resulting dynamic topography maps and estimated 3D mantle flow velocity vectors along these 2-D cross sections for each profile. The residual topography based on crustal thickness and observed topography was calculated and compared with other independent datasets concerning geological deformation and dynamic topography predictions. The results indicate an upper mantle driven dynamic uplift correlated with the under-compensated characteristic in Eastern Anatolia. We discuss our results combined with 3D mantle flow by considering seismic anisotropy studies in the region. Initial results indicate that high dynamic uplift and the localized low Pn velocities in concurrence with Pn anisotropy structures show nearly spatial coherence in Eastern Anatolia.

  16. Rotating-frame relaxation as a noise spectrum analyser of a superconducting qubit undergoing driven evolution.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Gustavsson, Simon; Bylander, Jonas; Jin, Xiaoyue; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Cory, David G; Nakamura, Yasunobu; Orlando, Terry P; Oliver, William D

    2013-01-01

    Gate operations in a quantum information processor are generally realized by tailoring specific periods of free and driven evolution of a quantum system. Unwanted environmental noise, which may in principle be distinct during these two periods, acts to decohere the system and increase the gate error rate. Although there has been significant progress characterizing noise processes during free evolution, the corresponding driven-evolution case is more challenging as the noise being probed is also extant during the characterization protocol. Here we demonstrate the noise spectroscopy (0.1-200 MHz) of a superconducting flux qubit during driven evolution by using a robust spin-locking pulse sequence to measure relaxation (T(1ρ)) in the rotating frame. In the case of flux noise, we resolve spectral features due to coherent fluctuators, and further identify a signature of the 1 MHz defect in a time-domain spin-echo experiment. The driven-evolution noise spectroscopy complements free-evolution methods, enabling the means to characterize and distinguish various noise processes relevant for universal quantum control. PMID:23945930

  17. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Cruchet, Steeve; Gustafson, Kyle; Benton, Richard; Floreano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs—locomotor bouts—matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior. PMID:26600381

  18. Early dynamical evolution of substructured stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Julien; Boily, Christian

    2015-08-01

    It is now widely accepted that stellar clusters form with a high level of substructure (Kuhn et al. 2014, Bate 2009), inherited from the molecular cloud and the star formation process. Evidence from observations and simulations also indicate the stars in such young clusters form a subvirial system (Kirk et al. 2007, Maschberger et al. 2010). The subsequent dynamical evolution can cause important mass loss, ejecting a large part of the birth population in the field. It can also imprint the stellar population and still be inferred from observations of evolved clusters. Nbody simulations allow a better understanding of these early twists and turns, given realistic initial conditions. Nowadays, substructured, clumpy young clusters are usually obtained through pseudo-fractal growth (Goodwin et al. 2004) and velocity inheritance. Such models are visually realistics and are very useful, they are however somewhat artificial in their velocity distribution. I introduce a new way to create clumpy initial conditions through a "Hubble expansion" which naturally produces self consistent clumps, velocity-wise. A velocity distribution analysis shows the new method produces realistic models, consistent with the dynamical state of the newly created cores in hydrodynamic simulation of cluster formation (Klessen & Burkert 2000). I use these initial conditions to investigate the dynamical evolution of young subvirial clusters, up to 80000 stars. I find an overall soft evolution, with hierarchical merging leading to a high level of mass segregation. I investigate the influence of the mass function on the fate of the cluster, specifically on the amount of mass loss induced by the early violent relaxation. Using a new binary detection algorithm, I also find a strong processing of the native binary population.

  19. On the classical dynamics of strongly driven anharmonic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, H. P.; Dietz, K.; Holthaus, M.

    1990-12-01

    We investigate the dynamics of periodically driven anharmonic oscillators. In particular, we consider values of the coupling strength which are orders of magnitude higher than those required for the overlap of primary resonances. We observe a division of phase space into a regular and a stochastic region. Both regions are separated by a sharp chaos border which sets an upper limit to the stochastic heating of particles; its dependence on the coupling strength is studied. We construct perpetual adiabatic invariants governing regular motion. A bifurcation mechanism leading to the annihilation of resonances is explained.

  20. Stochastic modeling indicates that aging and somatic evolution in the hematopoetic system are driven by non-cell-autonomous processes.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Andrii I; Salstrom, Jennifer L; DeGregori, James

    2014-12-01

    Age-dependent tissue decline and increased cancer incidence are widely accepted to be rate-limited by the accumulation of somatic mutations over time. Current models of carcinogenesis are dominated by the assumption that oncogenic mutations have defined advantageous fitness effects on recipient stem and progenitor cells, promoting and rate-limiting somatic evolution. However, this assumption is markedly discrepant with evolutionary theory, whereby fitness is a dynamic property of a phenotype imposed upon and widely modulated by environment. We computationally modeled dynamic microenvironment-dependent fitness alterations in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the Sprengel-Liebig system known to govern evolution at the population level. Our model for the first time integrates real data on age-dependent dynamics of HSC division rates, pool size, and accumulation of genetic changes and demonstrates that somatic evolution is not rate-limited by the occurrence of mutations, but instead results from aged microenvironment-driven alterations in the selective/fitness value of previously accumulated genetic changes. Our results are also consistent with evolutionary models of aging and thus oppose both somatic mutation-centric paradigms of carcinogenesis and tissue functional decline. In total, we demonstrate that aging directly promotes HSC fitness decline and somatic evolution via non-cell-autonomous mechanisms.

  1. Collisional and Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    2004-01-01

    Senior Scientst S. J. Weidenschilling presents his final administrative report in the research program entitled "Collisional and Dynamical Evolution of Planetary Systems," on which he was the Principal Investigator. This research program produced the following publications: 1) "Jumping Jupiters" in binary star systems. F. Marzari, S. J. Weidenschilling, M. Barbieri and V. Granata. Astrophys. J., in press, 2005; 2) Formation of the cores of the outer planets. To appear in "The Outer Planets" (R. Kallenbach, ED), ISSI Conference Proceedings (Space Sci. Rev.), in press, 2005; 3) Accretion dynamics and timescales: Relation to chondrites. S. J. Weidenschilling and J. Cuzzi. In Meteorites and the Early Solar System LI (D. Lauretta et al., Eds.), Univ. of Arizona Press, 2005; 4) Asteroidal heating and thermal stratification of the asteroid belt. A. Ghosh, S. J.Weidenschilling, H. Y. McSween, Jr. and A. Rubin. In Meteorites and the Early Solar System I1 (D. Lauretta et al., Eds.), Univ. of Arizona Press, 2005.

  2. A dynamic, climate-driven model of Rift Valley fever.

    PubMed

    Leedale, Joseph; Jones, Anne E; Caminade, Cyril; Morse, Andrew P

    2016-03-31

    Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in eastern Africa have previously occurred following specific rainfall dynamics and flooding events that appear to support the emergence of large numbers of mosquito vectors. As such, transmission of the virus is considered to be sensitive to environmental conditions and therefore changes in climate can impact the spatiotemporal dynamics of epizootic vulnerability. Epidemiological information describing the methods and parameters of RVF transmission and its dependence on climatic factors are used to develop a new spatio-temporal mathematical model that simulates these dynamics and can predict the impact of changes in climate. The Liverpool RVF (LRVF) model is a new dynamic, process-based model driven by climate data that provides a predictive output of geographical changes in RVF outbreak susceptibility as a result of the climate and local livestock immunity. This description of the multi-disciplinary process of model development is accessible to mathematicians, epidemiological modellers and climate scientists, uniting dynamic mathematical modelling, empirical parameterisation and state-of-the-art climate information.

  3. An opinion-driven behavioral dynamics model for addictive behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas W.; Finley, Patrick D.; Apelberg, Benjamin J.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Husten, Corinne; Glass, Robert J.

    2015-04-01

    We present a model of behavioral dynamics that combines a social network-based opinion dynamics model with behavioral mapping. The behavioral component is discrete and history-dependent to represent situations in which an individual's behavior is initially driven by opinion and later constrained by physiological or psychological conditions that serve to maintain the behavior. Individuals are modeled as nodes in a social network connected by directed edges. Parameter sweeps illustrate model behavior and the effects of individual parameters and parameter interactions on model results. Mapping a continuous opinion variable into a discrete behavioral space induces clustering on directed networks. Clusters provide targets of opportunity for influencing the network state; however, the smaller the network the greater the stochasticity and potential variability in outcomes. This has implications both for behaviors that are influenced by close relationships verses those influenced by societal norms and for the effectiveness of strategies for influencing those behaviors.

  4. An opinion-driven behavioral dynamics model for addictive behaviors

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Thomas W.; Finley, Patrick D.; Apelberg, Benjamin J.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Husten, Corinne; Glass, Robert J.

    2015-04-08

    We present a model of behavioral dynamics that combines a social network-based opinion dynamics model with behavioral mapping. The behavioral component is discrete and history-dependent to represent situations in which an individual’s behavior is initially driven by opinion and later constrained by physiological or psychological conditions that serve to maintain the behavior. Additionally, individuals are modeled as nodes in a social network connected by directed edges. Parameter sweeps illustrate model behavior and the effects of individual parameters and parameter interactions on model results. Mapping a continuous opinion variable into a discrete behavioral space induces clustering on directed networks. Clusters provide targets of opportunity for influencing the network state; however, the smaller the network the greater the stochasticity and potential variability in outcomes. Furthermore, this has implications both for behaviors that are influenced by close relationships verses those influenced by societal norms and for the effectiveness of strategies for influencing those behaviors.

  5. Spin motive force driven by skyrmion dynamics in magnetic nanodisks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yuhki; Ohe, Jun-ichiro

    2015-05-01

    The spin motive force driven by the dynamics of the skyrmion structure formed in a nanomagnetic disk is numerically investigated. Due to the existence of the magnetic structure along the disk edge, the collective mode of the magnetization is modified from that of the bulk skyrmion lattice obtained by using the periodic boundary condition. For a single-skyrmion disk, the dynamics of the skyrmion core and the edge magnetization induce the spin motive force, and a measurable AC voltage is obtained by two probes on the disk. For a multi-skyrmions disk, the phase-locked collective mode of skyrmions is found in the lowest resonant frequency where the amplitude of the AC voltage is enhanced by the cascade effect of the spin motive force. We also investigate the effect of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling on the spin motive force.

  6. THE MERGER-DRIVEN EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Robaina, Aday R.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Meisenheimer, Klaus; Bell, Eric F.; Somerville, Rachel S.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Wolf, Christian

    2010-08-10

    We explore the rate and impact of galaxy mergers on the massive galaxy population using the amplitude of the two-point correlation function on small scales for M {sub *} > 5 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} galaxies from the COSMOS and COMBO-17 surveys. Using a pair fraction derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as a low-redshift benchmark, the large survey area at intermediate redshifts allows us to determine the evolution of the close-pair fraction with unprecedented accuracy for a mass-selected sample: we find that the fraction of galaxies more massive than 5 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} in pairs separated by less than 30 kpc in three-dimensional space evolves as F(z) = (0.0130 {+-} 0.0019) x (1 + z){sup 1.21{+-}0.25} between z = 0 and z = 1.2. Assuming a merger timescale of 0.5 Gyr, the inferred merger rate is such that galaxies with mass in excess of 10{sup 11} M {sub sun} have undergone, on average, 0.5 (0.7) mergers involving progenitor galaxies both more massive than 5 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} since z = 0.6 (1.2). We also study the number density evolution of massive red sequence galaxies using published luminosity functions and constraints on the M/L {sub B} evolution from the fundamental plane. Moreover, we demonstrate that the measured merger rate of massive galaxies is sufficient to explain this observed number density evolution in massive red sequence galaxies since z = 1.

  7. Rapid biological speciation driven by tectonic evolution in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, Dave; Upton, Phaedra; Burridge, Christopher P.; Wallis, Graham P.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2016-02-01

    Collisions between tectonic plates lead to the rise of new mountain ranges that can separate biological populations and ultimately result in new species. However, the identification of links between tectonic mountain-building and biological speciation is confounded by environmental and ecological factors. Thus, there are surprisingly few well-documented examples of direct tectonic controls on terrestrial biological speciation. Here we present examples from New Zealand, where the rapid evolution of 18 species of freshwater fishes has resulted from parallel tectonic landscape evolution. We use numerical models to reconstruct changes in the deep crustal structure and surface drainage catchments of the southern island of New Zealand over the past 25 million years. We show that the island and mountain topography evolved in six principal tectonic zones, which have distinct drainage catchments that separated fish populations. We use new and existing phylogenetic analyses of freshwater fish populations, based on over 1,000 specimens from more than 400 localities, to show that fish genomes can retain evidence of this tectonic landscape development, with a clear correlation between geologic age and extent of DNA sequence divergence. We conclude that landscape evolution has controlled on-going biological diversification over the past 25 million years.

  8. Evolution of cooperation driven by social-welfare-based migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Ye, Hang; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Individuals' migration behavior may play a significant role in the evolution of cooperation. In reality, individuals' migration behavior may depend on their perceptions of social welfare. To study the relationship between social-welfare-based migration and the evolution of cooperation, we consider an evolutionary prisoner's dilemma game (PDG) in which an individual's migration depends on social welfare but not on the individual's own payoff. By introducing three important social welfare functions (SWFs) that are commonly studied in social science, we find that social-welfare-based migration can promote cooperation under a wide range of parameter values. In addition, these three SWFs have different effects on cooperation, especially through the different spatial patterns formed by migration. Because the relative efficiency of the three SWFs will change if the parameter values are changed, we cannot determine which SWF is optimal for supporting cooperation. We also show that memory capacity, which is needed to evaluate individual welfare, may affect cooperation levels in opposite directions under different SWFs. Our work should be helpful for understanding the evolution of human cooperation and bridging the chasm between studies of social preferences and studies of social cooperation.

  9. Probabilistic density function method for nonlinear dynamical systems driven by colored noise.

    PubMed

    Barajas-Solano, David A; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M

    2016-05-01

    We present a probability density function (PDF) method for a system of nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations driven by colored noise. The method provides an integrodifferential equation for the temporal evolution of the joint PDF of the system's state, which we close by means of a modified large-eddy-diffusivity (LED) closure. In contrast to the classical LED closure, the proposed closure accounts for advective transport of the PDF in the approximate temporal deconvolution of the integrodifferential equation. In addition, we introduce the generalized local linearization approximation for deriving a computable PDF equation in the form of a second-order partial differential equation. We demonstrate that the proposed closure and localization accurately describe the dynamics of the PDF in phase space for systems driven by noise with arbitrary autocorrelation time. We apply the proposed PDF method to analyze a set of Kramers equations driven by exponentially autocorrelated Gaussian colored noise to study nonlinear oscillators and the dynamics and stability of a power grid. Numerical experiments show the PDF method is accurate when the noise autocorrelation time is either much shorter or longer than the system's relaxation time, while the accuracy decreases as the ratio of the two timescales approaches unity. Similarly, the PDF method accuracy decreases with increasing standard deviation of the noise. PMID:27300844

  10. Probabilistic density function method for nonlinear dynamical systems driven by colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barajas-Solano, David A.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-05-01

    We present a probability density function (PDF) method for a system of nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations driven by colored noise. The method provides an integrodifferential equation for the temporal evolution of the joint PDF of the system's state, which we close by means of a modified large-eddy-diffusivity (LED) closure. In contrast to the classical LED closure, the proposed closure accounts for advective transport of the PDF in the approximate temporal deconvolution of the integrodifferential equation. In addition, we introduce the generalized local linearization approximation for deriving a computable PDF equation in the form of a second-order partial differential equation. We demonstrate that the proposed closure and localization accurately describe the dynamics of the PDF in phase space for systems driven by noise with arbitrary autocorrelation time. We apply the proposed PDF method to analyze a set of Kramers equations driven by exponentially autocorrelated Gaussian colored noise to study nonlinear oscillators and the dynamics and stability of a power grid. Numerical experiments show the PDF method is accurate when the noise autocorrelation time is either much shorter or longer than the system's relaxation time, while the accuracy decreases as the ratio of the two timescales approaches unity. Similarly, the PDF method accuracy decreases with increasing standard deviation of the noise.

  11. Dynamics of dental evolution in ornithopod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Strickson, Edward; Prieto-Márquez, Albert; Benton, Michael J.; Stubbs, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Ornithopods were key herbivorous dinosaurs in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems, with a variety of tooth morphologies. Several clades, especially the ‘duck-billed’ hadrosaurids, became hugely diverse and abundant almost worldwide. Yet their evolutionary dynamics have been disputed, particularly whether they diversified in response to events in plant evolution. Here we focus on their remarkable dietary adaptations, using tooth and jaw characters to examine changes in dental disparity and evolutionary rate. Ornithopods explored different areas of dental morphospace throughout their evolution, showing a long-term expansion. There were four major evolutionary rate increases, the first among basal iguanodontians in the Middle-Late Jurassic, and the three others among the Hadrosauridae, above and below the split of their two major clades, in the middle of the Late Cretaceous. These evolutionary bursts do not correspond to times of plant diversification, including the radiation of the flowering plants, and suggest that dental innovation rather than coevolution with major plant clades was a major driver in ornithopod evolution. PMID:27412496

  12. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  13. Dynamics of dental evolution in ornithopod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Strickson, Edward; Prieto-Márquez, Albert; Benton, Michael J; Stubbs, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Ornithopods were key herbivorous dinosaurs in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems, with a variety of tooth morphologies. Several clades, especially the 'duck-billed' hadrosaurids, became hugely diverse and abundant almost worldwide. Yet their evolutionary dynamics have been disputed, particularly whether they diversified in response to events in plant evolution. Here we focus on their remarkable dietary adaptations, using tooth and jaw characters to examine changes in dental disparity and evolutionary rate. Ornithopods explored different areas of dental morphospace throughout their evolution, showing a long-term expansion. There were four major evolutionary rate increases, the first among basal iguanodontians in the Middle-Late Jurassic, and the three others among the Hadrosauridae, above and below the split of their two major clades, in the middle of the Late Cretaceous. These evolutionary bursts do not correspond to times of plant diversification, including the radiation of the flowering plants, and suggest that dental innovation rather than coevolution with major plant clades was a major driver in ornithopod evolution. PMID:27412496

  14. Prevolutionary dynamics and the origin of evolution.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Martin A; Ohtsuki, Hisashi

    2008-09-30

    Life is that which replicates and evolves. The origin of life is also the origin of evolution. A fundamental question is when do chemical kinetics become evolutionary dynamics? Here, we formulate a general mathematical theory for the origin of evolution. All known life on earth is based on biological polymers, which act as information carriers and catalysts. Therefore, any theory for the origin of life must address the emergence of such a system. We describe prelife as an alphabet of active monomers that form random polymers. Prelife is a generative system that can produce information. Prevolutionary dynamics have selection and mutation, but no replication. Life marches in with the ability of replication: Polymers act as templates for their own reproduction. Prelife is a scaffold that builds life. Yet, there is competition between life and prelife. There is a phase transition: If the effective replication rate exceeds a critical value, then life outcompetes prelife. Replication is not a prerequisite for selection, but instead, there can be selection for replication. Mutation leads to an error threshold between life and prelife.

  15. The dynamics of radiation-driven, optically thick winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Rong-Feng; Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-06-01

    Recent observation of some luminous transient sources with low colour temperatures suggests that the emission is dominated by optically thick winds driven by super-Eddington accretion. We present a general analytical theory of the dynamics of radiation pressure-driven, optically thick winds. Unlike the classical adiabatic stellar wind solution whose dynamics are solely determined by the sonic radius, here the loss of the radiation pressure due to photon diffusion also plays an important role. We identify two high mass-loss rate regimes (dot{M} > L_Edd/c^2). In the large total luminosity regime, the solution resembles an adiabatic wind solution. Both the radiative luminosity, L, and the kinetic luminosity, Lk, are super-Eddington with L < Lk and L ∝ L_k^{1/3}. In the lower total luminosity regime, most of the energy is carried out by the radiation with Lk < L ≈ LEdd. In a third, low mass-loss regime (dot{M} < L_Edd/c^2), the wind becomes optically thin early on and, unless gas pressure is important at this stage, the solution is very different from the adiabatic one. The results are independent from the energy generation mechanism at the foot of the wind; therefore, they are applicable to a wide range of mass ejection systems, from black hole accretion, to planetary nebulae, and to classical novae.

  16. Numerical simulation of nonlinear dynamical systems driven by commutative noise

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F. Biscay, R.J.; Jimenez, J.C.; Cruz, H. de la

    2007-10-01

    The local linearization (LL) approach has become an effective technique for the numerical integration of ordinary, random and stochastic differential equations. One of the reasons for this success is that the LL method achieves a convenient trade-off between numerical stability and computational cost. Besides, the LL method reproduces well the dynamics of nonlinear equations for which other classical methods fail. However, in the stochastic case, most of the reported works has been focused in Stochastic Differential Equations (SDE) driven by additive noise. This limits the applicability of the LL method since there is a number of interesting dynamics observed in equations with multiplicative noise. On the other hand, recent results show that commutative noise SDEs can be transformed into a random differential equation (RDE) by means of a random diffeomorfism (conjugacy). This paper takes advantages of such conjugacy property and the LL approach for defining a LL scheme for SDEs driven by commutative noise. The performance of the proposed method is illustrated by means of numerical simulations.

  17. The evolution of instabilities during magnetically driven liner implosions.

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; McBride, Ryan D.; Herrmann, Mark C.; Sinars, Daniel Brian

    2010-11-01

    Numerical simulations [S.A. Slutz et al Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] indicate that fuel magnetization and preheat could enable cylindrical liner implosions to become an efficient means to generate fusion conditions. A series of simulations has been performed to study the stability of magnetically driven liner implosions. These simulations exhibit the initial growth and saturation of an electro-thermal instability. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability further amplifies the resultant density perturbations developing a spectrum of modes initially peaked at short wavelengths. With time the spectrum of modes evolves towards longer wavelengths developing an inverse cascade. The effects of mode coupling, the radial dependence of the magnetic pressure, and the initial surface roughness will be discussed.

  18. Protoplanetary Disk Heating and Evolution Driven by Spiral Density Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-11-01

    Scattered light imaging of protoplanetary disks often reveals prominent spiral arms, likely excited by massive planets or stellar companions. Assuming that these arms are density waves, evolving into spiral shocks, we assess their effect on the thermodynamics, accretion, and global evolution of the disk. We derive analytical expressions for the direct (irreversible) heating, angular momentum transport, and mass accretion rate induced by disk shocks of arbitrary amplitude. These processes are very sensitive to the shock strength. We show that waves of moderate strength (density jump at the shock ΔΣ/Σ ∼ 1) result in negligible disk heating (contributing at the ∼1% level to the energy budget) in passive, irradiated protoplanetary disks on ∼100 au scales, but become important within several au. However, shock heating is a significant (or even dominant) energy source in disks of cataclysmic variables, stellar X-ray binaries, and supermassive black hole binaries, heated mainly by viscous dissipation. Mass accretion induced by the spiral shocks is comparable to (or exceeds) the mass inflow due to viscous stresses. Protoplanetary disks featuring prominent global spirals must be evolving rapidly, in ≲0.5 Myr at ∼100 au. A direct upper limit on the evolution timescale can be established by measuring the gravitational torque due to the spiral arms from the imaging data. We find that, regardless of their origin, global spiral waves must be important agents of the protoplanetary disk evolution. They may serve as an effective mechanism of disk dispersal and could be related to the phenomenon of transitional disks.

  19. Dynamic x-ray imaging of laser-driven nanoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fennel, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    A major promise of current x-ray science at free electron lasers is the realization of unprecedented imaging capabilities for resolving the structure and ultrafast dynamics of matter with nanometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution or even below via single-shot x-ray diffraction. Laser-driven atomic clusters and nanoparticles provide an ideal platform for developing and demonstrating the required technology to extract the ultrafast transient spatiotemporal dynamics from the diffraction images. In this talk, the perspectives and challenges of dynamic x-ray imaging will be discussed using complete self-consistent microscopic electromagnetic simulations of IR pump x-ray probe imaging for the example of clusters. The results of the microscopic particle-in-cell simulations (MicPIC) enable the simulation-assisted reconstruction of corresponding experimental data. This capability is demonstrated by converting recently measured LCLS data into a ultrahigh resolution movie of laser-induced plasma expansion. Finally, routes towards reaching attosecond time resolution in the visualization of complex dynamical processes in matter by x-ray diffraction will be discussed.

  20. Data-driven approach to dynamic visual attention modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culibrk, Dubravko; Sladojevic, Srdjan; Riche, Nicolas; Mancas, Matei; Crnojevic, Vladimir

    2012-06-01

    Visual attention deployment mechanisms allow the Human Visual System to cope with an overwhelming amount of visual data by dedicating most of the processing power to objects of interest. The ability to automatically detect areas of the visual scene that will be attended to by humans is of interest for a large number of applications, from video coding, video quality assessment to scene understanding. Due to this fact, visual saliency (bottom-up attention) models have generated significant scientific interest in recent years. Most recent work in this area deals with dynamic models of attention that deal with moving stimuli (videos) instead of traditionally used still images. Visual saliency models are usually evaluated against ground-truth eye-tracking data collected from human subjects. However, there are precious few recently published approaches that try to learn saliency from eyetracking data and, to the best of our knowledge, no approaches that try to do so when dynamic saliency is concerned. The paper attempts to fill this gap and describes an approach to data-driven dynamic saliency model learning. A framework is proposed that enables the use of eye-tracking data to train an arbitrary machine learning algorithm, using arbitrary features derived from the scene. We evaluate the methodology using features from a state-of-the art dynamic saliency model and show how simple machine learning algorithms can be trained to distinguish between visually salient and non-salient parts of the scene.

  1. Nonconservative current-driven dynamics: beyond the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Tchavdar N; Dundas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Long metallic nanowires combine crucial factors for nonconservative current-driven atomic motion. These systems have degenerate vibrational frequencies, clustered about a Kohn anomaly in the dispersion relation, that can couple under current to form nonequilibrium modes of motion growing exponentially in time. Such motion is made possible by nonconservative current-induced forces on atoms, and we refer to it generically as the waterwheel effect. Here the connection between the waterwheel effect and the stimulated directional emission of phonons propagating along the electron flow is discussed in an intuitive manner. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics show that waterwheel modes self-regulate by reducing the current and by populating modes in nearby frequency, leading to a dynamical steady state in which nonconservative forces are counter-balanced by the electronic friction. The waterwheel effect can be described by an appropriate effective nonequilibrium dynamical response matrix. We show that the current-induced parts of this matrix in metallic systems are long-ranged, especially at low bias. This nonlocality is essential for the characterisation of nonconservative atomic dynamics under current beyond the nanoscale. PMID:26665086

  2. The Dynamical Evolution of a Tubular Leonid Persistent Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Nugent, David; Plane, John M. C.

    The dynamical evolution of the persistent train of a bright Leonid meteor was examined for evidence of the source of the luminosity and the physical conditions in the meteor path. The train consisted of two parallel somewhat diffuse luminous tracks, interpreted as the walls of a tube. A general lack of wind shear along the trail allowed these structures to remain intact for nearly 200 s, from which it was possible to determine that the tubular structure expanded at a near constant 10.5 ms^-1, independent of altitude between 86 and 97 km. An initial fast decrease of train intensity below 90 km was followed by an increase in intensity and then a gradual decrease at longer times, whereas at high altitudes the integrated intensity was nearly constant with time. These results are compared to a model that describes the dynamical evolution of the train by diffusion, following an initial rapid expansion of the hot gaseous trail behind the meteoroid. The train luminosity is produced by O (^1S) emission at 557 nm, driven by elevated atomic O levels produced by the meteor impact, as well as chemiluminescent reactions of the ablated metals Na and Fe with O_3. Ozone is rapidly removed within the train, both by thermal decomposition and catalytic destruction by the metallic species. Hence, the brightest emission occurs at the edge of the train between outwardly diffusing metallic species and inwardly diffusing O_3. Although the model is able to account plausibly for a number of characteristic features of the train evolution, significant discrepancies remain that cannot casily be resolved.

  3. The Dynamical Evolution of A Tubular Leonid Persistent Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Nugent, David; Plane, John M. C.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the persistent train of a bright Leonid meteor was examined for evidence of the source of the luminosity and the physical conditions in the meteor path. The train consisted of two parallel somewhat diffuse luminous tracks, interpreted as the walls of a tube. A general lack of wind shear along the trail allowed these structures to remain intact for nearly 200 s, from which it was possible to determine that the tubular structure expanded at a near constant 10.5 m/s, independent of altitude between 86 and 97 km. An initial fast decrease of train intensity below 90 km was followed by an increase in intensity and then a gradual decrease at longer times, whereas at high attitudes the integrated intensity was nearly constant with time. These results are compared to a model that describes the dynamical evolution of the train by diffusion, following an initial rapid expansion of the hot gaseous trail behind the meteoroid. The train luminosity is produced by O ((sup 1)S) emission at 557 nm, driven by elevated atomic O levels produced by the meteor impact, as well as chemiluminescent reactions of the ablated metals Na and Fe with O3. Ozone is rapidly removed within the train, both by thermal decomposition and catalytic destruction by the metallic species. Hence, the brightest emission occurs at the edge of the train between outwardly diffusing metallic species and inwardly diffusing O3. Although the model is able to account plausibly for a number of characteristic features of the train evolution, significant discrepancies remain that cannot easily be resolved.

  4. Evolution of Neogene Dynamic Topography in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jonathan; Roberts, Gareth; White, Nicky

    2013-04-01

    The characteristic basins and swells of Africa's surface topography probably reflect patterns of convective circulation in the sub-lithospheric mantle. We have interrogated drainage networks to determine the spatial and temporal pattern of convectively driven uplift. ~560 longitudinal river profiles were extracted from a digital elevation model of Africa. An inverse model is then used to minimise the misfit between observed and calculated river profiles as a function of uplift rate history. During inversion, the residual misfit decreases from ~22 to ~5. Our results suggest that Africa's topography began to grow most rapidly after ~30 Ma at peak uplift rates of 0.1-0.15 mm/yr. The algorithm resolves distinct phases of uplift which generate localized swells of high topography and relief (e.g. the Angolan Dome). Uplift rate histories are shown to vary significantly from swell to swell. The calculated magnitudes, timing, and location of uplift agree well with local independent geological constraints, such as intense volcanism at Hoggar (42-39 Ma) and Afar (31-29 Ma), uplifted marine terraces, and warped peneplains. We have also calculated solid sediment flux histories for major African deltas which have persisted through time. This onshore record provides an important indirect constraint on the history of vertical motions at the surface, and agrees well with the offshore flux record, obtained from mapping isopachs of deltaic sediments. Our modelling and reconstructed sedimentary flux histories indicate that the evolution of drainage networks may contain useful information about mantle convective processes.

  5. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  6. ORBITAL AND MASS RATIO EVOLUTION OF PROTOBINARIES DRIVEN BY MAGNETIC BRAKING

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Bo; Li, Zhi-Yun

    2013-01-20

    The majority of stars reside in multiple systems, especially binaries. The formation and early evolution of binaries is a longstanding problem in star formation that is not yet fully understood. In particular, how the magnetic field observed in star-forming cores shapes the binary characteristics remains relatively unexplored. We demonstrate numerically, using an MHD version of the ENZO AMR hydro code, that a magnetic field of the observed strength can drastically change two of the basic quantities that characterize a binary system: the orbital separation and mass ratio of the two components. Our calculations focus on the protostellar mass accretion phase, after a pair of stellar 'seeds' have already formed. We find that in dense cores magnetized to a realistic level, the angular momentum of the material accreted by the protobinary is greatly reduced by magnetic braking. Accretion of strongly braked material shrinks the protobinary separation by a large factor compared to the non-magnetic case. The magnetic braking also changes the evolution of the mass ratio of unequal-mass protobinaries by producing material of low specific angular momentum that accretes preferentially onto the more massive primary star rather than the secondary. This is in contrast with the preferential mass accretion onto the secondary previously found numerically for protobinaries accreting from an unmagnetized envelope, which tends to drive the mass ratio toward unity. In addition, the magnetic field greatly modifies the morphology and dynamics of the protobinary accretion flow. It suppresses the traditional circumstellar and circumbinary disks that feed the protobinary in the non-magnetic case; the binary is fed instead by a fast collapsing pseudodisk whose rotation is strongly braked. The magnetic braking-driven inward migration of binaries from their birth locations may be constrained by high-resolution observations of the orbital distribution of deeply embedded protobinaries, especially

  7. Classical and quantum dynamics of the impulsively driven hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Melles, M.; Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. |

    1992-12-01

    We investigate the classical and quantum dynamics of the hydrogen atom in a Rydberg state subject to a sequence of periodic and random pulses. One goal of this study is to test the validity of classical electron transport theories. We analyze the critical momentum transfer for which 10% of the Rydberg atoms are ionized after a large number of pulses as a function of the frequency of the perturbation. The quantum mechanical results for a periodic sequence of pulses exhibit clear structures which are not present in a classical simulation. These structures are shown to vanish for the case of stochastic pulses for which agreement is obtained between the classical and quantum mechanical results. The dynamics of the quantum mechanical periodic system is analyzed in terms of quasi-eigenstates of the period-one time evolution operator.

  8. Classical and quantum dynamics of the impulsively driven hydrogen atom

    SciTech Connect

    Melles, M.; Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the classical and quantum dynamics of the hydrogen atom in a Rydberg state subject to a sequence of periodic and random pulses. One goal of this study is to test the validity of classical electron transport theories. We analyze the critical momentum transfer for which 10% of the Rydberg atoms are ionized after a large number of pulses as a function of the frequency of the perturbation. The quantum mechanical results for a periodic sequence of pulses exhibit clear structures which are not present in a classical simulation. These structures are shown to vanish for the case of stochastic pulses for which agreement is obtained between the classical and quantum mechanical results. The dynamics of the quantum mechanical periodic system is analyzed in terms of quasi-eigenstates of the period-one time evolution operator.

  9. Describing Story Evolution from Dynamic Information Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Stuart J.; Butner, R. Scott; Cowley, Wendy E.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Walker, Julia

    2009-10-12

    Sources of streaming information, such as news syndicates, publish information continuously. Information portals and news aggregators list the latest information from around the world enabling information consumers to easily identify events in the past 24 hours. The volume and velocity of these streams causes information from prior days’ to quickly vanish despite its utility in providing an informative context for interpreting new information. Few capabilities exist to support an individual attempting to identify or understand trends and changes from streaming information over time. The burden of retaining prior information and integrating with the new is left to the skills, determination, and discipline of each individual. In this paper we present a visual analytics system for linking essential content from information streams over time into dynamic stories that develop and change over multiple days. We describe particular challenges to the analysis of streaming information and explore visual representations for showing story change and evolution over time.

  10. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Evolution in Ablatively Driven Cylindrical Implosions^*,**

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsing, W. W.

    1996-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is an important limitation in ICF capsule designs. Significant work both theoretically and experimentally has been done to demonstrate the stabilizing effects due to material flow through the unstable region. The experimental verification has been done predominantly in planar geometry. Convergent geometry introduces effects not present in planar geometry such as shell thickening and accelerationless growth of modal amplitudes (e.g. Bell-Plesset growth). Amplitude thresholds for the nonlinear regime are reduced, since the wavelength of a mode m decreases with convergence λ ~ r/m, where r is the radius. We have investigated convergent effects using an imploding cylinder driven by x-ray ablation on the NOVA laser. By doping sections of the cylinder with high-Z materials, in conjunction with x-ray backlighting, we have measured the growth and feedthrough of the perturbations from the ablation front to the inner surface of the cylinder for various initial modes and amplitudes from early time through stagnation. Mode coupling of illumination asymmetries with material perturbations is observed, as well as phase reversal of the perturbations from near the ablation front to the inner surface of the cylinder. Imaging is performed with an x-ray pinhole camera coupled to a gated microchannel plate detector. In collaboration with C. W. Barnes, J. B. Beck, N. Hoffman (LANL), D. Galmiche, A. Richard (CEA/L-V), J. Edwards, P. Graham, B. Thomas (AWE). ^**This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36.

  11. Dynamic landscapes in human evolution and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devès, Maud; King, Geoffrey; Bailey, Geoffrey; Inglis, Robyn; Williams, Matthew; Winder, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    Archaeological studies of human settlement in its wider landscape setting usually focus on climate change as the principal environmental driver of change in the physical features of the landscape, even on the long time scales of early human evolution. We emphasize that landscapes evolve dynamically due to an interplay of processes occurring over different timescales. Tectonic deformation, volcanism, sea level changes, by acting on the topography, the lithology and on the patterns of erosion-deposition in a given area, can moderate or amplify the influence of climate at the regional and local scale. These processes impose or alleviate physical barriers to movement, and modify the distribution and accessibility of plant and animal resources in ways critical to human ecological and evolutionary success (King and Bailey, JHE 2006; Bailey and King, Antiquity 2011, Winder et al. Antiquity in press). The DISPERSE project, an ERC-funded collaboration between the University of York and the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, aims to develop systematic methods for reconstructing landscapes associated with active tectonics, volcanism and sea level change at a variety of scales in order to study their potential impact on patterns of human evolution and dispersal. Examples are shown to illustrate the ways in which changes of significance to human settlement can occur at a range of geographical scales and on time scales that range from lifetimes to tens of millennia, creating and sustaining attractive conditions for human settlement and exercising powerful selective pressures on human development.

  12. Dynamic and data-driven classification for polarimetric SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlmann, S.; Kiranyaz, S.; Ince, T.; Gabbouj, M.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we introduce dynamic and scalable Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) terrain classification based on the Collective Network of Binary Classifiers (CNBC). The CNBC framework is primarily adapted to maximize the SAR classification accuracy on dynamically varying databases where variations do occur in any time in terms of (new) images, classes, features and users' relevance feedback. Whenever a "change" occurs, the CNBC dynamically and "optimally" adapts itself to the change by means of its topology and the underlying evolutionary method MD PSO. Thanks to its "Divide and Conquer" type approach, the CNBC can also support varying and large set of (PolSAR) features among which it optimally selects, weighs and fuses the most discriminative ones for a particular class. Each SAR terrain class is discriminated by a dedicated Network of Binary Classifiers (NBC), which encapsulates a set of evolutionary Binary Classifiers (BCs) discriminating the class with a distinctive feature set. Moreover, with each incremental evolution session, new classes/features can be introduced which signals the CNBC to create new corresponding NBCs and BCs within to adapt and scale dynamically to the change. This can in turn be a significant advantage when the current CNBC is used to classify multiple SAR images with similar terrain classes since no or only minimal (incremental) evolution sessions are needed to adapt it to a new classification problem while using the previously acquired knowledge. We demonstrate our proposed classification approach over several medium and highresolution NASA/JPL AIRSAR images applying various polarimetric decompositions. We evaluate and compare the computational complexity and classification accuracy against static Neural Network classifiers. As CNBC classification accuracy can compete and even surpass them, the computational complexity of CNBC is significantly lower as the CNBC body supports high parallelization making it applicable to grid

  13. Predicting when climate-driven phenotypic change affects population dynamics.

    PubMed

    McLean, Nina; Lawson, Callum R; Leech, Dave I; van de Pol, Martijn

    2016-06-01

    Species' responses to climate change are variable and diverse, yet our understanding of how different responses (e.g. physiological, behavioural, demographic) relate and how they affect the parameters most relevant for conservation (e.g. population persistence) is lacking. Despite this, studies that observe changes in one type of response typically assume that effects on population dynamics will occur, perhaps fallaciously. We use a hierarchical framework to explain and test when impacts of climate on traits (e.g. phenology) affect demographic rates (e.g. reproduction) and in turn population dynamics. Using this conceptual framework, we distinguish four mechanisms that can prevent lower-level responses from impacting population dynamics. Testable hypotheses were identified from the literature that suggest life-history and ecological characteristics which could predict when these mechanisms are likely to be important. A quantitative example on birds illustrates how, even with limited data and without fully-parameterized population models, new insights can be gained; differences among species in the impacts of climate-driven phenological changes on population growth were not explained by the number of broods or density dependence. Our approach helps to predict the types of species in which climate sensitivities of phenotypic traits have strong demographic and population consequences, which is crucial for conservation prioritization of data-deficient species.

  14. Cellular automata and complex dynamics of driven elastic media

    SciTech Connect

    Coppersmith, S.N.; Littlewodd, P.B.; Sibani, P.

    1995-12-01

    Several systems of importance in condensed matter physics can be modelled as an elastic medium in a disordered environment and driven by an external force. In the simplest cases, the equation of motion involves competition between a local non-linear potential (fluctuating in space) and elastic coupling, as well as relaxational (inertialess) dynamics. Despite a simple mathematical description, the interactions between many degrees of freedom lead to the emergence of time and length scales much longer than those set by the microscopic dynamics. Extensive computations have improved the understanding of the behavior of such models, but full solutions of the equations of motion for very large systems are time-consuming and may obscure important physical principles in a massive volume of output. The development of cellular automata models has been crucial, both in conceptual simplification and in allowing the collection of data on many replicas of very large systems. We will discuss how the marriage of cellular automata models and parallel computation on a MasPar MP-1216 computer has helped to elucidate the dynamical properties of these many-degree-of-freedom systems.

  15. Predicting when climate-driven phenotypic change affects population dynamics.

    PubMed

    McLean, Nina; Lawson, Callum R; Leech, Dave I; van de Pol, Martijn

    2016-06-01

    Species' responses to climate change are variable and diverse, yet our understanding of how different responses (e.g. physiological, behavioural, demographic) relate and how they affect the parameters most relevant for conservation (e.g. population persistence) is lacking. Despite this, studies that observe changes in one type of response typically assume that effects on population dynamics will occur, perhaps fallaciously. We use a hierarchical framework to explain and test when impacts of climate on traits (e.g. phenology) affect demographic rates (e.g. reproduction) and in turn population dynamics. Using this conceptual framework, we distinguish four mechanisms that can prevent lower-level responses from impacting population dynamics. Testable hypotheses were identified from the literature that suggest life-history and ecological characteristics which could predict when these mechanisms are likely to be important. A quantitative example on birds illustrates how, even with limited data and without fully-parameterized population models, new insights can be gained; differences among species in the impacts of climate-driven phenological changes on population growth were not explained by the number of broods or density dependence. Our approach helps to predict the types of species in which climate sensitivities of phenotypic traits have strong demographic and population consequences, which is crucial for conservation prioritization of data-deficient species. PMID:27062059

  16. Tertiary endosymbiosis driven genome evolution in dinoflagellate algae.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hwan Su; Hackett, Jeremiah D; Van Dolah, Frances M; Nosenko, Tetyana; Lidie, Kristy L; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2005-05-01

    Dinoflagellates are important aquatic primary producers and cause "red tides." The most widespread plastid (photosynthetic organelle) in these algae contains the unique accessory pigment peridinin. This plastid putatively originated via a red algal secondary endosymbiosis and has some remarkable features, the most notable being a genome that is reduced to 1-3 gene minicircles with about 14 genes (out of an original 130-200) remaining in the organelle and a nuclear-encoded proteobacterial Form II Rubisco. The "missing" plastid genes are relocated to the nucleus via a massive transfer unequaled in other photosynthetic eukaryotes. The fate of these characters is unknown in a number of dinoflagellates that have replaced the peridinin plastid through tertiary endosymbiosis. We addressed this issue in the fucoxanthin dinoflagellates (e.g., Karenia brevis) that contain a captured haptophyte plastid. Our multiprotein phylogenetic analyses provide robust support for the haptophyte plastid replacement and are consistent with a red algal origin of the chromalveolate plastid. We then generated an expressed sequence tag (EST) database of 5,138 unique genes from K. brevis and searched for nuclear genes of plastid function. The EST data indicate the loss of the ancestral peridinin plastid characters in K. brevis including the transferred plastid genes and Form II Rubisco. These results underline the remarkable ability of dinoflagellates to remodel their genomes through endosymbiosis and the considerable impact of this process on cell evolution.

  17. Dynamical evolution of the Oort cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    New studies of the dynamical evolution of cometary orbits in the Oort cloud are made using a revised version of Weissman's (1982) Monte Carlo simulation model, which more accurately mimics the perturbation of comets by the giant planets. It is shown that perturbations by Saturn and Jupiter provide a substantial barrier to the diffusion of cometary perihelia into the inner solar system. Perturbations by Uranus and Neptune are rarely great enough to remove comets from the Oort cloud, but do serve to scatter the comets in the cloud in initial energy. The new model gives a population of 1.8 to 2.1 x 10 to the 12th comets for the present-day Oort cloud, and a mass of 7 to 8 earth masses. Perturbation of the Oort cloud by giant molecular clouds in the galaxy is discussed, as is evidence for a massive 'inner Oort cloud' internal to the observed one. The possibility of an unseen solar companion orbiting in the Oort cloud and causing periodic comet showers is shown to be dynamically plausible but unlikely, based on the observed cratering rate on the earth and moon.

  18. DYNAMICS OF ASTROPHYSICAL BUBBLES AND BUBBLE-DRIVEN SHOCKS: BASIC THEORY, ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS, AND OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-05-10

    Bubbles in the interstellar medium are produced by astrophysical sources, which continuously or explosively deposit large amounts of energy into the ambient medium. These expanding bubbles can drive shocks in front of them, the dynamics of which is markedly different from the widely used Sedov-von Neumann-Taylor blast wave solution. Here, we present the theory of a bubble-driven shock and show how its properties and evolution are determined by the temporal history of the source energy output, generally referred to as the source luminosity law, L(t). In particular, we find the analytical solutions for a driven shock in two cases: the self-similar scaling law, L{proportional_to}(t/t{sub s} ) {sup p} (with p and t{sub s} being constants) and the finite activity time case, L{proportional_to}(1 - t/t{sub s} ){sup -p}. The latter with p > 0 describes a finite-time-singular behavior, which is relevant to a wide variety of systems with explosive-type energy release. For both luminosity laws, we derived the conditions needed for the driven shock to exist and predict the shock observational signatures. Our results can be relevant to stellar systems with strong winds, merging neutron star/magnetar/black hole systems, and massive stars evolving to supernovae explosions.

  19. Geometric phase of a qubit driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Berrada, K.

    2014-01-15

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to the environmental effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we study quantitatively the GP of a two-level atom system driven by a phase noise laser under non-Markovian dynamics in terms of different parameters involved in the whole system. We find that with the change of the damping coupling, the GP is very sensitive to its properties exhibiting long collapse and revival phenomena, which play a significant role in enhancing the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Moreover, we show that the GP can be considered as a tool for testing and characterizing the nature of the qubit–environment coupling. Due to the significance of how a system is quantum correlated with its environment in the construction of a scalable quantum computer, the entanglement dynamics between the qubit with its environment under external classical noise is evaluated and investigated during the time evolution. -- Highlights: •Geometric phase under noise phase laser. •Dynamics of the geometric phase under non-Markovian dynamics in the presence of classical noise. •Solution of master equation of the system in terms atomic inversion. •Nonlocal correlation between the system and its environment under non-Markovianity.

  20. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Melissa R; Fernandez, Steven J; Fu, Joshua S; Walker, Kimberly A

    2014-01-01

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  1. When Should Harvest Evolution Matter to Population Dynamics?

    PubMed

    Nusslé, Sébastien; Hendry, Andrew P; Carlson, Stephanie M

    2016-07-01

    The potential for evolution to influence fishery sustainability remains a controversial topic. We highlight new modeling research from Dunlop et al. that explores when and how fisheries-induced evolution matters for population dynamics, while also emphasizing transient dynamics in population growth and life history-dependent responses that influence population stability and resiliency. PMID:27095380

  2. Inertia, diffusion, and dynamics of a driven skyrmion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Christoph; Iwasaki, Junichi; Rosch, Achim; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    Skyrmions recently discovered in chiral magnets are a promising candidate for magnetic storage devices because of their topological stability, small size (˜3 -100 nm), and ultralow threshold current density (˜106 A/m 2) to drive their motion. However, the time-dependent dynamics has hitherto been largely unexplored. Here, we show, by combining the numerical solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation and the analysis of a generalized Thiele's equation, that inertial effects are almost completely absent in skyrmion dynamics driven by a time-dependent current. In contrast, the response to time-dependent magnetic forces and thermal fluctuations depends strongly on frequency and is described by a large effective mass and a (anti-) damping depending on the acceleration of the skyrmion. Thermal diffusion is strongly suppressed by the cyclotron motion and is proportional to the Gilbert damping coefficient α . This indicates that the skyrmion position is stable, and its motion responds to the time-dependent current without delay or retardation even if it is fast. These findings demonstrate the advantages of skyrmions as information carriers.

  3. An opinion-driven behavioral dynamics model for addictive behaviors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moore, Thomas W.; Finley, Patrick D.; Apelberg, Benjamin J.; Ambrose, Bridget K.; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Brown, Theresa J.; Husten, Corinne; Glass, Robert J.

    2015-04-08

    We present a model of behavioral dynamics that combines a social network-based opinion dynamics model with behavioral mapping. The behavioral component is discrete and history-dependent to represent situations in which an individual’s behavior is initially driven by opinion and later constrained by physiological or psychological conditions that serve to maintain the behavior. Additionally, individuals are modeled as nodes in a social network connected by directed edges. Parameter sweeps illustrate model behavior and the effects of individual parameters and parameter interactions on model results. Mapping a continuous opinion variable into a discrete behavioral space induces clustering on directed networks. Clusters providemore » targets of opportunity for influencing the network state; however, the smaller the network the greater the stochasticity and potential variability in outcomes. Furthermore, this has implications both for behaviors that are influenced by close relationships verses those influenced by societal norms and for the effectiveness of strategies for influencing those behaviors.« less

  4. Dynamics and predictability of a low-order wind-driven ocean - atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a low order coupled wind-driven Ocean-Atmosphere (OA) system is investigated with emphasis on its predictability properties. The low-order coupled deterministic system is composed of a baroclinic atmosphere for which 12 dominant dynamical modes are only retained (Charney and Straus, 1980) and a wind-driven, quasi-geostrophic and reduced-gravity shallow ocean whose field is truncated to four dominant modes able to reproduce the large scale oceanic gyres (Pierini, 2011). The two models are coupled through mechanical forcings only. The analysis of its dynamics reveals first that under aperiodic atmospheric forcings only dominant single gyres (clockwise or counterclockwise) appear. This feature is expected to be related with the specific domain choice over which the coupled system is defined. Second the dynamical quantities characterizing the short-term predictability (Lyapunov exponents, Lyapunov dimension, Kolmogorov-Sinaï (KS) entropy) displays a complex dependence as a function of the key parameters of the system, namely the coupling strength and the external thermal forcing. In particular, the KS-entropy is increasing as a function of the coupling in most of the experiments, implying an increase of the rate of loss of information about the localization of the system on his attractor. Finally the dynamics of the error is explored and indicates, in particular, a rich variety of short term behaviors of the error in the atmosphere depending on the (relative) amplitude of the initial error affecting the ocean, from polynomial (at2 + bt3 + ct4) up to purely exponential evolutions. These features are explained and analyzed in the light of the recent findings on error growth (Nicolis et al, 2009). References Charney J G, Straus DM (1980) Form-Drag Instability, Multiple Equilibria and Propagating Planetary Waves in Baroclinic, Orographically Forced, Planetary Wave Systems. J Atmos Sci 37: 1157-1176. Nicolis C, Perdigao RAP, Vannitsem S (2009) Dynamics of

  5. Dynamical evolution of the Oort cometary cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of comets in the Oort cloud under the influence of stellar perturbations has been modeled using Monte Carlo techniques. It is shown that the cloud has been depleted over the history of the solar system. Comets are lost from the cloud by direct ejection due to close stellar encounters, diffusion of aphelia to distances beyond the sun's sphere of influence, or diffusion of perihelia into the planetary region where Jupiter and Saturn perturbations either eject them on hyperbolic trajectories or capture them to short-period orbits. The population of the cloud is estimated to be 1.0 - 1.5 x 10 to the 12th comets and the total mass is on the order of 1.9 earth masses. In addition to random passing stars, less frequent encounters with giant molecular clouds may play a significant role in randomizing the orbits of comets in the cloud and reducing the effective radius of the sun's sphere of influence.

