Science.gov

Sample records for dynamically generated open

  1. Automatic Generation of OpenMP Directives and Its Application to Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry; Jin, Haoqiang; Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shared-memory programming model is a very effective way to achieve parallelism on shared memory parallel computers. As great progress was made in hardware and software technologies, performance of parallel programs with compiler directives has demonstrated large improvement. The introduction of OpenMP directives, the industrial standard for shared-memory programming, has minimized the issue of portability. In this study, we have extended CAPTools, a computer-aided parallelization toolkit, to automatically generate OpenMP-based parallel programs with nominal user assistance. We outline techniques used in the implementation of the tool and discuss the application of this tool on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks and several computational fluid dynamics codes. This work demonstrates the great potential of using the tool to quickly port parallel programs and also achieve good performance that exceeds some of the commercial tools.

  2. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  3. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  4. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  5. Nonlinear vortex dynamics in open nonequilibrium systems with bulk mass loss and a generation mechanism for tornadoes and typhoons

    SciTech Connect

    Pashitskii, E. A.

    2010-06-15

    Based on a general model of nonlinear vortex dynamics in open thermodynamically nonequilibrium systems with bulk or surface mass losses, an analysis is presented of the mechanism of generation of violent atmospheric vortices (tornadoes, typhoons, cyclones) associated with the formation of deep cloud systems by intense condensation of water vapor from moist air cooled below the dew point. Simple particular solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations are found that describe both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric incompressible vortex motions involving radial and vertical flows with viscous dissipation vanishing identically everywhere except for a thin shear layer at the boundary of the condensation region. It is shown that the nonlinear convective and local Coriolis forces generated by radial inflow in the presence of a background vorticity due to a global Coriolis force (the Earth's rotation) accelerate the solid-body rotation in the vortex core either exponentially or in a nonlinear regime of finite-time blow-up. Due to updrafts, such a vortex is characterized by a strong helicity. This mechanism explains a number of observed properties and characteristics of the structure and evolution of tornadoes and typhoons. Upper estimates are found for the kinetic energies of violent atmospheric vortices. It is shown that increase in rotational kinetic energy of atmospheric vortices with constant vortex-core radii is consistent with energy and momentum conservation, because radial inflow continually supplies the required amount of rotational kinetic energy drawn from the ambient atmosphere to an open system.

  6. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sablić, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  7. Baryons with open beauty dynamically generated from meson-baryon interaction in the extended local hidden gauge approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wei-Hong; Xiao, C. W.; Oset, E.

    2016-05-01

    In this talk we review the results about the interaction of B ¯N , B ¯Δ, B ¯*N and B ¯*Δ states with beauty B = 1, together with their coupled channels, using the extended local hidden gauge approach. The Λb(5912) and Λb(5920) observed in the experiment are dynamically generated from the meson-baryon interaction, and they couple mostly to B ¯*N , which are degenerate with the Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction. In addition, three more states with I = 0 and eight more states with I = 1 are predicted.

  8. Dynamical Mass Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bashir, A.; Raya, A.

    2006-09-25

    Understanding the origin of mass, in particular that of the fermions, is one of the most uncanny problems which lie at the very frontiers of particle physics. Although the celebrated Standard Model accommodates these masses in a gauge invariant fashion, it fails to predict their values. Moreover, the mass thus generated accounts for only a very small percentage of the mass which permeates the visible universe. Most of the observed mass is accounted for by the strong interactions which bind quarks into protons and neutrons. How does that exactly happen in its quantitative details is still an unsolved mystery. Lattice formulation of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) or continuum studies of its Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDEs) are two of the non-perturbative means to try to unravel how quarks, starting from negligible current masses can acquire enormously large constituent masses to account for the observed proton and neutron masses. Analytical studies of SDEs in this context are extremely hard as one has to resort to truncation schemes whose quantitative reliability can be established only after a very careful analysis. Let alone the far more complicated realm of QCD, arriving at reliable truncation schemes in simpler scenarios such as quantum electrodynamics (QED) has also proved to be a hard nut to crack. In the last years, there has been an increasing group of physicists in Mexico which is taking up the challenge of understanding how the dynamical generation of mass can be understood in a reliable way through SDEs of gauge theories in various contexts such as (i) in arbitrary space-time dimensions d as well as d {<=} 4 (ii) finite temperatures and (ii) in the presence of magnetic fields. In this article, we summarise some of this work.

  9. Dynamics of an open metabolic cycle at the surface of a charged membrane II. Multiple steady states and oscillatory behavior generated by electric repulsion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulliert, Guillermo; Kellershohn, Nicolas; Ricard, Jacques

    1990-12-01

    If an open metabolic cycle, made up with two antagonistic enzyme reactions, takes place at the surface of a charged membrane, the electric partitioning of the two charged reaction intermediates may generate the existence of three steady states. Two of these steady states are stable and another one is unstable. This means that the steady-state concentration of the reaction intermediate, S 1, may display a hysteresis loop when plotted versus the input rate of matter in the system. Similarly there exists a hysteresis loop of the electric potential at the surface of the membrane when the input rate of matter is varied. This type of dynamic behavior implies that the open multi-enzyme system is able to sense not only the intensity of a chemical signal (the input rate) but also the direction of variation of this signal, that is, whether this signal is being increased, or decreased. Another remarkable property of electric partitioning of charged reaction intermediates is that when increasing the substrate concentration, the local pH in the membrane rises. If the reaction rate of the bound enzyme decreases under the these conditions, the overall system may display sustained oscillations and limit cycle of the two reaction intermediates, as well as of the electric partition coefficient. The existence of sustained oscillations at the surface of the membrane may be viewed as a device which increases the efficiency of the metabolic cycle. These remarkable nonlinear properties of the open enzyme network are not properties of the enzyme network but of the partitioning of the reaction intermediates in the network.

  10. Generational Dynamics and Librarianship: Managing Generation X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Julie F.; Cooper, Eric A.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the abilities of Generation X (individuals born 1961 to 1981) librarians to respond to the evolving needs of society. Highlights include age demographics, generational attributes, technology, and the seniority system. (PEN)

  11. Open Sesame: a new generation journal

    PubMed Central

    Bhui, Kamaldeep; Malhi, Gin S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Royal College of Psychiatrists welcomes you to its newest peer-reviewed research journal, British Journal of Psychiatry Open (BJPsych Open), which has been created to maximise the College’s efforts to publish and disseminate the most exciting and progressive research in psychiatry and allied disciplines. BJPsych Open will maintain the same high quality standards established by the British Journal of Psychiatry (BJPsych). As an online journal without print restrictions, BJPsych Open will be able to publish many more excellent articles and article types not currently accommodated within BJPsych. The breadth of BJPsych Open is outlined in ‘What we publish’ and its strength is realised in our first issue, ‘Powerful papers’. As editors, we welcome both your submissions and comments as our new generation journal grows. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  12. Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, T.; Friefeld, Jerry M.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Space Station Freedom solar dynamic power generation are presented. Topics covered include: prime contract activity; key solar dynamic power module requirements; solar dynamic heat receiver technology; and solar concentrator advanced development.

  13. OCSEGen: Open Components and Systems Environment Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkachuk, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    To analyze a large system, one often needs to break it into smaller components.To analyze a component or unit under analysis, one needs to model its context of execution, called environment, which represents the components with which the unit interacts. Environment generation is a challenging problem, because the environment needs to be general enough to uncover unit errors, yet precise enough to make the analysis tractable. In this paper, we present a tool for automated environment generation for open components and systems. The tool, called OCSEGen, is implemented on top of the Soot framework. We present the tool's current support and discuss its possible future extensions.

  14. Colloquium: Non-Markovian dynamics in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry, and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markovian stochastic process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modeled phenomenologically by means of a dynamical semigroup with a corresponding time-independent generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics of the open system typically leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence, correlations, and entanglement. Here recent theoretical results on the rich non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems are discussed, paying particular attention to the rigorous mathematical definition, to the physical interpretation and classification, as well as to the quantification of quantum memory effects. The general theory is illustrated by a series of physical examples. The analysis reveals that memory effects of the open system dynamics reflect characteristic features of the environment which opens a new perspective for applications, namely, to exploit a small open system as a quantum probe signifying nontrivial features of the environment it is interacting with. This Colloquium further explores the various physical sources of non-Markovian quantum dynamics, such as structured environmental spectral densities, nonlocal correlations between environmental degrees of freedom, and correlations in the initial system-environment state, in addition to developing schemes for their local detection. Recent experiments addressing the detection, quantification, and control of

  15. CISweb: Dynamically Generated Reference for a Clinical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Banken, J; Lober, WB; Love, E; Gossett, A; Lowry, D

    2001-01-01

    We devised a method of producing dynamically generated reference material based on flexible templates. Our open source system allows modification of an entire website through a user-friendly interface to a database. This model has multiple other applications in developing informational /educational websites.

  16. Dynamics of Mouth Opening in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jason A; Hyland, Callen; Steele, Robert E; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2016-03-01

    Hydra, a simple freshwater animal famous for its regenerative capabilities, must tear a hole through its epithelial tissue each time it opens its mouth. The feeding response of Hydra has been well-characterized physiologically and is regarded as a classical model system for environmental chemical biology. However, due to a lack of in vivo labeling and imaging tools, the biomechanics of mouth opening have remained completely unexplored. We take advantage of the availability of transgenic Hydra lines to perform the first dynamical analysis, to our knowledge, of Hydra mouth opening and test existing hypotheses regarding the underlying cellular mechanisms. Through cell position and shape tracking, we show that mouth opening is accompanied by changes in cell shape, but not cellular rearrangements as previously suggested. Treatment with a muscle relaxant impairs mouth opening, supporting the hypothesis that mouth opening is an active process driven by radial contractile processes (myonemes) in the ectoderm. Furthermore, we find that all events exhibit the same relative rate of opening. Because one individual can open consecutively to different amounts, this suggests that the degree of mouth opening is controlled through neuronal signaling. Finally, from the opening dynamics and independent measurements of the elastic properties of the tissues, we estimate the forces exerted by the myonemes to be on the order of a few nanoNewtons. Our study provides the first dynamical framework, to our knowledge, for understanding the remarkable plasticity of the Hydra mouth and illustrates that Hydra is a powerful system for quantitative biomechanical studies of cell and tissue behaviors in vivo.

  17. Dynamic Participation in Interdistrict Open Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavery, Lesley; Carlson, Deven

    2015-01-01

    Interdistrict open enrollment is the nation's largest and most widespread school choice program, but our knowledge of these programs is limited. Drawing on 5 years of student-level data from the universe of public school attendees in Colorado, we perform a three-stage analysis to examine the dynamics of student participation in the state's…

  18. Experimental serpentinization of dunite cores at 150-200ºC and 150 bar: Importance of open system dynamics for hydrogen generation and stabilization of ferric-rich serpentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Tutolo, B. M.; Bagley, B. C.; Mildner, D. F. R.; Seyfried, W. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic processes often exhume mantle peridotite to environments near the Earth's surface, where serpentinization occurs and involves the hydration of peridotite at relatively low temperatures. This process oxidizes ferrous iron in olivine, which produces hydrogen (H2), creating environments that are conducive to abiotic synthesis of organic compounds and H2-based microbial communities. To understand better chemical and physical processes associated with serpentinization, two flow-through experiments (>30 days) were conducted at 150 and 200°C and 150 bar on intact dunite cores. Permeability decreased by a factor of 31 during the 200°C experiment, more than an order of magnitude larger than that at 150°C. Furthermore, H2 and methane concentrations exceeded 600 µmol/kg and 300 µmol/kg during the 200°C experiment, and were one and two orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than the 150°C experiment. H2 was primarily generated during the conversion of olivine to ferric serpentine at 200°C, since vibrating sample magnetometer analysis indicated little to no magnetite production. Secondary mineralization was identified on the core from this experiment, but X-ray computed tomography scans indicated little change. Furthermore, (ultra) small-angle neutron scattering datasets indicated that any change in nano-porosity and surface area was smaller than the natural variability of the dunite. Even though there was little evidence of alteration, the initial stage of serpentinization at 200°C was sufficient to produce a dramatic effect on flow fields in the core. Furthermore, this experiment generated significant dissolved H2 concentrations, while simulating open system dynamics. Thus, the experimental data provide insight on mass transfer processes in open geochemical systems, which effectively prevent highly elevated H2 concentrations due to continual loss. We speculate that this process is responsible for stabilizing unusually ferric-rich serpentine in nature.

  19. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  20. Open Automated Demand Response Dynamic Pricing Technologies and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Koch, Ed; Hennage, Dan

    2010-08-02

    This study examines the use of OpenADR communications specification, related data models, technologies, and strategies to send dynamic prices (e.g., real time prices and peak prices) and Time of Use (TOU) rates to commercial and industrial electricity customers. OpenADR v1.0 is a Web services-based flexible, open information model that has been used in California utilities' commercial automated demand response programs since 2007. We find that data models can be used to send real time prices. These same data models can also be used to support peak pricing and TOU rates. We present a data model that can accommodate all three types of rates. For demonstration purposes, the data models were generated from California Independent System Operator's real-time wholesale market prices, and a California utility's dynamic prices and TOU rates. Customers can respond to dynamic prices by either using the actual prices, or prices can be mapped into"operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different methods for mapping actual prices. Some of these methods were implemented in demonstration projects. The study results demonstrate show that OpenADR allows interoperability with existing/future systems/technologies and can be used within related dynamic pricing activities within Smart Grid.

  1. Towards a Theory of Metastability in Open Quantum Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Macieszczak, Katarzyna; Guţă, Mădălin; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P

    2016-06-17

    By generalizing concepts from classical stochastic dynamics, we establish the basis for a theory of metastability in Markovian open quantum systems. Partial relaxation into long-lived metastable states-distinct from the asymptotic stationary state-is a manifestation of a separation of time scales due to a splitting in the spectrum of the generator of the dynamics. We show here how to exploit this spectral structure to obtain a low dimensional approximation to the dynamics in terms of motion in a manifold of metastable states constructed from the low-lying eigenmatrices of the generator. We argue that the metastable manifold is in general composed of disjoint states, noiseless subsystems, and decoherence-free subspaces.

  2. Automatic Generation of Audio Content for Open Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brasher, Andrew; McAndrew, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how digital talking books (DTBs) with embedded functionality for learners can be generated from content structured according to the OU OpenLearn schema. It includes examples showing how a software transformation developed from open source components can be used to remix OpenLearn content, and discusses issues concerning the…

  3. Osmosis-based pressure generation: dynamics and application.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Brandon R; Schroeder, Thomas B H; Li, Suyi; Billeh, Yazan N; Wang, K W; Mayer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes osmotically-driven pressure generation in a membrane-bound compartment while taking into account volume expansion, solute dilution, surface area to volume ratio, membrane hydraulic permeability, and changes in osmotic gradient, bulk modulus, and degree of membrane fouling. The emphasis lies on the dynamics of pressure generation; these dynamics have not previously been described in detail. Experimental results are compared to and supported by numerical simulations, which we make accessible as an open source tool. This approach reveals unintuitive results about the quantitative dependence of the speed of pressure generation on the relevant and interdependent parameters that will be encountered in most osmotically-driven pressure generators. For instance, restricting the volume expansion of a compartment allows it to generate its first 5 kPa of pressure seven times faster than without a restraint. In addition, this dynamics study shows that plants are near-ideal osmotic pressure generators, as they are composed of many small compartments with large surface area to volume ratios and strong cell wall reinforcements. Finally, we demonstrate two applications of an osmosis-based pressure generator: actuation of a soft robot and continuous volume delivery over long periods of time. Both applications do not need an external power source but rather take advantage of the energy released upon watering the pressure generators.

  4. Osmosis-Based Pressure Generation: Dynamics and Application

    PubMed Central

    Li, Suyi; Billeh, Yazan N.; Wang, K. W.; Mayer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes osmotically-driven pressure generation in a membrane-bound compartment while taking into account volume expansion, solute dilution, surface area to volume ratio, membrane hydraulic permeability, and changes in osmotic gradient, bulk modulus, and degree of membrane fouling. The emphasis lies on the dynamics of pressure generation; these dynamics have not previously been described in detail. Experimental results are compared to and supported by numerical simulations, which we make accessible as an open source tool. This approach reveals unintuitive results about the quantitative dependence of the speed of pressure generation on the relevant and interdependent parameters that will be encountered in most osmotically-driven pressure generators. For instance, restricting the volume expansion of a compartment allows it to generate its first 5 kPa of pressure seven times faster than without a restraint. In addition, this dynamics study shows that plants are near-ideal osmotic pressure generators, as they are composed of many small compartments with large surface area to volume ratios and strong cell wall reinforcements. Finally, we demonstrate two applications of an osmosis-based pressure generator: actuation of a soft robot and continuous volume delivery over long periods of time. Both applications do not need an external power source but rather take advantage of the energy released upon watering the pressure generators. PMID:24614529

  5. The dynamics of laser droplet generation.

    PubMed

    Krese, Blaz; Perc, Matjaz; Govekar, Edvard

    2010-03-01

    We propose an experimental setup allowing for the characterization of laser droplet generation in terms of the underlying dynamics, primarily showing that the latter is deterministically chaotic by means of nonlinear time series analysis methods. In particular, we use a laser pulse to melt the end of a properly fed vertically placed metal wire. Due to the interplay of surface tension, gravity force, and light-metal interaction, undulating pendant droplets are formed at the molten end, which eventually completely detach from the wire as a consequence of their increasing mass. We capture the dynamics of this process by employing a high-speed infrared camera, thereby indirectly measuring the temperature of the wire end and the pendant droplets. The time series is subsequently generated as the mean value over the pixel intensity of every infrared snapshot. Finally, we employ methods of nonlinear time series analysis to reconstruct the phase space from the observed variable and test it against determinism and stationarity. After establishing that the observed laser droplet generation is a deterministic and dynamically stationary process, we calculate the spectra of Lyapunov exponents. We obtain a positive largest Lyapunov exponent and a negative divergence, i.e., sum of all the exponents, thus indicating that the observed dynamics is deterministically chaotic with an attractor as solution in the phase space. In addition to characterizing the dynamics of laser droplet generation, we outline industrial applications of the process and point out the significance of our findings for future attempts at mathematical modeling.

  6. Electric voltage generation by antiferromagnetic dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamane, Yuta; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Sinova, Jairo

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically demonstrate dc and ac electric voltage generation due to spin motive forces originating from domain wall motion and magnetic resonance, respectively, in two-sublattice antiferromagnets. Our theory accounts for the canting between the sublattice magnetizations, the nonadiabatic electron spin dynamics, and the Rashba spin-orbit coupling, with the intersublattice electron dynamics treated as a perturbation. This work suggests a way to observe and explore the dynamics of antiferromagnetic textures by electrical means, an important aspect in the emerging field of antiferromagnetic spintronics, where both manipulation and detection of antiferromagnets are needed.

  7. Open dynamic behaviour of financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, F. F.; Gong, F. X.; Gong, F. Y.

    2006-02-01

    Open dynamic behaviour of financial markets with internal interactions between agents and with external “fields” from other systems are investigated using the approach of Grossman and Stiglitz for inefficient markets, and Keynes for interference of the market using physics of finance (referred to hereafter as phynance). The simulation results indicate that the NYSE data analyzed in Plerou, V. et al., Nature 421, 130 (2003) can be fitted by an equation of order parameter Φ and local deviation R of type: -(R+0.03) Φ+ 0.6 Φ3 + 0.02 = 0, which is shown to be in remarkable agreement with Plerou's data.

  8. Open Source, Meet "User-Generated Science"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huwe, Terence K.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses Research Blogging, a community-run nonprofit organization that is promoting a suite of blogging software to scholars. Research Blogging itself does two things. First, it extends an invitation to a community, and it is open to anyone. Second, it requires its users to follow guidelines. The combination of rigorous guidelines…

  9. Dynamics and thermodynamics of open chemical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Massimiliano

    Open chemical networks (OCN) are large sets of coupled chemical reactions where some of the species are chemostated (i.e. continuously restored from the environment). Cell metabolism is a notable example of OCN. Two results will be presented. First, dissipation in OCN operating in nonequilibrium steady-states strongly depends on the network topology (algebraic properties of the stoichiometric matrix). An application to oligosaccharides exchange dynamics performed by so-called D-enzymes will be provided. Second, at low concentration the dissipation of OCN is in general inaccurately predicted by deterministic dynamics (i.e. nonlinear rate equations for the species concentrations). In this case a description in terms of the chemical master equation is necessary. A notable exception is provided by so-called deficiency zero networks, i.e. chemical networks with no hidden cycles present in the graph of reactant complexes.

  10. Dynamics of Open DNA Sliding Clamps.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    A range of enzymes in DNA replication and repair bind to DNA-clamps: torus-shaped proteins that encircle double-stranded DNA and act as mobile tethers. Clamps from viruses (such as gp45 from the T4 bacteriophage) and eukaryotes (PCNAs) are homotrimers, each protomer containing two repeats of the DNA-clamp motif, while bacterial clamps (pol III β) are homodimers, each protomer containing three DNA-clamp motifs. Clamps need to be flexible enough to allow opening and loading onto primed DNA by clamp loader complexes. Equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study DNA-clamp conformation in open and closed forms. The E. coli and PCNA clamps appear to prefer closed, planar conformations. Remarkably, gp45 appears to prefer an open right-handed spiral conformation in solution, in agreement with previously reported biophysical data. The structural preferences of DNA clamps in solution have implications for understanding the duty cycle of clamp-loaders. PMID:27148748

  11. Dynamics of Open DNA Sliding Clamps

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    A range of enzymes in DNA replication and repair bind to DNA-clamps: torus-shaped proteins that encircle double-stranded DNA and act as mobile tethers. Clamps from viruses (such as gp45 from the T4 bacteriophage) and eukaryotes (PCNAs) are homotrimers, each protomer containing two repeats of the DNA-clamp motif, while bacterial clamps (pol III β) are homodimers, each protomer containing three DNA-clamp motifs. Clamps need to be flexible enough to allow opening and loading onto primed DNA by clamp loader complexes. Equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study DNA-clamp conformation in open and closed forms. The E. coli and PCNA clamps appear to prefer closed, planar conformations. Remarkably, gp45 appears to prefer an open right-handed spiral conformation in solution, in agreement with previously reported biophysical data. The structural preferences of DNA clamps in solution have implications for understanding the duty cycle of clamp-loaders. PMID:27148748

  12. Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Ran; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Zeno effect shows that frequent observations can slow down or even stop the unitary time evolution of an unstable quantum system. This effect can also be regarded as a physical consequence of the statistical indistinguishability of neighboring quantum states. The accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics under unitary time evolution can be quantitatively estimated by quantum Zeno time in terms of Fisher information. In this work, we investigate the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems by calculating noisy Fisher information when a trace preserving and completely positive map is assumed. We firstly study the consequences of non-Markovian noise on quantum Zeno effect and give the exact forms of the dissipative Fisher information and the quantum Zeno time. Then, for the operator-sum representation, an achievable upper bound of the quantum Zeno time is given with the help of the results in noisy quantum metrology. It is of significance that the noise reducing the accuracy in the entanglement-enhanced parameter estimation can conversely be favorable for the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics of entangled states. PMID:26099840

  13. Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Ran; Fan, Heng

    2015-06-23

    Quantum Zeno effect shows that frequent observations can slow down or even stop the unitary time evolution of an unstable quantum system. This effect can also be regarded as a physical consequence of the statistical indistinguishability of neighboring quantum states. The accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics under unitary time evolution can be quantitatively estimated by quantum Zeno time in terms of Fisher information. In this work, we investigate the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems by calculating noisy Fisher information when a trace preserving and completely positive map is assumed. We firstly study the consequences of non-Markovian noise on quantum Zeno effect and give the exact forms of the dissipative Fisher information and the quantum Zeno time. Then, for the operator-sum representation, an achievable upper bound of the quantum Zeno time is given with the help of the results in noisy quantum metrology. It is of significance that the noise reducing the accuracy in the entanglement-enhanced parameter estimation can conversely be favorable for the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics of entangled states.

  14. Dynamic Open Inquiry Performances of High-School Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Sadeh, Irit

    2010-01-01

    In examining open inquiry projects among high-school biology students, we found dynamic inquiry performances expressed in two criteria: "changes occurring during inquiry" and "procedural understanding". Characterizing performances in a dynamic open inquiry project can shed light on both the procedural and epistemological scientific understanding…

  15. Dynamical gap generation in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    We developed a quantum field theoretical description for the surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators. Within the relativistic quantum field theory formulation, we investigated the dynamics of low-lying surface states in an applied transverse magnetic field. We argued that, by taking into account quantum fluctuations, in three-dimensional topological insulators there is dynamical generation of a gap by a rearrangement of the Dirac sea. By comparing with available experimental data we found that our theoretical results allowed a consistent and coherent description of the Landau level spectrum of the surface low-lying excitations. Finally, we showed that the recently detected zero-Hall plateau at the charge neutral point could be accounted for by chiral edge states residing at the magnetic domain boundaries between the top and bottom surfaces of the three-dimensional topological insulator.

  16. 33. Lower level, ballistic gas generator at left (opens launcher ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Lower level, ballistic gas generator at left (opens launcher door during launch), LDB panel at right - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility, On County Road T512, south of Exit 116 off I-90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  17. Adversarial inferencing for generating dynamic adversary behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surman, Joshua M.; Hillman, Robert G.; Santos, Eugene, Jr.

    2003-09-01

    In the current world environment, the rapidly changing dynamics of organizational adversaries are increasing the difficulty for Military Analysts and Planners to accurately predict potential actions. As an integral part of the planning process, we need to assess our planning strategies against the range of potential adversarial actions. This dynamic world environment has established a necessity to develop tools to assist in establishing hypotheses for future adversary actions. Our research investigated the feasibility to utilize an adversarial tool as the core element within a predictive simulation to establish emergent adversarial behavior. It is our desire to use this intelligent adversary to generate alternative futures in performing Course of Action (COA) analysis. Such a system will allow planners to gauge and evaluate the effectiveness of alternative plans under varying actions and reactions. This research focuses on one of many possible techniques required to address the technical challenge of generating intelligent adversary behaviors. This development activity addresses two research components. First, establish an environment in which to perform the feasibility experiment and analysis. The proof of concept performed to analyze and assess this feasibility of utilizing an adversarial inferencing system to provide emergent adversary behavior is discussed. Second, determine if the appropriate interfaces can be reasonably established to provide integration with an existing force structure simulation framework. The authors also describe the envisioned simulation system and the software development performed to extend the inferencing engine and system interface toward that goal. The experimental results of observing emergent adversary behavior by applying the simulated COAs to the adversary model will be discussed. The research addresses numerous technological challenges in developing the necessary methodologies and tools for a software-based COA analysis

  18. A platform for dynamic simulation and control of movement based on OpenSim and MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Misagh; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A

    2012-05-11

    Numerical simulations play an important role in solving complex engineering problems and have the potential to revolutionize medical decision making and treatment strategies. In this paper, we combine the rapid model-based design, control systems and powerful numerical method strengths of MATLAB/Simulink with the simulation and human movement dynamics strengths of OpenSim by developing a new interface between the two software tools. OpenSim is integrated with Simulink using the MATLAB S-function mechanism, and the interface is demonstrated using both open-loop and closed-loop control systems. While the open-loop system uses MATLAB/Simulink to separately reproduce the OpenSim Forward Dynamics Tool, the closed-loop system adds the unique feature of feedback control to OpenSim, which is necessary for most human movement simulations. An arm model example was successfully used in both open-loop and closed-loop cases. For the open-loop case, the simulation reproduced results from the OpenSim Forward Dynamics Tool with root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.03° for the shoulder elevation angle and 0.06° for the elbow flexion angle. MATLAB's variable step-size integrator reduced the time required to generate the forward dynamic simulation from 7.1s (OpenSim) to 2.9s (MATLAB). For the closed-loop case, a proportional-integral-derivative controller was used to successfully balance a pole on model's hand despite random force disturbances on the pole. The new interface presented here not only integrates the OpenSim and MATLAB/Simulink software tools, but also will allow neuroscientists, physiologists, biomechanists, and physical therapists to adapt and generate new solutions as treatments for musculoskeletal conditions.

  19. Open Source Next Generation Visualization Software for Interplanetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Rinker, George

    2016-01-01

    Mission control is evolving quickly, driven by the requirements of new missions, and enabled by modern computing capabilities. Distributed operations, access to data anywhere, data visualization for spacecraft analysis that spans multiple data sources, flexible reconfiguration to support multiple missions, and operator use cases, are driving the need for new capabilities. NASA's Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System (AMMOS), Ames Research Center (ARC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are collaborating to build a new generation of mission operations software for visualization, to enable mission control anywhere, on the desktop, tablet and phone. The software is built on an open source platform that is open for contributions (http://nasa.github.io/openmct).

  20. The new generation of OpenGL support in ROOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadel, M.

    2008-07-01

    OpenGL has been promoted to become the main 3D rendering engine of the ROOT framework. This required a major re-modularization of OpenGL support on all levels, from basic window-system specific interface to medium-level object-representation and top-level scene management. This new architecture allows seamless integration of external scene-graph libraries into the ROOT OpenGL viewer as well as inclusion of ROOT 3D scenes into external GUI and OpenGL-based 3D-rendering frameworks. Scene representation was removed from inside of the viewer, allowing scene-data to be shared among several viewers and providing for a natural implementation of multi-view canvas layouts. The object-graph traversal infrastructure allows free mixing of 3D and 2D-pad graphics and makes implementation of ROOT canvas in pure OpenGL possible. Scene-elements representing ROOT objects trigger automatic instantiation of user-provided rendering-objects based on the dictionary information and class-naming convention. Additionally, a finer, per-object control over scene-updates is available to the user, allowing overhead-free maintenance of dynamic 3D scenes and creation of complex real-time animations. User-input handling was modularized as well, making it easy to support application-specific scene navigation, selection handling and tool management.

  1. Dynamical generation of the top quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovic, Marko Berislav

    2002-09-01

    I study new physics theories in which the observed mass of the heaviest elementary particle, the top quark, is a result of a dynamical mechanism at the subatomic level. The same mechanism needs to explain the transition of the effective physical description at the largest space-time scales to that at smaller scales. This large-scale description is characterized by non-zero masses for most of the elementary particles and the existence of the familiar electromagnetic interactions. The description at smaller space-time scales is characterized by the presence of a richer set of fundamental interactions, including weak and hypercharge interactions, as well as no masses for the particles. As a minimal consequence of this transition, particle theories commonly predict the existence of a still unobserved particle, called the Higgs, at the largest scales. New physics considered in this thesis includes the following: (1) Models with new fundamental interactions that select the top quark and give an exclusive role to its dynamical mass generation mechanism. I propose one such model, discuss current experimental constraints, and suggest future tests of this idea. (2) Models with new spin one-half particles, not sensitive to the weak interactions, that mix with ordinary particles, including the top quark. I discuss the phenomenology, i.e., analyze data from particle colliders, and set limits on the parameters of the models. (3) Models with new spin one-half particles, sensitive to the weak interactions, that mix with ordinary particles. I propose the model structure, discuss some of its phenomenology, and suggest further tests of this idea at linear particle accelerators. Finally, I analyze the connection between the Higgs mass (m H) and the space-time scale at which the above-mentioned transition occurs. Without introducing new physics at the smallest scales, I show that due to the very large top mass, the standard description with the Higgs particle fails at small scales

  2. Digital computer program for generating dynamic turbofan engine models (DIGTEM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniele, C. J.; Krosel, S. M.; Szuch, J. R.; Westerkamp, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes DIGTEM, a digital computer program that simulates two spool, two-stream turbofan engines. The turbofan engine model in DIGTEM contains steady-state performance maps for all of the components and has control volumes where continuity and energy balances are maintained. Rotor dynamics and duct momentum dynamics are also included. Altogether there are 16 state variables and state equations. DIGTEM features a backward-differnce integration scheme for integrating stiff systems. It trims the model equations to match a prescribed design point by calculating correction coefficients that balance out the dynamic equations. It uses the same coefficients at off-design points and iterates to a balanced engine condition. Transients can also be run. They are generated by defining controls as a function of time (open-loop control) in a user-written subroutine (TMRSP). DIGTEM has run on the IBM 370/3033 computer using implicit integration with time steps ranging from 1.0 msec to 1.0 sec. DIGTEM is generalized in the aerothermodynamic treatment of components.

  3. Investigating non-Markovian dynamics of quantum open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yusui

    Quantum open system coupled to a non-Markovian environment has recently attracted widespread interest for its important applications in quantum information processing and quantum dissipative systems. New phenomena induced by the non-Markovian environment have been discovered in variety of research areas ranging from quantum optics, quantum decoherence to condensed matter physics. However, the study of the non-Markovian quantum open system is known a difficult problem due to its technical complexity in deriving the fundamental equation of motion and elusive conceptual issues involving non-equilibrium dynamics for a strong coupled environment. The main purpose of this thesis is to introduce several new techniques of solving the quantum open systems including a systematic approach to dealing with non-Markovian master equations from a generic quantum-state diffusion (QSD) equation. In the first part of this thesis, we briefly introduce the non-Markovian quantum-state diffusion approach, and illustrate some pronounced non-Markovian quantum effects through numerical investigation on a cavity-QED model. Then we extend the non-Markovian QSD theory to an interesting model where the environment has a hierarchical structure, and find out the exact non-Markovian QSD equation of this model system. We observe the generation of quantum entanglement due to the interplay between the non-Markovian environment and the cavity. In the second part, we show an innovative method to obtain the exact non-Markovian master equations for a set of generic quantum open systems based on the corresponding non-Markovian QSD equations. Multiple-qubit systems and multilevel systems are discussed in details as two typical examples. Particularly, we derive the exact master equation for a model consisting of a three-level atom coupled to an optical cavity and controlled by an external laser field. Additionally, we discuss in more general context the mathematical similarity between the multiple

  4. Modeling community population dynamics with the open-source language R.

    PubMed

    Green, Robin; Shou, Wenying

    2014-01-01

    The ability to explain biological phenomena with mathematics and to generate predictions from mathematical models is critical for understanding and controlling natural systems. Concurrently, the rise in open-source software has greatly increased the ease at which researchers can implement their own mathematical models. With a reasonably sound understanding of mathematics and programming skills, a researcher can quickly and easily use such tools for their own work. The purpose of this chapter is to expose the reader to one such tool, the open-source programming language R, and to demonstrate its practical application to studying population dynamics. We use the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey dynamics as an example.