  6. Electrically driven magnetization dynamics in yttrium iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungfleisch, Matthias Benjamin

    Creation and manipulation of magnetization states by spin-orbital torques are important for novel spintronics applications. Magnetic insulators were mostly ignored for this particular purpose, despite their low Gilbert damping, which makes them outstanding materials for magnonic applications and investigation of nonlinear spin-wave phenomena. Here, we demonstrate the propagation of spin-wave modes in micro-structured yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12,YIG) stripes. Spin waves propagating along the long side of the stripe are detected by means of spatially-resolved Brillouin light scattering (BLS) microscopy. The propagation distance of spin waves is determined in the linear regime, where an exponential decay of 10 μm is observed. We also explored the possibility of driving magnetization dynamics with spin Hall effects (SHE) in bilayers of YIG/Pt microstructures. For this purpose we adopted a spin-transfer torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR) approach. Here a rf charge current is passed through the Pt layer, which generates a spin-transfer torque at the interface from an oscillating spin current via the SHE. This gives rise to a resonant excitation of the magnetization dynamics. In all metallic systems the magnetization dynamics is detected via the homodyne anisotropic magnetoresistance of the ferromagnetic layer. However, since there is no charge flowing through ferromagnetic insulators there is no anisotropic magnetoresistance. Instead, we show that for the case of YIG/Pt the spin Hall magnetoresistance can be used. Our measured voltage spectra can be well fitted to an analytical model evidencing that the ST-FMR concept can be extended to insulating systems. Furthermore, we employ spatially-resolved BLS spectroscopy to map the ST-FMR driven spin dynamics. We observe the formation of a strong, self-localized spin-wave intensity in the center of the sample. This spin-wave `bullet' is created due to nonlinear cross coupling of eigenmodes existing in the magnetic

  7. Dynamic Data-Driven Event Reconstruction for Atmospheric Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Belles, R; Chow, F K; Monache, L D; Dyer, K; Glascoe, L; Hanley, W; Johannesson, G; Larsen, S; Loosmore, G; Lundquist, J K; Mirin, A; Neuman, S; Nitao, J; Serban, R; Sugiyama, G; Aines, R

    2007-02-22

    Accidental or terrorist releases of hazardous materials into the atmosphere can impact large populations and cause significant loss of life or property damage. Plume predictions have been shown to be extremely valuable in guiding an effective and timely response. The two greatest sources of uncertainty in the prediction of the consequences of hazardous atmospheric releases result from poorly characterized source terms and lack of knowledge about the state of the atmosphere as reflected in the available meteorological data. In this report, we discuss the development of a new event reconstruction methodology that provides probabilistic source term estimates from field measurement data for both accidental and clandestine releases. Accurate plume dispersion prediction requires the following questions to be answered: What was released? When was it released? How much material was released? Where was it released? We have developed a dynamic data-driven event reconstruction capability which couples data and predictive models through Bayesian inference to obtain a solution to this inverse problem. The solution consists of a probability distribution of unknown source term parameters. For consequence assessment, we then use this probability distribution to construct a ''''composite'' forward plume prediction which accounts for the uncertainties in the source term. Since in most cases of practical significance it is impossible to find a closed form solution, Bayesian inference is accomplished by utilizing stochastic sampling methods. This approach takes into consideration both measurement and forward model errors and thus incorporates all the sources of uncertainty in the solution to the inverse problem. Stochastic sampling methods have the additional advantage of being suitable for problems characterized by a non-Gaussian distribution of source term parameters and for cases in which the underlying dynamical system is non-linear. We initially developed a Markov Chain Monte

  8. Diversity Waves in Collapse-Driven Population Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-01

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe reduction in size of the population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is characterized by cyclic ''diversity waves'' triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances have bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak--species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies. PMID:26367172

  9. Diversity Waves in Collapse-Driven Population Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-01

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe reduction in size of the population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is characterized by cyclic ''diversity waves'' triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances have bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak--species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.

  10. Dynamics and universality in noise-driven dissipative systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Torre, Emanuele G.; Demler, Eugene; Giamarchi, Thierry; Altman, Ehud

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the dynamical properties of low-dimensional systems, driven by external noise sources. Specifically we consider a resistively shunted Josephson junction and a one-dimensional quantum liquid in a commensurate lattice potential, subject to 1/f noise. In absence of nonlinear coupling, we have shown previously that these systems establish a nonequilibrium critical steady state [Dalla Torre, Demler, Giamarchi, and Altman, Nat. Phys.1745-247310.1038/nphys1754 6, 806 (2010)]. Here, we use this state as the basis for a controlled renormalization group analysis using the Keldysh path integral formulation to treat the nonlinearities: the Josephson coupling and the commensurate lattice. The analysis to first order in the coupling constant indicates transitions between superconducting and localized regimes that are smoothly connected to the respective equilibrium transitions. However, at second order, the back action of the mode coupling on the critical state leads to renormalization of dissipation and emergence of an effective temperature. In the Josephson junction, the temperature is parametrically small allowing to observe a universal crossover between the superconducting and insulating regimes. The I-V characteristics of the junction displays algebraic behavior controlled by the underlying critical state over a wide range. In the noisy one-dimensional liquid, the generated dissipation and effective temperature are not small as in the junction. We find a crossover between a quasilocalized regime dominated by dissipation and another dominated by temperature. However, since in the thermal regime the thermalization rate is parametrically small, signatures of the nonequilibrium critical state may be seen in transient dynamics.

  11. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-14

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is cyclic ‘‘diversity waves’’ triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances are characterized by a bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak - species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.

  12. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-14

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g.more » by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is cyclic ‘‘diversity waves’’ triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances are characterized by a bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak - species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.« less

  13. Diversity Waves in Collapse-Driven Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe reduction in size of the population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is characterized by cyclic ‘‘diversity waves’’ triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances have bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak - species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies. PMID:26367172

  14. Galactic Dynamics and Evolution: Mergers and Infall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Melinda Loving

    1995-01-01

    Collisions and mergers are cited as culprits in the production of a large range of morphological phenomena observed in galaxies. Galactic interactions may generate faint structures, such as arcs and rings, or create an entirely different type of galaxy, depending on the types of galaxies involved and their orbital geometry. I develop detailed merger and infall models which are compared with observations in order to elucidate the dynamical processes which govern galactic formation and evolution. In a first project, the effect of including gas is studied in encounters between low-mass companions and elliptical galaxies which produce sharp-edged features called "shells." Ellipticals accrete gas, which may be important in constraining their evolution. Numerical simulations of tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies containing both gas and stars were performed. The stellar and gaseous components rapidly segregate to produce very different structures. Gaseous remnants are dense, concentrated structures that form when gas flows into the center of the galaxy. Star formation is expected in the nucleus, localized and distinctly separate from the stellar remnant. In a second project, the formation of a peculiar ring galaxy is modeled. The Cartwheel galaxy, in addition to an outer and inner ring, has several spokes which connect the two. In an attempt to reproduce the spokes, a fully self-consistent model is constructed in which a companion collides head-on with a primary consisting of a live halo and a disk containing both stars and gas. Stars and gas react to passage of the companion through the disk by producing a morphology similar to that of the Cartwheel. The region between the inner and outer rings contains several spokes with a clumpy, interrupted structure. Finally, models of both pairs and small groups of bulge-disk-halo galaxies are merged to form remnants that evince properties similar to elliptical galaxies. I analyze the spatial and kinematic characteristics of

  15. Dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fregeau, John M.

    2004-10-01

    The research presented in this thesis comprises a theoretical study of several aspects relating to the dynamics and evolution of dense stellar systems such as globular clusters. First, I present the results of a study of mass segregation in two-component star clusters, based on a large number of numerical N-body simulations using our Monte-Carlo code. Heavy objects, which could represent stellar remnants such as neutron stars or black holes, exhibit behavior that is in quantitative agreement with simple analytical arguments. Light objects, which could represent free-floating planets or brown dwarfs, are predominantly lost from the cluster, as expected from simple analytical arguments, but may remain in the halo in larger numbers than expected. Using a recent null detection of planetary-mass microlensing events in M22, I find an upper limit of ˜25% at the 63% confidence level for the current mass fraction of M22 in the form of very low-mass objects. Turning to more realistic clusters, I present a study of the evolution of clusters containing primordial binaries, based on an enhanced version of the Monte-Carlo code that treats binary interactions via cross sections and analytical prescriptions. All models exhibit a long-lived “binary burning” phase lasting many tens of relaxation times. The structural parameters of the models during this phase match well those of most observed Galactic globular clusters. At the end of this phase, clusters that have survived tidal disruption undergo deep core collapse, followed by gravothermal oscillations. The results clearly show that the presence of even a small fraction of binaries in a cluster is sufficient to support the core against collapse significantly beyond the normal core collapse time predicted without the presence of binaries. For tidally truncated systems, collapse is delayed sufficiently that the cluster will undergo complete tidal disruption before core collapse. Moving a step beyond analytical prescriptions, I

  16. Data-driven optimization of dynamic reconfigurable systems of systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Conrad S.; Eddy, John P.

    2010-11-01

    This report documents the results of a Strategic Partnership (aka University Collaboration) LDRD program between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne. The project is titled 'Data-Driven Optimization of Dynamic Reconfigurable Systems of Systems' and was conducted during FY 2009 and FY 2010. The purpose of this study was to determine and implement ways to incorporate real-time data mining and information discovery into existing Systems of Systems (SoS) modeling capabilities. Current SoS modeling is typically conducted in an iterative manner in which replications are carried out in order to quantify variation in the simulation results. The expense of many replications for large simulations, especially when considering the need for optimization, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification, can be prohibitive. In addition, extracting useful information from the resulting large datasets is a challenging task. This work demonstrates methods of identifying trends and other forms of information in datasets that can be used on a wide range of applications such as quantifying the strength of various inputs on outputs, identifying the sources of variation in the simulation, and potentially steering an optimization process for improved efficiency.

  17. Novel current driven domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, See-Hun

    It was reported that the domain walls in nanowires can be moved efficiently by electrical currents by a new type of torque, chiral spin torque (CST), the combination of spin Hall effect and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Recently we domonstrated that ns-long current pulses can move domain walls at extraordinarily high speeds (up to ~750 m s -1) in synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) nanowires that have almost zero net magnetization, which is much more efficient compared with similar nanowires in which the sub-layers are coupled ferromagnetically (SF). This high speed is found to be due to a new type of powerful torque, exchange coupling torque (ECT) that is directly proportional to the strength of the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the two sub-layers, showing that the ECT is effective only in SAF not in SF. Moreover, it is found that the dependence of the wall velocity on the magnetic field applied along the nanowire is non-monotonic. Most recently we predict an Walker-breakdown-like domain wall precession in SAF nanowires in the presence of in-plane field based on the model we develop, and this extraordinary precession has been observed. In this talk I will discuss this in details by showing a unique characteristics of SAF sublayers' DW boost-and-drag mechanism along with CST and ECT. Novel current driven domain wall dynamics in synthetic antiferromagnets.

  18. Dynamic Evolution Model Based on Social Network Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xi; Gou, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Shi-Bin; Zhao, Wen

    2013-11-01

    Based on the analysis of evolutionary characteristics of public opinion in social networking services (SNS), in the paper we propose a dynamic evolution model, in which opinions are coupled with topology. This model shows the clustering phenomenon of opinions in dynamic network evolution. The simulation results show that the model can fit the data from a social network site. The dynamic evolution of networks accelerates the opinion, separation and aggregation. The scale and the number of clusters are influenced by confidence limit and rewiring probability. Dynamic changes of the topology reduce the number of isolated nodes, while the increased confidence limit allows nodes to communicate more sufficiently. The two effects make the distribution of opinion more neutral. The dynamic evolution of networks generates central clusters with high connectivity and high betweenness, which make it difficult to control public opinions in SNS.

  19. Locally dispersing populations in heterogeneous dynamic landscapes with spatiotemporal correlations. II. Habitat driven by voter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hiebeler, David E; Hill, Jack L

    2016-10-21

    We examine a spatially explicit population model on a dynamic landscape with suitable and unsuitable habitat driven by voter or contagion dynamics. We consider four cases, consisting of all combinations of local and global interactions for both population dispersal and habitat dynamics. For both local and global population dispersal, using local habitat dynamics always increases population density relative to the case with global habitat dynamics, due to the resulting segregation of habitat turnover, decrease in effective habitat turnover rate, and presence of stable habitat corridors. With global habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal exhibits lower density than one with global dispersal due to local crowding as well as frequent disturbance due to habitat transitions. On the other hand, with local habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal can exploit suitable habitat patches and use dynamic corridors to colonize new regions. The latter effect is not seen with static landscapes, where clustered habitat can lead to the isolation of suitable patches due to surrounding unsuitable habitat.

  20. Locally dispersing populations in heterogeneous dynamic landscapes with spatiotemporal correlations. II. Habitat driven by voter dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hiebeler, David E; Hill, Jack L

    2016-10-21

    We examine a spatially explicit population model on a dynamic landscape with suitable and unsuitable habitat driven by voter or contagion dynamics. We consider four cases, consisting of all combinations of local and global interactions for both population dispersal and habitat dynamics. For both local and global population dispersal, using local habitat dynamics always increases population density relative to the case with global habitat dynamics, due to the resulting segregation of habitat turnover, decrease in effective habitat turnover rate, and presence of stable habitat corridors. With global habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal exhibits lower density than one with global dispersal due to local crowding as well as frequent disturbance due to habitat transitions. On the other hand, with local habitat dynamics, a population using local dispersal can exploit suitable habitat patches and use dynamic corridors to colonize new regions. The latter effect is not seen with static landscapes, where clustered habitat can lead to the isolation of suitable patches due to surrounding unsuitable habitat. PMID:27457095

  1. Effects of dynamical evolution on the internal kinematical properties of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-05-01

    The observational characterization of the internal kinematics of Galactic globular clusters will soon reach an unprecedented level of richness, thanks to the synergy between the astrometric data provided by Gaia and HST, and a number of ESO/VLT spectroscopic programs. Such a wealth of information on the three-dimensional velocity space of star clusters, offers the unique opportunity to address a number of open questions on the phase space evolution of collisional stellar systems.Driven by these motivations, I will present some highlighted results of a large survey of N-body simulations aimed at exploring the long-term dynamical evolution of the kinematical properties of tidally limited star clusters. First, I will discuss of the evolution of the anisotropy in velocity space, with particular attention to the dependence on the cluster initial structural properties and dynamical history. I will then focus on the implications of cluster dynamical evolution and loss of stars on its internal rotation. Such an enriched picture of the kinematical properties of star clusters offers a solid bedrock for addressing a range of exciting new questions related to the dynamics of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. In this context, I will illustrate some results on the internal rotational velocity profiles and the evolution of the differences in the rotation of different stellar populations.

  2. Accelerated dynamics of blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in high energy density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, N.; Kuranz, C.; Drake, R. P.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2014-10-01

    We report the systematic analysis of experimental data describing the late time evolution of the high Mach number and high Reynolds number Rayleigh-Taylor instability which is driven by a blast wave. The parameter regime is relevant to high energy density plasmas and astrophysics. The experiments have been conducted at the Omega laser facility. By processing the experimental x-ray images, we quantified the delicate features of RT dynamics, including the measurements of the curvature of the transmitted shock and the interface envelopes, the positions of RT bubbles and spikes, and the quantification of statistics of RT mixing. The measurements were performed at four time steps and for three different initial perturbations of the target (single mode and two two-mode). We found that within the noise level the curvatures of the shock and interface envelope evolve steadily and are an imprint of laser imperfections. At late times, the bubble merge does not occur, and the flow keeps significant degree of order. Yet, the blast-wave-driven RT spikes do accelerate with the power-law exponent smaller than that in case of sustained acceleration. We compared the experimental results with the momentum model of RT mixing and stochastic model achieving good agreement. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  3. The Dynamics of a Parametrically Driven Damped Pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A.; Kumar, K.

    2015-05-01

    Ordered and chaotic states of a parametrically driven planar pendulum with viscous damping are numerically investigated. The damping makes the number of chaotic windows fewer but with larger width. Stroboscopic maps of the chaotic motion of the pendulum, driven either subharmonically or harmonically, show strange attractors with inversion symmetry in the phase plane.

  4. Mercury's Thermal Evolution, Dynamical Topography and Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziethe, Ruth; Benkhoff, Johannes

    stagnant lid comprises roughly half the mantle after only 0.5Ga. Since the rigid lithosphere does not take part in the convection anymore, the heat coming from the interior (due to the cooling of the large core) can only be transported through the lithosphere by thermal conduction. This is a significantly less effective mechanism of heat transport than convection and hence the lithosphere forms an insulating layer. As a result, the interior is kept relatively warm.Because the mantle is relatively shallow compared to the planet's radius, and additionally the thick stagnant lid is formed relatively rapid, the convection is confined to a layer of only about 200km to 300km. Convection structures are therefore relatively small structured. The flow patterns in the early evolution show that mantle convection is characterized by numerous upwelling plumes, which are fed by the heat flow from the cooling core. These upwellings are relatively stable regarding their spatial position. As the core cools down the temperature anomalies become colder and less pronounced but not less numerous. In our calculations, a region of partial melt in the mantle forms immediately after the start of the model at a depths of roughly 220km. While in the entire lower mantle the temperature exceeds the solidus, the highest melt degrees can be found in the upwelling plumes. The partial molten region persists a significant time (up to 2.5Ga). How long the partial molten zone actually survives depends strongly on the initial conditions of the model. For instance, an outer layer with a reduced thermal conductivity would keep the lower mantle significantly warmer and a molten layer survives longer. The hot upwellings cause a surface deformation (dynamical topography) which itself causes a gravity anomaly. Due to the weak constraints of important parameters (e.g. sulfur content of the core, mantle rheology, amount and distribution of radiogenic heat sources, planetary contraction, thermal conductivity, etc

  5. Carrier density driven lasing dynamics in ZnO nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wille, Marcel; Sturm, Chris; Michalsky, Tom; Röder, Robert; Ronning, Carsten; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-06-01

    We report on the temporal lasing dynamics of high quality ZnO nanowires using the time-resolved micro-photoluminescence technique. The temperature dependence of the lasing characteristics and of the corresponding decay constants demonstrate the formation of an electron-hole plasma to be the underlying gain mechanism in the considered temperature range from 10 K to 300 K. We found that the temperature-dependent emission onset-time ({t}{{on}}) strongly depends on the excitation power and becomes smallest in the lasing regime, with values below 5 ps. Furthermore, the observed red shift of the dominating lasing modes in time is qualitatively discussed in terms of the carrier density induced change of the refractive index dispersion after the excitation laser pulse. This theory is supported by extending an existing model for the calculation of the carrier density dependent complex refractive index for different temperatures. This model coincides with the experimental observations and reliably describes the evolution of the refractive index after the excitation laser pulse.

  6. Carrier density driven lasing dynamics in ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marcel; Sturm, Chris; Michalsky, Tom; Röder, Robert; Ronning, Carsten; Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius

    2016-06-01

    We report on the temporal lasing dynamics of high quality ZnO nanowires using the time-resolved micro-photoluminescence technique. The temperature dependence of the lasing characteristics and of the corresponding decay constants demonstrate the formation of an electron-hole plasma to be the underlying gain mechanism in the considered temperature range from 10 K to 300 K. We found that the temperature-dependent emission onset-time ([Formula: see text]) strongly depends on the excitation power and becomes smallest in the lasing regime, with values below 5 ps. Furthermore, the observed red shift of the dominating lasing modes in time is qualitatively discussed in terms of the carrier density induced change of the refractive index dispersion after the excitation laser pulse. This theory is supported by extending an existing model for the calculation of the carrier density dependent complex refractive index for different temperatures. This model coincides with the experimental observations and reliably describes the evolution of the refractive index after the excitation laser pulse.

  7. Evolution of the Known Centaurs Population - Dynamical and Thermal Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Gal

    2010-10-01

    The structural and thermal evolution of small Solar system bodies may be strongly dependent on their dynamical history and environment. Objects on planet-crossing orbits are prone to gravitational perturbations that de-stabilize their orbits. Such are the Centaurs, which are the transient population, between the relatively stable trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) and the short-lived Jupiter family Comets (JFCs). This may indicate that these objects experience intermediate levels of internal processing, at different periods of their lives. Examining the evolution of several these Centaur objects, both in orbital and physical parameters, can help categorize the different states and origin and evolution scenarios in the outer Solar system. Determining the dynamical evolution of each object is achieved through statistical analysis of the results of multiple N-body integrations. This is achieved by using many clones of specific objects, with known orbital elements. Statistics of large clone samples of specific objects yield valuable information about their current states and future fates. Specifically, and with greater importance to thermal evolution, we focus on the dynamical lifetimes, survivability and mean orbital elements. The latter are considered during the relatively stable and non-diffusive phase of orbital evolution. Profiles of temperature, structure and composition are calculated utilizing our robust thermal evolution code several specific objects, which represent slightly varying dynamical groups, and for different orbits of the same object, which represent specific orbital evolution pathways. This has an influence on the internal stratified structure, through an adapting thermal response of the nucleus.

  8. Quantum dynamical field theory for nonequilibrium phase transitions in driven open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jamir; Diehl, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    We develop a quantum dynamical field theory for studying phase transitions in driven open systems coupled to Markovian noise, where nonlinear noise effects and fluctuations beyond semiclassical approximations influence the critical behavior. We systematically compare the diagrammatics, the properties of the renormalization group flow, and the structure of the fixed points of the quantum dynamical field theory and of its semiclassical counterpart, which is employed to characterize dynamical criticality in three-dimensional driven-dissipative condensates. As an application, we perform the Keldysh functional renormalization of a one-dimensional driven open Bose gas, where a tailored diffusion Markov noise realizes an analog of quantum criticality for driven-dissipative condensation. We find that the associated nonequilibrium quantum phase transition does not map into the critical behavior of its three-dimensional classical driven counterpart.

  9. Mercury's Thermal Evolution, Dynamical Topography and Geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziethe, Ruth; Benkhoff, Johannes

    stagnant lid comprises roughly half the mantle after only 0.5Ga. Since the rigid lithosphere does not take part in the convection anymore, the heat coming from the interior (due to the cooling of the large core) can only be transported through the lithosphere by thermal conduction. This is a significantly less effective mechanism of heat transport than convection and hence the lithosphere forms an insulating layer. As a result, the interior is kept relatively warm.Because the mantle is relatively shallow compared to the planet's radius, and additionally the thick stagnant lid is formed relatively rapid, the convection is confined to a layer of only about 200km to 300km. Convection structures are therefore relatively small structured. The flow patterns in the early evolution show that mantle convection is characterized by numerous upwelling plumes, which are fed by the heat flow from the cooling core. These upwellings are relatively stable regarding their spatial position. As the core cools down the temperature anomalies become colder and less pronounced but not less numerous. In our calculations, a region of partial melt in the mantle forms immediately after the start of the model at a depths of roughly 220km. While in the entire lower mantle the temperature exceeds the solidus, the highest melt degrees can be found in the upwelling plumes. The partial molten region persists a significant time (up to 2.5Ga). How long the partial molten zone actually survives depends strongly on the initial conditions of the model. For instance, an outer layer with a reduced thermal conductivity would keep the lower mantle significantly warmer and a molten layer survives longer. The hot upwellings cause a surface deformation (dynamical topography) which itself causes a gravity anomaly. Due to the weak constraints of important parameters (e.g. sulfur content of the core, mantle rheology, amount and distribution of radiogenic heat sources, planetary contraction, thermal conductivity, etc

  10. Nonlinear evolution of two fast-particle-driven modes near the linear stability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesny, Jaroslaw; Marczynski, Slawomir; Berczynski, Pawel; Berczynski, Stefan; Galant, Grzegorz; Lisak, Mietek; Galkowski, Andrzej

    2011-06-15

    A system of two coupled integro-differential equations is derived and solved for the non-linear evolution of two waves excited by the resonant interaction with fast ions just above the linear instability threshold. The effects of a resonant particle source and classical relaxation processes represented by the Krook, diffusion, and dynamical friction collision operators are included in the model, which exhibits different nonlinear evolution regimes, mainly depending on the type of relaxation process that restores the unstable distribution function of fast ions. When the Krook collisions or diffusion dominate, the wave amplitude evolution is characterized by modulation and saturation. However, when the dynamical friction dominates, the wave amplitude is in the explosive regime. In addition, it is found that the finite separation in the phase velocities of the two modes weakens the interaction strength between the modes.

  11. Galactic evolution. I - Single-zone models. [encompassing stellar evolution and gas-star dynamic theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuan, T. X.; Hart, M. H.; Ostriker, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The two basic approaches of physical theory required to calculate the evolution of a galactic system are considered, taking into account stellar evolution theory and the dynamics of a gas-star system. Attention is given to intrinsic (stellar) physics, extrinsic (dynamical) physics, and computations concerning the fractionation of an initial mass of gas into stars. The characteristics of a 'standard' model and its variants are discussed along with the results obtained with the aid of these models.

  12. Reduction of Large Dynamical Systems by Minimization of Evolution Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1999-01-01

    Reduction of a large system of equations to a lower-dimensional system of similar dynamics is investigated. For dynamical systems with disparate timescales, a criterion for determining redundant dimensions and a general reduction method based on the minimization of evolution rate are proposed.

  13. Evolutionary programming for goal-driven dynamic planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, James M.; Guest, Clark C.; Ross, David O.

    2002-03-01

    Many complex artificial intelligence (IA) problems are goal- driven in nature and the opportunity exists to realize the benefits of a goal-oriented solution. In many cases, such as in command and control, a goal-oriented approach may be the only option. One of many appropriate applications for such an approach is War Gaming. War Gaming is an important tool for command and control because it provides a set of alternative courses of actions so that military leaders can contemplate their next move in the battlefield. For instance, when making decisions that save lives, it is necessary to completely understand the consequences of a given order. A goal-oriented approach provides a slowly evolving tractably reasoned solution that inherently follows one of the principles of war: namely concentration on the objective. Future decision-making will depend not only on the battlefield, but also on a virtual world where military leaders can wage wars and determine their options by playing computer war games much like the real world. The problem with these games is that the built-in AI does not learn nor adapt and many times cheats, because the intelligent player has access to all the information, while the user has access to limited information provided on a display. These games are written for the purpose of entertainment and actions are calculated a priori and off-line, and are made prior or during their development. With these games getting more sophisticated in structure and less domain specific in scope, there needs to be a more general intelligent player that can adapt and learn in case the battlefield situations or the rules of engagement change. One such war game that might be considered is Risk. Risk incorporates the principles of war, is a top-down scalable model, and provides a good application for testing a variety of goal- oriented AI approaches. By integrating a goal-oriented hybrid approach, one can develop a program that plays the Risk game effectively and move

  14. Evolution of the Distribution of Wealth in an Economic Environment Driven by Local Nash Equilibria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Ringhofer, Christian

    2014-02-01

    We present and analyze a model for the evolution of the wealth distribution within a heterogeneous economic environment. The model considers a system of rational agents interacting in a game theoretical framework, through fairly general assumptions on the cost function. This evolution drives the dynamic of the agents in both wealth and economic configuration variables. We consider a regime of scale separation where the large scale dynamics is given by a hydrodynamic closure with a Nash equilibrium serving as the local thermodynamic equilibrium. The result is a system of gas dynamics-type equations for the density and average wealth of the agents on large scales. We recover the inverse gamma distribution as an equilibrium in the particular case of quadratic cost functions which has been previously considered in the literature.

  15. Dynamic Behaviors of Lead Flyer Driven by Collision of Head-on Sliding Detonations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chongyu; Hu, Haibo; Li, Qingzhong; Zhang, Zhengtao; Sun, Xuelin; LaboratoryShock Waves; Detonation Physics Research Team

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic behaviors of lead plate driven by head-on sliding detonation waves were characterized with the help of high-speed frame photography and pulsed X-ray radiography. Experimental records have shown a jet like bulging in the collision region, size of which extended rapidly after the collision of the head-on detonation waves because of the obvious speed gradients of particles inside the bulging from the tip to the bottom of the bulging. Multi-layer like structure of loading front formed in the result of the impact of two symmetric detonation fronts. The mass densities inside the bulging structure fixed by the pulsed X-ray radiography were evaluated at the level of 1% ~10% from the initial density of lead. The dynamic strength and shock wave melting should have played dominate role in the formation of the initial stage and the evolution of cavitations and fragmentation process finished merely in microseconds inside the continuum of melted lead under the intensive tension of release wave, in the result of which a porous or dispersed stage bulging was formed.

  16. Nonrandomness in protein sequences: evidence for a physically driven stage of evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Pande, V S; Grosberg, A Y; Tanaka, T

    1994-01-01

    The sequences, or primary structures, of existing biopolymers--in particular, proteins--are believed to be a product of evolution. Are the sequences random? If not, what is the character of this nonrandomness? To explore the statistics of protein sequences, we use the idea of mapping the sequence onto the trajectory of a random walk, originally proposed by Peng et al. [Peng, C.-K., Buldyrev, S. V., Goldberger, A. L., Havlin, S., Sciortino, F., Simons, M. & Stanley, H. E. (1992) Nature (London) 356, 168-170] in their analysis of DNA sequences. Using three different mappings, corresponding to three basic physical interactions between amino acids, we found pronounced deviations from pure randomness, and these deviations seem directed toward minimization of the energy of the three-dimensional structure. We consider this result as evidence for a physically driven stage of evolution. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7809157

  17. Evolution of a superfluid vortex filament tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

    PubMed

    Villois, Alberto; Proment, Davide; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    The development and decay of a turbulent vortex tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is studied. Using a recently developed accurate and robust tracking algorithm, all quantized vortices are extracted from the fields. The Vinen's decay law for the total vortex length with a coefficient that is in quantitative agreement with the values measured in helium II is observed. The topology of the tangle is then investigated showing that linked rings may appear during the evolution. The tracking also allows for determining the statistics of small-scale quantities of vortex lines, exhibiting large fluctuations of curvature and torsion. Finally, the temporal evolution of the Kelvin wave spectrum is obtained providing evidence of the development of a weak-wave turbulence cascade. PMID:27415198

  18. Evolution of a superfluid vortex filament tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villois, Alberto; Proment, Davide; Krstulovic, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    The development and decay of a turbulent vortex tangle driven by the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is studied. Using a recently developed accurate and robust tracking algorithm, all quantized vortices are extracted from the fields. The Vinen's decay law for the total vortex length with a coefficient that is in quantitative agreement with the values measured in helium II is observed. The topology of the tangle is then investigated showing that linked rings may appear during the evolution. The tracking also allows for determining the statistics of small-scale quantities of vortex lines, exhibiting large fluctuations of curvature and torsion. Finally, the temporal evolution of the Kelvin wave spectrum is obtained providing evidence of the development of a weak-wave turbulence cascade.

  19. Footprints of Directional Selection in Wild Atlantic Salmon Populations: Evidence for Parasite-Driven Evolution?

    PubMed Central

    Zueva, Ksenia J.; Lumme, Jaakko; Veselov, Alexey E.; Kent, Matthew P.; Lien, Sigbjørn; Primmer, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of host-parasite co-adaptation have long been of interest in evolutionary biology; however, determining the genetic basis of parasite resistance has been challenging. Current advances in genome technologies provide new opportunities for obtaining a genome-scale view of the action of parasite-driven natural selection in wild populations and thus facilitate the search for specific genomic regions underlying inter-population differences in pathogen response. European populations of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) exhibit natural variance in susceptibility levels to the ectoparasite Gyrodactylus salaris Malmberg 1957, ranging from resistance to extreme susceptibility, and are therefore a good model for studying the evolution of virulence and resistance. However, distinguishing the molecular signatures of genetic drift and environment-associated selection in small populations such as land-locked Atlantic salmon populations presents a challenge, specifically in the search for pathogen-driven selection. We used a novel genome-scan analysis approach that enabled us to i) identify signals of selection in salmon populations affected by varying levels of genetic drift and ii) separate potentially selected loci into the categories of pathogen (G. salaris)-driven selection and selection acting upon other environmental characteristics. A total of 4631 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were screened in Atlantic salmon from 12 different northern European populations. We identified three genomic regions potentially affected by parasite-driven selection, as well as three regions presumably affected by salinity-driven directional selection. Functional annotation of candidate SNPs is consistent with the role of the detected genomic regions in immune defence and, implicitly, in osmoregulation. These results provide new insights into the genetic basis of pathogen susceptibility in Atlantic salmon and will enable future searches for the specific genes involved. PMID

  20. Evolution of a storm-driven cloudy boundary layer in the Arctic

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, J; Kosovic, B; Curry, J A

    2003-10-24

    The cloudy boundary layer under stormy conditions during the summertime Arctic has been studied using observation from the SHEBA experiment and large-eddy simulations (LES). On 29 July 1998, a stable Arctic cloudy boundary layer event was observed after passage of a synoptic low. The local dynamic and thermodynamic structure of the boundary layer was determined from aircraft measurement including analysis of turbulence, cloud microphysics and radiative properties. After the upper cloud layer advected over the existing cloud layer, the turbulent kinetic energy budget indicated that the cloud layer below 200 m was maintained predominantly by shear production. Observations of longwave radiation showed that cloud top cooling at the lower cloud top has been suppressed by radiative effects of the upper cloud layer. Our LES results demonstrate the importance of the combination of shear mixing near the surface and radiative cooling at the cloud top in the storm-driven cloudy boundary layer. Once the low-level cloud reaches a certain height, depending on the amount of cloud-top cooling, the two sources of TKE production begin to separate in space under continuous stormy conditions, suggesting one possible mechanism for the cloud layering. The sensitivity tests suggest that the storm-driven cloudy boundary layer is flexibly switched to the shear-driven system due to the advection of upper clouds or the buoyantly driven system due to the lack of the wind shear. A comparison is made of this storm-driven boundary layer with the buoyantly driven boundary layer previously described in the literature.

  1. Evolution of specialization under non-equilibrium population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nurmi, Tuomas; Parvinen, Kalle

    2013-03-21

    We analyze the evolution of specialization in resource utilization in a mechanistically underpinned discrete-time model using the adaptive dynamics approach. We assume two nutritionally equivalent resources that in the absence of consumers grow sigmoidally towards a resource-specific carrying capacity. The consumers use resources according to the law of mass-action with rates involving trade-off. The resulting discrete-time model for the consumer population has over-compensatory dynamics. We illuminate the way non-equilibrium population dynamics affect the evolutionary dynamics of the resource consumption rates, and show that evolution to the trimorphic coexistence of a generalist and two specialists is possible due to asynchronous non-equilibrium population dynamics of the specialists. In addition, various forms of cyclic evolutionary dynamics are possible. Furthermore, evolutionary suicide may occur even without Allee effects and demographic stochasticity.

  2. Rapid evolution of plethodontid modulating factor, a hypervariable salamander courtship pheromone, is driven by positive selection.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Catherine A; Watts, Richard A; Hastings, Amy P; Houck, Lynne D; Arnold, Stevan J

    2010-05-01

    Sexual communication in plethodontid salamanders is mediated by a proteinaceous pheromone that a male delivers to a female during courtship, boosting her receptivity. The pheromone consists of three proteins from three unrelated protein families. These proteins are among a small group of pheromones known to affect female receptivity in vertebrates. Previously, we showed that the genes of two of these proteins (PRF and SPF) are prone to incessant evolution driven by positive selection, presumably as a consequence of coevolution with female receptors. In this report, we focus on the evolution of the third pheromone protein gene family, plethodontid modulating factor (PMF), to determine whether it shows the same pattern of diversification. We used RT-PCR in mental gland cDNA to survey PMF sequences from three genera of plethodontid salamanders (27 spp.) to measure rates of evolution, level of gene diversification, modes of selection, and types of amino acid substitution. Like PRF and SPF, PMF is produced by a multigene family characterized by gene duplication and high levels of polymorphism. PMF evolution is rapid, incessant, and driven by positive selection. PMF is more extreme in these dimensions than both PRF and SPF. Nestled within this extraordinary variation, however, is a signature of purifying selection, acting to preserve important structural and biochemical features of the PMF protein (i.e., secretion signal, cysteine residues, and pI). Although a pattern of persistent diversification exists at the molecular level, the morphological and behavioral aspects of the pheromone delivery system show evolutionary stasis over millions of years.

  3. Rapid evolution of plethodontid modulating factor, a hypervariable salamander courtship pheromone, is driven by positive selection.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Catherine A; Watts, Richard A; Hastings, Amy P; Houck, Lynne D; Arnold, Stevan J

    2010-05-01

    Sexual communication in plethodontid salamanders is mediated by a proteinaceous pheromone that a male delivers to a female during courtship, boosting her receptivity. The pheromone consists of three proteins from three unrelated protein families. These proteins are among a small group of pheromones known to affect female receptivity in vertebrates. Previously, we showed that the genes of two of these proteins (PRF and SPF) are prone to incessant evolution driven by positive selection, presumably as a consequence of coevolution with female receptors. In this report, we focus on the evolution of the third pheromone protein gene family, plethodontid modulating factor (PMF), to determine whether it shows the same pattern of diversification. We used RT-PCR in mental gland cDNA to survey PMF sequences from three genera of plethodontid salamanders (27 spp.) to measure rates of evolution, level of gene diversification, modes of selection, and types of amino acid substitution. Like PRF and SPF, PMF is produced by a multigene family characterized by gene duplication and high levels of polymorphism. PMF evolution is rapid, incessant, and driven by positive selection. PMF is more extreme in these dimensions than both PRF and SPF. Nestled within this extraordinary variation, however, is a signature of purifying selection, acting to preserve important structural and biochemical features of the PMF protein (i.e., secretion signal, cysteine residues, and pI). Although a pattern of persistent diversification exists at the molecular level, the morphological and behavioral aspects of the pheromone delivery system show evolutionary stasis over millions of years. PMID:20407892

  4. Extremal dynamics and punctuated co-evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneppen, Kim

    1995-02-01

    Extremal dynamics opens up a new way for understanding the coherence that is observed in some large non-equilibrium systems. Extremal dynamics is characterized by quasistatic motion where only one part of the large system is active at a given instant: the part where a local variable assumes a global extremum value. Extremal dynamics may apply when the parts of the system nearly always are caught in metastable states. Examples from physics may include earthquakes, fluid invasion in porous media and possibly also dynamical roughening of interfaces. We discuss a simple model of extremal dynamics and its application to biological macroevolution. The model can be formulated as an ecology of adapting interacting species. The environment of any given species is affected by other species; hence it may change with time. For low mutation rate the model ecology expands at a self-organized critical state where periods of statis alternate with avalanches of evolutionary changes.

  5. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    PubMed

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions.

  6. Volcano seismicity and ground deformation unveil the gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics of a volcanic eruption.

    PubMed

    Ripepe, Maurizio; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Maggio, Giuseppe; Pistolesi, Marco; Marchetti, Emanuele; Lacanna, Giorgio; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Poggi, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Effusive eruptions are explained as the mechanism by which volcanoes restore the equilibrium perturbed by magma rising in a chamber deep in the crust. Seismic, ground deformation and topographic measurements are compared with effusion rate during the 2007 Stromboli eruption, drawing an eruptive scenario that shifts our attention from the interior of the crust to the surface. The eruption is modelled as a gravity-driven drainage of magma stored in the volcanic edifice with a minor contribution of magma supplied at a steady rate from a deep reservoir. Here we show that the discharge rate can be predicted by the contraction of the volcano edifice and that the very-long-period seismicity migrates downwards, tracking the residual volume of magma in the shallow reservoir. Gravity-driven magma discharge dynamics explain the initially high discharge rates observed during eruptive crises and greatly influence our ability to predict the evolution of effusive eruptions. PMID:25980642

  7. Dynamics of hydrofracturing and permeability evolution in layered reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Irfan; Koehn, Daniel; Toussaint, Renaud; Passchier, Cees

    2015-09-01

    A coupled hydro-mechanical model is presented to model fluid driven fracturing in layered porous rocks. In the model the solid elastic continuum is described by a discrete element approach coupled with a fluid continuum grid that is used to solve Darcy based pressure diffusion. The model assumes poro-elasto-plastic effects and yields real time dynamic aspects of the fracturing and effective stress evolution under the influence of excess fluid pressure gradients. We show that the formation and propagation of hydrofractures are sensitive to mechanical and tectonic conditions of the system. In cases where elevated fluid pressure is the sole driving agent in a stable tectonic system, sealing layers induce permutations between the principal directions of the local stress tensor, which regulate the growth of vertical fractures and may result in irregular pattern formation or sub-horizontal failure below the seal. Stiffer layers tend to concentrate differential stresses and lead to vertical fracture growth, whereas the layer-contact tends to fracture if the strength of the neighboring rock is comparably high. If the system has remained under extension for a longer time period, the developed hydrofractures propagate by linking up confined tensile fractures in competent layers. This leads to the growth of large-scale normal faults in the layered systems, so that subsequently the effective permeability is highly variable over time and the faults drain the system. The simulation results are shown to be consistent with some of the field observations carried out in the Oman Mountains, where abnormal fluid pressure is reported to be a significant factor in the development of several generations of local and regional fracture and fault sets.

  8. Exploring the Dynamics of Evolution and Ecology of Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    We established the potential and flux landscape theory for evolution. We found explicitly the conventional Wright's gradient adaptive landscape based on the mean fitness is inadequate to describe the general evolutionary dynamics. We show the intrinsic potential as being Lyapunov function (monotonically decreasing in time) does exist and can define the adaptive landscape for general evolution dynamics for studying global stability. The driving force determining the dynamics can be decomposed into gradient of potential landscape and curl probability flux. Non-zero flux causes detailed balance breaking and measures how far the evolution from equilibrium state. The gradient of intrinsic potential and curl flux are perpendicular to each other in zero fluctuation limit resembling electric and magnetic forces on electrons. We quantified intrinsic energy, entropy and free energy of evolution and constructed non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The intrinsic non-equilibrium free energy is a Lyapunov function. Both intrinsic potential and free energy can be used to quantify the global stability and robustness of evolution. We investigated an example of three allele evolutionary dynamics with frequency dependent selection (detailed balance broken). We uncovered the underlying single, triple, and limit cycle attractor landscapes. We found quantitative criterions for stability through landscape topography. We also quantified evolution pathways and found paths do not follow potential gradient and are irreversible due to non-zero flux. We generalized the original Fisher's fundamental theorem to the general (i.e., frequency dependent selection) regime of evolution by linking the adaptive rate with not only genetic variance related to the potential but also the flux. We show there is an optimum potential where curl flux resulting from biotic interactions of individuals within a species or between species can sustain an endless evolution even if the physical environment is unchanged. We

  9. Assisted stellar suicide: the wind-driven evolution of the recurrent nova T Pyxidis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knigge, Ch.; King, A. R.; Patterson, J.

    2000-12-01

    We show that the extremely high luminosity of the short-period recurrent nova T Pyx in quiescence can be understood if this system is a wind-driven supersoft x-ray source (SSS). In this scenario, a strong, radiation-induced wind is excited from the secondary star and accelerates the binary evolution. The accretion rate is therefore much higher than in an ordinary cataclysmic binary at the same orbital period, as is the luminosity of the white dwarf primary. In the steady state, the enhanced luminosity is just sufficient to maintain the wind from the secondary. The accretion rate and luminosity predicted by the wind-driven model for T Pyx are in good agreement with the observational evidence. X-ray observations with Chandra or XMM may be able to confirm T Pyx's status as a SSS. T Pyx's lifetime in the wind-driven state is on the order of a million years. Its ultimate fate is not certain, but the system may very well end up destroying itself, either via the complete evaporation of the secondary star, or in a Type Ia supernova if the white dwarf reaches the Chandrasekhar limit. Thus either the primary, the secondary, or both may currently be committing assisted stellar suicide.

  10. Analyses of Magnetic Structures of Active Region 11117 Evolution using a 3D Data-Driven Magnetohydrodynamic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shi; Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang

    We use the photospheric vector magnetograms obtained by Helioseismic and Magnetic Image (HMI) on-board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) as the boundary conditions for a Data-Driven CESE-MHD model (Jiang et al. 2012) to investigate the physical characteristics and evolution of magnetic field configurations in the corona before and after a solar eruptive event. Specifically, the evolution of AR11117 characteristics such as length of magnetic shear along the neutral line, current helicity, magnetic free energy and the energy flux across the photosphere due to flux emergence and surface flow are presented. The computed 3D magnetic field configuration are compared with AIA (Atmosphere Image Assembly) which shows remarkable resemblance. A topological analyses reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photosphere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare is caused by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of flare, while the computed magnetic free energy drops during the flare by 10 (30) ergs which is adequate in providing the energy budget of a minor C-class confined flare as observed. Jiang, Chaowei, Xueshang, Feng, S. T Wu and Qiang Hu, Ap. J., 759:85, 2012 Nov 10

  11. Iron-Doped Carbon Nitride-Type Polymers as Homogeneous Organocatalysts for Visible Light-Driven Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin-Feng; Wen, Ting; Xu, Jing-Yin; Zhai, Xin-Ping; Zhao, Min; Hu, Guo-Wen; Chen, Peng; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2016-01-13

    Graphitic carbon nitrides have appeared as a new type of photocatalyst for water splitting, but their broader and more practical applications are oftentimes hindered by the insolubility or difficult dispersion of the material in solvents. We herein prepared novel two-dimensional (2D) carbon nitride-type polymers doped by iron under a mild one-pot method through preorganizing formamide and citric acid precursors into supramolecular structures, which eventually polycondensed into a homogeneous organocatalyst for highly efficient visible light-driven hydrogen evolution with a rate of ∼16.2 mmol g(-1) h(-1) and a quantum efficiency of 0.8%. Laser photolysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements suggested that iron-doping enabled strong electron coupling between the metal and the carbon nitride and formed unique electronic structures favoring electron mobilization along the 2D nanomaterial plane, which might facilitate the electron transfer process in the photocatalytic system and lead to efficient H2 evolution. In combination with electrochemical measurements, the electron transfer dynamics during water reduction were depicted, and the earth-abundant Fe-based catalyst may open a sustainable strategy for conversion of sunlight into hydrogen energy and cope with current challenging energy issues worldwide.

  12. Mutation rate evolution in replicator dynamics.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Rosenbloom, Daniel I Scholes

    2012-11-01

    The mutation rate of an organism is itself evolvable. In stable environments, if faithful replication is costless, theory predicts that mutation rates will evolve to zero. However, positive mutation rates can evolve in novel or fluctuating environments, as analytical and empirical studies have shown. Previous work on this question has focused on environments that fluctuate independently of the evolving population. Here we consider fluctuations that arise from frequency-dependent selection in the evolving population itself. We investigate how the dynamics of competing traits can induce selective pressure on the rates of mutation between these traits. To address this question, we introduce a theoretical framework combining replicator dynamics and adaptive dynamics. We suppose that changes in mutation rates are rare, compared to changes in the traits under direct selection, so that the expected evolutionary trajectories of mutation rates can be obtained from analysis of pairwise competition between strains of different rates. Depending on the nature of frequency-dependent trait dynamics, we demonstrate three possible outcomes of this competition. First, if trait frequencies are at a mutation-selection equilibrium, lower mutation rates can displace higher ones. Second, if trait dynamics converge to a heteroclinic cycle-arising, for example, from "rock-paper-scissors" interactions-mutator strains succeed against non-mutators. Third, in cases where selection alone maintains all traits at positive frequencies, zero and nonzero mutation rates can coexist indefinitely. Our second result suggests that relatively high mutation rates may be observed for traits subject to cyclical frequency-dependent dynamics.

  13. Shock-driven chemistry and reactive wave dynamics in benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Stephen; Dattelbaum, Dana; Coe, Joshua; Los Alamos National Laboratory Team

    2015-06-01

    Benzene is a stable organic chemistry molecule because of its electronic structure - aromatic stability is derived from its delocalized, π-bonded, 6-membered planar ring structure. Benzene principal shock Hugoniot states have been reported previously by several groups, at both high and low pressures. Cusps (or discontinuities) in the shock Hugoniot provide evidence that chemical reactions take place under shockwave compression of benzene at input pressure conditions above 12 GPa. In other shock-driven experiments, spectral changes have been observed near this cusp condition, indicating that the cusp is associated with shock-driven chemical reaction(s). In this work, a series of gas-gun-driven plate impact experiments were performed to measure and quantify the details associated with shock-driven reactive flow in benzene. Using embedded electromagnetic gauges (with up to 10 Lagrangian gauge positions in-material in a single experiment) multiple, evolving wave structures have been measured in benzene when the inputs were above 12 GPa, with the details changing as the input pressure was increased. Detailed insights into the volume changes associated with the chemical reaction(s), reaction rates, and estimates of the bulk moduli of reaction intermediates and products were obtained. Using this new experimental data (along with the older experimental data from others), the benzene reactant and product Hugoniot loci have been modeled by thermodynamically complete equations of state.

  14. Dynamics of Transcription Factor Binding Site Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tuğrul, Murat; Paixão, Tiago; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation is crucial for our understanding of the phenotypic differences between species, populations and individuals. Sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to the regulatory regions on the DNA is a key regulatory mechanism that determines gene expression and hence heritable phenotypic variation. We use a biophysical model for directional selection on gene expression to estimate the rates of gain and loss of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in finite populations under both point and insertion/deletion mutations. Our results show that these rates are typically slow for a single TFBS in an isolated DNA region, unless the selection is extremely strong. These rates decrease drastically with increasing TFBS length or increasingly specific protein-DNA interactions, making the evolution of sites longer than ∼ 10 bp unlikely on typical eukaryotic speciation timescales. Similarly, evolution converges to the stationary distribution of binding sequences very slowly, making the equilibrium assumption questionable. The availability of longer regulatory sequences in which multiple binding sites can evolve simultaneously, the presence of “pre-sites” or partially decayed old sites in the initial sequence, and biophysical cooperativity between transcription factors, can all facilitate gain of TFBS and reconcile theoretical calculations with timescales inferred from comparative genomics. PMID:26545200

  15. Collective Dynamics Differentiates Functional Divergence in Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Glembo, Tyler J.; Farrell, Daniel W.; Gerek, Z. Nevin; Thorpe, M. F.; Ozkan, S. Banu

    2012-01-01

    Protein evolution is most commonly studied by analyzing related protein sequences and generating ancestral sequences through Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood methods, and/or by resurrecting ancestral proteins in the lab and performing ligand binding studies to determine function. Structural and dynamic evolution have largely been left out of molecular evolution studies. Here we incorporate both structure and dynamics to elucidate the molecular principles behind the divergence in the evolutionary path of the steroid receptor proteins. We determine the likely structure of three evolutionarily diverged ancestral steroid receptor proteins using the Zipping and Assembly Method with FRODA (ZAMF). Our predictions are within ∼2.7 Å all-atom RMSD of the respective crystal structures of the ancestral steroid receptors. Beyond static structure prediction, a particular feature of ZAMF is that it generates protein dynamics information. We investigate the differences in conformational dynamics of diverged proteins by obtaining the most collective motion through essential dynamics. Strikingly, our analysis shows that evolutionarily diverged proteins of the same family do not share the same dynamic subspace, while those sharing the same function are simultaneously clustered together and distant from those, that have functionally diverged. Dynamic analysis also enables those mutations that most affect dynamics to be identified. It correctly predicts all mutations (functional and permissive) necessary to evolve new function and ∼60% of permissive mutations necessary to recover ancestral function. PMID:22479170

  16. Recent dynamical evolution of Mimas and Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuk, Matija

    2015-05-01

    Mimas and Enceladus are the smallest and innermost mid-sized icy moons of Saturn. They are each caught in a 2:1 orbital resonance with an outer, larger moon: Mimas with Tethys, Enceladus with Dione. This is where the similarities end. Mimas is heavily cratered and appears geologically inactive, while Enceladus has a young surface and high tidal heat flow. Large free eccentricity of Mimas implies low tidal dissipation, while Enceladus appears very dissipative, likely due to an internal ocean. Their resonances are very different too. Mimas is caught in a 4:2 inclination type resonance with Tethys which involves inclinations of both moons. Enceladus is in a 2:1 resonance with Dione which affects only Enceladus's eccentricity. The well-known controversy over the heat flow of Enceladus can be solved by invoking a faster tidal evolution rate than previously expected (Lainey et al. 2012), but other mysteries remain. It has been long known that Mimas has very low probability of being captured into the present resonance, assuming that the large resonant libration amplitude reflects sizable pre-capture inclination of Mimas. Furthermore, Enceladus seems to have avoided capture into a number of sub-resonances that should have preceded the present one. An order of magnitude increase in the rate of tidal evolution does not solve these problems. It may be the time to reconsider the dominance of tides in the establishment of these resonances, especially if the moons themselves may be relatively young. An even faster orbital evolution due to ring/disk torques can help avoid capture into smaller resonances. Additionally, past interaction of Mimas with Janus and Epimetheus produce some of the peculiarities of Mimas' current orbit. At the meeting I will present numerical integrations that confirm the the existence of these problems, and demonstrate the proposed solutions.

  17. Dynamics of domain wall driven by spin-transfer torque

    SciTech Connect

    Chureemart, P.; Evans, R. F. L.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2011-05-01

    Spin-torque switching of magnetic devices offers new technological possibilities for data storage and integrated circuits. We have investigated domain-wall motion in a ferromagnetic thin film driven by a spin-polarized current using an atomistic spin model with a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation including the effect of the spin-transfer torque. The presence of the spin-transfer torque is shown to create an out-of-plane domain wall, in contrast to the external-field-driven case where an in-plane wall is found. We have investigated the effect of the spin torque on domain-wall displacement, domain-wall velocity, and domain-wall width, as well as the equilibration time in the presence of the spin-transfer torque. We have shown that the minimum spin-current density, regarded as the critical value for domain-wall motion, decreases with increasing temperature.

  18. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains.

  19. Biosensor-driven adaptive laboratory evolution of l-valine production in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Regina; Gätgens, Cornelia; Gätgens, Jochem; Polen, Tino; Kalinowski, Jörn; Frunzke, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive laboratory evolution has proven a valuable strategy for metabolic engineering. Here, we established an experimental evolution approach for improving microbial metabolite production by imposing an artificial selective pressure on the fluorescent output of a biosensor using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Cells showing the highest fluorescent output were iteratively isolated and (re-)cultivated. The L-valine producer Corynebacterium glutamicum ΔaceE was equipped with an L-valine-responsive sensor based on the transcriptional regulator Lrp of C. glutamicum. Evolved strains featured a significantly higher growth rate, increased L-valine titers (~25%) and a 3-4-fold reduction of by-product formation. Genome sequencing resulted in the identification of a loss-of-function mutation (UreD-E188*) in the gene ureD (urease accessory protein), which was shown to increase L-valine production by up to 100%. Furthermore, decreased L-alanine formation was attributed to a mutation in the global regulator GlxR. These results emphasize biosensor-driven evolution as a straightforward approach to improve growth and productivity of microbial production strains. PMID:26453945

  20. Nonlinear wave evolution in pressure-driven stratified flow of Newtonian and Herschel-Bulkley fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valluri, Prashant; Sahu, Kirti; Ding, Hang; Spelt, Peter; Matar, Omar; Lawrence, Chris

    2007-11-01

    Pressure-driven stratified channel flow of a Newtonian fluid flowing over a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) fluid is considered. The effects of yield stress and shear-thinning rheology on the nonlinear wave evolution are studied using numerical simulations; the HB rheology is regularized at low shear rates using a bi-viscosity formulation. Two different numerical methods were used to carry out the computations: a level-set method (based on that by Spelt, J. Comput. Phys. 2005) and a diffuse-interface method (based on that by Ding et al., J. Comput. Phys., in press). The simulations, which account for fluid inertia, surface tension and gravity are validated against linear theory predictions at early times. The results at later times show the spatio-temporal evolution into the nonlinear regime wherein waves are strongly deformed, leading to the onset of drop entrainment. It is shown that the apparent viscosity in the region of the HB fluid directly involved in the onset of entrainment is almost constant; unyielded regions are confined to wave troughs at late stages of the nonlinear evolution.

  1. Response of mountain plovers to plague-driven dynamics of black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sylvatic plague is a major factor influencing prairie dog colony dynamics in the western Great Plains. We studied the nesting response of the mountain plover (Charadrius montanus), a grassland bird that nests on prairie dog colonies, to plague-driven dynamics of prairie dog colonies at three sites i...

  2. Lattice gas dynamics: application to driven vortices in two dimensional superconductors.

    PubMed

    Gotcheva, Violeta; Wang, Albert T J; Teitel, S

    2004-06-18

    A continuous time Monte Carlo lattice gas dynamics is developed to model driven steady states of vortices in two dimensional superconducting networks. Dramatic differences are found when compared to a simpler Metropolis dynamics. Subtle finite size effects are found at low temperature, with a moving smectic that becomes unstable to an anisotropic liquid on sufficiently large length scales.

  3. Nuclear Reactions and Stellar Evolution: Unified Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, W.; Strother, T.

    2007-10-26

    Motivated by the success of kinetic theory in the description of observables in intermediate and high energy heavy ion collisions, we use kinetic theory to model the dynamics of collapsing iron cores in type II supernova explosions. The algorithms employed to model the collapse, some preliminary results and predictions, and the future of the code are discussed.

  4. Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics Driven by Large-Amplitude Whistlers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Tel'nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of radiation belt electrons driven by oblique large-amplitude whistler waves is studied. We show analytically and numerically that this is a stochastic process; the intensity of which depends on the wave power modified by Bessel functions. The type of this dependence is determined by the character of the nonlinear interaction due to coupling between action and phase. The results show that physically significant quantities have a relatively weak dependence on the wave power.

  5. Redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS

    SciTech Connect

    Beifiori, Alessandra; Saglia, Roberto P.; Bender, Ralf; Senger, Robert; Thomas, Daniel; Maraston, Claudia; Steele, Oliver; Masters, Karen L.; Pforr, Janine; Tojeiro, Rita; Johansson, Jonas; Nichol, Robert C.; Chen, Yan-Mei; Wake, David; Bolton, Adam; Brownstein, Joel R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Schneider, Donald P.; Skibba, Ramin; Pan, Kaike; and others

    2014-07-10

    We study the redshift evolution of the dynamical properties of ∼180, 000 massive galaxies from SDSS-III/BOSS combined with a local early-type galaxy sample from SDSS-II in the redshift range 0.1 ≤ z ≤ 0.6. The typical stellar mass of this sample is M{sub *} ∼2 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ☉}. We analyze the evolution of the galaxy parameters effective radius, stellar velocity dispersion, and the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift. As the effective radii of BOSS galaxies at these redshifts are not well resolved in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging we calibrate the SDSS size measurements with Hubble Space Telescope/COSMOS photometry for a sub-sample of galaxies. We further apply a correction for progenitor bias to build a sample which consists of a coeval, passively evolving population. Systematic errors due to size correction and the calculation of dynamical mass are assessed through Monte Carlo simulations. At fixed stellar or dynamical mass, we find moderate evolution in galaxy size and stellar velocity dispersion, in agreement with previous studies. We show that this results in a decrease of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio with redshift at >2σ significance. By combining our sample with high-redshift literature data, we find that this evolution of the dynamical to stellar mass ratio continues beyond z ∼ 0.7 up to z > 2 as M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} ∼(1 + z){sup –0.30±0.12}, further strengthening the evidence for an increase of M{sub dyn}/M{sub *} with cosmic time. This result is in line with recent predictions from galaxy formation simulations based on minor merger driven mass growth, in which the dark matter fraction within the half-light radius increases with cosmic time.

  6. Current-driven morphological evolution of single-layer epitaxial islands on crystalline substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Dwaipayan; Sfyris, Georgios I.; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2013-12-01

    We develop and validate a nonlinear model for the current-driven dynamics of single-layer epitaxial islands on crystalline substrates. Simulations based on the model show that the dependence of the stable steady island migration speed vm on the inverse of the island size is not linear for larger-than-critical island sizes. In this nonlinear regime, we report morphological transitions, Hopf bifurcations, and instabilities for various surface crystallographic orientations and island misfit strains. Proper rescaling of vm gives a universal linear relationship for its dependence on island size.

  7. Internal Dynamics and Crustal Evolution of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuber, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to improve understanding of the internal structure, crustal evolution, and thermal history of Mars by combining geophysical data analysis of topography, gravity and magnetics with results from analytical and computational modeling. Accomplishments thus far in this investigation include: (1) development of a new crustal thickness model that incorporates constraints from Mars meteorites, corrections for polar cap masses and other surface loads, Pratt isostasy, and core flattening; (2) determination of a refined estimate of crustal thickness of Mars from geoid/topography ratios (GTRs); (3) derivation of a preliminary estimate of the k(sub 2) gravitational Love number and a preliminary estimate of possible dissipation within Mars consistent with this value; and (4) an integrative analysis of the sequence of evolution of early Mars. During the remainder of this investigation we will: (1) extend models of degree-1 mantle convection from 2-D to 3-D; (2) investigate potential causal relationships and effects of major impacts on mantle plume formation, with primary application to Mars; (3) develop exploratory models to assess the convective stability of various Martian core states as relevant to the history of dynamo action; and (4) develop models of long-wavelength relaxation of crustal thickness anomalies to potentially explain the degree-1 structure of the Martian crust.

  8. Dynamics in genome evolution of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rachana; Das, Bhabatosh; Balakrish Nair, G; Basak, Surajit

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the etiological agent of the acute secretary diarrheal disease cholera, is still a major public health concern in developing countries. In former centuries cholera was a permanent threat even to the highly developed populations of Europe, North America, and the northern part of Asia. Extensive studies on the cholera bug over more than a century have made significant advances in our understanding of the disease and ways of treating patients. V. cholerae has more than 200 serogroups, but only few serogroups have caused disease on a worldwide scale. Until the present, the evolutionary relationship of these pandemic causing serogroups was not clear. In the last decades, we have witnessed a shift involving genetically and phenotypically varied pandemic clones of V. cholerae in Asia and Africa. The exponential knowledge on the genome of several representatives V. cholerae strains has been used to identify and analyze the key determinants for rapid evolution of cholera pathogen. Recent comparative genomic studies have identified the presence of various integrative mobile genetic elements (IMGEs) in V. cholerae genome, which can be used as a marker of differentiation of all seventh pandemic clones with very similar core genome. This review attempts to bring together some of the important researches in recent times that have contributed towards understanding the genetics, epidemiology and evolution of toxigenic V. cholerae strains.

  9. Interregional neural synchrony has similar dynamics during spontaneous and stimulus-driven states

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Avniel Singh; van den Honert, Rebecca N.; Martin, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the correspondence between spontaneous and stimulus-driven neural activity can reveal intrinsic properties of the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated that many large-scale functional networks have a similar spatial structure during spontaneous and stimulus-driven states. However, it is unknown whether the temporal dynamics of network activity are also similar across these states. Here we demonstrate that, in the human brain, interhemispheric coupling of somatosensory regions is preferentially synchronized in the high beta frequency band (~20–30 Hz) in response to somatosensory stimulation and interhemispheric coupling of auditory cortices is preferentially synchronized in the alpha frequency band (~7–12 Hz) in response to auditory stimulation. Critically, these stimulus-driven synchronization frequencies were also selective to these interregional interactions during spontaneous activity. This similarity between stimulus-driven and spontaneous states suggests that frequency-specific oscillatory dynamics are intrinsic to the interactions between the nodes of these brain networks. PMID:23512004

  10. Linking stress-driven microstructural evolution in nanocrystalline aluminium with grain boundary doping of oxygen.

    PubMed

    He, Mo-Rigen; Samudrala, Saritha K; Kim, Gyuseok; Felfer, Peter J; Breen, Andrew J; Cairney, Julie M; Gianola, Daniel S

    2016-01-01

    The large fraction of material residing at grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals and alloys is responsible for their ultrahigh strength, but also undesirable microstructural instability under thermal and mechanical loads. However, the underlying mechanism of stress-driven microstructural evolution is still poorly understood and precludes rational alloy design. Here we combine quantitative in situ electron microscopy with three-dimensional atom-probe tomography to directly link the mechanics and kinetics of grain boundary migration in nanocrystalline Al films with the excess of O atoms at the boundaries. Site-specific nanoindentation leads to grain growth that is retarded by impurities, and enables quantification of the critical stress for the onset of grain boundary migration. Our results show that a critical excess of impurities is required to stabilize interfaces in nanocrystalline materials against mechanical driving forces, providing new insights to guide control of deformation mechanisms and tailoring of mechanical properties apart from grain size alone. PMID:27071458

  11. Linking stress-driven microstructural evolution in nanocrystalline aluminium with grain boundary doping of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Mo-Rigen; Samudrala, Saritha K.; Kim, Gyuseok; Felfer, Peter J.; Breen, Andrew J.; Cairney, Julie M.; Gianola, Daniel S.

    2016-04-01

    The large fraction of material residing at grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals and alloys is responsible for their ultrahigh strength, but also undesirable microstructural instability under thermal and mechanical loads. However, the underlying mechanism of stress-driven microstructural evolution is still poorly understood and precludes rational alloy design. Here we combine quantitative in situ electron microscopy with three-dimensional atom-probe tomography to directly link the mechanics and kinetics of grain boundary migration in nanocrystalline Al films with the excess of O atoms at the boundaries. Site-specific nanoindentation leads to grain growth that is retarded by impurities, and enables quantification of the critical stress for the onset of grain boundary migration. Our results show that a critical excess of impurities is required to stabilize interfaces in nanocrystalline materials against mechanical driving forces, providing new insights to guide control of deformation mechanisms and tailoring of mechanical properties apart from grain size alone.

  12. Linking stress-driven microstructural evolution in nanocrystalline aluminium with grain boundary doping of oxygen

    PubMed Central

    He, Mo-Rigen; Samudrala, Saritha K.; Kim, Gyuseok; Felfer, Peter J.; Breen, Andrew J.; Cairney, Julie M.; Gianola, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    The large fraction of material residing at grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals and alloys is responsible for their ultrahigh strength, but also undesirable microstructural instability under thermal and mechanical loads. However, the underlying mechanism of stress-driven microstructural evolution is still poorly understood and precludes rational alloy design. Here we combine quantitative in situ electron microscopy with three-dimensional atom-probe tomography to directly link the mechanics and kinetics of grain boundary migration in nanocrystalline Al films with the excess of O atoms at the boundaries. Site-specific nanoindentation leads to grain growth that is retarded by impurities, and enables quantification of the critical stress for the onset of grain boundary migration. Our results show that a critical excess of impurities is required to stabilize interfaces in nanocrystalline materials against mechanical driving forces, providing new insights to guide control of deformation mechanisms and tailoring of mechanical properties apart from grain size alone. PMID:27071458

  13. Evolution of Porosity and Channelization of an Erosive Medium Driven by Fluid Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Arshad; Clotet, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that a homogeneous porous medium composed of sedimentary particles develops channels due to curvature driven growth of fluid flow coupled with an increase in porosity. While the flux is increased linearly, the evolution of porosity is observed to be intermittent with erosion occurring at the boundaries between low and high porosity regions. Calculating the spatial distribution of the flow within the medium and the fluid stress given by the product of the fluid flux and the volume fraction of the particles, we find that the system organizes itself to be locally near the threshold needed to erode the weakest particles. A statistical model simulating the coupling of the erosion, transport, and deposition of the particles to the local fluid flow and porosity is found to capture the overall development of the observed channels.

  14. Cosmological evolution of alpha driven by a general coupling with quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Valerio; Rosati, Francesca

    2005-05-01

    A general model for the cosmological evolution of the fine structure constant α driven by a typical quintessence scenario is presented. We consider a coupling between the quintessence scalar phi and the electromagnetic kinetic term FμνFμν, given by a general function BF(phi). We study the dependence of the cosmological Δα(t) upon the functional form of BF(phi) and discuss the constraints imposed by the data. We find that different cosmological histories for Δα(t) are possible within the available constraints. We also find that quasar absorption spectra evidence for a time variation of α, if confirmed, is not incompatible with Oklo and meteorite limits.

  15. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  16. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications. PMID:12398441

  17. Coupled dynamics of translation and collapse of acoustically driven microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Anil J; Szeri, Andrew J

    2002-10-01

    Pressure gradients drive the motion of microbubbles relative to liquids in which they are suspended. Examples include the hydrostatic pressure due to a gravitational field, and the pressure gradients in a sound field, useful for acoustic levitation. In this paper, the equations describing the coupled dynamics of radial oscillation and translation of a microbubble are given. The formulation is based on a recently derived expression for the hydrodynamic force on a bubble of changing size in an incompressible liquid [J. Magnaudet and D. Legendre, Phys. Fluids 10, 550-556 (1998)]. The complex interaction between radial and translation dynamics is best understood by examination of the added momentum associated with the liquid motion caused by the moving bubble. Translation is maximized when the bubble collapses violently. The new theory for coupled collapse and translation dynamics is compared to past experiments and to previous theories for decoupled translation dynamics. Special attention is paid to bubbles of relevance in biomedical applications.

  18. Meiotic recombination counteracts male-biased mutation (male-driven evolution).

    PubMed

    Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Ito, Michihiko; Ogata, Mitsuaki; Oota, Hiroki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Miura, Ikuo

    2016-01-27

    Meiotic recombination is believed to produce greater genetic variation despite the fact that deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-replication errors are a major source of mutations. In some vertebrates, mutation rates are higher in males than in females, which developed the theory of male-driven evolution (male-biased mutation). However, there is little molecular evidence regarding the relationships between meiotic recombination and male-biased mutation. Here we tested the theory using the frog Rana rugosa, which has both XX/XY- and ZZ/ZW-type sex-determining systems within the species. The male-to-female mutation-rate ratio (α) was calculated from homologous sequences on the X/Y or Z/W sex chromosomes, which supported male-driven evolution. Surprisingly, each α value was notably higher in the XX/XY-type group than in the ZZ/ZW-type group, although α should have similar values within a species. Interestingly, meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes did not occur except at terminal regions in males of this species. Then, by subdividing α into two new factors, a replication-based male-to-female mutation-rate ratio (β) and a meiotic recombination-based XX-to-XY/ZZ-to-ZW mutation-rate ratio (γ), we constructed a formula describing the relationship among a nucleotide-substitution rate and the two factors, β and γ. Intriguingly, the β- and γ-values were larger and smaller than 1, respectively, indicating that meiotic recombination might reduce male-biased mutations.

  19. Gravity-driven structures and rift basin evolution: Rio Muni Basin, offshore equatorial West Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, J.P.

    1995-08-01

    Offshore Equatorial Guinea, west Africa, gravity-driven nappes, more than 1 km thick and 15 km from head to toe, provide key evidence in reconstructing the late synrift: evolution of this part of the South Atlantic margin basin system. Furthermore, Aptian-Cenomanian carbonate and clastic rocks in the nappes` allochthonous hanging walls are attracting interest as a new exploration play in west Africa. The nappes exhibit a range of geometries that suggest they share many of the same deformation processes as thin-skin thrust and linked extensional fault systems. Not only are these structures significant in their own right, representing a rare example of gravity tectonics in the virtual absence of major halokinesis, but their presence may record an other-wise undetectable process active during the transition from a rift basin to a passive continental margin. A review of Equatorial Guinea in its pre-Atlantic configuration, alongside neighboring basins in Brazil (the Sergipe-Alagoas basin) and Gabon, suggests that gravity gliding was sustained by a relatively steep, westward paleoslope promoted by east-ward offset of the locus of thermal uplift from the rift basin (i.e., a simple shear model of basin formation). In contrast to gravity-driven structures in most postrift settings, the Equatorial Guinea nappes developed at the close of the Aptian-Albian synrift episode in response to a growing bathymetric deep caused by rapid subsidence outpacing restricted sedimentation.

  20. Dynamic evolution of interface roughness during friction and wear processes.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, K J; Bigerelle, M; Mathia, T G; Dubois, A; Dubar, L

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic evolution of surface roughness and influence of initial roughness (S(a) = 0.282-6.73 µm) during friction and wear processes has been analyzed experimentally. The mirror polished and rough surfaces (28 samples in total) have been prepared by surface polishing on Ti-6Al-4V and AISI 1045 samples. Friction and wear have been tested in classical sphere/plane configuration using linear reciprocating tribometer with very small displacement from 130 to 200 µm. After an initial period of rapid degradation, dynamic evolution of surface roughness converges to certain level specific to a given tribosystem. However, roughness at such dynamic interface is still increasing and analysis of initial roughness influence revealed that to certain extent, a rheology effect of interface can be observed and dynamic evolution of roughness will depend on initial condition and history of interface roughness evolution. Multiscale analysis shows that morphology created in wear process is composed from nano, micro, and macro scale roughness. Therefore, mechanical parts working under very severe contact conditions, like rotor/blade contact, screws, clutch, etc. with poor initial surface finishing are susceptible to have much shorter lifetime than a quality finished parts. PMID:23440686

  1. Two-dimensional nonlinear dynamics of four driven vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Guzdar, P.N.; Finn, J.M.; Rogalsky, A.V.; Drake, J.F. )

    1994-03-01

    The interaction of four alternately driven counterrotating vortices in a two-dimensional box, with inpenetrable free-slip boundary conditions in the [ital x] direction and periodic boundary conditions in the [ital y] direction, has been studied numerically. For viscosity above a critical value the nonlinear state consists of four alternately counterrotating vortices. For a lower value of the viscosity the system evolves to a nonlinear steady state consisting of four vortices and shear flow generated by the peeling instability'' [Drake [ital et] [ital al]., Phys. Fluids B 4, 447 (1992)]. For a still lower viscosity the steady-state nonlinear state undergoes a Hopf bifurcation. The periodic state is caused by a secondary instability associated with vortex pairing. However, the vorticity of the shear flow, though periodic, has a definite sign. With a further decrease in the viscosity, a global bifurcation gives rise to a periodic state during which the vorticity of the shear flow changes sign. At even lower viscosity, there is a transition to a steady state, involving dominantly shear flow and a two-vortex state. Finally, this state undergoes a bifurcation to a temporally chaotic state, with the further decrease of viscosity. The results are compared to some recent experiments in fluids with driven vortices [P. Tabeling [ital et] [ital al]., J. Fluid Mech. 215, 511 (1990)].

  2. Koala Retroviruses: Evolution and Disease Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-11-01

    A retroviral etiology for malignant neoplasias in koalas has long been suspected. Evidence for retroviral involvement was bolstered in 2000 by the isolation of a koala retrovirus (KoRV), now termed KoRV-A. KoRV-A is an endogenous retrovirus-a retrovirus that infects germ cells-a feature that makes it a permanent resident of the koala genome. KoRV-A lacks the genetic diversity of an exogenous retrovirus, a quality associated with the ability of a retrovirus to cause neoplasias. In 2013, a second KoRV isolate, KoRV-B, was obtained from koalas with lymphomas in the Los Angeles Zoo. Unlike KoRV-A, which is present in the genomes of all koalas in the United States, KoRV-B is restricted in its distribution and is associated with host pathology (neoplastic disease). Here, our current understanding of the evolution of endogenous and exogenous KoRVs, and the relationship between them, is reviewed to build a perspective on the future impact of these viruses on koala sustainability.

  3. Koala Retroviruses: Evolution and Disease Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-11-01

    A retroviral etiology for malignant neoplasias in koalas has long been suspected. Evidence for retroviral involvement was bolstered in 2000 by the isolation of a koala retrovirus (KoRV), now termed KoRV-A. KoRV-A is an endogenous retrovirus-a retrovirus that infects germ cells-a feature that makes it a permanent resident of the koala genome. KoRV-A lacks the genetic diversity of an exogenous retrovirus, a quality associated with the ability of a retrovirus to cause neoplasias. In 2013, a second KoRV isolate, KoRV-B, was obtained from koalas with lymphomas in the Los Angeles Zoo. Unlike KoRV-A, which is present in the genomes of all koalas in the United States, KoRV-B is restricted in its distribution and is associated with host pathology (neoplastic disease). Here, our current understanding of the evolution of endogenous and exogenous KoRVs, and the relationship between them, is reviewed to build a perspective on the future impact of these viruses on koala sustainability. PMID:26958909

  4. Quantum recurrence and fractional dynamic localization in ac-driven perfect state transfer Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-06-15

    Quantum recurrence and dynamic localization are investigated in a class of ac-driven tight-binding Hamiltonians, the Krawtchouk quantum chain, which in the undriven case provides a paradigmatic Hamiltonian model that realizes perfect quantum state transfer and mirror inversion. The equivalence between the ac-driven single-particle Krawtchouk Hamiltonian H{sup -hat} (t) and the non-interacting ac-driven bosonic junction Hamiltonian enables to determine in a closed form the quasi energy spectrum of H{sup -hat} (t) and the conditions for exact wave packet reconstruction (dynamic localization). In particular, we show that quantum recurrence, which is predicted by the general quantum recurrence theorem, is exact for the Krawtchouk quantum chain in a dense range of the driving amplitude. Exact quantum recurrence provides perfect wave packet reconstruction at a frequency which is fractional than the driving frequency, a phenomenon that can be referred to as fractional dynamic localization.

  5. Hopf bifurcation in the evolution of networks driven by spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Quansheng; Kolwankar, Kiran M; Samal, Areejit; Jost, Jürgen

    2012-11-01

    We study the interplay of topology and dynamics in a neural network connected with spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) synapses. Stimulated with periodic spike trains, the STDP-driven network undergoes a synaptic pruning process and evolves to a residual network. We examine the variation of topological and dynamical properties of the residual network by varying two key parameters of STDP: synaptic delay and the ratio between potentiation and depression. Our extensive numerical simulations of the leaky integrate-and-fire model show that there exists two regions in the parameter space. The first corresponds to fixed-point configurations, where the distribution of peak synaptic conductances and the firing rate of neurons remain constant over time. The second corresponds to oscillating configurations, where both topological and dynamical properties vary periodically, which is a result of a fixed point becoming a limit cycle via a Hopf bifurcation. This leads to interesting questions regarding the implications of these rhythms in the topology and dynamics of the network for learning and cognitive processing.

  6. Hyperuniform Density Fluctuations and Diverging Dynamic Correlations in Periodically Driven Colloidal Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, Elsen; Berthier, Ludovic

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of particle irreversibility in periodically driven colloidal suspensions has been interpreted as resulting either from a nonequilibrium phase transition to an absorbing state or from the chaotic nature of particle trajectories. Using a simple model of a driven suspension, we show that a nonequilibrium phase transition is accompanied by hyperuniform static density fluctuations in the vicinity of the transition, where we also observe strong dynamic heterogeneities reminiscent of dynamics in glassy materials. We find that single particle dynamics becomes intermittent and strongly non-Fickian, and that collective dynamics becomes spatially correlated over diverging length scales. Our results suggest that the two theoretical scenarii can be experimentally discriminated using particle-resolved measurements of standard static and dynamic observables.

  7. Predator-driven brain size evolution in natural populations of Trinidadian killifish (Rivulus hartii).

    PubMed

    Walsh, Matthew R; Broyles, Whitnee; Beston, Shannon M; Munch, Stephan B

    2016-07-13

    Vertebrates exhibit extensive variation in relative brain size. It has long been assumed that this variation is the product of ecologically driven natural selection. Yet, despite more than 100 years of research, the ecological conditions that select for changes in brain size are unclear. Recent laboratory selection experiments showed that selection for larger brains is associated with increased survival in risky environments. Such results lead to the prediction that increased predation should favour increased brain size. Work on natural populations, however, foreshadows the opposite trajectory of evolution; increased predation favours increased boldness, slower learning, and may thereby select for a smaller brain. We tested the influence of predator-induced mortality on brain size evolution by quantifying brain size variation in a Trinidadian killifish, Rivulus hartii, from communities that differ in predation intensity. We observed strong genetic differences in male (but not female) brain size between fish communities; second generation laboratory-reared males from sites with predators exhibited smaller brains than Rivulus from sites in which they are the only fish present. Such trends oppose the results of recent laboratory selection experiments and are not explained by trade-offs with other components of fitness. Our results suggest that increased male brain size is favoured in less risky environments because of the fitness benefits associated with faster rates of learning and problem-solving behaviour. PMID:27412278

  8. Two-body Relaxation Driven Evolution of the Young Stellar Disk in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šubr, Ladislav; Haas, Jaroslav

    2014-05-01

    The center of our Galaxy hosts almost two hundred very young stars, a subset of which is orbiting the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) in a relatively thin disk-like structure. First analyses indicated a power-law surface density profile of the disk, ΣvpropR β with β = -2. Recently, however, doubts about this profile arose. In particular, it now seems to be better described by a sort of broken power law. By means of both analytical arguments and numerical N-body modeling, we show that such a broken power-law profile is a natural consequence of the two-body relaxation of the disk. Due to the small relative velocities of the nearby stars in co-planar Keplerian orbits around the SMBH, two-body relaxation is effective enough to affect the evolution of the disk on timescales comparable to its estimated age. In the inner, densest part of the disk, the profile becomes rather flat (β ≈ -1) while the outer parts keep imprints of the initial state. Our numerical models show that the observed projected surface density profile of the young stellar disk can result from two-body relaxation driven evolution of a disk with initial single power-law profile with -2 <~ β <~ -1.5. In addition, we suggest that two-body relaxation may have caused a significant radial migration of the S-stars toward the central SMBH, thus playing an important role in their formation scenario.

  9. Real-time estimation of lead-acid battery parameters: A dynamic data-driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yue; Shen, Zheng; Ray, Asok; Rahn, Christopher D.

    2014-12-01

    This short paper presents a recently reported dynamic data-driven method, Symbolic Dynamic Filtering (SDF), for real-time estimation of the state-of-health (SOH) and state-of-charge (SOC) in lead-acid batteries, as an alternative to model-based analysis techniques. In particular, SOC estimation relies on a k-NN regression algorithm while SOH estimation is obtained from the divergence between extracted features. The results show that the proposed data-driven method successfully distinguishes battery voltage responses under different SOC and SOH situations.

  10. Constant Acceleration: Experiments with a Fan-Driven Dynamics Cart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the rebuilding of a Project Physics fan cart on a PASCO dynamics cart chassis for achieving greatly reduced frictional forces. Suggests four experiments for the rebuilt cart: (1) acceleration on a level track, (2) initial negative velocity, (3) different masses and different forces, and (4) inclines. (MVL)

  11. Nonadiabatic evolution of electronic states by electron nuclear dynamics theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelberg, Frank

    The problem of how to determine the nonadiabatic content of any given dynamic process involving molecular motion is addressed in the context of Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END) theory. Specifically, it is proposed to cast the dynamic END wave function into the language of static electronic configurations with time dependent complex-valued amplitudes. This is achieved by adiabatic transport of an electronic basis along the classical nuclear trajectories of the studied molecular system, as yielded by END simulation. Projecting the dynamic wave function on this basis yields a natural distinction between adiabatic and nonadiabatic components of the motion considered. Tracing the evolution of the leading configurations is shown to be a helpful device for clarifying the physical nature of electronic excitation processes. For illustration of these concepts, dynamic configuration analysis is applied to the scattering of a proton by a lithium atom.

  12. Evolution of the long-wavelength, subduction-driven topography of South America since 150 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, N. E.; Gurnis, M.; Williams, S.; Bower, D. J.; Seton, M.; Müller, D.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction to the west of South America spans 6000 km along strike and has been active for over 250 Myr. The influence of the history of subduction on the geodynamics of South America has been profound, driving mountain building and arc volcanism in the Andean Cordillera. Here, we investigate the long-wavelength changes in the topography of South America associated with subduction and plate motion and their interplay with the lithospheric deformation associated with the opening of the South Atlantic. We pay particular attention to the topographic expression of flat-lying subduction zones. We develop time-dependent geodynamic models of mantle flow and lithosphere deformation to investigate the evolution of South American dynamic and total topography since the late Jurassic (150 Ma). Our models are semi-empirical because the computational cost of fully dynamic, evolutionary models is still prohibitive. We impose the kinematics of global plate reconstructions with deforming continents in forward global mantle convection models with compositionally distinct crust and continental lithosphere embedded within the thermal lithosphere. The shallow thermal structure of subducting slabs is imposed, allowing us to investigate the evolution of dynamic topography around flat slab segments in time-dependent models. Multiple cases are used to investigate how the evolution of South American dynamic topography is influenced by mantle viscosity, the kinematics of the opening of the South Atlantic and alternative scenarios for recent and past flat-slab subduction. We predict that the migration of South America over sinking oceanic lithosphere resulted in continental tilt to the west until ~ 45 Ma, inverting to an eastward tilt thereafter. This first-order result is consistent with the reversal of the drainage of the Amazon River system. We investigate which scenarios of flat-slab subduction since the Eocene are compatible with geological constraints on the evolution of the Solimoes

  13. Dynamic analysis of evolutive conservative systems. Discussion of eigenmode crossings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morand, H. J. P.

    1984-01-01

    After an analysis of the close connection between the symmetries of a dynamical system and the multiplicity of its vibrational natural frequencies, it is proved by variational arguments that for a system of invariable symmetry the eigenfrequencies associated with the eigenmodes of a given symmetry type do not cross, in general, during the evolution of this system. The theory is implemented by some numerical calculations applied to the analysis of the evolution of the axisymmetric hydroelastic modes of the Ariane launch vehicle during burning of the first stage.

  14. Nonequilibrium Dynamics and the Evolution of Superfluid Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauls, Jame

    2016-07-01

    The interior crust and the liquid core of neutron stars are predicted to be a mixture of neutron and proton superfluids and a liquid of relativistic electrons and muons. Quantized vortices in the neutron superfluid and quantized flux lines in the proton superconductor are topological defects of these hadronic condensates. I discuss the roles of nucleation, interaction and evolution of topological defects under non-equilibrium conditions in the context of our current understanding and models of the rotational dynamics of pulsars, as well as thermal and magnetic field evolution of neutron stars. I include some speculative ideas on possibile turbulent vortex states in neutron star interiors.

  15. Gravity-driven soap film dynamics in subcritical regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auliel, M. I.; Castro, F.; Sosa, R.; Artana, G.

    2015-10-01

    We undertake the analysis of soap-film dynamics with the classical approach of asymptotic expansions. We focus our analysis in vertical soap film tunnels operating in subcritical regimes with elastic Mach numbers Me=O(10-1) . Considering the associated set of nondimensional numbers that characterize this flow, we show that the flow behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) divergence free flow with variable mass density. When the soap film dynamics agrees with that of a 2D and almost constant mass density flow, the regions where the second invariant of the velocity gradient is non-null correspond to regions where the rate of change of film thickness is non-negligible.

  16. Nonlinear Actuation Dynamics of Driven Casimir Oscillators with Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broer, Wijnand; Waalkens, Holger; Svetovoy, Vitaly B.; Knoester, Jasper; Palasantzas, George

    2015-11-01

    At separations below 100 nm, Casimir-Lifshitz forces strongly influence the actuation dynamics of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in dry vacuum conditions. For a micron-size plate oscillating near a surface, which mimics a frequently used setup in experiments with MEMS, we show that the roughness of the surfaces significantly influences the qualitative dynamics of the oscillator. Via a combination of analytical and numerical methods, it is shown that surface roughness leads to a clear increase of initial conditions associated with chaotic motion, that eventually lead to stiction between the surfaces. Since stiction leads to a malfunction of MEMS oscillators, our results are of central interest for the design of microdevices. Moreover, stiction is of significance for fundamentally motivated experiments performed with MEMS.

  17. Dynamics of the driven Goodwin business cycle equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S. N.; Todorov, M. D.

    2015-10-01

    We study dynamics of the Goodwin nonlinear accelerator business cycle model with periodic forced autonomous investment Ia(t) = a(1 - cos ωt), where a and ω are the amplitude and the frequency of investment. We give examples of the parameters a and ω when the chaotic oscillations of income are possible. We find the critical values of amplitude acr (ω): if a > acr (ω) the period of the income equals to the driving period T=2π/ω.

  18. Dynamical Logic Driven by Classified Inferences Including Abduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawa, Koji; Gunji, Yukio-Pegio

    2010-11-01

    We propose a dynamical model of formal logic which realizes a representation of logical inferences, deduction and induction. In addition, it also represents abduction which is classified by Peirce as the third inference following deduction and induction. The three types of inference are represented as transformations of a directed graph. The state of a relation between objects of the model fluctuates between the collective and the distinctive. In addition, the location of the relation in the sequence of the relation influences its state.

  19. Nonperturbative stochastic dynamics driven by strongly correlated colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Jun; Li, Rui; You, J. Q.; Yu, Ting

    2015-02-01

    We propose a quantum model consisting of two remote qubits interacting with two correlated colored noises and establish an exact stochastic Schrödinger equation for this open quantum system. It is shown that the quantum dynamics of the qubit system is profoundly modulated by the mutual correlation between baths and the bath memory capability through dissipation and fluctuation. We report a physical effect on generating inner correlation and entanglement of two distant qubits arising from the strong bath-bath correlation.

  20. Rapid contemporary evolution and clonal food web dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laura E; Becks, Lutz; Ellner, Stephen P; Hairston, Nelson G; Yoshida, Takehito; Fussmann, Gregor F

    2009-06-12

    Character evolution that affects ecological community interactions often occurs contemporaneously with temporal changes in population size, potentially altering the very nature of those dynamics. Such eco-evolutionary processes may be most readily explored in systems with short generations and simple genetics. Asexual and cyclically parthenogenetic organisms such as microalgae, cladocerans and rotifers, which frequently dominate freshwater plankton communities, meet these requirements. Multiple clonal lines can coexist within each species over extended periods, until either fixation occurs or a sexual phase reshuffles the genetic material. When clones differ in traits affecting interspecific interactions, within-species clonal dynamics can have major effects on the population dynamics. We first consider a simple predator-prey system with two prey genotypes, parametrized with data from a well-studied experimental system, and explore how the extent of differences in defence against predation within the prey population determine dynamic stability versus instability of the system. We then explore how increased potential for evolution affects the community dynamics in a more general community model with multiple predator and multiple prey genotypes. These examples illustrate how microevolutionary 'details' that enhance or limit the potential for heritable phenotypic change can have significant effects on contemporaneous community-level dynamics and the persistence and coexistence of species.

  1. Coherently driven, ultrafast electron-phonon dynamics in transport junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, Joshua E.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-07-28

    Although the vast majority of studies of transport via molecular-scale heterojunctions have been conducted in the (static) energy domain, experiments are currently beginning to apply time domain approaches to the nanoscale transport problem, combining spatial with temporal resolution. It is thus an opportune time for theory to develop models to explore both new phenomena in, and new potential applications of, time-domain, coherently driven molecular electronics. In this work, we study the interaction of a molecular phonon with an electronic wavepacket transmitted via a conductance junction within a time-domain model that treats the electron and phonon on equal footing and spans the weak to strong electron-phonon coupling strengths. We explore interference between two coherent energy pathways in the electronic subspace, thus complementing previous studies of coherent phenomena in conduction junctions, where the stationary framework was used to study interference between spatial pathways. Our model provides new insights into phase decoherence and population relaxation within the electronic subspace, which have been conventionally treated by density matrix approaches that often rely on phenomenological parameters. Although the specific case of a transport junction is explored, our results are general, applying also to other instances of coupled electron-phonon systems.

  2. Evolution and selection of river networks: statics, dynamics, and complexity.

    PubMed

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rigon, Riccardo; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2014-02-18

    Moving from the exact result that drainage network configurations minimizing total energy dissipation are stationary solutions of the general equation describing landscape evolution, we review the static properties and the dynamic origins of the scale-invariant structure of optimal river patterns. Optimal channel networks (OCNs) are feasible optimal configurations of a spanning network mimicking landscape evolution and network selection through imperfect searches for dynamically accessible states. OCNs are spanning loopless configurations, however, only under precise physical requirements that arise under the constraints imposed by river dynamics--every spanning tree is exactly a local minimum of total energy dissipation. It is remarkable that dynamically accessible configurations, the local optima, stabilize into diverse metastable forms that are nevertheless characterized by universal statistical features. Such universal features explain very well the statistics of, and the linkages among, the scaling features measured for fluvial landforms across a broad range of scales regardless of geology, exposed lithology, vegetation, or climate, and differ significantly from those of the ground state, known exactly. Results are provided on the emergence of criticality through adaptative evolution and on the yet-unexplored range of applications of the OCN concept. PMID:24550264

  3. Nonlinear Evolution of the Radiation-driven Magneto-acoustic Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-04-01

    We examine the nonlinear development of unstable magnetosonic waves driven by a background radiative flux—the radiation-driven magneto-acoustic instability (RMI, a.k.a. the "photon bubble" instability). The RMI may serve as a persistent source of density, radiative flux, and magnetic field fluctuations in stably stratified, optically thick media. The conditions for instability are present in a variety of astrophysical environments and do not require the radiation pressure to dominate or the magnetic field to be strong. Here, we numerically study the saturation properties of the RMI, covering three orders of magnitude in the relative strength of radiation, magnetic field, and gas energies. Two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of local, stably stratified domains are conducted with Zeus-MP in the optically thick, highly conducting limit. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations of Blaes & Socrates in that the RMI operates even in gas-pressure-dominated environments that are weakly magnetized. The saturation amplitude is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure. Keeping this ratio constant, we find that the saturation amplitude peaks when the magnetic pressure is comparable to the radiation pressure. We discuss the implications of our results for the dynamics of magnetized stellar envelopes, where the RMI should act as a source of sub-photospheric perturbations.

  4. NONLINEAR EVOLUTION OF THE RADIATION-DRIVEN MAGNETO-ACOUSTIC INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Rodrigo; Socrates, Aristotle

    2013-04-20

    We examine the nonlinear development of unstable magnetosonic waves driven by a background radiative flux-the radiation-driven magneto-acoustic instability (RMI, a.k.a. the ''photon bubble'' instability). The RMI may serve as a persistent source of density, radiative flux, and magnetic field fluctuations in stably stratified, optically thick media. The conditions for instability are present in a variety of astrophysical environments and do not require the radiation pressure to dominate or the magnetic field to be strong. Here, we numerically study the saturation properties of the RMI, covering three orders of magnitude in the relative strength of radiation, magnetic field, and gas energies. Two-dimensional, time-dependent radiation-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of local, stably stratified domains are conducted with Zeus-MP in the optically thick, highly conducting limit. Our results confirm the theoretical expectations of Blaes and Socrates in that the RMI operates even in gas-pressure-dominated environments that are weakly magnetized. The saturation amplitude is a monotonically increasing function of the ratio of radiation to gas pressure. Keeping this ratio constant, we find that the saturation amplitude peaks when the magnetic pressure is comparable to the radiation pressure. We discuss the implications of our results for the dynamics of magnetized stellar envelopes, where the RMI should act as a source of sub-photospheric perturbations.

  5. Induced photoemission from driven nonadiabatic dynamics in an avoided crossing system

    SciTech Connect

    Arasaki, Yasuki; Mizuno, Yuta; Takatsuka, Kazuo; Scheit, Simona

    2014-12-21

    When vibrational dynamics on an ionic state (large dipole moment) is coupled to that on a neutral state (small dipole moment) such as at an avoided crossing in the alkali halide system, the population transfer between the states cause oscillation of the molecular dipole, leading to dipole emission. Such dynamics may be driven by an external field. We study how the coupled wavepacket dynamics is affected by the parameters (intensity, frequency) of the driving field with the aim of making use of the photoemission as an alternative detection scheme of femtosecond and subfemtosecond vibrational and electronic dynamics or as a characteristic optical source.

  6. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  7. Topological structure dynamics revealing collective evolution in active nematics

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xia-qing; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2013-01-01

    Topological defects frequently emerge in active matter like bacterial colonies, cytoskeleton extracts on substrates, self-propelled granular or colloidal layers and so on, but their dynamical properties and the relations to large-scale organization and fluctuations in these active systems are seldom touched. Here we reveal, through a simple model for active nematics using self-driven hard elliptic rods, that the excitation, annihilation and transportation of topological defects differ markedly from those in non-active media. These dynamical processes exhibit strong irreversibility in active nematics in the absence of detailed balance. Moreover, topological defects are the key factors in organizing large-scale dynamic structures and collective flows, resulting in multi-spatial temporal effects. These findings allow us to control the self-organization of active matter through topological structures. PMID:24346733

  8. Dynamic Data-Driven Event Reconstruction for Atmospheric Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Mirin, A; Serban, R; Kosovic, B

    2005-03-14

    This is a collaborative LDRD Exploratory Research project involving four directorates--Energy & Environment, Engineering, NAI and Computation. The project seeks to answer the following critical questions regarding atmospheric releases--''How much material was released? When? Where? and What are the potential consequences?'' Inaccurate estimation of the source term can lead to gross errors, time delays during a crisis, and even fatalities. We are developing a capability that seamlessly integrates observational data streams with predictive models in order to provide the best possible estimates of unknown source term parameters, as well as optimal and timely situation analyses consistent with both models and data. Our approach utilizes Bayesian inference and stochastic sampling methods (Markov Chain and Sequential Monte Carlo) to reformulate the inverse problem into a solution based on efficient sampling of an ensemble of predictive simulations, guided by statistical comparisons with data. We are developing a flexible and adaptable data-driven event-reconstruction capability for atmospheric releases that provides (1) quantitative probabilistic estimates of the principal source-term parameters (e.g., the time-varying release rate and location); (2) predictions of increasing fidelity as an event progresses and additional data become available; and (3) analysis tools for sensor network design and uncertainty studies. Our computational framework incorporates multiple stochastic algorithms, operates with a range and variety of atmospheric models, and runs on multiple computer platforms, from workstations to large-scale computing resources. Our final goal is a multi-resolution capability for both real-time operational response and high fidelity multi-scale applications.

  9. Dynamic Binding of Driven Interfaces in Coupled Ultrathin Ferromagnetic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, P. J.; Stamps, R. L.; Jamet, J.-P.; Ferré, J.; Baltz, V.; Rodmacq, B.; Politi, P.

    2010-06-01

    We demonstrate experimentally dynamic interface binding in a system consisting of two coupled ferromagnetic layers. While domain walls in each layer have different velocity-field responses, for two broad ranges of the driving field H, walls in the two layers are bound and move at a common velocity. The bound states have their own velocity-field response and arise when the isolated wall velocities in each layer are close, a condition which always occurs as H→0. Several features of the bound states are reproduced using a one-dimensional model, illustrating their general nature.

  10. Dynamic binding of driven interfaces in coupled ultrathin ferromagnetic layers.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, P J; Stamps, R L; Jamet, J-P; Ferré, J; Baltz, V; Rodmacq, B; Politi, P

    2010-06-11

    We demonstrate experimentally dynamic interface binding in a system consisting of two coupled ferromagnetic layers. While domain walls in each layer have different velocity-field responses, for two broad ranges of the driving field H, walls in the two layers are bound and move at a common velocity. The bound states have their own velocity-field response and arise when the isolated wall velocities in each layer are close, a condition which always occurs as H→0. Several features of the bound states are reproduced using a one-dimensional model, illustrating their general nature. PMID:20867268

  11. Dynamics of the driven Goodwin business cycle equation

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S. N.; Todorov, M. D.

    2015-10-28

    We study dynamics of the Goodwin nonlinear accelerator business cycle model with periodic forced autonomous investment I{sub a}(t) = a(1 – cos ωt), where a and ω are the amplitude and the frequency of investment. We give examples of the parameters a and ω when the chaotic oscillations of income are possible. We find the critical values of amplitude a{sub cr} (ω): if a > a{sub cr} (ω) the period of the income equals to the driving period T=2π/ω.

  12. Temporal Evolution of Energetic Particles and Magnetic Field Waves Near CME-driven shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Mihir; Smith, Charles; Lee, Martin; Mason, Glenn; Al-Dayeh, Maher

    Coronal Mass Ejection-or CME-driven interplanetary (IP) shocks are responsible for caus-ing the so-called energetic storm particle (ESP) events observed at Earth. However, despite recent observational and theoretical advances, many important questions regarding such CME-associated particle events remain unanswered. This is because ESP events occur due to a con-fluence of numerous poorly understood physical effects all of whose contributions can vary with time and location. These effects include: the origin, structure, and obliquity of the shocks, the nature of wave-particle interactions and the type of turbulence that is present near the shocks, the distribution and composition of the seed populations, and the type of injection and accel-eration processes involved. In this paper, we combine observations of ˜0.1-0.5 MeV/nucleon O and Fe ions with that of the magnetic field near four CME-driven IP shocks observed at the Advanced Composition Explorer spacecraft to differentiate between shocks where the seed population is most likely dominated by thermal solar wind ions and those events where it is dominated by pre-existing suprathermal ions. In particular, we use the temporal evolution of (1) O and Fe intensities, (2) power-law spectral indices of O, (3) the Fe/O and C/O ratios, and (4) the magnetic field power spectrum to identify unique signatures that provide strong clues regarding the origin of the seed population. Such observational signatures may also be useful in modeling the properties of the so-called large gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events that are primarily accelerated by CME shocks near the Sun.

  13. Interfacial Instabilities Driven by Self-Gravity in the ISM: Onset and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueckstaedt, R. M.; Hunter, J. H., Jr.

    2000-12-01

    As the sites of all present day star formation within the Milky Way, cold molecular clouds are a vital link in the evolution of tenuous interstellar gas into stars. Any comprehensive theory of star formation must include a study of the hydrodynamic processes that effect molecular cloud morphology. In the ISM, hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulence play large roles in shaping clouds and creating regions capable of gravitational collapse. One of the key forces in the interstellar environment is self-gravity. Regardless of the mechanism initially responsible for creating density enhancements, self-gravity must ultimately drive the final collapse. A recent study has shown that self-gravity also gives rise to an interfacial instability that persists in the static limit when a density discontinuity exists (Hunter, Whitaker & Lovelace 1997). This instability also persists in the absence of a constant gravitational acceleration, unlike the familiar Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Analytic studies in Cartesian geometry predict that for perturbations proportional to exp(-iωt), the instability has an incompressible growth rate ω2= -2πG(ρ 1-ρ 2)2/(ρ1+ρ2). The growth rate is independent of the perturbation wavelength. Studies have also included cases in cylindrical geometry in which a static density interface has proven stable to kink modes but unstable to sausage modes. In the case of sausage modes, (perturbations in the radial direction), there exists a critical wavelength below which the instability does not appear. In this paper, we present two-dimensional numerical models designed to examine this self-gravity driven instability. A hydrodynamic code with self-gravity is used to test the analytic predictions in Cartesian and cylindrical geometries and to follow the instability into the nonlinear regime. We consider how the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities, including self-gravity driven instabilities, can have a role in shaping the ISM. We discuss implications for

  14. Dynamic scaling behaviors of linear fractal Langevin-type equation driven by nonconserved and conserved noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Xun, Zhi-Peng; Wu, Ling; Chen, Yi-Li; Xia, Hui; Hao, Da-Peng; Tang, Gang

    2016-06-01

    In order to study the effects of the microscopic details of fractal substrates on the scaling behavior of the growth model, a generalized linear fractal Langevin-type equation, ∂h / ∂t =(- 1) m + 1 ν∇ mzrw h (zrw is the dynamic exponent of random walk on substrates), driven by nonconserved and conserved noise is proposed and investigated theoretically employing scaling analysis. Corresponding dynamic scaling exponents are obtained.

  15. Entropy-driven structure and dynamics in carbon nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    McNutt, Nicholas W; Wang, Qifei; Rios, Orlando; Keffer, David J

    2014-01-01

    New carbon composite materials are being developed that contain carbon nanocrystallites in the range of 5 17 A in radius dispersed within an amorphous carbon matrix. Evaluating the applicability of these materials for use in battery electrodes requires a molecular-level understanding of the thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic properties of the nanocrystallites. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations reveal the molecular-level mechanisms for such experimental observations as the increased spacing between carbon planes in nanocrystallites as a function of decreasing crystallite size. As the width of this spacing impacts Li-ion capacity, an explanation of the origin of this distance is relevant to understanding anode performance. It is thus shown that the structural configuration of these crystallites is a function of entropy. The magnitude of out-of-plane ripples, binding energy between layers, and frequency of characteristic planar modes are reported over a range of nanocrystallite sizes and temperatures. This fundamental information for layered carbon nanocrystallites may be used to explain enhanced lithium ion diffusion within the carbon composites.

  16. Dynamic scene stitching driven by visual cognition model.

    PubMed

    Zou, Li-hui; Zhang, Dezheng; Wulamu, Aziguli

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic scene stitching still has a great challenge in maintaining the global key information without missing or deforming if multiple motion interferences exist in the image acquisition system. Object clips, motion blurs, or other synthetic defects easily occur in the final stitching image. In our research work, we proceed from human visual cognitive mechanism and construct a hybrid-saliency-based cognitive model to automatically guide the video volume stitching. The model consists of three elements of different visual stimuli, that is, intensity, edge contour, and scene depth saliencies. Combined with the manifold-based mosaicing framework, dynamic scene stitching is formulated as a cut path optimization problem in a constructed space-time graph. The cutting energy function for column width selections is defined according to the proposed visual cognition model. The optimum cut path can minimize the cognitive saliency difference throughout the whole video volume. The experimental results show that it can effectively avoid synthetic defects caused by different motion interferences and summarize the key contents of the scene without loss. The proposed method gives full play to the role of human visual cognitive mechanism for the stitching. It is of high practical value to environmental surveillance and other applications.

  17. Chaotic dynamics of flexible beams driven by external white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awrejcewicz, J.; Krysko, A. V.; Papkova, I. V.; Zakharov, V. M.; Erofeev, N. P.; Krylova, E. Yu.; Mrozowski, J.; Krysko, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Mathematical models of continuous structural members (beams, plates and shells) subjected to an external additive white noise are studied. The structural members are considered as systems with infinite number of degrees of freedom. We show that in mechanical structural systems external noise can not only lead to quantitative changes in the system dynamics (that is obvious), but also cause the qualitative, and sometimes surprising changes in the vibration regimes. Furthermore, we show that scenarios of the transition from regular to chaotic regimes quantified by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) can lead to erroneous conclusions, and a support of the wavelet analysis is needed. We have detected and illustrated the modifications of classical three scenarios of transition from regular vibrations to deterministic chaos. The carried out numerical experiment shows that the white noise lowers the threshold for transition into spatio-temporal chaotic dynamics. A transition into chaos via the proposed modified scenarios developed in this work is sensitive to small noise and significantly reduces occurrence of periodic vibrations. Increase of noise intensity yields decrease of the duration of the laminar signal range, i.e., time between two successive turbulent bursts decreases. Scenario of transition into chaos of the studied mechanical structures essentially depends on the control parameters, and it can be different in different zones of the constructed charts (control parameter planes). Furthermore, we found an interesting phenomenon, when increase of the noise intensity yields surprisingly the vibrational characteristics with a lack of noisy effect (chaos is destroyed by noise and windows of periodicity appear).