  5. Open science: Investigating precipitation cycles in dynamically downscaled data using openly available radar data and open source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collis, Scott; helmus, Jonathan; Kotamarthi, Rao; Wang, Jiali; Feng, Yan; Ghate, Virendra

    2016-04-01

    In order to assess infrastructure resilience to climate change in urban centers, climate model output is needed at spatial resolutions required for urban planning. This is most commonly achieved using either empirical or dynamic downscaling at present. The utility of these downscaling methods for assessments depends on having estimates of biases in the models estimate climate variables and their extremes, surface temperature and precipitation as an example, developed using historical data sets. Since precipitation is a multi-scale stochastic process direct comparison with observations is challenging and even modern data sets work at scales too coarse to capture extreme events. Gauge data requires a direct hit by a storm to see the highest rain rates, often leading to an underestimation in the 1-100 year rainfall. This is exacerbated by phenomena such as training that can cause very high gradients in accumulation. This presentation details a long-term (multi-year) study of precipitation derived from open data from the NOAA Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) network. Two locations are studied; Portland, Maine, location for a pilot study conducted by the US Department of Homeland Security's on regional resilience to climate change and the Southern Great Plains of Oklahoma, home to the Department of Energy's ARM program. Both are located within 40km of a NEXRAD radar allowing retrievals of rainfall rates on the order of one kilometer using the Python-ARM Radar Toolkit (Py-ART). Both the diurnal and season cycle of precipitation is studied and compared to WRF dynamically downscaled precipitation rates. This project makes heavy use of open source community tools such as project Jupyter and the Scientific Python ecosystem to manage and process 10's of TB of data on midrange cluster infrastructure. Both the meteorological aspects and the data infrastructure and architecture will be discussed.

  6. Generating optimal control simulations of musculoskeletal movement using OpenSim and MATLAB

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Leng-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling, simulation and optimization are powerful tools that have seen increased use in biomechanics research. Dynamic optimizations can be categorized as either data-tracking or predictive problems. The data-tracking approach has been used extensively to address human movement problems of clinical relevance. The predictive approach also holds great promise, but has seen limited use in clinical applications. Enhanced software tools would facilitate the application of predictive musculoskeletal simulations to clinically-relevant research. The open-source software OpenSim provides tools for generating tracking simulations but not predictive simulations. However, OpenSim includes an extensive application programming interface that permits extending its capabilities with scripting languages such as MATLAB. In the work presented here, we combine the computational tools provided by MATLAB with the musculoskeletal modeling capabilities of OpenSim to create a framework for generating predictive simulations of musculoskeletal movement based on direct collocation optimal control techniques. In many cases, the direct collocation approach can be used to solve optimal control problems considerably faster than traditional shooting methods. Cyclical and discrete movement problems were solved using a simple 1 degree of freedom musculoskeletal model and a model of the human lower limb, respectively. The problems could be solved in reasonable amounts of time (several seconds to 1–2 hours) using the open-source IPOPT solver. The problems could also be solved using the fmincon solver that is included with MATLAB, but the computation times were excessively long for all but the smallest of problems. The performance advantage for IPOPT was derived primarily by exploiting sparsity in the constraints Jacobian. The framework presented here provides a powerful and flexible approach for generating optimal control simulations of musculoskeletal movement using OpenSim and MATLAB

  7. Generating optimal control simulations of musculoskeletal movement using OpenSim and MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Leng-Feng; Umberger, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling, simulation and optimization are powerful tools that have seen increased use in biomechanics research. Dynamic optimizations can be categorized as either data-tracking or predictive problems. The data-tracking approach has been used extensively to address human movement problems of clinical relevance. The predictive approach also holds great promise, but has seen limited use in clinical applications. Enhanced software tools would facilitate the application of predictive musculoskeletal simulations to clinically-relevant research. The open-source software OpenSim provides tools for generating tracking simulations but not predictive simulations. However, OpenSim includes an extensive application programming interface that permits extending its capabilities with scripting languages such as MATLAB. In the work presented here, we combine the computational tools provided by MATLAB with the musculoskeletal modeling capabilities of OpenSim to create a framework for generating predictive simulations of musculoskeletal movement based on direct collocation optimal control techniques. In many cases, the direct collocation approach can be used to solve optimal control problems considerably faster than traditional shooting methods. Cyclical and discrete movement problems were solved using a simple 1 degree of freedom musculoskeletal model and a model of the human lower limb, respectively. The problems could be solved in reasonable amounts of time (several seconds to 1-2 hours) using the open-source IPOPT solver. The problems could also be solved using the fmincon solver that is included with MATLAB, but the computation times were excessively long for all but the smallest of problems. The performance advantage for IPOPT was derived primarily by exploiting sparsity in the constraints Jacobian. The framework presented here provides a powerful and flexible approach for generating optimal control simulations of musculoskeletal movement using OpenSim and MATLAB. This

  8. Generating optimal control simulations of musculoskeletal movement using OpenSim and MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Lee, Leng-Feng; Umberger, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling, simulation and optimization are powerful tools that have seen increased use in biomechanics research. Dynamic optimizations can be categorized as either data-tracking or predictive problems. The data-tracking approach has been used extensively to address human movement problems of clinical relevance. The predictive approach also holds great promise, but has seen limited use in clinical applications. Enhanced software tools would facilitate the application of predictive musculoskeletal simulations to clinically-relevant research. The open-source software OpenSim provides tools for generating tracking simulations but not predictive simulations. However, OpenSim includes an extensive application programming interface that permits extending its capabilities with scripting languages such as MATLAB. In the work presented here, we combine the computational tools provided by MATLAB with the musculoskeletal modeling capabilities of OpenSim to create a framework for generating predictive simulations of musculoskeletal movement based on direct collocation optimal control techniques. In many cases, the direct collocation approach can be used to solve optimal control problems considerably faster than traditional shooting methods. Cyclical and discrete movement problems were solved using a simple 1 degree of freedom musculoskeletal model and a model of the human lower limb, respectively. The problems could be solved in reasonable amounts of time (several seconds to 1-2 hours) using the open-source IPOPT solver. The problems could also be solved using the fmincon solver that is included with MATLAB, but the computation times were excessively long for all but the smallest of problems. The performance advantage for IPOPT was derived primarily by exploiting sparsity in the constraints Jacobian. The framework presented here provides a powerful and flexible approach for generating optimal control simulations of musculoskeletal movement using OpenSim and MATLAB. This

  9. Achieving Coordination through Dynamic Construction of Open Workflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Louis; Wilson, Justin; Roman, Gruia-Catalin; Gill, Christopher

    Workflow middleware executes tasks orchestrated by rules defined in a carefully handcrafted static graph. Workflow management systems have proved effective for service-oriented business automation in stable, wired infrastructures. We introduce a radically new paradigm for workflow construction and execution called open workflow to support goal-directed coordination among physically mobile people and devices that form a transient community over an ad hoc wireless network. The quintessential feature of the open workflow paradigm is dynamic construction of custom, context-specific workflows in response to unpredictable and evolving circumstances by exploiting the knowledge and services available within a given spatiotemporal context. This paper introduces the open workflow approach, surveys open research challenges in this promising new field, and presents algorithmic, architectural, and evaluation results for the first practical realization of an open workflow management system.

  10. Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML): an open format for representing quantitative biological dynamics data

    PubMed Central

    Kyoda, Koji; Tohsato, Yukako; Ho, Kenneth H. L.; Onami, Shuichi

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Recent progress in live-cell imaging and modeling techniques has resulted in generation of a large amount of quantitative data (from experimental measurements and computer simulations) on spatiotemporal dynamics of biological objects such as molecules, cells and organisms. Although many research groups have independently dedicated their efforts to developing software tools for visualizing and analyzing these data, these tools are often not compatible with each other because of different data formats. Results: We developed an open unified format, Biological Dynamics Markup Language (BDML; current version: 0.2), which provides a basic framework for representing quantitative biological dynamics data for objects ranging from molecules to cells to organisms. BDML is based on Extensible Markup Language (XML). Its advantages are machine and human readability and extensibility. BDML will improve the efficiency of development and evaluation of software tools for data visualization and analysis. Availability and implementation: A specification and a schema file for BDML are freely available online at http://ssbd.qbic.riken.jp/bdml/. Contact: sonami@riken.jp Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25414366

  11. Dynamics of open bosonic quantum systems in coherent state representation

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, D. A. R.; Berman, G. P.; Vishik, M.

    2006-01-15

    We consider the problem of decoherence and relaxation of open bosonic quantum systems from a perspective alternative to the standard master equation or quantum trajectories approaches. Our method is based on the dynamics of expectation values of observables evaluated in a coherent state representation. We examine a model of a quantum nonlinear oscillator with a density-density interaction with a collection of environmental oscillators at finite temperature. We derive the exact solution for dynamics of observables and demonstrate a consistent perturbation approach.

  12. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Riccardo Esposito, Massimiliano; Lacoste, David

    2015-12-28

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them.

  13. Dynamics and stability of wind turbine generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.; Nolan, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    Synchronous and induction generators are considered. A comparison is made between wind turbines, steam, and hydro units. The unusual phenomena associated with wind turbines are emphasized. The general control requirements are discussed, as well as various schemes for torsional damping such as speed sensitive stabilizer and blade pitch control. Integration between adjacent wind turbines in a wind farm is also considered.

  14. Automatic code generation from the OMT-based dynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, J.; Tanaka, J.

    1996-12-31

    The OMT object-oriented software development methodology suggests creating three models of the system, i.e., object model, dynamic model and functional model. We have developed a system that automatically generates implementation code from the dynamic model. The system first represents the dynamic model as a table and then generates executable Java language code from it. We used inheritance for super-substate relationships. We considered that transitions relate to states in a state diagram exactly as operations relate to classes in an object diagram. In the generated code, each state in the state diagram becomes a class and each event on a state becomes an operation on the corresponding class. The system is implemented and can generate executable code for any state diagram. This makes the role of the dynamic model more significant and the job of designers even simpler.

  15. Automation Framework for Flight Dynamics Products Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, Robert E.; Esposito, Timothy C.; Watson, John S.; Jun, Linda; Shoan, Wendy; Matusow, Carla

    2010-01-01

    XFDS provides an easily adaptable automation platform. To date it has been used to support flight dynamics operations. It coordinates the execution of other applications such as Satellite TookKit, FreeFlyer, MATLAB, and Perl code. It provides a mechanism for passing messages among a collection of XFDS processes, and allows sending and receiving of GMSEC messages. A unified and consistent graphical user interface (GUI) is used for the various tools. Its automation configuration is stored in text files, and can be edited either directly or using the GUI.

  16. Multi-Fluid Moment Simulations of Ganymede using the Next-Generation OpenGGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Germaschewski, K.; Hakim, A.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Raeder, J.

    2015-12-01

    We coupled the multi-fluid moment code Gkeyll[1,2] to the next-generation OpenGGCM[3], and studied the reconnection dynamics at the Ganymede. This work is part of our effort to tackle the grand challenge of integrating kinetic effects into global fluid models. The multi-fluid moment model integrates kinetic effects in that it can capture crucial kinetic physics like pressure tensor effects by evolving moments of the Vlasov equations for each species. This approach has advantages over previous models: desired kinetic effects, together with other important effects like the Hall effect, are self-consistently embedded in the moment equations, and can be efficiently implemented, while not suffering from severe time-step restriction due to plasma oscillation nor artificial whistler modes. This model also handles multiple ion species naturally, which opens up opportunties in investigating the role of oxygen in magnetospheric reconnection and improved coupling to ionosphere models. In this work, the multi-fluid moment solver in Gkeyll was wrapped as a time-stepping module for the high performance, highly flexible next-generation OpenGGCM. Gkeyll is only used to provide the local plasma solver, while computational aspects like parallelization and boundary conditions are handled entirely by OpenGGCM, including interfacing to other models like ionospheric boundary conditions provided by coupling with CTIM [3]. The coupled code is used to study the dynamics near Ganymede, and the results are compared with MHD and Hall MHD results by Dorelli et al. [4]. Hakim, A. (2008). Journal of Fusion Energy, 27, 36-43. Hakim, A., Loverich, J., & Shumlak, U. (2006). Journal of Computational Physics, 219, 418-442. Raeder, J., Larson, D., Li, W., Kepko, E. L., & Fuller-Rowell, T. (2008). Space Science Reviews, 141(1-4), 535-555. Dorelli, J. C., Glocer, A., Collinson, G., & Tóth, G. (2015). Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, 120.

  17. Dynamical and thermodynamical control of Open Quantum Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco; Sinayskiy, Ilya

    2014-03-01

    Over the last few years dynamical properties and limit distributions of Open Quantum Walks (OQWs), quantum walks driven by dissipation, have been intensely studied [S. Attal et. al. J. Stat. Phys. 147, Issue 4, 832 (2012)]. For some particular cases of OQWs central limit theorems have been proven [S. Attal, N. Guillotin, C. Sabot, ``Central Limit Theorems for Open Quantum Random Walks,'' to appear in Annales Henri Poincaré]. However, only recently the connection between the rich dynamical behavior of OQWs and the corresponding microscopic system-environment models has been established. The microscopic derivation of an OQW as a reduced system dynamics on a 2-nodes graph [I. Sinayskiy, F. Petruccione, Open Syst. Inf. Dyn. 20, 1340007 (2013)] and its generalization to arbitrary graphs allow to explain the dependance of the dynamical behavior of the OQW on the temperature and coupling to the environment. For thermal environments we observe Gaussian behaviour, whereas at zero temperature population trapping and ``soliton''-like behaviour are possible. Physical realizations of OQWs in quantum optical setups will be also presented. This work is based on research supported by the South African Research Chair Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and National Research Foundation.

  18. Can Generating Representations Enhance Learning with Dynamic Visualizations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhihui Helen; Linn, Marcia C.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the impact of asking middle school students to generate drawings of their ideas about chemical reactions on integrated understanding. Students explored atomic interactions during hydrogen combustion using a dynamic visualization. The generation group drew their ideas about how the reaction takes place at the molecular level.…

  19. Fluid dynamic aspects of jet noise generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The location of the noise sources within jet flows, their relative importance to the overall radiated field, and the mechanisms by which noise generation occurs, are studied by detailed measurements of the level and spectral composition of the radiated sound in the far field. Directional microphones are used to isolate the contribution to the radiated sound of small regions of the flow, and for cross-correlation between the radiated acoustic field and either the velocity fluctuations or the pressure fluctuations in the source field. Acquired data demonstrate the supersonic convection of the acoustic field and the resulting limited upstream influence of the signal source, as well as a possible increase of signal strength as it propagates toward the centerline of the flow.

  20. Glucans monomer-exchange dynamics as an open chemical network.

    PubMed

    Rao, Riccardo; Lacoste, David; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2015-12-28

    We describe the oligosaccharides-exchange dynamics performed by the so-called D-enzymes on polysaccharides. To mimic physiological conditions, we treat this process as an open chemical network by assuming some of the polymer concentrations fixed (chemostatting). We show that three different long-time behaviors may ensue: equilibrium states, nonequilibrium steady states, and continuous growth states. We dynamically and thermodynamically characterize these states and emphasize the crucial role of conservation laws in identifying the chemostatting conditions inducing them. PMID:26723707

  1. Dynamical gauge effects in an open quantum network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    We describe new experimental techniques for simulation of high-energy field theories based on an analogy between open thermodynamic systems and effective dynamical gauge-fields following SU(2) × U(1) Yang-Mills models. By coupling near-resonant laser-modes to atoms moving in a disordered optical environment, we create an open system which exhibits a non-equilibrium phase transition between two steady-state behaviors, exhibiting scale-invariant behavior near the transition. By measuring transport of atoms through the disordered network, we observe two distinct scaling behaviors, corresponding to the classical and quantum limits for the dynamical gauge field. This behavior is loosely analogous to dynamical gauge effects in quantum chromodynamics, and can mapped onto generalized open problems in theoretical understanding of quantized non-Abelian gauge theories. Additional, the scaling behavior can be understood from the geometric structure of the gauge potential and linked to the measure of information in the local disordered potential, reflecting an underlying holographic principle. We acknowledge support from NSF Award No.1068570, and the Charles E. Kaufman Foundation.

  2. Deterministic generation of multiparticle entanglement by quantum Zeno dynamics.

    PubMed

    Barontini, Giovanni; Hohmann, Leander; Haas, Florian; Estève, Jérôme; Reichel, Jakob

    2015-09-18

    Multiparticle entangled quantum states, a key resource in quantum-enhanced metrology and computing, are usually generated by coherent operations exclusively. However, unusual forms of quantum dynamics can be obtained when environment coupling is used as part of the state generation. In this work, we used quantum Zeno dynamics (QZD), based on nondestructive measurement with an optical microcavity, to deterministically generate different multiparticle entangled states in an ensemble of 36 qubit atoms in less than 5 microseconds. We characterized the resulting states by performing quantum tomography, yielding a time-resolved account of the entanglement generation. In addition, we studied the dependence of quantum states on measurement strength and quantified the depth of entanglement. Our results show that QZD is a versatile tool for fast and deterministic entanglement generation in quantum engineering applications.

  3. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  4. Integrating extended MHD and kinetic physics into the next-generation OpenGGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germaschewski, K.; Wang, L.; Maynard, K. R. M.; Raeder, J.

    2015-12-01

    Going beyond one-fluid MHD is crucial to properly model the ion- and electron-scale reconnection physics in collisionless plasmas, as present in Earth's geospace environment. This presentation introduces the next-generation OpenGGCM, based on J.~Raeder's well-known global magnetospheric model. OpenGGCM has been modularized using the libMRC framework, so that components can easily be exchanged. For example, the MHD solver can be replaced by using a coupled version of the multi-fluid moment code Gkeyll, that handles multiple species and integrates kinetic effects, e.g., a full pressure tensor. We have also added the option to couple OpenGGCM to the widely used ATHENA code. Similarly, there are options for inner magnetosphere and ionosphere models. Mesh refinement is available in the new version, enabling the use of a computational grid that puts very high resolution at the reconnection current sheets at the dayside magnetopause and in the magnetotail while saving computational effort using a coarser resolution in regions that have no small-scale dynamics. Mesh refinement is implemented as a number of sparse-matrix multiplications to fill ghost cells, and to correct fluxes and electric fields. It supports exact flux conservation for the cell-centered fluid quantities and the staggered Yee grid for the electromagnetic fields, maintaining the magnetic field divergence-free to machine precision. We will present computational tests and show applications of the next-generation OpenGGCM to simulations of reconnection at Ganymede and at Earth's dayside magnetopause.

  5. Modeling community population dynamics with the open-source language R.

    PubMed

    Green, Robin; Shou, Wenying

    2014-01-01

    The ability to explain biological phenomena with mathematics and to generate predictions from mathematical models is critical for understanding and controlling natural systems. Concurrently, the rise in open-source software has greatly increased the ease at which researchers can implement their own mathematical models. With a reasonably sound understanding of mathematics and programming skills, a researcher can quickly and easily use such tools for their own work. The purpose of this chapter is to expose the reader to one such tool, the open-source programming language R, and to demonstrate its practical application to studying population dynamics. We use the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey dynamics as an example. PMID:24838889

  6. Integrating open-source software applications to build molecular dynamics systems.

    PubMed

    Allen, Bruce M; Predecki, Paul K; Kumosa, Maciej

    2014-04-01

    Three open-source applications, NanoEngineer-1, packmol, and mis2lmp are integrated using an open-source file format to quickly create molecular dynamics (MD) cells for simulation. The three software applications collectively make up the open-source software (OSS) suite known as MD Studio (MDS). The software is validated through software engineering practices and is verified through simulation of the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-a and isophorone diamine (DGEBA/IPD) system. Multiple simulations are run using the MDS software to create MD cells, and the data generated are used to calculate density, bulk modulus, and glass transition temperature of the DGEBA/IPD system. Simulation results compare well with published experimental and numerical results. The MDS software prototype confirms that OSS applications can be analyzed against real-world research requirements and integrated to create a new capability.

  7. Portable dynamic pressure generator for static and dynamic calibration of in situ pressure transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolt, P. A.; Hess, R. W.; Davis, W. T.

    1983-01-01

    A portable dynamic pressure generator was developed to meet the requirements of determining the dynamic sensitivities of in situ pressure transducers at low frequencies. The device is designed to operate in a frequency range of 0 to 100 Hz, although it was only tested up to 30 Hz, and to generate dynamic pressures up to 13.8 kPa (2 psi). A description of the operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure, frequency, and displacement measurements is given. The pressure generator was used to statically and dynamically calibrate transducers. Test results demonstrated that a difference an exist between the static and dynamic sensitivity of a transducer, confirming the need for dynamic calibrations of in situ pressure transducers.

  8. Dynamic Loads Generation for Multi-Point Vibration Excitation Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    A random-force method has been developed to predict dynamic loads produced by rocket-engine random vibrations for new rocket-engine designs. The method develops random forces at multiple excitation points based on random vibration environments scaled from accelerometer data obtained during hot-fire tests of existing rocket engines. This random-force method applies random forces to the model and creates expected dynamic response in a manner that simulates the way the operating engine applies self-generated random vibration forces (random pressure acting on an area) with the resulting responses that we measure with accelerometers. This innovation includes the methodology (implementation sequence), the computer code, two methods to generate the random-force vibration spectra, and two methods to reduce some of the inherent conservatism in the dynamic loads. This methodology would be implemented to generate the random-force spectra at excitation nodes without requiring the use of artificial boundary conditions in a finite element model. More accurate random dynamic loads than those predicted by current industry methods can then be generated using the random force spectra. The scaling method used to develop the initial power spectral density (PSD) environments for deriving the random forces for the rocket engine case is based on the Barrett Criteria developed at Marshall Space Flight Center in 1963. This invention approach can be applied in the aerospace, automotive, and other industries to obtain reliable dynamic loads and responses from a finite element model for any structure subject to multipoint random vibration excitations.

  9. Generation of a Multicomponent Library of Disulfide Donor-Acceptor Architectures Using Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Drożdż, Wojciech; Kołodziejski, Michał; Markiewicz, Grzegorz; Jenczak, Anna; Stefankiewicz, Artur R

    2015-07-17

    We describe here the generation of new donor-acceptor disulfide architectures obtained in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The application of a dynamic combinatorial chemistry approach allowed us to generate a large number of new disulfide macrocyclic architectures together with a new type of [2]catenanes consisting of four distinct components. Up to fifteen types of structurally-distinct dynamic architectures have been generated through one-pot disulfide exchange reactions between four thiol-functionalized aqueous components. The distribution of disulfide products formed was found to be strongly dependent on the structural features of the thiol components employed. This work not only constitutes a success in the synthesis of topologically- and morphologically-complex targets, but it may also open new horizons for the use of this methodology in the construction of molecular machines.

  10. Generation of a Multicomponent Library of Disulfide Donor-Acceptor Architectures Using Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Drożdż, Wojciech; Kołodziejski, Michał; Markiewicz, Grzegorz; Jenczak, Anna; Stefankiewicz, Artur R.

    2015-01-01

    We describe here the generation of new donor-acceptor disulfide architectures obtained in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The application of a dynamic combinatorial chemistry approach allowed us to generate a large number of new disulfide macrocyclic architectures together with a new type of [2]catenanes consisting of four distinct components. Up to fifteen types of structurally-distinct dynamic architectures have been generated through one-pot disulfide exchange reactions between four thiol-functionalized aqueous components. The distribution of disulfide products formed was found to be strongly dependent on the structural features of the thiol components employed. This work not only constitutes a success in the synthesis of topologically- and morphologically-complex targets, but it may also open new horizons for the use of this methodology in the construction of molecular machines. PMID:26193265

  11. Development and Design of a Dynamic Multimedia Item Generation Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Ting-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    This research applies multimedia technology to design a dynamic item generation method that can adaptively adjust the difficulty level of items according to the level of the testee. The method is based on interactive testing software developed by Flash Actionscript, and provides a testing solution for users by automatically distributing items of…

  12. Neural network approaches to dynamic collision-free trajectory generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, S X; Meng, M

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, dynamic collision-free trajectory generation in a nonstationary environment is studied using biologically inspired neural network approaches. The proposed neural network is topologically organized, where the dynamics of each neuron is characterized by a shunting equation or an additive equation. The state space of the neural network can be either the Cartesian workspace or the joint space of multi-joint robot manipulators. There are only local lateral connections among neurons. The real-time optimal trajectory is generated through the dynamic activity landscape of the neural network without explicitly searching over the free space nor the collision paths, without explicitly optimizing any global cost functions, without any prior knowledge of the dynamic environment, and without any learning procedures. Therefore the model algorithm is computationally efficient. The stability of the neural network system is guaranteed by the existence of a Lyapunov function candidate. In addition, this model is not very sensitive to the model parameters. Several model variations are presented and the differences are discussed. As examples, the proposed models are applied to generate collision-free trajectories for a mobile robot to solve a maze-type of problem, to avoid concave U-shaped obstacles, to track a moving target and at the same to avoid varying obstacles, and to generate a trajectory for a two-link planar robot with two targets. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approaches are demonstrated through simulation and comparison studies. PMID:18244794

  13. Designing Guidance for Interpreting Dynamic Visualizations: Generating versus Reading Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryoo, Kihyun; Linn, Marcia C.

    2014-01-01

    We compared designs of guidance to support students while interacting with dynamic visualizations of complex scientific phenomena in inquiry instruction. Three hundred thirty-two 7th-grade students were randomly assigned to either a reading or a generating condition and completed a web-based inquiry unit focusing on energy concepts in…

  14. Dynamical phase transition in the open Dicke model

    PubMed Central

    Klinder, Jens; Keßler, Hans; Wolke, Matthias; Mathey, Ludwig; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The Dicke model with a weak dissipation channel is realized by coupling a Bose–Einstein condensate to an optical cavity with ultranarrow bandwidth. We explore the dynamical critical properties of the Hepp–Lieb–Dicke phase transition by performing quenches across the phase boundary. We observe hysteresis in the transition between a homogeneous phase and a self-organized collective phase with an enclosed loop area showing power-law scaling with respect to the quench time, which suggests an interpretation within a general framework introduced by Kibble and Zurek. The observed hysteretic dynamics is well reproduced by numerically solving the mean-field equation derived from a generalized Dicke Hamiltonian. Our work promotes the understanding of nonequilibrium physics in open many-body systems with infinite range interactions. PMID:25733892

  15. Ehrenfest approach to open double-well dynamics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Stephen; Onofrio, Roberto; Sundaram, Bala

    2015-10-01

    We consider an Ehrenfest approximation for a particle in a double-well potential in the presence of an external environment schematized as a finite resource heat bath. This allows us to explore how the limitations in the applicability of Ehrenfest dynamics to nonlinear systems are modified in an open system setting. Within this framework, we have identified an environment-induced spontaneous symmetry breaking mechanism, and we argue that the Ehrenfest approximation becomes increasingly valid in the limit of strong coupling to the external reservoir, either in the form of an increasing number of oscillators or increasing temperature. The analysis also suggests a rather intuitive picture for the general phenomenon of quantum tunneling and its interplay with classical thermal activation processes, which may be of relevance in physical chemistry, ultracold atom physics, and fast-switching dynamics such as in superconducting digital electronics. PMID:26565304

  16. Ehrenfest approach to open double-well dynamics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Stephen; Onofrio, Roberto; Sundaram, Bala

    2015-10-01

    We consider an Ehrenfest approximation for a particle in a double-well potential in the presence of an external environment schematized as a finite resource heat bath. This allows us to explore how the limitations in the applicability of Ehrenfest dynamics to nonlinear systems are modified in an open system setting. Within this framework, we have identified an environment-induced spontaneous symmetry breaking mechanism, and we argue that the Ehrenfest approximation becomes increasingly valid in the limit of strong coupling to the external reservoir, either in the form of an increasing number of oscillators or increasing temperature. The analysis also suggests a rather intuitive picture for the general phenomenon of quantum tunneling and its interplay with classical thermal activation processes, which may be of relevance in physical chemistry, ultracold atom physics, and fast-switching dynamics such as in superconducting digital electronics.

  17. Dynamic-stability experiments in LMFBR steam-generator tubes

    SciTech Connect

    France, D.M.; Carlson, R.D.; Chiang, T.; Roy, R.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of instabilities have been recognized in two-phase flows. Parallel channel two-phase flows are particularly sensitive to static instability and dynamic instability of the density wave type. Sodium-heated steam generators, for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) electric power plants, fall into this category, since they are typically comprised of 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 3/ water tubes. The purpose of this study was to experimentally determine the threshold of dynamic instability in sodium-heated boiling-water tubes using a full scale LMFBR tube and prototypic system parameters. A series of 72 dynamic stability experiments were performed in the Steam Generator Test Facility (SGTF) at Argonne National Laboratory.

  18. Dynamic investigation of Drosophila myocytes with second harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhalgh, Catherine; Stewart, Bryan; Cisek, Richard; Prent, Nicole; Major, Arkady; Barzda, Virginijus

    2006-09-01

    The functional dynamics and structure of both larval and adult Drosophila melanogaster muscle were investigated with a nonlinear multimodal microscope. Imaging was carried out using a home built microscope capable of recording the multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation signals simultaneously at a scanning rate of up to ~12 frames/sec. The sample was excited by a home built femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser at 840 nm, or by a Yb-ion doped potassium gadolinium tungstate (Yb:KGW) crystal based oscillator at 1042 nm. There was no observable damage detected in the myocyte after prolonged scanning with either of the lasers. Microscopic second harmonic generation (SHG) appears particularly strong in the myocytes. This allows the fast contraction dynamics of the myocytes to be followed. The larger sarcomere size observed in the larvae myocytes is especially well suited for studying the contraction dynamics. Microscopic imaging of muscle contractions showed different relaxation and contraction rates. The SHG intensities were significantly higher in the relaxed state of the myocyte compared to the contracted state. The imaging also revealed disappearance of SHG signal in highly stretched sarcomeres, indicating that SHG diminishes in the disordered structures. The study illustrates that SHG microscopy, combined with other nonlinear contrast mechanisms, can help to elucidate physiological mechanisms of contraction. This study also provides further insight into the mechanisms of harmonic generation in biological tissue and shows that crystalline arrangement of macromolecules has a determining factor for the high efficiency second harmonic generation from the bulk structures.

  19. Automated generation of discrete event controllers for dynamic reconfiguration of autonomous sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, Sarah; Griffin, Christopher; Phoha, Shashi

    2003-12-01

    Autonomous Sensor Networks have the potential for broad applicability to national security, intelligent transportation, industrial production and environmental and hazardous process control. Distributed sensors may be used for detecting bio-terrorist attacks, for contraband interdiction, border patrol, monitoring building safety and security, battlefield surveillance, or may be embedded in complex dynamic systems for enabling fault tolerant operations. In this paper we present algorithms and automation tools for constructing discrete event controllers for complex networked systems that restrict the dynamic behavior of the system according to given specifications. In our previous work we have modeled dynamic system as a discrete event automation whose open loop behavior is represented as a language L of strings generated with the alphabet 'Elipson' of all possible atomic events that cause state transitions in the network. The controlled behavior is represented by a sublanguage K, contained in L, that restricts the behavior of the system according to the specifications of the controller. We have developed the algebraic structure of controllable sublanguages as perfect right partial ideals that satisfy a precontrollability condition. In this paper we develop an iterative algorithm to take an ad hoc specification described using a natural language, and to formulate a complete specification that results in a controllable sublanguage. A supervisory controller modeled as an automaton that runs synchronously with the open loop system in the sense of Ramadge and Wonham is automatically generated to restrict the behavior of the open loop system to the controllable sublanguage. A battlefield surveillance scenario illustrates the iterative evolution of ad hoc specifications for controlling an autonomous sensor network and the generation of a controller that reconfigures the sensor network to dynamically adapt to environmental perturbations.

  20. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening: Insights from laboratory models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models that have been conducted to improve our understanding of the influence of slab window opening on subduction dynamics, mantle flow and associated dynamic topography over geological time scales. The adopted setup consists of a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the subduction of a fixed plate of silicone (lithosphere) under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We found that the opening of a slab window does not produce consistent changes of the geometry and the kinematics of the slab. On the contrary, slab-induced mantle circulation, quantified both in the vertical and horizontal sections using the Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified. In particular, rollback subduction and the opening of the slab window generate a complex mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of poloidal and toroidal components, with the importance of each evolving according to kinematic stages. Mantle coming from the oceanic domain floods through the slab window, indenting the supra-slab mantle zone and producing its deformation without any mixing between mantle portions. The opening of the slab window and the upwelling of sub-slab mantle produce a regional-scale non-isostatic topographic uplift of the overriding plate that would correspond to values ranging between ca. 1 and 5 km in nature. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compared them to the tectonics and volcanism of the Patagonian subduction zone. We found that the anomalous backarc volcanism that has been developing since the middle Miocene could result from the lateral flow of sub

  1. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    A slab window is defined as an 'hole' in the subducting lithosphere. In the classical view, slab windows develop where a spreading ridge intersects a subduction zone. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. In this work, we perform dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models, to evaluate how the opening of a window in the subducting panel influences the geometry and the kinematics of the slab, the mantle circulation pattern and, finally, the overriding plate dynamic topography. The adopted setup consists in a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the roll-back of a fixed subducting plate (simulated using silicone putty) into the upper mantle (simulated using glucose syrup). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We find that the geometry and the kinematics of the slab are only minorly affected by the opening of a slab window. On the contrary, slab induced mantle circulation, quantified using Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified and produces a peculiar non-isostatic topographic signal on the overriding plate. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compare them to the Patagonian subduction zone finding that anomalous backarc volcanism that developed since middle Miocene could result from the lateral flowage of subslab mantle, and that part of the Patagonian uplift could be dynamically supported.

  2. Dynamic simulation of dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E; Butterfield, C P

    1996-10-01

    Induction generators have been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness, and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single- speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. The operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind-speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative to capture more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine will be investigated. One type of control algorithm for dual- speed operation is proposed. Results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works and how power, current and torque of the system vary as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  3. ERCOT's Dynamic Model of Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Conto, J.; Donoho, K.