  18. Black hole dynamical evolution in a Lorentz-violating spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, S.; Salesi, G.

    2011-04-15

    We consider the black hole dynamical evolution in the framework of a Lorentz-violating spacetime endowed with a Schwarzchild-like momentum-dependent metric. Large deviations from the Hawking-Bekenstein predictions are obtained, depending on the values of the Lorentz-violating parameter {lambda} introduced. A nontrivial evolution comes out, following mainly from the existence of a nonvanishing minimum mass: for large Lorentz violations, most of the black hole evaporation takes place in the initial stage, which is then followed by a stationary stage (whose duration depends on the value of {lambda}) where the mass does not change appreciably. Furthermore, for the final stage of evolution, our model predicts a sweet slow death of the black hole, whose ''slowness'' again depends on {lambda}, in contrast with the violent final explosion predicted by the standard theory.

  19. Task-Based Cohesive Evolution of Dynamic Brain Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Applications of graph theory to neuroscience have resulted in significant progress towards a mechanistic understanding of the brain. Functional network representation of the brain has linked efficient network structure to psychometric intelligence and altered configurations with disease. Dynamic graphs provide us with tools to further study integral properties of the brain; specifically, the mathematical convention of hyperedges has allowed us to study the brain's cross-linked structure. Hyperedges capture the changes in network structure by identifying groups of brain regions with correlation patterns that change cohesively through time. We performed a hyperedge analysis on functional MRI data from 86 subjects and explored the cohesive evolution properties of their functional brain networks as they performed a series of tasks. Our results establish the hypergraph as a useful measure in understanding functional brain dynamics over tasks and reveal characteristic differences in the co-evolution structure of task-specific networks.

  20. Autonomous Evolution of Dynamic Gaits with Two Quadruped Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Takamura, Seichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Fujita, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    A challenging task that must be accomplished for every legged robot is creating the walking and running behaviors needed for it to move. In this paper we describe our system for autonomously evolving dynamic gaits on two of Sony's quadruped robots. Our evolutionary algorithm runs on board the robot and uses the robot's sensors to compute the quality of a gait without assistance from the experimenter. First we show the evolution of a pace and trot gait on the OPEN-R prototype robot. With the fastest gait, the robot moves at over 10/min/min., which is more than forty body-lengths/min. While these first gaits are somewhat sensitive to the robot and environment in which they are evolved, we then show the evolution of robust dynamic gaits, one of which is used on the ERS-110, the first consumer version of AIBO.

  1. Dynamical Evolution of the Alpha and Proxima Centauri Triple System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Rachel; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2015-01-01

    Proxima Centauri is approximately 15,000 AU from the Alpha Centauri binary and moving through the galaxy on a similar path, and is thought to be in a loosely bound orbit about the binary. Dynamic simulations show that this configuration can form from a less extreme triple system. As our nearest neighbors, these stars command great interest as potential planet hosts, and the dynamics of the stars govern the formation of any planets within the system. Here we present a scenario for the evolution of Alpha Centauri A and B and Proxima Centauri as a triple system, to establish limits on the evolution of the binary since formation and allow for a better understanding of planet formation therein.

  2. Bioattractors: dynamical systems theory and the evolution of regulatory processes.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Johannes; Monk, Nick

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we illustrate how dynamical systems theory can provide a unifying conceptual framework for evolution of biological regulatory systems. Our argument is that the genotype-phenotype map can be characterized by the phase portrait of the underlying regulatory process. The features of this portrait--such as attractors with associated basins and their bifurcations--define the regulatory and evolutionary potential of a system. We show how the geometric analysis of phase space connects Waddington's epigenetic landscape to recent computational approaches for the study of robustness and evolvability in network evolution. We discuss how the geometry of phase space determines the probability of possible phenotypic transitions. Finally, we demonstrate how the active, self-organizing role of the environment in phenotypic evolution can be understood in terms of dynamical systems concepts. This approach yields mechanistic explanations that go beyond insights based on the simulation of evolving regulatory networks alone. Its predictions can now be tested by studying specific, experimentally tractable regulatory systems using the tools of modern systems biology. A systematic exploration of such systems will enable us to understand better the nature and origin of the phenotypic variability, which provides the substrate for evolution by natural selection.

  3. Habitable Planets: Interior Dynamics and Long-Term Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tackley, Paul J.; Ammann, Michael M.; Brodholt, John P.; Dobson, David P.; Valencia, Diana

    2014-04-01

    Here, the state of our knowledge regarding the interior dynamics and evolution of habitable terrestrial planets including Earth and super-Earths is reviewed, and illustrated using state-of-the-art numerical models. Convection of the rocky mantle is the key process that drives the evolution of the interior: it causes plate tectonics, controls heat loss from the metallic core (which generates the magnetic field) and drives long-term volatile cycling between the atmosphere/ocean and interior. Geoscientists have been studying the dynamics and evolution of Earth's interior since the discovery of plate tectonics in the late 1960s and on many topics our understanding is very good, yet many first-order questions remain. It is commonly thought that plate tectonics is necessary for planetary habitability because of its role in long-term volatile cycles that regulate the surface environment. Plate tectonics is the surface manifestation of convection in the 2900-km deep rocky mantle, yet exactly how plate tectonics arises is still quite uncertain; other terrestrial planets like Venus and Mars instead have a stagnant lithosphere- essentially a single plate covering the entire planet. Nevertheless, simple scalings as well as more complex models indicate that plate tectonics should be easier on larger planets (super-Earths), other things being equal. The dynamics of terrestrial planets, both their surface tectonics and deep mantle dynamics, change over billions of years as a planet cools. Partial melting is a key process influencing solid planet evolution. Due to the very high pressure inside super-Earths' mantles the viscosity would normally be expected to be very high, as is also indicated by our density function theory (DFT) calculations. Feedback between internal heating, temperature and viscosity leads to a superadiabatic temperature profile and self-regulation of the mantle viscosity such that sluggish convection still occurs.

  4. Field driven ferromagnetic phase evolution originating from the domain boundaries in antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anitsotropy films

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Juanita; Hauet, Thomas; Gunther, Christian; Hovorka, Ondrej; Berger, Andreas; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Hellwig, Olav

    2008-05-01

    Strong perpendicular anisotropy systems consisting of Co/Pt multilayer stacks that are antiferromagnetically coupled via thin Ru or NiO layers have been used as model systems to study the competition between local interlayer exchange and long-range dipolar interactions [1,2]. Magnetic Force Microscopy (MFM) studies of such systems reveal complex magnetic configurations with a mix of antiferromagnetic (AF) and ferromagnetic (FM) phases. However, MFM allows detecting surface stray fields only and can interact strongly with the magnetic structure of the sample, thus altering the original domain configuration of interest [3,4]. In the current study they combine magnetometry and state-of-the-art soft X-ray transmission microscopy (MXTM) to investigate the external field driven FM phase evolution originating from the domain boundaries in such antiferromagnetically coupled perpendicular anisotropy films. MXTM allows directly imaging the perpendicular component of the magnetization in an external field at sub 100 nm spatial resolution without disturbing the magnetic state of the sample [5,6]. Here they compare the domain evolution for two similar [Co(4{angstrom})/Pt(7{angstrom})]x-1/{l_brace}Co(4{angstrom})/Ru(9{angstrom})/[Co(4{angstrom})/Pt(7{angstrom})]x-1{r_brace}16 samples with slightly different Co/Pt stack thickness, i.e. slightly different strength of internal dipolar fields. After demagnetization they obtain AF domains with either sharp AF domain walls for the thinner multilayer stacks or 'tiger-tail' domain walls (one dimensional FM phase) for the thicker stacks. When increasing the external field strength the sharp domain walls in the tinner stack sample transform into the one-dimensional FM phase, which then serves as nucleation site for further FM stripe domains that spread out into all directions to drive the system towards saturation. Energy calculations reveal the subtle difference between the two samples and help to understand the observed transition, when

  5. Two-body relaxation driven evolution of the young stellar disk in the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Šubr, Ladislav; Haas, Jaroslav

    2014-05-10

    The center of our Galaxy hosts almost two hundred very young stars, a subset of which is orbiting the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) in a relatively thin disk-like structure. First analyses indicated a power-law surface density profile of the disk, Σ∝R {sup β} with β = –2. Recently, however, doubts about this profile arose. In particular, it now seems to be better described by a sort of broken power law. By means of both analytical arguments and numerical N-body modeling, we show that such a broken power-law profile is a natural consequence of the two-body relaxation of the disk. Due to the small relative velocities of the nearby stars in co-planar Keplerian orbits around the SMBH, two-body relaxation is effective enough to affect the evolution of the disk on timescales comparable to its estimated age. In the inner, densest part of the disk, the profile becomes rather flat (β ≈ –1) while the outer parts keep imprints of the initial state. Our numerical models show that the observed projected surface density profile of the young stellar disk can result from two-body relaxation driven evolution of a disk with initial single power-law profile with –2 ≲ β ≲ –1.5. In addition, we suggest that two-body relaxation may have caused a significant radial migration of the S-stars toward the central SMBH, thus playing an important role in their formation scenario.

  6. Lava flow dynamics driven by temperature-dependent viscosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniega, S.; Smrekar, S. E.; Anderson, S. W.; Stofan, E. R.

    2011-12-01

    As lava viscosity can change 1-2 orders of magnitude due to small changes in temperature, several studies have predicted the formation of low-viscosity/high-temperature "fingers" (similar to a Saffman-Taylor type instability) within an initially near-uniform flow. We examine the onset and evolution of such fingers within a uniform lava sheet flow due to an influx of lava with slightly-variable temperature. We assume Hele-shaw-type geometry (depth << other dimensions), Newtonian and laminar fluid flow, a simple Nahme's exponential law relating temperature and viscosity, and radiative heat-loss through the flow's upper surface. Through the use of numerical simulation and steady-state analysis of model equations, we identify solutions that provide pahoehoe lava flows with a natural mechanism for the formation of lava channels/tubes within a sheet flow. Preliminary results indicate that flow-focusing occurs rapidly due to the thermo-viscosity relation, but zones of hotter flow commonly settle into a new steady-state and it is difficult to create perpetually-lengthening hot-fingers of lava (which seem more physically similar to developing lava tubes). This suggests that additional and/or discontinuous physical processes (such as decreasing radiative rates due to thickening of the surface crust or crystallization abruptly retarding flow within lower-temperature regions) may play important roles in the continued growth of preferred flow zones. We also derive qualitative and quantitative estimates of environmental controls on finger size, spacing, and location. This work has application to Earth and planetary volcanology studies as pahoehoe flows dominate terrestrial basaltic lavas and the eruption/emplacement mechanics that yield long lava flows on the Earth and Mars are not yet well understood.

  7. Evolution and selection of river networks: Statics, dynamics, and complexity

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldo, Andrea; Rigon, Riccardo; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Maritan, Amos; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Moving from the exact result that drainage network configurations minimizing total energy dissipation are stationary solutions of the general equation describing landscape evolution, we review the static properties and the dynamic origins of the scale-invariant structure of optimal river patterns. Optimal channel networks (OCNs) are feasible optimal configurations of a spanning network mimicking landscape evolution and network selection through imperfect searches for dynamically accessible states. OCNs are spanning loopless configurations, however, only under precise physical requirements that arise under the constraints imposed by river dynamics—every spanning tree is exactly a local minimum of total energy dissipation. It is remarkable that dynamically accessible configurations, the local optima, stabilize into diverse metastable forms that are nevertheless characterized by universal statistical features. Such universal features explain very well the statistics of, and the linkages among, the scaling features measured for fluvial landforms across a broad range of scales regardless of geology, exposed lithology, vegetation, or climate, and differ significantly from those of the ground state, known exactly. Results are provided on the emergence of criticality through adaptative evolution and on the yet-unexplored range of applications of the OCN concept. PMID:24550264

  8. Magnetic relaxation dynamics driven by the first-order character of magnetocaloric La(Fe,Mn,Si)13.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Edmund; Bratko, Milan; Caplin, A David; Barcza, Alexander; Katter, Matthias; Ghivelder, Luis; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-08-13

    Here, we study the temporal evolution of the magnetic field-driven paramagnetic to ferromagnetic transition in the La(Fe,Mn,Si)13 material family. Three compositions are chosen that show varying strengths of the first-order character of the transition, as determined by the relative magnitude of their magnetic hysteresis and temperature separation between the zero-field transition temperature Tc and the temperature Tcrit, where the transition becomes continuous. Systematic variations in the fixed field, isothermal rate of relaxation are observed as a function of temperature and as a function of the degree of first-order character. The relaxation rate is reduced in more weakly first-order compositions and is also reduced as the temperature is increased towards Tcrit At temperatures above Tcrit, the metastability of the transition vanishes along with its associated temporal dynamics.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'. PMID:27402929

  9. The origin and dynamic evolution of chemical information transfer.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Sandra; Schmitt, Thomas; Schaefer, H Martin

    2011-04-01

    Although chemical communication is the most widespread form of communication, its evolution and diversity are not well understood. By integrating studies of a wide range of terrestrial plants and animals, we show that many chemicals are emitted, which can unintentionally provide information (cues) and, therefore, act as direct precursors for the evolution of intentional communication (signals). Depending on the content, design and the original function of the cue, there are predictable ways that selection can enhance the communicative function of chemicals. We review recent progress on how efficacy-based selection by receivers leads to distinct evolutionary trajectories of chemical communication. Because the original function of a cue may channel but also constrain the evolution of functional communication, we show that a broad perspective on multiple selective pressures acting upon chemicals provides important insights into the origin and dynamic evolution of chemical information transfer. Finally, we argue that integrating chemical ecology into communication theory may significantly enhance our understanding of the evolution, the design and the content of signals in general.

  10. Capsule implosions driven by dynamic hohlraum x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, James

    2005-10-01

    Dynamic hohlraum experiments at the Z facility already implode capsules with up to 80 kJ absorbed x-ray energy. However, many challenging issues remain for ICF. The present experiments use diagnostic capsules to address two of these issues: symmetry measurement and control and building understanding of the capsule/hohlraum implosion system. A suite of x-ray spectrometers record time and space resolved spectra emitted by Ar tracer atoms in the implosion core, simultaneously from up to three different quasi-orthogonal directions. Comparing the results with simulation predictions provide severe tests of understanding. These data also can used to produce a tomographic reconstruction of the time resolved core temperature and density profiles. X-ray and neutron diagnostics are used to examine how the implosion conditions change as the capsule design changes. The capsule design changes include variations in CH wall thickness and diameter, Ge-doped CH shells, and SiO2 shells. In addition, a new campaign investigating Be capsule implosions is beginning. Be capsules may offer superior performance for dynamic hohlraum research and it may be possible to investigate NIF-relevant Be implosion issues such as the fill tube effects, sensitivity to columnar growth associated with sputtered Be capsule fabrication, and the effect of Cu dopants on implosion conditions. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the U.S. Dept. of Energy under contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. * In collaboration with G.A. Rochau, G.A. Chandler, S.A. Slutz, P.W. Lake, G. Cooper, G.S. Dunham, R.J. Leeper, R. Lemke, T.A. Mehlhorn, T.J. Nash, D.S. Nielsen, K. Peterson, C.L. Ruiz, D.B. Sinars, J. Torres, W. Varnum, Sandia; R.C. Mancini, T.J. Buris-Mog, UNR; I. Golovkin, J.J. MacFarlane, PRISM; A. Nikro, D. Steinman, J.D. Kilkenny, H. Xu, General Atomics; M. Bump, T.C. Moore, K-tech; D.G. Schroen, Schafer

  11. Dynamic Symmetry of Indirectly Driven ICF Capsules on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Town, R. P. J.

    2013-10-01

    In order to achieve ignition it is important to control the growth of low-mode asymmetries as the capsule is compressed. Understanding the time-dependent evolution of the shape of the imploding capsule, hot spot and surrounding fuel layer is crucial to optimizing implosion performance. A design and experimental campaign to examine the sources of asymmetry and to measure the symmetry throughout the implosion has been developed and executed on the NIF. For the first time on NIF, two-dimensional radiographs of the capsule during its implosion phase have been measured to infer the symmetry of the radiation drive. Time dependent equatorial symmetry has been measured of gas-filled capsules and capsules with cryogenic DT layers. These measurements have been used to modify the hohlraum geometry and the wavelength tuning to improve the inflight implosion symmetry. The technique is being extended to study azimuthal symmetry by imaging along the hohlraum axis. We have also expanded our shock timing measurements by the addition of extra mirrors inside the re-entrant cone to allow the simultaneous measurement of shock symmetry in three locations on a single shot, providing a measurement of asymmetries up to mode 4 in both the equatorial and azimuthal planes. The shape of the hot spot during final stagnation is measured using time-resolved imaging of the self-emission, and information on the shape of the fuel at stagnation can be obtained from Compton radiography using a wire-backlighter. In addition to x-ray diagnostics, a series of neutron and proton measurements of the low-mode areal density of the fuel at peak compression and at shock-flash time have been made. This talk will discuss the new imaging techniques, the results, and the analysis of the experiments done to date and their implication for ignition on NIF. The sensitivity of the in-flight and final implosion symmetry to imposed changes will be presented and compared to model predictions. This work performed under the

  12. On the impact of radiation pressure on the dynamics and inner structure of dusty wind-driven shells

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-González, Sergio; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2014-04-20

    Massive young stellar clusters are strong sources of radiation and mechanical energy. Their powerful winds and radiation pressure sweep up interstellar gas into thin expanding shells that trap the ionizing radiation produced by the central clusters affecting the dynamics and the distribution of their ionized gas. Here we continue our comparison of the star cluster winds and radiation pressure effects on the dynamics of shells around young massive clusters. We calculate the impact that radiation pressure has on the distribution of matter and thermal pressure within such shells, as well as on the density-weighted ionization parameter U{sub w} , and put our results on the diagnostic diagram, which allows one to discriminate between the wind-dominated and radiation-dominated regimes. We found that model-predicted values of the ionization parameter agree well with typical values found in local starburst galaxies. Radiation pressure may affect the inner structure and the dynamics of wind-driven shells, but only during the earliest stages of evolution (before ∼3 Myr) or if a major fraction of the star cluster mechanical luminosity is dissipated or radiated away within the star cluster volume and thus the star cluster mechanical energy output is significantly smaller than star cluster synthetic models predict. However, even in these cases radiation dominates over the wind dynamical pressure only if the exciting cluster is embedded into a high-density ambient medium.

  13. Supernova-driven outflows and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong-Zhong; Wasserburg, G J

    2012-03-27

    We present a general phenomenological model for the metallicity distribution (MD) in terms of [Fe/H] for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). These galaxies appear to have stopped accreting gas from the intergalactic medium and are fossilized systems with their stars undergoing slow internal evolution. For a wide variety of infall histories of unprocessed baryonic matter to feed star formation, most of the observed MDs can be well described by our model. The key requirement is that the fraction of the gas mass lost by supernova-driven outflows is close to unity. This model also predicts a relationship between the total stellar mass and the mean metallicity for dSphs in accord with properties of their dark matter halos. The model further predicts as a natural consequence that the abundance ratios [E/Fe] for elements such as O, Mg, and Si decrease for stellar populations at the higher end of the [Fe/H] range in a dSph. We show that, for infall rates far below the net rate of gas loss to star formation and outflows, the MD in our model is very sharply peaked at one [Fe/H] value, similar to what is observed in most globular clusters. This result suggests that globular clusters may be end members of the same family as dSphs. PMID:22411827

  14. Temperature driven evolution of thermal, electrical, and optical properties of Ti–Al–N coatings

    PubMed Central

    Rachbauer, Richard; Gengler, Jamie J.; Voevodin, Andrey A.; Resch, Katharina; Mayrhofer, Paul H.

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic single phase cubic (c) Ti1−xAlxN thin films are used in various industrial applications due to their high thermal stability, which beneficially effects lifetime and performance of cutting and milling tools, but also find increasing utilization in electronic and optical devices. The present study elucidates the temperature-driven evolution of heat conductivity, electrical resistivity and optical reflectance from room temperature up to 1400 °C and links them to structural and chemical changes in Ti1−xAlxN coatings. It is shown that various decomposition phenomena, involving recovery and spinodal decomposition (known to account for the age hardening phenomenon in c-Ti1−xAlxN), as well as the cubic to wurtzite phase transformation of spinodally formed AlN-enriched domains, effectively increase the thermal conductivity of the coatings from ∼3.8 W m−1 K−1 by a factor of three, while the electrical resistivity is reduced by one order of magnitude. A change in the coating color from metallic grey after deposition to reddish-golden after annealing to 1400 °C is related to the film structure and discussed in terms of film reflectivity. PMID:23482424

  15. Supernova-driven outflows and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yong-Zhong; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a general phenomenological model for the metallicity distribution (MD) in terms of [Fe/H] for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). These galaxies appear to have stopped accreting gas from the intergalactic medium and are fossilized systems with their stars undergoing slow internal evolution. For a wide variety of infall histories of unprocessed baryonic matter to feed star formation, most of the observed MDs can be well described by our model. The key requirement is that the fraction of the gas mass lost by supernova-driven outflows is close to unity. This model also predicts a relationship between the total stellar mass and the mean metallicity for dSphs in accord with properties of their dark matter halos. The model further predicts as a natural consequence that the abundance ratios [E/Fe] for elements such as O, Mg, and Si decrease for stellar populations at the higher end of the [Fe/H] range in a dSph. We show that, for infall rates far below the net rate of gas loss to star formation and outflows, the MD in our model is very sharply peaked at one [Fe/H] value, similar to what is observed in most globular clusters. This result suggests that globular clusters may be end members of the same family as dSphs. PMID:22411827

  16. Wind-driven evolution of white dwarf binaries to type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Xu, Xiao-jie; Li, X.-D.

    2014-01-01

    In the single-degenerate scenario for the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), a white dwarf rapidly accretes hydrogen- or helium-rich material from its companion star and appears as a supersoft X-ray source. This picture has been challenged by the properties of the supersoft X-ray sources with very low mass companions and the observations of several nearby SNe Ia. It has been pointed out that the X-ray radiation or the wind from the accreting white dwarf can excite winds or strip mass from the companion star, thus significantly influencing the mass transfer processes. In this paper, we perform detailed calculations of the wind-driven evolution of white dwarf binaries. We present the parameter space for the possible SN Ia progenitors and for the surviving companions after the SNe. The results show that the ex-companion stars of SNe Ia have characteristics more compatible with the observations, compared with those in the traditional single-degenerate scenario.

  17. Supernova-driven outflows and chemical evolution of dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong-Zhong; Wasserburg, G J

    2012-03-27

    We present a general phenomenological model for the metallicity distribution (MD) in terms of [Fe/H] for dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). These galaxies appear to have stopped accreting gas from the intergalactic medium and are fossilized systems with their stars undergoing slow internal evolution. For a wide variety of infall histories of unprocessed baryonic matter to feed star formation, most of the observed MDs can be well described by our model. The key requirement is that the fraction of the gas mass lost by supernova-driven outflows is close to unity. This model also predicts a relationship between the total stellar mass and the mean metallicity for dSphs in accord with properties of their dark matter halos. The model further predicts as a natural consequence that the abundance ratios [E/Fe] for elements such as O, Mg, and Si decrease for stellar populations at the higher end of the [Fe/H] range in a dSph. We show that, for infall rates far below the net rate of gas loss to star formation and outflows, the MD in our model is very sharply peaked at one [Fe/H] value, similar to what is observed in most globular clusters. This result suggests that globular clusters may be end members of the same family as dSphs.

  18. Integrated Observations of ICME - Driven Substorm - Storm Evolution on 7 August 1998: Traditional and Non-Traditional Aspects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Sandholt, P. E.; Torbert, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain an integrated view of substorm-storm evolution in relation to well-defined interplanetary (IP) conditions, and to identify traditional and non-traditional aspects of the DP1 and DP2 current systems during substorm activity. Specifically, we report a case study of substorm/storm evolution driven by an ICME from ground observations around the oval in relation to geoeffective IP parameters (Kan-Lee electric field, E-KL, and dynamic pressure, Pdyn), geomagnetic indices (AL, SYM-H and PCN) and satellite observations (from DMSP F13 and F14, Geotail, and GOES spacecraft). A sudden enhancement of E-KL at a southward turning of the IMF led to an initial transient phase (PCN-enhancement) followed by a persistent stage of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The persistent phase terminated abruptly at a steep E-KL reduction when the ICME magnetic field turned north after a 3-hour-long interval of enhanced E-KL. The persistent phase consisted of (i) a 45-min-long substorm growth phase (DP2 current) followed by (ii) a classical substorm onset (DP1 current) in the 0100 - 0300 MLT sector, (ii) a 30-min-long expansion phase, maximizing in the same sector, and (iii) a phase lasting for 1.5 hr of 10-15 min-long DP1 events in the 2100 - 2300 and 0400 - 0600 MLT sectors. In the morning sector the expansion phase was characterized by Ps6 pulsations and omega bands. The SYM-H evolution reached the level of a major storm after a 2.5-hour-long interval of E-KL ˜5 mV/m and elevated Pdyn in the substorm expansion phase. Magetosphere - Ionosphere (M - I) coupling during a localized electrojet event at 0500 MLT in the late stage of the substorm expansion is studied by ground - satellite conjunction data (Iceland - Geotail). The DP1 and DP2 components of geomagnetic activity are discussed in relation to M - I current systems and substorm current wedge morphology.

  19. Floquet-Magnus theory and generic transient dynamics in periodically driven many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Mori, Takashi; Saito, Keiji

    2016-04-01

    This work explores a fundamental dynamical structure for a wide range of many-body quantum systems under periodic driving. Generically, in the thermodynamic limit, such systems are known to heat up to infinite temperature states in the long-time limit irrespective of dynamical details, which kills all the specific properties of the system. In the present study, instead of considering infinitely long-time scale, we aim to provide a general framework to understand the long but finite time behavior, namely the transient dynamics. In our analysis, we focus on the Floquet-Magnus (FM) expansion that gives a formal expression of the effective Hamiltonian on the system. Although in general the full series expansion is not convergent in the thermodynamics limit, we give a clear relationship between the FM expansion and the transient dynamics. More precisely, we rigorously show that a truncated version of the FM expansion accurately describes the exact dynamics for a certain time-scale. Our theory reveals an experimental time-scale for which non-trivial dynamical phenomena can be reliably observed. We discuss several dynamical phenomena, such as the effect of small integrability breaking, efficient numerical simulation of periodically driven systems, dynamical localization and thermalization. Especially on thermalization, we discuss a generic scenario on the prethermalization phenomenon in periodically driven systems.

  20. Dynamics of a quantum two-state system in a linearly driven quantum bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichert, J.; Nalbach, P.; Thorwart, M.

    2016-09-01

    When an open quantum system is driven by an external time-dependent force, the coupling of the driving to the central system is usually included, whereas the impact of the driving field on the bath is neglected. We investigate the effect of a quantum bath of linearly driven harmonic oscillators on the relaxation dynamics of a quantum two-level system which is not directly driven. In particular, we calculate the frequency-dependent response of the system when the bath is subject to Dirac and Gaussian driving pulses. We show that a time-retarded effective force on the system is induced by the driven bath which depends on the full history of the perturbation and the spectral characteristics of the underlying bath. In particular, when a structured Ohmic bath with a pronounced Lorentzian peak is considered, the dynamical response of the system to a driven bath is qualitatively different than that of the undriven bath. Specifically, additional resonances appear which can be directly associated with a Jaynes-Cummings-like effective energy spectrum.

  1. Dynamic clustering of driven colloidal particles on a circular path.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Shogo; Shibata, Syuhei; Kawamura, Yuriko Sassa; Ichikawa, Masatoshi; Kimura, Yasuyuki

    2015-09-01

    We studied the collective motion of particles forced to move along a circular path in water by utilizing an optical vortex. Their collective motion, including the spontaneous formation of clusters and their dissociation, was observed. The observed temporal patterns depend on the number of particles on the path and the variation of their sizes. The addition of particles with different sizes suppresses the dynamic formation and dissociation of clusters and promotes the formation of specific stationary clusters. These experimental findings are reproduced by numerical simulations that take into account the hydrodynamic interaction between the particles and the radial trapping force confining the particles to the circular path. A transition between stationary and nonstationary clustering of the particles was observed by varying their size ratio in the binary-size systems. Our simulation reveals that the transition can be either continuous or discontinuous depending on the number of different-size particles. This result suggests that the size distribution of particles has a significant effect on the collective behavior of self-propelled particles in viscous fluids. PMID:26465469

  2. Surfactant-driven dynamics of immiscible jets under microfluidic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Joao; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2013-11-01

    We examine the dynamics of three water jets in oil (PDMS) under microfluidic confinement in the presence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate). Our experimental results demonstrate the occurrence of two flow regimes, ``jetting'' and ``dripping,'' depending on the choice of system parameters; the latter are the flow-rates of water and oil, the viscosity ratio, and the surfactant concentration. In the dripping regime, the average diameter of the water droplets decreases with increasing oil flow-rate until a transition to jetting occurs. In the jetting regime, and at high oil and water flow-rates, and high oil viscosity, our results demonstrate that each jet exhibit sinusoidal deformations that appear to be either in- or out-of-phase with those of their neighbours'. Numerical simulations of the system studied experimentally are also carried out using a volume-of-fluid approach, which account for the presence of insoluble surfactant. The results of these simulations capture the trends observed in the experiments. Skolkovo Foundation, UNIHEAT project.

  3. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). By comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps. PMID:25548155

  4. Degeneracy-driven self-structuring dynamics in selective repertoires.

    PubMed

    Atamas, Sergei P; Bell, Jonathan

    2009-08-01

    Numerous biological interactions, such as interactions between T cell receptors or antibodies with antigens, interactions between enzymes and substrates, or interactions between predators and prey are often not strictly specific. In such less specific, or "sloppy," systems, referred to here as degenerate systems, a given unit of a diverse resource (antigens, enzymatic substrates, prey) is at risk of being recognized and consumed by multiple consumers (lymphocytes, enzymes, predators). In this study, we model generalized degenerate consumer-resource systems of Lotka-Volterra and Verhulst types. In the degenerate systems of Lotka-Volterra, there is a continuum of types of consumer and resource based on variation of a single trait (characteristic, or preference). The consumers experience competition for a continuum of resource types. This non-local interaction system is modeled with partial differential-integral equations and shows spontaneous self-structuring of the consumer population that depends on the degree of interaction degeneracy between resource and consumer, but does not mirror the distribution of resource. We also show that the classical Verhulst (i.e. logistic) single population model can be generalized to a degenerate model, which shows qualitative behavior similar to that in the degenerate Lotka-Volterra model. These results provide better insight into the dynamics of selective systems in biology, suggesting that adaptation of degenerate repertoires is not a simple "mirroring" of the environment by the "fittest" elements of population.

  5. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-12-29

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). As a result, by comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps, we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.

  6. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-12-29

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling upmore » of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). As a result, by comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps, we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.« less

  7. Dynamics of a three-level V-type atom driven by a cavity photon and microwave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Li, Xue; Shi-Deng, Zhu; Ju, Liu; Ting-Hui, Xiao; Bao-Hua, Feng; Zhi-Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the dynamics of a three-level V-type atom driven simultaneously by a cavity photon and microwave field by examining the atomic population evolution. Owing to the coupling effect of the cavity photon, periodical oscillation of the population between the two upper states and the ground state takes place, which is the well-known vacuum Rabi oscillation. Meanwhile, the population exchange between the upmost level and the middle level can occur due to the driving action of the external microwave field. The general dynamic behavior is the superposition of a fast and a slow periodical oscillation under the cooperative and competitive effect of the cavity photon and the microwave field. Numerical results demonstrate that the time evolution of the population is strongly dependent on the atom-cavity coupling coefficient g and Rabi frequency Ω e that reflects the intensity of the external microwave field. By modulating the two parameters g and Ω e, a large number of population transfer behaviors can be achieved. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11434017 and 11374357) and the National Basics Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632704).

  8. Role of methyl groups in dynamics and evolution of biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nickels, Jonathan D; Curtis, J. E.; Oneill, Hugh; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have discovered strong differences between the dynamics of nucleic acids (RNA and DNA) and proteins, especially at low hydration and low temperatures. This difference is caused primarily by dynamics of methyl groups that are abundant in proteins, but are absent or very rare in RNA and DNA. In this paper, we present a hypothesis regarding the role of methyl groups as intrinsic plasticizers in proteins and their evolutionary selection to facilitate protein dynamics and activity. We demonstrate the profound effect methyl groups have on protein dynamics relative to nucleic acid dynamics, and note the apparent correlation of methyl group content in protein classes and their need for molecular flexibility. Moreover, we note the fastest methyl groups of some enzymes appear around dynamical centers such as hinges or active sites. Methyl groups are also of tremendous importance from a ydrophobicity/folding/entropy perspective. These significant roles, however, complement our hypothesis rather than preclude the recognition of methyl groups in the dynamics and evolution of biomolecules.

  9. Calculating gravitationally self-consistent sea level changes driven by dynamic topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austermann, J.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2015-12-01

    We present a generalized formalism for computing gravitationally self-consistent sea level changes driven by the combined effects of dynamic topography, geoid perturbations due to mantle convection, ice mass fluctuations and sediment redistribution on a deforming Earth. Our mathematical treatment conserves mass of the surface (ice plus ocean) load and the solid Earth. Moreover, it takes precise account of shoreline migration and the associated ocean loading. The new formalism avoids a variety of approximations adopted in previous models of sea level change driven by dynamic topography, including the assumption that a spatially fixed isostatic amplification of `air-loaded' dynamic topography accurately accounts for ocean loading effects. While our approach is valid for Earth models of arbitrary complexity, we present numerical results for a set of simple cases in which a pattern of dynamic topography is imposed, the response to surface mass loading assumes that Earth structure varies only with depth and that isostatic equilibrium is maintained at all times. These calculations, involving fluid Love number theory, indicate that the largest errors in previous predictions of sea level change driven by dynamic topography occur in regions of shoreline migration, and thus in the vicinity of most geological markers of ancient sea level. We conclude that a gravitationally self-consistent treatment of long-term sea level change is necessary in any effort to use such geological markers to estimate ancient ice volumes.

  10. Dynamic Data Driven Applications Systems (DDDAS) modeling for automatic target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Seetharaman, Guna; Darema, Frederica

    2013-05-01

    The Dynamic Data Driven Applications System (DDDAS) concept uses applications modeling, mathematical algorithms, and measurement systems to work with dynamic systems. A dynamic systems such as Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) is subject to sensor, target, and the environment variations over space and time. We use the DDDAS concept to develop an ATR methodology for multiscale-multimodal analysis that seeks to integrated sensing, processing, and exploitation. In the analysis, we use computer vision techniques to explore the capabilities and analogies that DDDAS has with information fusion. The key attribute of coordination is the use of sensor management as a data driven techniques to improve performance. In addition, DDDAS supports the need for modeling from which uncertainty and variations are used within the dynamic models for advanced performance. As an example, we use a Wide-Area Motion Imagery (WAMI) application to draw parallels and contrasts between ATR and DDDAS systems that warrants an integrated perspective. This elementary work is aimed at triggering a sequence of deeper insightful research towards exploiting sparsely sampled piecewise dense WAMI measurements - an application where the challenges of big-data with regards to mathematical fusion relationships and high-performance computations remain significant and will persist. Dynamic data-driven adaptive computations are required to effectively handle the challenges with exponentially increasing data volume for advanced information fusion systems solutions such as simultaneous target tracking and ATR.

  11. Analysis of dynamic behavior of multiple-stage planetary gear train used in wind driven generator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jungang; Wang, Yong; Huo, Zhipu

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic model of multiple-stage planetary gear train composed of a two-stage planetary gear train and a one-stage parallel axis gear is proposed to be used in wind driven generator to analyze the influence of revolution speed and mesh error on dynamic load sharing characteristic based on the lumped parameter theory. Dynamic equation of the model is solved using numerical method to analyze the uniform load distribution of the system. It is shown that the load sharing property of the system is significantly affected by mesh error and rotational speed; load sharing coefficient and change rate of internal and external meshing of the system are of obvious difference from each other. The study provides useful theoretical guideline for the design of the multiple-stage planetary gear train of wind driven generator.

  12. Dynamic Pulse-Driven Flowering Phenology in a Semiarid Shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krell, N.; Papuga, S. A.; Kipnis, E. L.; Nelson, K.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated springtime temperature has been convincingly linked to an increasingly earlier onset of phenological activity. Studies highlighting this phenomenon have generally been conducted in ecosystems where energy is the primary limiting factor. Importantly, phenological studies in semiarid ecosystems where water is the major limiting factor are rare. In semiarid ecosystems, the timing of phenological activity is also highly sensitive to discrete moisture pulses from infrequent precipitation events. The objective of this study is to identify the triggers of flowering phenology in a semiarid creosotebush-dominated ecosystem. Creosotebush (Larrea tridentata) is a repeat-flowering evergreen shrub that is the dominant species in three of the North American deserts. We present results from six years of daily meteorological and phenological data collected within the Santa Rita Experimental Range in southern Arizona. Our site is equipped with an eddy covariance tower providing estimates of water and carbon fluxes and associated meteorological variables including precipitation and soil moisture at multiple depths. Additionally, three digital cameras distributed within the footprint of the eddy provide daily images of phenological activity. Our results highlight substantial interannual variability in flowering phenology, both in spring and summer flowering. We show that spring flowering activity tends to be associated with energy triggers (e.g. temperature, growing degree days), whereas summer flowering activity tends to be associated with moisture triggers (e.g. large precipitation events, deep soil moisture). Our study suggests that changes in frequency and duration of precipitation events will impact timing of phenological activity resulting in important consequences for vegetation dynamics and pollinator behavior.

  13. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  14. Cascaded spin motive force driven by the dynamics of the skyrmion lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ohe, Jun-ichiro; Shimada, Yuhki

    2013-12-09

    We numerically investigate the spin motive force (SMF) driven by the dynamics of a Skyrmion lattice. The rotating mode of the Skyrmion core excited by the AC magnetic field induces the large spin-dependent electric field near the core. Due to the collective dynamics of Skyrmion lattice, the measurable voltage is enhanced by the cascade effect of the SMF. The amplitude of the AC voltage is estimated to 30 μV in a macroscopic sample, where 100 Skyrmions exist between two probes. We also investigate the SMF due to the dynamics of the helical magnetic state, where the enhancement of the SMF does not occur.

  15. Data-based virtual unmodeled dynamics driven multivariable nonlinear adaptive switching control.

    PubMed

    Chai, Tianyou; Zhang, Yajun; Wang, Hong; Su, Chun-Yi; Sun, Jing

    2011-12-01

    For a complex industrial system, its multivariable and nonlinear nature generally make it very difficult, if not impossible, to obtain an accurate model, especially when the model structure is unknown. The control of this class of complex systems is difficult to handle by the traditional controller designs around their operating points. This paper, however, explores the concepts of controller-driven model and virtual unmodeled dynamics to propose a new design framework. The design consists of two controllers with distinct functions. First, using input and output data, a self-tuning controller is constructed based on a linear controller-driven model. Then the output signals of the controller-driven model are compared with the true outputs of the system to produce so-called virtual unmodeled dynamics. Based on the compensator of the virtual unmodeled dynamics, the second controller based on a nonlinear controller-driven model is proposed. Those two controllers are integrated by an adaptive switching control algorithm to take advantage of their complementary features: one offers stabilization function and another provides improved performance. The conditions on the stability and convergence of the closed-loop system are analyzed. Both simulation and experimental tests on a heavily coupled nonlinear twin-tank system are carried out to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  16. Network evolution induced by the dynamical rules of two populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platini, Thierry; Zia, R. K. P.

    2010-10-01

    We study the dynamical properties of a finite dynamical network composed of two interacting populations, namely extrovert (a) and introvert (b). In our model, each group is characterized by its size (Na and Nb) and preferred degree (κa and \\kappa_b\\ll \\kappa_a ). The network dynamics is governed by the competing microscopic rules of each population that consist of the creation and destruction of links. Starting from an unconnected network, we give a detailed analysis of the mean field approach which is compared to Monte Carlo simulation data. The time evolution of the restricted degrees langkbbrang and langkabrang presents three time regimes and a non-monotonic behavior well captured by our theory. Surprisingly, when the population sizes are equal Na = Nb, the ratio of the restricted degree θ0 = langkabrang/langkbbrang appears to be an integer in the asymptotic limits of the three time regimes. For early times (defined by t < t1 = κb) the total number of links presents a linear evolution, where the two populations are indistinguishable and where θ0 = 1. Interestingly, in the intermediate time regime (defined for t_1\\lt t\\lt t_2\\propto \\kappa_a and for which θ0 = 5), the system reaches a transient stationary state, where the number of contacts among introverts remains constant while the number of connections increases linearly in the extrovert population. Finally, due to the competing dynamics, the network presents a frustrated stationary state characterized by a ratio θ0 = 3.

  17. Cryptic Population Dynamics: Rapid Evolution Masks Trophic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takehito; Ellner, Stephen P; Jones, Laura E; Bohannan, Brendan J. M; Lenski, Richard E; Hairston, Nelson G

    2007-01-01

    Trophic relationships, such as those between predator and prey or between pathogen and host, are key interactions linking species in ecological food webs. The structure of these links and their strengths have major consequences for the dynamics and stability of food webs. The existence and strength of particular trophic links has often been assessed using observational data on changes in species abundance through time. Here we show that very strong links can be completely missed by these kinds of analyses when changes in population abundance are accompanied by contemporaneous rapid evolution in the prey or host species. Experimental observations, in rotifer-alga and phage-bacteria chemostats, show that the predator or pathogen can exhibit large-amplitude cycles while the abundance of the prey or host remains essentially constant. We know that the species are tightly linked in these experimental microcosms, but without this knowledge, we would infer from observed patterns in abundance that the species are weakly or not at all linked. Mathematical modeling shows that this kind of cryptic dynamics occurs when there is rapid prey or host evolution for traits conferring defense against attack, and the cost of defense (in terms of tradeoffs with other fitness components) is low. Several predictions of the theory that we developed to explain the rotifer-alga experiments are confirmed in the phage-bacteria experiments, where bacterial evolution could be tracked. Modeling suggests that rapid evolution may also confound experimental approaches to measuring interaction strength, but it identifies certain experimental designs as being more robust against potential confounding by rapid evolution. PMID:17803356

  18. Quantum dynamics of a microwave driven superconducting phase qubit coupled to a two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guozhu; Wen, Xueda; Mao, Bo; Zhou, Zhongyuan; Yu, Yang; Wu, Peiheng; Han, Siyuan

    2010-10-01

    We present an analytical and comprehensive description of the quantum dynamics of a microwave resonantly driven superconducting phase qubit coupled to a microscopic two-level system (TLS), covering a wide range of the external microwave field strength. Our model predicts several interesting phenomena in such an ac driven four-level bipartite system including anomalous Rabi oscillations, high-contrast beatings of Rabi oscillations, and extraordinary two-photon transitions. Our experimental results in a coupled qubit-TLS system agree quantitatively very well with the predictions of the theoretical model.

  19. Real-time imaging of surface evolution driven by variable-energy ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Swiech, W; Rajappan, M; Ondrejcek, M; Sammann, E; Burdin, S; Petrov, I; Flynn, C P

    2008-06-01

    We describe the design of a tandem instrument combining a low-energy electron microscope (LEEM) and a negative ion accelerator. This instrument provides video rate imaging of surface microtopography and the dynamics of its evolution during irradiation by energetic ions, at temperatures up to 1700 K. The negative ion beam is incident on the sample at normal incidence with impact energies selectable in the range 0-5 keV, and with current densities up to 30 muA/cm2 ( approximately 2 x 10(14)ions/cm2 s or approximately 0.2 ML/s). The LEEM operates at a base pressure in the 10(-9)Pa range. We describe the design and operating principles of the instrument and present examples of Pt(111) and Si(001) self-ion irradiation experiments.

  20. Dynamical evolution of small bodies in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Seth A.

    2012-05-01

    This thesis explores the dynamical evolution of small bodies in the Solar System. It focuses on the asteroid population but parts of the theory can be applied to other systems such as comets or Kuiper Belt objects. Small is a relative term that refers to bodies whose dynamics can be significantly perturbed by non-gravitational forces and tidal torques on timescales less than their lifetimes (for instance the collisional timescale in the Main Belt asteroid population or the sun impact timescale for the near-Earth asteroid population). Non-gravitational torques such as the YORP effect can result in the active endogenous evolution of asteroid systems; something that was not considered more than twenty years ago. This thesis is divided into three independent studies. The first explores the dynamics of a binary systems immediately after formation from rotational fission. The rotational fission hypothesis states that a rotationally torqued asteroid will fission when the centrifugal accelerations across the body exceed gravitational attraction. Asteroids must have very little or no tensile strength for this to occur, and are often referred to as "rubble piles.'' A more complete description of the hypothesis and the ensuing dynamics is provided there. From that study a framework of asteroid evolution is assembled. It is determined that mass ratio is the most important factor for determining the outcome of a rotational fission event. Each observed binary morphology is tied to this evolutionary schema and the relevant timescales are assessed. In the second study, the role of non-gravitational and tidal torques in binary asteroid systems is explored. Understanding the competition between tides and the YORP effect provides insight into the relative abundances of the different binary morphologies and the effect of planetary flybys. The interplay between tides and the BYORP effect creates dramatic evolutionary pathways that lead to interesting end states including stranded

  1. In silico evolution of oscillatory dynamics in biochemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md Zulfikar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2015-03-01

    We are studying in silico evolution of complex, oscillatory network dynamics within the framework of a minimal mutational model of protein-protein interactions. In our model we consider two different types of proteins, kinase (activator) and phosphatase(inhibitor). In our model. each protein can either be phosphorylated(active) or unphospphorylated (inactive), represented by binary strings. Active proteins can modify their target based on the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of chemical equation. Reaction rate constants are directly related to sequence dependent protein-protein interaction energies. This model can be stuided for non-trivial behavior e.g. oscillations, chaos, multiple stable states. We focus here on biochemical oscillators; some questions we will address within our framework include how the oscillatory dynamics depends on number of protein species, connectivity of the network, whether evolution can readily converge on a stable oscillator if we start with random intitial parameters, neutral evolution with additional protein components and general questions of robustness and evolavability.

  2. THE DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF YOUNG EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    An Tao; Baan, Willem A. E-mail: baan@astron.nl

    2012-11-20

    The evolution of symmetric extragalactic radio sources can be characterized by four distinct growth stages of the radio luminosity versus size of the source. The interaction of the jet with the ambient medium results in the formation and evolution of sources with non-standard (flaring) morphology. In addition, cessation or restarting of the jet power and obstruction of the jet will also result in distinct morphological structures. The radio source population may thus be classified in morphological types that indicate the prevailing physical processes. Compact symmetric objects (CSOs) occupy the earliest evolutionary phase of symmetric radio sources and their dynamical behavior is fundamental for any further evolution. Analysis of CSO dynamics is presented for a sample of 24 CSOs with known redshift and hotspot separation velocity and with a large range of radio power. Observables such as radio power, separation between two hotspots, hotspot separation velocity, and kinematic age of the source are found to be generally consistent with the self-similar predictions for individual sources that reflect the varying density structure of the ambient interstellar medium. Individual sources behave different from the group as a whole. The age and size statistics confirm that a large fraction of CSOs does not evolve into extended doubles.

  3. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L.; Alejos, Ó.; Martínez, E.; Muñoz, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current.

  4. Scaling in driven dynamics starting in the vicinity of a quantum critical point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuai; Lo, Chung-Yu; Chen, Pochung

    2016-08-01

    Driven dynamics across a quantum critical point is usually described by the Kibble-Zurek scaling. Although the original Kibble-Zurek scaling requires an adiabatic initial state, it has been shown that scaling behaviors exist even when the driven dynamics is triggered from a thermal equilibrium state exactly at the critical point, in spite of the breakdown of the initial adiabaticity. In this paper, we show that the existence of the scaling behavior can be generalized to the case of the initial state being a thermal equilibrium state near the critical point. We propose a scaling theory in which the initial parameters are included as additional scaling variables due to the breakdown of the initial adiabaticity. In particular, we demonstrate that for the driven critical dynamics in a closed system, the nontrivial thermal effects are closely related to the initial distance to the critical point. We numerically confirm the scaling theory by simulating the real-time dynamics of the one-dimensional quantum Ising model at both zero and finite temperatures.

  5. Ten Billion Years of Growth: Massive Galaxy Evolution from Structures and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Rachel

    Once thought to be relies of a much earlier epoch, the most massive local galaxies are red and dead ellipticals, with little ongoing star formation or organized rotation. In the last decade, observations of their assumed progenitors have demonstrated that billions of years ago, massive galaxies were more compact and morphologically different, possibly with more disklike structures. The details of this observed evolution can place constraints on the physical processes that have driven massive galaxy evolution through cosmic time. The work presented in this thesis provides observational constraints on the dynamical and structural evolution of massive galaxies since z ~ 1.5 - 2 using a variety of photometric and spectroscopic surveys, including OBEY, SDSS, NMBS, and UDS. First, we find that although overall densities of these galaxies have decreased with time, the central densities of massive galaxies at high and low redshifts, are quite similar. This suggests that massive galaxies grow "inside-out": compact cores form early and then gradually build a more diffuse envelope of stars in their outskirts. Balancing the need for efficient size growth and consistent number densities of progenitor and descendent galaxies, we conclude that minor-merging is the best physical explanation for the observed size evolution. The remainder of this dissertation focuses on the inferred and measured dynamical evolution of massive galaxies since z ~ 2. Using velocity dispersions inferred by galaxy stellar masses and morphologies, we find that the number density of galaxies at a given velocity dispersion, or velocity dispersion function , is quite stable with redshift since z ~ 1.5, with a weak evolution at the low dispersion end due to a growing population of quenched galaxies. The constancy provides evidence in favor of inside-out growth of galaxies and is consistent with theoretical predictions that the central potentials of massive galaxies are set early. We suggest a toy model that

  6. The dynamical and radiative evolution of clumpy supernova ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, M. C.; Jones, T. W.; Rudnick, L.; Tregillis, I. L.; Kang, Hyesung

    1994-01-01

    Numerical simulations describing the dynamical and radiative evolution of clumpy supernova ejecta are compared with observations of optical and radio emission knots in supernova remnant (SNR) Cassiopeia A. Three major phases are identified in the evolution of clumpy ejecta: a bow-shock phase, an instability phase, and a dispersal phase. The phenomenological and radiative signatures of each phase are discussed and compared with multi-epoch measurements of small-scale features in Cas A. Good correspondence is found between theory and observations. Both support the premise that compact radio emission features are controlled more by magnetic field amplification triggered in the instability phase than by in situ acceleration of new relativistic particles.

  7. Star clusters as laboratories for stellar and dynamical evolution.

    PubMed

    Kalirai, Jason S; Richer, Harvey B

    2010-02-28

    Open and globular star clusters have served as benchmarks for the study of stellar evolution owing to their supposed nature as simple stellar populations of the same age and metallicity. After a brief review of some of the pioneering work that established the importance of imaging stars in these systems, we focus on several recent studies that have challenged our fundamental picture of star clusters. These new studies indicate that star clusters can very well harbour multiple stellar populations, possibly formed through self-enrichment processes from the first-generation stars that evolved through post-main-sequence evolutionary phases. Correctly interpreting stellar evolution in such systems is tied to our understanding of both chemical-enrichment mechanisms, including stellar mass loss along the giant branches, and the dynamical state of the cluster. We illustrate recent imaging, spectroscopic and theoretical studies that have begun to shed new light on the evolutionary processes that occur within star clusters.

  8. Comprehensive Representation of Hydrologic and Geomorphic Process Coupling in Numerical Models: Internal Dynamics and Basin Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istanbulluoglu, E.; Vivoni, E. R.; Ivanov, V. Y.; Bras, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Landscape morphology has an important control on the spatial and temporal organization of basin hydrologic response to climate forcing, affecting soil moisture redistribution as well as vegetation function. On the other hand, erosion, driven by hydrology and modulated by vegetation, produces landforms over geologic time scales that reflect characteristic signatures of the dominant land forming process. Responding to extreme climate events or anthropogenic disturbances of the land surface, infrequent but rapid forms of erosion (e.g., arroyo development, landsliding) can modify topography such that basin hydrology is significantly influenced. Despite significant advances in both hydrologic and geomorphic modeling over the past two decades, the dynamic interactions between basin hydrology, geomorphology and terrestrial ecology are not adequately captured in current model frameworks. In order to investigate hydrologic-geomorphic-ecologic interactions at the basin scale we present initial efforts in integrating the CHILD landscape evolution model (Tucker et al. 2001) with the tRIBS hydrology model (Ivanov et al. 2004), both developed in a common software environment. In this talk, we present preliminary results of the numerical modeling of the coupled evolution of basin hydro-geomorphic response and resulting landscape morphology in two sets of examples. First, we discuss the long-term evolution of both the hydrologic response and the resulting basin morphology from an initially uplifted plateau. In the second set of modeling experiments, we implement changes in climate and land-use to an existing topography and compare basin hydrologic response to the model results when landscape form is fixed (e.g. no coupling between hydrology and geomorphology). Model results stress the importance of internal basin dynamics, including runoff generation mechanisms and hydrologic states, in shaping hydrologic response as well as the importance of employing comprehensive

  9. Dynamics and Innovations within Oomycete Genomes: Insights into Biology, Pathology, and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The eukaryotic microbes known as oomycetes are common inhabitants of terrestrial and aquatic environments and include saprophytes and pathogens. Lifestyles of the pathogens extend from biotrophy to necrotrophy, obligate to facultative pathogenesis, and narrow to broad host ranges on plants or animals. Sequencing of several pathogens has revealed striking variation in genome size and content, a plastic set of genes related to pathogenesis, and adaptations associated with obligate biotrophy. Features of genome evolution include repeat-driven expansions, deletions, gene fusions, and horizontal gene transfer in a landscape organized into gene-dense and gene-sparse sectors and influenced by transposable elements. Gene expression profiles are also highly dynamic throughout oomycete life cycles, with transcriptional polymorphisms as well as differences in protein sequence contributing to variation. The genome projects have set the foundation for functional studies and should spur the sequencing of additional species, including more diverse pathogens and nonpathogens. PMID:22923046

  10. 2D pattern evolution constrained by complex network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Rocha, L. E. C.; Costa, L. da F.

    2007-03-01

    Complex networks have established themselves in recent years as being particularly suitable and flexible for representing and modelling several complex natural and artificial systems. In the same time in which the structural intricacies of such networks are being revealed and understood, efforts have also been directed at investigating how such connectivity properties define and constrain the dynamics of systems unfolding on such structures. However, less attention has been focused on hybrid systems, i.e. involving more than one type of network and/or dynamics. Several real systems present such an organization, e.g. the dynamics of a disease coexisting with the dynamics of the immune system. The current paper investigates a specific system involving diffusive (linear and nonlinear) dynamics taking place in a regular network while interacting with a complex network of defensive agents following Erdös Rényi (ER) and Barabási Albert (BA) graph models with moveable nodes. More specifically, the complex network is expected to control, and if possible, to extinguish the diffusion of some given unwanted process (e.g. fire, oil spilling, pest dissemination, and virus or bacteria reproduction during an infection). Two types of pattern evolution are considered: Fick and Gray Scott. The nodes of the defensive network then interact with the diffusing patterns and communicate between themselves in order to control the diffusion. The main findings include the identification of higher efficiency for the BA control networks and the presence of relapses in the case of the ER model.

  11. The Formation and Dynamical Evolution of Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M. S.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations have revealed a variety of young star clusters, including embedded systems, young massive clusters, and associations. We study the formation and dynamical evolution of these clusters using a combination of simulations and theoretical models. Our simulations start with a turbulent molecular cloud that collapses under its own gravity. The stars are assumed to form in the densest regions in the collapsing cloud after an initial free-fall time of the molecular cloud. The dynamical evolution of these stellar distributions is continued by means of direct N-body simulations. The molecular clouds typical of the Milky Way Galaxy tend to form embedded clusters that evolve to resemble open clusters. The associations were initially considerably more clumpy, but they lost their irregularity in about a dynamical timescale, due to the relaxation process. The densest molecular clouds, which are absent in the Milky Way but are typical in starburst galaxies, form massive, young star clusters. They indeed are rare in the Milky Way. Our models indicate a distinct evolutionary path from molecular clouds to open clusters and associations or to massive star clusters. The mass-radius relation for both types of evolutionary tracks excellently matches the observations. According to our calculations, the time evolution of the half-mass-radius relation for open clusters and associations follows {r}{{h}}/{{pc}}=2.7{({t}{{age}}/{{pc}})}2/3, whereas for massive star clusters {r}{{h}}/{{pc}}=0.34{({t}{{age}}/{{Myr}})}2/3. Both trends are consistent with the observed age-mass-radius relation for clusters in the Milky Way.

  12. On learning dynamics underlying the evolution of learning rules.

    PubMed

    Dridi, Slimane; Lehmann, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    In order to understand the development of non-genetically encoded actions during an animal's lifespan, it is necessary to analyze the dynamics and evolution of learning rules producing behavior. Owing to the intrinsic stochastic and frequency-dependent nature of learning dynamics, these rules are often studied in evolutionary biology via agent-based computer simulations. In this paper, we show that stochastic approximation theory can help to qualitatively understand learning dynamics and formulate analytical models for the evolution of learning rules. We consider a population of individuals repeatedly interacting during their lifespan, and where the stage game faced by the individuals fluctuates according to an environmental stochastic process. Individuals adjust their behavioral actions according to learning rules belonging to the class of experience-weighted attraction learning mechanisms, which includes standard reinforcement and Bayesian learning as special cases. We use stochastic approximation theory in order to derive differential equations governing action play probabilities, which turn out to have qualitative features of mutator-selection equations. We then perform agent-based simulations to find the conditions where the deterministic approximation is closest to the original stochastic learning process for standard 2-action 2-player fluctuating games, where interaction between learning rules and preference reversal may occur. Finally, we analyze a simplified model for the evolution of learning in a producer-scrounger game, which shows that the exploration rate can interact in a non-intuitive way with other features of co-evolving learning rules. Overall, our analyses illustrate the usefulness of applying stochastic approximation theory in the study of animal learning.

  13. Asymptotic Dynamics of Self-driven Vehicles in a Closed Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chi-Lun; Huang, Chia-Ling

    2011-08-01

    We study the asymptotic dynamics of self-driven vehicles in a loop using a car-following model with the consideration of volume exclusions. In particular, we derive the dynamical steady states for the single-cluster case and obtain the corresponding fundamental diagrams, exhibiting two branches representative of entering and leaving the jam, respectively. By simulations we find that the speed average over all vehicles eventually reaches the same value, regardless of final clustering states. The autocorrelation functions for overall speed average and single-vehicle speed are studied, each revealing a unique time scale. We also discuss the role of noises in vehicular accelerations. Based on our observations we give trial definitions about the degree of chaoticity for general self-driven many-body systems.

  14. Dynamics of Green Sahara Periods and Their Role in Hominin Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Larrasoaña, Juan C.; Roberts, Andrew P.; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2013-01-01

    Astronomically forced insolation changes have driven monsoon dynamics and recurrent humid episodes in North Africa, resulting in green Sahara Periods (GSPs) with savannah expansion throughout most of the desert. Despite their potential for expanding the area of prime hominin habitats and favouring out-of-Africa dispersals, GSPs have not been incorporated into the narrative of hominin evolution due to poor knowledge of their timing, dynamics and landscape composition at evolutionary timescales. We present a compilation of continental and marine paleoenvironmental records from within and around North Africa, which enables identification of over 230 GSPs within the last 8 million years. By combining the main climatological determinants of woody cover in tropical Africa with paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic data for representative (Holocene and Eemian) GSPs, we estimate precipitation regimes and habitat distributions during GSPs. Their chronology is consistent with the ages of Saharan archeological and fossil hominin sites. Each GSP took 2–3 kyr to develop, peaked over 4–8 kyr, biogeographically connected the African tropics to African and Eurasian mid latitudes, and ended within 2–3 kyr, which resulted in rapid habitat fragmentation. We argue that the well-dated succession of GSPs presented here may have played an important role in migration and evolution of hominins. PMID:24146882

  15. Dynamics of green Sahara periods and their role in hominin evolution.

    PubMed

    Larrasoaña, Juan C; Roberts, Andrew P; Rohling, Eelco J

    2013-01-01

    Astronomically forced insolation changes have driven monsoon dynamics and recurrent humid episodes in North Africa, resulting in green Sahara Periods (GSPs) with savannah expansion throughout most of the desert. Despite their potential for expanding the area of prime hominin habitats and favouring out-of-Africa dispersals, GSPs have not been incorporated into the narrative of hominin evolution due to poor knowledge of their timing, dynamics and landscape composition at evolutionary timescales. We present a compilation of continental and marine paleoenvironmental records from within and around North Africa, which enables identification of over 230 GSPs within the last 8 million years. By combining the main climatological determinants of woody cover in tropical Africa with paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic data for representative (Holocene and Eemian) GSPs, we estimate precipitation regimes and habitat distributions during GSPs. Their chronology is consistent with the ages of Saharan archeological and fossil hominin sites. Each GSP took 2-3 kyr to develop, peaked over 4-8 kyr, biogeographically connected the African tropics to African and Eurasian mid latitudes, and ended within 2-3 kyr, which resulted in rapid habitat fragmentation. We argue that the well-dated succession of GSPs presented here may have played an important role in migration and evolution of hominins. PMID:24146882

  16. Geomagnetic forecasts driven by thermal wind dynamics in the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, J.

    2015-12-01

    There exists a fundamental as well as practical interest in being able to accurately forecast the future evolution of Earth's magnetic field at decadal to secular ranges. This work enables such forecasts by combining geomagnetic data with an Earth-like numerical model of a convection-driven fluid dynamo. The underlying data assimilation framework builds on recent progress in inverse geodynamo modelling, a method which estimates an internal dynamic structure for Earth's core from a snapshot of the magnetic field and its instantaneous rate of change at the surface, and takes advantage of linear relationships and long-range correlations between observed and hidden state variables. Here the method is further evolved into a single-epoch ensemble Kalman filter, in order to initialise at a given epoch an ensemble of states compatible with the observations and representative of the uncertainties in the estimation of hidden quantities. The ensemble dynamics, obtained by subsequent numerical integration of the prognostic model equations, are found to be governed by a thermal wind balance or equilibrium between buoyancy forces, the Coriolis force and the pressure gradient. The resulting core fluid flow pattern is a quasi-steady eccentric gyre organised in a column parallel to Earth's rotation axis, in equilibrium with a longitudinal hemispheric convective density anomaly pattern. The flow provides induction for the magnetic field, which also undergoes a realistic amount of diffusion. Predictions of the present magnetic field from data taken within the past century show that the ensemble has an average retaining good consistency with the true geomagnetic evolution and an acceptable spread well representative of prediction errors, up to at least a secular range. The predictability of the geodynamo thus appears to significantly exceed previous theoretical expectations based on the chaotic divergence of ensemble members. The assimilation generally outperforms the linear

  17. The Transition to Collisionless Ion-temperature-gradient-driven Plasma Turbulence: A Dynamical Systems Approach

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Kolesnikov; J.A. Krommes

    2004-10-21

    The transition to collisionless ion-temperature-gradient-driven plasma turbulence is considered by applying dynamical systems theory to a model with ten degrees of freedom. Study of a four-dimensional center manifold predicts a ''Dimits shift'' of the threshold for turbulence due to the excitation of zonal flows and establishes the exact value of that shift in terms of physical parameters. For insight into fundamental physical mechanisms, the method provides a viable alternative to large simulations.

  18. Black hole evolution - II. Spinning black holes in a supernova-driven turbulent interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Yohan; Volonteri, Marta; Silk, Joseph; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2014-05-01

    Supermassive black holes (BHs) accrete gas from their surroundings and coalesce with companions during galaxy mergers, and both processes change the BH mass and spin. By means of high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies, either idealized or embedded within the cosmic web, we explore the effects of interstellar gas dynamics and external perturbations on BH spin evolution. All these physical quantities were evolved on the fly in a self-consistent manner. We use a `maximal' model to describe the turbulence induced by stellar feedback to highlight its impact on the angular momentum of the gas accreted by the BH. Periods of intense star formation are followed by phases where stellar feedback drives large-scale outflows and hot bubbles. We find that BH accretion is synchronized with star formation, as only when gas is cold and dense do both processes take place. During such periods, gas motion is dominated by consistent rotation. On the other hand, when stellar feedback becomes substantial, turbulent motion randomizes gas angular momentum. However, BH accretion is strongly suppressed in that case, as cold and dense gas is lacking. In our cosmological simulation, at very early times (z > 6), the galactic disc has not yet settled and no preferred direction exists for the angular momentum of the accreted gas, so the BH spin remains low. As the gas settles into a disc (6 > z > 3), the BH spin then rapidly reaches its maximal value. At lower redshifts (z < 3), even when galaxy mergers flip the direction of the angular momentum of the accreted gas, causing it to counter-rotate, the BH spin magnitude only decreases modestly and temporarily. Should this be a typical evolution scenario for BH, it potentially has dramatic consequences regarding their origin and assembly, as accretion on maximally spinning BH embedded in thin Shakura-Sunyaev disc is significantly reduced.

  19. Dynamic structural network evolution in compressed granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Lia; Puckett, James; Daniels, Karen; Bassett, Danielle

    The heterogeneous dynamic behavior of granular packings under shear or compression is not well-understood. In this study, we use novel techniques from network science to investigate the structural evolution that occurs in compressed granular systems. Specifically, we treat particles as network nodes, and pressure-dependent forces between particles as layer-specific network edges. Then, we use a generalization of community detection methods to multilayer networks, and develop quantitative measures that characterize changes in the architecture of the force network as a function of pressure. We observe that branchlike domains reminiscent of force chains evolve differentially as pressure is applied: topological characteristics of these domains at rest predict their coalescence or dispersion under pressure. Our methods allow us to study the dynamics of mesoscale structure in granular systems, and provide a direct way to compare data from systems under different external conditions or with different physical makeup.

  20. Extended space expectation values in quantum dynamical system evolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Demiralp, Metin

    2014-10-06

    The time variant power series expansion for the expectation value of a given quantum dynamical operator is well-known and well-investigated issue in quantum dynamics. However, depending on the operator and Hamiltonian singularities this expansion either may not exist or may not converge for all time instances except the beginning of the evolution. This work focuses on this issue and seeks certain cures for the negativities. We work in the extended space obtained by adding all images of the initial wave function under the system Hamiltonian’s positive integer powers. This requires the introduction of certain appropriately defined weight operators. The resulting better convergence in the temporal power series urges us to call the new defined entities “extended space expectation values” even though they are constructed over certain weight operators and are somehow pseudo expectation values.

  1. Analysis of the potential of the electrofluid dynamic wind-driven generator

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Electrofluid Dynamic wind-driven generator has been investigated under government supported programs since 1975. The concept features the direct conversion of wind energy into electrical power with virtually no moving parts. Research on this concept has resulted in a detailed operational theory of electrofluid systems and a preliminary conceptual design of a full-scale generator. Analysis of the potential of this concept has established a range for the value indicators and an understanding of its optimization potential and uncertainty. A comparison is made between the value indicators for the Electrofluid Dynamic concept and those of several conventional WECS.

  2. Effect of thermal fluctuations in spin-torque driven magnetization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, R.; Bertotti, G.; Serpico, C.; Mayergoyz, I. D.; d'Aquino, M.

    2007-09-01

    Nanomagnets with uniaxial symmetry driven by an external field and spin-polarized currents are considered. Anisotropy, applied field, and spin polarization are all aligned along the symmetry axis. Thermal fluctuations are described by adding a Gaussian white noise stochastic term to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for the deterministic dynamics. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is derived. It is shown that deterministic dynamics, thermal relaxation, and transition rate between stable states are governed by an effective potential including the effect of current injection.

  3. The Dynamical Evolution of Stellar-Mass Black Holes in Dense Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morscher, Maggie

    Solar masses. Birth kicks from supernova explosions may eject some black holes from their birth clusters, but most should be retained initially. Using our Monte Carlo code, we have investigated the long-term dynamical evolution of globular clusters containing large numbers of stellar black holes. Our study is the first to explore in detail the dynamics of BHs in clusters through a large number of realistic simulations covering a wide range of initial conditions (cluster masses from 105 -- 106 Solar masses, as well as variation in other key parameters, such as the virial radius, central concentration, and metallicity), that also includes all the required physics. In almost all of our models we find that significant numbers of black holes (up to about a 1000) are retained all the way to the present. This is in contrast to previous theoretical expectations that most black holes should be ejected dynamically within a few Gyr. The main reason for this difference is that core collapse driven by black holes (through the Spitzer "mass segregation instability'') is easily reverted through three-body processes, and involves only a small number of the most massive black holes, while lower-mass black holes remain well-mixed with ordinary stars far from the central cusp. Thus the rapid segregation of stellar black holes does not lead to a long-term physical separation of most black holes into a dynamically decoupled inner core, as often assumed previously; this is one of the most important results of this dissertation. Combined with the recent detections of several black hole X-ray binary candidates in Galactic globular clusters, our results suggest that stellar black holes could still be present in large numbers in many globular clusters today, and that they may play a significant role in shaping the long-term dynamical evolution and the present-day dynamical structure of many clusters.

  4. Evolution and dynamics of a matter creation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, S.; Haro, J. de; Paliathanasis, A.; Slagter, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    In a flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, we consider the expansion of the universe powered by the gravitationally induced `adiabatic' matter creation. To demonstrate how matter creation works well with the expanding universe, we have considered a general creation rate and analysed this rate in the framework of dynamical analysis. The dynamical analysis hints the presence of a non-singular universe (without the big bang singularity) with two successive accelerated phases, one at the very early phase of the universe (i.e. inflation), and the other one describes the current accelerating universe, where this early, late accelerated phases are associated with an unstable fixed point (i.e. repeller) and a stable fixed point (attractor), respectively. We have described this phenomena by analytic solutions of the Hubble function and the scale factor of the FLRW universe. Using Jacobi last multiplier method, we have found a Lagrangian for this matter creation rate describing this scenario of the universe. To match with our early physics results, we introduce an equivalent dynamics driven by a single scalar field, discuss the associated observable parameters and compare them with the latest Planck data sets. Finally, introducing the teleparallel modified gravity, we have established an equivalent gravitational theory in the framework of matter creation.

  5. Schumpeterian economic dynamics as a quantifiable model of evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurner, Stefan; Klimek, Peter; Hanel, Rudolf

    2010-07-01

    We propose a simple quantitative model of Schumpeterian economic dynamics. New goods and services are endogenously produced through combinations of existing goods. As soon as new goods enter the market, they may compete against already existing goods. In other words, new products can have destructive effects on existing goods. As a result of this competition mechanism, existing goods may be driven out from the market—often causing cascades of secondary defects (Schumpeterian gales of destruction). The model leads to generic dynamics characterized by phases of relative economic stability followed by phases of massive restructuring of markets—which could be interpreted as Schumpeterian business 'cycles'. Model time series of product diversity and productivity reproduce several stylized facts of economics time series on long timescales, such as GDP or business failures, including non-Gaussian fat tailed distributions and volatility clustering. The model is phrased in an open, non-equilibrium setup which can be understood as a self-organized critical system. Its diversity dynamics can be understood by the time-varying topology of the active production networks.

  6. Coherent backscattering and dynamical light localization in liquid crystals driven throughout chaotic regimes.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Francesco; De Luca, Antonio; Barna, Valentin; Ferjani, Sameh; Vena, Carlo; Versace, Carlo; Strangi, Giuseppe

    2009-08-01

    An important effect of dynamical localization of light waves in liquid crystal electro-hydrodynamic instabilities is reported by investigating coherent backscattering effects. Recurrent multiple scattering in dynamic and chaotic complex fluids lead to a cone of enhanced backscattered light. The cone width and the related mean free path dependence on the dynamic scattering regimes emphasize the diverse light localization scales related to the internal structures present in the sample. The systems investigated up to now were mainly nano-powdered solutions or biological tissues, without any external control on the disorder. Here, an anisotropic complex fluid is "driven" throughout chaotic regimes by an external electric field, giving rise to dynamics that evolve through several spatio-temporal patterns.

  7. Interface dynamics of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate driven by an external force

    SciTech Connect

    Kobyakov, D.; Bychkov, V.; Lundh, E.; Bezett, A.; Marklund, M.; Akkerman, V.

    2011-04-15

    The dynamics of an interface in a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate driven by a spatially uniform time-dependent force is studied. Starting from the Gross-Pitaevskii Lagrangian, the dispersion relation for linear waves and instabilities at the interface is derived by means of a variational approach. A number of diverse dynamical effects for different types of driving force is demonstrated, which includes the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a constant force, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability for a pulse force, dynamic stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and onset of the parametric instability for an oscillating force. Gaussian Markovian and non-Markovian stochastic forces are also considered. It is found that the Markovian stochastic force does not produce any average effect on the dynamics of the interface, while the non-Markovian force leads to exponential perturbation growth.

  8. Quantum system driven by incoherent a.c fields: Multi-crossing Landau Zener dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jipdi, M. N.; Fai, L. C.; Tchoffo, M.

    2016-10-01

    The paper investigates the multi-crossing dynamics of a Landau-Zener (LZ) system driven by two sinusoidal a.c fields applying the Dynamic Matrix approach (DMA). The system is shown to follow one-crossing and multi-crossing dynamics for low and high frequency regime respectively. It is shown that in low frequency regime, the resonance phenomenon occurs and leads to the decoupling of basis states; the effective gap vanishes and then the complete blockage of the system. For high frequency, the system achieves multi-crossing dynamics with two fictitious crossings; the system models a Landau-Zener-Stückelberg (LZS) interferometer with critical parameters that tailor probabilities. The system is then shown to depend only on the phase that permits the easiest control with possible application in implementing logic gates.

  9. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy observation of Ag nanocrystal evolution by surfactant free electron-driven synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Elson; Avansi, Waldir; Bettini, Jefferson; Andrés, Juan; Gracia, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The study of the interaction of electron irradiation with matter and the response of the material to the passage of electrons is a very challenging problem. However, the growth mechanism observed during nanostructural evolution appears to be a broad and promising scientific field in nanotechnology. We report the in situ TEM study of nanostructural evolution of electron-driven silver (Ag) nanocrystals through an additive-free synthetic procedure. Observations revealed the direct effect of the electron beam on the morphological evolution of Ag nanocrystals through different mechanisms, such as mass transport, site-selective coalescence, and an appropriate structural configuration after coalescence leading to a more stable configuration. A fundamental understanding of the growth and formation mechanisms of Ag nanocrystals, which interact with the electron beam, is essential to improve the nanocrystal shape-control mechanisms as well as the future design and study of nanomaterials. PMID:26979671

  10. Quantum dynamics of incoherently driven V-type systems: Analytic solutions beyond the secular approximation.

    PubMed

    Dodin, Amro; Tscherbul, Timur V; Brumer, Paul

    2016-06-28

    Closed-form analytic solutions to non-secular Bloch-Redfield master equations for quantum dynamics of a V-type system driven by weak coupling to a thermal bath, relevant to light harvesting processes, are obtained and discussed. We focus on noise-induced Fano coherences among the excited states induced by incoherent driving of the V-system initially in the ground state. For suddenly turned-on incoherent driving, the time evolution of the coherences is determined by the damping parameter ζ=12(γ1+γ2)/Δp, where γi are the radiative decay rates of the excited levels i = 1, 2, and Δp=Δ(2)+(1-p(2))γ1γ2 depends on the excited-state level splitting Δ > 0 and the angle between the transition dipole moments in the energy basis. The coherences oscillate as a function of time in the underdamped limit (ζ ≫ 1), approach a long-lived quasi-steady state in the overdamped limit (ζ ≪ 1), and display an intermediate behavior at critical damping (ζ = 1). The sudden incoherent turn-on is shown to generate a mixture of excited eigenstates |e1〉 and |e2〉 and their in-phase coherent superposition |ϕ+〉=1r1+r2(r1|e1〉+r2|e2〉), which is remarkably long-lived in the overdamped limit (where r1 and r2 are the incoherent pumping rates). Formation of this coherent superposition enhances the decay rate from the excited states to the ground state. In the strongly asymmetric V-system where the coupling strengths between the ground state and the excited states differ significantly, additional asymptotic quasistationary coherences are identified, which arise due to slow equilibration of one of the excited states. Finally, we demonstrate that noise-induced Fano coherences are maximized with respect to populations when r1 = r2 and the transition dipole moments are fully aligned. PMID:27369498

  11. Adaptive network dynamics and evolution of leadership in collective migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Darren; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of leadership in migratory populations depends not only on costs and benefits of leadership investments but also on the opportunities for individuals to rely on cues from others through social interactions. We derive an analytically tractable adaptive dynamic network model of collective migration with fast timescale migration dynamics and slow timescale adaptive dynamics of individual leadership investment and social interaction. For large populations, our analysis of bifurcations with respect to investment cost explains the observed hysteretic effect associated with recovery of migration in fragmented environments. Further, we show a minimum connectivity threshold above which there is evolutionary branching into leader and follower populations. For small populations, we show how the topology of the underlying social interaction network influences the emergence and location of leaders in the adaptive system. Our model and analysis can be extended to study the dynamics of collective tracking or collective learning more generally. Thus, this work may inform the design of robotic networks where agents use decentralized strategies that balance direct environmental measurements with agent interactions.

  12. Random Evolution of Idiotypic Networks: Dynamics and Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Markus; Behn, Ulrich

    The paper deals with modelling a subsystem of the immune system, the so-called idiotypic network (INW). INWs, conceived by N.K. Jerne in 1974, are functional networks of interacting antibodies and B cells. In principle, Jernes' framework provides solutions to many issues in immunology, such as immunological memory, mechanisms for antigen recognition and self/non-self discrimination. Explaining the interconnection between the elementary components, local dynamics, network formation and architecture, and possible modes of global system function appears to be an ideal playground of statistical mechanics. We present a simple cellular automaton model, based on a graph representation of the system. From a simplified description of idiotypic interactions, rules for the random evolution of networks of occupied and empty sites on these graphs are derived. In certain biologically relevant parameter ranges the resultant dynamics leads to stationary states. A stationary state is found to correspond to a specific pattern of network organization. It turns out that even these very simple rules give rise to a multitude of different kinds of patterns. We characterize these networks by classifying `static' and `dynamic' network-patterns. A type of `dynamic' network is found to display many features of real INWs.

  13. Evolution of collision numbers for a chaotic gas dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vidgop, Alexander Jonathan; Fouxon, Itzhak

    2011-11-01

    We put forward a conjecture of recurrence for a gas of hard spheres that collide elastically in a finite volume. The dynamics consists of a sequence of instantaneous binary collisions. We study how the numbers of collisions of different pairs of particles grow as functions of time. We observe that these numbers can be represented as a time integral of a function on the phase space. Assuming the results of the ergodic theory apply, we describe the evolution of the numbers by an effective Langevin dynamics. We use the facts that hold for these dynamics with probability one, in order to establish properties of a single trajectory of the system. We find that for any triplet of particles there will be an infinite sequence of moments of time, when the numbers of collisions of all three different pairs of the triplet will be equal. Moreover, any value of difference of collision numbers of pairs in the triplet will repeat indefinitely. On the other hand, for larger numbers of pairs there is but a finite number of repetitions. Thus the ergodic theory produces a limitation on the dynamics.

  14. Dynamical and collisional evolution of Halley-type comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Helm, E.; Jeffers, S. V.

    2012-03-01

    The number of observed Halley-type comets is hundreds of times less than predicted by models (Levison, H.F., Dones, L., Duncan, M.J. [2001]. Astron. J. 121, 2253-2267). In this paper we investigate the impact of collisions with planetesimals on the evolution of Halley-type comets. First we compute the dynamical evolution of a sub-set of 21 comets using the MERCURY integrator package over 100 Myr. The dynamical lifetime is determined to be of the order of 105-106 years in agreement with previous work. The collisional probability of Halley-type comets colliding with known asteroids, a simulated population of Kuiper-belt objects, and planets, is calculated using a modified, Öpik-based collision code. Our results show that the catastrophic disruption of the cometary nucleus has a very low probability of occurring, and disruption through cumulative minor impacts is concluded to be negligible. The dust mantle formed from ejected material falling back to the comet’s surface is calculated to be less than a few centimeters thick, which is insignificant compared to the mantle formed by volatile depletion, while planetary encounters were found to be a negligible disruption mechanism.

  15. Dynamical Evolution in Hickson Compact Groups using Intragroup Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Rocha, C.; Ziegler, B. L.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.

    2007-05-01

    Most of the galaxies in the local universe are located in groups, in particular in small groups, and most of the transformations suffered by galaxies located in today's clusters are likely to have occurred in groups at higher redshifts. Understanding the formation and evolution of groups is essential to understand the whole picture of structures and galaxy build-up. Using multi-band photometry we studied the intragroup light component observed in compact groups of galaxies in a subsample of Hickson's catalogue. The diffuse intragroup light component observed in compact groups of galaxies represent an efficient tool for the determination of the stage of dynamical evolution of such structures and for mapping the gravitational potential of the group. This component is presumably due to stellar material tidally stripped from the member galaxies of the group, which gets trapped in the group potential. To detect this very faint component (about 1% above the sky level) we have applied the OVWAV package, a wavelet based technique particularly suitable to detect low surface brightness extended structures, down to a S/N = 0.1 per pixel, which corresponds to a 5-σ-detection level in wavelet space. This analysis technique identifies the intragroup component independently of the main contaminating effects, as stars and galaxy modelling and sky subtraction. The fraction of intragroup light in the studied objects can be as high as 46%, with surface brightness as low as 27.3 B mag arcsec-2 and the colours are compatible with matter stripped from the group member galaxies. Using the IGL, along with other dynamical evolution indicators, we could stablish a evolutionary sequence to our subsample.

  16. Influence of Peruvian flat-subduction dynamics on the evolution of western Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eakin, Caroline M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina; Dávila, Federico M.

    2014-10-01

    Convection in the Earth's mantle is mainly driven by cold, dense subducting slabs, but relatively little is known about how 3D variations in slab morphology and buoyancy affect mantle flow or how the surface above deforms in response (i.e. dynamic topography). We investigate this problem by studying the dynamics of an active region of flat-slab subduction located in Peru in South America. Here the slab geometry is well known, based on the regional seismicity, and we have observations from the local geological record to validate our models. Of particular interest is the widespread subsidence and deposition of the Solimões Formation across western Amazonia that coincided with the development of the Peruvian flat-slab during the Mid-Late Miocene. This formation covers an extensive area from the foredeep to the Purus Arch located ∼2000 km away from the trench. Close to the Andes the preservation of several kilometers of sedimentary thicknesses can be easily accounted for by flexure. Based on an estimate of the Andean loading we predict 2.8 to 3.6 km of accommodation space that spans 100 km. The spatial and temporal history of the Solimões Formation however, particularly the thick distal foreland accumulations up to 1.2 km deep, can only be matched with the addition of a longer-wavelength dynamic source of topography. Following the transition from normal to flat subduction, we predict over 1 km of dynamic subsidence (∼1500 km wide) that propagates over 1000 km away from the trench, tracking the subduction leading edge. This is followed by a pulse of dynamic uplift over the flat segment behind it. We therefore propose that a combination of uplift, flexure and dynamic topography during slab flattening in Peru is responsible for the sedimentation history and landscape evolution of western Amazonia that eventually led to the configuration of the Amazon Drainage Basin we know today.

  17. Trapping and evolution dynamics of strongly magnetized cold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Hoon

    Cold Rydberg atoms and ultracold plasmas have been studied in the strong-magnetization regime. In this new territory, novel atomic and plasma states---such as guiding-center drift Rydberg attains and strongly magnetized, quasi-neutral, ultracold plasmas---have been created and investigated. The evolution dynamics studies of these exotic diamagnetic forms of matter, made possible by implementing a superconducting magnetic atom trap, revealed rich dynamical features in the systems: The Landau-quantized energy structure has led to entirely different evolutions of the highly excited atoms in laser-excited or drift Rydberg states than in magnetic-field-free cases; and the presence of the strong magnetic field has drastically altered the collisional behavior and expansion dynamics of the plasmas. Furthermore, atom cooling and trapping methodology has been extended in multiple directions. Firstly, laser cooling and magnetic trapping of ground-state atoms has been demonstrated in magnetic; fields exceeding 3 Tesla, representing a 20-fold increase in the field-strength of cold-atom traps. Secondly, the trapping of Rydberg atoms with a lifetime of 80 ms has been achieved. This trapping technique exploits the quasi-free nature of Rydberg electrons, which can be adopted in other forms of Rydberg-atom trapping. Lastly; the trapping of two-component, ultracold plasmas has been demonstrated in a nested Penning-trap configuration. The confinement of quasi-neutral ultracold plasmas allowed us to observe novel effects such as the correlation between the ionic oscillation and the electron energy distribution.

  18. Colloidal particle adsorption at liquid interfaces: capillary driven dynamics and thermally activated kinetics.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Amir M; Wang, Anna; Manoharan, Vinothan N; Colosqui, Carlos E

    2016-08-14

    The adsorption of single colloidal microparticles (0.5-1 μm radius) at a water-oil interface has been recently studied experimentally using digital holographic microscopy [Kaz et al., Nat. Mater., 2012, 11, 138-142]. An initially fast adsorption dynamics driven by capillary forces is followed by an unexpectedly slow relaxation to equilibrium that is logarithmic in time and can span hours or days. The slow relaxation kinetics has been attributed to the presence of surface "defects" with nanoscale dimensions (1-5 nm) that induce multiple metastable configurations of the contact line perimeter. A kinetic model considering thermally activated transitions between such metastable configurations has been proposed [Colosqui et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 2013, 111, 028302] to predict both the relaxation rate and the crossover point to the slow logarithmic regime. However, the adsorption dynamics observed experimentally before the crossover point has remained unstudied. In this work, we propose a Langevin model that is able to describe the entire adsorption process of single colloidal particles by considering metastable states produced by surface defects and thermal motion of the particle and liquid interface. Invoking the fluctuation dissipation theorem, we introduce a drag term that considers significant dissipative forces induced by thermal fluctuations of the liquid interface. Langevin dynamics simulations based on the proposed adsorption model yield close agreement with experimental observations for different microparticles, capturing the crossover from (fast) capillary driven dynamics to (slow) thermally activated kinetics. PMID:27373956

  19. Age distributions and dynamically changing hydrologic systems: Exploring topography-driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, J. D.; Wilson, J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Natural systems are driven by dynamic forcings that change in time as well as space, behavior that is inherited by the system flow field and results in time-varying age distributions (ADs). This work presents a review of the mathematical tools and solution approaches used to model ADs in dynamic time-varying flow systems. A simple conceptual, numerical model is then used to explore the role of flow dynamics in ADs for topography-driven flow systems. This model is an analog for regional groundwater systems and hyporheic zones. This model demonstrates that relatively small fluctuations in the forcing, even though importantly affecting the flow in the system, can have minimal effects in ADs. However, as the intensity of fluctuation increases, still within the bounds observed in natural systems, ADs in shallow parts of the system become highly sensitive to dynamic flow conditions, leading to considerable changes in the moments and modality of the distributions with time. In particular, transient flow can lead to emergence of new modes in the AD, which would not be present under steady flow conditions. The discrepancy observed between ADs under steady and transient flow conditions is explained by enhancement of mixing due to temporal variations in the flow field. ADs in deeper parts of the system are characterized by multimodality and tend to be more stable over time even for large forcing fluctuations.

  20. Neutrino Transport in Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries: Dynamical Mass Ejection and Neutrino-Driven Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, K.; Kiuchi, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our recent results of numerical-relativity simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers incorporating approximate neutrino transport. We in particular discuss dynamical mass ejection and neutrino-driven wind.

  1. Energetic particle injections at Saturn: their relationship to solar wind driven and rotationally driven magnetospheric dynamics as measured in situ and using ENA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Paranicas, C.; Brandt, P. C.; Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mauk, B.; Krupp, N.; Hamilton, D. C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Dougherty, M. K.; Pryor, W. R.; Bunce, E. J.; Badman, S. V.; Radioti, A.; Crary, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Plasma dynamics in Saturn's magnetosphere are driven externally by solar wind interaction, and internally by the continuous production of new plasma from the Enceladus water vapor plumes and the need for that plasma to escape the fast-rotating system. Solar wind interaction is especially important to the dynamics of the outer magnetosphere, but it is not clear how important it is to the processes that transport the cold plasma radially outward. Rotational dynamics are clearly important to radial cold plasma transport, which is largely driven by centrifugal force. In this study we look at the signatures of magnetospheric dynamics in energetic particles, and in energetic neutral atoms (ENA). The magnetosphere driving processes described above also tend to accelerate plasma ions and electrons to high energy, and so energetic particle intensities can provide an important telltale and diagnostic for when, where, and how cold plasma transport is occurring. In particular, injection has been broadly used to describe sudden increases in energetic particle intensities, and this presentation will attempt to discriminate among such energetic particle events or injections, and place them in context with relation to both solar wind driven and rotating cold plasma transport driven processes in Saturn's magnetosphere. We also will discuss their relationship with other measurements including plasma wave emissions and auroral emissions.

  2. The ENSO signal in atmospheric composition fields: emission-driven versus dynamically induced changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inness, A.; Benedetti, A.; Flemming, J.; Huijnen, V.; Kaiser, J. W.; Parrington, M.; Remy, S.

    2015-08-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) not only affects meteorological fields but also has a large impact on atmospheric composition. Atmospheric composition fields from the Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC) reanalysis are used to identify the ENSO signal in tropospheric ozone, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide and smoke aerosols, concentrating on the months October to December. During El Niño years, all of these fields have increased concentrations over maritime South East Asia in October. The MACC Composition Integrated Forecasting System (C-IFS) model is used to quantify the relative magnitude of dynamically induced and emission-driven changes in the atmospheric composition fields. While changes in tropospheric ozone are a combination of dynamically induced and emission-driven changes, the changes in carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and smoke aerosols are almost entirely emission-driven in the MACC model. The ozone changes continue into December, i.e. after the end of the Indonesian fire season while changes in the other fields are confined to the fire season.

  3. Thermally Driven and Cytoskeletal-Assisted Dynamics of the Mitochondrial Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Michelle K.; Marcus, Andrew H.

    2003-05-01

    We report Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy (FICS) and digital video fluorescence microscopy (DVFM) measurements of the dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in living osteosarcoma cells. Mitochondrial dynamics are strongly influenced by interactions with cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor proteins, which lead to complex multi-exponential relaxations that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The cytoskeleton consists of an interconnected polymer network whose primary components are microfilaments (actin) and microtubules (tubulin). These filaments work with motor proteins to translate organelles through the cell. We studied the dynamics of osteosarcoma cells labeled with red fluorescent protein in the mitochondrial matrix space using DVFM and FICS. Cells were then treated with cytoskeletal destabilizing drugs. Analysis of microscopy data allows for us to determine whether dynamic processes are diffusive or driven (by the cytoskeleton or collective dynamics). In FICS experiments, the control cells exhibit a unique pattern of dynamics that are then simplified when the cytoskeleton is depolymerized. Upon depolymerization, the dynamics of the organelle appear primarily diffusive.

  4. Observation-driven adaptive differential evolution and its application to accurate and smooth bronchoscope three-dimensional motion tracking.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Wan, Ying; He, Xiangjian; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes an observation-driven adaptive differential evolution algorithm that fuses bronchoscopic video sequences, electromagnetic sensor measurements, and computed tomography images for accurate and smooth bronchoscope three-dimensional motion tracking. Currently an electromagnetic tracker with a position sensor fixed at the bronchoscope tip is commonly used to estimate bronchoscope movements. The large tracking error from directly using sensor measurements, which may be deteriorated heavily by patient respiratory motion and the magnetic field distortion of the tracker, limits clinical applications. How to effectively use sensor measurements for precise and stable bronchoscope electromagnetic tracking remains challenging. We here exploit an observation-driven adaptive differential evolution framework to address such a challenge and boost the tracking accuracy and smoothness. In our framework, two advantageous points are distinguished from other adaptive differential evolution methods: (1) the current observation including sensor measurements and bronchoscopic video images is used in the mutation equation and the fitness computation, respectively and (2) the mutation factor and the crossover rate are determined adaptively on the basis of the current image observation. The experimental results demonstrate that our framework provides much more accurate and smooth bronchoscope tracking than the state-of-the-art methods. Our approach reduces the tracking error from 3.96 to 2.89 mm, improves the tracking smoothness from 4.08 to 1.62 mm, and increases the visual quality from 0.707 to 0.741. PMID:25660001

  5. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadius; vonToussaint, Udo V.; Timucin, Dogan A.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum exitation gap, gmin = O(n2(sup -n/2)), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  6. Dynamics of Quantum Adiabatic Evolution Algorithm for Number Partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, V. N.; Toussaint, U. V.; Timucin, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a general technique to study the dynamics of the quantum adiabatic evolution algorithm applied to random combinatorial optimization problems in the asymptotic limit of large problem size n. We use as an example the NP-complete Number Partitioning problem and map the algorithm dynamics to that of an auxiliary quantum spin glass system with the slowly varying Hamiltonian. We use a Green function method to obtain the adiabatic eigenstates and the minimum excitation gap. g min, = O(n 2(exp -n/2), corresponding to the exponential complexity of the algorithm for Number Partitioning. The key element of the analysis is the conditional energy distribution computed for the set of all spin configurations generated from a given (ancestor) configuration by simultaneous flipping of a fixed number of spins. For the problem in question this distribution is shown to depend on the ancestor spin configuration only via a certain parameter related to 'the energy of the configuration. As the result, the algorithm dynamics can be described in terms of one-dimensional quantum diffusion in the energy space. This effect provides a general limitation of a quantum adiabatic computation in random optimization problems. Analytical results are in agreement with the numerical simulation of the algorithm.

  7. Dynamic evolution and biogenesis of small RNAs during sex reversal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Luo, Majing; Sheng, Yue; Hong, Qiang; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-01-01

    Understanding origin, evolution and functions of small RNA (sRNA) genes has been a great challenge in the past decade. Molecular mechanisms underlying sexual reversal in vertebrates, particularly sRNAs involved in this process, are largely unknown. By deep-sequencing of small RNA transcriptomes in combination with genomic analysis, we identified a large amount of piRNAs and miRNAs including over 1,000 novel miRNAs, which were differentially expressed during gonad reversal from ovary to testis via ovotesis. Biogenesis and expressions of miRNAs were dynamically changed during the reversal. Notably, phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic expansions of miRNAs in vertebrates and an evolutionary trajectory of conserved miR-17-92 cluster in the Eukarya. We showed that the miR-17-92 cluster in vertebrates was generated through multiple duplications from ancestor miR-92 in invertebrates Tetranychus urticae and Daphnia pulex from the Chelicerata around 580 Mya. Moreover, we identified the sexual regulator Dmrt1 as a direct target of the members miR-19a and -19b in the cluster. These data suggested dynamic biogenesis and expressions of small RNAs during sex reversal and revealed multiple expansions and evolutionary trajectory of miRNAs from invertebrates to vertebrates, which implicate small RNAs in sexual reversal and provide new insight into evolutionary and molecular mechanisms underlying sexual reversal. PMID:25944477

  8. An investigation of the dynamic electromechanical coupling effects in machine drive systems driven by asynchronous motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolc, Tomasz; Konowrocki, Robert; Michajłow, Maciej; Pręgowska, Agnieszka

    2014-12-01

    In the paper dynamic electromechanical interaction between the rotating machine drive system and the electric driving motor is considered. The investigations are performed by means of the circuit model of the asynchronous motor as well as using an advanced structural hybrid model of the drive system. Using the analytical solutions applied for the electrical and the mechanical systems the electromagnetic stiffness and coefficient of damping, both generated by the electric motor rotationally interacting with the mechanical system of the given dynamic properties, were determined. By means of experimentally validated computational responses obtained for torsional harmonic excitation induced by the driven machine working tool, a modification of dynamic properties of the mechanical system by the electromagnetic flux between the stator and the rotor has been studied.

  9. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Wei; Hao, Xiaolei; Chen, Yongju; Yu, Shaogang; Xu, Songpo; Wang, Yanlan; Sun, Renping; Lai, Xuanyang; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; He, Xiantu; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends.

  10. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Wei; Hao, XiaoLei; Chen, YongJu; Yu, ShaoGang; Xu, SongPo; Wang, YanLan; Sun, RenPing; Lai, XuanYang; Wu, ChengYin; Gong, QiHuang; He, XianTu; Liu, XiaoJun; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends. PMID:27256904

  11. Phantom instabilities in adiabatically driven systems: dynamical sensitivity to computational precision.

    PubMed

    Jafri, Haider Hasan; Singh, Thounaojam Umeshkanta; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2012-09-01

    We study the robustness of dynamical phenomena in adiabatically driven nonlinear mappings with skew-product structure. Deviations from true orbits are observed when computations are performed with inadequate numerical precision for monotone, periodic, or quasiperiodic driving. The effect of slow modulation is to "freeze" orbits in long intervals of purely contracting or purely expanding dynamics in the phase space. When computations are carried out with low precision, numerical errors build up phantom instabilities which ultimately force trajectories to depart from the true motion. Thus, the dynamics observed with finite precision computation shows sensitivity to numerical precision: the minimum accuracy required to obtain "true" trajectories is proportional to an internal timescale that can be defined for the adiabatic system.

  12. Coordination, Organisation and Model-driven Approaches for Dynamic, Flexible, Robust Software and Services Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, Juan Carlos; Padget, Julian; Vasconcelos, Wamberto; Staikopoulos, Athanasios; Cliffe, Owen; Dignum, Frank; Vázquez-Salceda, Javier; Clarke, Siobhán; Reed, Chris

    Enterprise systems are increasingly composed of (and even functioning as) components in a dynamic, digital ecosystem. On the one hand, this new situation requires flexible, spontaneous and opportunistic collaboration activities to be identified and established among (electronic) business parties. On the other, it demands engineering methods that are able to integrate new functionalities and behaviours into running systems composed by active, distributed, interdependent processes. Here we present a multi-level architecture that combines organisational and coordination theories with model driven development, for the implementation, deployment and management of dynamic, flexible and robust service-oriented business applications, combined with a service layer that accommodates semantic service description, fine-grained semantic service discovery and the dynamic adaptation of services to meet changing circumstances.

  13. Safety-Information-Driven Human Mobility Patterns with Metapopulation Epidemic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bing; Cao, Lang; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-11-01

    With the help of mass media, people receive information concerning the status of an infectious disease to guide their mobility. Herein, we develop a theoretical framework to investigate the safety-information-driven human mobility with metapopulation epidemic dynamics. Individuals respond to the safety information of a city by taking safe moves (passing cities with a more number of healthy individuals) or unsafe moves (passing cities with a less number of healthy individuals). Our findings show that the critical threshold depends on mobility in such a way that personal execution of safe moves unexpectedly promotes the global spread of a disease, while unsafe moves counterintuitively cause a locally, relatively small outbreak size. Our analysis underlines the role of safety consideration in the spatial spread of an infectious disease with clear implications for the model of mobility driven by individuals' benefit.

  14. Force-velocity relation for actin-polymerization-driven motility from Brownian dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kun-Chun; Liu, Andrea J

    2009-09-01

    We report numerical simulation results for the force-velocity relation for actin-polymerization-driven motility. We use Brownian dynamics to solve a physically consistent formulation of the dendritic nucleation model with semiflexible filaments that self-assemble and push a disk. We find that at small loads, the disk speed is independent of load, whereas at high loads, the speed decreases and vanishes at a characteristic stall pressure. Our results demonstrate that at small loads, the velocity is controlled by the reaction rates, whereas at high loads the stall pressure is determined by the mechanical properties of the branched actin network. The behavior is consistent with experiments and with our recently proposed self-diffusiophoretic mechanism for actin-polymerization-driven motility. New in vitro experiments to measure the force-velocity relation are proposed.

  15. Experimental study of curvature-driven flute instability in the gas-dynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.A.; Anikeev, A.V.; Bagryansky, P.A.; Bocharov, V.N.; Deichuli, P.P.; Karpushov, A.N.; Maximov, V.V.; Pod'minogin, A.A.; Rogozin, A.I.; Salikova, T.V.; Tsidulko, Y.A. )

    1994-05-01

    A curvature-driven flute instability will be excited in the magnetized plasmas if the magnetic field lines curve toward the entire plasma boundary. Conditions under which it can be effectively stabilized in axisymmetric geometry have been experimentally studied in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT) at Novosibirsk. Flexible design of the experimental device and the availability of neutral beams and ion cyclotron heating enabled the pressure-weighted curvature to be varied over a wide range. The stability limits were thus measured and compared with those predicted by the modified Rosenbluth--Longmire criterion. Characteristics of unstable curvature-driven flute modes were also measured and found to conform to a theory including finite ion Larmor radius (FLR) effects. Stable operation during neutral beam injection was achieved with a cusp end cell, resulting in an increase in [ital T][sub [ital e

  16. Focusing dynamics of high-energy density, laser-driven ion beams.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; d'Humières, E; Lefebvre, E; Romagnani, L; Toncian, T; Antici, P; Audebert, P; Brambrink, E; Cecchetti, C A; Kudyakov, T; Pipahl, A; Sentoku, Y; Borghesi, M; Willi, O; Fuchs, J

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of the focusing of laser-driven ion beams produced from concave solid targets was studied. Most of the ion beam energy is observed to converge at the center of the cylindrical targets with a spot diameter of 30  μm, which can be very beneficial for applications requiring high beam energy densities. Also, unbalanced laser irradiation does not compromise the focusability of the beam. However, significant filamentation occurs during the focusing, potentially limiting the localization of the energy deposition region by these beams at focus. These effects could impact the applicability of such high-energy density beams for applications, e.g., in proton-driven fast ignition. PMID:22400936

  17. Prediction-driven coordination of distributed MPC controllers for linear unconstrained dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos, Natalia I.; Fraser Forbes, J.; Guay, Martin

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, a coordinated-distributed model predictive control (CDMPC) scheme is proposed for discrete-time, linear, unconstrained dynamic systems. The proposed control scheme incorporates a coordinator that communicates with local CDMPC controllers. With the assistance of the coordinator, the local CDMPC controllers adjust their calculated control actions iteratively to achieve the optimal plant-wide operation. A 'prediction-driven' algorithm is used to coordinate the local CDMPC controllers. Convergence of the prediction-driven algorithm is shown along with a stability analysis of the closed-loop system under coordinated-distributed control. A simulation example is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed coordinated-distributed control scheme.

  18. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, R. H. H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L. N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J. L.; Farmer, D. K.; van Heerwaarden, C. C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-08-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment) must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA) concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  19. Primary Surface Particle Motion as a Mechanism for YORP-Driven Binary Asteroid Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2008-09-01

    Within the largest class of binary asteroid systems -- asynchronous binaries typified by 1999 KW4 -- we hypothesize continued YORP spin-up of the rapidly rotating primary leads to recurring episodic lofting motion of primary equator regolith. We theorize this is a mechanism for transporting YORP-injected angular momentum from primary spin into the mutual orbit. This both enables binary primaries to continue to spin at near surface fission rates and produces continued orbit expansion on time scales several times faster than expansion predicted by tidal dissipation alone. This is distinct from the Binary Yorp (BYORP) phenomenon, not studied in this work but to be added to it later. We evaluate our hypotheses using a combination of techniques for an example binary system. First high-fidelity dynamic simulation of surface-originating particles in the full-detail gravity field of the binary components, themselves propagated according to the full two body problem, gives particle final disposition (return impact, transfer impact, escape). Trajectory end states found for regolith lofted at different initial primary spin rates and relative poses are collected into probability matrices, allowing probabilistic propagation of surface particles for long durations at low computational cost. We track changes to mass, inertia dyad, rotation state, and centroid position and velocity for each component in response to this mapped particle motion. This allows tracking of primary, secondary, and mutual orbit angular momenta over time, clearly demonstrating the angular momentum transfer mechanism and validating our hypotheses. We present current orbit expansion rates and estimated orbit size doubling times consistent with this mechanism, for a few binary systems. We also discuss ramifications of this type of rapid binary evolution towards separation, including the frequency with which "divorced binaries" on similar heliocentric orbits are produced, formation of triple systems such as

  20. Cooperative Bacterial Growth Dynamics Predict the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Hsin-Jung Li, Sophia; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    Since the discovery of penicillin, antibiotics have been our primary weapon against bacterial infections. Unfortunately, bacteria can gain resistance to penicillin by acquiring the gene that encodes beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. However, mutations in this gene are necessary to degrade the modern antibiotic cefotaxime. Understanding the conditions that favor the spread of these mutations is a challenge. Here we show that bacterial growth in beta-lactam antibiotics is cooperative and that the nature of this growth determines the conditions in which resistance evolves. Quantitative analysis of the growth dynamics predicts a peak in selection at very low antibiotic concentrations; competition between strains confirms this prediction. We also find significant selection at higher antibiotic concentrations, close to the minimum inhibitory concentrations of the strains. Our results argue that an understanding of the evolutionary forces that lead to antibiotic resistance requires a quantitative understanding of the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

  1. Bus Vent Design Evolution for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    As a spacecraft undergoes ascent in a launch vehicle, its pressure environment transitions from one atmosphere to high vacuum in a matter of minutes. Venting of internal cavities is necessary to prevent the buildup of pressure differentials across cavity walls. Opposing the need to vent these volumes freely into space are thermal, optical, and electrostatic requirements for limiting or prohibiting the intrusion of unwanted energy into the same cavities. Bus vent design evolution is discussed for the Solar Dynamics Observatory. Design changes were influenced by a number of factors and concerns, such as contamination control, electrostatic discharge, changes in bus material, and driving fairing ascent pressure for a launch vehicle that was just entering service as this satellite project had gotten underway.