    2005-08-01

    By the end of 2003, the total installed wind farm capacity in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) system was approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) and the total in the United States was about 5 GW. As the number of wind turbines installed throughout the United States increases, there is a greater need for dynamic wind turbine generator models that can properly model entire power systems for different types of analysis. This paper describes the ERCOT dynamic models and simulations of a simple network with different types of wind turbine models currently available.

  4. Dynamical generation of maximally entangled states in two identical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2011-11-15

    The generation of entanglement between two identical coupled cavities, each containing a single three-level atom, is studied when the cavities exchange two coherent photons and are in the N=2,4 manifolds, where N represents the maximum number of photons possible in either cavity. The atom-photon state of each cavity is described by a qutrit for N=2 and a five-dimensional qudit for N=4. However, the conservation of the total value of N for the interacting two-cavity system limits the total number of states to only 4 states for N=2 and 8 states for N=4, rather than the usual 9 for two qutrits and 25 for two five-dimensional qudits. In the N=2 manifold, two-qutrit states dynamically generate four maximally entangled Bell states from initially unentangled states. In the N=4 manifold, two-qudit states dynamically generate maximally entangled states involving three or four states. The generation of these maximally entangled states occurs rather rapidly for large hopping strengths. The cavities function as a storage of periodically generated maximally entangled states.

  5. Generating spatiotemporal joint torque patterns from dynamical synchronization of distributed pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Pitti, Alexandre; Lungarella, Max; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Pattern generators found in the spinal cord are no more seen as simple rhythmic oscillators for motion control. Indeed, they achieve flexible and dynamical coordination in interaction with the body and the environment dynamics giving to rise motor synergies. Discovering the mechanisms underlying the control of motor synergies constitutes an important research question not only for neuroscience but also for robotics: the motors coordination of high dimensional robotic systems is still a drawback and new control methods based on biological solutions may reduce their overall complexity. We propose to model the flexible combination of motor synergies in embodied systems via partial phase synchronization of distributed chaotic systems; for specific coupling strength, chaotic systems are able to phase synchronize their dynamics to the resonant frequencies of one external force. We take advantage of this property to explore and exploit the intrinsic dynamics of one specified embodied system. In two experiments with bipedal walkers, we show how motor synergies emerge when the controllers phase synchronize to the body's dynamics, entraining it to its intrinsic behavioral patterns. This stage is characterized by directed information flow from the sensors to the motors exhibiting the optimal situation when the body dynamics drive the controllers (mutual entrainment). Based on our results, we discuss the relevance of our findings for modeling the modular control of distributed pattern generators exhibited in the spinal cord, and for exploring the motor synergies in robots. PMID:20011216

  6. Generational Spreading Speed and the Dynamics of Population Range Expansion.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Andrew W; Neubert, Michael G; Krkošek, Martin; Lewis, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    Some of the most fundamental quantities in population ecology describe the growth and spread of populations. Population dynamics are often characterized by the annual rate of increase, λ, or the generational rate of increase, R0. Analyses involving R0 have deepened our understanding of disease dynamics and life-history complexities beyond that afforded by analysis of annual growth alone. While range expansion is quantified by the annual spreading speed, a spatial analog of λ, an R0-like expression for the rate of spread is missing. Using integrodifference models, we derive the appropriate generational spreading speed for populations with complex (stage-structured) life histories. The resulting measure, relevant to locations near the expanding edge of a (re)colonizing population, incorporates both local population growth and explicit spatial dispersal rather than solely growth across a population, as is the case for R0. The calculations for generational spreading speed are often simpler than those for annual spreading speed, and analytic or partial analytic solutions can yield insight into the processes that facilitate or slow a population's spatial spread. We analyze the spatial dynamics of green crabs, sea otters, and teasel as examples to demonstrate the flexibility of our methods and the intuitive insights that they afford. PMID:26655354

  7. Open-system dynamics of entanglement: a key issues review.

    PubMed

    Aolita, Leandro; de Melo, Fernando; Davidovich, Luiz

    2015-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the fields of quantum information processing and quantum technologies is the detailed coherent control over each and every constituent of quantum systems with an ever increasing number of particles. Within this endeavor, harnessing of many-body entanglement against the detrimental effects of the environment is a major pressing issue. Besides being an important concept from a fundamental standpoint, entanglement has been recognized as a crucial resource for quantum speed-ups or performance enhancements over classical methods. Understanding and controlling many-body entanglement in open systems may have strong implications in quantum computing, quantum simulations of many-body systems, secure quantum communication or cryptography, quantum metrology, our understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, and other important questions of quantum foundations.In this paper we present an overview of recent theoretical and experimental efforts to underpin the dynamics of entanglement under the influence of noise. Entanglement is thus taken as a dynamic quantity on its own, and we survey how it evolves due to the unavoidable interaction of the entangled system with its surroundings. We analyze several scenarios, corresponding to different families of states and environments, which render a very rich diversity of dynamical behaviors.In contrast to single-particle quantities, like populations and coherences, which typically vanish only asymptotically in time, entanglement may disappear at a finite time. In addition, important classes of entanglement display an exponential decay with the number of particles when subject to local noise, which poses yet another threat to the already-challenging scaling of quantum technologies. Other classes, however, turn out to be extremely robust against local noise. Theoretical results and recent experiments regarding the difference between local and global decoherence are summarized. Control and

  8. Open-system dynamics of entanglement: a key issues review.

    PubMed

    Aolita, Leandro; de Melo, Fernando; Davidovich, Luiz

    2015-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the fields of quantum information processing and quantum technologies is the detailed coherent control over each and every constituent of quantum systems with an ever increasing number of particles. Within this endeavor, harnessing of many-body entanglement against the detrimental effects of the environment is a major pressing issue. Besides being an important concept from a fundamental standpoint, entanglement has been recognized as a crucial resource for quantum speed-ups or performance enhancements over classical methods. Understanding and controlling many-body entanglement in open systems may have strong implications in quantum computing, quantum simulations of many-body systems, secure quantum communication or cryptography, quantum metrology, our understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, and other important questions of quantum foundations.In this paper we present an overview of recent theoretical and experimental efforts to underpin the dynamics of entanglement under the influence of noise. Entanglement is thus taken as a dynamic quantity on its own, and we survey how it evolves due to the unavoidable interaction of the entangled system with its surroundings. We analyze several scenarios, corresponding to different families of states and environments, which render a very rich diversity of dynamical behaviors.In contrast to single-particle quantities, like populations and coherences, which typically vanish only asymptotically in time, entanglement may disappear at a finite time. In addition, important classes of entanglement display an exponential decay with the number of particles when subject to local noise, which poses yet another threat to the already-challenging scaling of quantum technologies. Other classes, however, turn out to be extremely robust against local noise. Theoretical results and recent experiments regarding the difference between local and global decoherence are summarized. Control and

  9. DNA dynamics in aqueous solution: opening the double helix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Ross, W. S.; Tinoco, I. Jr; MacElroy, R. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    The opening of a DNA base pair is a simple reaction that is a prerequisite for replication, transcription, and other vital biological functions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of biological reactions is crucial for predicting and, ultimately, controlling them. Realistic computer simulations of the reactions can provide the needed understanding. To model even the simplest reaction in aqueous solution requires hundreds of hours of supercomputing time. We have used molecular dynamics techniques to simulate fraying of the ends of a six base pair double strand of DNA, [TCGCGA]2, where the four bases of DNA are denoted by T (thymine), C (cytosine), G (guanine), and A (adenine), and to estimate the free energy barrier to this process. The calculations, in which the DNA was surrounded by 2,594 water molecules, required 50 hours of CRAY-2 CPU time for every simulated 100 picoseconds. A free energy barrier to fraying, which is mainly characterized by the movement of adenine away from thymine into aqueous environment, was estimated to be 4 kcal/mol. Another fraying pathway, which leads to stacking between terminal adenine and thymine, was also observed. These detailed pictures of the motions and energetics of DNA base pair opening in water are a first step toward understanding how DNA will interact with any molecule.

  10. PREVENTION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE GENERATION FROM OPEN-PIT MINE HIGHWALLS

    EPA Science Inventory



    Exposed, open pit mine highwalls contribute significantly to the production of acid mine

    drainage (AMD) thus causing environmental concerns upon closure of an operating mine. Available information on the generation of AMD from open-pit mine highwalls is very limit...

  11. Integration of an open interface PC scene generator using COTS DVI converter hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordland, Todd; Lyles, Patrick; Schultz, Bret

    2006-05-01

    Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) personal computer (PC) hardware is increasingly capable of computing high dynamic range (HDR) scenes for military sensor testing at high frame rates. New electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) scene projectors feature electrical interfaces that can accept the DVI output of these PC systems. However, military Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) facilities such as those at the US Army Aviation and Missile Research Development and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) utilize a sizeable inventory of existing projection systems that were designed to use the Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI) digital video port (DVP, also known as DVP2 or DD02) interface. To mate the new DVI-based scene generation systems to these legacy projection systems, CG2 Inc., a Quantum3D Company (CG2), has developed a DVI-to-DVP converter called Delta DVP. This device takes progressive scan DVI input, converts it to digital parallel data, and combines and routes color components to derive a 16-bit wide luminance channel replicated on a DVP output interface. The HWIL Functional Area of AMRDEC has developed a suite of modular software to perform deterministic real-time, wave band-specific rendering of sensor scenes, leveraging the features of commodity graphics hardware and open source software. Together, these technologies enable sensor simulation and test facilities to integrate scene generation and projection components with diverse pedigrees.

  12. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-10

    Highlights: {yields} Molecular Dynamics codes implemented on GPUs have achieved two-order of magnitude computational accelerations. {yields} Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations require a large number of random numbers per time step. {yields} We introduce a method for generating small batches of pseudorandom numbers distributed over many threads of calculations. {yields} With this method, Dissipative Particle Dynamics is implemented on a GPU device without requiring thread-to-thread communication. - Abstract: Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  13. Dynamics of quantum tomography in an open system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Chikako

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we provide a way to describe the dynamics of quantum tomography in an open system with a generalized master equation, considering a case where the relevant system under tomographic measurement is influenced by the environment. We apply this to spin tomography because such situations typically occur in μSR (muon spin rotation/relaxation/resonance) experiments where microscopic features of the material are investigated by injecting muons as probes. As a typical example to describe the interaction between muons and a sample material, we use a spin-boson model where the relevant spin interacts with a bosonic environment. We describe the dynamics of a spin tomogram using a time-convolutionless type of generalized master equation that enables us to describe short time scales and/or low-temperature regions. Through numerical evaluation for the case of Ohmic spectral density with an exponential cutoff, a clear interdependency is found between the time evolution of elements of the density operator and a spin tomogram. The formulation in this paper may provide important fundamental information for the analysis of results from, for example, μSR experiments on short time scales and/or in low-temperature regions using spin tomography.

  14. Modeling Airborne Beryllium Concentrations From Open Air Dynamic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. M.

    2003-12-01

    A heightened awareness of airborne beryllium contamination from industrial activities was reestablished during the late 1980's and early 1990's when it became recognized that Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD) had not been eradicated, and that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration standards for occupational air exposure to beryllium may not be sufficiently protective. This was in response to the observed CBD increase in multiple industrial settings where beryllium was manufactured and/or machined, thus producing beryllium particulates which are then available for redistribution by airborne transport. Sampling and modeling design activities were expanded at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico to evaluate potential airborne beryllium exposure to workers who might be exposed during dynamic testing activities associated with nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship. Herein is presented the results of multiple types of collected air measurements that were designed to characterize the production and dispersion of beryllium used in components whose performance is evaluated during high explosive detonation at open air firing sites. Data from fallout, high volume air, medium volume air, adhesive film, particle size impactor, and fine-particulate counting techniques will be presented, integrated, and applied in dispersion modeling to assess potential onsite and offsite personal exposures resulting from dynamic testing activities involving beryllium.

  15. Upon Generating (2+1)-dimensional Dynamical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Bai, Yang; Wu, Lixin

    2016-06-01

    Under the framework of the Adler-Gel'fand-Dikii(AGD) scheme, we first propose two Hamiltonian operator pairs over a noncommutative ring so that we construct a new dynamical system in 2+1 dimensions, then we get a generalized special Novikov-Veselov (NV) equation via the Manakov triple. Then with the aid of a special symmetric Lie algebra of a reductive homogeneous group G, we adopt the Tu-Andrushkiw-Huang (TAH) scheme to generate a new integrable (2+1)-dimensional dynamical system and its Hamiltonian structure, which can reduce to the well-known (2+1)-dimensional Davey-Stewartson (DS) hierarchy. Finally, we extend the binormial residue representation (briefly BRR) scheme to the super higher dimensional integrable hierarchies with the help of a super subalgebra of the super Lie algebra sl(2/1), which is also a kind of symmetric Lie algebra of the reductive homogeneous group G. As applications, we obtain a super 2+1 dimensional MKdV hierarchy which can be reduced to a super 2+1 dimensional generalized AKNS equation. Finally, we compare the advantages and the shortcomings for the three schemes to generate integrable dynamical systems.

  16. Rise and fall of quantum and classical correlations in open-system dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Khasin, Michael; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2007-07-15

    Interacting quantum systems evolving from an uncorrelated composite initial state generically develop quantum correlations--entanglement. As a consequence, a local description of interacting quantum systems is impossible as a rule. A unitarily evolving (isolated) quantum system generically develops extensive entanglement: the magnitude of the generated entanglement will increase without bounds with the effective Hilbert space dimension of the system. It is conceivable that coupling of the interacting subsystems to local dephasing environments will restrict the generation of entanglement to such extent that the evolving composite system may be considered as approximately disentangled. This conjecture is addressed in the context of some common models of a bipartite system with linear and nonlinear interactions and local coupling to dephasing environments. Analytical and numerical results obtained imply that the conjecture is generally false. Open dynamics of the quantum correlations is compared to the corresponding evolution of the classical correlations and a qualitative difference is found.

  17. The Dynamical Generation of Current Sheets in Astrophysical Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory G.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence profoundly affects particle transport and plasma heating in many astrophysical plasma environments, from galaxy clusters to the solar corona and solar wind to Earth's magnetosphere. Both fluid and kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence ubiquitously generate coherent structures, in the form of current sheets, at small scales, and the locations of these current sheets appear to be associated with enhanced rates of dissipation of the turbulent energy. Therefore, illuminating the origin and nature of these current sheets is critical to identifying the dominant physical mechanisms of dissipation, a primary aim at the forefront of plasma turbulence research. Here, we present evidence from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations that strong nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating Alfvén waves, or strong Alfvén wave collisions, are a natural mechanism for the generation of current sheets in plasma turbulence. Furthermore, we conceptually explain this current sheet development in terms of the nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén wave collisions, showing that these current sheets arise through constructive interference among the initial Alfvén waves and nonlinearly generated modes. The properties of current sheets generated by strong Alfvén wave collisions are compared to published observations of current sheets in the Earth's magnetosheath and the solar wind, and the nature of these current sheets leads to the expectation that Landau damping of the constituent Alfvén waves plays a dominant role in the damping of turbulently generated current sheets.

  18. Precipitation-generated oscillations in open cellular cloud fields.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Graham; Koren, Ilan; Wang, Hailong; Xue, Huiwen; Brewer, Wm Alan

    2010-08-12

    Cloud fields adopt many different patterns that can have a profound effect on the amount of sunlight reflected back to space, with important implications for the Earth's climate. These cloud patterns can be observed in satellite images of the Earth and often exhibit distinct cell-like structures associated with organized convection at scales of tens of kilometres. Recent evidence has shown that atmospheric aerosol particles-through their influence on precipitation formation-help to determine whether cloud fields take on closed (more reflective) or open (less reflective) cellular patterns. The physical mechanisms controlling the formation and evolution of these cells, however, are still poorly understood, limiting our ability to simulate realistically the effects of clouds on global reflectance. Here we use satellite imagery and numerical models to show how precipitating clouds produce an open cellular cloud pattern that oscillates between different, weakly stable states. The oscillations are a result of precipitation causing downward motion and outflow from clouds that were previously positively buoyant. The evaporating precipitation drives air down to the Earth's surface, where it diverges and collides with the outflows of neighbouring precipitating cells. These colliding outflows form surface convergence zones and new cloud formation. In turn, the newly formed clouds produce precipitation and new colliding outflow patterns that are displaced from the previous ones. As successive cycles of this kind unfold, convergence zones alternate with divergence zones and new cloud patterns emerge to replace old ones. The result is an oscillating, self-organized system with a characteristic cell size and precipitation frequency.

  19. Dynamically generated cyclic dominance in spatial prisoner's dilemma games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Jinlong; Zhu, Xiaodan

    2010-09-01

    We have studied the impact of time-dependent learning capacities of players in the framework of spatial prisoner’s dilemma game. In our model, this capacity of players may decrease or increase in time after strategy adoption according to a steplike function. We investigated both possibilities separately and observed significantly different mechanisms that form the stationary pattern of the system. The time decreasing learning activity helps cooperator domains to recover the possible intrude of defectors hence supports cooperation. In the other case the temporary restrained learning activity generates a cyclic dominance between defector and cooperator strategies, which helps to maintain the diversity of strategies via propagating waves. The results are robust and remain valid by changing payoff values, interaction graphs or functions characterizing time dependence of learning activity. Our observations suggest that dynamically generated mechanisms may offer alternative ways to keep cooperators alive even at very larger temptation to defect.

  20. Multi-channel electronic and vibrational dynamics in polyatomic resonant high-order harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, A.; Boguslavskiy, A. E.; Dagan, M.; Blanchet, V.; Bruner, B. D.; Burgy, F.; Camper, A.; Descamps, D.; Fabre, B.; Fedorov, N.; Gaudin, J.; Geoffroy, G.; Mikosch, J.; Patchkovskii, S.; Petit, S.; Ruchon, T.; Soifer, H.; Staedter, D.; Wilkinson, I.; Stolow, A.; Dudovich, N.; Mairesse, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation in polyatomic molecules generally involves multiple channels of ionization. Their relative contribution can be strongly influenced by the presence of resonances, whose assignment remains a major challenge for high-harmonic spectroscopy. Here we present a multi-modal approach for the investigation of unaligned polyatomic molecules, using SF6 as an example. We combine methods from extreme-ultraviolet spectroscopy, above-threshold ionization and attosecond metrology. Fragment-resolved above-threshold ionization measurements reveal that strong-field ionization opens at least three channels. A shape resonance in one of them is found to dominate the signal in the 20–26 eV range. This resonance induces a phase jump in the harmonic emission, a switch in the polarization state and different dynamical responses to molecular vibrations. This study demonstrates a method for extending high-harmonic spectroscopy to polyatomic molecules, where complex attosecond dynamics are expected. PMID:25608712

  1. A parallel computational fluid dynamics unstructured grid generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Deborah E.

    1993-12-01

    This research addressed the development of a parallel computational fluid dynamics unstructured grid generator using Delaunay triangulation. The generator is applied to simple elliptical and cylindrical two-dimensional bodies. The methodologies used included Watson's point insertion algorithm, Holmes and Snyder's point creation algorithm, a discretized surface definition, Anderson's clustering function, and a Laplacian smoother. The first version of the software involved a processor boundary exchange at the end of each iteration with no inter-processor communications during the iterations. The second version used inter-processor communication during each iteration instead of the boundary exchange. Version 1 demonstrated a speedup of 1.8 for some portions of the code, but proved to be unscalable for more than two nodes due to the interdependency of the triangular elements. The results of Version 2 were similar. Two distribution methodologies, a simple 360-degree distribution and recursive spectral bisection (RSB), were examined. For the initial grid distribution, the distribution generated by the RSB code would be similar to the distribution generated by the 360-degree methodology and would require significantly more time to execute.

  2. Dynamics of microresonator frequency comb generation: models and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, Tobias; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    Microresonator frequency combs hold promise for enabling a new class of light sources that are simultaneously both broadband and coherent, and that could allow for a profusion of potential applications. In this article, we review various theoretical models for describing the temporal dynamics and formation of optical frequency combs. These models form the basis for performing numerical simulations that can be used in order to better understand the comb generation process, for example helping to identify the universal combcharacteristics and their different associated physical phenomena. Moreover, models allow for the study, design and optimization of comb properties prior to the fabrication of actual devices. We consider and derive theoretical formalisms based on the Ikeda map, the modal expansion approach, and the Lugiato-Lefever equation. We further discuss the generation of frequency combs in silicon resonators featuring multiphoton absorption and free-carrier effects. Additionally, we review comb stability properties and consider the role of modulational instability as well as of parametric instabilities due to the boundary conditions of the cavity. These instability mechanisms are the basis for comprehending the process of frequency comb formation, for identifying the different dynamical regimes and the associated dependence on the comb parameters. Finally, we also discuss the phenomena of continuous wave bi- and multistability and its relation to the observation of mode-locked cavity solitons.

  3. Lessons learned in the generation of biomedical research datasets using Semantic Open Data technologies.

    PubMed

    Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Miñarro-Giménez, José Antonio; Menárguez-Tortosa, Marcos; Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical research usually requires combining large volumes of data from multiple heterogeneous sources. Such heterogeneity makes difficult not only the generation of research-oriented dataset but also its exploitation. In recent years, the Open Data paradigm has proposed new ways for making data available in ways that sharing and integration are facilitated. Open Data approaches may pursue the generation of content readable only by humans and by both humans and machines, which are the ones of interest in our work. The Semantic Web provides a natural technological space for data integration and exploitation and offers a range of technologies for generating not only Open Datasets but also Linked Datasets, that is, open datasets linked to other open datasets. According to the Berners-Lee's classification, each open dataset can be given a rating between one and five stars attending to can be given to each dataset. In the last years, we have developed and applied our SWIT tool, which automates the generation of semantic datasets from heterogeneous data sources. SWIT produces four stars datasets, given that fifth one can be obtained by being the dataset linked from external ones. In this paper, we describe how we have applied the tool in two projects related to health care records and orthology data, as well as the major lessons learned from such efforts.

  4. LUNA: an algorithm for generating dynamic planet-moon transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David M.

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously shown that moons of extrasolar planets may be detectable with the Kepler Mission, for moon masses above ˜0.2 M⊕. Transit timing effects have been formerly identified as a potent tool to this end, exploiting the dynamics of the system. In this work, we explore the simulation of transit light curves of a planet plus a single moon including not only the transit timing effects, but also the light-curve signal of the moon itself. We introduce our new algorithm, LUNA, which produces transit light curves for both bodies, analytically accounting for shadow overlaps, stellar limb darkening and planet-moon dynamical motion. By building the dynamics into the core of LUNA, the routine automatically accounts for transit-timing/duration variations and ingress/egress asymmetries for not only the planet, but also the moon. We then generate some artificial data for two feasibly detectable hypothetical systems of interest: (i) prograde and (ii) retrograde Earth-like moons around a habitable-zone Neptune for an M dwarf system. We fit the hypothetical systems using LUNA and demonstrate the feasibility of detecting these cases with Kepler photometry.

  5. Openness, Dynamic Specialization, and the Disaggregated Future of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David; Hilton, John, III

    2009-01-01

    Openness is a fundamental value underlying significant changes in society and is a prerequisite to changes institutions of higher education need to make in order to remain relevant to the society in which they exist. There are a number of ways institutions can be more open, including programs of open sharing of educational materials. Individual…

  6. Pseudo-random number generation for Brownian Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations on GPU devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Carolyn L.; Anderson, Joshua A.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2011-08-01

    Brownian Dynamics (BD), also known as Langevin Dynamics, and Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) are implicit solvent methods commonly used in models of soft matter and biomolecular systems. The interaction of the numerous solvent particles with larger particles is coarse-grained as a Langevin thermostat is applied to individual particles or to particle pairs. The Langevin thermostat requires a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) to generate the stochastic force applied to each particle or pair of neighboring particles during each time step in the integration of Newton's equations of motion. In a Single-Instruction-Multiple-Thread (SIMT) GPU parallel computing environment, small batches of random numbers must be generated over thousands of threads and millions of kernel calls. In this communication we introduce a one-PRNG-per-kernel-call-per-thread scheme, in which a micro-stream of pseudorandom numbers is generated in each thread and kernel call. These high quality, statistically robust micro-streams require no global memory for state storage, are more computationally efficient than other PRNG schemes in memory-bound kernels, and uniquely enable the DPD simulation method without requiring communication between threads.

  7. Excitation and dynamics of liquid tin micrometer droplet generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinger, B.; Abhari, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of capillary breakup-based droplet generation are studied for an excitation system based on a tunable piezoelectrically actuated oscillating piston, which generates acoustic pressure waves at the dispenser nozzle. First, the non-ideal pressure boundary conditions of droplet breakup are measured using a fast response pressure probe. A structural analysis shows that the axial modes of the excitation system are the main reasons for the resonance peaks in the pressure response. Second, a correlation between the nozzle inlet pressure and the droplet timing jitter is established with the help of experiments and a droplet formation model. With decreasing wave number, the growth rate of the main excitation decreases, while noise contributions with wave numbers with higher growth rates lead to a non-deterministic structure of the droplet train. A highly coherent and monodisperse droplet stream is obtained when the excitation system is tuned to generate high acoustic pressures at the desired operation frequency and when the noise level on the jet is limited. The jet velocity, hence droplet spacing for a set frequency is then adjusted by varying the reservoir pressure, according to the trade-off between lowest wave number and acceptable timing jitter.

  8. Asymmetries in mouth opening during word generation in male stuttering and non-stuttering participants.

    PubMed

    Code, Chris; Lincoln, Michelle; Dredge, Rebekah

    2005-09-01

    We examined lateral asymmetries in mouth opening in right-handed male stuttering (N = 11) and non-stuttering (N = 14) participants. Lateral asymmetries in mouth opening were video-recorded and analysed in participants while they generated words beginning with the bilabial phones /b, p, m/. Non-stuttering participants showed an expected preference for right mouth opening during the task, whereas a group of stuttering participants who were matched for sex and age produced a left or bilateral pattern of mouth opening. Analysis of variance revealed the difference between the groups to be significant (p < .001). However, there was more variability in the lateral mouth asymmetries in the stuttering participants. We interpret this finding as adding some support for the hypothesis that aberrant hemispheric control for speech is involved in stuttering. Asymmetric mouth openings appear to have no direct linguistic function, and we discuss the possible implications of the phenomenon for models of speech planning and programming.

  9. IllinoisGRMHD: an open-source, user-friendly GRMHD code for dynamical spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etienne, Zachariah B.; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Haas, Roland; Mösta, Philipp; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    2015-09-01

    In the extreme violence of merger and mass accretion, compact objects like black holes and neutron stars are thought to launch some of the most luminous outbursts of electromagnetic and gravitational wave energy in the Universe. Modeling these systems realistically is a central problem in theoretical astrophysics, but has proven extremely challenging, requiring the development of numerical relativity codes that solve Einstein's equations for the spacetime, coupled to the equations of general relativistic (ideal) magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) for the magnetized fluids. Over the past decade, the Illinois numerical relativity (ILNR) group's dynamical spacetime GRMHD code has proven itself as a robust and reliable tool for theoretical modeling of such GRMHD phenomena. However, the code was written ‘by experts and for experts’ of the code, with a steep learning curve that would severely hinder community adoption if it were open-sourced. Here we present IllinoisGRMHD, which is an open-source, highly extensible rewrite of the original closed-source GRMHD code of the ILNR group. Reducing the learning curve was the primary focus of this rewrite, with the goal of facilitating community involvement in the code's use and development, as well as the minimization of human effort in generating new science. IllinoisGRMHD also saves computer time, generating roundoff-precision identical output to the original code on adaptive-mesh grids, but nearly twice as fast at scales of hundreds to thousands of cores.

  10. Weak decays of heavy hadrons into dynamically generated resonances

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Oset, Eulogio; Liang, Wei -Hong; Bayar, Melahat; Xie, Ju -Jun; Dai, Lian Rong; Albaladejo, Miguel; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Navarra, Fernando; Roca, Luis; et al

    2016-01-28

    In this study, we present a review of recent works on weak decay of heavy mesons and baryons with two mesons, or a meson and a baryon, interacting strongly in the final state. The aim is to learn about the interaction of hadrons and how some particular resonances are produced in the reactions. It is shown that these reactions have peculiar features and act as filters for some quantum numbers which allow to identify easily some resonances and learn about their nature. The combination of basic elements of the weak interaction with the framework of the chiral unitary approach allowmore » for an interpretation of results of many reactions and add a novel information to different aspects of the hadron interaction and the properties of dynamically generated resonances.« less

  11. Knowledge-based zonal grid generation for computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation of flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards reducing the difficulty of three-dimensional grid generation in computational fluid dynamics. Using a knowledge-based approach makes sense, but problems arise which are caused by aspects of zoning involving perception, lack of expert consensus, and design processes. These obstacles are overcome by means of a simple shape and configuration language, a tunable zoning archetype, and a method of assembling plans from selected, predefined subplans. A demonstration system for knowledge-based two-dimensional flow field zoning has been successfully implemented and tested on representative aerodynamic configurations. The results show that this approach can produce flow field zonings that are acceptable to experts with differing evaluation criteria.

  12. Force Generation, Polymerization Dynamics and Nucleation of Actin Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ruizhe

    We study force generation and actin filament dynamics using stochastic and deterministic methods. First, we treat force generation of bundled actin filaments by polymerization via molecular-level stochastic simulations. In the widely-used Brownian Ratchet model, actin filaments grow freely whenever the tip-obstacle gap created by thermal fluctuation exceeds the monomer size. We name this model the Perfect Brownian Ratchet (PBR) model. In the PBR model, actin monomer diffusion is treated implicitly. We perform a series of simulations based on the PBR, in which obstacle motion is treated explicitly; in most previous studies, obstacle motion has been treated implicitly. We find that the cooperativity of filaments is generally weak in the PBR model, meaning that more filaments would grow more slowly given the same force per filament. Closed-form formulas are also developed, which match the simulation results. These portable and accurate formulas provide guidance for experiments and upper and lower bounds for theoretical analyses. We also studied a variation of the PBR, called the Diffusing Brownian Ratchet (DBR) model, in which both actin monomer and obstacle diffusion are treated explicitly. We find that the growth rate of multiple filaments is even lower, compared with that in PBR. This finding challenges the widely-accepted PBR assumption and suggests that pushing the study of actin dynamics down to the sub-nanometer level yields new insights. We subsequently used a rate equation approach to model the effect of local depletion of actin monomers on the nucleation of actin filaments on biomimetic beads, and how the effect is regulated by capping protein (CP). We find that near the bead surface, a higher CP concentration increases local actin concentration, which leads to an enhanced activities of actin filaments' nucleation. Our model analysis matches the experimental results and lends support to an important but undervalued hypothesis proposed by Carlier and

  13. Generating Systems Biology Markup Language Models from the Synthetic Biology Open Language.

    PubMed

    Roehner, Nicholas; Zhang, Zhen; Nguyen, Tramy; Myers, Chris J

    2015-08-21

    In the context of synthetic biology, model generation is the automated process of constructing biochemical models based on genetic designs. This paper discusses the use cases for model generation in genetic design automation (GDA) software tools and introduces the foundational concepts of standards and model annotation that make this process useful. Finally, this paper presents an implementation of model generation in the GDA software tool iBioSim and provides an example of generating a Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML) model from a design of a 4-input AND sensor written in the Synthetic Biology Open Language (SBOL).

  14. OPEN PROBLEM: Orbits' statistics in chaotic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, V.

    2008-07-01

    This paper shows how the measurement of the stochasticity degree of a finite sequence of real numbers, published by Kolmogorov in Italian in a journal of insurances' statistics, can be usefully applied to measure the objective stochasticity degree of sequences, originating from dynamical systems theory and from number theory. Namely, whenever the value of Kolmogorov's stochasticity parameter of a given sequence of numbers is too small (or too big), one may conclude that the conjecture describing this sequence as a sample of independent values of a random variables is highly improbable. Kolmogorov used this strategy fighting (in a paper in 'Doklady', 1940) against Lysenko, who had tried to disprove the classical genetics' law of Mendel experimentally. Calculating his stochasticity parameter value for the numbers from Lysenko's experiment reports, Kolmogorov deduced, that, while these numbers were different from the exact fulfilment of Mendel's 3 : 1 law, any smaller deviation would be a manifestation of the report's number falsification. The calculation of the values of the stochasticity parameter would be useful for many other generators of pseudorandom numbers and for many other chaotically looking statistics, including even the prime numbers distribution (discussed in this paper as an example).

  15. Coupled ice-ocean dynamics in the marginal ice zones Upwelling/downwelling and eddy generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakkinen, S.

    1986-01-01

    This study is aimed at modeling mesoscale processes such as upwelling/downwelling and ice edge eddies in the marginal ice zones. A two-dimensional coupled ice-ocean model is used for the study. The ice model is coupled to the reduced gravity ocean model through interfacial stresses. The parameters of the ocean model were chosen so that the dynamics would be nonlinear. The model was tested by studying the dynamics of upwelling. Wings parallel to the ice edge with the ice on the right produce upwelling because the air-ice momentum flux is much greater than air-ocean momentum flux; thus the Ekman transport is greater than the ice than in the open water. The stability of the upwelling and downwelling jets is discussed. The downwelling jet is found to be far more unstable than the upwelling jet because the upwelling jet is stabilized by the divergence. The constant wind field exerted on a varying ice cover will generate vorticity leading to enhanced upwelling/downwelling regions, i.e., wind-forced vortices. Steepening and strengthening of vortices are provided by the nonlinear terms. When forcing is time-varying, the advection terms will also redistribute the vorticity. The wind reversals will separate the vortices from the ice edge, so that the upwelling enhancements are pushed to the open ocean and the downwelling enhancements are pushed underneath the ice.

  16. Coordinating the Commons: Diversity & Dynamics in Open Collaborations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    The success of Wikipedia demonstrates that open collaboration can be an effective model for organizing geographically-distributed volunteers to perform complex, sustained work at a massive scale. However, Wikipedia's history also demonstrates some of the challenges that large, long-term open collaborations face: the core community of Wikipedia…

  17. Optimal design of semiconductor opening switches for use in the inductive stage of high power pulse generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelko, A.; Bluhm, H.