  2. Cosmic string dynamics and evolution in warped spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Avgoustidis, A.

    2008-07-15

    We study the dynamics and evolution of Nambu-Goto strings in a warped spacetime, where the warp factor is a function of the internal coordinates giving rise to a ''throat'' region. The microscopic equations of motion for strings in this background include potential and friction terms, which attract the strings towards the bottom of the warping throat. However, by considering the resulting macroscopic equations for the velocities of strings in the vicinity of the throat, we note the absence of enough classical damping to guarantee that the strings actually reach the warped minimum and stabilize there. Instead, our classical analysis supports a picture in which the strings experience mere deflections and bounces around the tip, rather than strongly damped oscillations. Indeed, 4D Hubble friction is inefficient in the internal dimensions and there is no other classical mechanism known, which could provide efficient damping. These results have potentially important implications for the intercommuting probabilities of cosmic superstrings.

  3. Lessons in Protein Design from Combined Evolution and Conformational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Swarnendu; Waxham, M. Neal; Cheung, Margaret S.; Liu, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play important roles in the control of every cellular process. How natural selection has optimized protein design to produce molecules capable of binding to many partner proteins is a fascinating problem but not well understood. Here, we performed a combinatorial analysis of protein sequence evolution and conformational dynamics to study how calmodulin (CaM), which plays essential roles in calcium signaling pathways, has adapted to bind to a large number of partner proteins. We discovered that amino acid residues in CaM can be partitioned into unique classes according to their degree of evolutionary conservation and local stability. Holistically, categorization of CaM residues into these classes reveals enriched physico-chemical interactions required for binding to diverse targets, balanced against the need to maintain the folding and structural modularity of CaM to achieve its overall function. The sequence-structure-function relationship of CaM provides a concrete example of the general principle of protein design. We have demonstrated the synergy between the fields of molecular evolution and protein biophysics and created a generalizable framework broadly applicable to the study of protein-protein interactions. PMID:26388515

  4. Data-driven Modeling of Metal-oxide Sensors with Dynamic Bayesian Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosangi, Rakesh; Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

    2011-09-01

    We present a data-driven probabilistic framework to model the transient response of MOX sensors modulated with a sequence of voltage steps. Analytical models of MOX sensors are usually built based on the physico-chemical properties of the sensing materials. Although building these models provides an insight into the sensor behavior, they also require a thorough understanding of the underlying operating principles. Here we propose a data-driven approach to characterize the dynamical relationship between sensor inputs and outputs. Namely, we use dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), probabilistic models that represent temporal relations between a set of random variables. We identify a set of control variables that influence the sensor responses, create a graphical representation that captures the causal relations between these variables, and finally train the model with experimental data. We validated the approach on experimental data in terms of predictive accuracy and classification performance. Our results show that DBNs can accurately predict the dynamic response of MOX sensors, as well as capture the discriminatory information present in the sensor transients.

  5. Current driven magnetization dynamics of a self-polarised synthetic ferrimagnet

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, A. S.; Lacoste, B.; Geranton, G.; Gusakova, D.; Dieny, B.; Ebels, U.; Buda-Prejbeanu, L. D.

    2014-02-28

    Spin torque driven excitations in spin valves and tunnel junctions are often investigated for a two magnetic layer system for which a polarizer (fixed magnetization) and a free layer can be distinguished. In the search for improved microwave properties and to understand the role of different coupling mechanisms between the magnetic layers, here, the excitation spectrum of an exchange coupled two layer synthetic ferrimagnet (SyF) system is investigated numerically with spin momentum transfer acting on both layers simultaneously. This self-polarised two layer system does not contain an external polarizer, and excitation of coupled modes arises due to the mutual spin transfer torque and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interlayer exchange coupling. The current-field state diagrams of static and dynamic states are reported as a function of the interlayer exchange coupling strength. The numerically determined critical boundaries are well reproduced by an analytical stability analysis. The dynamic steady states reveal an optic-like mode at low magnetic fields, which becomes progressively acoustic-like for increased magnetic fields and currents. The frequency of these modes can be tuned by the film thickness and the strength of the interlayer exchange interaction. The results presented here will provide an important guide for designing spin torque oscillators that exploit the dynamic coupling between layers and, furthermore, they will provide a basis to test analytical models of spin torque driven coupled excitations.

  6. Data-Driven Engineering of Social Dynamics: Pattern Matching and Profit Maximization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huan-Kai; Lee, Hao-Chih; Pan, Jia-Yu; Marculescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we define a new problem related to social media, namely, the data-driven engineering of social dynamics. More precisely, given a set of observations from the past, we aim at finding the best short-term intervention that can lead to predefined long-term outcomes. Toward this end, we propose a general formulation that covers two useful engineering tasks as special cases, namely, pattern matching and profit maximization. By incorporating a deep learning model, we derive a solution using convex relaxation and quadratic-programming transformation. Moreover, we propose a data-driven evaluation method in place of the expensive field experiments. Using a Twitter dataset, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our dynamics engineering approach for both pattern matching and profit maximization, and study the multifaceted interplay among several important factors of dynamics engineering, such as solution validity, pattern-matching accuracy, and intervention cost. Finally, the method we propose is general enough to work with multi-dimensional time series, so it can potentially be used in many other applications. PMID:26771830

  7. Data-Driven Engineering of Social Dynamics: Pattern Matching and Profit Maximization.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huan-Kai; Lee, Hao-Chih; Pan, Jia-Yu; Marculescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we define a new problem related to social media, namely, the data-driven engineering of social dynamics. More precisely, given a set of observations from the past, we aim at finding the best short-term intervention that can lead to predefined long-term outcomes. Toward this end, we propose a general formulation that covers two useful engineering tasks as special cases, namely, pattern matching and profit maximization. By incorporating a deep learning model, we derive a solution using convex relaxation and quadratic-programming transformation. Moreover, we propose a data-driven evaluation method in place of the expensive field experiments. Using a Twitter dataset, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our dynamics engineering approach for both pattern matching and profit maximization, and study the multifaceted interplay among several important factors of dynamics engineering, such as solution validity, pattern-matching accuracy, and intervention cost. Finally, the method we propose is general enough to work with multi-dimensional time series, so it can potentially be used in many other applications.

  8. Data-Driven Engineering of Social Dynamics: Pattern Matching and Profit Maximization

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Huan-Kai; Lee, Hao-Chih; Pan, Jia-Yu; Marculescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we define a new problem related to social media, namely, the data-driven engineering of social dynamics. More precisely, given a set of observations from the past, we aim at finding the best short-term intervention that can lead to predefined long-term outcomes. Toward this end, we propose a general formulation that covers two useful engineering tasks as special cases, namely, pattern matching and profit maximization. By incorporating a deep learning model, we derive a solution using convex relaxation and quadratic-programming transformation. Moreover, we propose a data-driven evaluation method in place of the expensive field experiments. Using a Twitter dataset, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our dynamics engineering approach for both pattern matching and profit maximization, and study the multifaceted interplay among several important factors of dynamics engineering, such as solution validity, pattern-matching accuracy, and intervention cost. Finally, the method we propose is general enough to work with multi-dimensional time series, so it can potentially be used in many other applications. PMID:26771830

  9. Dynamical evolution of star-forming regions - II. Basic kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard J.; Wright, Nicholas J.

    2016-04-01

    We follow the dynamical evolution of young star-forming regions with a wide range of initial conditions and examine how the radial velocity dispersion, σ, evolves over time. We compare this velocity dispersion to the theoretically expected value for the velocity dispersion if a region were in virial equilibrium, σvir and thus assess the virial state (σ/σvir) of these systems. We find that in regions that are initially subvirial, or in global virial equilibrium but subvirial on local scales, the system relaxes to virial equilibrium within several million years, or roughly 25-50 crossing times, according to the measured virial ratio. However, the measured velocity dispersion, σ, appears to be a bad diagnostic of the current virial state of these systems as it suggests that they become supervirial when compared to the velocity dispersion estimated from the virial mass, σvir. We suggest that this discrepancy is caused by the fact that the regions are never fully relaxed, and that the early non-equilibrium evolution is imprinted in the one-dimensional velocity dispersion at these early epochs. If measured early enough (<2 Myr in our simulations, or ˜20 crossing times), the velocity dispersion can be used to determine whether a region was highly supervirial at birth without the risk of degeneracy. We show that combining σ, or the ratio of σ to the interquartile range (IQR) dispersion, with measures of spatial structure, places stronger constraints on the dynamical history of a region than using the velocity dispersion in isolation.

  10. Alternative end joining, clonal evolution, and escape from a telomere-driven crisis.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Eric A; Baird, Duncan M

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction and fusion play key roles in driving genomic instability and clonal evolution in many tumor types. We have recently described a role for DNA ligase III (LIG3) in facilitating the escape of cells from crisis induced by telomere dysfunction. Our data indicate that LIG3-mediated telomere fusion is important in facilitating clonal evolution.

  11. DREISS: Using State-Space Models to Infer the Dynamics of Gene Expression Driven by External and Internal Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gerstein, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is controlled by the combinatorial effects of regulatory factors from different biological subsystems such as general transcription factors (TFs), cellular growth factors and microRNAs. A subsystem’s gene expression may be controlled by its internal regulatory factors, exclusively, or by external subsystems, or by both. It is thus useful to distinguish the degree to which a subsystem is regulated internally or externally–e.g., how non-conserved, species-specific TFs affect the expression of conserved, cross-species genes during evolution. We developed a computational method (DREISS, dreiss.gerteinlab.org) for analyzing the Dynamics of gene expression driven by Regulatory networks, both External and Internal based on State Space models. Given a subsystem, the “state” and “control” in the model refer to its own (internal) and another subsystem’s (external) gene expression levels. The state at a given time is determined by the state and control at a previous time. Because typical time-series data do not have enough samples to fully estimate the model’s parameters, DREISS uses dimensionality reduction, and identifies canonical temporal expression trajectories (e.g., degradation, growth and oscillation) representing the regulatory effects emanating from various subsystems. To demonstrate capabilities of DREISS, we study the regulatory effects of evolutionarily conserved vs. divergent TFs across distant species. In particular, we applied DREISS to the time-series gene expression datasets of C. elegans and D. melanogaster during their embryonic development. We analyzed the expression dynamics of the conserved, orthologous genes (orthologs), seeing the degree to which these can be accounted for by orthologous (internal) versus species-specific (external) TFs. We found that between two species, the orthologs have matched, internally driven expression patterns but very different externally driven ones. This is particularly true for genes with

  12. Effects of Stress and Void-Void Interactions on Current-Driven Void Surface Evolution in Metallic Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaeseol; Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2006-03-01

    We report results of electromigration- and stress-induced migration and morphological evolution of voids in metallic thin films based on self-consistent numerical simulations. The analysis reveals the complex nature of void-void interactions and their implications for the evolution of metallic thin-film electrical resistance, providing interpretation for experimental measurements in interconnect lines. Interestingly, for two voids migrating in the same direction under certain conditions, we find that a smaller void does not always approach and coalesce with a larger one, while a larger void may approach and coalesce with a smaller one. In addition, we find that under certain electromechanical conditions, biaxially applied mechanical stress can cause substantial retardation of void motion, as measured by the constant speed of electromigration-induced translation of morphologically stable voids. This effect suggests the possibility for complete inhibition of current-driven void motion under stress.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics of a sinusoidally driven pendulum in a repulsive magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siahmakoun, Azad; French, Valentina A.; Patterson, Jeffrey

    1997-05-01

    The dynamics of a sinusoidally driven pendulum in a repulsive magnetic field is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The experimental data are acquired using a shaft encoder interfaced to a PC which measures the angular displacement of the pendulum as a function of time. Both the theoretical simulations and the experimental measurements exhibit regions of periodic and chaotic behavior, depending on the system parameters. Amplitude jumps, hysteresis, and bistable states are also observed. The simplicity of the apparatus makes this experiment suitable for an advanced undergraduate laboratory.

  14. Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

    2006-03-30

    We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

  15. Nonparametric and data-driven data assimilation for the reconstruction of complex geophysical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandeo, Pierre; Ailliot, Pierre; Ruiz, Juan; Hannart, Alexis; Chapron, Bertrand; Cuzol, Anne; Monbet, Valérie; Le Goff, Clément; Lguensat, Redouane; Fablet, Ronan

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, ocean, atmosphere and climate sciences face a deluge of data pouring from space, in situ monitoring as well as numerical simulations. The availability of these different data sources offer new opportunities, still largely underexploited, to improve the understanding, modeling and reconstruction of geophysical dynamics. The classical way to reconstruct the space-time dynamics of a geophysical system from observation series relies on data assimilation methods, which perform multiple runs of the known dynamical model. This classical framework may have severe limitations including its computational cost, the lack of consistency of the model with respect to the observed data, modeling uncertainties. Here, we explore an alternative approach and develop a fully data-driven framework. We assume that a representative catalog of examples of the space-time dynamics of the geophysical system of interest is available. Depending on the case-study, such a catalog may be issued from observations as well as numerical simulations. Based on this catalog, we combine machine learning and statistical sampling to address data assimilation as follows. The key idea is to design a nonparametric sampler of the dynamics of the considered geophysical system from the available catalog. We focus in this work on analog (also referred to as nearest-neighbor) methods. They provide us the mean for sampling forecast members with no online evaluation of the physical model. The combination of these members with the observations resorts to the classical stochastic filtering techniques, such as ensemble Kalman or particle filters and smoothers. As a proof concept, we demonstrate the relevance of the proposed data assimilation method for Lorenz-63 and Lorenz-96 chaotic dynamics. We compare different nonparametric sampling schemes as well as stochastic filters and evaluate how the size of the catalog and the dimensionality of the system affect assimilation performance. We show that our

  16. Effects of grain size evolution on mantle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Falko; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2016-04-01

    The rheology of planetary mantle materials is strongly dependent on temperature, pressure, strain-rate, and grain size. In particular, the rheology of olivine, the most abundant mineral of the Earth's upper mantle, has been extensively studied in the laboratory (e.g., Karato and Wu, 1993; Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003). Two main mechanisms control olivine's deformation: dislocation and diffusion creep. While the former implies a power-law dependence of the viscosity on the strain-rate that leads to a non-Newtonian behaviour, the latter is sensitively dependent on the grain size. The dynamics of planetary interiors is locally controlled by the deformation mechanism that delivers the lowest viscosity. Models of the dynamics and evolution of planetary mantles should thus be capable to self-consistently distinguish which of the two mechanisms dominates at given conditions of temperature, pressure, strain-rate and grain size. As the grain size can affect the viscosity associated with diffusion creep by several orders of magnitude, it can strongly influence the dominant deformation mechanism. The vast majority of numerical, global-scale models of mantle convection, however, are based on the use of a linear diffusion-creep rheology with constant grain-size. Nevertheless, in recent studies, a new equation has been proposed to properly model the time-dependent evolution of the grain size (Austin and Evens, 2007; Rozel et al., 2010). We implemented this equation in our mantle convection code Gaia (Hüttig et al., 2013). In the framework of simple models of stagnant lid convection, we compared simulations based on the fully time-dependent equation of grain-size evolution with simulations based on its steady-state version. In addition, we tested a number of different parameters in order to identify those that affects the grain size to the first order and, in turn, control the conditions at which mantle deformation is dominated by diffusion or dislocation creep. References Austin

  17. Dynamical evolution and spatial mixing of multiple population globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesperini, Enrico; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; D'Antona, Francesca; D'Ercole, Annibale

    2013-03-01

    Numerous spectroscopic and photometric observational studies have provided strong evidence for the widespread presence of multiple stellar populations in globular clusters. In this paper, we study the long-term dynamical evolution of multiple population clusters, focusing on the evolution of the spatial distributions of the first- (FG) and second-generation (SG) stars. In previous studies, we have suggested that SG stars formed from the ejecta of FG AGB stars are expected initially to be concentrated in the cluster inner regions. Here, by means of N-body simulations, we explore the time-scales and the dynamics of the spatial mixing of the FG and the SG populations and their dependence on the SG initial concentration. Our simulations show that, as the evolution proceeds, the radial profile of the SG/FG number ratio, NSG/NFG, is characterized by three regions: (1) a flat inner part; (2) a declining part in which FG stars are increasingly dominant and (3) an outer region where the NSG/NFG profile flattens again (the NSG/NFG profile may rise slightly again in the outermost cluster regions). Until mixing is complete and the NSG/NFG profile is flat over the entire cluster, the radial variation of NSG/NFG implies that the fraction of SG stars determined by observations covering a limited range of radial distances is not, in general, equal to the SG global fraction, (NSG/NFG)glob. The distance at which NSG/NFG equals (NSG/NFG)glob is approximately between 1 and 2 cluster half-mass radii. The time-scale for complete mixing depends on the SG initial concentration, but in all cases complete mixing is expected only for clusters in advanced evolutionary phases, having lost at least 60-70 per cent of their mass due to two-body relaxation (in addition to the early FG loss due to the cluster expansion triggered by SNII ejecta and gas expulsion).The results of our simulations suggest that in many Galactic globular clusters the SG should still be more spatially concentrated than the

  18. Sex speeds adaptation by altering the dynamics of molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael J; Rice, Daniel P; Desai, Michael M

    2016-03-10

    Sex and recombination are pervasive throughout nature despite their substantial costs. Understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain these phenomena is a central challenge in biology. One longstanding hypothesis argues that sex is beneficial because recombination speeds adaptation. Theory has proposed several distinct population genetic mechanisms that could underlie this advantage. For example, sex can promote the fixation of beneficial mutations either by alleviating interference competition (the Fisher-Muller effect) or by separating them from deleterious load (the ruby in the rubbish effect). Previous experiments confirm that sex can increase the rate of adaptation, but these studies did not observe the evolutionary dynamics that drive this effect at the genomic level. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, comparison between the sequence-level dynamics of adaptation in experimental sexual and asexual Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations, which allows us to identify the specific mechanisms by which sex speeds adaptation. We find that sex alters the molecular signatures of evolution by changing the spectrum of mutations that fix, and confirm theoretical predictions that it does so by alleviating clonal interference. We also show that substantially deleterious mutations hitchhike to fixation in adapting asexual populations. In contrast, recombination prevents such mutations from fixing. Our results demonstrate that sex both speeds adaptation and alters its molecular signature by allowing natural selection to more efficiently sort beneficial from deleterious mutations.

  19. Sex speeds adaptation by altering the dynamics of molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael J; Rice, Daniel P; Desai, Michael M

    2016-03-10

    Sex and recombination are pervasive throughout nature despite their substantial costs. Understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain these phenomena is a central challenge in biology. One longstanding hypothesis argues that sex is beneficial because recombination speeds adaptation. Theory has proposed several distinct population genetic mechanisms that could underlie this advantage. For example, sex can promote the fixation of beneficial mutations either by alleviating interference competition (the Fisher-Muller effect) or by separating them from deleterious load (the ruby in the rubbish effect). Previous experiments confirm that sex can increase the rate of adaptation, but these studies did not observe the evolutionary dynamics that drive this effect at the genomic level. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, comparison between the sequence-level dynamics of adaptation in experimental sexual and asexual Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations, which allows us to identify the specific mechanisms by which sex speeds adaptation. We find that sex alters the molecular signatures of evolution by changing the spectrum of mutations that fix, and confirm theoretical predictions that it does so by alleviating clonal interference. We also show that substantially deleterious mutations hitchhike to fixation in adapting asexual populations. In contrast, recombination prevents such mutations from fixing. Our results demonstrate that sex both speeds adaptation and alters its molecular signature by allowing natural selection to more efficiently sort beneficial from deleterious mutations. PMID:26909573

  20. Sex Speeds Adaptation by Altering the Dynamics of Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Michael J.; Rice, Daniel P.; Desai, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Sex and recombination are pervasive throughout nature despite their substantial costs1. Understanding the evolutionary forces that maintain these phenomena is a central challenge in biology2,3. One longstanding hypothesis argues that sex is beneficial because recombination speeds adaptation4. Theory has proposed a number of distinct population genetic mechanisms that could underlie this advantage. For example, sex can promote the fixation of beneficial mutations either by alleviating interference competition (the Fisher-Muller effect)5,6 or by separating them from deleterious load (the ruby in the rubbish effect)7,8. Previous experiments confirm that sex can increase the rate of adaptation9–17, but these studies did not observe the evolutionary dynamics that drive this effect at the genomic level. Here, we present the first comparison between the sequence-level dynamics of adaptation in experimental sexual and asexual populations, which allows us to identify the specific mechanisms by which sex speeds adaptation. We find that sex alters the molecular signatures of evolution by changing the spectrum of mutations that fix, and confirm theoretical predictions that it does so by alleviating clonal interference. We also show that substantially deleterious mutations hitchhike to fixation in adapting asexual populations. In contrast, recombination prevents such mutations from fixing. Our results demonstrate that sex both speeds adaptation and alters its molecular signature by allowing natural selection to more efficiently sort beneficial from deleterious mutations. PMID:26909573

  1. Evolution dynamics of tropical ocean-atmosphere annual cycle variability

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.; Chao, Y.

    1996-12-01

    The structure of ocean-atmosphere annual cycle variability is extracted from the revised Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set SSTs, surface winds, and the latent heat (LH) and net shortwave (SW) surface fluxes using the covariance-based rotated principal component analysis method. The coupled annual cycle variability is concisely described using two modes that are in temporal quadrature. The first, peaking in June/July (and December/January), represents monsoonal flow onto Indochina, Central America, and western Africa. The second mode peaks in September/October and March/April when it represents the extreme phases of the SST annual cycle in the eastern oceans. Analysis of the surface momentum balance in the Pacific cold tongue core shows the equatorial flow, and in particular the zonal wind, to be dynamically consistent with the SST gradient during both the cold tongue`s nascent (June/July) and mature (September/October) phases; the dynamical consistency improves when the impact of nearsurface static stability variation on horizontal momentum dissipation is also considered. Evolution structure of the extracted annual cycle, moreover, shows the easterly wind tendency to lead SST cooling in the off-coastal zone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the Pacific cold tongue westward expansion results from local interaction of the zonal wind and zonal SST gradient, as encapsulated in the proposed {open_quotes}westward expansion hypothesis{close_quotes} - a simple analytic model of which is also presented. 29 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Phylogenomics and the Dynamic Genome Evolution of the Genus Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Vincent P.; Palmer, Sara R.; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D.; Qin, Xiang; Weinstock, George M.; Highlander, Sarah K.; Town, Christopher D.; Burne, Robert A.; Stanhope, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Streptococcus comprises important pathogens that have a severe impact on human health and are responsible for substantial economic losses to agriculture. Here, we utilize 46 Streptococcus genome sequences (44 species), including eight species sequenced here, to provide the first genomic level insight into the evolutionary history and genetic basis underlying the functional diversity of all major groups of this genus. Gene gain/loss analysis revealed a dynamic pattern of genome evolution characterized by an initial period of gene gain followed by a period of loss, as the major groups within the genus diversified. This was followed by a period of genome expansion associated with the origins of the present extant species. The pattern is concordant with an emerging view that genomes evolve through a dynamic process of expansion and streamlining. A large proportion of the pan-genome has experienced lateral gene transfer (LGT) with causative factors, such as relatedness and shared environment, operating over different evolutionary scales. Multiple gene ontology terms were significantly enriched for each group, and mapping terms onto the phylogeny showed that those corresponding to genes born on branches leading to the major groups represented approximately one-fifth of those enriched. Furthermore, despite the extensive LGT, several biochemical characteristics have been retained since group formation, suggesting genomic cohesiveness through time, and that these characteristics may be fundamental to each group. For example, proteolysis: mitis group; urea metabolism: salivarius group; carbohydrate metabolism: pyogenic group; and transcription regulation: bovis group. PMID:24625962

  3. Data-driven output-feedback fault-tolerant L2 control of unknown dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Sheng; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the data-driven output-feedback fault-tolerant L2-control problem for unknown dynamic systems. In a framework of active fault-tolerant control (FTC), three issues are addressed, including fault detection, controller reconfiguration for optimal guaranteed cost control, and tracking control. According to the data-driven form of observer-based residual generators, the system state is expressed in the form of the measured input-output data. On this basis, a model-free approach to L2 control of unknown linear time-invariant (LTI) discrete-time plants is given. To achieve tracking control, a design method for a pre-filter is also presented. With the aid of the aforementioned results and the input-output data-based time-varying value function approximation structure, a data-driven FTC scheme ensuring L2-gain properties is developed. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology, two simulation examples are employed.

  4. Muscle-driven forward dynamic simulations for the study of normal and pathological gait

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in the use of muscle-actuated forward dynamic simulations to describe human locomotion. These models simulate movement through the integration of dynamic equations of motion and usually are driven by excitation inputs to muscles. Because motion is effected by individual muscle actuators, these simulations offer potential insights into the roles played by muscles in producing walking motions. Better knowledge of the actions of muscles should lead to clarification of the etiology of movement disorders and more effective treatments. This article reviews the use of such simulations to characterize musculoskeletal function and describe the actions of muscles during normal and pathological locomotion. The review concludes by identifying ways in which models must be improved if their potential for clinical utility is to be realized. PMID:16519796

  5. Dynamical features and electric field strengths of double layers driven by currents. [in auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, a number of papers have been concerned with 'ion-acoustic' double layers. In the present investigation, results from numerical simulations are presented to show that the shapes and forms of current-driven double layers evolve dynamically with the fluctuations in the current through the plasma. It is shown that double layers with a potential dip can form even without the excitation of ion-acoustic modes. Double layers in two-and one-half-dimensional simulations are discussed, taking into account the simulation technique, the spatial and temporal features of plasma, and the dynamical behavior of the parallel potential distribution. Attention is also given to double layers in one-dimensional simulations, and electrical field strengths predicted by two-and one-half-dimensional simulations.

  6. Cycle-averaged dynamics of a periodically driven, closed-loop circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heldt, T.; Chang, J. L.; Chen, J. J. S.; Verghese, G. C.; Mark, R. G.

    2005-01-01

    Time-varying elastance models have been used extensively in the past to simulate the pulsatile nature of cardiovascular waveforms. Frequently, however, one is interested in dynamics that occur over longer time scales, in which case a detailed simulation of each cardiac contraction becomes computationally burdensome. In this paper, we apply circuit-averaging techniques to a periodically driven, closed-loop, three-compartment recirculation model. The resultant cycle-averaged model is linear and time invariant, and greatly reduces the computational burden. It is also amenable to systematic order reduction methods that lead to further efficiencies. Despite its simplicity, the averaged model captures the dynamics relevant to the representation of a range of cardiovascular reflex mechanisms. c2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anisotropic relaxation dynamics in a dipolar Fermi gas driven out of equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, K; Frisch, A; Mark, M; Baier, S; Grimm, R; Bohn, J L; Jin, D S; Bruun, G M; Ferlaino, F

    2014-12-31

    We report on the observation of a large anisotropy in the rethermalization dynamics of an ultracold dipolar Fermi gas driven out of equilibrium. Our system consists of an ultracold sample of strongly magnetic 167Er fermions, spin polarized in the lowest Zeeman sublevel. In this system, elastic collisions arise purely from universal dipolar scattering. Based on cross-dimensional rethermalization experiments, we observe a strong anisotropy of the scattering, which manifests itself in a large angular dependence of the thermal relaxation dynamics. Our result is in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we measure the rethermalization rate as a function of temperature for different angles and find that the suppression of collisions by Pauli blocking is not influenced by the dipole orientation. PMID:25615326

  8. Anisotropic Relaxation Dynamics in a Dipolar Fermi Gas Driven Out of Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, K.; Frisch, A.; Mark, M.; Baier, S.; Grimm, R.; Bohn, J. L.; Jin, D. S.; Bruun, G. M.; Ferlaino, F.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the observation of a large anisotropy in the rethermalization dynamics of an ultracold dipolar Fermi gas driven out of equilibrium. Our system consists of an ultracold sample of strongly magnetic Er 167 fermions, spin polarized in the lowest Zeeman sublevel. In this system, elastic collisions arise purely from universal dipolar scattering. Based on cross-dimensional rethermalization experiments, we observe a strong anisotropy of the scattering, which manifests itself in a large angular dependence of the thermal relaxation dynamics. Our result is in good agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we measure the rethermalization rate as a function of temperature for different angles and find that the suppression of collisions by Pauli blocking is not influenced by the dipole orientation.

  9. Studies on Dynamic Damage Evolution for Pp/pa Polymer Blends Under High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zi-Jian; Wang, Li-Li

    The dynamic damage evolution for PP/PA blends with different compatibilizers is studied in high strain rates from two different approaches, namely by determining the unloading elastic modulus of specimen experienced impact deformation and by combining the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experimental technique with the back-propagation (BP) neural network. The results obtained by both approaches consistently show that a threshold strain ɛth exists for dynamic damage evolution, and both the damage evolution and ɛth are dependent on strain and strain rate. For non-linear visco-elastic materials, the damage evolution determined by the unloading elastic modulus provides an underestimation of real damage evolution.

  10. Using a spectral approach to compare dynamic and static head driven hyporheic exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, Anders; Morén, Ida; Riml, Joakim

    2016-04-01

    Hyporheic exchange is an important process controlling the transportation and fate of solutes in natural streams. The exchange is driven by the hydraulic head gradients over the stream bottom and occurs on a wide range of spatial scales. The hydraulic head gradient is either dominated by the static head, originating from water surface elevation differences or it is dominated by the dynamic head that is created when the velocity head of the stream is transformed to pressure variations along an uneven bed surface. This article uses a power spectral approach to compare the exchange due to the static and dynamic head occurring over a range of spatial scales in the Tullstorps Brook. Prediction of hyporheic exchange is restrained by the complications of performing measurements of high quality and quantity in the field. In this study bottom elevation and water depth was measured with a levelling instrument every 2.56 - 16.83 m along a 500 m long reach of the Tullstorps Brook. The velocity head was calculated at the same sections based on the measured cross section area of the stream and the average discharge during the day when the measurements were done. Parallel to the head investigations a Rhodamine WT tracer test was performed in the reach and the parameters controlling hyporheic exchange was estimated through inverse modelling. These tracer test parameters were compared with theoretical parameters obtained from a spectral model. Hyporheic exchange is often modelled by assuming the head variations to be harmonic with a certain wavelength and amplitude. In the reality the head variation cannot be represented by a single harmonic function, but the representation of head geometry can be improved by superimposing a large number of harmonic functions. Here, to be able to include the whole range of harmonics, we used a power spectral approach to analyse the hydraulic head measurements from the field. The Fourier power spectrum of the data was calculated for the water

  11. A unified N-body and statistical treatment of stellar dynamics. III - Early postcollapse evolution of globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, S. L. W.

    1986-01-01

    The period immediately following the core collapse phase in the evolution of a globular cluster is studied using a hybrid N-body/Fokker-Planck stellar dynamical code. Several core oscillations of the type predicted in earlier work are seen. The oscillations are driven by the formation, hardening, and ejection of binaries by three-body processes, and appear to decay on a timescale of about 10 to the 7th yr, for the choice of 'typical' cluster parameters made here. There is no evidence that they are gravothermal in nature. The mechanisms responsible for the decay are discussed in some detail. The distribution of hard binaries produced by the oscillations is compared with theoretical expectations and the longer term evolution of the system is considered.

  12. Plasma Formation and Evolution on Cu, Al, Ti, and Ni Surfaces Driven by a Mega-Ampere Current Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Kevin C.

    Metal alloy mm-diameter rods have been driven by a 1-MA, 100-ns current pulse from the Zebra z-pinch. The intense current produces megagauss surface magnetic fields that diffuse into the load, ohmically heating the metal until plasma forms. Because the radius is much thicker than the skin depth, the magnetic field reaches a much higher value than around a thin-wire load. With the "barbell" load design, plasma formation in the region of interest due to contact arcing or electron avalanche is avoided, allowing for the study of ohmically heated loads. Work presented here will show first evidence of a magnetic field threshold for plasma formation in copper 101, copper 145, titanium, and nickel, and compare with previous work done with aluminum. Copper alloys 101 and 145, titanium grade II, and nickel alloy 200 form plasma when the surface magnetic field reaches 3.5, 3.0, 2.2, and 2.6 megagauss, respectively. Varying the element metal, as well as the alloy, changes multiple physical properties of the load and affects the evolution of the surface material through the multiple phase changes. Similarities and differences between these metals will be presented, giving motivation for continued work with different material loads. During the current rise, the metal is heated to temperatures that cause multiple phase changes. When the surface magnetic field reaches a threshold, the metal ionizes and the plasma becomes pinched against the underlying cooler, dense material. Diagnostics fielded have included visible light radiometry, two-frame shadowgraphy (266 and 532 nm wavelengths), time-gated EUV spectroscopy, single-frame/2ns gated imaging, and multi-frame/4ns gated imaging with an intensified CCD camera (ICCD). Surface temperature, expansion speeds, instability growth, time of plasma formation, and plasma uniformity are determined from the data. The time-period of potential plasma formation is scrutinized to understand if and when plasma forms on the surface of a heated

  13. Using the Dynamic Model to Develop an Evidence-Based and Theory-Driven Approach to School Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creemers, B. P. M.; Kyriakides, Leonidas

    2010-01-01

    This paper refers to a dynamic perspective of educational effectiveness and improvement stressing the importance of using an evidence-based and theory-driven approach. Specifically, an approach to school improvement based on the dynamic model of educational effectiveness is offered. The recommended approach to school improvement gives emphasis to…

  14. Bias-modulated dynamics of a strongly driven two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Zhiguo; Yan, Yiying; Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Zheng, Hang

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the bias-modulated dynamics of a strongly driven two-level system using the counterrotating-hybridized rotating-wave (CHRW) method. This CHRW method treats the driving field and the bias on equal footing by a unitary transformation with two parameters ξ and ζ , and is nonperturbative in driving strength, tunneling amplitude, or bias. In addition, this CHRW method is beyond the traditional rotating-wave approximation (Rabi-RWA) and yet by properly choosing the two parameters ξ and ζ , the transformed Hamiltonian takes the RWA form with a renormalized energy splitting and a renormalized driving strength. The reformulated CHRW method possesses the same mathematical simplicity as the Rabi-RWA approach and thus allows us to calculate analytically the dynamics and explore explicitly the effect of the bias. We show that the CHRW method gives the accurate driven dynamics for a wide range of parameters as compared to the numerically exact results. When energy scales of the driving are comparable to the intrinsic energy scale of the two-level systems, the counterrotating interactions and static bias profoundly influence the generalized Rabi frequency. In this regime, where ordinary perturbation approaches fail, the CHRW works very well and efficiently. We also demonstrate the dynamics of the system in the strong-driving and off-resonance cases for which the Rabi-RWA method breaks down but the CHRW method remains valid. We obtain analytical expressions for the generalized Rabi frequency and bias-modulated Bloch-Siegert shift as functions of the bias, tunneling, and driving field parameters. The CHRW approach is a mathematically simple and physically clear method. It can be applied to treat some complicated problems for which a numerical study is difficult to perform.

  15. The dynamics of information-driven coordination phenomena: A transfer entropy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Perra, Nicola; Gonçalves, Bruno; González-Bailón, Sandra; Arenas, Alex; Moreno, Yamir; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Data from social media provide unprecedented opportunities to investigate the processes that govern the dynamics of collective social phenomena. We consider an information theoretical approach to define and measure the temporal and structural signatures typical of collective social events as they arise and gain prominence. We use the symbolic transfer entropy analysis of microblogging time series to extract directed networks of influence among geolocalized subunits in social systems. This methodology captures the emergence of system-level dynamics close to the onset of socially relevant collective phenomena. The framework is validated against a detailed empirical analysis of five case studies. In particular, we identify a change in the characteristic time scale of the information transfer that flags the onset of information-driven collective phenomena. Furthermore, our approach identifies an order-disorder transition in the directed network of influence between social subunits. In the absence of clear exogenous driving, social collective phenomena can be represented as endogenously driven structural transitions of the information transfer network. This study provides results that can help define models and predictive algorithms for the analysis of societal events based on open source data. PMID:27051875

  16. The dynamics of information-driven coordination phenomena: A transfer entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Borge-Holthoefer, Javier; Perra, Nicola; Gonçalves, Bruno; González-Bailón, Sandra; Arenas, Alex; Moreno, Yamir; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Data from social media provide unprecedented opportunities to investigate the processes that govern the dynamics of collective social phenomena. We consider an information theoretical approach to define and measure the temporal and structural signatures typical of collective social events as they arise and gain prominence. We use the symbolic transfer entropy analysis of microblogging time series to extract directed networks of influence among geolocalized subunits in social systems. This methodology captures the emergence of system-level dynamics close to the onset of socially relevant collective phenomena. The framework is validated against a detailed empirical analysis of five case studies. In particular, we identify a change in the characteristic time scale of the information transfer that flags the onset of information-driven collective phenomena. Furthermore, our approach identifies an order-disorder transition in the directed network of influence between social subunits. In the absence of clear exogenous driving, social collective phenomena can be represented as endogenously driven structural transitions of the information transfer network. This study provides results that can help define models and predictive algorithms for the analysis of societal events based on open source data. PMID:27051875

  17. Dynamic control of laser driven proton beams by exploiting self-generated, ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Hanton, F.; Giesecke, A. L.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the ultrafast charge dynamics initiated by high intensity laser irradiations of solid targets, high amplitude EM pulses propagate away from the interaction point and are transported along any stalks and wires attached to the target. The propagation of these high amplitude pulses along a thin wire connected to a laser irradiated target was diagnosed via the proton radiography technique, measuring a pulse duration of ˜20 ps and a pulse velocity close to the speed of light. The strong electric field associated with the EM pulse can be exploited for controlling dynamically the proton beams produced from a laser-driven source. Chromatic divergence control of broadband laser driven protons (upto 75% reduction in divergence of >5 MeV protons) was obtained by winding the supporting wire around the proton beam axis to create a helical coil structure. In addition to providing focussing and energy selection, the technique has the potential to post-accelerate the transiting protons by the longitudinal component of the curved electric field lines produced by the helical coil lens.

  18. An Event-Driven Hybrid Molecular Dynamics and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, A; Garcia, A L; Alder, B J

    2007-07-30

    A novel algorithm is developed for the simulation of polymer chains suspended in a solvent. The polymers are represented as chains of hard spheres tethered by square wells and interact with the solvent particles with hard core potentials. The algorithm uses event-driven molecular dynamics (MD) for the simulation of the polymer chain and the interactions between the chain beads and the surrounding solvent particles. The interactions between the solvent particles themselves are not treated deterministically as in event-driven algorithms, rather, the momentum and energy exchange in the solvent is determined stochastically using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The coupling between the solvent and the solute is consistently represented at the particle level, however, unlike full MD simulations of both the solvent and the solute, the spatial structure of the solvent is ignored. The algorithm is described in detail and applied to the study of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a hard wall subjected to uniform shear. The algorithm closely reproduces full MD simulations with two orders of magnitude greater efficiency. Results do not confirm the existence of periodic (cycling) motion of the polymer chain.

  19. Dynamic Structure Factor and Transport Coefficients of a Homogeneously Driven Granular Fluid in Steady State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmayr-Lee, Katharina; Zippelius, Annette; Aspelmeier, Timo

    2011-03-01

    We study the dynamic structure factor of a granular fluid of hard spheres, driven into a stationary nonequilibrium state by balancing the energy loss due to inelastic collisions with the energy input due to driving. The driving is chosen to conserve momentum, so that fluctuating hydrodynamics predicts the existence of sound modes. We present results of computer simulations which are based on an event driven algorithm. The dynamic structure factor F (q , ω) is determined for volume fractions 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 and coefficients of normal restitution 0.8 and 0.9. We observe sound waves, and compare our results for F (q , ω) with the predictions of generalized fluctuating hydrodynamics which takes into account that temperature fluctuations decay either diffusively or with a finite relaxation rate, depending on wave number and inelasticity. We determine the speed of sound and the transport coefficients and compare them to the results of kinetic theory. K.V.L. thanks the Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Goettingen, for financial support and hospitality.

  20. Outflow dynamics of dust-driven wind models and implications for cool envelopes of PNe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbena, J. L.; Schröder, K.-P.; Wachter, A.

    2011-08-01

    The density profiles of cool envelopes of young planetary nebulae (PNe) are reminiscent of the final asymptotic giant branch (AGB) outflow history of the central star, so far as these have not yet been transformed by the hot wind and radiation of the central star. Obviously, the evolution of the mass loss rate of that dust-driven, cool wind of the former giant in its final AGB stages must have shaped these envelopes to some extent. Less clear is the impact of changes in the outflow velocity. Certainly, larger and fast changes would lead to significant complications in the reconstruction of the mass-loss history from a cool envelope's density profile. Here, we analyse the outflow velocity vexp in a consistent set of over 50 carbon-rich, dust-driven and well 'saturated' wind models, and how it depends on basic stellar parameters. We find a relation of the kind of vexp∝ (L/M)0.6. By contrast to the vast changes of the mass-loss rate in the final outflow phase, this relation suggests only very modest variations in the wind velocity, even during a thermal pulse. Hence, we conclude that the density profiles of cool envelopes around young PNe should indeed compare relatively well with their recent mass-loss history, when diluted plainly by the equation of continuity.

  1. An event-driven approach for studying gene block evolution in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ream, David C.; Bankapur, Asma R.; Friedberg, Iddo

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Gene blocks are genes co-located on the chromosome. In many cases, gene blocks are conserved between bacterial species, sometimes as operons, when genes are co-transcribed. The conservation is rarely absolute: gene loss, gain, duplication, block splitting and block fusion are frequently observed. An open question in bacterial molecular evolution is that of the formation and breakup of gene blocks, for which several models have been proposed. These models, however, are not generally applicable to all types of gene blocks, and consequently cannot be used to broadly compare and study gene block evolution. To address this problem, we introduce an event-based method for tracking gene block evolution in bacteria. Results: We show here that the evolution of gene blocks in proteobacteria can be described by a small set of events. Those include the insertion of genes into, or the splitting of genes out of a gene block, gene loss, and gene duplication. We show how the event-based method of gene block evolution allows us to determine the evolutionary rateand may be used to trace the ancestral states of their formation. We conclude that the event-based method can be used to help us understand the formation of these important bacterial genomic structures. Availability and implementation: The software is available under GPLv3 license on http://github.com/reamdc1/gene_block_evolution.git. Supplementary online material: http://iddo-friedberg.net/operon-evolution Contact: i.friedberg@miamioh.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25717195

  2. Molecular Dynamic Simulation of Thin Film Growth Stress Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haifeng

    2011-12-01

    With the increasing demand for thin films across a wide range of technology, especially in electronic and magnetic applications, controlling the stresses in deposited thin films has become one of the more important challenges in modern engineering. It is well known that large intrinsic stress---in the magnitude of several gigapascals---can result during the thin film preparation. The magnitude of stress depends on the deposition technique, film thickness, types and structures of materials used as films and substrates, as well as other factors. Such large intrinsic stress may lead to film cracking and peeling in case of tensile stress, and delamination and blistering in case of compression. However it may also have beneficial effects on optoelectronics and its applications. For example, intrinsic stresses can be used to change the electronic band gap of semiconducting materials. The far-reaching fields of microelectronics and optoelectronics depend critically on the properties, behavior, and reliable performance of deposited thin films. Thus, understanding and controlling the origins and behavior of such intrinsic stresses in deposited thin films is a highly active field of research. In this study, on-going tensile stress evolution during Volmer-Weber growth mode was analyzed through numerical methods. A realistic model with semi-cylinder shape free surfaces was used and molecular dynamics simulations were conducted. Simulations were at room temperature (300 K), and 10 nanometer diameter of islands were used. A deposition rate that every 3 picoseconds deposit one atom was chosen for simulations. The deposition energy was and lattice orientation is [0 0 1]. Five different random seeds were used to ensure average behaviors. In the first part of this study, initial coalescence stress was first calculated by comparing two similar models, which only differed in the distance between two neighboring islands. Three different substrate thickness systems were analyzed to

  3. The Chemical and Dynamical Evolution of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    1993-04-01

    Theoretical models of the chemical and dynamical evolution of galaxies are developed and a Galactic structure survey is presented -- both are invaluable tools for uncovering the history of the formation of our Galaxy. Important advances in my theoretical models are non-instantaneous recycling of newly synthesized elements such as iron from Type Ia supernovae (mergers of white dwarf binaries). For the first time, Type Ia supernovae are incorporated in models of stellar remnants as baryonic dark matter. If dark halos consist mainly of white dwarfs, as has been proposed, then an excessive Type Ia supernovae rate is predicted unless the binary fraction of precursor stars is virtually zero. The observed constancy of chemical abundance ratios in halo stars e.g., [O/Fe] ~/= +0.5, signifies enrichment from only Type II supernovae. I explore the timescale for the onset of Type Ia supernovae as an upper limit to the timescale of halo formation. The apparent inconsistency between age differences of 2-3 Gyr in halo stars and the timescale inferred from the onset of Type Ia supernovae (~<0.1 Gyr for a range of models) suggests galaxies formed hierarchically from substructures in which star formation was disrupted before the onset of Type Ia supernovae. Chemical and dynamical evolution models of viscous disks with non-instantaneous recycling are also explored. The patterns of chemical element ratios and scatter in the age-metallicity relationship are calculated. Characterized by radial flow of gas, these models are ideal for exploring new ideas on the formation of galactic bulges from inflow of disk gas. The observed high metallicity of bulge stars may not require an ad hoc variation of the stellar initial mass function, if the bulge is an extension of the disk metallicity gradient. In addition, I present data from an unbiased spectroscopic survey of F-G stars in Selected Areas 51, 57 and 68. Radial velocities accurate to ~<10 km/s are derived. Comparison of the velocity

  4. Dynamic modeling and motion simulation for a winged hybrid-driven underwater glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Xin; Sun, Xiu-Jun; Wang, Yan-Hui; Wu, Jian-Guo; Wang, Xiao-Ming

    2011-03-01

    PETREL, a winged hybrid-driven underwater glider is a novel and practical marine survey platform which combines the features of legacy underwater glider and conventional AUV (autonomous underwater vehicle). It can be treated as a multi-rigid-body system with a floating base and a particular hydrodynamic profile. In this paper, theorems on linear and angular momentum are used to establish the dynamic equations of motion of each rigid body and the effect of translational and rotational motion of internal masses on the attitude control are taken into consideration. In addition, due to the unique external shape with fixed wings and deflectable rudders and the dual-drive operation in thrust and glide modes, the approaches of building dynamic model of conventional AUV and hydrodynamic model of submarine are introduced, and the tailored dynamic equations of the hybrid glider are formulated. Moreover, the behaviors of motion in glide and thrust operation are analyzed based on the simulation and the feasibility of the dynamic model is validated by data from lake field trials.

  5. Modeling PSA Problems - I: The Stimulus-Driven Theory of Probabilistic Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Labeau, P.E.; Izquierdo, J.M.

    2005-06-15

    The theory of probabilistic dynamics (TPD) offers a framework capable of modeling the interaction between the physical evolution of a system in transient conditions and the succession of branchings defining a sequence of events. Nonetheless, the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation, besides being inherently Markovian, assumes instantaneous changes in the system dynamics when a setpoint is crossed. In actuality, a transition between two dynamic evolution regimes of the system is a two-phase process. First, conditions corresponding to the triggering of a transition have to be met; this phase will be referred to as the activation of a 'stimulus'. Then, a time delay must elapse before the actual occurrence of the event causing the transition to take place. When this delay cannot be neglected and is a random quantity, the general TPD can no longer be used as such. Moreover, these delays are likely to influence the ordering of events in an accident sequence with competing situations, and the process of delineating sequences in the probabilistic safety analysis of a plant might therefore be affected in turn. This paper aims at presenting several extensions of the classical TPD, in which additional modeling capabilities are progressively introduced. A companion paper sketches a discretized approach of these problems.

  6. The Laser-Driven X-ray Big Area Backlighter (BABL): Design, Optimization, and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, Kirk; DeVolder, Barbara; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Merritt, Elizabeth; Loomis, Eric; Capelli, Deanna; Schmidt, Derek; Schmitt, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    The Big Area BackLigher (BABL) has been developed for large area laser-driven x-ray backlighting on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which can be used for general High Energy Density (HED) experiments. The BABL has been optimized via hydrodynamic simulations to produce laser-to-x-ray conversion efficiencies of up to nearly 5%. Four BABL foil materials, Zn, Fe, V, and Cu, have been used for He-α x ray production.

  7. Evolution of the Granular Dynamics and Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesis, A.; Hammer, R.; Schleicher, H.

    2003-05-01

    Based on series of excellent spectrograms taken at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT) at the Observatorio del Teide (Tenerife), we study the temporal evolution of the granular dynamics and the energy transport in the photospheric layers. We consider the ensemble of the granules cut by the spectrograph slit as a complex system. We describe this ensemble by the rms of the fluctuations of the granular observables along the slit: continuum intensity I, Doppler velocity v, and line width w. The history of the rms of the observables v and w reflects the dynamical change of the system over the 20 minutes observation time. We find for both observables a quasi-periodical change. However, the history of the cross-correlation between I and v remains virtually constant, with the exception of two gaps. We measure the rms of v in the deep photospheric layers for six lines of different strength included in the spectrograms. Using a model velocity variation based on our previous publications, we assign photospheric heights to the velocity measurements. These heights agree with those calculated by other means. On the basis of this v variation we calculate the kinetic energy flux as a function of the height in the photosphere for different times during the observation. The form of the variation with height turns out to be constant in time. The convective energy flux, finally, is calculated from the measured velocity and the temperature variations of our earlier models. Again we find practically the same variation form over the time of the observation. Taken together, these results quantify the different roles that the lower and higher photospheric layers play for the energetics of the convective overshoot at the upper boundary of the superadiabatic region of the Sun. A.N. acknowledges travel support from the German science foundation DFG.

  8. Spatial structure, host heterogeneity and parasite virulence: implications for vaccine-driven evolution.

    PubMed

    Zurita-Gutiérrez, Yazmín Hananí; Lion, Sébastien

    2015-08-01

    Natural host-parasite interactions exhibit considerable variation in host quality, with profound consequences for disease ecology and evolution. For instance, treatments (such as vaccination) may select for more transmissible or virulent strains. Previous theory has addressed the ecological and evolutionary impact of host heterogeneity under the assumption that hosts and parasites disperse globally. Here, we investigate the joint effects of host heterogeneity and local dispersal on the evolution of parasite life-history traits. We first formalise a general theoretical framework combining variation in host quality and spatial structure. We then apply this model to the specific problem of parasite evolution following vaccination. We show that, depending on the type of vaccine, spatial structure may select for higher or lower virulence compared to the predictions of non-spatial theory. We discuss the implications of our results for disease management, and their broader fundamental relevance for other causes of host heterogeneity in nature.

  9. Dynamical evolution of the Earth-Moon progenitors - Whence Theia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Billy L.; Lissauer, Jack J.

    2015-03-01

    We present integrations of a model Solar System with five terrestrial planets (beginning ∼30-50 Myr after the formation of primitive Solar System bodies) in order to determine the preferred regions of parameter space leading to a Giant Impact that resulted in the formation of the Moon. Our results indicate which choices of semimajor axes and eccentricities for Theia (the proto-Moon) at this epoch can produce a late Giant Impact, assuming that Mercury, Venus, and Mars are near the current orbits. We find that the likely semimajor axis of Theia, at the epoch when our simulations begin, depends on the assumed mass ratio of Earth-Moon progenitors (8/1, 4/1, or 1/1). The low eccentricities of the terrestrial planets are most commonly produced when the progenitors have similar semimajor axes at the epoch when our integrations commence. Additionally, we show that mean motion resonances among the terrestrial planets and perturbations from the giant planets can affect the dynamical evolution of the system leading to a late Giant Impact.

  10. The orbit and dynamical evolution of the Chelyabinsk object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'Yanenko, Vacheslav V.; Naroenkov, Sergey A.; Jenniskens, Peter; Popova, Olga P.

    2014-12-01

    The orbit of the Chelyabinsk object is calculated, applying the least-squares method directly to astrometric positions. The dynamical evolution of this object in the past is studied by integrating equations of motion for particles with orbits from the confidence region. It is found that the majority of the Chelyabinsk clones reach the near-Sun state. Sixty-seven percent of these objects have collisions with the Sun for 15 Myr in our numerical simulations. The distribution of minimum solar distances shows that the most probable time for the encounters of the Chelyabinsk object with the Sun lies in the interval from -0.8 Myr to -2 Myr. This is consistent with the estimate of a cosmic ray exposure age of 1.2 Myr (Popova et al. 2013). A parent body of the Chelyabinsk object should experience strong tidal and thermal effects at this time. The possible association of the Chelyabinsk object with 86039 (1999 NC43) and 2008 DJ is discussed.

  11. Dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Bettina M; Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    We studied the highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) in Holozoa. Most major clades within Holozoa are characterized by gains and/or losses of MRPs. The usefulness of gains of MRPs as rare genomic changes in phylogenetics is undermined by the high frequency of secondary losses. However, phylogenetic analyses of the MRP sequences provide evidence for the Acrosomata hypothesis, a sister group relationship between Ctenophora and Bilateria. An extensive restructuring of the mitochondrial genome and, as a consequence, of the mitochondrial ribosomes occurred in the ancestor of metazoans. The last MRP genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome were either moved to the nuclear genome or were lost. The strong decrease in size of the mitochondrial genome was probably caused by selection for rapid replication of mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis in the metazoan ancestor. A phylogenetic analysis of MRPL56 sequences provided evidence for a horizontal gene transfer of the corresponding MRP gene between metazoans and Dictyostelidae (Amoebozoa). The hypothesis that the requisition of additional MRPs compensated for a loss of rRNA segments in the mitochondrial ribosomes is corroborated by a significant negative correlation between the number of MRPs and length of the rRNA. Newly acquired MRPs evolved faster than bacterial MRPs and positions in eukaryote-specific MRPs were more strongly affected by coevolution than positions in prokaryotic MRPs in accordance with the necessity to fit these proteins into the pre-existing structure of the mitoribosome. PMID:24631858

  12. Dynamical Evolution of Supernova Remnants Breaking Through Molecular Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Wankee; Kim, Jongsoo; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-04-01

    We carry out three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the supernova remnants (SNRs) produced inside molecular clouds (MCs) near their surface using the HLL code tep{har83}. We explore the dynamical evolution and the X-ray morphology of SNRs after breaking through the MC surface for ranges of the explosion depths below the surface and the density ratios of the clouds to the intercloud media (ICM). We find that if an SNR breaks out through an MC surface in its Sedov stage, the outermost dense shell of the remnant is divided into several layers. The divided layers are subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and fragmented. On the other hand, if an SNR breaks through an MC after the remnant enters the snowplow phase, the radiative shell is not divided to layers. We also compare the predictions of previous analytic solutions for the expansion of SNRs in stratified media with our one-dimensional simulations. Moreover, we produce synthetic X-ray surface brightness in order to research the center-bright X-ray morphology shown in thermal composite SNRs. In the late stages, a breakout SNR shows the center-bright X-ray morphology inside an MC in our results. We apply our model to the observational results of the X-ray morphology of the thermal composite SNR 3C 391.

  13. Dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in Holozoa.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Bettina M; Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    We studied the highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) in Holozoa. Most major clades within Holozoa are characterized by gains and/or losses of MRPs. The usefulness of gains of MRPs as rare genomic changes in phylogenetics is undermined by the high frequency of secondary losses. However, phylogenetic analyses of the MRP sequences provide evidence for the Acrosomata hypothesis, a sister group relationship between Ctenophora and Bilateria. An extensive restructuring of the mitochondrial genome and, as a consequence, of the mitochondrial ribosomes occurred in the ancestor of metazoans. The last MRP genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome were either moved to the nuclear genome or were lost. The strong decrease in size of the mitochondrial genome was probably caused by selection for rapid replication of mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis in the metazoan ancestor. A phylogenetic analysis of MRPL56 sequences provided evidence for a horizontal gene transfer of the corresponding MRP gene between metazoans and Dictyostelidae (Amoebozoa). The hypothesis that the requisition of additional MRPs compensated for a loss of rRNA segments in the mitochondrial ribosomes is corroborated by a significant negative correlation between the number of MRPs and length of the rRNA. Newly acquired MRPs evolved faster than bacterial MRPs and positions in eukaryote-specific MRPs were more strongly affected by coevolution than positions in prokaryotic MRPs in accordance with the necessity to fit these proteins into the pre-existing structure of the mitoribosome.

  14. Evolution and Reengineering of NASA's Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas; Hoge, Susan

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) is a multimission support facility that performs ground navigation and spacecraft trajectory design services for a wide range of scientific satellites. The FDF also supports the NASA Space Network by providing orbit determination and tracking data evaluation services for the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The FDF traces its history to early NASA missions in the 1960's, including navigation support to the Apollo lunar missions. Over its 40 year history, the FDF has undergone many changes in its architecture, services offered, missions supported, management approach, and business operation. As a fully reimbursable facility (users now pay 100% of all costs for FDF operations and sustaining engineering activities), the FDF has faced significant challenges in recent years in providing mission critical products and services at minimal cost while defining and implementing upgrades necessary to meet future mission demands. This paper traces the history of the FDF and discusses significant events in the past that impacted the FDF infrastructure and/or business model, and the events today that are shaping the plans for the FDF in the next decade. Today's drivers for change include new mission requirements, the availability of new technology for spacecraft navigation, and continued pressures for cost reduction from FDF users. Recently, the FDF completed an architecture study based on these drivers that defines significant changes planned for the facility. This paper discusses the results of this study and a proposed implementation plan. As a case study in how flight dynamics operations have evolved and will continue to evolve, this paper focuses on two periods of time (1992 and the present) in order to contrast the dramatic changes that have taken place in the FDF. This paper offers observations and plans for the evolution of the FDF over the next ten years. Finally, this paper defines the

  15. Rotational Control of Asymmetric Molecules: Dipole- versus Polarizability-Driven Rotational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Damari, Ran; Kallush, Shimshon; Fleischer, Sharly

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally study the optical- and terahertz-induced rotational dynamics of asymmetric molecules in the gas phase. Terahertz and optical fields are identified as two distinct control handles over asymmetric molecules, as they couple to the rotational degrees of freedom via the molecular dipole and polarizability selectively. The distinction between those two rotational handles is highlighted by different types of quantum revivals observed in long-duration (>100  ps) field-free rotational evolution. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with random phase wave function (RPWF) simulations [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063420 (2015)] and provide verification of the RPWF as an efficient method for calculating asymmetric molecular dynamics at ambient temperatures, where exact calculation methods are practically not feasible. Our observations and analysis pave the way for orchestrated excitations by both optical and terahertz fields as complementary rotational handles that enable a plethora of new possibilities in three-dimensional rotational control of asymmetric molecules. PMID:27636471

  16. Rotational Control of Asymmetric Molecules: Dipole- versus Polarizability-Driven Rotational Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damari, Ran; Kallush, Shimshon; Fleischer, Sharly

    2016-09-01

    We experimentally study the optical- and terahertz-induced rotational dynamics of asymmetric molecules in the gas phase. Terahertz and optical fields are identified as two distinct control handles over asymmetric molecules, as they couple to the rotational degrees of freedom via the molecular dipole and polarizability selectively. The distinction between those two rotational handles is highlighted by different types of quantum revivals observed in long-duration (>100 ps ) field-free rotational evolution. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with random phase wave function (RPWF) simulations [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063420 (2015)] and provide verification of the RPWF as an efficient method for calculating asymmetric molecular dynamics at ambient temperatures, where exact calculation methods are practically not feasible. Our observations and analysis pave the way for orchestrated excitations by both optical and terahertz fields as complementary rotational handles that enable a plethora of new possibilities in three-dimensional rotational control of asymmetric molecules.

  17. Trace element cycling through iron oxide minerals during redox-driven dynamic recrystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Frierdich, Andrew J.; Luo, Yun; Catalano, Jeffrey G.

    2011-11-17

    Microbially driven iron redox cycling in soil and sedimentary systems, including during diagenesis and fluid migration, may activate secondary abiotic reactions between aqueous Fe(II) and solid Fe(III) oxides. These reactions catalyze dynamic recrystallization of iron oxide minerals through localized and simultaneous oxidative adsorption of Fe(II) and reductive dissolution of Fe(III). Redox-active trace elements undergo speciation changes during this process, but the impact redox-driven recrystallization has on redox-inactive trace elements associated with iron oxides is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that Ni is cycled through the minerals goethite and hematite during redox-driven recrystallization. X-ray absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that during this process adsorbed Ni becomes progressively incorporated into the minerals. Kinetic studies using batch reactors containing aqueous Fe(II) and Ni preincorporated into iron oxides display substantial release of Ni to solution. We conclude that iron oxide recrystallization activated by aqueous Fe(II) induces cycling of Ni through the mineral structure, with adsorbed Ni overgrown in regions of Fe(II) oxidative adsorption and incorporated Ni released in regions of reductive dissolution of structural Fe(III). The redistribution of Ni among the mineral bulk, mineral surface, and aqueous solution appears to be thermodynamically controlled and catalyzed by Fe(II). Our work suggests that important proxies for ocean composition on the early Earth may be invalid, identifies new processes controlling micronutrient availability in soil, sedimentary, and aquatic ecosystems, and points toward a mechanism for trace element mobilization during diagenesis and enrichment in geologic fluids.

  18. How much does weather-driven vegetation dynamics matter in land surface modelling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models (LSM) are an essential part of weather and climate models as they provide the lower boundary condition for the atmospheric models. In state-of-the-art LSMs the seasonal vegetation dynamics is "frozen". The seasonal variation of vegetation state variables, such as leaf area index or green vegetation fraction, are prescribed in lookup tables. Hence, a year-by-year variation in the development of vegetation due to changing weather conditions cannot be considered. For climate simulations, this is obviously a severe drawback. The objective of the present study was to quantify the potential error in the simulation of land surface exchange processes resulting from "frozen" vegetation dynamics. For this purpose we simulated energy and water fluxes from a winter wheat stand and a maize stand in Southwest Germany. In a first set of simulations, six years (2010 to 2015) were simulated considering weather-driven vegetation dynamics. For this purpose, we coupled the generic crop growth model GECROS with the NOAH-MP model (NOAHMP-GECROS). In a second set of simulations all vegetation-related state variables of the 2010 simulation were written to an external file and were used to overwrite the vegetation-related state variables of the simulations of the years 2011-2015. The difference between both sets was taken as a measure for the potential error introduced to the LSM due to the assumption of a "frozen" vegetation dynamics. We will present first results and discuss the impact of "frozen" vegetation dynamics on climate change simulations.

  19. An action potential-driven model of soleus muscle activation dynamics for locomotor-like movements

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hojeong; Sandercock, Thomas G.; Heckman, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically plausible, computationally robust model for the muscle activation dynamics (A(t)) under physiologically relevant excitation and movement. Approach The interaction of excitation and movement on A(t) was investigated comparing the force production between a cat soleus muscle and its Hill-type model. For capturing A(t) under excitation and movement variation, a modular modeling framework was proposed comprising of 3 compartments: (1) spikes-to-[Ca2+]; (2) [Ca2+]-to-A; and (3) A-to-force transformation. The individual signal transformations were modeled based on physiological factors so that the parameter values could be separately determined for individual modules directly based on experimental data. Main results The strong dependency of A(t) on excitation frequency and muscle length was found during both isometric and dynamically-moving contractions. The identified dependencies of A(t) under the static and dynamic conditions could be incorporated in the modular modeling framework by modulating the model parameters as a function of movement input. The new modeling approach was also applicable to cat soleus muscles producing waveforms independent of those used to set the model parameters. Significance This study provides a modeling framework for spike-driven muscle responses during movement, that is suitable not only for insights into molecular mechanisms underlying muscle behaviors but also for large scale simulations. PMID:26087477

  20. Dynamics of driven transitions between minima of a complex energy landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja; Lang, Alex H.; Mehta, Pankaj; Castillo, Horacio E.

    We recently modeled cellular interconvertion dynamics by using an epigenetic landscape model inspired by neural network models. Given an arbitrary set of patterns, the model can be used to construct an energy landscape in which those patterns are the global minima. Here we study the transitions between stable states of the landscapes thus constructed, under the effect of an external driving force. We consider three different cases: i) choosing the patterns to be random and independendently distributed ii) choosing a set of patterns directly derived from the experimental cellular transcription factor expression data for a representative set of cell types in an organism and iii) choosing randomly generated trees of hierarchically correlated patterns, inspired by biology. For each of the three cases, we study the stability of the global minima against thermal fluctuations and external driving forces, and the dynamics of the driven transitions away from global minima. We compare the results obtained in the three cases defined above, and in particular we explore to what degree the correlations between patterns affect the transition dynamics.

  1. An action potential-driven model of soleus muscle activation dynamics for locomotor-like movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hojeong; Sandercock, Thomas G.; Heckman, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to develop a physiologically plausible, computationally robust model for muscle activation dynamics (A(t)) under physiologically relevant excitation and movement. Approach. The interaction of excitation and movement on A(t) was investigated comparing the force production between a cat soleus muscle and its Hill-type model. For capturing A(t) under excitation and movement variation, a modular modeling framework was proposed comprising of three compartments: (1) spikes-to-[Ca2+]; (2) [Ca2+]-to-A; and (3) A-to-force transformation. The individual signal transformations were modeled based on physiological factors so that the parameter values could be separately determined for individual modules directly based on experimental data. Main results. The strong dependency of A(t) on excitation frequency and muscle length was found during both isometric and dynamically-moving contractions. The identified dependencies of A(t) under the static and dynamic conditions could be incorporated in the modular modeling framework by modulating the model parameters as a function of movement input. The new modeling approach was also applicable to cat soleus muscles producing waveforms independent of those used to set the model parameters. Significance. This study provides a modeling framework for spike-driven muscle responses during movement, that is suitable not only for insights into molecular mechanisms underlying muscle behaviors but also for large scale simulations.

  2. System Dynamics to Climate-Driven Water Budget Analysis in the Eastern Snake Plains Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J.; Contor, B.; Wylie, A.; Johnson, G.; Allen, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    Climate variability, weather extremes and climate change continue to threaten the sustainability of water resources in the western United States. Given current climate change projections, increasing temperature is likely to modify the timing, form, and intensity of precipitation events, which consequently affect regional and local hydrologic cycles. As a result, drought, water shortage, and subsequent water conflicts may become an increasing threat in monotone hydrologic systems in arid lands, such as the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer (ESPA). The ESPA, in particular, is a critical asset in the state of Idaho. It is known as the economic lifeblood for more than half of Idaho’s population so that water resources availability and aquifer management due to climate change is of great interest, especially over the next few decades. In this study, we apply system dynamics as a methodology with which to address dynamically complex problems in ESPA’s water resources management. Aquifer recharge and discharge dynamics are coded in STELLA modeling system as input and output, respectively to identify long-term behavior of aquifer responses to climate-driven hydrological changes.

  3. Translocation dynamics of a short polymer driven by an oscillating force.

    PubMed

    Pizzolato, Nicola; Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Adorno, Dominique Persano; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    2013-02-01

    We study the translocation dynamics of a short polymer moving in a noisy environment and driven by an oscillating force. The dynamics is numerically investigated by solving a Langevin equation in a two-dimensional domain. We consider a phenomenological cubic potential with a metastable state to model the polymer-pore interaction and the entropic free energy barrier characterizing the translocation process. The mean first translocation time of the center of inertia of polymers shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with a minimum, as a function of the number of the monomers. The dependence of the mean translocation time on the polymer chain length shows a monotonically increasing behavior for high values of the number of monomers. Moreover, the translocation time shows a minimum as a function of the frequency of the oscillating forcing field for all the polymer lengths investigated. This finding represents the evidence of the resonant activation phenomenon in the dynamics of polymer translocation, whose occurrence is maintained for different values of the noise intensity.

  4. Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of the unstirred layer in the osmotically driven flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Keito; Itano, Tomoaki; Seki, Masako

    2015-11-01

    We studied the solvent flows driven by the osmotic pressure difference across the semi-permeable membrane. The flow penetrating from the low concentration side transports away solutes adjacent of the membrane, so that the concentration is reduced significantly only at the vicinity of the membrane. It is expected that the relatively low solute concentration develops into a thin boundary layer in the vicinity of the membrane in the case of absence of external stirring process, which is termed as un-stirred layer (USL). To investigate concentration distribution in USL, we carried out non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The flows driven by th osmotic pressure are idealized as 2 dimensional hard disk model, which is composed of solvent and solute molecules. The membrane is modeled as a medium composed of stationary parallel rods distributed by a spatial interval, which is less than the diameter of the solute molecules. The following results were obtained from the numerical simulation. First, the thickness of USL, which was estimated from the obtained concentration distribution, is on the order of a length determined by mean free path. Second, USL was semicircle the center of which is on the end of pore of membrane.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Flows in an Oxidation Ditch Driven by a New Surface Aerator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weidong; Li, Kun; Wang, Gan; Wang, Yingzhe

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we present a newly designed inverse umbrella surface aerator, and tested its performance in driving flow of an oxidation ditch. Results show that it has a better performance in driving the oxidation ditch than the original one with higher average velocity and more uniform flow field. We also present a computational fluid dynamics model for predicting the flow field in an oxidation ditch driven by a surface aerator. The improved momentum source term approach to simulate the flow field of the oxidation ditch driven by an inverse umbrella surface aerator was developed and validated through experiments. Four kinds of turbulent models were investigated with the approach, including the standard k−ɛ model, RNG k−ɛ model, realizable k−ɛ model, and Reynolds stress model, and the predicted data were compared with those calculated with the multiple rotating reference frame approach (MRF) and sliding mesh approach (SM). Results of the momentum source term approach are in good agreement with the experimental data, and its prediction accuracy is better than MRF, close to SM. It is also found that the momentum source term approach has lower computational expenses, is simpler to preprocess, and is easier to use. PMID:24302850

  6. Venom Down Under: Dynamic Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Sunagar, Kartik; Undheim, Eivind A. B.; Koludarov, Ivan; Chan, Angelo H. C.; Sanders, Kate; Ali, Syed A.; Hendrikx, Iwan; Dunstan, Nathan; Fry, Bryan G.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the unparalleled diversity of venomous snakes in Australia, research has concentrated on a handful of medically significant species and even of these very few toxins have been fully sequenced. In this study, venom gland transcriptomes were sequenced from eleven species of small Australian elapid snakes, from eleven genera, spanning a broad phylogenetic range. The particularly large number of sequences obtained for three-finger toxin (3FTx) peptides allowed for robust reconstructions of their dynamic molecular evolutionary histories. We demonstrated that each species preferentially favoured different types of α-neurotoxic 3FTx, probably as a result of differing feeding ecologies. The three forms of α-neurotoxin [Type I (also known as (aka): short-chain), Type II (aka: long-chain) and Type III] not only adopted differential rates of evolution, but have also conserved a diversity of residues, presumably to potentiate prey-specific toxicity. Despite these differences, the different α-neurotoxin types were shown to accumulate mutations in similar regions of the protein, largely in the loops and structurally unimportant regions, highlighting the significant role of focal mutagenesis. We theorize that this phenomenon not only affects toxin potency or specificity, but also generates necessary variation for preventing/delaying prey animals from acquiring venom-resistance. This study also recovered the first full-length sequences for multimeric phospholipase A2 (PLA2) ‘taipoxin/paradoxin’ subunits from non-Oxyuranus species, confirming the early recruitment of this extremely potent neurotoxin complex to the venom arsenal of Australian elapid snakes. We also recovered the first natriuretic peptides from an elapid that lack the derived C-terminal tail and resemble the plesiotypic form (ancestral character state) found in viper venoms. This provides supporting evidence for a single early recruitment of natriuretic peptides into snake venoms. Novel forms of kunitz

  7. A discrete mathematical model of the dynamic evolution of a transportation network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinetskii, G. G.; Stepantsov, M. E.

    2009-09-01

    A dynamic model of the evolution of a transportation network is proposed. The main feature of this model is that the evolution of the transportation network is not a process of centralized transportation optimization. Rather, its dynamic behavior is a result of the system self-organization that occurs in the course of the satisfaction of needs in goods transportation and the evolution of the infrastructure of the network nodes. Nonetheless, the possibility of soft control of the network evolution direction is taken into account.

  8. Thermally driven transverse transports and magnetic dynamics on a topological surface capped with a ferromagnet strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Shi-Han; Qiu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Mou; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically study thermally driven transport of the Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator capped with a ferromagnet strip. The generation and manipulation of anomalous Hall and Nernst effects are analyzed, in which the in-plane magnetization of the ferromagnet film is found to take a decisive role. This scenario is distinct from that modulated by Berry phase where the in-plane magnetization is independent. We further discuss the thermal spin-transfer torque as a backaction of the thermoelectric transports on the magnetization and calculate the dynamics of the anomalous Hall and Nernst effects self-consistently. It is found that the magnitude of the long-time steady Hall and Nernst conductance is determined by competition between the magnetic anisotropy and current-induced effective anisotropy. These results open up a possibility of magnetically controlling the transverse thermoelectric transports or thermally manipulating the magnet switching.

  9. Picosecond dynamics of a shock-driven displacive phase transformation in Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinburne, T. D.; Glavicic, M. G.; Rahman, K. M.; Jones, N. G.; Coakley, J.; Eakins, D. E.; White, T. G.; Tong, V.; Milathianaki, D.; Williams, G. J.; Rugg, D.; Sutton, A. P.; Dye, D.

    2016-04-01

    High-pressure solid-state transformations at high strain rates are usually observed after the fact, either during static holding or after unloading, or inferred from interferometry measurements of the sample surface. The emergence of femtosecond x-ray diffraction techniques provides insight into the dynamics of short-time-scale events such as shocks. We report laser pump-probe experiments of the response of Zr to laser-driven shocks over the first few nanoseconds of the shock event, enabling the α →ω transition and orientation relationship to be observed in real time with picosecond resolution. A clear orientation relationship of (101 ¯0 ) α|| (101 ¯1 ) ω is found, in conflict with ω →α annealing experiments in zirconium and the two α →ω pathways proposed for titanium.

  10. Preliminary Dynamic Feasibility and Analysis of a Spherical, Wind-Driven (Tumbleweed), Martian Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flick, John J.; Toniolo, Matthew D.

    2005-01-01

    The process and findings are presented from a preliminary feasibility study examining the dynamics characteristics of a spherical wind-driven (or Tumbleweed) rover, which is intended for exploration of the Martian surface. The results of an initial feasibility study involving several worst-case mobility situations that a Tumbleweed rover might encounter on the surface of Mars are discussed. Additional topics include the evaluation of several commercially available analysis software packages that were examined as possible platforms for the development of a Monte Carlo Tumbleweed mission simulation tool. This evaluation lead to the development of the Mars Tumbleweed Monte Carlo Simulator (or Tumbleweed Simulator) using the Vortex physics software package from CM-Labs, Inc. Discussions regarding the development and evaluation of the Tumbleweed Simulator, as well as the results of a preliminary analysis using the tool are also presented. Finally, a brief conclusions section is presented.

  11. Mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution during hetero-epitaxy in a ternary AlGaN system

    PubMed Central

    He, Chenguang; Qin, Zhixin; Xu, Fujun; Zhang, Lisheng; Wang, Jiaming; Hou, Mengjun; Zhang, Shan; Wang, Xinqiang; Ge, Weikun; Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Two AlGaN samples with different strain were designed to investigate mechanism of stress-driven composition evolution. It is discovered that AlGaN grown on AlN or (AlN/GaN superlattices (SLs))/GaN both consist of two distinct regions with different compositions: transition region and uniform region, which is attributed to the compositional pulling effect. The formation of the transition region is due to the partial stress release caused by the generation of misfit dislocations near the hetero-interface. And the Al composition in the uniform region depends on the magnitude of residual strain. The difference in relaxation degree is 80.5% for the AlGaN epilayers grown on different underlayers, leading to a large Al composition difference of 22%. The evolutionary process of Al composition along [0001] direction was investigated in detail. PMID:27112969

  12. Metal-encapsulated organolead halide perovskite photocathode for solar-driven hydrogen evolution in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Pazos-Outón, Luis M.; Warnan, Julien; Kuehnel, Moritz F.; Friend, Richard H.; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Lead-halide perovskites have triggered the latest breakthrough in photovoltaic technology. Despite the great promise shown by these materials, their instability towards water even in the presence of low amounts of moisture makes them, a priori, unsuitable for their direct use as light harvesters in aqueous solution for the production of hydrogen through water splitting. Here, we present a simple method that enables their use in photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen evolution while immersed in an aqueous solution. Field's metal, a fusible InBiSn alloy, is used to efficiently protect the perovskite from water while simultaneously allowing the photogenerated electrons to reach a Pt hydrogen evolution catalyst. A record photocurrent density of -9.8 mA cm-2 at 0 V versus RHE with an onset potential as positive as 0.95+/-0.03 V versus RHE is obtained. The photoelectrodes show remarkable stability retaining more than 80% of their initial photocurrent for ~1 h under continuous illumination.

  13. Real World Data Driven Evolution of Volvo Cars’ Side Impact Protection Systems and their Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Lotta; Lindman, Magdalena; Svanberg, Bo; Carlsson, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the outcome of the continuous improved occupant protection over the last two decades for front seat near side occupants in side impacts based on a real world driven working process. The effectiveness of four generations of improved side impact protection are calculated based on data from Volvo’s statistical accident database of Volvo Cars in Sweden. Generation I includes vehicles with a new structural and interior concept (SIPS). Generation II includes vehicles with structural improvements and a new chest airbag (SIPSbag). Generation III includes vehicles with further improved SIPS and SIPSbag as well as the new concept with a head protecting Inflatable Curtain (IC). Generation IV includes the most recent vehicles with further improvements of all the systems plus advanced sensors and seat belt pretensioner activation. Compared to baseline vehicles, vehicles of generation I reduce MAIS2+ injuries by 54%, generation II by 61% and generation III by 72%. For generation IV effectiveness figures cannot be calculated because of the lack of MAIS2+ injuries. A continuous improved performance is also seen when studying the AIS2+ pelvis, abdomen, chest and head injuries separately. By using the same real world driven working process, future improvements and possibly new passive as well as active safety systems, will be developed with the aim of further improved protection to near side occupants in side impacts. PMID:21050597

  14. Evolution of information-driven HIV/AIDS policies in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinhua; Lu, Fan; Wu, Zunyou; Poundstone, Katharine; Zeng, Gang; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Dapeng; Liu, Kangmai; Liau, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Background As China continues to commit to universal access to HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and care services, its HIV/AIDS policies have become increasingly information driven. We review China’s key national-level HIV/AIDS policies and discuss policy gaps and challenges ahead. Methods We conducted a desk review of key national-level policies that have had a major impact on China’s HIV/AIDS epidemic, and examined recent epidemiological data relevant to China’s HIV response. Results National-level policies that have had a major impact on China’s HIV/AIDS response include: ‘Four Frees and One Care’; 5-year action plans; and HIV/AIDS regulation. These landmark policies have facilitated massive scaling up of services over the past decade. For example, the number of drug users provided with methadone maintenance treatment significantly increased from 8116 in 2005 to 241 975 in 2009; almost a 30-fold increase. The ‘Four Frees and One Care’ policy has increased the number of people living with AIDS on anti-retroviral treatment from some 100 patients in 2003 to over 80 000 in 2009. However, stigma and discrimination remains major obstacles for people living with HIV/AIDS trying to access services. Conclusions China’s current national policies are increasingly information driven and responsive to changes in the epidemic. However, gaps remain in policy implementation, and new policies are needed to meet emerging challenges. PMID:21113036

  15. Temporal evolution of atmosphere pressure plasma jets driven by microsecond pulses with positive and negative polarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Yang, Wenjin; Zhang, Cheng; Fang, Zhi; Zhou, Yixiao; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2014-09-01

    Current-voltage characteristics, discharge images, and optical spectra of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are studied using a microsecond pulse length generator producing repetitive output pulses with different polarities. The experimental results show that the APPJs excited by the pulses with positive polarity have longer plume, faster propagation speed, higher power, and more excited species, such as \\text{N}2 , O, He, \\text{N}2+ , than that with the negatively excited APPJs. The images taken using an intensified charge-coupled device show that the APPJs excited by pulses with positive polarity are characterized by a bullet-like structure, while the APPJs excited by pulses with negative polarity are continuous. The propagation speed of the APPJs driven by a microsecond pulse length generator is about tens of km/s, which is similar to the APPJs driven by a kHz frequency sinusoidal voltage source. The analysis shows that the space charge accumulation effect plays an important role during the discharge. The transient enhanced electric field induced by the accumulated ions between the needle-like electrode and the nozzle in the APPJs excited by pulses with negative polarity enhances electron field emission from the cathode, which is illustrated by the bright line on the time-integrated images. This makes the shape of the APPJ excited using pulses with negative polarity different from the bullet-like shape of the APPJs excited by pulses with positive polarity.

  16. Event-driven Monte Carlo: Exact dynamics at all time scales for discrete-variable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza-Coto, Alejandro; Díaz-Méndez, Rogelio; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-06-01

    We present an algorithm for the simulation of the exact real-time dynamics of classical many-body systems with discrete energy levels. In the same spirit of kinetic Monte Carlo methods, a stochastic solution of the master equation is found, with no need to define any other phase-space construction. However, unlike existing methods, the present algorithm does not assume any particular statistical distribution to perform moves or to advance the time, and thus is a unique tool for the numerical exploration of fast and ultra-fast dynamical regimes. By decomposing the problem in a set of two-level subsystems, we find a natural variable step size, that is well defined from the normalization condition of the transition probabilities between the levels. We successfully test the algorithm with known exact solutions for non-equilibrium dynamics and equilibrium thermodynamical properties of Ising-spin models in one and two dimensions, and compare to standard implementations of kinetic Monte Carlo methods. The present algorithm is directly applicable to the study of the real-time dynamics of a large class of classical Markovian chains, and particularly to short-time situations where the exact evolution is relevant.

  17. Orbital Dynamics, Environmental Heterogeneity, and the Evolution of the Human Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Many explanations have been proposed for the evolution of our anomalously large brains, including social, ecological, and epiphenomenal hypotheses. Recently, an additional hypothesis has emerged, suggesting that advanced cognition and, by inference, increases in brain size, have been driven over evolutionary time by the need to deal with…

  18. A new model for biological effects of radiation and the driven force of molecular evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Takahiro; Manabe, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Hiroo; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Bando, Masako

    We proposed a new mathematical model to estimate biological effects of radiation, which we call Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model. A special feature of WAM model is that it involves the dose rate of radiation as a key ingredient. We succeeded to reproduce the experimental data of various species concerning the radiation induced mutation frequencies. From the analysis of the mega-mouse experiments, we obtained the mutation rate per base-pair per year for mice which is consistent with the so-called molecular clock in evolution genetics, 10-9 mutation/base-pair/year. Another important quantity is the equivalent dose rate for the whole spontaneous mutation, deff. The value of deff for mice is 1.1*10-3 Gy/hour which is much larger than the dose rate of natural radiation (10- (6 - 7) Gy/hour) by several orders of magnitude. We also analyzed Drosophila data and obtained essentially the same numbers. This clearly indicates that the natural radiation is not the dominant driving force of the molecular evolution, but we should look for other factors, such as miscopy of DNA in duplication process. We believe this is the first quantitative proof of the small contribution of the natural radiation in the molecular evolution.

  19. Drift-driven evolution of electric signals in a Neotropical knifefish.

    PubMed

    Picq, Sophie; Alda, Fernando; Bermingham, Eldredge; Krahe, Rüdiger

    2016-09-01

    Communication signals are highly diverse traits. This diversity is usually assumed to be shaped by selective forces, whereas the null hypothesis of divergence through drift is often not considered. In Panama, the weakly electric fish Brachyhypopomus occidentalis is widely distributed in multiple independent drainage systems, which provide a natural evolutionary laboratory for the study of genetic and signal divergence in separate populations. We quantified geographic variation in the electric signals of 109 fish from five populations, and compared it to the neutral genetic variation estimated from cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences of the same individuals, to test whether drift may be driving divergence of their signals. Signal distances were highly correlated with genetic distances, even after controlling for geographic distances, suggesting that drift alone is sufficient to explain geographic variation in electric signals. Significant differences at smaller geographic scales (within drainages) showed, however, that electric signals may evolve at a faster rate than expected under drift, raising the possibility that additional adaptive forces may be contributing to their evolution. Overall, our data point to stochastic forces as main drivers of signal evolution in this species and extend the role of drift in the evolution of communication systems to fish and electrocommunication. PMID:27436179

  20. Drift-driven evolution of electric signals in a Neotropical knifefish.

    PubMed

    Picq, Sophie; Alda, Fernando; Bermingham, Eldredge; Krahe, Rüdiger

    2016-09-01

    Communication signals are highly diverse traits. This diversity is usually assumed to be shaped by selective forces, whereas the null hypothesis of divergence through drift is often not considered. In Panama, the weakly electric fish Brachyhypopomus occidentalis is widely distributed in multiple independent drainage systems, which provide a natural evolutionary laboratory for the study of genetic and signal divergence in separate populations. We quantified geographic variation in the electric signals of 109 fish from five populations, and compared it to the neutral genetic variation estimated from cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences of the same individuals, to test whether drift may be driving divergence of their signals. Signal distances were highly correlated with genetic distances, even after controlling for geographic distances, suggesting that drift alone is sufficient to explain geographic variation in electric signals. Significant differences at smaller geographic scales (within drainages) showed, however, that electric signals may evolve at a faster rate than expected under drift, raising the possibility that additional adaptive forces may be contributing to their evolution. Overall, our data point to stochastic forces as main drivers of signal evolution in this species and extend the role of drift in the evolution of communication systems to fish and electrocommunication.

  1. A phylogenomic data-driven exploration of viral origins and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    The origin of viruses remains mysterious because of their diverse and patchy molecular and functional makeup. Although numerous hypotheses have attempted to explain viral origins, none is backed by substantive data. We take full advantage of the wealth of available protein structural and functional data to explore the evolution of the proteomic makeup of thousands of cells and viruses. Despite the extremely reduced nature of viral proteomes, we established an ancient origin of the “viral supergroup” and the existence of widespread episodes of horizontal transfer of genetic information. Viruses harboring different replicon types and infecting distantly related hosts shared many metabolic and informational protein structural domains of ancient origin that were also widespread in cellular proteomes. Phylogenomic analysis uncovered a universal tree of life and revealed that modern viruses reduced from multiple ancient cells that harbored segmented RNA genomes and coexisted with the ancestors of modern cells. The model for the origin and evolution of viruses and cells is backed by strong genomic and structural evidence and can be reconciled with existing models of viral evolution if one considers viruses to have originated from ancient cells and not from modern counterparts. PMID:26601271

  2. GLOBAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD EVOLUTION IN BARRED GALAXIES UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF THE COSMIC-RAY-DRIVEN DYNAMO

    SciTech Connect

    Kulpa-Dybel, K.; Otmianowska-Mazur, K.; Kulesza-Zydzik, B.; Kowal, G.; Hanasz, M.; Woltanski, D.; Kowalik, K.

    2011-06-01

    We present three-dimensional global numerical simulations of the cosmic-ray (CR) driven dynamo in barred galaxies. We study the evolution of the interstellar medium of the barred galaxy in the presence of non-axisymmetric component of the potential, i.e., the bar. The magnetohydrodynamical dynamo is driven by CRs, which are continuously supplied to the disk by supernova (SN) remnants. No magnetic field is present at the beginning of simulations but one-tenth of SN explosions is a source of a small-scale randomly oriented dipolar magnetic field. In all models we assume that 10% of 10{sup 51} erg SN kinetic energy output is converted into CR energy. To compare our results directly with the observed properties of galaxies, we construct realistic maps of polarized radio emission. The main result is that the CR-driven dynamo can amplify weak magnetic fields up to a few {mu}G within a few Gyr in barred galaxies. The obtained e-folding time is equal to 300 Myr and the magnetic field reaches equipartition at time t {approx} 4.0 Gyr. Initially, the completely random magnetic field evolves into large-scale structures. An even (quadrupole-type) configuration of the magnetic field with respect to the galactic plane can be observed. Additionally, the modeled magnetic field configuration resembles maps of the polarized intensity observed in barred galaxies. Polarization vectors are distributed along the bar and between spiral arms. Moreover, the drift of magnetic arms with respect to the spiral pattern in the gas density distribution is observed during the entire simulation time.

  3. Rapid evolution of elaborate male coloration is driven by visual system in Australian fairy-wrens (Maluridae).

    PubMed

    Friedman, N R; Remeš, V

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between colour vision and animal signalling is of keen interest to behavioural ecologists and evolutionary biologists alike, but is difficult to address in terrestrial animals. Unlike most avian lineages, in which colour vision is relatively invariant among species, the fairy-wrens and allies (Maluridae) show a recent gain of ultraviolet sensitivity (UVS). Here, we compare the rates of colour evolution on 11 patches for males and females across Maluridae in the context of their visual system. We measured reflectance spectra for 24 species, estimating five vision-independent colour metrics as well as metrics of colour contrast among patches and sexual dichromatism in a receiver-neutral colour space. We fit Brownian motion (BM) and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) models to estimate evolutionary rates for these metrics and to test whether male coloration, female coloration or dichromatism was driven by selective regimes defined by visual system or geography. We found that in general male coloration evolved rapidly in comparison with females. Male colour contrast was strongly correlated with visual system and expanded greatly in UVS lineages, whereas female coloration was weakly associated with geography (Australia vs. Papua New Guinea). These results suggest that dichromatism has evolved in Maluridae as males and females evolve at different rates, and are driven by different selection pressures. PMID:26299546

  4. Rapid evolution of elaborate male coloration is driven by visual system in Australian fairy-wrens (Maluridae).

    PubMed

    Friedman, N R; Remeš, V

    2015-12-01

    The interplay between colour vision and animal signalling is of keen interest to behavioural ecologists and evolutionary biologists alike, but is difficult to address in terrestrial animals. Unlike most avian lineages, in which colour vision is relatively invariant among species, the fairy-wrens and allies (Maluridae) show a recent gain of ultraviolet sensitivity (UVS). Here, we compare the rates of colour evolution on 11 patches for males and females across Maluridae in the context of their visual system. We measured reflectance spectra for 24 species, estimating five vision-independent colour metrics as well as metrics of colour contrast among patches and sexual dichromatism in a receiver-neutral colour space. We fit Brownian motion (BM) and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) models to estimate evolutionary rates for these metrics and to test whether male coloration, female coloration or dichromatism was driven by selective regimes defined by visual system or geography. We found that in general male coloration evolved rapidly in comparison with females. Male colour contrast was strongly correlated with visual system and expanded greatly in UVS lineages, whereas female coloration was weakly associated with geography (Australia vs. Papua New Guinea). These results suggest that dichromatism has evolved in Maluridae as males and females evolve at different rates, and are driven by different selection pressures.

  5. Dynamics of molecular evolution and phylogeography of Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV.

    PubMed

    Wu, Beilei; Blanchard-Letort, Alexandra; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Guanghe; Wang, Xifeng; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) species PAV occurs frequently in irrigated wheat fields worldwide and can be efficiently transmitted by aphids. Isolates of BYDV-PAV from different countries show great divergence both in genomic sequences and pathogenicity. Despite its economical importance, the genetic structure of natural BYDV-PAV populations, as well as of the mechanisms maintaining its high diversity, remain poorly explored. In this study, we investigate the dynamics of BYDV-PAV genome evolution utilizing time-structured data sets of complete genomic sequences from 58 isolates from different hosts obtained worldwide. First, we observed that BYDV-PAV exhibits a high frequency of homologous recombination. Second, our analysis revealed that BYDV-PAV genome evolves under purifying selection and at a substitution rate similar to other RNA viruses (3.158×10(-4) nucleotide substitutions/site/year). Phylogeography analyses show that the diversification of BYDV-PAV can be explained by local geographic adaptation as well as by host-driven adaptation. These results increase our understanding of the diversity, molecular evolutionary characteristics and epidemiological properties of an economically important plant RNA virus. PMID:21326861

  6. Formation and Dynamical Evolution of the Asteroid Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, William F.

    2015-08-01

    Asteroids are critical to our desire to unravel the origin of the Solar System because they supply unique, relatively pristine snapshots of the environment in which the Earth formed and evolved. This is due to the fact that, although the asteroids and Earth have followed very different evolutionary pathways, they all formed from the same set of physical processes and share a common ancestry. The asteroid belt presents a particular challenge to understanding terrestrial planet formation because of its small mass. Models of the protoplanetary disk suggest the region between 2-3 AU should contain roughly 3 Earth masses, while less than 0.001 of an Earth mass is actually found there.A long-standing explanation for the asteroid belt's small mass is that it is due to the gravitational influence of Jupiter and Saturn. Some have suggested protoplanets grew there before they were dynamically removed from the asteroid belt by resonances with the gas giants. This left the asteroid belt dynamically excited (which is observed) and heavily depleted in mass. More recently, however, detailed models have shown that this process produces an asteroid belt that is inconsistent with observations.Two recent models propose new ways to match asteroid belt constraints. The first, the so-called ‘Grand Tack’ scenario, uses the results of hydrodynamic simulations to show that Jupiter (and Saturn) migrated both inward and outward across the asteroid belt while interacting with the protoplanetary gas disk. The Grand Tack not only reproduces the mass and mixture of spectral types in the asteroid belt, but it also truncates the planetesimal disk from which the terrestrial planets form, potentially explaining why Mars is less massive than Earth. In a second scenario, planetesimals that form directly from cm- to meter-sized objects, known as “pebbles”, are rapidly converted to 100 to 1000 km asteroid-like object that subsequently grow by accreting even more pebbles. Pebble accretion models

  7. The dynamics of nestedness predicts the evolution of industrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bustos, Sebastián; Gomez, Charles; Hausmann, Ricardo; Hidalgo, César A

    2012-01-01

    In economic systems, the mix of products that countries make or export has been shown to be a strong leading indicator of economic growth. Hence, methods to characterize and predict the structure of the network connecting countries to the products that they export are relevant for understanding the dynamics of economic development. Here we study the presence and absence of industries in international and domestic economies and show that these networks are significantly nested. This means that the less filled rows and columns of these networks' adjacency matrices tend to be subsets of the fuller rows and columns. Moreover, we show that their nestedness remains constant over time and that it is sustained by both, a bias for industries that deviate from the networks' nestedness to disappear, and a bias for the industries that are missing according to nestedness to appear. This makes the appearance and disappearance of individual industries in each location predictable. We interpret the high level of nestedness observed in these networks in the context of the neutral model of development introduced by Hidalgo and Hausmann (2009). We show that the model can reproduce the high level of nestedness observed in these networks only when we assume a high level of heterogeneity in the distribution of capabilities available in countries and required by products. In the context of the neutral model, this implies that the high level of nestedness observed in these economic networks emerges as a combination of both, the complementarity of inputs and heterogeneity in the number of capabilities available in countries and required by products. The stability of nestedness in industrial ecosystems, and the predictability implied by it, demonstrates the importance of the study of network properties in the evolution of economic networks. PMID:23185326

  8. The Dynamics of Nestedness Predicts the Evolution of Industrial Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Sebastián; Gomez, Charles; Hausmann, Ricardo; Hidalgo, César A.

    2012-01-01

    In economic systems, the mix of products that countries make or export has been shown to be a strong leading indicator of economic growth. Hence, methods to characterize and predict the structure of the network connecting countries to the products that they export are relevant for understanding the dynamics of economic development. Here we study the presence and absence of industries in international and domestic economies and show that these networks are significantly nested. This means that the less filled rows and columns of these networks' adjacency matrices tend to be subsets of the fuller rows and columns. Moreover, we show that their nestedness remains constant over time and that it is sustained by both, a bias for industries that deviate from the networks' nestedness to disappear, and a bias for the industries that are missing according to nestedness to appear. This makes the appearance and disappearance of individual industries in each location predictable. We interpret the high level of nestedness observed in these networks in the context of the neutral model of development introduced by Hidalgo and Hausmann (2009). We show that the model can reproduce the high level of nestedness observed in these networks only when we assume a high level of heterogeneity in the distribution of capabilities available in countries and required by products. In the context of the neutral model, this implies that the high level of nestedness observed in these economic networks emerges as a combination of both, the complementarity of inputs and heterogeneity in the number of capabilities available in countries and required by products. The stability of nestedness in industrial ecosystems, and the predictability implied by it, demonstrates the importance of the study of network properties in the evolution of economic networks. PMID:23185326

  9. A Dynamic Model for the Evolution of Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Tal, Guy; Boca, Simina Maria; Mittenthal, Jay; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-05-01

    Domains are folded structures and evolutionary building blocks of protein molecules. Their three-dimensional atomic conformations, which define biological functions, can be coarse-grained into levels of a hierarchy. Here we build global dynamical models for the evolution of domains at fold and fold superfamily (FSF) levels. We fit the models with data from phylogenomic trees of domain structures and evaluate the distributions of the resulting parameters and their implications. The trees were inferred from a census of domain structures in hundreds of genomes from all three superkingdoms of life. The models used birth-death differential equations with the global abundances of structures as state variables, with one set of equations for folds and another for FSFs. Only the transitions present in the tree are assumed possible. Each fold or FSF diversifies in variants, eventually producing a new fold or FSF. The parameters specify rates of generation of variants and of new folds or FSFs. The equations were solved for the parameters by simplifying the trees to a comb-like topology, treating branches as emerging directly from a trunk. We found that the rate constants for folds and FSFs evolved similarly. These parameters showed a sharp transient change at about 1.5 Gyrs ago. This time coincides with a period in which domains massively combined in proteins and their arrangements distributed in novel lineages during the rise of organismal diversification. Our simulations suggest that exploration of protein structure space occurs through coarse-grained discoveries that undergo fine-grained elaboration. PMID:27146880

  10. Microsecond evolution of laser driven blast waves, the influence of shock asymmetries and the resulting development of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubman, Eleanor; Crowston, R.; Lam, G.; Dimoline, G.; Alraddadi, R.; Doyle, H.; Meinecke, J.; Cross, J.; Bolis, R.; Lamb, D.; Tzeferacos, P.; Doria, D.; Reville, B.; Ahmed, H.; Borghesi, M.; Gregori, G.; Woolsey, N.

    2015-11-01

    The ability to recreate scaled conditions of a supernova remnant within a laboratory environment is of great interest for informing the understanding of the evolution of galactic magnetic fields. The experiments rely on a near point explosion driven by one sided laser illumination producing a plasma, surrounded by a background gas. The subsequent shock and blast waves emerge following an initial ballistic phase into a self-similar expansion. Studies have been undertaken into the evolution of shock asymmetries which lead to magnetic field generation via the Biermann battery mechanism. Here we use the Vulcan laser facility, with targets such as carbon rods and plastic spheres placed in ambient gases of argon, helium or hydrogen, to produce the blast waves. These conditions allow us to study the asymmetries of the shocks using multi-frame imaging cameras, interferometry, and spectroscopy, while measuring the resulting magnetic fields with B-dot probes. The velocity of the shock and the temporal resolution of the asymmetries can be acquired on a single shot by the multi-framing cameras, and comparison with the measured B-dot fields allow for detailed inferences to be made.

  11. A model of the evolution of larval feeding rate in Drosophila driven by conflicting energy demands.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Laurence D; Barter, Thomas T

    2015-02-01

    Energy allocation is believed to drive trade-offs in life history evolution. We develop a physiological and genetic model of energy allocation that drives evolution of feeding rate in a well-studied model system. In a variety of stressful environments Drosophila larvae adapt by altering their rate of feeding. Drosophila larvae adapted to high levels of ammonia, urea, and the presence of parasitoids evolve lower feeding rates. Larvae adapted to crowded conditions evolve higher feeding rates. Feeding rates should affect gross food intake, metabolic rates, and efficiency of food utilization. We develop a model of larval net energy intake as a function of feeding rates. We show that when there are toxic compounds in the larval food that require energy for detoxification, larvae can maximize their energy intake by slowing their feeding rates. While the reduction in feeding rates may increase development time and decrease competitive ability, we show that genotypes with lower feeding rates can be favored by natural selection if they have a sufficiently elevated viability in the toxic environment. This work shows how a simple phenotype, larval feeding rates, may be of central importance in adaptation to a wide variety of stressful environments via its role in energy allocation.

  12. Substructure Evolution in Energetic-Driven Spherically Shock-Loaded Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Sinitsyna, L. M.; Novikov, S. A.; Gray, G. T. III; Cerreta, E.; Henrie, B.; Lopez, M.; Yablinsky, C.

    2006-07-28

    Post-shock-recovered metallurgical analysis of solid metal spheres shock loaded via spherical energetic(HE) loading provides a unique opportunity to quantify the substructure evolution in a material subjected to converging Taylor-wave (triangular-shock pulse) loading. In this paper detailed quantitative metallographic, orientation-imaging microscopy (OIM), and texture analysis is presented characterizing the gradient in substructure generated in Cu subjected to a spherical HE shock loading pulse at VNIIEF. The substructure in the recovered sphere is seen to include: 1) a spherical cavity generated in the center of the sphere due to shock-wave convergence and release, displaying ductile dimpled failure and no evidence of melting, 2) a gradient in deformation (slip and deformation twins) from the center outward to the surface, and 3) numerous shear cracks and/or spall planes. The substructure evolution is discussed relative to that previously observed in Cu shock prestrained via either 1-D triangular-shaped shockwave loading or 1-D square-topped pulse shock loading.

  13. Metal-encapsulated organolead halide perovskite photocathode for solar-driven hydrogen evolution in water

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Pazos-Outón, Luis M.; Warnan, Julien; Kuehnel, Moritz F.; Friend, Richard H.; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Lead-halide perovskites have triggered the latest breakthrough in photovoltaic technology. Despite the great promise shown by these materials, their instability towards water even in the presence of low amounts of moisture makes them, a priori, unsuitable for their direct use as light harvesters in aqueous solution for the production of hydrogen through water splitting. Here, we present a simple method that enables their use in photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen evolution while immersed in an aqueous solution. Field's metal, a fusible InBiSn alloy, is used to efficiently protect the perovskite from water while simultaneously allowing the photogenerated electrons to reach a Pt hydrogen evolution catalyst. A record photocurrent density of −9.8 mA cm−2 at 0 V versus RHE with an onset potential as positive as 0.95±0.03 V versus RHE is obtained. The photoelectrodes show remarkable stability retaining more than 80% of their initial photocurrent for ∼1 h under continuous illumination. PMID:27595974

  14. Metal-encapsulated organolead halide perovskite photocathode for solar-driven hydrogen evolution in water.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Quesada, Micaela; Pazos-Outón, Luis M; Warnan, Julien; Kuehnel, Moritz F; Friend, Richard H; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    Lead-halide perovskites have triggered the latest breakthrough in photovoltaic technology. Despite the great promise shown by these materials, their instability towards water even in the presence of low amounts of moisture makes them, a priori, unsuitable for their direct use as light harvesters in aqueous solution for the production of hydrogen through water splitting. Here, we present a simple method that enables their use in photoelectrocatalytic hydrogen evolution while immersed in an aqueous solution. Field's metal, a fusible InBiSn alloy, is used to efficiently protect the perovskite from water while simultaneously allowing the photogenerated electrons to reach a Pt hydrogen evolution catalyst. A record photocurrent density of -9.8 mA cm(-2) at 0 V versus RHE with an onset potential as positive as 0.95±0.03 V versus RHE is obtained. The photoelectrodes show remarkable stability retaining more than 80% of their initial photocurrent for ∼1 h under continuous illumination. PMID:27595974

  15. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Jin, Xiaogang; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses. PMID:27187068

  16. Multichannel emission spectrometer for high dynamic range optical pyrometry of shock-driven materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2016-10-01

    An emission spectrometer (450-850 nm) using a high-throughput, high numerical aperture (N.A. = 0.3) prism spectrograph with stepped fiberoptic coupling, 32 fast photomultipliers and thirty-two 1.25 GHz digitizers is described. The spectrometer can capture single-shot events with a high dynamic range in amplitude and time (nanoseconds to milliseconds or longer). Methods to calibrate the spectrometer and verify its performance and accuracy are described. When a reference thermal source is used for calibration, the spectrometer can function as a fast optical pyrometer. Applications of the spectrometer are illustrated by using it to capture single-shot emission transients from energetic materials or reactive materials initiated by kmṡs-1 impacts with laser-driven flyer plates. A log (time) data analysis method is used to visualize multiple kinetic processes resulting from impact initiation of HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) or a Zr/CuO nanolaminate thermite. Using a gray body algorithm to interpret the spectral radiance from shocked HMX, a time history of temperature and emissivity was obtained, which could be used to investigate HMX hot spot dynamics. Finally, two examples are presented showing how the spectrometer can avoid temperature determination errors in systems where thermal emission is accompanied by atomic or molecular emission lines.