    2004-05-01

    Semiconductor opening switches (SOS) are able to interrupt currents at density levels of up to 10 kA/cm2 in less than 10 ns, operate at repetition rates up to 1 kHz, and possess lifetimes of more than 1011 pulses. If stacked, SOS diodes can hold off voltage levels up to several 100 kV. They are therefore ideal for the design of compact high voltage pulse generators of the GW-class for industrial applications. The aim of this work was to improve our understanding of the opening process in a semiconductor diode of SOS-type with a doping profile of p+pnn+ structure, obtainable through diffusion from the surfaces. To simulate the physical processes inside this diode the code POSEOSS was developed. It contains a detailed physical model of charge carrier transport under the influence of density gradients and electric fields and considers all relevant generation and recombination processes. It possesses a large degree of flexibility and is easy to use, and thus allows to carry out parameter studies to determine the influence of different physical quantities, such as doping and impurity levels, on the performance of the device. When applying the code some interesting results concerning the plasma dynamics during the opening process in the switch have been found. In particular, using realistic values for the charge carrier mobility, it was found that the opening process starts first at the n-n+ boundary. Also it has been possible to derive the physical conditions for the occurrence of the SOS-effect. Based on the simulation results a simplified SOS equivalent circuit model has been developed. This model can be used in the circuit simulation program PSPICE. A pulse generator scheme based on inductive storage is proposed, in which power multiplication is achieved by unloading the inductors, previously charged in series, in parallel. This scheme can be considered as the inductive equivalent of a Marx-generator. PSPICE simulations of such a scheme based on semiconductor opening

  18. Real-time dynamic PC image generation techniques for high performance and high dynamic range fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunfield, Dennis H.; Trimble, Darian E.; Fronckowiak, Thomas, Jr.; Ballard, Gary; Morris, Joesph

    2008-04-01

    AMRDEC has developed and implemented new techniques for rendering real-time 32-bit floating point energy-conserved dynamic scenes using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Personal Computer (PC) based hardware and high performance nVidia Graphics Processing Units (GPU). The AMRDEC IGStudio rendering framework with the real-time Joint Scientific Image Generator (JSIG) core has been integrated into numerous AMRDEC Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) facilities, successfully replacing the lower fidelity legacy SGI hardware and software. JSIG uses high dynamic range unnormalized radiometric 32-bit floating point rendering through the use of GPU frame buffer objects (FBOs). A high performance nested zoom anti-aliasing (NZAA) technique was developed to address performance and geometric errors of past zoom anti-aliasing (ZAA) implementations. The NZAA capability for multi-object and occluded object representations includes: cluster ZAA, object ZAA, sub-object ZAA, and point source generation for unresolved objects. This technique has an optimal 128x128 pixel asymmetrical field-of-view zoom. The current NZAA capability supports up to 8 objects in real-time with a near future capability of increasing to a theoretical 128 objects in real-time. JSIG performs other dynamic entity effects which are applied in vertex and fragment shaders. These effects include floating point dynamic signature application, dynamic model ablation heating models, and per-material thermal emissivity rolloff interpolated on a per-pixel zoomed window basis. JSIG additionally performs full scene per-pixel effects in a post render process. These effects include real-time convolutions, optical scene corrections, per-frame calibrations, and energy distribution blur used to compensate for projector element energy limitations.

  19. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PREVENTION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE GENERATION FROM OPEN-PIT HIGHWALLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program Activity III, Project 26, Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Generation from Open-Pit Highwalls. The intent of this project was to obtain performance data on the ability of four technologies to prevent the gener...

  20. Dynamic headspace generation and quantitation of triacetone triperoxide vapor.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Braden C; Lubrano, Adam L; Field, Christopher R; Collins, Greg E

    2014-02-28

    Two methods for quantitation of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) vapor using a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet coupled to a gas chromatography/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) have been demonstrated. The dynamic headspace of bulk TATP was mixed with clean humid air to produce a TATP vapor stream. Sampling via a heated transfer line to a PTV inlet with a Tenax-TA™ filled liner allowed for direct injection of the vapor stream to a GC/MS for vapor quantitation. TATP was extracted from the vapor stream and subsequently desorbed from the PTV liner for splitless injection on the GC column. Calibration curves were prepared using solution standards with a standard split/splitless GC inlet for quantitation of the TATP vapor. Alternatively, vapor was sampled onto a Tenax-TA™ sample tube and placed into a thermal desorption system. In this instance, vapor was desorbed from the tube and subsequently trapped on a liquid nitrogen cooled PTV inlet. Calibration curves for this method were prepared from direct liquid injection of standards onto samples tube with the caveat that a vacuum is applied to the tube during deposition to ensure that the volatile TATP penetrates into the tube. Vapor concentration measurements, as determined by either GC/MS analysis or mass gravimetry of the bulk TATP, were statistically indistinguishable. Different approaches to broaden the TATP vapor dynamic range, including diluent air flow, sample chamber temperature, sample vial orifice size, and sample size are discussed. Vapor concentrations between 50 and 5400ngL(-1) are reported, with stable vapor generation observed for as long as 60 consecutive hours. PMID:24508355

  1. Teachers' Performances during a Practical Dynamic Open Inquiry Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Schanin, Ilana; Shmueli, Ester Rimerman

    2013-01-01

    The research goal of this study was to determine whether teachers who participated in an inquiry-based course were able to internalize a dynamic open inquiry process. This study focused on 25 science teachers who participated in an annual inquiry-based academic course. Several teaching tools helped teachers employ an open inquiry process. We…

  2. Migraine generator network and spreading depression dynamics as neuromodulation targets in episodic migraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, Markus A.

    2013-12-01

    Migraine is a common disabling headache disorder characterized by recurrent episodes sometimes preceded or accompanied by focal neurological symptoms called aura. The relation between two subtypes, migraine without aura (MWoA) and migraine with aura (MWA), is explored with the aim to identify targets for neuromodulation techniques. To this end, a dynamically regulated control system is schematically reduced to a network of the trigeminal nerve, which innervates the cranial circulation, an associated descending modulatory network of brainstem nuclei, and parasympathetic vasomotor efferents. This extends the idea of a migraine generator region in the brainstem to a larger network and is still simple and explicit enough to open up possibilities for mathematical modeling in the future. In this study, it is suggested that the migraine generator network (MGN) is driven and may therefore respond differently to different spatio-temporal noxious input in the migraine subtypes MWA and MWoA. The noxious input is caused by a cortical perturbation of homeostasis, known as spreading depression (SD). The MGN might even trigger SD in the first place by a failure in vasomotor control. As a consequence, migraine is considered as an inherently dynamical disease to which a linear course from upstream to downstream events would not do justice. Minimally invasive and noninvasive neuromodulation techniques are briefly reviewed and their rational is discussed in the context of the proposed mechanism.

  3. Parallel Cascade Selection Molecular Dynamics (PaCS-MD) to generate conformational transition pathway.

    PubMed

    Harada, Ryuhei; Kitao, Akio

    2013-07-21

    Parallel Cascade Selection Molecular Dynamics (PaCS-MD) is proposed as a molecular simulation method to generate conformational transition pathway under the condition that a set of "reactant" and "product" structures is known a priori. In PaCS-MD, the cycle of short multiple independent molecular dynamics simulations and selection of the structures close to the product structure for the next cycle are repeated until the simulated structures move sufficiently close to the product. Folding of 10-residue mini-protein chignolin from the extended to native structures and open-close conformational transition of T4 lysozyme were investigated by PaCS-MD. In both cases, tens of cycles of 100-ps MD were sufficient to reach the product structures, indicating the efficient generation of conformational transition pathway in PaCS-MD with a series of conventional MD without additional external biases. Using the snapshots along the pathway as the initial coordinates, free energy landscapes were calculated by the combination with multiple independent umbrella samplings to statistically elucidate the conformational transition pathways.

  4. Open-Source Programming for Automated Generation of Graphene Raman Spectral Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendola, P.; Blades, M.; Pierre, W.; Jedlicka, S.; Rotkin, S. V.

    Raman microscopy is a useful tool for studying the structural characteristics of graphene deposited onto substrates. However, extracting useful information from the Raman spectra requires data processing and 2D map generation. An existing home-built confocal Raman microscope was optimized for graphene samples and programmed to automatically generate Raman spectral maps across a specified area. In particular, an open source data collection scheme was generated to allow the efficient collection and analysis of the Raman spectral data for future use. NSF ECCS-1509786.

  5. Nonequilibrium dynamics of laser-generated plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tz. B.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Baronavski, A. P.

    2008-05-01

    A time-dependent nonequilibrium kinetics model based upon the time-dependent electron Boltzmann equation coupled with an extensive air chemistry model accounting for gas heating and vibrational kinetics is developed. The model is applied to the temporal evolution of femtosecond laser-generated air plasma channels at atmospheric pressure in an external electric field. The plasma channel dynamics depend upon the initial free electron density, the initial electron energy of the plasma, and upon the externally applied electric field strength. The model predicts an electric breakdown field strength of 5-10kV/cm with a delay time of hundreds of nanoseconds when the electron density drops to the optimum value of ˜1012-1013cm-3. The experimentally observed breakdown field is ˜5.7kV/cm with a statistical breakdown delay time of ˜200ns. The reduction in the breakdown field strength in natural air from ˜30to5kV/cm is attributed to a combination of processes such as enhanced ionization due to relaxation of the initial electron energy distribution function toward a Maxwellian distribution, strong electron detachment, and gas heating. The calculated electron density decay of the laser-generated plasma channel in both pure nitrogen and dry air is in good agreement with the NRL experiments. The derived rate constant for recombination in dry air is bBair=3.9×10-8cm3s-1 and in pure nitrogen it is bBN2=4.4×10-8cm3s-1. The attachment rate coefficient in dry air is ηBair=7.5×106s-1.

  6. Automatic generation of active coordinates for quantum dynamics calculations: Application to the dynamics of benzene photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lasorne, Benjamin; Sicilia, Fabrizio; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.; Worth, Graham A.; Blancafort, Lluis

    2008-03-28

    A new practical method to generate a subspace of active coordinates for quantum dynamics calculations is presented. These reduced coordinates are obtained as the normal modes of an analytical quadratic representation of the energy difference between excited and ground states within the complete active space self-consistent field method. At the Franck-Condon point, the largest negative eigenvalues of this Hessian correspond to the photoactive modes: those that reduce the energy difference and lead to the conical intersection; eigenvalues close to 0 correspond to bath modes, while modes with large positive eigenvalues are photoinactive vibrations, which increase the energy difference. The efficacy of quantum dynamics run in the subspace of the photoactive modes is illustrated with the photochemistry of benzene, where theoretical simulations are designed to assist optimal control experiments.

  7. Molecular dynamics of alamethicin transmembrane channels from open-channel current noise analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, D O; Webb, W W

    1995-01-01

    Conductance noise measurement of the open states of alamethicin transmembrane channels reveals excess noise attributable to cooperative low-frequency molecular dynamics that can generate fluctuations approximately 1 A rms in the effective channel pore radius. Single-channel currents through both persistent and nonpersistent channels with multiple conductance states formed by purified polypeptide alamethicin in artificial phospholipid bilayers isolated onto micropipettes with gigaohm seals were recorded using a voltage-clamp technique with low background noise (rms noise < 3 pA up to 20 kHz). Current noise power spectra between 100 Hz and 20 kHz of each open channel state showed little frequency dependence. Noise from undetected conductance state transitions was insignificant. Johnson and shot noises were evaluated. Current noise caused by electrolyte concentration fluctuation via diffusion was isolated by its dependence on buffer concentration. After removing these contributions, significant current noise remains in all persistent channel states and increases in higher conductance states. In nonpersistent channels, remaining noise occurs primarily in the lowest two states. These fluctuations of channel conductance are attributed to thermal oscillations of the channel molecular conformation and are modeled as a Langevin translational oscillation of alamethicin molecules moving radially from the channel pore, damped mostly by lipid bilayer viscosity. PMID:8599640

  8. Intermyofilament dynamics of myocytes revealed by second harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Prent, Nicole; Green, Chantal; Greenhalgh, Catherine; Cisek, Richard; Major, Arkady; Stewart, Bryan; Barzda, Virginijus

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larva myocytes are imaged with second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy undergoing forced stretching and rhythmic contractions to determine the nature of the SHG signal. During stretching, double peaked SHG profiles of the anisotropic (A-) bands evolve into single peaks with a higher SHG intensity. The dip in the intensity profile at the center of the A-band is attributed to destructive interference from out-of-phase second harmonic radiating myosin molecules that, in the central region of myofilaments, are arranged antiparallel. An intensity increase at the center of the A-band appears during forced stretching due to a small, less than 100 nm, intermyofilament separation of the antiparallel myosin molecules leading to constructive interference of the SHG radiation. In addition, the same phenomenon occurs during periodic contractions of the myocyte, where an SHG intensity increase with the lengthening of sarcomeres is observed. The SHG intensity dependence on sarcomere length can be used for imaging myocyte contractions with low resolution microscopy, and can be applied for the development of diagnostic tools where monitoring of muscle contraction dynamics is required.

  9. Fermion flavor mixing in models with dynamical mass generation

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, Petr

    2010-03-15

    We present a model-independent method of dealing with fermion flavor mixing in the case when instead of constant, momentum-independent mass matrices one has rather momentum-dependent self-energies. This situation is typical for strongly coupled models of dynamical fermion mass generation. We demonstrate our approach on the example of quark mixing. We show that quark self-energies with a generic momentum dependence lead to an effective Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, which turns out to be in general nonunitary, in accordance with previous claims of other authors, and to nontrivial flavor changing electromagnetic and neutral currents. We also discuss some conceptual consequences of the momentum-dependent self-energies and show that in such a case the interaction basis and the mass basis are not related by a unitary transformation. In fact, we argue that the latter is merely an effective concept, in a specified sense. While focusing mainly on the fermionic self-energies, we also study the effects of momentum-dependent radiative corrections to the gauge bosons and to the proper vertices. Our approach is based on an application of the Lehmann-Symanzik-Zimmermann reduction formula and for the special case of constant self-energies it gives the same results as the standard approach based on the diagonalization of mass matrices.

  10. Study of a possible S = + 1 dynamically generated baryonic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sourav; Oset, E.; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2005-05-01

    Starting from the lowest-order chiral Lagrangian for the interaction of the baryon decuplet with the octet of pseudoscalar mesons we find an attractive interaction in the ΔK channel with L = 0 and I = 1, while the interaction is repulsive for I = 2. The attractive interaction leads to a pole in the second Riemann sheet of the complex plane and manifests itself in a large strength of the ΔK scattering amplitude close to the ΔK threshold, which is not the case for I = 2. However, we also make a study of uncertainties in the model and conclude that the existence of this pole depends sensitively upon the input used and can disappear within reasonable variations of the input parameters. We take advantage to study the stability of the other poles obtained for the {{3}/{2}}- dynamically generated resonances of the model and conclude that they are stable and not contingent to reasonable changes in the input of the theory.

  11. Dynamic airspace configuration algorithms for next generation air transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jian

    The National Airspace System (NAS) is under great pressure to safely and efficiently handle the record-high air traffic volume nowadays, and will face even greater challenge to keep pace with the steady increase of future air travel demand, since the air travel demand is projected to increase to two to three times the current level by 2025. The inefficiency of traffic flow management initiatives causes severe airspace congestion and frequent flight delays, which cost billions of economic losses every year. To address the increasingly severe airspace congestion and delays, the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is proposed to transform the current static and rigid radar based system to a dynamic and flexible satellite based system. New operational concepts such as Dynamic Airspace Configuration (DAC) have been under development to allow more flexibility required to mitigate the demand-capacity imbalances in order to increase the throughput of the entire NAS. In this dissertation, we address the DAC problem in the en route and terminal airspace under the framework of NextGen. We develop a series of algorithms to facilitate the implementation of innovative concepts relevant with DAC in both the en route and terminal airspace. We also develop a performance evaluation framework for comprehensive benefit analyses on different aspects of future sector design algorithms. First, we complete a graph based sectorization algorithm for DAC in the en route airspace, which models the underlying air route network with a weighted graph, converts the sectorization problem into the graph partition problem, partitions the weighted graph with an iterative spectral bipartition method, and constructs the sectors from the partitioned graph. The algorithm uses a graph model to accurately capture the complex traffic patterns of the real flights, and generates sectors with high efficiency while evenly distributing the workload among the generated sectors. We further improve

  12. Dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. C.; Fourakis, E.; Hammer, J. M.; Smith, G. A.; Grosskreutz, J. C.; Mcbride, E.

    1974-01-01

    The effort undertaken during this program led to the selection of the water-superheated steam (850 psig/900 F) crescent central receiver as the preferred concept from among 11 candidate systems across the technological spectrum of the dynamic conversion of solar generated heat to electricity. The solar power plant designs were investigated in the range of plant capacities from 100 to 1000 Mw(e). The investigations considered the impacts of plant size, collector design, feed-water temperature ratio, heat rejection equipment, ground cover, and location on solar power technical and economic feasibility. For the distributed receiver systems, the optimization studies showed that plant capacities less than 100 Mw(e) may be best. Although the size of central receiver concepts was not parametrically investigated, all indications are that the optimal plant capacity for central receiver systems will be in the range from 50 to 200 Mw(e). Solar thermal power plant site selection criteria and methodology were also established and used to evaluate potentially suitable sites. The result of this effort was to identify a site south of Inyokern, California, as typically suitable for a solar thermal power plant. The criteria used in the selection process included insolation and climatological characteristics, topography, and seismic history as well as water availability.

  13. The Evolution of Open Magnetic Flux Driven by Photospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.; Lionello, Roberto; Mikic, Zoran; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Antiochos, Spiro K.

    2010-01-01

    The coronal magnetic field is of paramount importance in solar and heliospheric physics. Two profoundly different views of the coronal magnetic field have emerged. In quasi-steady models, the predominant source of open magnetic field is in coronal holes. In contrast, in the interchange model, the open magnetic flux is conserved, and the coronal magnetic field can only respond to the photospheric evolution via interchange reconnection. In this view the open magnetic flux diffuses through the closed, streamer belt fields, and substantial open flux is present in the streamer belt during solar minimum. However, Antiochos and co-workers, in the form of a conjecture, argued that truly isolated open flux cannot exist in a configuration with one heliospheric current sheet (HCS) - it will connect via narrow corridors to the polar coronal hole of the same polarity. This contradicts the requirements of the interchange model. We have performed an MHD simulation of the solar corona up to 20R solar to test both the interchange model and the Antiochos conjecture. We use a synoptic map for Carrington Rotation 1913 as the boundary condition for the model, with two small bipoles introduced into the region where a positive polarity extended coronal hole forms. We introduce flows at the photospheric boundary surface to see if open flux associated with the bipoles can be moved into the closed-field region. Interchange reconnection does occur in response to these motions. However, we find that the open magnetic flux cannot be simply injected into closed-field regions - the flux eventually closes down and disconnected flux is created. Flux either opens or closes, as required, to maintain topologically distinct open and closed field regions, with no indiscriminate mixing of the two. The early evolution conforms to the Antiochos conjecture in that a narrow corridor of open flux connects the portion of the coronal hole that is nearly detached by one of the bipoles. In the later evolution, a

  14. Comparison of petroleum generation kinetics by isothermal hydrous and nonisothermal open-system pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewan, M.D.; Ruble, T.E.

    2002-01-01

    This study compares kinetic parameters determined by open-system pyrolysis and hydrous pyrolysis using aliquots of source rocks containing different kerogen types. Kinetic parameters derived from these two pyrolysis methods not only differ in the conditions employed and products generated, but also in the derivation of the kinetic parameters (i.e., isothermal linear regression and non-isothermal nonlinear regression). Results of this comparative study show that there is no correlation between kinetic parameters derived from hydrous pyrolysis and open-system pyrolysis. Hydrous-pyrolysis kinetic parameters determine narrow oil windows that occur over a wide range of temperatures and depths depending in part on the organic-sulfur content of the original kerogen. Conversely, open-system kinetic parameters determine broad oil windows that show no significant differences with kerogen types or their organic-sulfur contents. Comparisons of the kinetic parameters in a hypothetical thermal-burial history (2.5 ??C/my) show open-system kinetic parameters significantly underestimate the extent and timing of oil generation for Type-US kerogen and significantly overestimate the extent and timing of petroleum formation for Type-I kerogen compared to hydrous pyrolysis kinetic parameters. These hypothetical differences determined by the kinetic parameters are supported by natural thermal-burial histories for the Naokelekan source rock (Type-IIS kerogen) in the Zagros basin of Iraq and for the Green River Formation (Type-I kerogen) in the Uinta basin of Utah. Differences in extent and timing of oil generation determined by open-system pyrolysis and hydrous pyrolysis can be attributed to the former not adequately simulating natural oil generation conditions, products, and mechanisms.

  15. Open Automated Demand Response Technologies for Dynamic Pricing and Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatikar, Girish; Mathieu, Johanna L.; Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-06-02

    We present an Open Automated Demand Response Communications Specifications (OpenADR) data model capable of communicating real-time prices to electricity customers. We also show how the same data model could be used to for other types of dynamic pricing tariffs (including peak pricing tariffs, which are common throughout the United States). Customers participating in automated demand response programs with building control systems can respond to dynamic prices by using the actual prices as inputs to their control systems. Alternatively, prices can be mapped into"building operation modes," which can act as inputs to control systems. We present several different strategies customers could use to map prices to operation modes. Our results show that OpenADR can be used to communicate dynamic pricing within the Smart Grid and that OpenADR allows for interoperability with existing and future systems, technologies, and electricity markets.

  16. Characterization of open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators. 16th quarterly technical progress report, December 16, 1980-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.; Kolb, C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Cheng, W.; Dvore, D.; Freedman, A.; Stanton, A.; Stewart, G.

    1981-05-01

    The successful design of full-scale, open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators for baseload electrical production requires a detailed understanding of the plasma chemical and plasma dynamic characteristics of anticipated combustor and channel fluids. Progress in efforts to model the efficiency of an open-cycle, coal-fired MHD channel based on the characterization of the channel flow as well as laboratory experiments to validate the modeling effort is reported. In addition, studies related to understanding arcing and corrosion phenomena in the vicinity of an anode are reported.

  17. Characterization of open-cycle coal-fired MHD generators. 14th/15th quarterly technical progress report, February 1-July 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Wormhoudt, J.; Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.; Kolb, C.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Cheng, W.; Bien, F.; Dvore, D.; Unkel, W.; Stewart, G.

    1980-09-01

    The successful design of full-scale, open-cycle, coal-fired MHD generators for baseload electrical production requires a detailed understanding of the plasma chemical and plasma dynamic characteristics of anticipated combustor and channel fluids. Progress in efforts to model the efficiency of an open-cycle, coal-fired MHD channel based on the characterization of the channel flow as well as laboratory experiments to validate the modeling effort as detailed. In addition, studies related to understanding arcing phenomena in the vicinity of an anode are reported.

  18. Dynamic simulation and safety evaluation of high-speed trains meeting in open air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songyan; Zheng, Zhijun; Yu, Jilin; Qian, Chunqiang

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic responses of a carriage under excitation with the German high-speed low-interference track spectrum together with the air pressure pulse generated as high-speed trains passing each other are investigated with a multi-body dynamics method. The variations of degrees of freedom (DOFs: horizontal movement, roll angle, and yaw angle), the lateral wheel-rail force, the derailment coefficient, and the rate of wheel load reduction with time when two carriages meet in open air are obtained and compared with the results of a single train travelling at specified speeds. Results show that the rate of wheel load reduction increases with the increase of train speed and meets some safety standard at a certain speed, but exceeding the value of the rate of wheel load reduction does not necessarily mean derailment. The evaluation standard of the rate of wheel load reduction is somewhat conservative and may be loosened. The pressure pulse has significant effects on the train DOFs, and the evaluations of these safety indexes are strongly suggested in practice. The pressure pulse has a limited effect on the derailment coefficient and the lateral wheel-rail force, and, thus, their further evaluations may be not necessary.

  19. Dynamical Generation of the Transition Zone in the Earth's Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Stemmer, K.

    2005-12-01

    The internal structure of the Earth is made up by a series of layers, though it is unclear how many layers exist and if there are layers invisible to remote sensing techniques. The transition zone is likely to be a boundary layer separating the convective systems in the lower and upper mantle. It seems likely that currently there is some mass exchange across this boundary, rather than the two systems beeing strictly separated.a Double-diffusive convection(d.d.c) is a vital mechanism which can generate layered structure and may thus be an important mmical machinery behind the formation of the transition zone. Double-diffusive convection determines the dynamics of systems whose density is influenced by at least two components with different molecular diffusivities.In the mantle, composition and temperature play the role of those two components. By means of numerical experiments we demonstrate that under mantle relevant conditions d.d.c typically leads to the formation of a transition zone. The calculations encompass two- and three dimensional Cartesian geometries as well as fully 3D spherical domains. We have further included strongly temperature dependent viscosity and find that this leads to even more pronounced layering. In most cases a layered flow pattern emerges, where two layers with a transition zone in between resembles a quasistationary state. Thus, the transition zone can be the result of a self organization process of the convective flow in the mantle. The presence of a phase transition further helps to stabilize the boundary against overturning, even on a time scale on the order of the age of the Earth.

  20. Tracking dynamics of magma migration in open-conduit systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, Sébastien; Lacanna, Giorgio; Coppola, Diego; Laiolo, Marco; Pistolesi, Marco; Donne, Dario Delle; Genco, Riccardo; Marchetti, Emanuele; Ulivieri, Giacomo; Allocca, Carmine; Cigolini, Corrado; Nishimura, Takeshi; Poggi, Pasquale; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    Open-conduit volcanic systems are typically characterized by unsealed volcanic conduits feeding permanent or quasi-permanent volcanic activity. This persistent activity limits our ability to read changes in the monitored parameters, making the assessment of possible eruptive crises more difficult. We show how an integrated approach to monitoring can solve this problem, opening a new way to data interpretation. The increasing rate of explosive transients, tremor amplitude, thermal emissions of ejected tephra, and rise of the very-long-period (VLP) seismic source towards the surface are interpreted as indicating an upward migration of the magma column in response to an increased magma input rate. During the 2014 flank eruption of Stromboli, this magma input preceded the effusive eruption by several months. When the new lateral effusive vent opened on the Sciara del Fuoco slope, the effusion was accompanied by a large ground deflation, a deepening of the VLP seismic source, and the cessation of summit explosive activity. Such observations suggest the drainage of a superficial magma reservoir confined between the crater terrace and the effusive vent. We show how this model successfully reproduces the measured rate of effusion, the observed rate of ground deflation, and the deepening of the VLP seismic source. This study also demonstrates the ability of the geophysical network to detect superficial magma recharge within an open-conduit system and to track magma drainage during the effusive crisis, with a great impact on hazard assessment.

  1. Self-generated overvoltages due to open-phasing of ungrounded-wye delta transformer banks

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, R.A.; Hartana, R.K.; Ros, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Disconnecting one phase of an ungrounded-wye delta transformer bank from the source can result in severe overvoltages due to neutral shift and ferroresonance. Neutral shift overvoltages are quantified and their impact on metal-oxide surge arresters are evaluated. Ferroresonance is shown by test data to occur when low-loss banks, 15 kV and higher, are open phased. Design and operating practices to eliminate or mitigate these self-generated overvoltages are discussed.

  2. Self-generated overvoltages due to open-phasing of ungrounded-wye delta transformer banks

    SciTech Connect

    Walling, R.A.; Hartana, R.K.; Ros, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    Disconnecting one phase of an ungrounded-wye delta transformer bank from the source can result In severe overvoltages due to neutral shirt and ferroresonance. Neutral shirt overvoltages are quantified and their Impact on metal-oxide surge arresters are evaluated. Ferroresonance is shown by test data to occur when low-loss banks, 15 kV and higher, are open phased. Design and operating practices to eliminate or mitigate these self-generated overvoltages are discussed.

  3. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, F.; Tung, Y.-S.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the Ktrans values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that Ktrans in the BBB-opened region (0.02 ± 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 ± 0.0167 min-1 for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 × 10-4 ± 12 × 10-4 min-1, respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method.

  4. Dynamic Simulation over Long Time Periods with 100% Solar Generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Concepcion, Ricky James; Elliott, Ryan Thomas

    2015-12-01

    This project aimed to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accommodate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for potential problems.

  5. Asymmetric exclusion process with a dynamic roadblock and open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Mamata; Klumpp, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by complex transport processes occurring in nature, we study a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with a dynamic ‘roadblock’ particle. The roadblock particle blocks the traffic of moving particles while bound to the lattice, but can stochastically unbind or switch off, thus enabling the traffic to pass. We use simulations to study the dependence of the particle flux on the on/off switching dynamics of the roadblock, which exhibits a surprisingly rich dynamic behaviour. In particular, unlike in other studied TASEP variants with defects, here we observe that the particle flux is affected by the roadblock even in the initiation-limited or low density phase if the roadblock dynamics is slow. Rapid switching off the roadblock results in the typical behaviour of a TASEP with a defect/pause with reduced maximal current, but no effect of the roadblock on the flux in the initiation-limited phase. Moreover, in an intermediate range of roadblock rates, the particle current is found to be system-size dependent.

  6. QuTiP: An open-source Python framework for the dynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, J. R.; Nation, P. D.; Nori, Franco

    2012-08-01

    We present an object-oriented open-source framework for solving the dynamics of open quantum systems written in Python. Arbitrary Hamiltonians, including time-dependent systems, may be built up from operators and states defined by a quantum object class, and then passed on to a choice of master equation or Monte Carlo solvers. We give an overview of the basic structure for the framework before detailing the numerical simulation of open system dynamics. Several examples are given to illustrate the build up to a complete calculation. Finally, we measure the performance of our library against that of current implementations. The framework described here is particularly well suited to the fields of quantum optics, superconducting circuit devices, nanomechanics, and trapped ions, while also being ideal for use in classroom instruction. Catalogue identifier: AEMB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 16 482 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 213 438 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python Computer: i386, x86-64 Operating system: Linux, Mac OSX, Windows RAM: 2+ Gigabytes Classification: 7 External routines: NumPy (http://numpy.scipy.org/), SciPy (http://www.scipy.org/), Matplotlib (http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/) Nature of problem: Dynamics of open quantum systems. Solution method: Numerical solutions to Lindblad master equation or Monte Carlo wave function method. Restrictions: Problems must meet the criteria for using the master equation in Lindblad form. Running time: A few seconds up to several tens of minutes, depending on size of underlying Hilbert space.

  7. A Tesla-pulse forming line-plasma opening switch pulsed power generator.

    PubMed

    Novac, B M; Kumar, R; Smith, I R

    2010-10-01

    A pulsed power generator based on a high-voltage Tesla transformer which charges a 3.85 Ω/55 ns water-filled pulse forming line to 300 kV has been developed at Loughborough University as a training tool for pulsed power students. The generator uses all forms of insulation specific to pulsed power technology, liquid (oil and water), gas (SF(6)), and magnetic insulation in vacuum, and a number of fast voltage and current sensors are implemented for diagnostic purposes. A miniature (centimeter-size) plasma opening switch has recently been coupled to the output of the pulse forming line, with the overall system comprising the first phase of a program aimed at the development of a novel repetitive, table-top generator capable of producing 15 GW pulses for high power microwave loads. Technical details of all the generator components and the main experimental results obtained during the program and demonstrations of their performance are presented in the paper, together with a description of the various diagnostic tools involved. In particular, it is shown that the miniature plasma opening switch is capable of reducing the rise time of the input current while significantly increasing the load power. Future plans are outlined in the conclusions.

  8. On the generation of flight dynamics aerodynamic tables by computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Ronch, A.; Ghoreyshi, M.; Badcock, K. J.

    2011-11-01

    An approach for the generation of aerodynamic tables using computational fluid dynamics is discussed. For aircraft flight dynamics, forces and moments are often tabulated in multi-dimensional look-up tables, requiring a large number of calculations to fill the tables. A method to efficiently reduce the number of high-fidelity analyses is reviewed. The method uses a kriging-based surrogate model. Low-fidelity (computationally cheap) estimates are augmented with higher fidelity data. Data fusion combines the two datasets into one single database. The approach can also handle changes in aircraft geometry. Once constructed, the look-up tables can be used in real-time to fly the aircraft through the database. To demonstrate the capabilities of the framework presented, five test cases are considered. These include a transonic cruiser concept design, an unconventional configuration, two passenger jet aircraft, and a jet trainer aircraft. Investigations into the areas of flight handling qualities, stability and control characteristics and manoeuvring aircraft are made. To assess the accuracy of the simulations, numerical results are also compared with wind tunnel and flight test data.

  9. Open system degassing, bubble rise and flow dynamics within volcanic conduits- an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Azzopardi, B. J.; Bonadonna, C.; Marchetti, E.; Ripepe, M.

    2009-12-01

    Open conduit basaltic volcanoes are characterized by frequent eruptions, usually consisting in mild Strombolian and Hawaiian explosions, alternating years to months of quiescence periods, with degassing activity from the central conduit. Recent improvements of thermal, video, radar and acoustic monitoring techniques have provided new powerful tools for the study of degassing processes and made available geophysical and geochemical datasets for many central volcanoes, such as Stromboli, Etna (Italy), Kilauea (Hawaii), Villarrica (Chile). These studies revealed that degassing is an unsteady, often pulsatory process, characterized by fluctuations in both intensity and composition of the emitted gases. Unambiguous interpretation of monitoring data of surface activity in terms of conduit dynamics and flow processes is, however, not possible, due to partial knowledge of the physical processes controlling the dynamics of two-phase flows in magmas. We performed a series of experiments to gain further insights on the dynamics of the gas-bubble rise in magmas within a cylindrical conduit, their ability to segregate and coalesce and the effect of these processes on the degassing dynamics. The experiments consisted in generating fluxes at variable intensities of air through stagnant water or glucose syrup in a bubble column apparatus 6.5 m high and with a diameter of 24 cm diameter. Glucose syrup and water are Newtonian liquids with viscosity ranging from 2.4 to 204.0 Pa*s and from 1.7 to 0.2 10 -3 Pa*s respectively, depending on temperature. Air was inserted at the base of the column through a variable number (1 to 25) of 5mm-diameter nozzles reaching surficial gas velocities of up to 0.5 m/s. The activity of the bubble column was monitored through temperature, pressure, void fraction and acoustic measurements and filmed by a high-speed camera with maximum resolution of 800x600 pixels. Pressure fluctuations, vesicularity and acoustic signal were then analyzed and correlated

  10. Dynamic federations: storage aggregation using open tools and protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furano, Fabrizio; Brito da Rocha, Ricardo; Devresse, Adrien; Keeble, Oliver; Álvarez Ayllón, Alejandro; Fuhrmann, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    A number of storage elements now offer standard protocol interfaces like NFS 4.1/pNFS and WebDAV, for access to their data repositories, in line with the standardization effort of the European Middleware Initiative (EMI). Also the LCG FileCatalogue (LFC) can offer such features. Here we report on work that seeks to exploit the federation potential of these protocols and build a system that offers a unique view of the storage and metadata ensemble and the possibility of integration of other compatible resources such as those from cloud providers. The challenge, here undertaken by the providers of dCache and DPM, and pragmatically open to other Grid and Cloud storage solutions, is to build such a system while being able to accommodate name translations from existing catalogues (e.g. LFCs), experiment-based metadata catalogues, or stateless algorithmic name translations, also known as “trivial file catalogues”. Such so-called storage federations of standard protocols-based storage elements give a unique view of their content, thus promoting simplicity in accessing the data they contain and offering new possibilities for resilience and data placement strategies. The goal is to consider HTTP and NFS4.1-based storage elements and metadata catalogues and make them able to cooperate through an architecture that properly feeds the redirection mechanisms that they are based upon, thus giving the functionalities of a “loosely coupled” storage federation. One of the key requirements is to use standard clients (provided by OS'es or open source distributions, e.g. Web browsers) to access an already aggregated system; this approach is quite different from aggregating the repositories at the client side through some wrapper API, like for instance GFAL, or by developing new custom clients. Other technical challenges that will determine the success of this initiative include performance, latency and scalability, and the ability to create worldwide storage federations that

  11. Using Open Geographic Data to Generate Natural Language Descriptions for Hydrological Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Martin; Sanchez-Soriano, Javier; Corcho, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Providing descriptions of isolated sensors and sensor networks in natural language, understandable by the general public, is useful to help users find relevant sensors and analyze sensor data. In this paper, we discuss the feasibility of using geographic knowledge from public databases available on the Web (such as OpenStreetMap, Geonames, or DBpedia) to automatically construct such descriptions. We present a general method that uses such information to generate sensor descriptions in natural language. The results of the evaluation of our method in a hydrologic national sensor network showed that this approach is feasible and capable of generating adequate sensor descriptions with a lower development effort compared to other approaches. In the paper we also analyze certain problems that we found in public databases (e.g., heterogeneity, non-standard use of labels, or rigid search methods) and their impact in the generation of sensor descriptions. PMID:26151211

  12. Pore opening dynamics in the exocytosis of serotonin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Cercos, Montserrat G.; Martinez-Valencia, Alejandro; Salinas Hernandez, Israel; Rodríguez-Sosa, Leonardo; de-Miguel, Francisco F.

    2015-03-01

    The current view of the exocytosis of transmitter molecules is that it starts with the formation of a fusion pore that connects the intravesicular and the extracellular spaces, and is completed by the release of the rest of the transmitter contained in the vesicle upon the full fusion and collapse of the vesicle with the plasma membrane. However, under certain circumstances, a rapid closure of the pore before the full vesicle fusion produces only a partial release of the transmitter. Here we show that whole release of the transmitter occurs through fusion pores that remain opened for tens of milliseconds without vesicle collapse. This was demonstrated through amperometric measurements of serotonin release from electrodense vesicles in the axon of leech Retzius neurons and mathematical modelling. By modeling transmitter release with a diffusion equation subjected to boundary conditions that are defined by the experiment, we showed that those pores with a fast half rise time constant remained opened and allowed the full quantum release without vesicle collapse, whereas pores with a slow rise time constant closed rapidly, thus producing partial release. We conclude that a full transmitter release may occur through the fusion pore in the absence of vesicle collapse. This work was founded by a DGAPA-UNAM grants IN200914 and IN118410 CONACYT GRANT 130031, and CONACyT doctoral fellowships.

  13. Dynamical Interactions Make Hot Jupiters in Open Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2016-01-01

    Explaining the origin and evolution of exoplanetary hot Jupiters remains a significant challenge. One possible mechanism for the production of hot Jupiters is planet-planet interactions, which produce them from planets born far from their host stars but near their dynamical stability limits. In the much more likely case of planets born far from their dynamical stability limits, can hot Jupiters be formed in star clusters? Our N-body simulations answer this question in the affirmative, and show that hot Jupiter formation is not a rare event, occurring in ˜1% of star cluster planetary systems. We detail three case studies of the dynamics-induced births of hot Jupiters on highly eccentric orbits that can only occur inside star clusters. The hot Jupiters’ orbits bear remarkable similarities to those of some of the most extreme exoplanets known: HAT-P-32b, HAT-P-2b, HD 80606b, and GJ 876d. If stellar perturbations formed these hot Jupiters, then our simulations predict that these very hot inner planets are often accompanied by much more distant gas giants in highly eccentric orbits.

  14. Dynamics and Power Generation Potential from a Tethered Kite Moving in a Horizontal Flightpath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavi, Glenn Romo

    Tethered-wing power systems are a viable possibility for collecting energy from stronger, more consistent winds found in the upper regions of the atmosphere where conventional wind turbines are incapable of reaching. To date, all of the tethered-wing systems fly with the tether oriented down-wind of the ground attachment point. Examined here are the dynamics and performance of a novel system where the tether is oriented both upwind and downwind of the ground attachment point during normal operation of the device. Certain prototypes built by Makani and Ampyx Power are considered to have motions analogous to the motions of the blade tips on conventional horizontal-axis wind turbines. If true, this system has motions that are analogous to conventional vertical-axis wind turbines. The system has a ground-based generator which is mechanical coupled to the aircraft and energy is generated on the reel-out phase of each cycle while a smaller amount of energy is consumed during the reel-in phase of each cycle. A simple model was developed which captures the dominant dynamics of this system and shows, via simulation, that the proposed system is viable and capable of stable and unstable periodic motions with a simulated closed-loop tether tension controller or a simple open loop reel-rate controller. In addition, it is capable of motions which produce net positive power. The small system examined, where parameter optimization was not performed, predicts an average cycle power of more than 500 watts in a 10 m/s wind.

  15. Global Dynamic Exposure and the OpenBuildingMap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorlemmer, D.; Beutin, T.; Hirata, N.; Hao, K. X.; Wyss, M.; Cotton, F.; Prehn, K.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed understanding of local risk factors regarding natural catastrophes requires in-depth characterization of the local exposure. Current exposure capture techniques have to find the balance between resolution and coverage. We aim at bridging this gap by employing a crowd-sourced approach to exposure capturing focusing on risk related to earthquake hazard. OpenStreetMap (OSM), the rich and constantly growing geographical database, is an ideal foundation for us. More than 2.5 billion geographical nodes, more than 150 million building footprints (growing by ~100'000 per day), and a plethora of information about school, hospital, and other critical facility locations allow us to exploit this dataset for risk-related computations. We will harvest this dataset by collecting exposure and vulnerability indicators from explicitly provided data (e.g. hospital locations), implicitly provided data (e.g. building shapes and positions), and semantically derived data, i.e. interpretation applying expert knowledge. With this approach, we can increase the resolution of existing exposure models from fragility classes distribution via block-by-block specifications to building-by-building vulnerability. To increase coverage, we will provide a framework for collecting building data by any person or community. We will implement a double crowd-sourced approach to bring together the interest and enthusiasm of communities with the knowledge of earthquake and engineering experts. The first crowd-sourced approach aims at collecting building properties in a community by local people and activists. This will be supported by tailored building capture tools for mobile devices for simple and fast building property capturing. The second crowd-sourced approach involves local experts in estimating building vulnerability that will provide building classification rules that translate building properties into vulnerability and exposure indicators as defined in the Building Taxonomy 2.0 developed

  16. Synchronous Generator Model Parameter Estimation Based on Noisy Dynamic Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhausen, Sebastian; Paszek, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have occurred system failures in many power systems all over the world. They have resulted in a lack of power supply to a large number of recipients. To minimize the risk of occurrence of power failures, it is necessary to perform multivariate investigations, including simulations, of power system operating conditions. To conduct reliable simulations, the current base of parameters of the models of generating units, containing the models of synchronous generators, is necessary. In the paper, there is presented a method for parameter estimation of a synchronous generator nonlinear model based on the analysis of selected transient waveforms caused by introducing a disturbance (in the form of a pseudorandom signal) in the generator voltage regulation channel. The parameter estimation was performed by minimizing the objective function defined as a mean square error for deviations between the measurement waveforms and the waveforms calculated based on the generator mathematical model. A hybrid algorithm was used for the minimization of the objective function. In the paper, there is described a filter system used for filtering the noisy measurement waveforms. The calculation results of the model of a 44 kW synchronous generator installed on a laboratory stand of the Institute of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science of the Silesian University of Technology are also given. The presented estimation method can be successfully applied to parameter estimation of different models of high-power synchronous generators operating in a power system.

  17. Frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; He, Min; Wang, Zhibiao E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Song, Dan; Lei, Guangrong; Lin, Zhou; Zhang, Dong E-mail: wangzhibiao@haifu.com.cn; Wu, Junru

    2015-12-15

    Resolution of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing is limited by the wave diffraction. We have developed a spherical cavity transducer with two open ends to improve the focusing precision without sacrificing the acoustic intensity (App Phys Lett 2013; 102: 204102). This work aims to theoretically and experimentally investigate the frequency dependence of the acoustic field generated from the spherical cavity transducer with two open ends. The device emits high intensity ultrasound at the frequency ranging from 420 to 470 kHz, and the acoustic field is measured by a fiber optic probe hydrophone. The measured results shows that the spherical cavity transducer provides high acoustic intensity for HIFU treatment only in its resonant modes, and a series of resonant frequencies can be choosen. Furthermore, a finite element model is developed to discuss the frequency dependence of the acoustic field. The numerical simulations coincide well with the measured results.

  18. Enhancement of the flexible spacecraft dynamics program for open spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The modifications and additions made to the Flexible Spacecraft Dynamics (FSD) Program are described. The principal addition to the program was the capability to simulate a single axis gimble platform nadir pointing despin control system. The formulation for the single axis gimble equations of motion is a modification of the formulation. The details of the modifications made to the FSD Program are presented. Modifications to existing subroutines are briefly described and a detailed description of new subroutines is given. In addition, e program variables in new labelled COMMON blocks are described in detail. A description of new input symbols for the FSD Program is given.

  19. Generalized Langevin equation: An efficient approach to nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stella, L.; Lorenz, C. D.; Kantorovich, L.

    2014-04-01

    The generalized Langevin equation (GLE) has been recently suggested to simulate the time evolution of classical solid and molecular systems when considering general nonequilibrium processes. In this approach, a part of the whole system (an open system), which interacts and exchanges energy with its dissipative environment, is studied. Because the GLE is derived by projecting out exactly the harmonic environment, the coupling to it is realistic, while the equations of motion are non-Markovian. Although the GLE formalism has already found promising applications, e.g., in nanotribology and as a powerful thermostat for equilibration in classical molecular dynamics simulations, efficient algorithms to solve the GLE for realistic memory kernels are highly nontrivial, especially if the memory kernels decay nonexponentially. This is due to the fact that one has to generate a colored noise and take account of the memory effects in a consistent manner. In this paper, we present a simple, yet efficient, algorithm for solving the GLE for practical memory kernels and we demonstrate its capability for the exactly solvable case of a harmonic oscillator coupled to a Debye bath.

  20. Molecular dynamics study of the opening mechanism for DNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Miller, Bill R; Parish, Carol A; Wu, Eugene Y

    2014-12-01

    During DNA replication, DNA polymerases follow an induced fit mechanism in order to rapidly distinguish between correct and incorrect dNTP substrates. The dynamics of this process are crucial to the overall effectiveness of catalysis. Although X-ray crystal structures of DNA polymerase I with substrate dNTPs have revealed key structural states along the catalytic pathway, solution fluorescence studies indicate that those key states are populated in the absence of substrate. Herein, we report the first atomistic simulations showing the conformational changes between the closed, open, and ajar conformations of DNA polymerase I in the binary (enzyme:DNA) state to better understand its dynamics. We have applied long time-scale, unbiased molecular dynamics to investigate the opening process of the fingers domain in the absence of substrate for B. stearothermophilis DNA polymerase in silico. These simulations are biologically and/or physiologically relevant as they shed light on the transitions between states in this important enzyme. All closed and ajar simulations successfully transitioned into the fully open conformation, which is known to be the dominant binary enzyme-DNA conformation from solution and crystallographic studies. Furthermore, we have detailed the key stages in the opening process starting from the open and ajar crystal structures, including the observation of a previously unknown key intermediate structure. Four backbone dihedrals were identified as important during the opening process, and their movements provide insight into the recognition of dNTP substrate molecules by the polymerase binary state. In addition to revealing the opening mechanism, this study also demonstrates our ability to study biological events of DNA polymerase using current computational methods without biasing the dynamics. PMID:25474643

  1. Non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Chris H.

    An open quantum system is a quantum system that interacts with some environment whose degrees of freedom have been coarse grained away. This model describes non-equilibrium processes more general than scattering-matrix formulations. Furthermore, the microscopically-derived environment provides a model of noise, dissipation and decoherence far more general than Markovian (white noise) models. The latter are fully characterized by Lindblad equations and can be motivated phenomenologically. Non-Markovian processes consistently account for backreaction with the environment and can incorporate effects such as finite temperature and spatial correlations. We consider linear systems with bilinear coupling to the environment, or quantum Brownian motion, and nonlinear systems with weak coupling to the environment. For linear systems we provide exact solutions with analytical results for a variety of spectral densities. Furthermore, we point out an important mathematical subtlety which led to incorrect master-equation coefficients in earlier derivations, given nonlocal dissipation. For nonlinear systems we provide perturbative solutions by translating the formalism of canonical perturbation theory into the context of master equations. It is shown that unavoidable degeneracy causes an unfortunate reduction in accuracy between perturbative master equations and their solutions. We also extend the famous theorem of Lindblad, Gorini, Kossakowski and Sudarshan on completely positivity to non-Markovian master equations. Our application is primarily to model atoms interacting via a common electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field contains correlations in both space and time, which are related to its relativistic (photon-mediated) nature. As such, atoms residing in the same field experience different environmental effects depending upon their relative position and orientation. Our more accurate solutions were necessary to assess sudden death of entanglement at zero temperature

  2. Combined flux compression and plasma opening switch on the Saturn pulsed power generator.

    PubMed

    Felber, Franklin S; Waisman, Eduardo M; Mazarakis, Michael G

    2010-05-01

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 micros. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  3. Combined Flux Compression and Plasma Opening Switch on the Saturn Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Felber, Franklin S.; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Mazarakis, Michael G.

    2010-05-07

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 {mu}s. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  4. High-voltage pulsed generator for dynamic fragmentation of rocks.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, B M; Kharlov, A V; Vizir, V A; Kumpyak, V V; Zorin, V B; Kiselev, V N

    2010-10-01

    A portable high-voltage (HV) pulsed generator has been designed for rock fragmentation experiments. The generator can be used also for other technological applications. The installation consists of low voltage block, HV block, coaxial transmission line, fragmentation chamber, and control system block. Low voltage block of the generator, consisting of a primary capacitor bank (300 μF) and a thyristor switch, stores pulse energy and transfers it to the HV block. The primary capacitor bank stores energy of 600 J at the maximum charging voltage of 2 kV. HV block includes HV pulsed step up transformer, HV capacitive storage, and two electrode gas switch. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved: output voltage up to 300 kV, voltage rise time of ∼50 ns, current amplitude of ∼6 kA with the 40 Ω active load, and ∼20 kA in a rock fragmentation regime (with discharge in a rock-water mixture). Typical operation regime is a burst of 1000 pulses with a frequency of 10 Hz. The operation process can be controlled within a wide range of parameters. The entire installation (generator, transmission line, treatment chamber, and measuring probes) is designed like a continuous Faraday's cage (complete shielding) to exclude external electromagnetic perturbations.

  5. High-voltage pulsed generator for dynamic fragmentation of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalchuk, B. M.; Kharlov, A. V.; Vizir, V. A.; Kumpyak, V. V.; Zorin, V. B.; Kiselev, V. N.

    2010-10-01

    A portable high-voltage (HV) pulsed generator has been designed for rock fragmentation experiments. The generator can be used also for other technological applications. The installation consists of low voltage block, HV block, coaxial transmission line, fragmentation chamber, and control system block. Low voltage block of the generator, consisting of a primary capacitor bank (300 μF) and a thyristor switch, stores pulse energy and transfers it to the HV block. The primary capacitor bank stores energy of 600 J at the maximum charging voltage of 2 kV. HV block includes HV pulsed step up transformer, HV capacitive storage, and two electrode gas switch. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved: output voltage up to 300 kV, voltage rise time of ˜50 ns, current amplitude of ˜6 kA with the 40 Ω active load, and ˜20 kA in a rock fragmentation regime (with discharge in a rock-water mixture). Typical operation regime is a burst of 1000 pulses with a frequency of 10 Hz. The operation process can be controlled within a wide range of parameters. The entire installation (generator, transmission line, treatment chamber, and measuring probes) is designed like a continuous Faraday's cage (complete shielding) to exclude external electromagnetic perturbations.

  6. High-voltage pulsed generator for dynamic fragmentation of rocks.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, B M; Kharlov, A V; Vizir, V A; Kumpyak, V V; Zorin, V B; Kiselev, V N

    2010-10-01

    A portable high-voltage (HV) pulsed generator has been designed for rock fragmentation experiments. The generator can be used also for other technological applications. The installation consists of low voltage block, HV block, coaxial transmission line, fragmentation chamber, and control system block. Low voltage block of the generator, consisting of a primary capacitor bank (300 μF) and a thyristor switch, stores pulse energy and transfers it to the HV block. The primary capacitor bank stores energy of 600 J at the maximum charging voltage of 2 kV. HV block includes HV pulsed step up transformer, HV capacitive storage, and two electrode gas switch. The following technical parameters of the generator were achieved: output voltage up to 300 kV, voltage rise time of ∼50 ns, current amplitude of ∼6 kA with the 40 Ω active load, and ∼20 kA in a rock fragmentation regime (with discharge in a rock-water mixture). Typical operation regime is a burst of 1000 pulses with a frequency of 10 Hz. The operation process can be controlled within a wide range of parameters. The entire installation (generator, transmission line, treatment chamber, and measuring probes) is designed like a continuous Faraday's cage (complete shielding) to exclude external electromagnetic perturbations. PMID:21034090

  7. Working memory dynamics bias the generation of beliefs: the influence of data presentation rate on hypothesis generation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Nicholas D; Thomas, Rick P; Buttaccio, Daniel R; Illingworth, David A; Davelaar, Eddy J

    2013-02-01

    Although temporal dynamics are inherent aspects of diagnostic tasks, few studies have investigated how various aspects of time course influence hypothesis generation. An experiment is reported that demonstrates that working memory dynamics operating during serial data acquisition bias hypothesis generation. The presentation rate (and order) of a sequence of serially presented symptoms was manipulated to be either fast (180 ms per symptom) or slow (1,500 ms per symptom) in a simulated medical diagnosis task. When the presentation rate was slow, participants chose the disease hypothesis consistent with the symptoms appearing later in the sequence. When the presentation rate was fast, however, participants chose the disease hypothesis consistent with the symptoms appearing earlier in the sequence, therefore representing a novel primacy effect. We predicted and account for this effect through competitive working memory dynamics governing information acquisition and the contribution of maintained information to the retrieval of hypotheses from long-term memory.

  8. Alpha-canonical form representation of the open loop dynamics of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duyar, Almet; Eldem, Vasfi; Merrill, Walter C.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    1991-01-01

    A parameter and structure estimation technique for multivariable systems is used to obtain a state space representation of open loop dynamics of the space shuttle main engine in alpha-canonical form. The parameterization being used is both minimal and unique. The simplified linear model may be used for fault detection studies and control system design and development.

  9. Collaborative Learning: The Effects of Trust and Open and Closed Dynamics on Consensus and Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harney, Owen; Hogan, Michael J.; Broome, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    The current study compared the effects of open versus closed group dynamics on perceived consensus, objective consensus, and perceived efficacy of collaborative learning in participants high and low in dispositional trust in the context of an Interactive Management (IM) session. Interactive management is a computer-mediated collaborative tool…

  10. Towards numerical simulation of turbulent hydrogen combustion based on flamelet generated manifolds in OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fancello, A.; Bastiaans, R. J. M.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    2013-10-01

    This work proposes an application of the Flamelet-Generated Manifolds (FGM) technique in the OpenFOAM environment. FGM is a chemical reduced method for combustion modeling. This technique treats the combustion process as the solution of a small amount of controlling variables. Regarding laminar simulation, a progress variable and enthalpy evolution can describe satisfactorily the problem. From a turbulent point of view, FGM can be applied to LES and RANS simulations, where the subgrid chemical terms are described with a β - PDF approach. These approaches apply satisfactorily in relatively simple gases, nevertheless for hydrogen are not more valid, due to preferential diffusion effects and instability of the flame structure. The overall aim of this research is to find technical solution for hydrogen gas turbines design in the next generation of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants.

  11. Experimental investigation of door dynamic opening caused by impinging shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamino, L.; Jourdan, G.; Mariani, C.; Igra, O.; Massol, A.; Houas, L.

    2011-02-01

    To prevent damage caused by accidental overpressure inside a closed duct (e.g. jet engine) safety valves are introduced. The present study experimentally investigates the dynamic opening of such valves by employing a door at the end of a shock tube driven section. The door is hung on an axis and is free to rotate, thereby opening the tube. The evolved flow and wave pattern due to a collision of an incident shock wave with the door, causing the door opening, is studied by employing a high speed schlieren system and recording pressures at different places inside the tube as well as on the rotating door. Analyzing this data sheds light on the air flow evolution and the behavior of the opening door. In the present work, emphasis is given to understanding the complex, unsteady flow developed behind the transmitted shock wave as it diffracts over the opening door. It is shown that both the door inertia and the shock wave strength influence the opening dynamic evolution, but not in the proportions that might be expected.

  12. The 2PPI Expansion:. Dynamical Mass Generation and Vacuum Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudal, D.; Verschelde, H.; Browne, R. E.; Gracey, J. A.

    2004-04-01

    We discuss the 2PPI expansion, a summation of the bubble graphs up to all orders, by means of the 2D Gross-Neveu toy model, whose exact mass gap and vacuum energy are known. Then we use the expansion to give analytical evidence that a dimension two gluon condensate exists for pure Yang-Mills in the Landau gauge. This < {Aμ a Aμ a } ; > condensate consequently gives rise to a dynamical gluon mass.

  13. Schwinger-Dyson Equations and Dynamical gluon mass generation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, A.C.; Natale, A.A.

    2004-12-02

    We obtain a solution for the gluon propagador in Landau gauge within two distinct approximations for the Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDE). The first, named Mandelstam's approximation, consist in neglecting all contributions that come from fermions and ghosts fields while in the second, the ghosts fields are taken into account leading to a coupled system of integral equations. In both cases we show that a dynamical mass for the gluon propagator can arise as a solution.

  14. Dynamics of cavityless lasing generated by ultrafast multiphoton excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimberg, Victor; Polyutov, Sergey; Gel'Mukhanov, Faris; Ågren, Hans; Baev, Alexander; Zheng, Qingdong; He, Guang S.

    2006-09-01

    A dynamical theory is developed with the purpose of explaining recent experimental results on multiphoton-excited amplified stimulated emission (ASE). Several conspicuous features of this experiment are analyzed, like the threshold dependence of the spectral profile on the pump intensity, and spectral shifts of the ASE pulses co- and counterpropagating relative to the pump pulse. Two models are proposed and evaluated, one based on the isolated molecule and another which involves solvent interaction. The spectral shift between the forward and backward ASE pulses arises in the first model through the competition between the ASE transitions from the pumped vibrational levels and from the bottom of the excited-state well, while in the solvent-related model the dynamical solute-solvent interaction leads to a relaxed excited state, producing an additional ASE channel. In the latter model the additional redshifted ASE channel makes the dynamics of ASE essentially different from that in the molecular model because the formation of the relaxed state takes a longer time. The variation of the pump intensity influences strongly the relative intensities of the different ASE channels and, hence, the spectral shape of ASE in both models. The regime of ASE changes character when the pump intensity crosses a threshold value. Such a phase transition occurs when the ASE rate approaches the rate of vibrational relaxation or the rate of solute-solvent relaxation in the first excited state.

  15. A first-generation prototype dynamic residential window

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Christian; Goudey, Howdy; Arasteh, Dariush

    2004-10-26

    We present the concept for a ''smart'' highly efficient dynamic window that maximizes solar heat gain during the heating season and minimizes solar heat gain during the cooling season in residential buildings. We describe a prototype dynamic window that relies on an internal shade, which deploys automatically in response to solar radiation and temperature. This prototype was built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory from commercially available ''off-the-shelf'' components. It is a stand-alone, standard-size product, so it can be easily installed in place of standard window products. Our design shows promise for near-term commercialization. Improving thermal performance of this prototype by incorporating commercially available highly efficient glazing technologies could result in the first window that could be suitable for use in zero-energy homes. The unit's predictable deployment of shading could help capture energy savings that are not possible with manual shading. Installation of dynamically shaded windows in the field will allow researchers to better quantify the energy effects of shades, which could lead to increased efficiency in the sizing of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment for residences.

  16. Dynamics of cavityless lasing generated by ultrafast multiphoton excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kimberg, Victor; Polyutov, Sergey; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; A ring gren, Hans; Baev, Alexander; Zheng Qingdong; He, Guang S.

    2006-09-15

    A dynamical theory is developed with the purpose of explaining recent experimental results on multiphoton-excited amplified stimulated emission (ASE). Several conspicuous features of this experiment are analyzed, like the threshold dependence of the spectral profile on the pump intensity, and spectral shifts of the ASE pulses co- and counterpropagating relative to the pump pulse. Two models are proposed and evaluated, one based on the isolated molecule and another which involves solvent interaction. The spectral shift between the forward and backward ASE pulses arises in the first model through the competition between the ASE transitions from the pumped vibrational levels and from the bottom of the excited-state well, while in the solvent-related model the dynamical solute-solvent interaction leads to a relaxed excited state, producing an additional ASE channel. In the latter model the additional redshifted ASE channel makes the dynamics of ASE essentially different from that in the molecular model because the formation of the relaxed state takes a longer time. The variation of the pump intensity influences strongly the relative intensities of the different ASE channels and, hence, the spectral shape of ASE in both models. The regime of ASE changes character when the pump intensity crosses a threshold value. Such a phase transition occurs when the ASE rate approaches the rate of vibrational relaxation or the rate of solute-solvent relaxation in the first excited state.

  17. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based

  18. Drawing on Dynamic Local Knowledge through Student-Generated Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles-Ritchie, Marilee; Monson, Bayley; Moses, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the authors explored how teachers using student-generated photography draw on local knowledge. The study draws on the framework of funds of knowledge to highlight the assets marginalized students bring to the classroom and the need for culturally relevant pedagogy to address the needs of a diverse public school population. The…

  19. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Cross Polarized Wave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Daniel; Squier, Jeff; Durfee, Charles

    2009-10-01

    We use time-domain Spatially and Spectrally Resolved Interferometry (SSRI) to investigate cross-polarized wave (XPW) generation in barium fluoride. We find that the XPW pulse is √3 smaller than the input in the spatiotemporal domain regardless of the input chirp. Additionally, we calculate a temporally dependent focal length resulting from the nonlinear interaction, and discuss its implications.

  20. Quantum dynamical field theory for nonequilibrium phase transitions in driven open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jamir; Diehl, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    We develop a quantum dynamical field theory for studying phase transitions in driven open systems coupled to Markovian noise, where nonlinear noise effects and fluctuations beyond semiclassical approximations influence the critical behavior. We systematically compare the diagrammatics, the properties of the renormalization group flow, and the structure of the fixed points of the quantum dynamical field theory and of its semiclassical counterpart, which is employed to characterize dynamical criticality in three-dimensional driven-dissipative condensates. As an application, we perform the Keldysh functional renormalization of a one-dimensional driven open Bose gas, where a tailored diffusion Markov noise realizes an analog of quantum criticality for driven-dissipative condensation. We find that the associated nonequilibrium quantum phase transition does not map into the critical behavior of its three-dimensional classical driven counterpart.

  1. A dynamical systems analysis of afferent control in a neuromechanical model of locomotion: I. Rhythm generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spardy, Lucy E.; Markin, Sergey N.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Prilutsky, Boris I.; Rybak, Ilya A.; Rubin, Jonathan E.

    2011-10-01

    Locomotion in mammals is controlled by a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) coupled to a biomechanical limb system, with afferent feedback to the spinal circuits and CPG closing the control loop. We have considered a simplified model of this system, in which the CPG establishes a rhythm when a supra-spinal activating drive is present and afferent signals from a single-joint limb feed back to affect CPG operation. Using dynamical system methods, in a series of two papers we analyze the mechanisms by which this model produces oscillations, and the characteristics of these oscillations, in the closed- and open-loop regimes. In this first paper, we analyze the phase transition mechanisms operating within the CPG and use the results to explain how afferent feedback allows oscillations to occur at a wider range of drive values to the CPG than the range over which oscillations occur in the CPG without feedback, and then to comment on why stronger feedback leads to faster oscillations. Linking these transitions to structures in the phase plane associated with the limb segment clarifies how increased weights of afferent feedback to the CPG can restore locomotion after removal of supra-spinal drive to simulate spinal cord injury.

  2. Coherent Dynamics of Open Quantum System in the Presence of Majorana Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assuncao, Maryzaura O.; Diniz, Ginetom S.; Vernek, Edson; Souza, Fabricio M.

    In recent years the research on quantum coherent dynamics of open systems has attracted great attention due to its relevance for future implementation of quantum computers. In the present study we apply the Kadanoff-Baym formalism to simulate the population dynamics of a double-dot molecular system attached to both a superconductor and fermionic reservoirs. We solve both analytically and numerically a set of coupled differential equations that account for crossed Andreev reflection (CAR), intramolecular hopping and tunneling. We pay particular attention on how Majorana bound states can affect the population dynamics of the molecule. We investigate on how initial state configuration affects the dynamics. For instance, if one dot is occupied and the other one is empty, the dynamics is dictated by the inter dot tunneling. On the other hand, for initially empty dots, the CAR dominates. We also investigate how the source and drain currents evolve in time. This work was supporte by FAPEMIG, CNPq and CAPES.

  3. Dynamics of Cell Generation and Turnover in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Olaf; Zdunek, Sofia; Felker, Anastasia; Salehpour, Mehran; Alkass, Kanar; Bernard, Samuel; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Szewczykowska, Mirosława; Jackowska, Teresa; Dos Remedios, Cris; Malm, Torsten; Andrä, Michaela; Jashari, Ramadan; Nyengaard, Jens R; Possnert, Göran; Jovinge, Stefan; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-06-18

    The contribution of cell generation to physiological heart growth and maintenance in humans has been difficult to establish and has remained controversial. We report that the full complement of cardiomyocytes is established perinataly and remains stable over the human lifespan, whereas the numbers of both endothelial and mesenchymal cells increase substantially from birth to early adulthood. Analysis of the integration of nuclear bomb test-derived (14)C revealed a high turnover rate of endothelial cells throughout life (>15% per year) and more limited renewal of mesenchymal cells (<4% per year in adulthood). Cardiomyocyte exchange is highest in early childhood and decreases gradually throughout life to <1% per year in adulthood, with similar turnover rates in the major subdivisions of the myocardium. We provide an integrated model of cell generation and turnover in the human heart.

  4. Keeping up with dynamics of next generation missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warden, Michael A.; Hauser, Robin; Hofstetter, Peter; Kägi, Martin; Meier, Matthias; Rindlisbacher, Walter; Stomas, Anastasios; Wälti, Peter

    2008-04-01

    In an effort to comply with the increasing quest for higher dynamics and increased inertia of test units modern HWIL-systems are employing increasingly larger hydraulic actuators. A new 3-axis flight motion simulator with increased performance is reviewed. Also future trends of the HWIL-systems are discussed both for hydraulic and electric actuators. Some drawbacks of hydraulic systems, including increased acoustic noise levels and extensive service and maintenance requirements from the hydraulic power unit, limited stroke of the actuators for large systems and poor small signal performance are discussed and compared to the performance of electric actuators. Can the electric actuators advantages make up for the power density performance gap?

  5. Rotor dynamic considerations for large wind power generator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Successful large, reliable, low maintenance wind turbines must be designed with full consideration for minimizing dynamic response to aerodynamic, inertial, and gravitational forces. Much of existing helicopter rotor technology is applicable to this problem. Compared with helicopter rotors, large wind turbines are likely to be relatively less flexible with higher dimensionless natural frequencies. For very large wind turbines, low power output per unit weight and stresses due to gravitational forces are limiting factors. The need to reduce rotor complexity to a minimum favors the use of cantilevered (hingeless) rotor configurations where stresses are relieved by elastic deformations.

  6. Oscillon dynamics and rogue wave generation in Faraday surface ripples.

    PubMed

    Xia, H; Maimbourg, T; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2012-09-14

    We report new experimental results which suggest that the generation of extreme wave events in the Faraday surface ripples is related to the increase in the horizontal mobility of oscillating solitons (oscillons). The analysis of the oscillon trajectories in a horizontal plane shows that at higher vertical acceleration, oscillons move chaotically, merge and form enclosed areas on the water surface. The probability of the formation of such craters, which precede large wave events, increases with the increase in horizontal mobility. PMID:23005636

  7. Temporal Dynamics of Hypothesis Generation: The Influences of Data Serial Order, Data Consistency, and Elicitation Timing

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Nicholas D.; Thomas, Rick P.; Davelaar, Eddy J.