  17. Enabled negatively regulates diaphanous-driven actin dynamics in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bilancia, Colleen G; Winkelman, Jonathan D; Tsygankov, Denis; Nowotarski, Stephanie H; Sees, Jennifer A; Comber, Kate; Evans, Iwan; Lakhani, Vinal; Wood, Will; Elston, Timothy C; Kovar, David R; Peifer, Mark

    2014-02-24

    Actin regulators facilitate cell migration by controlling cell protrusion architecture and dynamics. As the behavior of individual actin regulators becomes clear, we must address why cells require multiple regulators with similar functions and how they cooperate to create diverse protrusions. We characterized Diaphanous (Dia) and Enabled (Ena) as a model, using complementary approaches: cell culture, biophysical analysis, and Drosophila morphogenesis. We found that Dia and Ena have distinct biochemical properties that contribute to the different protrusion morphologies each induces. Dia is a more processive, faster elongator, paralleling the long, stable filopodia it induces in vivo, while Ena promotes filopodia with more dynamic changes in number, length, and lifetime. Acting together, Ena and Dia induce protrusions distinct from those induced by either alone, with Ena reducing Dia-driven protrusion length and number. Consistent with this, EnaEVH1 binds Dia directly and inhibits DiaFH1FH2-mediated nucleation in vitro. Finally, Ena rescues hemocyte migration defects caused by activated Dia.

  18. Structural and Dynamic Features of F-recruitment Site Driven Substrate Phosphorylation by ERK2

    PubMed Central

    Piserchio, Andrea; Ramakrishan, Venkatesh; Wang, Hsin; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Arshava, Boris; Dutta, Kaushik; Dalby, Kevin N.; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2015-01-01

    The F-recruitment site (FRS) of active ERK2 binds F-site (Phe-x-Phe-Pro) sequences found downstream of the Ser/Thr phospho-acceptor on cellular substrates. Here we apply NMR methods to analyze the interaction between active ERK2 (ppERK2), and a 13-residue F-site-bearing peptide substrate derived from its cellular target, the transcription factor Elk-1. Our results provide detailed insight into previously elusive structural and dynamic features of FRS/F-site interactions and FRS-driven substrate phosphorylation. We show that substrate F-site engagement significantly quenches slow dynamics involving the ppERK2 activation-loop and the FRS. We also demonstrate that the F-site phenylalanines make critical contacts with ppERK2, in contrast to the proline whose cis-trans isomerization has no significant effect on F-site recognition by the kinase FRS. Our results support a mechanism where phosphorylation of the disordered N-terminal phospho-acceptor is facilitated by its increased productive encounters with the ppERK2 active site due to docking of the proximal F-site at the kinase FRS. PMID:26054059

  19. Spatial and temporal dynamics of corticosterone and corticosterone binding globulin are driven by environmental heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Michael Todd; Kitaysky, Alexander Stanislav

    2008-02-01

    The question of whether changes in glucocorticoid concentrations reflect consistent changes in physiology associated with transitions between different stages of reproduction, or whether they reflect responses to environmental conditions, is one the central issues in field endocrinology studies. We examined the temporal and spatial dynamics of corticosterone (CORT, baseline, and acute stress-induced) and corticosterone binding globulin (CBG) concentrations in blood of Black-legged Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) breeding at four major colonies in the Bering Sea, Alaska, during 1999-2005. We found that total CORT, free CORT, and CBG capacity varied inconsistently among reproductive stages, colonies, and years. Total CORT levels were positively correlated with CBG capacity. Variation in free CORT was largely driven by variation in total CORT. Results suggest that the adrenocortical function and CBG in breeding kittiwakes do not vary as a consequence of stage-specific modulation associated with a particular reproductive stage as in some short-lived passerine birds. Rather, in accord with predictions for a long-lived species, the lack of consistent colony, year, and reproductive stage patterns in baseline and maximum CORT, and CBG indicates that environmental factors, probably local dynamics of food availability, drive variation in these factors.

  20. Particle dynamics in a symmetrically driven underdamped inhomogeneous periodic potential system.

    PubMed

    Kharkongor, D; Reenbohn, W L; Mahato, Mangal C

    2016-08-01

    We numerically solve the underdamped Langevin equation to obtain the trajectories of a particle in a sinusoidal potential driven by a temporally sinusoidal force in a medium with coefficient of friction periodic in space as the potential but with a phase difference. With the appropriate choice of system parameters, like the mean friction coefficient and the period of the applied field, only two kinds of periodic trajectories are obtained for all possible initial conditions at low noise strengths: one with a large amplitude and a large phase lag with respect to the applied field and the other with a small amplitude and a small phase lag. Thus, the periodic potential system is effectively mapped dynamically into a bistable system. Though the directional asymmetry, brought about only by the frictional inhomogeneity, is weak we find both the phenomena of stochastic resonance, with ready explanation in terms of the two dynamical states of trajectories, and ratchet effect simultaneously in the same parameter space. We analyze the results in detail attempting to find plausible explanations for each. PMID:27627287

  1. Particle dynamics in a symmetrically driven underdamped inhomogeneous periodic potential system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharkongor, D.; Reenbohn, W. L.; Mahato, Mangal C.

    2016-08-01

    We numerically solve the underdamped Langevin equation to obtain the trajectories of a particle in a sinusoidal potential driven by a temporally sinusoidal force in a medium with coefficient of friction periodic in space as the potential but with a phase difference. With the appropriate choice of system parameters, like the mean friction coefficient and the period of the applied field, only two kinds of periodic trajectories are obtained for all possible initial conditions at low noise strengths: one with a large amplitude and a large phase lag with respect to the applied field and the other with a small amplitude and a small phase lag. Thus, the periodic potential system is effectively mapped dynamically into a bistable system. Though the directional asymmetry, brought about only by the frictional inhomogeneity, is weak we find both the phenomena of stochastic resonance, with ready explanation in terms of the two dynamical states of trajectories, and ratchet effect simultaneously in the same parameter space. We analyze the results in detail attempting to find plausible explanations for each.

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of a strongly driven single spin solid state qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppersmith, S. N.; Jullien, Thibaut; Scarlino, P.; Kawakami, E.; Ward, D. R.; Savage, D. E.; Lagally, M. G.; Friesen, Mark; Eriksson, M. A.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    This talk will discuss how dynamical systems theory can yield new insight into some exotic behavior found in experiments on strongly driven quantum spins in silicon/silicon-germanium heterostructures. Spin resonance experiments were performed by using ac voltages to drive an electron wavefunction in a strong magnetic field gradient. Nontrivial dependence of the resonance frequency on applied power, including the observation of multiple resonant frequencies at one power, are shown to be consistent with frequency-dependent attenuation in the high-frequency lines. The method of analysis is very similar to that presented in the course on nonlinear dynamics that Leo Kadanoff developed at the University of Chicago in the early 1990's. This work was supported in part by ARO (W911NF-12-0607). Development and maintenance of the growth facilities used for fabricating samples is supported by DOE (DE-FG02-03ER46028). This research utilized NSF-supported shared facilities at UW-Madison.

  3. The demography of climate-driven and density-regulated population dynamics in a perennial plant.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, Johan P; Bengtsson, Karin; Ehrlén, Johan

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the internal and external drivers of population dynamics is a key objective in ecology, currently accentuated by the need to forecast the effects of climate change on species distributions and abundances. The interplay between environmental and density effects is one particularly important aspect of such forecasts. We examined the simultaneous impact of climate and intraspecific density on vital rates of the dwarf shrub Fumana procumbens over 20 yr, using generalized additive mixed models. We then analyzed effects on population dynamics using integral projection models. The population projection models accurately captured observed fluctuations in population size. Our analyses suggested the population was intrinsically regulated but with annual fluctuations in response to variation in weather. Simulations showed that implicitly assuming variation in demographic rates to be driven solely by the environment can overestimate extinction risks if there is density dependence. We conclude that density regulation can dampen effects of climate change on Fumana population size, and discuss the need to quantify density dependence in predictions of population responses to environmental changes. PMID:27220206

  4. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses. PMID:27187068

  5. The dynamics of capillary-driven two-phase flow: the role of nanofluid structural forces.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Alex; Zhang, Hua

    2015-07-01

    Capillary-driven flows are fundamental phenomena and are involved in many key technological processes, such as oil recovery through porous rocks, ink-jet printing, the bubble dynamics in a capillary, microfluidic devices and labs on chips. Here, we discuss and propose a model for the oil displacement dynamics from the capillary by the nanofluid (which is composed of a liquid suspension of nanoparticles); we elucidate the physics of the novelty of the phenomenon and its application. The oil displacement by the nanofluid flow is a multi-stage phenomenon, first leading to the oil film formation on the capillary wall, its break-up, and retraction over the capillary wall; this lead to the formation of the oil double concave meniscus. With time, the process repeats itself, leading to the formation of a regular "necklace" of oil droplets inside the capillary. Finally, the oil droplets are separated by the nanofluid film from the capillary wall. The light reflected differential interferometry technique is applied to investigate the nanofluid interactions with the glass wall. We find nanoparticles tend to self-structure into multiple layers close to the solid wall, which cause the structural forces to arise that lead to the oil displacement from the capillary. This research is expected to benefit the understanding of nanofluid phenomena in a capillary and promote their use in technological applications. PMID:25465201

  6. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Jin, Xiaogang; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses.

  7. WIFIRE: A Scalable Data-Driven Monitoring, Dynamic Prediction and Resilience Cyberinfrastructure for Wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altintas, I.; Block, J.; Braun, H.; de Callafon, R. A.; Gollner, M. J.; Smarr, L.; Trouve, A.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies confirm that climate change will cause wildfires to increase in frequency and severity in the coming decades especially for California and in much of the North American West. The most critical sustainability issue in the midst of these ever-changing dynamics is how to achieve a new social-ecological equilibrium of this fire ecology. Wildfire wind speeds and directions change in an instant, and first responders can only be effective when they take action as quickly as the conditions change. To deliver information needed for sustainable policy and management in this dynamically changing fire regime, we must capture these details to understand the environmental processes. We are building an end-to-end cyberinfrastructure (CI), called WIFIRE, for real-time and data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization of wildfire behavior. The WIFIRE integrated CI system supports social-ecological resilience to the changing fire ecology regime in the face of urban dynamics and climate change. Networked observations, e.g., heterogeneous satellite data and real-time remote sensor data is integrated with computational techniques in signal processing, visualization, modeling and data assimilation to provide a scalable, technological, and educational solution to monitor weather patterns to predict a wildfire's Rate of Spread. Our collaborative WIFIRE team of scientists, engineers, technologists, government policy managers, private industry, and firefighters architects implement CI pathways that enable joint innovation for wildfire management. Scientific workflows are used as an integrative distributed programming model and simplify the implementation of engineering modules for data-driven simulation, prediction and visualization while allowing integration with large-scale computing facilities. WIFIRE will be scalable to users with different skill-levels via specialized web interfaces and user-specified alerts for environmental events broadcasted to receivers before

  8. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots supported on gallium and indium oxide for visible-light-driven hydrogen evolution from water.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yun-xiang; Zhuang, Huaqiang; Hong, Jindui; Fang, Zheng; Liu, Hai; Liu, Bin; Huang, Yizhong; Xu, Rong

    2014-09-01

    In this work, CdS quantum dots (QDs) supported on Ga2O3 and In2O3 are applied for visible-light-driven H2 evolution from aqueous solutions that contain lactic acid. With Pt as the cocatalyst, the H2 evolution rates on CdS/Pt/Ga2O3 and CdS/Pt/In2O3 are as high as 995.8 and 1032.2 μmol h(-1), respectively, under visible light (λ>420 nm) with apparent quantum efficiencies of 43.6 and 45.3% obtained at 460 nm, respectively. These are much higher than those on Pt/CdS (108.09 μmol h(-1)), Pt/Ga2O3 (0.12 μmol h(-1)), and Pt/In2O3 (0.05 μmol h(-1)). The photocatalysts have been characterized thoroughly and their band structures and photocurrent responses have been measured. The band alignment between the CdS QDs and In2O3 can lead to interfacial charge separation, which cannot occur between the CdS QDs and Ga2O3. Among the various possible factors that contribute to the high H2 evolution rates on CdS/Pt/oxide, the surface properties of the metal oxides play important roles, which include (i) the anchoring of CdS QDs and Pt nanoparticles for favorable interactions and (ii) the efficient trapping of photogenerated electrons from the CdS QDs because of surface defects (such as oxygen defects) based on photoluminescence and photocurrent studies.

  9. Defect and damage evolution quantification in dynamically-deformed metals using orientation-imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, George T., III; Livescu, Veronica; Cerreta, Ellen K

    2010-03-18

    Orientation-imaging microscopy offers unique capabilities to quantify the defects and damage evolution occurring in metals following dynamic and shock loading. Examples of the quantification of the types of deformation twins activated, volume fraction of twinning, and damage evolution as a function of shock loading in Ta are presented. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the damage evolution in sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading to study spallation in Cu is also presented.

  10. Exploring metazoan evolution through dynamic and holistic changes in protein families and domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding proteome evolution is important for deciphering processes that drive species diversity and adaptation. Herein, the dynamics of change in protein families and protein domains over the course of metazoan evolution was explored. Change, as defined by birth/death and duplication/deletion ...

  11. Blowback: new formal perspectives on agriculturally driven pathogen evolution and spread.

    PubMed

    Wallace, R; Wallace, R G

    2015-07-01

    By their diversity in time, space, and mode, traditional and conservation agricultures can create barriers limiting pathogen evolution and spread analogous to a sterilizing temperature. Large-scale monocropping and confined animal feeding-lot operations remove such barriers, resulting, above agroecologically specific thresholds, in the development and wide propagation of novel disease strains. We apply a newly developed class of necessary-conditions statistical models of evolutionary process, first using the theory on an evolutionarily stable viral pathogen vulnerable to vaccine treatment: post-World War II poliomyelitis emerged in the UK and USA from sudden widespread adoption of automobile ownership and usage. We then examine an evolutionarily variable pathogen, swine influenza in North America. The model suggests epidemiological blowback from globalizing intensive husbandry and the raising and shipping of monoculture livestock across increasing expanses, is likely to be far more consequential, driving viral selection for greater virulence and lowered response to biomedical intervention.

  12. Visible‐Light‐Driven Hydrogen Evolution Using Planarized Conjugated Polymer Photocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sprick, Reiner Sebastian; Bonillo, Baltasar; Clowes, Rob; Guiglion, Pierre; Brownbill, Nick J.; Slater, Benjamin J.; Blanc, Frédéric; Zwijnenburg, Martijn A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Linear poly(p‐phenylene)s are modestly active UV photocatalysts for hydrogen production in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor. Introduction of planarized fluorene, carbazole, dibenzo[b,d]thiophene or dibenzo[b,d]thiophene sulfone units greatly enhances the H2 evolution rate. The most active dibenzo[b,d]thiophene sulfone co‐polymer has a UV photocatalytic activity that rivals TiO2, but is much more active under visible light. The dibenzo[b,d]thiophene sulfone co‐polymer has an apparent quantum yield of 2.3 % at 420 nm, as compared to 0.1 % for platinized commercial pristine carbon nitride. PMID:26696450

  13. Visible‐Light‐Driven Hydrogen Evolution Using Planarized Conjugated Polymer Photocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sprick, Reiner Sebastian; Bonillo, Baltasar; Clowes, Rob; Guiglion, Pierre; Brownbill, Nick J.; Slater, Benjamin J.; Blanc, Frédéric; Zwijnenburg, Martijn A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Linear poly(p‐phenylene)s are modestly active UV photocatalysts for hydrogen production in the presence of a sacrificial electron donor. Introduction of planarized fluorene, carbazole, dibenzo[b,d]thiophene or dibenzo[b,d]thiophene sulfone units greatly enhances the H2 evolution rate. The most active dibenzo[b,d]thiophene sulfone co‐polymer has a UV photocatalytic activity that rivals TiO2, but is much more active under visible light. The dibenzo[b,d]thiophene sulfone co‐polymer has an apparent quantum yield of 2.3 % at 420 nm, as compared to 0.1 % for platinized commercial pristine carbon nitride. PMID:27478279

  14. Self-similar mesostructure evolution of the growing mollusc shell reminiscent of thermodynamically driven grain growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayerlein, Bernd; Zaslansky, Paul; Dauphin, Yannicke; Rack, Alexander; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor

    2014-12-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the interaction between mineral precursors and organic components leading to material formation and structuring in biomineralizing systems. The mesostructure of biological materials, such as the outer calcitic shell of molluscs, is characterized by many parameters and the question arises as to what extent they all are, or need to be, controlled biologically. Here, we analyse the three-dimensional structure of the calcite-based prismatic layer of Pinna nobilis, the giant Mediterranean fan mussel, using high-resolution synchrotron-based microtomography. We show that the evolution of the layer is statistically self-similar and, remarkably, its morphology and mesostructure can be fully predicted using classical materials science theories for normal grain growth. These findings are a fundamental step in understanding the constraints that dictate the shape of these biogenic minerals and shed light on how biological organisms make use of thermodynamics to generate complex morphologies.

  15. Self-similar mesostructure evolution of the growing mollusc shell reminiscent of thermodynamically driven grain growth.

    PubMed

    Bayerlein, Bernd; Zaslansky, Paul; Dauphin, Yannicke; Rack, Alexander; Fratzl, Peter; Zlotnikov, Igor

    2014-12-01

    Significant progress has been made in understanding the interaction between mineral precursors and organic components leading to material formation and structuring in biomineralizing systems. The mesostructure of biological materials, such as the outer calcitic shell of molluscs, is characterized by many parameters and the question arises as to what extent they all are, or need to be, controlled biologically. Here, we analyse the three-dimensional structure of the calcite-based prismatic layer of Pinna nobilis, the giant Mediterranean fan mussel, using high-resolution synchrotron-based microtomography. We show that the evolution of the layer is statistically self-similar and, remarkably, its morphology and mesostructure can be fully predicted using classical materials science theories for normal grain growth. These findings are a fundamental step in understanding the constraints that dictate the shape of these biogenic minerals and shed light on how biological organisms make use of thermodynamics to generate complex morphologies.

  16. Role of spall in microstructure evolution during laser-shock-driven rapid undercooling and resolidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Kumar, Mukul; MoberlyChan, Warren J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Tierney, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported [Colvin et al., J. Appl. Phys. 101, 084906 (2007)] on the microstructure morphology of pure Bi metal subjected to rapid laser-shock-driven melting and subsequent resolidification upon release of pressure, where the estimated effective undercooling rates were of the order of 109-1010 K/s. More recently, we repeated these experiments, but with a Bi/Zn alloy (Zn atomic fraction of 2%-4%) instead of elemental Bi and with a change in target design to suppress spall in the Bi/Zn samples. We observed a similar microstructure morphology in the two sets of experiments, with initially columnar grains recrystallizing to larger equiaxed grains. The Bi samples, however, exhibited micron-scale dendrites on the spall surfaces, whereas there were no dendritic structures anywhere in the nonspalled Bi/Zn, even down to the nanometer scale as observed by transmission electron microscopy. We present the simulations and the interferometry data that show that the samples in the two sets of experiments followed nearly identical hydrodynamic and thermodynamic paths apart from the presence of (probably partially liquid) spall in pure Bi. Simulations also show that the spall occurs right at the moving phase front and, hence, the spall itself cuts off the principal direction for latent heat dissipation across the phase boundary. We suggest that it is the liquid spall itself that creates the conditions for dendrite formation.

  17. Role of spall in microstructure evolution during laser-shock-driven rapid undercooling and resolidification

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Kumar, Mukul; MoberlyChan, Warren J.; Reed, Bryan W.; Paisley, Dennis L.; Tierney, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported [Colvin et al., J. Appl. Phys. 101, 084906 (2007)] on the microstructure morphology of pure Bi metal subjected to rapid laser-shock-driven melting and subsequent resolidification upon release of pressure, where the estimated effective undercooling rates were of the order of 10{sup 9}-10{sup 10} K/s. More recently, we repeated these experiments, but with a Bi/Zn alloy (Zn atomic fraction of 2%-4%) instead of elemental Bi and with a change in target design to suppress spall in the Bi/Zn samples. We observed a similar microstructure morphology in the two sets of experiments, with initially columnar grains recrystallizing to larger equiaxed grains. The Bi samples, however, exhibited micron-scale dendrites on the spall surfaces, whereas there were no dendritic structures anywhere in the nonspalled Bi/Zn, even down to the nanometer scale as observed by transmission electron microscopy. We present the simulations and the interferometry data that show that the samples in the two sets of experiments followed nearly identical hydrodynamic and thermodynamic paths apart from the presence of (probably partially liquid) spall in pure Bi. Simulations also show that the spall occurs right at the moving phase front and, hence, the spall itself cuts off the principal direction for latent heat dissipation across the phase boundary. We suggest that it is the liquid spall itself that creates the conditions for dendrite formation.

  18. Self-consistent Dynamical And Thermodynamical Evolutions Of Protoplanetary Disks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, Kevin; Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.; Piau, L.

    2012-10-01

    Astronomical observations reveal the diversity of protoplanetary disk evolutions. In order to understand the global evolution of these disks from their birth, during the collapse of the molecular cloud, to their evaporation because of the stellar radiation, many processes with different timescales must be coupled: stellar evolution, thermodynamical evolution, photoevaporation, cloud collapse, viscous spreading...By modeling the results of large scale simulations and coupling them with models of viscous evolution, we have designed a one dimension full model of disk evolution for which most parameters are self-consistently calculated at each time step. We integrate the Hueso and Guillot, 2005 model of disk evolution and couple the radiative transfer description of Calvet et al, 1991 allowing us to handle a non-isothermal disk. We also take into account the collapse of the molecular cloud that feeds the disk. Using the same temperature model in the vertical direction, we estimate 2D thermal maps of the disk. The central star itself is modeled using recent stellar evolution code described in Piau et al, 2011. We first test our model in the case of an already formed Minimum Mass solar Nebula, trying to match the observational constraints on the radial surface density gradients and photosphere height profiles of the Taurus-Auriga or Ophiucus disks for instance. We then follow the full long-term evolution of a disk fed by the collapse of the molecular cloud. We estimate disk temperatures and accretion rates and try to constrain the favourable zone for the formation of the first solids. This will help targeting future JWST observations.

  19. Self-consistent dynamical and thermodynamical evolutions of protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.; Piau, L.

    2012-12-01

    Astronomical observations reveal the diversity of protoplanetary disk evolutions. In order to understand the global evolution of these disks from their birth, during the collapse of the molecular cloud, to their evaporation because of the stellar radiation, many processes with different timescales must be coupled: stellar evolution, thermodynamical evolution, photoevaporation, cloud collapse, viscous spreading... By modeling the results of large scale simulations and coupling them with models of viscous evolution, we have designed a one dimension full model of disk evolution for which most parameters are self-consistently calculated at each time step. We integrate the Hueso and Guillot, 2005 model of disk evolution and couple the radiative transfer description of Calvet et al, 1991 allowing us to handle a non-isothermal disk. We also take into account the collapse of the molecular cloud that feeds the disk. Using the same temperature model in the vertical direction, we estimate 2D thermal maps of the disk. The central star itself is modeled using recent stellar evolution code described in Piau et al, 2011. We first test our model in the case of an already formed Minimum Mass solar Nebula, trying to match the observational constraints on the radial surface density gradients and photosphere height profiles of the Taurus-Auriga or Ophiucus disks for instance. We then follow the full long-term evolution of a disk fed by the collapse of the molecular cloud. We estimate disk temperatures and accretion rates and try to constrain the favourable zone for the formation of the first solids. This will help targeting future JWST observations.

  20. A Pathophysiological Model-Driven Communication for Dynamic Distributed Medical Best Practice Guidance Systems.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad; Jiang, Yu; Wu, Poliang; Berlin, Richard B; Ren, Shangping; Sha, Lui

    2016-11-01

    There is a great divide between rural and urban areas, particularly in medical emergency care. Although medical best practice guidelines exist and are in hospital handbooks, they are often lengthy and difficult to apply clinically. The challenges are exaggerated for doctors in rural areas and emergency medical technicians (EMT) during patient transport. In this paper, we propose the concept of distributed executable medical best practice guidance systems to assist adherence to best practice from the time that a patient first presents at a rural hospital, through diagnosis and ambulance transfer to arrival and treatment at a regional tertiary hospital center. We codify complex medical knowledge in the form of simplified distributed executable disease automata, from the thin automata at rural hospitals to the rich automata in the regional center hospitals. However, a main challenge is how to efficiently and safely synchronize distributed best practice models as the communication among medical facilities, devices, and professionals generates a large number of messages. This complex problem of patient diagnosis and transport from rural to center facility is also fraught with many uncertainties and changes resulting in a high degree of dynamism. A critically ill patient's medical conditions can change abruptly in addition to changes in the wireless bandwidth during the ambulance transfer. Such dynamics have yet to be addressed in existing literature on telemedicine. To address this situation, we propose a pathophysiological model-driven message exchange communication architecture that ensures the real-time and dynamic requirements of synchronization among distributed emergency best practice models are met in a reliable and safe manner. Taking the signs, symptoms, and progress of stroke patients transported across a geographically distributed healthcare network as the motivating use case, we implement our communication system and apply it to our developed best practice

  1. Dynamic analysis of propulsion mechanism directly driven by wave energy for marine mobile buoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenjiang; Zheng, Zhongqiang; Yang, Xiaoguang; Chang, Zongyu

    2016-07-01

    Marine mobile buoy(MMB) have many potential applications in the maritime industry and ocean science. Great progress has been made, however the technology in this area is far from maturity in theory and faced with many difficulties in application. A dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism is very necessary for optimizing the parameters of the MMB, especially with consideration of hydrodynamic force. The principle of wave-driven propulsion mechanism is briefly introduced. To set a theory foundation for study on the MMB, a dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism of the MMB is obtained. The responses of the motion of the platform and the hydrofoil are obtained by using a numerical integration method to solve the ordinary differential equations. A simplified form of the motion equations is reached by omitting terms with high order small values. The relationship among the heave motion of the buoy, stiffness of the elastic components, and the forward speed can be obtained by using these simplified equations. The dynamic analysis show the following: The angle of displacement of foil is fairly small with the biggest value around 0.3 rad; The speed of mobile buoy and the angle of hydrofoil increased gradually with the increase of heave motion of buoy; The relationship among heaven motion, stiffness and attack angle is that heave motion leads to the angle change of foil whereas the item of speed or push function is determined by vertical velocity and angle, therefore, the heave motion and stiffness can affect the motion of buoy significantly if the size of hydrofoil is kept constant. The proposed model is provided to optimize the parameters of the MMB and a foundation is laid for improving the performance of the MMB.

  2. Dynamic analysis of propulsion mechanism directly driven by wave energy for marine mobile buoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhenjiang; Zheng, Zhongqiang; Yang, Xiaoguang; Chang, Zongyu

    2016-05-01

    Marine mobile buoy(MMB) have many potential applications in the maritime industry and ocean science. Great progress has been made, however the technology in this area is far from maturity in theory and faced with many difficulties in application. A dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism is very necessary for optimizing the parameters of the MMB, especially with consideration of hydrodynamic force. The principle of wave-driven propulsion mechanism is briefly introduced. To set a theory foundation for study on the MMB, a dynamic model of the propulsion mechanism of the MMB is obtained. The responses of the motion of the platform and the hydrofoil are obtained by using a numerical integration method to solve the ordinary differential equations. A simplified form of the motion equations is reached by omitting terms with high order small values. The relationship among the heave motion of the buoy, stiffness of the elastic components, and the forward speed can be obtained by using these simplified equations. The dynamic analysis show the following: The angle of displacement of foil is fairly small with the biggest value around 0.3 rad; The speed of mobile buoy and the angle of hydrofoil increased gradually with the increase of heave motion of buoy; The relationship among heaven motion, stiffness and attack angle is that heave motion leads to the angle change of foil whereas the item of speed or push function is determined by vertical velocity and angle, therefore, the heave motion and stiffness can affect the motion of buoy significantly if the size of hydrofoil is kept constant. The proposed model is provided to optimize the parameters of the MMB and a foundation is laid for improving the performance of the MMB.

  3. A Pathophysiological Model-Driven Communication for Dynamic Distributed Medical Best Practice Guidance Systems.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad; Jiang, Yu; Wu, Poliang; Berlin, Richard B; Ren, Shangping; Sha, Lui

    2016-11-01

    There is a great divide between rural and urban areas, particularly in medical emergency care. Although medical best practice guidelines exist and are in hospital handbooks, they are often lengthy and difficult to apply clinically. The challenges are exaggerated for doctors in rural areas and emergency medical technicians (EMT) during patient transport. In this paper, we propose the concept of distributed executable medical best practice guidance systems to assist adherence to best practice from the time that a patient first presents at a rural hospital, through diagnosis and ambulance transfer to arrival and treatment at a regional tertiary hospital center. We codify complex medical knowledge in the form of simplified distributed executable disease automata, from the thin automata at rural hospitals to the rich automata in the regional center hospitals. However, a main challenge is how to efficiently and safely synchronize distributed best practice models as the communication among medical facilities, devices, and professionals generates a large number of messages. This complex problem of patient diagnosis and transport from rural to center facility is also fraught with many uncertainties and changes resulting in a high degree of dynamism. A critically ill patient's medical conditions can change abruptly in addition to changes in the wireless bandwidth during the ambulance transfer. Such dynamics have yet to be addressed in existing literature on telemedicine. To address this situation, we propose a pathophysiological model-driven message exchange communication architecture that ensures the real-time and dynamic requirements of synchronization among distributed emergency best practice models are met in a reliable and safe manner. Taking the signs, symptoms, and progress of stroke patients transported across a geographically distributed healthcare network as the motivating use case, we implement our communication system and apply it to our developed best practice

  4. Retrovolution: HIV-driven evolution of cellular genes and improvement of anticancer drug activation.

    PubMed

    Rossolillo, Paola; Winter, Flore; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Negroni, Matteo

    2012-08-01

    In evolution strategies aimed at isolating molecules with new functions, screening for the desired phenotype is generally performed in vitro or in bacteria. When the final goal of the strategy is the modification of the human cell, the mutants selected with these preliminary screenings may fail to confer the desired phenotype, due to the complex networks that regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. We developed a system where, by mimicking successive infection cycles with HIV-1 derived vectors containing the gene target of the evolution in their genome, libraries of gene mutants are generated in the human cell, where they can be directly screened. As a proof of concept we created a library of mutants of the human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) gene, involved in the activation of nucleoside analogues used in cancer treatment, with the aim of isolating a variant sensitizing cancer cells to the chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine, to be used in gene therapy for anti-cancer approaches or as a poorly immunogenic negative selection marker for cell transplantation approaches. We describe the isolation of a dCK mutant, G12, inducing a 300-fold sensitization to Gemcitabine in cells originally resistant to the prodrug (Messa 10K), an effect 60 times stronger than the one induced by the wt enzyme. The phenotype is observed in different tumour cell lines irrespective of the insertion site of the transgene and is due to a change in specificity of the mutated kinase in favour of the nucleoside analogue. The mutations characterizing G12 are distant from the active site of the enzyme and are unpredictable on a rational basis, fully validating the pragmatic approach followed. Besides the potential interest of the G12 dCK variant for therapeutic purposes, the methodology developed is of interest for a large panel of applications in biotechnology and basic research. PMID:22927829

  5. Quaternary landscape evolution driven by slab-pull mechanisms in the Granada Basin (Central Betics)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Peña, J. V.; Azañón, J. M.; Azor, A.; Booth-Rea, G.; Galve, J. P.; Roldán, F. J.; Mancilla, F.; Giaconia, F.; Morales, J.; Al-Awabdeh, M.

    2015-11-01

    The Granada Basin is one of the largest Neogene-Quaternary intramontane basins of the Betic Cordillera in SE Spain. The landscape evolution in this basin is complex and does not respond to a simple model of headward erosion following river capture of a former endorheic catchment. In the NE border of the basin, the drainage network is highly incised and reveals two different stages of river development since the Pleistocene. The older drainage network presents low incision, being locally controlled by ENE-WSW open folds. The present-day drainage network features deep incised valleys with a well-defined local base-level controlled by NW-SE normal faults. The ENE-WSW open folds were generated by compressional stresses and affect a geomorphic surface that caps the local sedimentary sequence. These folds are thought to reactivate a Pliocene roll-over formed in the hanging wall of ENE-WSW normal faults that bound the Granada Basin to the north and the deepest Pliocene depocenter. On the contrary, Quaternary depocenters are located in the hanging wall of the NW-SE-oriented normal faults that control the present-day drainage network (NW-SE oriented). The activity of these faults also contributes to the erosion of the Pliocene depocenter located to the north, thus suggesting a southwestward migration of the loci of extension to the center of the basin. The broad-scale scenario envisaged to explain the Pliocene-Quaternary evolution of the NE border of the Granada Basin is one dominated by mantle slab-pull coeval with the Africa-Iberia continuous convergence.

  6. Public debates driven by incomplete scientific data: The cases of evolution theory, global warming and H1N1 pandemic influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galam, Serge

    2010-09-01

    Public debates driven by incomplete scientific data where nobody can claim absolute certainty, due to the current state of scientific knowledge, are studied. The cases of evolution theory, global warming and H1N1 pandemic influenza are investigated. The first two are of controversial impact while the third is more neutral and resolved. To adopt a cautious balanced attitude based on clear but inconclusive data appears to be a lose-out strategy. In contrast overstating arguments with incorrect claims which cannot be scientifically refuted appears to be necessary but not sufficient to eventually win a public debate. The underlying key mechanisms of these puzzling and unfortunate conclusions are identified using the Galam sequential probabilistic model of opinion dynamics (Galam, 2002 [4], Galam, 2005 [18], Galam and Jacobs, 2007 [19]). It reveals that the existence of inflexible agents and their respective proportions are the instrumental parameters to determine the faith of incomplete scientific data in public debates. Acting on one’s own inflexible proportion modifies the topology of the flow diagram, which in turn can make irrelevant initial supports. On the contrary focusing on open-minded agents may be useless given some topologies. When the evidence is not as strong as claimed, the inflexibles rather than the data are found to drive the opinion of the population. The results shed a new but disturbing light on designing adequate strategies to win a public debate.

  7. Learning real-world stimuli in a neural network with spike-driven synaptic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Brader, Joseph M; Senn, Walter; Fusi, Stefano

    2007-11-01

    We present a model of spike-driven synaptic plasticity inspired by experimental observations and motivated by the desire to build an electronic hardware device that can learn to classify complex stimuli in a semisupervised fashion. During training, patterns of activity are sequentially imposed on the input neurons, and an additional instructor signal drives the output neurons toward the desired activity. The network is made of integrate-and-fire neurons with constant leak and a floor. The synapses are bistable, and they are modified by the arrival of presynaptic spikes. The sign of the change is determined by both the depolarization and the state of a variable that integrates the postsynaptic action potentials. Following the training phase, the instructor signal is removed, and the output neurons are driven purely by the activity of the input neurons weighted by the plastic synapses. In the absence of stimulation, the synapses preserve their internal state indefinitely. Memories are also very robust to the disruptive action of spontaneous activity. A network of 2000 input neurons is shown to be able to classify correctly a large number (thousands) of highly overlapping patterns (300 classes of preprocessed Latex characters, 30 patterns per class, and a subset of the NIST characters data set) and to generalize with performances that are better than or comparable to those of artificial neural networks. Finally we show that the synaptic dynamics is compatible with many of the experimental observations on the induction of long-term modifications (spike-timing-dependent plasticity and its dependence on both the postsynaptic depolarization and the frequency of pre- and postsynaptic neurons). PMID:17883345

  8. Magnetocentrifugally driven flows from young stars and disks. 2: Formulation of the dynamical problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shu, Frank H.; Najita, Joan; Ruden, Steven P.; Lizano, Susana

    1994-01-01

    We formulate the dynamical problem of a cool wind centrifugally driven from the magnetic interface of a young star and an adjoining Keplerian disk. We examine the situation for mildly accreting T Tauri stars that rotate slowly as well as rapidly accreting protostars that rotate near break-up. In both cases a wind can be driven from a small X-region just outside the stellar magnetopause, where the field lines assume an open geometry and are rooted to material that rotates at an angular speed equal both to the local Keplerian value and to the stellar angular speed. Assuming axial symmetry for the ideal magnetohydrodynamic flow, which requires us to postpone asking how the (lightly ionized) gas is loaded onto field lines, we can formally integrate all the governing equations analytically except for a partial equation that describes how streamlines spread in the meridional plane. Apart from the difficulty of dealing with PDEs of mixed type, finding the functional forms of the conserved quantities along streamlines - the ratio beta of magnetic field to mass flux, the specific energy H of the fluid in the rotating frame, and the total specific angular momentum J carried in the matter and the field - constitutes a standard difficulty in this kind of (Grad-Shafranov) formalism. Fortunately, because the ratio of the thermal speed of the mass-loss regions to the Keplerian speed of rotation of the interface constitutes a small parameter epsilon, we can attack the overall problem by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. This procedure leads to a natural and systematic technique for obtaining the relevant functional dependences of beta, H, and J. Moreover, we are able to solve analytically for the properties of the flow emergent from the small transsonic region driven by gas pressure without having to specify the detailed form of any of the conserved functions, beta, H, and J. This analytical solution provides inner boundary conditions for the numerical computation in a

  9. Self-consistent dynamical and thermodynamical evolutions of protoplanetary disks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, K.; Charnoz, S.; Taillifet, E.; Piau, L.

    2012-09-01

    Astronomical observations reveal the diversity of protoplanetary disk evolutions. In order to understand the global evolution of these disks from their birth, during the collapse of the molecular cloud, to their evaporation because of the stellar radiation, many processes with different timescales must be coupled: stellar evolution, thermodynamical evolution, photoevaporation, cloud collapse, viscous spreading... Simulating all these processes simultaneously is beyond the capacity of modern computers. However, by modeling the results of large scale simulations and coupling them with models of viscous evolution, we have designed a one dimension full model of disk evolution. In order to generate the most realistic protoplanetary disk, we minimize the number of input parameters and try to calculate most of them from self-consistent processes, as early as possible in the history of the disk; starting with the collapse of the molecular cloud that feeds the disk in gas. We start from the Hueso and Guillot, 2005 [2] model of disk evolution and couple the radiative transfer description of Calvet et al, 1991 [1] allowing us to handle a non-isothermal disk which midplane temperature is defined by an irradiation term form the central star and a viscous heating term depending on the optical depth of the disk. Our new model of the disk photosphere profile allows us to estimate self-consistent photosphere heights and midplane temperatures at the same time. We then follow the disk evolution using an upgrade of the viscous spreading equation from Lynden-Bell and Pringle, 1981 [3]. In particular, the molecular cloud collapse adds a time varying term to the temporal variation of the surface mass density of the disk, in the same manner that photo-evaporation introduces a density loss term. The central star itself is modeled using recent stellar evolution code described in Piau et al, 2011 [4]. Using the same temperature model in the vertical direction, we estimate 2D thermal maps of

  10. The dynamics and evolution of clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret; Huchra, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Research was undertaken to produce a coherent picture of the formation and evolution of large-scale structures in the universe. The program is divided into projects which examine four areas: the relationship between individual galaxies and their environment; the structure and evolution of individual rich clusters of galaxies; the nature of superclusters; and the large-scale distribution of individual galaxies. A brief review of results in each area is provided.

  11. Pressure-anisotropy-driven microturbulence and magnetic-field evolution in shearing, collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melville, Scott; Schekochihin, Alexander A.; Kunz, Matthew W.

    2016-07-01

    The non-linear state of a high-beta collisionless plasma is investigated where an imposed shear amplifies or diminishes a uniform mean magnetic field, driving pressure anisotropies and, therefore, firehose or mirror instabilities. To mimic the local behaviour of a macroscopic flow, the shear is switched off or reversed after one shear time, so a new macroscale configuration is superimposed on previous microscale state. A threshold plasma beta is found: when β ≪ Ω/S (ion cyclotron frequency/shear rate), the emergence/disappearance of firehose or mirror fluctuations is quasi-instantaneous compared to the shear time (lending some credence to popular closures that assume this). This follows from the free decay of these fluctuations being constrained by the same marginal-stability conditions as their growth in the unstable regime, giving the decay time ˜β/Ω ≪ S-1. In contrast, when β ≳ Ω/S, the old microscale state only disappears on the shear time-scale. In this `ultra-high-beta' regime, driven firehose fluctuations grow secularly to order-unity amplitudes, compensating for the decrease of the mean field and thus pinning the pressure anisotropy at marginal stability without scattering particles - unlike what happens at moderate β. After the shear reverses, the shearing away of these fluctuations compensates for the increase of the mean field and thus prevents growth of the pressure anisotropy, so the system stays close to the firehose threshold, does not go mirror-unstable, the total magnetic energy barely changing at all. Implications for various astrophysical situations, especially the origin of cosmic magnetism, are discussed: collisionless effects appear mostly beneficial to fast magnetic-field generation.

  12. Proton-driven spin diffusion in rotating solids via reversible and irreversible quantum dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Veshtort, Mikhail; Griffin, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiments in rotating solids have received a great deal of attention as a potential source of distance constraints in large biomolecules. However, the quantitative relationship between the molecular structure and observed spin diffusion has remained obscure due to the lack of an accurate theoretical description of the spin dynamics in these experiments. We start with presenting a detailed relaxation theory of PDSD in rotating solids that provides such a description. The theory applies to both conventional and radio-frequency-assisted PDSD experiments and extends to the non-Markovian regime to include such phenomena as rotational resonance (R2). The basic kinetic equation of the theory in the non-Markovian regime has the form of a memory function equation, with the role of the memory function played by the correlation function. The key assumption used in the derivation of this equation expresses the intuitive notion of the irreversible dissipation of coherences in macroscopic systems. Accurate expressions for the correlation functions and for the spin diffusion constants are given. The theory predicts that the spin diffusion constants governing the multi-site PDSD can be approximated by the constants observed in the two-site diffusion. Direct numerical simulations of PDSD dynamics via reversible Liouville-von Neumann equation are presented to support and compliment the theory. Remarkably, an exponential decay of the difference magnetization can be observed in such simulations in systems consisting of only 12 spins. This is a unique example of a real physical system whose typically macroscopic and apparently irreversible behavior can be traced via reversible microscopic dynamics. An accurate value for the spin diffusion constant can be usually obtained through direct simulations of PDSD in systems consisting of two 13C nuclei and about ten 1H nuclei from their nearest environment. Spin diffusion constants computed by this method

  13. Massively Parallel Combined Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics Methods to Study the Long-Time-Scale Evolution of Particulate Matter and Molecular Structures Under Reactive Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, A; Mundy, C J; Pitz, W J; Melius, C; Westbrook, C K; Caturla, M

    2003-12-19

    An important challenge in computational modeling is the development of new computational methods and capabilities for studying molecular-scale structures over very large time-scales. In particular, there is great interest in understanding the nucleation and growth of carbon soot particles as well as their fate in the atmosphere. We have recently developed and implemented a new computational tool to time-integrate the detailed structure of atomistically resolved surfaces and nanostructures driven by chemical and physical kinetic rule-based rate expressions. Fundamental chemical and physical processes such as chemical reactions, surface adsorption and surface diffusion are performed using a non-lattice real-space kinetic Monte Carlo scheme and driven by user-defined rule-based kinetic rate expressions, while atomic structure relaxation is approached using molecular dynamics. We demonstrate the sensitivity of particle evolution to chemical and physical kinetic mechanism using a parallel implementation of the combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics code.

  14. On the Dynamics of Plate Tectonics: Multiple Solutions, the Influence of Water, and Thermal Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, John W.

    An analytic boundary layer model for thermal convection with a finite-strength plate and depth-dependent viscosity is developed. The model includes a specific energy balance for the lithosphere and accounts for coupling between the plate and underlying mantle. Multiple solutions are possible with three solution branches representing three distinct modes of thermal convection. One branch corresponds to the classic boundary layer solution for active lid plate tectonics while two new branches represent solutions for sluggish lid convection. The model is compared to numerical simulations with highly temperature dependent viscosity and is able to predict both the type of convection (active, sluggish, or stagnant lid) as well as the presence of single and multiple solution regimes. The existence of multiple solutions suggests that the mode of planetary convection may be history dependent. The dependence of mantle viscosity on temperature and water concentration is found to introduce a strong dynamic feedback with plate tectonics. A dimensionless parameter is defined to quantitatively evaluate the relative strength of this feedback and demonstrates that water and heat transport may be equally important in controlling present-day plate-mantle dynamics for the Earth. A simple parameterized evolution model illustrates the feedback and agrees well with our analytic results. This suggests that a simple relationship may exist between the rate of change of water concentration and the rate of change of temperature in the mantle. This study concludes by investigating the possibility of a magnetic field dynamo in early solar system planetesimals. The thermal evolution of planetesimals is modeled by considering melting, core formation, and the onset of mantle convection and then employing thermal boundary layer theory for stagnant lid convection (if possible) to determine the cooling rate of the body. We assess the presence, strength and duration of a dynamo for a range of

  15. A Lagrangian model for soil water dynamics during rainfall-driven conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehe, Erwin; Jackisch, Conrad

    2016-09-01

    Within this study we propose a stochastic approach to simulate soil water dynamics in the unsaturated zone by using a non-linear, space domain random walk of water particles. Soil water is represented by particles of constant mass, which travel according to the Itô form of the Fokker-Planck equation. The model concept builds on established soil physics by estimating the drift velocity and the diffusion term based on the soil water characteristics. A naive random walk, which assumes all water particles to move at the same drift velocity and diffusivity, overestimated depletion of soil moisture gradients compared to a Richards solver. This is because soil water and hence the corresponding water particles in smaller pore size fractions are, due to the non-linear decrease in soil hydraulic conductivity with decreasing soil moisture, much less mobile. After accounting for this subscale variability in particle mobility, the particle model and a Richards solver performed highly similarly during simulated wetting and drying circles in three distinctly different soils. Both models were in very good accordance during rainfall-driven conditions, regardless of the intensity and type of the rainfall forcing and the shape of the initial state. Within subsequent drying cycles the particle model was typically slightly slower in depleting soil moisture gradients than the Richards model. Within a real-world benchmark, the particle model and the Richards solver showed the same deficiencies in matching observed reactions of topsoil moisture to a natural rainfall event. The particle model performance, however, clearly improved after a straightforward implementation of rapid non-equilibrium infiltration, which treats event water as different types of particles, which travel initially in the largest pore fraction at maximum velocity and experience a slow diffusive mixing with the pre-event water particles. The proposed Lagrangian approach is hence a promising, easy

  16. Non-linear macro evolution of a dc driven micro atmospheric glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2015-10-15

    We studied the macro evolution of the micro atmospheric glow discharge generated between a micro argon jet into ambient air and static water. The micro discharge behaves similarly to a complex ecosystem. Non-linear behaviors are found for the micro discharge when the water acts as a cathode, different from the discharge when water behaves as an anode. Groups of snapshots of the micro discharge formed at different discharge currents are captured by an intensified charge-coupled device with controlled exposure time, and each group consisted of 256 images taken in succession. Edge detection methods are used to identify the water surface and then the total brightness is defined by adding up the signal counts over the area of the micro discharge. Motions of the water surface at different discharge currents show that the water surface lowers increasingly rapidly when the water acts as a cathode. In contrast, the water surface lowers at a constant speed when the water behaves as an anode. The light curves are similar to logistic growth curves, suggesting that a self-inhibition process occurs in the micro discharge. Meanwhile, the total brightness increases linearly during the same time when the water acts as an anode. Discharge-water interactions cause the micro discharge to evolve. The charged particle bomb process is probably responsible for the different behaviors of the micro discharges when the water acts as cathode and anode.

  17. Non-linear macro evolution of a dc driven micro atmospheric glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S. F.; Zhong, X. X.

    2015-10-01

    We studied the macro evolution of the micro atmospheric glow discharge generated between a micro argon jet into ambient air and static water. The micro discharge behaves similarly to a complex ecosystem. Non-linear behaviors are found for the micro discharge when the water acts as a cathode, different from the discharge when water behaves as an anode. Groups of snapshots of the micro discharge formed at different discharge currents are captured by an intensified charge-coupled device with controlled exposure time, and each group consisted of 256 images taken in succession. Edge detection methods are used to identify the water surface and then the total brightness is defined by adding up the signal counts over the area of the micro discharge. Motions of the water surface at different discharge currents show that the water surface lowers increasingly rapidly when the water acts as a cathode. In contrast, the water surface lowers at a constant speed when the water behaves as an anode. The light curves are similar to logistic growth curves, suggesting that a self-inhibition process occurs in the micro discharge. Meanwhile, the total brightness increases linearly during the same time when the water acts as an anode. Discharge-water interactions cause the micro discharge to evolve. The charged particle bomb process is probably responsible for the different behaviors of the micro discharges when the water acts as cathode and anode.

  18. Porosity evolution and crystallization-driven fragmentation during weathering of andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, BjøRn; Kobchenko, Maya; Austrheim, HâKon; Malthe-SøRenssen, Anders; RøYne, Anja; Svensen, Henrik

    2011-12-01

    A 10 m thick andesitic sill intrusion from the Neuquén Basin, Argentina, shows spectacular examples of spheroidal weathering and Liesegang banding. The Liesegang patterns demonstrate how andesite blocks, initially cut out by a preweathering joint set, are subdivided by fractures formed during the spheroidal weathering process. The stresses that cause fracturing originate from the growth of ferrihydrite and calcite in the pore space of the andesite, partly at the expense of original ilmenite, amphibole, and plagioclase. The porosity evolution and fracture formation during progressive weathering was characterized by scanning electron microscopy studies, X-ray computed tomography, and He- and Hg-porosimetry. Fresh andesite has a porosity of approximately 8%, and a major fraction (>80%) of the pore volume is composed of pores less than 10 μm in diameter. The extent of pore filling during weathering increases with pore size. Pores more than 100 μm are almost completely filled by an intimate intergrowth of calcite and ferrihydrite, whereas pores less than 10 μm are filled less than 50%. The fracturing associated with spheroidal weathering is caused by mineral growth in the largest pores, which account for 10%-20% of the total porosity. The periodic precipitation of the weathering product to form Liesegang bands indicates a significant supersaturation threshold before nucleation commences. The increase in the weathering product growth rate with increasing size is therefore most likely due to higher nucleation probabilities in larger pores.

  19. Porosity evolution and crystallization-driven fragmentation during weathering of andesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Kobchenko, M.; Royne, A.

    2011-12-01

    A 10 meter thick andesitic sill intrusion from the Neuquen Basin, Argentina, shows spectacular examples of spheroidal weathering and Liesegang banding (see Figure). The Liesegang patterns demonstrate how andesite blocks, initially cut out by a pre-weathering joint set, are subdivided by fractures forming during the spheroidal weathering process. The stresses causing fracturing originate from the growth of ferrihydrite and calcite in the pore space of the andesite, partly at the expense of original ilmenite, amphibole, and plagioclase. The porosity evolution and fracture formation during progressive weathering has been characterized by SEM studies, X-ray computed tomography (CT), He- and Hg-porosimetry. Fresh andesite has a porosity of ca. 8%, and a major fraction (>80%) of the pore volume is comprised of pores < 10 μm in diameter. The extent of pore filling during weathering increases with pore-size. Pores > 100 μm are almost completely filled by an intimate intergrowth of calcite and ferrihydrite, whereas pores < 10 μm stay open. The fracturing associated with spheroidal weathering is caused by growth in pores comprising the largest 10-20% of the total porosity. Periodic precipitation of weathering product to form Liesegang bands indicates a significant superaturation treshold before nucleation commences. Preferential growth of weathering products in large pores is most likely due to a higher probability of nucleation in pores with a large surface area. A simple model that couple the mechanical and chemical processes involved will be presented.

  20. Evolution of opsin expression in birds driven by sexual selection and habitat

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Natasha I.

    2015-01-01

    Theories of sexual and natural selection predict coevolution of visual perception with conspecific colour and/or the light environment animals occupy. One way to test these theories is to focus on the visual system, which can be achieved by studying the opsin-based visual pigments that mediate vision. Birds vary greatly in colour, but opsin gene coding sequences and associated visual pigment spectral sensitivities are known to be rather invariant across birds. Here, I studied expression of the four cone opsin genes (Lws, Rh2, Sws2 and Sws1) in 16 species of New World warblers (Parulidae). I found levels of opsin expression vary both across species and between the sexes. Across species, female, but not male Sws2 expression is associated with an index of sexual selection, plumage dichromatism. This fits predictions of classic sexual selection models, in which the sensory system changes in females, presumably impacting female preference, and co-evolves with male plumage. Expression of the opsins at the extremes of the light spectrum, Lws and Uvs, correlates with the inferred light environment occupied by the different species. Unlike opsin spectral tuning, regulation of opsin gene expression allows for fast adaptive evolution of the visual system in response to natural and sexual selection, and in particular, sex-specific selection pressures. PMID:25429020