    2012-01-01

    The pre-decisional process of hypothesis generation is a ubiquitous cognitive faculty that we continually employ in an effort to understand our environment and thereby support appropriate judgments and decisions. Although we are beginning to understand the fundamental processes underlying hypothesis generation, little is known about how various temporal dynamics, inherent in real world generation tasks, influence the retrieval of hypotheses from long-term memory. This paper presents two experiments investigating three data acquisition dynamics in a simulated medical diagnosis task. The results indicate that the mere serial order of data, data consistency (with previously generated hypotheses), and mode of responding influence the hypothesis generation process. An extension of the HyGene computational model endowed with dynamic data acquisition processes is forwarded and explored to provide an account of the present data. PMID:22754547

  8. Innovative open air brayton combined cycle systems for the next generation nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohuri, Bahman

    The purpose of this research was to model and analyze a nuclear heated multi-turbine power conversion system operating with atmospheric air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a molten salt, or liquid metal, to gas heat exchanger reaching a peak temperature of 660 0C. The effects of adding a recuperator or a bottoming steam cycle have been addressed. The calculated results are intended to identify paths for future work on the next generation nuclear power plant (GEN-IV). This document describes the proposed system in sufficient detail to communicate a good understanding of the overall system, its components, and intended uses. The architecture is described at the conceptual level, and does not replace a detailed design document. The main part of the study focused on a Brayton --- Rankine Combined Cycle system and a Recuperated Brayton Cycle since they offer the highest overall efficiencies. Open Air Brayton power cycles also require low cooling water flows relative to other power cycles. Although the Recuperated Brayton Cycle achieves an overall efficiency slightly less that the Brayton --- Rankine Combined Cycle, it is completely free of a circulating water system and can be used in a desert climate. Detailed results of modeling a combined cycle Brayton-Rankine power conversion system are presented. The Rankine bottoming cycle appears to offer a slight efficiency advantage over the recuperated Brayton cycle. Both offer very significant advantages over current generation Light Water Reactor steam cycles. The combined cycle was optimized as a unit and lower pressure Rankine systems seem to be more efficient. The combined cycle requires a lot less circulating water than current power plants. The open-air Brayton systems appear to be worth investigating, if the higher temperatures predicted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant do materialize.

  9. A method for generating enhanced vision displays using OpenGL video texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Kenneth L.

    2010-04-01

    Degraded visual conditions can marvel the curious and destroy the unprepared. While navigation instruments are trustworthy companions, true visual reference remains king of the hills. Poor visibility may be overcome via imaging sensors such as low light level charge-coupled-device, infrared, and millimeter wave radar. Enhanced Vision systems combine this imagery into a comprehensive situation awareness display, presented to the pilot as reference imagery on a cockpit display, or as world-conformal imagery on head-up or head-mounted displays. This paper demonstrates that Enhanced Vision imaging can be achieved at video rates using typical CPU / GPU architecture, standard video capture hardware, dynamic non-linear ray tracing algorithms, efficient image transfer methods, and simple OpenGL rendering techniques.

  10. Quantum algorithm for simulating the dynamics of an open quantum system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hefeng; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-15

    In the study of open quantum systems, one typically obtains the decoherence dynamics by solving a master equation. The master equation is derived using knowledge of some basic properties of the system, the environment, and their interaction: One basically needs to know the operators through which the system couples to the environment and the spectral density of the environment. For a large system, it could become prohibitively difficult to even write down the appropriate master equation, let alone solve it on a classical computer. In this paper, we present a quantum algorithm for simulating the dynamics of an open quantum system. On a quantum computer, the environment can be simulated using ancilla qubits with properly chosen single-qubit frequencies and with properly designed coupling to the system qubits. The parameters used in the simulation are easily derived from the parameters of the system + environment Hamiltonian. The algorithm is designed to simulate Markovian dynamics, but it can also be used to simulate non-Markovian dynamics provided that this dynamics can be obtained by embedding the system of interest into a larger system that obeys Markovian dynamics. We estimate the resource requirements for the algorithm. In particular, we show that for sufficiently slow decoherence a single ancilla qubit could be sufficient to represent the entire environment, in principle.

  11. Dynamical Generation of Topological Magnetic Lattices for Ultracold Atoms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinlong; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Lü, Rong; You, Li

    2016-04-01

    We propose a scheme to dynamically synthesize a space-periodic effective magnetic field for neutral atoms by time-periodic magnetic field pulses. When atomic spin adiabatically follows the direction of the effective magnetic field, an adiabatic scalar potential together with a geometric vector potential emerges for the atomic center-of-mass motion, due to the Berry phase effect. While atoms hop between honeycomb lattice sites formed by the minima of the adiabatic potential, complex Peierls phase factors in the hopping coefficients are induced by the vector potential, and these phase factors facilitate a topological Chern insulator. With further tuning of external parameters, both a topological phase transition and topological flat bands can be achieved, highlighting realistic prospects for studying strongly correlated phenomena in this system. Our Letter presents an alternative pathway towards creating and manipulating topological states of ultracold atoms by magnetic fields.

  12. Plasma-wave Generation in a Dynamic Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new electromagnetic (EM)-emission mechanism in magnetized, force-free plasma, which is driven by the evolution of the underlying dynamic spacetime. In particular, the emission power and angular distribution of the emitted fast-magnetosonic and Alfvén waves are separately determined. Previous numerical simulations of binary black hole mergers occurring within magnetized plasma have recorded copious amounts of EM radiation that, in addition to collimated jets, include an unexplained, isotropic component that becomes dominant close to the merger. This raises the possibility of multimessenger gravitational-wave and EM observations on binary black hole systems. The mechanism proposed here provides a candidate analytical characterization of the numerical results, and when combined with previously understood mechanisms such as the Blandford-Znajek process and kinetic-motion-driven radiation, it allows us to construct a classification of different EM radiation components seen in the inspiral stage of compact-binary coalescences.

  13. Dynamic model of in-lake alkalinity generation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.A.; Brezonik, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    In-lake alkalinity generation (IAG) is important in regulation of alkalinity in lakes with long residence times, particularly seepage lakes. An IAG model based on input/output modeling concepts is presented that describes budgets for each ion involved in alkalinity regulation by a single differential equation that includes inputs, outputs, and a first-order sink term. These equations are linked to an alkalinity balance equation that includes inputs, outputs, IAG (by sulfate and nitrate reduction), and internal alkalinity consumption (by ammonium assimilation). Calibration using published lake budgets shows that rate constants are generally similar among soft water lakes (k/sub SO/sub 4// approx. 0.5 m/yr; k/sub NO/sub 3// approx. = 1.3 yr/sup -1/; k/sub NH/sub 4// approx. 1.5 yr/sup -1/). Sensitivity analysis shows that predicted alkalinity is sensitive to water residence time, but less sensitive to modest changes in rate constants. The model reflects the homeostatic nature of internal alkalinity generation, in which internal alkalinity production increases with increasing acid input and decreases with decreasing acid inputs of HNO/sub 3/ or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.

  14. Dynamics of Oscillatory Vortex Multipoles Generated by Electromagnetic Forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Aldo; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    Vortices formed by the concurrent effect on a localized magnetic field distribution and two alternate electric currents perpendicular to each other in a shallow (4mm) layer of an electrolyte are analyzed. Alternate currents with frequencies and amplitude in the range of 1-500 mHz and 80 mA, respectively, are explored. For a single dipolar magnetic field and a single electric current, the dominant structure of the flow is a pair of alternating lobes located co-linear with the generated Lorenz force. The flow presents a resonant behavior when the forcing frequency is around 10 mHz. When multipoles are used to generate the magnetic field, more complicated lobe distributions are obtained. The flow patterns were successfully described using a quasi-two-dimensional numerical model. A tridimensional numerical models corroborates the theoretical results. Flow visualization and numerical Lagrangian particle tracking indicate that multipolar flows present symmetries according to the magnetic field distributions. Although in some regions the flow patterns efficiently mix the fluid, the mixing is inhomogeneous due to symmetry conditions of the flows. Mixing is enhanced when symmetries are destroyed by the use of a random array of magnets or by injecting two electric currents.

  15. Gas-phase generation of photoacoustic sound in an open environment.

    PubMed

    Yönak, Serdar H; Dowling, David R

    2003-12-01

    The photoacoustic effect is commonly exploited for molecular spectroscopy, nondestructive evaluation, and trace gas detection. Photoacoustic sound is produced when a photoactive material absorbs electromagnetic radiation and converts it to acoustic waves. This article focuses on the generation of photoacoustic sound from thermal expansion of photoactive gases due to unsteady heating from a laser light source, and extends the work of prior studies on photoacoustic sound generation in an open environment. Starting with the forced free-space wave equation, a simple model is constructed for photoacoustic sounds produced by both acoustically distributed and compact gas clouds. The model accounts for laser absorption through the Lambert-Beer law and includes the effects of photoactive gas cloud characteristics (shape, size, and concentration distribution), but does not include molecular diffusion, thermal conduction, convection, or the effects of acoustic propagation through sound-absorbing inhomogeneous media. This model is compared to experimentally measured photoacoustic sounds generated by scanning a 10.6-micron carbon dioxide (CO2) laser beam through small clouds of a photoactive gas, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). For the current investigation, the photoactive gas clouds are formed either by low flow-rate calibrated leak sources or by a laminar jet emerging from a 1.6-mm-diam tube. Model-measurement comparisons are presented over a 3- to 160-kHz bandwidth. Signal pulse shapes from simple gas cloud geometries are found to match calculated results when unmeasured gas cloud characteristics within the model are adjusted.

  16. A 6 GW nanosecond solid-state generator based on semiconductor opening switch.

    PubMed

    Gusev, A I; Pedos, M S; Rukin, S N; Timoshenkov, S P; Tsyranov, S N

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a nanosecond all solid-state generator providing peak power of up to 6 GW, output voltage of 500-900 kV, pulse length (full width at half maximum) of ∼7 ns across external loads of 40-100 Ω, and pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz in burst operation mode is described. The output pulse is generated by a semiconductor opening switch (SOS). A new SOS pumping circuit based on a double forming line (DFL) is proposed and its implementation described. As compared with a lumped capacitors-based pumping circuit, the DFL allows minimization of the inductance and stray capacitance of the reverse pumping circuit, and thus, an increase in the SOS cutoff current amplitude and generator output peak power as a whole. The pumping circuit provides a reverse current increasing through the SOS up to 14 kA within ∼12 ns. The SOS cuts off the current in ∼2 ns; the current cutoff rate reaches 7 kA/ns. The SOS braking power (the product of peak voltage and cutoff current) for an external load above 100 Ω is 13 GW.

  17. A 6 GW nanosecond solid-state generator based on semiconductor opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. I.; Pedos, M. S.; Rukin, S. N.; Timoshenkov, S. P.; Tsyranov, S. N.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a nanosecond all solid-state generator providing peak power of up to 6 GW, output voltage of 500-900 kV, pulse length (full width at half maximum) of ˜7 ns across external loads of 40-100 Ω, and pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz in burst operation mode is described. The output pulse is generated by a semiconductor opening switch (SOS). A new SOS pumping circuit based on a double forming line (DFL) is proposed and its implementation described. As compared with a lumped capacitors-based pumping circuit, the DFL allows minimization of the inductance and stray capacitance of the reverse pumping circuit, and thus, an increase in the SOS cutoff current amplitude and generator output peak power as a whole. The pumping circuit provides a reverse current increasing through the SOS up to 14 kA within ˜12 ns. The SOS cuts off the current in ˜2 ns; the current cutoff rate reaches 7 kA/ns. The SOS braking power (the product of peak voltage and cutoff current) for an external load above 100 Ω is 13 GW.

  18. Jar-opening challenges. Part 2: estimating the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles in healthy young adults during jar-opening tasks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L C; Chang, J H; Lin, C F; Hsu, H Y; Ho, K Y; Su, F C

    2009-07-01

    This study discusses the force-generating capacity of thumb muscles during jar-opening tasks using two grip patterns: the power grip and the precision grip. This study develops a three-dimensional biomechanical model of the thumb to predict muscle forces in jar-opening activities based on external forces measured by a custom-designed jar device. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. Each participant turned a jar lid of 66 mm diameter counterclockwise with maximal effort and preferred speed using both grip patterns. The average normal and tangential forces applied by the thumb to the jar lid show that the normal force is the primary contributive force for opening a jar. This normal force is approximately three times the tangential force. Muscular force-generating capacity measurements show that the major active muscles during a jar-opening activity for both grips include the flexor pollicis longus, flexor pollicis brevis, abductor pollicis brevis, adductor pollicis, and opponens pollicis. The total muscle force ratios for the precision grip and power grip with respect to externally applied forces are 5.6 and 4.7 respectively. These ratios indicate that the power grip pattern produces less muscle force per unit of external applied load. The technique proposed in this study provides a proper apparatus and model for measuring three-dimensional loads and estimating the force-generating capacity of each muscle and tendon of the thumb during jar-opening tasks. PMID:19623911

  19. Dynamical generation and detection of entanglement in neutral leviton pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasenbrook, David; Flindt, Christian

    2015-10-01

    The entanglement of coherently split electron-hole pairs in an electronic conductor is typically not considered accessible due to particle number conservation and fermionic superselection rules. We demonstrate here that current cross-correlation measurements at the outputs of an electronic Mach-Zehnder interferometer can nevertheless provide a robust witness of electron-hole entanglement. Specifically, we consider neutral excitations generated by modulating the transmission of an unbiased quantum point contact periodically in time. For an optimized modulation profile, an entangled state with one positively-charged leviton (a hole) and one negatively-charged leviton (an electron) gets delocalized over the two paths of the interferometer and is detected at the output arms. We evaluate the influence of finite electronic temperatures and dephasing corresponding to recent experiments.

  20. Reconfigurable optical interconnections via dynamic computer-generated holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Zhou, Shaomin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A system is proposed for optically providing one-to-many irregular interconnections, and strength-adjustable many-to-many irregular interconnections which may be provided with strengths (weights) w(sub ij) using multiple laser beams which address multiple holograms and means for combining the beams modified by the holograms to form multiple interconnections, such as a cross-bar switching network. The optical means for interconnection is based on entering a series of complex computer-generated holograms on an electrically addressed spatial light modulator for real-time reconfigurations, thus providing flexibility for interconnection networks for largescale practical use. By employing multiple sources and holograms, the number of interconnection patterns achieved is increased greatly.

  1. Reconfigurable Optical Interconnections Via Dynamic Computer-Generated Holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor); Zhou, Shao-Min (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A system is presented for optically providing one-to-many irregular interconnections, and strength-adjustable many-to-many irregular interconnections which may be provided with strengths (weights) w(sub ij) using multiple laser beams which address multiple holograms and means for combining the beams modified by the holograms to form multiple interconnections, such as a cross-bar switching network. The optical means for interconnection is based on entering a series of complex computer-generated holograms on an electrically addressed spatial light modulator for real-time reconfigurations, thus providing flexibility for interconnection networks for large-scale practical use. By employing multiple sources and holograms, the number of interconnection patterns achieved is increased greatly.

  2. Frontal dynamic aphasia in progressive supranuclear palsy: Distinguishing between generation and fluent sequencing of novel thoughts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Gail A; Spooner, Donna; Harrison, William J

    2015-10-01

    Frontal dynamic aphasia is characterised by a profound reduction in spontaneous speech despite well-preserved naming, repetition and comprehension. Since Luria (1966, 1970) designated this term, two main forms of dynamic aphasia have been identified: one, a language-specific selection deficit at the level of word/sentence generation, associated with left inferior frontal lesions; and two, a domain-general impairment in generating multiple responses or connected speech, associated with more extensive bilateral frontal and/or frontostriatal damage. Both forms of dynamic aphasia have been interpreted as arising due to disturbances in early prelinguistic conceptual preparation mechanisms that are critical for language production. We investigate language-specific and domain-general accounts of dynamic aphasia and address two issues: one, whether deficits in multiple conceptual preparation mechanisms can co-occur; and two, the contribution of broader cognitive processes such as energization, the ability to initiate and sustain response generation over time, to language generation failure. Thus, we report patient WAL who presented with frontal dynamic aphasia in the context of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). WAL was given a series of experimental tests that showed that his dynamic aphasia was not underpinned by a language-specific deficit in selection or in microplanning. By contrast, WAL presented with a domain-general deficit in fluent sequencing of novel thoughts. The latter replicated the pattern documented in a previous PSP patient (Robinson, et al., 2006); however, unique to WAL, generating novel thoughts was impaired but there was no evidence of a sequencing deficit because perseveration was absent. Thus, WAL is the first unequivocal case to show a distinction between novel thought generation and subsequent fluent sequencing. Moreover, WAL's generation deficit encompassed verbal and non-verbal responses, showing a similar (but more profoundly reduced) pattern

  3. Response of borehole extensometers to explosively generated dynamic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.C.; Brough, W.G.

    1980-08-25

    Commercially available, hydraulically anchored, multiple-point borehole extensometers (MPBX) were evaluated with respect to response to dynamic loads produced by explosions. This study is part of the DOE-funded Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C), currently being conducted in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site. The SFT-C is an investigation of the feasibility of short-term storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel assemblies at a plausible repository depth in granitic rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies are stored at a depth of 420 m for three to five years, and will then be retrieved. MPBX units are used in the SFT-C to measure both excavation-induced and thermally induced rock displacements. Long-term reliability of extensometers in this hostile environment is essential in order to obtain valid data during the course of this test. Research to date shows conclusively that extensometers of this type continue to function reliably even though subjected to accelerations of 1.8 g; research also implies that they function well though subjected to accelerations in excess of 100 g. MPBX survivability during the first four months of testing at ambient temperatures was about 90 percent.

  4. Learning through the Ages? Generational Inequalities and Inter-Generational Dynamics of Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory paper considers the concept of generation in the context of learning across the life course. Although researchers have often found considerable inequalities in participation by age, as well as strongly articulated attitudinal differences, there have so far been only a handful of studies that have explored these patterns through…

  5. Is {open_quotes}early commitment{close_quotes} in plan generation ever a good idea?

    SciTech Connect

    Joslin, D.; Pollack, M.E.

    1996-12-31

    Partial-Order Causal Link planners typically take a {open_quotes}least-commitment{close_quotes} approach to some decisions (notably, step ordering), postponing those decisions until constraints force them to be made. However, these planners rely to some degree on early commitments in making other types of decisions, including threat resolution and operator choice. We show why existing planners cannot support full least-commitment decision-making, and present an alternative approach that can. The approach has been implemented in the Descartes system, which we describe. We also provide experimental results that demonstrate that a least-commitment approach to planning can be profitably extended beyond what is done in POCL and similar planners, but that taking a least-commitment approach to every planning decision can be inefficient: early commitment in plan generation is sometimes a good idea.

  6. Influence of open water bodies on the generation of summertime convection over the Canadian Prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, D.; Bélair, S.; Carrera, M. L.; Leroyer, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are still numerous water features on the Canadian landscape that are not monitored. Specifically, there are landscape features (e.g. the prairies and Canadian shield regions of North America) that are ephemeral in nature and have a significant influence on convective storm generation and local weather patterns through turbulent exchanges of sensible and latent heat between land and the atmosphere. In this study we perform a series of numerical experiments with the GEM (Global Environmental Multiscale model) model at 2.5 km resolution to examine the sensitivity of the atmospheric boundary layer to the presence of open water bodies. At present the land-water fraction in the GEM model is specified by means of static geophysical databases which do not change annually. Uncertainty is introduced into this land-water fraction and the sensitivity of the resulting soil moisture and precipitation is quantified for a series of convective precipitation events over Alberta for the summer 2014 period.

  7. Dynamics of morphology-dependent resonances by openness in dielectric disks for TE polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jinhang; Rim, Sunghwan; Kim, Chil-Min

    2011-04-15

    We have studied the parametric evolution of morphology-dependent resonances according to the change of openness in a two-dimensional dielectric microdisk for transverse-electric polarization. We found that the dynamics exhibit avoided resonance crossings between the inner and outer resonances even though the corresponding billiard is integrable. Due to these recondite avoidances, inner and outer resonances can be exchanged and the quality (Q) factor of inner resonances is strongly affected. We analyze the diverse phenomena arising from these dynamics including the avoided crossings.

  8. Non-Markovian dynamics of multipartite open quantum systems with internal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyang; Dai, Hong-Yi; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Ming

    2015-04-01

    How internal interactions influence the state dynamics of multipartite open quantum systems is investigated with a typical model, where two interacting qubits are coupled with a non-Markovian vacuum field environment. A general state dynamical equation containing all the internal interactions is derived and its analytical solution is presented for the system initially in an extended Werner-like state and coupled with a Lorentzian field. With a discussion of concurrence evolutions in various systems, our research indicates that the entanglement could be significantly affected by internal interactions and omitting them imprudently would lead to errors in estimating features of the system.

  9. Dynamics of laser ablation of microparticles prior to nanoparticle generation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jaemyoung; Becker, Michael F.; Keto, John W.

    2001-06-15

    To better understand the process of nanoparticle formation when microspheres are ablated by a high-energy laser pulse, we investigated the Nd:YAG laser-induced breakdown of 20 {mu}m glass microspheres using time-resolved optical shadow images and Schlieren images. Time-resolved imaging showed the location of the initial breakdown and the shockwave motion over its first 300 {mu}m of expansion. From these measurements, we determined the shockwave velocity dependence on laser fluence. Measured shockwave velocities were in the range of 1{endash}10 km/s. We also developed a numerical model that simulated breakdown in the glass microsphere and the propagation of this disturbance through the edge of the sphere where it could launch an air shock. Our objective was to simulate the shockwave velocity dependence on laser fluence and to generate glass density, temperature, and mass velocity profiles after breakdown. The simulation and experimental data compared favorably. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Dynamic Gate Product and Artifact Generation from System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Maddalena; Delp, Christopher; Bindschadler, Duane; Sarrel, Marc; Wollaeger, Ryan; Lam, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) is gaining acceptance as a way to formalize systems engineering practice through the use of models. The traditional method of producing and managing a plethora of disjointed documents and presentations ("Power-Point Engineering") has proven both costly and limiting as a means to manage the complex and sophisticated specifications of modern space systems. We have developed a tool and method to produce sophisticated artifacts as views and by-products of integrated models, allowing us to minimize the practice of "Power-Point Engineering" from model-based projects and demonstrate the ability of MBSE to work within and supersede traditional engineering practices. This paper describes how we have created and successfully used model-based document generation techniques to extract paper artifacts from complex SysML and UML models in support of successful project reviews. Use of formal SysML and UML models for architecture and system design enables production of review documents, textual artifacts, and analyses that are consistent with one-another and require virtually no labor-intensive maintenance across small-scale design changes and multiple authors. This effort thus enables approaches that focus more on rigorous engineering work and less on "PowerPoint engineering" and production of paper-based documents or their "office-productivity" file equivalents.

  11. Force Generation and Dynamics of Individual Cilia under External Loading

    PubMed Central

    Hill, David B.; Swaminathan, Vinay; Estes, Ashley; Cribb, Jeremy; O'Brien, E. Timothy; Davis, C. William; Superfine, R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Motile cilia are unique multimotor systems that display coordination and periodicity while imparting forces to biological fluids. They play important roles in normal physiology, and ciliopathies are implicated in a growing number of human diseases. In this work we measure the response of individual human airway cilia to calibrated forces transmitted via spot-labeled magnetic microbeads. Cilia respond to applied forces by 1), a reduction in beat amplitude (up to an 85% reduction by 160–170 pN of force); 2), a decreased tip velocity proportionate to applied force; and 3), no significant change in beat frequency. Tip velocity reduction occurred in each beat direction, independently of the direction of applied force, indicating that the cilium is “driven” in both directions at all times. By applying a quasistatic force model, we deduce that axoneme stiffness is dominated by the rigidity of the microtubules, and that cilia can exert 62 ± 18 pN of force at the tip via the generation of 5.6 ± 1.6 pN/dynein head. PMID:20085719

  12. Quantum Information Biology: From Theory of Open Quantum Systems to Adaptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    This chapter reviews quantum(-like) information biology (QIB). Here biology is treated widely as even covering cognition and its derivatives: psychology and decision making, sociology, and behavioral economics and finances. QIB provides an integrative description of information processing by bio-systems at all scales of life: from proteins and cells to cognition, ecological and social systems. Mathematically QIB is based on the theory of adaptive quantum systems (which covers also open quantum systems). Ideologically QIB is based on the quantum-like (QL) paradigm: complex bio-systems process information in accordance with the laws of quantum information and probability. This paradigm is supported by plenty of statistical bio-data collected at all bio-scales. QIB re ects the two fundamental principles: a) adaptivity; and, b) openness (bio-systems are fundamentally open). In addition, quantum adaptive dynamics provides the most generally possible mathematical representation of these principles.

  13. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of opening reaction of molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobač, Vladmír; Lewis, James P.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    We report non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of the ring opening reaction of diarylethene (DAE) derivative molecules, both free standing and embedded between gold electrodes. Simulations are performed by the surface hopping method employing density functional theory. Typically, the free-standing molecules exhibit large quantum yields to open and close; however the process is quenched for the molecules embedded between electrodes. Our simulations reveal the importance of the DAE side chemical groups, which explain the efficiency of the quenching process. Namely, delocalization of the LUMO state contributes to electronic coupling between the molecule and electrodes, suppressing or enhancing the reaction process. The simulations indicate that a proper choice of the chemical side group, which provides the strong localization of the LUMO state, can substantially diminish the quenching mechanism. Additionally, we analyze a strong dependency of the quantum yield of the opening reaction coming from the mechanical strength of the molecules.

  14. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of opening reaction of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zobač, Vladmír; Lewis, James P; Jelínek, Pavel

    2016-07-15

    We report non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of the ring opening reaction of diarylethene (DAE) derivative molecules, both free standing and embedded between gold electrodes. Simulations are performed by the surface hopping method employing density functional theory. Typically, the free-standing molecules exhibit large quantum yields to open and close; however the process is quenched for the molecules embedded between electrodes. Our simulations reveal the importance of the DAE side chemical groups, which explain the efficiency of the quenching process. Namely, delocalization of the LUMO state contributes to electronic coupling between the molecule and electrodes, suppressing or enhancing the reaction process. The simulations indicate that a proper choice of the chemical side group, which provides the strong localization of the LUMO state, can substantially diminish the quenching mechanism. Additionally, we analyze a strong dependency of the quantum yield of the opening reaction coming from the mechanical strength of the molecules. PMID:27255903

  15. Influence of external magnetic field on dynamics of open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalandarov, Sh. A.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2007-03-15

    The influence of an external magnetic field on the non-Markovian dynamics of an open two-dimensional quantum system is investigated. The fluctuations of collective coordinate and momentum and transport coefficients are studied for a charged harmonic oscillator linearly coupled to a neutral bosonic heat bath. It is shown that the dissipation of collective energy slows down with increasing strength of the external magnetic field. The role of magnetic field in the diffusion processes is illustrated by several examples.

  16. Quantifying the behavior of price dynamics at opening time in stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Tomoshiro; Takada, Hideyuki; Nacher, Jose C.

    2014-11-01

    The availability of huge volume of financial data has offered the possibility for understanding the markets as a complex system characterized by several stylized facts. Here we first show that the time evolution of the Japan’s Nikkei stock average index (Nikkei 225) futures follows the resistance and breaking-acceleration effects when the complete time series data is analyzed. However, in stock markets there are periods where no regular trades occur between the close of the market on one day and the next day’s open. To examine these time gaps we decompose the time series data into opening time and intermediate time. Our analysis indicates that for the intermediate time, both the resistance and the breaking-acceleration effects are still observed. However, for the opening time there are almost no resistance and breaking-acceleration effects, and volatility is always constantly high. These findings highlight unique dynamic differences between stock markets and forex market and suggest that current risk management strategies may need to be revised to address the absence of these dynamic effects at the opening time.

  17. Reactive molecular dynamics of network polymers: Generation, characterization and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Chandrashekar

    The goal of this research was to gain a fundamental understanding of the properties of networks created by the ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) used in self-healing materials. To this end we used molecular simulation methods to generate realistic structures of DCPD networks, characterize their structures, and determine their mechanical properties. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, complemented by structural information derived from molecular dynamics simulations were used to reconstruct experimental Raman spectra and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) data. We performed coarse-grained simulations comparing networks generated via the ROMP reaction process and compared them to those generated via a RANDOM process, which led to the fundamental realization that the polymer topology has a unique influence on the network properties. We carried out fully atomistic simulations of DCPD using a novel algorithm for recreating ROMP reactions of DCPD molecules. Mechanical properties derived from these atomistic networks are in excellent agreement with those obtained from coarse-grained simulations in which interactions between nodes are subject to angular constraints. This comparison provides self-consistent validation of our simulation results and helps to identify the level of detail necessary for the coarse-grained interaction model. Simulations suggest networks can classified into three stages: fluid-like, rubber-like or glass-like delineated by two thresholds in degree of reaction alpha: The onset of finite magnitudes for the Young's modulus, alphaY, and the departure of the Poisson ration from 0.5, alphaP. In each stage the polymer exhibits a different predominant mechanical response to deformation. At low alpha < alphaY it flows. At alpha Y < alpha < alphaP the response is entropic with no change in internal energy. At alpha > alphaP the response is enthalpic change in internal energy. We developed graph theory

  18. STARS 2.0: 2nd-generation open-source archiving and query software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winegar, Tom

    2008-07-01

    The Subaru Telescope is in process of developing an open-source alternative to the 1st-generation software and databases (STARS 1) used for archiving and query. For STARS 2, we have chosen PHP and Python for scripting and MySQL as the database software. We have collected feedback from staff and observers, and used this feedback to significantly improve the design and functionality of our future archiving and query software. Archiving - We identified two weaknesses in 1st-generation STARS archiving software: a complex and inflexible table structure and uncoordinated system administration for our business model: taking pictures from the summit and archiving them in both Hawaii and Japan. We adopted a simplified and normalized table structure with passive keyword collection, and we are designing an archive-to-archive file transfer system that automatically reports real-time status and error conditions and permits error recovery. Query - We identified several weaknesses in 1st-generation STARS query software: inflexible query tools, poor sharing of calibration data, and no automatic file transfer mechanisms to observers. We are developing improved query tools and sharing of calibration data, and multi-protocol unassisted file transfer mechanisms for observers. In the process, we have redefined a 'query': from an invisible search result that can only transfer once in-house right now, with little status and error reporting and no error recovery - to a stored search result that can be monitored, transferred to different locations with multiple protocols, reporting status and error conditions and permitting recovery from errors.

  19. Experimental control of the transition from Markovian to non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bi-Heng; Li, Li; Huang, Yun-Feng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Piilo, Jyrki

    2011-12-01

    Realistic quantum mechanical systems are always exposed to an external environment. This often induces Markovian processes in which the system loses information to its surroundings. However, many quantum systems exhibit non-Markovian behaviour with a flow of information from the environment back to the system. The environment usually consists of large number of degrees of freedom which are difficult to control, but some sophisticated schemes for reservoir engineering have been developed. The control of open systems plays a decisive role, for example, in proposals for entanglement generation and dissipative quantum computation, for the design of quantum memories and in quantum metrology. Here we report an all-optical experiment which allows one to drive the open system from the Markovian to the non-Markovian regime, to control the information flow between the system and the environment, and to determine the degree of non-Markovianity by measurements on the open system.

  20. From Particles and Point Clouds to Voxel Models: High Resolution Modeling of Dynamic Landscapes in Open Source GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitasova, H.; Hardin, E. J.; Kratochvilova, A.; Landa, M.

    2012-12-01

    Multitemporal data acquired by modern mapping technologies provide unique insights into processes driving land surface dynamics. These high resolution data also offer an opportunity to improve the theoretical foundations and accuracy of process-based simulations of evolving landforms. We discuss development of new generation of visualization and analytics tools for GRASS GIS designed for 3D multitemporal data from repeated lidar surveys and from landscape process simulations. We focus on data and simulation methods that are based on point sampling of continuous fields and lead to representation of evolving surfaces as series of raster map layers or voxel models. For multitemporal lidar data we present workflows that combine open source point cloud processing tools with GRASS GIS and custom python scripts to model and analyze dynamics of coastal topography (Figure 1) and we outline development of coastal analysis toolbox. The simulations focus on particle sampling method for solving continuity equations and its application for geospatial modeling of landscape processes. In addition to water and sediment transport models, already implemented in GIS, the new capabilities under development combine OpenFOAM for wind shear stress simulation with a new module for aeolian sand transport and dune evolution simulations. Comparison of observed dynamics with the results of simulations is supported by a new, integrated 2D and 3D visualization interface that provides highly interactive and intuitive access to the redesigned and enhanced visualization tools. Several case studies will be used to illustrate the presented methods and tools and demonstrate the power of workflows built with FOSS and highlight their interoperability.Figure 1. Isosurfaces representing evolution of shoreline and a z=4.5m contour between the years 1997-2011at Cape Hatteras, NC extracted from a voxel model derived from series of lidar-based DEMs.

  1. Monte Carlo method based radiative transfer simulation of stochastic open forest generated by circle packing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shengye; Tamura, Masayuki

    2013-10-01

    Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) method is a versatile application for simulating radiative transfer regime of the Solar - Atmosphere - Landscape system. Moreover, it can be used to compute the radiation distribution over a complex landscape configuration, as an example like a forest area. Due to its robustness to the complexity of the 3-D scene altering, MCRT method is also employed for simulating canopy radiative transfer regime as the validation source of other radiative transfer models. In MCRT modeling within vegetation, one basic step is the canopy scene set up. 3-D scanning application was used for representing canopy structure as accurately as possible, but it is time consuming. Botanical growth function can be used to model the single tree growth, but cannot be used to express the impaction among trees. L-System is also a functional controlled tree growth simulation model, but it costs large computing memory. Additionally, it only models the current tree patterns rather than tree growth during we simulate the radiative transfer regime. Therefore, it is much more constructive to use regular solid pattern like ellipsoidal, cone, cylinder etc. to indicate single canopy. Considering the allelopathy phenomenon in some open forest optical images, each tree in its own `domain' repels other trees. According to this assumption a stochastic circle packing algorithm is developed to generate the 3-D canopy scene in this study. The canopy coverage (%) and the tree amount (N) of the 3-D scene are declared at first, similar to the random open forest image. Accordingly, we randomly generate each canopy radius (rc). Then we set the circle central coordinate on XY-plane as well as to keep circles separate from each other by the circle packing algorithm. To model the individual tree, we employ the Ishikawa's tree growth regressive model to set the tree parameters including DBH (dt), tree height (H). However, the relationship between canopy height (Hc) and trunk height (Ht) is

  2. On trajectory generation for flexible space crane: Inverse dynamics analysis by LATDYN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Housner, J. M.; Wu, S.-C.; Chang, C.-W.

    1989-01-01

    For future in-space construction facility, one or more space cranes capable of manipulating and positioning large and massive spacecraft components will be needed. Inverse dynamics was extensively studied as a basis for trajectory generation and control of robot manipulators. The focus here is on trajectory generation in the gross-motion phase of space crane operation. Inverse dynamics of the flexible crane body is much more complex and intricate as compared with rigid robot link. To model and solve the space crane's inverse dynamics problem, LATDYN program which employs a three-dimensional finite element formulation for the multibody truss-type structures will be used. The formulation is oriented toward a joint dominated structure which is suitable for the proposed space crane concept. To track a planned trajectory, procedures will be developed to obtain the actuation profile and dynamics envelope which are pertinent to the design and performance requirements of the space crane concept.

  3. Semi-automatic simulation model generation of virtual dynamic networks for production flow planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenczyk, D.; Skolud, B.; Olender, M.

    2016-08-01

    Computer modelling, simulation and visualization of production flow allowing to increase the efficiency of production planning process in dynamic manufacturing networks. The use of the semi-automatic model generation concept based on parametric approach supporting processes of production planning is presented. The presented approach allows the use of simulation and visualization for verification of production plans and alternative topologies of manufacturing network configurations as well as with automatic generation of a series of production flow scenarios. Computational examples with the application of Enterprise Dynamics simulation software comprising the steps of production planning and control for manufacturing network have been also presented.

  4. Analysis of the potential of the electrofluid dynamic wind-driven generator

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, R.

    1983-01-01

    The Electrofluid Dynamic wind-driven generator has been investigated under government supported programs since 1975. The concept features the direct conversion of wind energy into electrical power with virtually no moving parts. Research on this concept has resulted in a detailed operational theory of electrofluid systems and a preliminary conceptual design of a full-scale generator. Analysis of the potential of this concept has established a range for the value indicators and an understanding of its optimization potential and uncertainty. A comparison is made between the value indicators for the Electrofluid Dynamic concept and those of several conventional WECS.

  5. Dynamic visual cues induce jaw opening and closing by tiger beetles during pursuit of prey

    PubMed Central

    Zurek, Daniel B.; Perkins, Madeleine Q.; Gilbert, Cole

    2014-01-01

    In dynamic locomotory contexts, visual cues often trigger adaptive behaviour by the viewer, yet studies investigating how animals determine impending collisions typically employ either stationary viewers or objects. Here, we describe a dynamic situation of visually guided prey pursuit in which both impending prey contact and escape elicit observable adaptive behaviours in the pursuer, a predatory beetle. We investigated which visual cues may independently control opening and closing of the beetle's jaws during chases of prey dummies. Jaw opening and closing typically occur when prey is within the 60° binocular field, but not at specific distances, angular sizes or time-to-collision. We show that a sign change in the expansion rate of the target image precedes jaw opening (16 ms) and closing (35 ms), signalling to the beetle that it is gaining on the target or that the target is getting away. We discuss the ‘sloppiness' of such variation in the lag of the behavioural response, especially jaw closing, as an adaptation to uncertainty about target position due to degradation of the target image by motion blur from the fast-running beetle. PMID:25376803

  6. A next-generation open-source toolkit for FITS file image viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Eric; Inagaki, Takeshi; Kackley, Russell

    2012-09-01

    The astronomical community has a long tradition of sharing and collaborating on FITS file tools, including viewers. Several excellent viewers such as DS9 and Skycat have been successfully reused again and again. Yet this "first generation" of viewers predate the emergence of a new class of powerful object-oriented scripting languages such as Python, which has quickly become a very popular language for astronomical (and general scientific) use. Integration and extension of these viewers by Python is cumbersome. Furthermore, these viewers are also built on older widget toolkits such as Tcl/Tk, which are becoming increasingly difficult to support and extend as time passes. Suburu Telescope's second-generation observation control system (Gen2) is built on a a foundation of Python-based technologies and leverages several important astronomically useful packages such as numpy and pyfits. We have written a new flexible core widget for viewing FITS files which is available in versions for both the modern Gtk and Qt-based desktops. The widget offers seamless integration with pyfits and numpy arrays of FITS data. A full-featured viewer based on this widget has been developed, and supports a plug-in architecture in which new features can be added by scripting simple Python modules. In this paper we will describe and demonstrate the capabilities of the new widget and viewer and discuss the architecture of the software which allows new features and widgets to easily developed by subclassing a powerful abstract base class. The software will be released as open-source.

  7. Automated Flight Dynamics Product Generation for the EOS AM-1 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matusow, Carla

    1999-01-01

    As part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, the Earth Observing System (EOS) AM-1 spacecraft is designed to monitor long-term, global, environmental changes. Because of the complexity of the AM-1 spacecraft, the mission operations center requires more than 80 distinct flight dynamics products (reports). To create these products, the AM-1 Flight Dynamics Team (FDT) will use a combination of modified commercial software packages (e.g., Analytical Graphic's Satellite ToolKit) and NASA-developed software applications. While providing the most cost-effective solution to meeting the mission requirements, the integration of these software applications raises several operational concerns: (1) Routine product generation requires knowledge of multiple applications executing on variety of hardware platforms. (2) Generating products is a highly interactive process requiring a user to interact with each application multiple times to generate each product. (3) Routine product generation requires several hours to complete. (4) User interaction with each application introduces the potential for errors, since users are required to manually enter filenames and input parameters as well as run applications in the correct sequence. Generating products requires some level of flight dynamics expertise to determine the appropriate inputs and sequencing. To address these issues, the FDT developed an automation software tool called AutoProducts, which runs on a single hardware platform and provides all necessary coordination and communication among the various flight dynamics software applications. AutoProducts, autonomously retrieves necessary files, sequences and executes applications with correct input parameters, and deliver the final flight dynamics products to the appropriate customers. Although AutoProducts will normally generate pre-programmed sets of routine products, its graphical interface allows for easy configuration of customized and one-of-a-kind products. Additionally, Auto

  8. Probing the holographic principle using dynamical gauge effects from open spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Price, Craig; Liu, Qi; Gemelke, Nathan

    2016-05-01

    Dynamical gauge fields result from locally defined symmetries and an effective over-labeling of quantum states. Coupling atoms weakly to a reservoir of laser modes can create an effective dynamical gauge field purely due to the disregard of information in the optical states. Here we report measurements revealing effects of open spin-orbit coupling in a system where an effective model can be formed from a non-abelian SU(2) × U(1) field theory following the Yang-Mills construct. Forming a close analogy to dynamical gauge effects in quantum chromodynamics, we extract a measure of atomic motion which reveals the analog of a closing mass gap for the relevant gauge boson, shedding insight on long standing open problems in gauge-fixing scale anomalies. Using arguments following the holographic principle, we measure scaling relations which can be understood by quantifying information present in the local potential. New prospects using these techniques for developing fractionalization of multi-particle and macroscopic systems using dissipative and non-abelian gauge fields will also be discussed. We acknowledge support from NSF Award No. 1068570, and the Charles E. Kaufman Foundation.

  9. Synchronization of fractional-order colored dynamical networks via open-plus-closed-loop control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lixin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the synchronization of a fractional-order colored complex dynamical network model is studied for the first time. In this network model, color edges imply that both the outer coupling topology and the inner interactions between any pair of nodes may be different, and color nodes mean that local dynamics may be different. Based on the stability theory of fractional-order systems, the scheme of synchronization for fractional-order colored complex dynamical networks is presented. To achieve the synchronization of a complex fractional-order edge-colored network, the open-plus-closed-loop (OPCL) strategy is adopted and effective controllers for synchronization are designed. The open-plus-closed-loop (OPCL) strategy avoids the need for computation of eigenvalues of a very large matrix. Then, a synchronization method for a class of fractional-order colored complex network, containing both colored edges and colored nodes, is developed and some effective synchronization conditions via close-loop control are presented. Two examples of numerical simulations are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed control strategies.

  10. Opening of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels enhance hydroxyl radical generation induced by MPP(+) in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Obata, Toshio; Nakashima, Michiko

    2016-07-15

    The present study examined whether opening of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels can enhance 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced hydroxyl radical (OH) generation in rat striatum. Rats were anesthetized, and sodium salicylate in Ringer's solution (0.5nmol/ml per min) was infused through a microdialysis probe to detect the generation of OH as reflected by the non-enzymatic formation of 2.3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) in the striatum. MPP(+) (5mM) enhanced generation of OH with concomitant increased efflux of dopamine (DA). Cromakalim (100μM), a KATP channel opener, through the microdialysis probe significantly increased both DA efflux and OH formation induced by MPP(+). Another KATP channel opener, nicorandil (1mM), also increased the level DA or DHBA, but these changes were not significant. However, in the presence of glibenclamide (10μM), a KATP channel antagonist, and the increase of MPP(+)-induced DA or DHBA were not observed. Cromakalim (10, 50 and 100μM) increased MPP(+)-induced DHBA formation in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the effects of cromakalim in the presence of glibenclamide were abolished. These results suggest that opening of KATP channels may cause OH generation by MPP(+). PMID:27288802

  11. Improved Confinement due to Open Ergodic Field Lines Imposed by the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finken, K. H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Jakubowski, M. W.; de Bock, M. F. M.; Bozhenkov, S.; Busch, C.; von Hellermann, M.; Jaspers, R.; Kikuchi, Y.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Lehnen, M.; Schega, D.; Schmitz, O.; Spatschek, K. H.; Unterberg, B.; Wingen, A.; Wolf, R. C.; Zimmermann, O.

    2007-02-01

    The ergodization of the magnetic field lines imposed by the dynamic ergodic diverter (DED) in TEXTOR can lead both to confinement improvement and to confinement deterioration. The cases of substantial improvement are in resonant ways related to particular conditions in which magnetic flux tubes starting at the X points of induced islands are connected with the wall. This opening process is connected with a characteristic modification of the heat deposition pattern at the divertor target plate and leads to a substantial increase and steepening of the core plasma density and pressure. The improvement is tentatively attributed to a modification of the electric potential in the plasma carried by the open field lines. The confinement improvement bases on a spontaneous density built up due to the application of the DED and is primarily a particle confinement improvement.

  12. Generating a Dynamic Synthetic Population – Using an Age-Structured Two-Sex Model for Household Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Namazi-Rad, Mohammad-Reza; Mokhtarian, Payam; Perez, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Generating a reliable computer-simulated synthetic population is necessary for knowledge processing and decision-making analysis in agent-based systems in order to measure, interpret and describe each target area and the human activity patterns within it. In this paper, both synthetic reconstruction (SR) and combinatorial optimisation (CO) techniques are discussed for generating a reliable synthetic population for a certain geographic region (in Australia) using aggregated- and disaggregated-level information available for such an area. A CO algorithm using the quadratic function of population estimators is presented in this paper in order to generate a synthetic population while considering a two-fold nested structure for the individuals and households within the target areas. The baseline population in this study is generated from the confidentialised unit record files (CURFs) and 2006 Australian census tables. The dynamics of the created population is then projected over five years using a dynamic micro-simulation model for individual- and household-level demographic transitions. This projection is then compared with the 2011 Australian census. A prediction interval is provided for the population estimates obtained by the bootstrapping method, by which the variability structure of a predictor can be replicated in a bootstrap distribution. PMID:24733522

  13. Dynamic opto-VLSI lens and lenslet generation with programmable focal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenglin; Alameh, Kamal E.; Zheng, Rong; Ahderom, Selam

    2004-12-01

    In this paper we present and demonstrate a dynamic lens and lens array generation method with programmable focal length based on an Opto-VLSI processor. The Opto-VLSI is driven by computer generated algorithm to generate a discrete Fresnel lens phase hologram. By optimizing the phase hologram, lenses and lens arrays of different focal lengths ranging from 300mm to infinity can be realized. The optical axis of each lens element can be independently addressed to simultaneously focus and steer an optical beam within an angular range of +/-0.5°.

  14. An evolutionary approach toward dynamic self-generated fuzzy inference systems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Er, Meng Joo

    2008-08-01

    An evolutionary approach toward automatic generation of fuzzy inference systems (FISs), termed evolutionary dynamic self-generated fuzzy inference systems (EDSGFISs), is proposed in this paper. The structure and parameters of an FIS are generated through reinforcement learning, whereas an action set for training the consequents of the FIS is evolved via genetic algorithms (GAs). The proposed EDSGFIS algorithm can automatically create, delete, and adjust fuzzy rules according to the performance of the entire system, as well as evaluation of individual fuzzy rules. Simulation studies on a wall-following task by a mobile robot show that the proposed EDSGFIS approach is superior to other related methods.

  15. Explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions for charged particle dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruili; Qin, Hong; Tang, Yifa; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of a charged particle in the canonical coordinates is a Hamiltonian system, and the well-known symplectic algorithm has been regarded as the de facto method for numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems due to its long-term accuracy and fidelity. For long-term simulations with high efficiency, explicit symplectic algorithms are desirable. However, it is generally believed that explicit symplectic algorithms are only available for sum-separable Hamiltonians, and this restriction limits the application of explicit symplectic algorithms to charged particle dynamics. To overcome this difficulty, we combine the familiar sum-split method and a generating function method to construct second- and third-order explicit symplectic algorithms for dynamics of charged particle. The generating function method is designed to generate explicit symplectic algorithms for product-separable Hamiltonian with form of H(x,p)=p_{i}f(x) or H(x,p)=x_{i}g(p). Applied to the simulations of charged particle dynamics, the explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions demonstrate superiorities in conservation and efficiency. PMID:27575228

  16. Explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions for charged particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruili; Qin, Hong; Tang, Yifa; Liu, Jian; He, Yang; Xiao, Jianyuan

    2016-07-01

    Dynamics of a charged particle in the canonical coordinates is a Hamiltonian system, and the well-known symplectic algorithm has been regarded as the de facto method for numerical integration of Hamiltonian systems due to its long-term accuracy and fidelity. For long-term simulations with high efficiency, explicit symplectic algorithms are desirable. However, it is generally believed that explicit symplectic algorithms are only available for sum-separable Hamiltonians, and this restriction limits the application of explicit symplectic algorithms to charged particle dynamics. To overcome this difficulty, we combine the familiar sum-split method and a generating function method to construct second- and third-order explicit symplectic algorithms for dynamics of charged particle. The generating function method is designed to generate explicit symplectic algorithms for product-separable Hamiltonian with form of H (x ,p ) =pif (x ) or H (x ,p ) =xig (p ) . Applied to the simulations of charged particle dynamics, the explicit symplectic algorithms based on generating functions demonstrate superiorities in conservation and efficiency.

  17. Analysis of dynamic behavior of multiple-stage planetary gear train used in wind driven generator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jungang; Wang, Yong; Huo, Zhipu

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic model of multiple-stage planetary gear train composed of a two-stage planetary gear train and a one-stage parallel axis gear is proposed to be used in wind driven generator to analyze the influence of revolution speed and mesh error on dynamic load sharing characteristic based on the lumped parameter theory. Dynamic equation of the model is solved using numerical method to analyze the uniform load distribution of the system. It is shown that the load sharing property of the system is significantly affected by mesh error and rotational speed; load sharing coefficient and change rate of internal and external meshing of the system are of obvious difference from each other. The study provides useful theoretical guideline for the design of the multiple-stage planetary gear train of wind driven generator.

  18. Image communication scheme based on dynamic visual cryptography and computer generated holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palevicius, Paulius; Ragulskis, Minvydas

    2015-01-01

    Computer generated holograms are often exploited to implement optical encryption schemes. This paper proposes the integration of dynamic visual cryptography (an optical technique based on the interplay of visual cryptography and time-averaging geometric moiré) with Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. A stochastic moiré grating is used to embed the secret into a single cover image. The secret can be visually decoded by a naked eye if only the amplitude of harmonic oscillations corresponds to an accurately preselected value. The proposed visual image encryption scheme is based on computer generated holography, optical time-averaging moiré and principles of dynamic visual cryptography. Dynamic visual cryptography is used both for the initial encryption of the secret image and for the final decryption. Phase data of the encrypted image are computed by using Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. The optical image is decrypted using the computationally reconstructed field of amplitudes.

  19. Dynamical calculation of third-harmonic generation in a semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guazzotti, Stefano; Pusch, Andreas; Reiter, Doris E.; Hess, Ortwin

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear phenomena in optically excited semiconductor structures are of high interest. Here we develop a model capable of studying the dynamics of the photoexcited carriers, including Coulomb interaction on a Hartree-Fock level, on the same footing as the dynamics of the light field impinging on an arbitrary photonic structure. Applying this method to calculate the third-harmonic generation in a semiconductor quantum well embedded in a Bragg mirror structure, we find that the power-law exponent of the intensity dependence of the third-harmonic generation depends on the frequency of the exciting pulse. Off-resonant pulses follow the expected cubic dependence, while the exponent is smaller for resonant pulses due to saturation effects in the induced carrier density. Our study provides a detailed understanding of the carrier and light field dynamics during nonlinear processes.

  20. Dynamite: a flexible code generating language for dynamic programming methods used in sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Birney, E; Durbin, R

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a code generating language, called Dynamite, specialised for the production and subsequent manipulation of complex dynamic programming methods for biological sequence comparison. From a relatively simple text definition file Dynamite will produce a variety of implementations of a dynamic programming method, including database searches and linear space alignments. The speed of the generated code is comparable to hand written code, and the additional flexibility has proved invaluable in designing and testing new algorithms. An innovation is a flexible labelling system, which can be used to annotate the original sequences with biological information. We illustrate the Dynamite syntax and flexibility by showing definitions for dynamic programming routines (i) to align two protein sequences under the assumption that they are both poly-topic transmembrane proteins, with the simultaneous assignment of transmembrane helices and (ii) to align protein information to genomic DNA, allowing for introns and sequencing error.

  1. The Development of Dynamic Inquiry Performances within an Open Inquiry Setting: A Comparison to Guided Inquiry Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeh, Irit; Zion, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic inquiry learning emphasizes aspects of change, intellectual flexibility, and critical thinking. Dynamic inquiry learning is characterized by the following criteria: learning as a process, changes during the inquiry, procedural understanding, and affective points of view. This study compared the influence of open versus guided inquiry…

  2. EpiTools: An Open-Source Image Analysis Toolkit for Quantifying Epithelial Growth Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide; Hoppe, Andreas; Restrepo, Simon; Gatti, Lorenzo; Tournier, Alexander L; Tapon, Nicolas; Basler, Konrad; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-01-11

    Epithelia grow and undergo extensive rearrangements to achieve their final size and shape. Imaging the dynamics of tissue growth and morphogenesis is now possible with advances in time-lapse microscopy, but a true understanding of their complexities is limited by automated image analysis tools to extract quantitative data. To overcome such limitations, we have designed a new open-source image analysis toolkit called EpiTools. It provides user-friendly graphical user interfaces for accurately segmenting and tracking the contours of cell membrane signals obtained from 4D confocal imaging. It is designed for a broad audience, especially biologists with no computer-science background. Quantitative data extraction is integrated into a larger bioimaging platform, Icy, to increase the visibility and usability of our tools. We demonstrate the usefulness of EpiTools by analyzing Drosophila wing imaginal disc growth, revealing previously overlooked properties of this dynamic tissue, such as the patterns of cellular rearrangements.

  3. EpiTools: An Open-Source Image Analysis Toolkit for Quantifying Epithelial Growth Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Davide; Hoppe, Andreas; Restrepo, Simon; Gatti, Lorenzo; Tournier, Alexander L.; Tapon, Nicolas; Basler, Konrad; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Epithelia grow and undergo extensive rearrangements to achieve their final size and shape. Imaging the dynamics of tissue growth and morphogenesis is now possible with advances in time-lapse microscopy, but a true understanding of their complexities is limited by automated image analysis tools to extract quantitative data. To overcome such limitations, we have designed a new open-source image analysis toolkit called EpiTools. It provides user-friendly graphical user interfaces for accurately segmenting and tracking the contours of cell membrane signals obtained from 4D confocal imaging. It is designed for a broad audience, especially biologists with no computer-science background. Quantitative data extraction is integrated into a larger bioimaging platform, Icy, to increase the visibility and usability of our tools. We demonstrate the usefulness of EpiTools by analyzing Drosophila wing imaginal disc growth, revealing previously overlooked properties of this dynamic tissue, such as the patterns of cellular rearrangements. PMID:26766446

  4. EpiTools: An Open-Source Image Analysis Toolkit for Quantifying Epithelial Growth Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Heller, Davide; Hoppe, Andreas; Restrepo, Simon; Gatti, Lorenzo; Tournier, Alexander L; Tapon, Nicolas; Basler, Konrad; Mao, Yanlan

    2016-01-11

    Epithelia grow and undergo extensive rearrangements to achieve their final size and shape. Imaging the dynamics of tissue growth and morphogenesis is now possible with advances in time-lapse microscopy, but a true understanding of their complexities is limited by automated image analysis tools to extract quantitative data. To overcome such limitations, we have designed a new open-source image analysis toolkit called EpiTools. It provides user-friendly graphical user interfaces for accurately segmenting and tracking the contours of cell membrane signals obtained from 4D confocal imaging. It is designed for a broad audience, especially biologists with no computer-science background. Quantitative data extraction is integrated into a larger bioimaging platform, Icy, to increase the visibility and usability of our tools. We demonstrate the usefulness of EpiTools by analyzing Drosophila wing imaginal disc growth, revealing previously overlooked properties of this dynamic tissue, such as the patterns of cellular rearrangements. PMID:26766446

  5. Multi-valley effective mass theory for device-level modeling of open quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Baczewski, Andrew D.; Frees, Adam; Gamble, John King; Montano, Ines; Moussa, Jonathan E.; Muller, Richard P.; Nielsen, Erik

    2015-03-01

    Simple models for semiconductor-based quantum information processors can provide useful qualitative descriptions of device behavior. However, as experimental implementations have matured, more specific guidance from theory has become necessary, particularly in the form of quantitatively reliable yet computationally efficient modeling. Besides modeling static device properties, improved characterization of noisy gate operations requires a more sophisticated description of device dynamics. Making use of recent developments in multi-valley effective mass theory, we discuss device-level simulations of the open system quantum dynamics of a qubit interacting with phonons and other noise sources. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Average entanglement dynamics in open two-qubit systems with continuous monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Ivonne; Viviescas, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive implementation of the quantum trajectory theory for the description of the entanglement dynamics in a Markovian open quantum system made of two qubits. We introduce the average concurrence to characterize the entanglement in the system and derive a deterministic evolution equation for it that depends on the ways in which information is read from the environment. This buildt-in flexibility of the method is used to address two actual issues in quantum information: entanglement protection and entanglement estimation. We identify general physical situations in which an entanglement protection protocol based on local monitoring of the environment can be implemented. Additionally, we methodically find unravelings of the system dynamics providing analytical tight bounds for the unmonitored entanglement in the system at all times. We conclude by showing the independence of the method from the choice of entanglement measure.

  7. The effect of open and closed kinetic chain exercises on dynamic balance ability of normal healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yoo Jung; Park, Soo Jin; Jefferson, John; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of open and closed kinetic chain exercise on the dynamic balance ability of healthy young adults. [Subjects] Thirty-three healthy adults participated in this study. [Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to either an open kinetic chain exercise group (n=17) or a closed kinetic chain exercise group (n=16). Both the open kinetic chain and closed kinetic chain exercise groups performed 3 sets of exercises 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Dynamic balance was measured at the beginning and end of the 6-week training period, including anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and total displacement of the center of pressure. [Results] Both exercise groups showed improvement in balance parameters but the improvement was only statistically significant in the closed kinetic chain group. [Conclusion] Closed kinetic chain exercise appears to be more effective at improving of dynamic balance ability than open kinetic chain exercise within a 6-week training period. PMID:24259825

  8. The Effect of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Exercises on Dynamic Balance Ability of Normal Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yoo Jung; Park, Soo Jin; Jefferson, John; Kim, Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of open and closed kinetic chain exercise on the dynamic balance ability of healthy young adults. [Subjects] Thirty-three healthy adults participated in this study. [Methods] Subjects were randomly assigned to either an open kinetic chain exercise group (n=17) or a closed kinetic chain exercise group (n=16). Both the open kinetic chain and closed kinetic chain exercise groups performed 3 sets of exercises 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Dynamic balance was measured at the beginning and end of the 6-week training period, including anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and total displacement of the center of pressure. [Results] Both exercise groups showed improvement in balance parameters but the improvement was only statistically significant in the closed kinetic chain group. [Conclusion] Closed kinetic chain exercise appears to be more effective at improving of dynamic balance ability than open kinetic chain exercise within a 6-week training period. PMID:24259825

  9. Charge Generation Dynamics in Efficient All-Polymer Solar Cells: Influence of Polymer Packing and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Bhoj R; Lee, Changyeon; Younts, Robert; Lee, Wonho; Danilov, Evgeny; Kim, Bumjoon J; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-12-23

    All-polymer solar cells exhibit rapid progress in power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 2 to 7.7% over the past few years. While this improvement is primarily attributed to efficient charge transport and balanced mobility between the carriers, not much is known about the charge generation dynamics in these systems. Here we measured exciton relaxation and charge separation dynamics using ultrafast spectroscopy in polymer/polymer blends with different molecular packing and morphology. These measurements indicate that preferential face-on configuration with intermixed nanomorphology increases the charge generation efficiency. In fact, there is a direct quantitative correlation between the free charge population in the ultrafast time scales and the external quantum efficiency, suggesting not only the transport but also charge generation is key for the design of high performance all polymer solar cells. PMID:26630116

  10. Charge Generation Dynamics in Efficient All-Polymer Solar Cells: Influence of Polymer Packing and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Bhoj R; Lee, Changyeon; Younts, Robert; Lee, Wonho; Danilov, Evgeny; Kim, Bumjoon J; Gundogdu, Kenan

    2015-12-23

    All-polymer solar cells exhibit rapid progress in power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 2 to 7.7% over the past few years. While this improvement is primarily attributed to efficient charge transport and balanced mobility between the carriers, not much is known about the charge generation dynamics in these systems. Here we measured exciton relaxation and charge separation dynamics using ultrafast spectroscopy in polymer/polymer blends with different molecular packing and morphology. These measurements indicate that preferential face-on configuration with intermixed nanomorphology increases the charge generation efficiency. In fact, there is a direct quantitative correlation between the free charge population in the ultrafast time scales and the external quantum efficiency, suggesting not only the transport but also charge generation is key for the design of high performance all polymer solar cells.

  11. Ring-opening photochemistry in cyclohexadiene derivatives: Ultrafast dynamics in solution and model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arruda, Brenden C.

    The ultrafast dynamics of molecules in condensed phases is an area of research that has the possibility to inform the design of molecules for functional nano-devices as well as improve on understanding of biological processes. Presented in this thesis are experiments probing the excited and ground state dynamics of molecules based on the 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD) chromophore. The reversible photochemistry of these molecules is applicable to the study of photo-switching systems under consideration for molecular memory devices as well as the photobiological synthesis of Vitamin D3. The full reaction mechanism for a number of CHD derivatives is deduced from ultrafast broadband transient absorption spectroscopy and supporting density functional calculations. Steric groups on the cyclohexadiene backbone can affect both the excited state properties as well as the dynamic approach to equilibrium for the hexatriene photoproducts following excitation of CHD. The photoreaction was characterized in multiple solvent environments with a range of viscosity, polarity, hydrogen-bonding capacity, and packing density. The conformational dynamics of the photoproducts depend on the substitution pattern and solvent. The alpha-phellandrene photoproduct relaxes to a fully trans form much like hexatriene, while alpha-terpinene and 7-dehydrocholesterol photoproducts are limited to certain conformations by steric clashes. The solvent affects the relaxation timescales differently for each photoproduct, but all of the dynamics occur within 5 - 10 ps. The ring opening of DHC that occurs in the biological synthesis of Vitamin D3 is also examined in a liposomal model for the cell membrane. In this anisotropic environment, the excited state dynamics are significantly lengthened to ~ 11 -- 50 ps depending on the liposome properties. This suggests significant interaction between DHC and the lipids that affects the ring-opening reaction coordinate. The excited state and photoproduct conformational

  12. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Vicente J.; Lewandowski, Edward J.; Callahan, John

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical RPS launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources was designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  13. SRG110 Stirling Generator Dynamic Simulator Vibration Test Results and Analysis Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Edward J.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Goodnight, Thomas W.; Callahan, John

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Lockheed Martin (LM), and NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have been developing the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG110) for use as a power system for space science missions. The launch environment enveloping potential missions results in a random input spectrum that is significantly higher than historical radioisotope power system (RPS) launch levels and is a challenge for designers. Analysis presented in prior work predicted that tailoring the compliance at the generator-spacecraft interface reduced the dynamic response of the system thereby allowing higher launch load input levels and expanding the range of potential generator missions. To confirm analytical predictions, a dynamic simulator representing the generator structure, Stirling convertors and heat sources were designed and built for testing with and without a compliant interface. Finite element analysis was performed to guide the generator simulator and compliant interface design so that test modes and frequencies were representative of the SRG110 generator. This paper presents the dynamic simulator design, the test setup and methodology, test article modes and frequencies and dynamic responses, and post-test analysis results. With the compliant interface, component responses to an input environment exceeding the SRG110 qualification level spectrum were all within design allowables. Post-test analysis included finite element model tuning to match test frequencies and random response analysis using the test input spectrum. Analytical results were in good overall agreement with the test results and confirmed previous predictions that the SRG110 power system may be considered for a broad range of potential missions, including those with demanding launch environments.

  14. [Study on the control of dynamic artificial limb ankle based on central pattern generator].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Xu, Caiyu; Li, Mingyue; Su, Longtao

    2014-12-01

    In order to obtain the normal gait for the prosthesis-carrier with the change of external environment and gait, we designed a model of dynamic ankle prosthesis and control system and introduced the strategy of central pattern generator (CPG) about the moving trail of dynamic ankle prosthesis. The dynamic parts, which are incorporated in the model of dynamic ankle prosthesis, provide power in order to have anthropic function and character. The tool of Matlab/simulink was used to simulate the strategy. The simulation results showed that the strategy of CPG learn- ing control in this study was effective and could track the reference trail rapidly and fit the moving trail of a person's normal limb. It can make the prosthetic timely regulation and action, enhance the prosthetic intelligence. It has im- portant practical value for intelligent prosthesis development based on this analysis of technology.

  15. Emergency Department Visit Forecasting and Dynamic Nursing Staff Allocation Using Machine Learning Techniques With Readily Available Open-Source Software.

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Gallardo-Antolín, Ascensión; Cuchí Alfaro, Miguel; Pérez Pérez, María Carmen; Montero Martínez, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Although emergency department visit forecasting can be of use for nurse staff planning, previous research has focused on models that lacked sufficient resolution and realistic error metrics for these predictions to be applied in practice. Using data from a 1100-bed specialized care hospital with 553,000 patients assigned to its healthcare area, forecasts with different prediction horizons, from 2 to 24 weeks ahead, with an 8-hour granularity, using support vector regression, M5P, and stratified average time-series models were generated with an open-source software package. As overstaffing and understaffing errors have different implications, error metrics and potential personnel monetary savings were calculated with a custom validation scheme, which simulated subsequent generation of predictions during a 4-year period. Results were then compared with a generalized estimating equation regression. Support vector regression and M5P models were found to be superior to the stratified average model with a 95% confidence interval. Our findings suggest that medium and severe understaffing situations could be reduced in more than an order of magnitude and average yearly savings of up to €683,500 could be achieved if dynamic nursing staff allocation was performed with support vector regression instead of the static staffing levels currently in use.

  16. Note: Compact, reusable inductive-storage-cum-opening-switch based 1.5 GW single-shot pulsed power generator.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rohit; Shyam, Anurag

    2014-03-01

    The results of a very-compact (Marx generator-cum-inductor confined into 0.20 m cylindrical diameter and 0.75 m length) and light-weight (<15 kg) pulsed-power generator are being presented in the paper. The load voltage at 10.5 Ω is measured 125 kV (150 ns full width at half maximum FWHM) with 1.5 GW peak-power. The use of single-optimized-exploding-copper-wire along with the use of air for all the switches of the generator (closing switches of Marx generator used as primary energy source and opening switch of exploding wire) make device very attractive. Marx generator shape itself provides the desired inductance for the inductive storage.

  17. The Dynamics of the Aspirations and Demands of Different Generations of Russia's Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khotkina, Z. A.

    2013-01-01

    Survey data comparing the life aspirations of three generations of Russians show an increase from the level of the Soviet generation of young people to the perestroika generation, followed by a decline in the generation of young people who were born and grew up in today's "market" Russia. One chief cause of the downward dynamic of…

  18. Dynamics of capillary-driven liquid-liquid displacement in open microchannels.

    PubMed

    Yang, D; Krasowska, M; Priest, C; Ralston, J

    2014-11-28

    The dynamics of the spontaneous spreading of a liquid droplet along an open hydrophilic microchannel filled with another immiscible liquid is primarily determined by the competition between the capillary driving force and the viscous drag. While the former force depends on the channel cross-section and dimensions, interfacial tension between two liquids and the contact angle formed between the channel's wall and the two liquids, the latter arises from the motion of fluid molecules in the two bulk liquids. This paper focuses on the influence of the outer (displaced) phase viscosity. In general, as the viscosity of the displaced phase increases relative to the viscosity of the displacing phase, the velocity of the liquid-liquid meniscus decreases. The experiments were interpreted by extending a previously established correlation for liquid-vapour systems (J. Phys. Chem. C, 2011, 115(38), 18761-18769) in open microchannels of the same geometry. The relationship between the liquid-liquid flow dynamics and the properties of the liquids (e.g. viscosities) is still unclear. Nonetheless, by taking a self-consistent empirical approach to estimate the influence of the viscosities on the flow kinetics for a given system, it is possible to obtain a reasonable theoretical description for the experimental system over a specific range of viscosity ratios.

  19. A comprehensive photometric study of dynamically evolved small van den Bergh-Hagen open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, Andrés E.

    2016-09-01

    We present results from Johnson UBV, Kron-Cousins RI and Washington CT1T2 photometries for seven van den Bergh-Hagen (vdBH) open clusters, namely, vdBH 1, 10, 31, 72, 87, 92, and 118. The high-quality, multi-band photometric data sets were used to trace the cluster stellar density radial profiles and to build colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and colour-colour (CC) diagrams from which we estimated their structural parameters and fundamental astrophysical properties. The clusters in our sample cover a wide age range, from ˜ 60 Myr up to 2.8 Gyr, are of relatively small size (˜ 1 - 6 pc) and are placed at distances from the Sun which vary between 1.8 and 6.3 kpc, respectively. We also estimated lower limits for the cluster present-day masses as well as half-mass relaxation times (tr). The resulting values in combination with the structural parameter values suggest that the studied clusters are in advanced stages of their internal dynamical evolution (age/tr ˜ 20 - 320), possibly in the typical phase of those tidally filled with mass segregation in their core regions. Compared to open clusters in the solar neighbourhood, the seven vdBH clusters are within more massive (˜ 80 - 380M$⊙$), with higher concentration parameter values (c ˜ 0.75-1.15) and dynamically evolved ones.

  20. HAPCAD: An open-source tool to detect PCR crossovers in next-generation sequencing generated HLA data.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Shana L; Bredeson, Jessen V; Roy, Scott W; Lane, Julie A; Noble, Janelle A

    2016-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) based HLA genotyping can generate PCR artifacts corresponding to IMGT/HLA Database alleles, for which multiple examples have been observed, including sequence corresponding to the HLA-DRB1(∗)03:42 allele. Repeat genotyping of 131 samples, previously genotyped as DRB1(∗)03:01 homozygotes using probe-based methods, resulted in the heterozygous call DRB1(∗)03:01+DRB1(∗)03:42. The apparent rare DRB1(∗)03:42 allele is hypothesized to be a "hybrid amplicon" generated by PCR crossover, a process in which a partial PCR product denatures from its template, anneals to a different allele template, and extends to completion. Unlike most PCR crossover products, "hybrid amplicons" always corresponds to an IMGT/HLA Database allele, necessitating a case-by-case analysis of whether its occurrence reflects the actual allele or is simply the result of PCR crossover. The Hybrid Amplicon/PCR Crossover Artifact Detector (HAPCAD) program mimics jumping PCR in silico and flags allele sequences that may also be generated as hybrid amplicon.

  1. Below-ground ectomycorrhizal community in natural Tuber melanosporum truffle grounds and dynamics after canopy opening.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Barreda, Sergi; Reyna, Santiago

    2012-07-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber melanosporum fruits in association with Quercus in natural forests of Spain. Some of these stands are managed to keep an open canopy and meet the habitat requirements of the fungus. However, there are few quantitative studies analysing in these forests the relationship between soil environment and T. melanosporum. Eight forest stands which produce T. melanosporum have been monitored for 6 years in order to characterise the below-ground ectomycorrhizal community and to assess its temporal dynamics after experimental canopy opening. The brûlé, the ground where T. melanosporum fruits, shows a distinct ectomycorrhizal community, characterised by lower density of active ectomycorrhizal tips, lower morphotype richness per soil volume, higher abundance of T. melanosporum and lower abundance of Cenococcum geophilum than soil closest to the trunk of the host Quercus ilex. Opening the canopy has not stimulated an increase in T. melanosporum, suggesting that a shift in the soil environment alone will not trigger the formation of new truffières in the short term. The dry climate of these truffières may be a factor as T. melanosporum abundance appears to be sensitive to annual weather conditions.

  2. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    SciTech Connect

    Archambeau, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself.

  3. Extended-Term Dynamic Simulations with High Penetrations of Photovoltaic Generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Concepcion, Ricky James; Elliott, Ryan Thomas; Donnelly, Matt; Sanchez-Gasca, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The uncontrolled intermittent availability of renewable energy sources makes integration of such devices into today's grid a challenge. Thus, it is imperative that dynamic simulation tools used to analyze power system performance are able to support systems with high amounts of photovoltaic (PV) generation. Additionally, simulation durations expanding beyond minutes into hours must be supported. This report aims to identify the path forward for dynamic simulation tools to accom- modate these needs by characterizing the properties of power systems (with high PV penetration), analyzing how these properties affect dynamic simulation software, and offering solutions for po- tential problems. We present a study of fixed time step, explicit numerical integration schemes that may be more suitable for these goals, based on identified requirements for simulating high PV penetration systems. We also present the alternative of variable time step integration. To help determine the characteristics of systems with high PV generation, we performed small signal sta- bility studies and time domain simulations of two representative systems. Along with feedback from stakeholders and vendors, we identify the current gaps in power system modeling including fast and slow dynamics and propose a new simulation framework to improve our ability to model and simulate longer-term dynamics.

  4. Dynamical Processes in Open Quantum Systems from a TDDFT Perspective: Resonances and Electron Photoemission.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; De Giovannini, Umberto; Rubio, Angel

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of different computational methods to describe time-dependent phenomena in open quantum systems and their extension to a density-functional framework. We focus the discussion on electron emission processes in atoms and molecules addressing excited-state lifetimes and dissipative processes. Initially we analyze the concept of an electronic resonance, a central concept in spectroscopy associated with a metastable state from which an electron eventually escapes (electronic lifetime). Resonances play a fundamental role in many time-dependent molecular phenomena but can be rationalized from a time-independent context in terms of scattering states. We introduce the method of complex scaling, which is used to capture resonant states as localized states in the spirit of usual bound-state methods, and work on its extension to static and time-dependent density-functional theory. In a time-dependent setting, complex scaling can be used to describe excitations in the continuum as well as wave packet dynamics leading to electron emission. This process can also be treated by using open boundary conditions which allow time-dependent simulations of emission processes without artificial reflections at the boundaries (i.e., borders of the simulation box). We compare in detail different schemes to implement open boundaries, namely transparent boundaries using Green functions, and absorbing boundaries in the form of complex absorbing potentials and mask functions. The last two are regularly used together with time-dependent density-functional theory to describe the electron emission dynamics of atoms and molecules. Finally, we discuss approaches to the calculation of energy and angle-resolved time-dependent pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular systems. PMID:25860253

  5. Multiple Model-Informed Open-Loop Control of Uncertain Intracellular Signaling Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Perley, Jeffrey P.; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Rundell, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  6. Multiple model-informed open-loop control of uncertain intracellular signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Perley, Jeffrey P; Mikolajczak, Judith; Harrison, Marietta L; Buzzard, Gregery T; Rundell, Ann E

    2014-04-01

    Computational approaches to tune the activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways both predictably and selectively will enable researchers to explore and interrogate cell biology with unprecedented precision. Techniques to control complex nonlinear systems typically involve the application of control theory to a descriptive mathematical model. For cellular processes, however, measurement assays tend to be too time consuming for real-time feedback control and models offer rough approximations of the biological reality, thus limiting their utility when considered in isolation. We overcome these problems by combining nonlinear model predictive control with a novel adaptive weighting algorithm that blends predictions from multiple models to derive a compromise open-loop control sequence. The proposed strategy uses weight maps to inform the controller of the tendency for models to differ in their ability to accurately reproduce the system dynamics under different experimental perturbations (i.e. control inputs). These maps, which characterize the changing model likelihoods over the admissible control input space, are constructed using preexisting experimental data and used to produce a model-based open-loop control framework. In effect, the proposed method designs a sequence of control inputs that force the signaling dynamics along a predefined temporal response without measurement feedback while mitigating the effects of model uncertainty. We demonstrate this technique on the well-known Erk/MAPK signaling pathway in T cells. In silico assessment demonstrates that this approach successfully reduces target tracking error by 52% or better when compared with single model-based controllers and non-adaptive multiple model-based controllers. In vitro implementation of the proposed approach in Jurkat cells confirms a 63% reduction in tracking error when compared with the best of the single-model controllers. This study provides an experimentally

  7. Transformation properties of dynamic χ(2) holograms generating at the difference frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloglyadov, E. V.; Stasel'ko, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    The transformation properties of dynamic χ(2) holograms generating at the difference frequency are analyzed as applied to the position and scales of reconstructed images. Some regularities are established for the spatial localization and scales of images for different combinations of frequencies and positions of the reference and object point sources, involved in the formation of a holographic image. The formation of amplitude transparency images, reconstructed by dynamic χ(2) holograms with a decrease or conservation of the object beam frequency, and their transformations are experimentally demonstrated.

  8. Electric field-induced second harmonic generation studies of chromophore orientational dynamics in photorefractive polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostroverkhova, Oksana; Stickrath, Andrew; Singer, Kenneth D.

    2002-06-01

    Photorefractive (PR) polymers are promising for use in various applications that require fast response times. The main factors that determine the PR speed in polymers are photoconductivity and chromophore reorientation in an electric field. In this article, we investigate the chromophore reorientational dynamics in various PR composites using the electric field second harmonic generation (EFISHG) technique, and then relate it to the PR dynamics observed in a four-wave mixing holographic experiment. We also report on the enhancement of the EFISHG signal in the presence of HeNe light, which we attribute to a photoinduced internal electric field that formed in the PR polymer.

  9. An Open-Source Galaxy Redshift Survey Simulator for next-generation Large Scale Structure Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seijak, Uros

    Galaxy redshift surveys produce three-dimensional maps of the galaxy distribution. On large scales these maps trace the underlying matter fluctuations in a relatively simple manner, so that the properties of the primordial fluctuations along with the overall expansion history and growth of perturbations can be extracted. The BAO standard ruler method to measure the expansion history of the universe using galaxy redshift surveys is thought to be robust to observational artifacts and understood theoretically with high precision. These same surveys can offer a host of additional information, including a measurement of the growth rate of large scale structure through redshift space distortions, the possibility of measuring the sum of neutrino masses, tighter constraints on the expansion history through the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and constraints on the scale-dependence and non-Gaussianity of the primordial fluctuations. Extracting this broadband clustering information hinges on both our ability to minimize and subtract observational systematics to the observed galaxy power spectrum, and our ability to model the broadband behavior of the observed galaxy power spectrum with exquisite precision. Rapid development on both fronts is required to capitalize on WFIRST's data set. We propose to develop an open-source computational toolbox that will propel development in both areas by connecting large scale structure modeling and instrument and survey modeling with the statistical inference process. We will use the proposed simulator to both tailor perturbation theory and fully non-linear models of the broadband clustering of WFIRST galaxies and discover novel observables in the non-linear regime that are robust to observational systematics and able to distinguish between a wide range of spatial and dynamic biasing models for the WFIRST galaxy redshift survey sources. We have demonstrated the utility of this approach in a pilot study of the SDSS-III BOSS galaxies, in which we

  10. Woody Plant Invasion Changes Soil Water Storage Dynamics And Shifts Runoff Generation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, L.; Zou, C.; Stebler, E.

    2015-12-01

    Infiltration excess and saturation excess are the main runoff generation mechanisms for rangeland watersheds, while the role of subsurface stormflow is highly variable. Climate, topography, vegetation, and edaphic factors determine the runoff generation processes for a given location and a substantial change in any of these factors, either alone or combined, could result in a change in soil water storage dynamics and cause a shift in the runoff generation mechanisms. Three paired experimental watersheds were established in 2010 to quantify the streamflow responses to woody plant invasion into grassland in the South-central Great Plains. Here, we compare the runoff generation mechanisms under both vegetation types using soil water content and surface runoff data from 2011 to 2014. These data were collected every 5-15 minutes during the period experiencing both extremely high and low precipitation events. The objectives of this study include: 1). Understand change in soil moisture content and storage dynamic across the entire soil profile under grassland and woody plant invaded grassland watersheds; 2). Determine the dominant runoff mechanism for each vegetation type; and 3). Illustrate the process which shifts the runoff generation mechanisms. These results are important in understanding the impact of woody plant expansions on altering surface water and groundwater availability and therefore affect water resources sustainability management in the South-central Great Plains.

  11. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  12. Dynamical generation of string tension and stiffness in strings and membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, H.

    1988-08-01

    Simple field theoretic models are presented in which a surface acquires an extrinsic curvature stiffness dynamically. This, in turn, leads to a spontaneous generation of tension with all the attractive features of spontaneous strings (glueballs, thermal deconfinement, quark potential with good long- and short-distance behaviour). The simplest model mimics the generation of curvature stiffness in oil-water interfaces by soap molecules and is therefore of potential use in the theory of microemulsions. Another accounts for the emission and reabsorption of thin color electric flux lines, into extrinsic space, from a world-sheet of a string thereby producing bending stiffness.

  13. Dynamics and control of Stirling engines in a 15 kWe solar electric generation concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, R. L.; Bahrami, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of kinematic and free piston Stirling engines in a 15 kWe dish-electric approach for solar thermal electric generation. Initially, the principle of operation of Stirling engines in solar thermal electric generation is discussed. Then, under certain simplifying assumptions, mathematical models describing the dynamic operation of the kinematic and free piston Stirling engines are developed. It is found that the engine dynamics may be approximated by second order models. Control mechanisms for both types of Stirling engines are discussed. An approach based on the modulation of the working fluid mean pressure is presented. It is concluded that this approach offers a fast and effective means of control. The free piston Stirling engine, being a thermally driven mechanical oscillator, presents unique control requirements. These are discussed in this paper.

  14. Multistable particle-field dynamics in cavity-generated optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterauer, Dominik J.; Niedenzu, Wolfgang; Ritsch, Helmut

    2015-05-01

    Polarizable particles trapped in a resonator-sustained optical-lattice potential generate strong position-dependent backaction on the intracavity field. In the quantum regime, particles in different energy bands are connected to different intracavity light intensities and optical-lattice depths. This generates a highly nonlinear coupled particle-field dynamics. For a given pump strength and detuning, a factorizing mean-field approach predicts several self-consistent stationary solutions of strongly distinct photon numbers and motional states. Quantum Monte Carlo wave-function simulations of the master equation confirm these predictions and reveal complex multimodal photon-number and particle-momentum distributions. Using larger nanoparticles in such a setup thus constitutes a well-controllable playground to study nonlinear quantum dynamics and the buildup of macroscopic quantum superpositions at the quantum-classical boundary.

  15. Dynamic angle stability of an industrial turbo generator connected in power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grouni, S.; Hallak, M.; Aibeche, A.; Ramdani, A.; Bouallegue, K.

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with the dynamic problem of oscillation and damping on an industrial turbo generator connected to infinite networks. A set of equations that governs the turbo generator connected to infinite bus are written in characteristic form. The power system stabilizer PSS applied in order to solve the problem of damping internal angle and operating power system synchronization. The PSS model described is inspired from Heffron-Philips model is applied on real parameters simulation under Matlab simulink. The results obtained from practical application are advantageous which variations of amplitude and time mitigation oscillations magnitude of electrical and mechanical output variables. This numerical experiment permits to gain more simplicity compared with several methods applied in a real operating prototyping systems. The PSS that is used will improve the dynamic stability.

  16. Dynamical mass generation in unquenched QED using the Dyson-Schwinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Kızılersü, Ayse; Sizer, Tom; Pennington, Michael R.; Williams, Anthony G.; Williams, Richard

    2015-03-13

    We present a comprehensive numerical study of dynamical mass generation for unquenched QED in four dimensions, in the absence of four-fermion interactions, using the Dyson-Schwinger approach. We begin with an overview of previous investigations of criticality in the quenched approximation. To this we add an analysis using a new fermion-antifermion-boson interaction ansatz, the Kizilersu-Pennington (KP) vertex, developed for an unquenched treatment. After surveying criticality in previous unquenched studies, we investigate the performance of the KP vertex in dynamical mass generation using a renormalized fully unquenched system of equations. This we compare with the results for two hybrid vertices incorporating the Curtis-Pennington vertex in the fermion equation. We conclude that the KP vertex is as yet incomplete, and its relative gauge-variance is due to its lack of massive transverse components in its design.

  17. Dynamical mass generation in unquenched QED using the Dyson-Schwinger equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kızılersü, Ayse; Sizer, Tom; Pennington, Michael R.; Williams, Anthony G.; Williams, Richard

    2015-03-13

    We present a comprehensive numerical study of dynamical mass generation for unquenched QED in four dimensions, in the absence of four-fermion interactions, using the Dyson-Schwinger approach. We begin with an overview of previous investigations of criticality in the quenched approximation. To this we add an analysis using a new fermion-antifermion-boson interaction ansatz, the Kizilersu-Pennington (KP) vertex, developed for an unquenched treatment. After surveying criticality in previous unquenched studies, we investigate the performance of the KP vertex in dynamical mass generation using a renormalized fully unquenched system of equations. This we compare with the results for two hybrid vertices incorporating themore » Curtis-Pennington vertex in the fermion equation. We conclude that the KP vertex is as yet incomplete, and its relative gauge-variance is due to its lack of massive transverse components in its design.« less

  18. Investigation of rocket-powered, open-cycle, magnetohydrodynamic generators for high, pulsed power needs in space. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J.W.

    1986-11-01

    This investigation examined the possibility of using a rocket-powered magnetohydrodynamic generator for pulse power in space of 300 megawatts (MW). The result is a preliminary design of an MHD generator using an open cycle disk channel and a single superconducting solenoid coil. The disk channel acts as a thrust deflector, and internal vanes counteract induced vorticity. The use of a solid-fuel-wafer grain design rocket motor is proposed for increased electrical conductivity and pulse operation of the generator. Using conservative parameters, a generator design capable of being carried on one or two space-shuttle launches is developed with estimated mass of 24,450 kg and estimated power output of 1346 MW. The nominal operation time before refurbishment is 115 seconds; the restriction operation time is deterioration of the channel throat. This design exceeds present nuclear and solar-cell power systems in power output per unit mass.

  19. Dynamical gap generation in graphene nanoribbons: An effective relativistic field theoretical model

    SciTech Connect

    Chaves, A. J.; Paula, W. de; Frederico, T.; Lima, G. D.; Cordeiro, C. E.; Delfino, A.

    2011-04-15

    We show that the assumption of a nontrivial zero band gap for a graphene sheet within an effective relativistic field theoretical model description of interacting Dirac electrons on the surface of graphene describes the experimental band gap of graphene nanoribbons for a wide range of widths. The graphene band gap is dynamically generated, corresponding to a nontrivial gapless solution, found in the limit of an infinitely wide graphene ribbon. The nanoribbon band gap is determined by the experimental graphene work function.

  20. A convection-driven long-range linear gradient generator with dynamic control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Chen, Chia-Hung; Xiang, Zhuolin; Wang, Ming; Lee, Chengkuo

    2015-03-21

    We developed a novel gradient generator to achieve long range and linear chemical gradients with a dynamic control function. The length of the gradient can be on the centimetre scale. The gradient profile can be tuned by changing the flow rates. The device can work in both high flow rate regimes with large shear stress and low flow rate regimes with minimum shear stress. The drug screening function was demonstrated by the viability test of PC-9 cancer cells.

  1. Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e

  2. Evolutionary Fates and Dynamic Functionalization of Young Duplicate Genes in Arabidopsis Genomes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Tao, Feng; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication is a primary means to generate genomic novelties, playing an essential role in speciation and adaptation. Particularly in plants, a high abundance of duplicate genes has been maintained for significantly long periods of evolutionary time. To address the manner in which young duplicate genes were derived primarily from small-scale gene duplication and preserved in plant genomes and to determine the underlying driving mechanisms, we generated transcriptomes to produce the expression profiles of five tissues in Arabidopsis thaliana and the closely related species Arabidopsis lyrata and Capsella rubella. Based on the quantitative analysis metrics, we investigated the evolutionary processes of young duplicate genes in Arabidopsis. We determined that conservation, neofunctionalization, and specialization are three main evolutionary processes for Arabidopsis young duplicate genes. We explicitly demonstrated the dynamic functionalization of duplicate genes along the evolutionary time scale. Upon origination, duplicates tend to maintain their ancestral functions; but as they survive longer, they might be likely to develop distinct and novel functions. The temporal evolutionary processes and functionalization of plant duplicate genes are associated with their ancestral functions, dynamic DNA methylation levels, and histone modification abundances. Furthermore, duplicate genes tend to be initially expressed in pollen and then to gain more interaction partners over time. Altogether, our study provides novel insights into the dynamic retention processes of young duplicate genes in plant genomes. PMID:27485883

  3. Dynamics of a pulsed laser generated tin plasma expanding in an oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreca, F.; Fazio, E.; Neri, F.; Barletta, E.; Trusso, S.; Fazio, B.

    2005-10-01

    Semiconducting tin oxide can be successfully deposited by means of the laser ablation technique. In particular by ablating metallic tin in a controlled oxygen atmosphere, thin films of SnOx have been deposited. The partial oxygen pressure at which the films are deposited strongly influences both the stoichiometry and the structural properties of the films. In this work, we present a study of the expansion dynamics of the plasma generated by ablating a tin target by means of a pulsed laser using time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography imaging of the expanding plasma. Both Sn I and Sn II optical emission lines have been observed from the time-integrated spectroscopy. Time resolved-measurements revealed the dynamics of the expanding plasma in the ambient oxygen atmosphere. Stoichiometry of the films has been determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and correlated to the expansion dynamics of the plasma.

  4. Functional second harmonic generation microscopy probes molecular dynamics with high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Förderer, Moritz; Georgiev, Tihomir; Mosqueira, Matias; Fink, Rainer H. A.; Vogel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for label free ex vivo or in vivo imaging, widely used to investigate structure and organization of endogenous SHG emitting proteins such as myosin or collagen. Polarization resolved SHG microscopy renders supplementary information and is used to probe different molecular states. This development towards functional SHG microscopy is calling for new methods for high speed functional imaging of dynamic processes. In this work we present two approaches with linear polarized light and demonstrate high speed line scan measurements of the molecular dynamics of the motor protein myosin with a time resolution of 1 ms in mammalian muscle cells. Such a high speed functional SHG microscopy has high potential to deliver new insights into structural and temporal molecular dynamics under ex vivo or in vivo conditions. PMID:26977360

  5. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) heat transport system dynamics and steam generator control: Figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Dynamic modeling of LMFBR heat transport system is discussed. Uncontrolled transient behavior of individual components and of the integrated heat transport system are considered. For each component, results showing specific dynamic features of the component and/or model capability were generated. Controlled dynamic behavior for alternative steam generator control systems during forced and natural sodium coolant circulation was analyzed. Combined free and forced convection of laminar and turbulent vertical pipe flow of liquid metals was investigated.

  6. Generating relevant kinetic Monte Carlo catalogs using temperature accelerated dynamics with control over the accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Voter, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    We develop a variation of the temperature accelerated dynamics (TAD) method, called the p-TAD method, that efficiently generates an on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) process catalog with control over the accuracy of the catalog. It is assumed that transition state theory is valid. The p-TAD method guarantees that processes relevant at the timescales of interest to the simulation are present in the catalog with a chosen confidence. A confidence measure associated with the process catalog is derived. The dynamics is then studied using the process catalog with the KMC method. Effective accuracy of a p-TAD calculation is derived when a KMC catalog is reused for conditions different from those the catalog was originally generated for. Different KMC catalog generation strategies that exploit the features of the p-TAD method and ensure higher accuracy and/or computational efficiency are presented. The accuracy and the computational requirements of the p-TAD method are assessed. Comparisons to the original TAD method are made. As an example, we study dynamics in sub-monolayer Ag/Cu(110) at the time scale of seconds using the p-TAD method. It is demonstrated that the p-TAD method overcomes several challenges plaguing the conventional KMC method.

  7. Experimental study of stable imbibition displacements in a model open fracture. I. Local avalanche dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clotet, Xavier; Ortín, Jordi; Santucci, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the spatiotemporal dynamics of stable imbibition fronts in a disordered medium, in the regime of capillary disorder, for a wide range of experimental conditions. We have used silicone oils of various viscosities μ and nearly identical oil-air surface tension and forced them to slowly invade a model open fracture at different constant flow rates v . In this first part of the study we have focused on the local dynamics at a scale below the size of the quenched disorder. Changing μ and v independently, we have found that the dynamics is not simply controlled by the capillary number Ca˜μ v . Specifically, we have found that the wide statistical distributions of local front velocities, and their large spatial correlations along the front, are indeed controlled by the capillary number Ca. However, local velocities exhibit also very large temporal correlations, and these correlations depend more strongly on the mean imposed velocity v than on the viscosity μ of the invading fluid. Correlations between local velocities lead to a burstlike dynamics. Avalanches, defined as clusters of large local velocities, follow power-law distributions—both in size and duration—with exponential cutoffs that diverge as Ca→0 , the pinning-depinning transition of stable imbibition displacements. Large data sets have led to reliable statistics, from which we have derived accurate values of critical exponents of the relevant power-law distributions. We have investigated also the dependence of their cutoffs on μ and v and related them to the autocorrelations of local velocities in space and time.

  8. Experimental study of stable imbibition displacements in a model open fracture. I. Local avalanche dynamics.

    PubMed

    Clotet, Xavier; Ortín, Jordi; Santucci, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of an experimental investigation of the spatiotemporal dynamics of stable imbibition fronts in a disordered medium, in the regime of capillary disorder, for a wide range of experimental conditions. We have used silicone oils of various viscosities μ and nearly identical oil-air surface tension and forced them to slowly invade a model open fracture at different constant flow rates v. In this first part of the study we have focused on the local dynamics at a scale below the size of the quenched disorder. Changing μ and v independently, we have found that the dynamics is not simply controlled by the capillary number Ca∼μv. Specifically, we have found that the wide statistical distributions of local front velocities, and their large spatial correlations along the front, are indeed controlled by the capillary number Ca. However, local velocities exhibit also very large temporal correlations, and these correlations depend more strongly on the mean imposed velocity v than on the viscosity μ of the invading fluid. Correlations between local velocities lead to a burstlike dynamics. Avalanches, defined as clusters of large local velocities, follow power-law distributions-both in size and duration-with exponential cutoffs that diverge as Ca→0, the pinning-depinning transition of stable imbibition displacements. Large data sets have led to reliable statistics, from which we have derived accurate values of critical exponents of the relevant power-law distributions. We have investigated also the dependence of their cutoffs on μ and v and related them to the autocorrelations of local velocities in space and time. PMID:26871064

  9. Structure and Dynamics of Reentrant Nematics: Any Open Questions after Almost 40 Years?

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Marco G.; Schoen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Liquid crystals have attracted enormous interest because of the variety of their phases and richness of their application. The interplay of general physical symmetries and specific molecular features generates a myriad of different phenomena. A surprising behavior of liquid crystals is the reentrancy of phases as temperature, pressure, or concentration are varied. Here, we review the main experimental facts and the different theoretical scenarios that have guided the understanding of bulk reentrant nematics. Recently, some computer simulations of a system confined to nanoscopic scales have found new dynamical features of the reentrant nematic phase. We discuss this prediction in relation with the available experimental evidence on reentrant nematics and with the dynamics of liquids in strongly confined environments. PMID:21954364

  10. Open-system dynamics of entanglement:a key issues review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aolita, Leandro; de Melo, Fernando; Davidovich, Luiz

    2015-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the fields of quantum information processing and quantum technologies is the detailed coherent control over each and every constituent of quantum systems with an ever increasing number of particles. Within this endeavor, harnessing of many-body entanglement against the detrimental effects of the environment is a major pressing issue. Besides being an important concept from a fundamental standpoint, entanglement has been recognized as a crucial resource for quantum speed-ups or performance enhancements over classical methods. Understanding and controlling many-body entanglement in open systems may have strong implications in quantum computing, quantum simulations of many-body systems, secure quantum communication or cryptography, quantum metrology, our understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, and other important questions of quantum foundations. In this paper we present an overview of recent theoretical and experimental efforts to underpin the dynamics of entanglement under the influence of noise. Entanglement is thus taken as a dynamic quantity on its own, and we survey how it evolves due to the unavoidable interaction of the entangled system with its surroundings. We analyze several scenarios, corresponding to different families of states and environments, which render a very rich diversity of dynamical behaviors. In contrast to single-particle quantities, like populations and coherences, which typically vanish only asymptotically in time, entanglement may disappear at a finite time. In addition, important classes of entanglement display an exponential decay with the number of particles when subject to local noise, which poses yet another threat to the already-challenging scaling of quantum technologies. Other classes, however, turn out to be extremely robust against local noise. Theoretical results and recent experiments regarding the difference between local and global decoherence are summarized. Control and

  11. Infragravity wave generation and dynamics over a mild slope beach : Experiments and numerical computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cienfuegos, R.; Duarte, L.; Hernandez, E.

    2008-12-01

    Charasteristic frequencies of gravity waves generated by wind and propagating towards the coast are usually comprised between 0.05Hz and 1Hz. Nevertheless, lower frequecy waves, in the range of 0.001Hz and 0.05Hz, have been observed in the nearshore zone. Those long waves, termed as infragravity waves, are generated by complex nonlinear mechanisms affecting the propagation of irregular waves up to the coast. The groupiness of an incident random wave field may be responsible for producing a slow modulation of the mean water surface thus generating bound long waves travelling at the group speed. Similarly, a quasi- periodic oscillation of the break-point location, will be accompained by a slow modulation of set-up/set-down in the surf zone and generation and release of long waves. If the primary structure of the carrying incident gravity waves is destroyed (e.g. by breaking), forced long waves can be freely released and even reflected at the coast. Infragravity waves can affect port operation through resonating conditions, or strongly affect sediment transport and beach morphodynamics. In the present study we investigate infragravity wave generation mechanisms both, from experiments and numerical computations. Measurements were conducted at the 70-meter long wave tank, located at the Instituto Nacional de Hidraulica (Chile), prepared with a beach of very mild slope of 1/80 in order to produce large surf zone extensions. A random JONSWAP type wave field (h0=0.52m, fp=0.25Hz, Hmo=0.17m) was generated by a piston wave-maker and measurements of the free surface displacements were performed all over its length at high spatial resolution (0.2m to 1m). Velocity profiles were also measured at four verticals inside the surf zone using an ADV. Correlation maps of wave group envelopes and infragravity waves are computed in order to identify long wave generation and dynamics in the experimental set-up. It appears that both mechanisms (groupiness and break-point oscillation) are

  12. The Zebrafish Neurophenome Database (ZND): a dynamic open-access resource for zebrafish neurophenotypic data.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan; Zapolsky, Ivan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Pham, Mimi; Collins, Christopher; Roth, Andrew; Stewart, Adam Michael; St-Pierre, Paul; Hirons, Budd; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-03-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are widely used in neuroscience research, where their utility as a model organism is rapidly expanding. Low cost, ease of experimental manipulations, and sufficient behavioral complexity make zebrafish a valuable tool for high-throughput studies in biomedicine. To complement the available repositories for zebrafish genetic information, there is a growing need for the collection of zebrafish neurobehavioral and neurological phenotypes. For this, we are establishing the Zebrafish Neurophenome Database (ZND; www.tulane.edu/∼znpindex/search ) as a new dynamic online open-access data repository for behavioral and related physiological data. ZND, currently focusing on adult zebrafish, combines zebrafish neurophenotypic data with a simple, easily searchable user interface, which allow scientists to view and compare results obtained by other laboratories using various treatments in different testing paradigms. As a developing community effort, ZND is expected to foster innovative research using zebrafish by federating the growing body of zebrafish neurophenotypic data.

  13. Open and closed shear-walls in high-rise structural systems: Static and dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Nitti, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a General Algorithm is applied to the analysis of high-rise structures. This algorithm is to be used as a calculation tool in preliminary design; it allows to define the interaction between closed and open, straight or curved shear-walls, and the forces exchanged in structures subject to mainly horizontal loads. The analysis can be performed in both static and dynamic regimes, the mode shapes and the natural frequencies being assessed. This general formulation allows analyses of high-rise structures by taking into account the torsional rigidity and the warping deformations of the elements composing the building without gross simplifications. In thisway it is possible to model the structure as a single equivalent cantilever, thus minimising the degrees of freedom of the system, and consequently the calculation time. Finally, potentials of the method proposed are demonstrated by a numerical example which emphasizes the link between global displacements and stresses in the elements composing the structure.

  14. TDDFT-MD Study on Dynamics in Photoinduced Ring Opening of Benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Oyama, Norihisa; Ohno, Takahisa

    2004-03-01

    Coupled dynamics of ions and electrons in the excited states of molecular and solid benzene is investigated on the femtosecond scale by the efficient simulation scheme recently developed for the time-dependent density functional theory. Within the π arrow π excitations, any out-of-plane motion of ions is not induced in the molecular system basically. In the solid, however, we found that large swing of the C-H bonds and subsequent twist of the carbon ring takes place, leading to sp^3-like bonding of carbon ions. This swing-to-twist motion presents a plausible mechanism underlying the photoinduced ring opening in solid benzene experimentally observed under pressure. This research is partially supported by ACT-JST, and also by FSIS and Special Coordination Funds of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japanese Government.

  15. Dynamic performance and control of a static var generator using cascade multilevel inverters

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Fang Zheng; Lai, Jih-Sheng

    1996-10-01

    A cascade multilevel inverter is proposed for static VAR shifting, compensation/generation applications. The new cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 single-phase full bridges in which each bridge has its own separate dc source. This inverter can generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage with only one time switching per cycle. It can eliminate the need for transformers in multipulse inverters. A prototype static VAR generator (SVG) system using 11- level cascade inverter (21-level line-to-line voltage waveform) has been built. The output voltage waveform is equivalent to that of a 60- pulse inverter. This paper focuses on dynamic performance of the cascade inverter based SVG system. Control schemes are proposed to achieve a fast response which is impossible for a conventional static VAR compensator (SVC). Analytical, simulated and experimental results show the superiority of the proposed SVG system.

  16. Oriented rotational wave-packet dynamics studies via high harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Frumker, E; Hebeisen, C T; Kajumba, N; Bertrand, J B; Wörner, H J; Spanner, M; Villeneuve, D M; Naumov, A; Corkum, P B

    2012-09-14

    We produce oriented rotational wave packets in CO and measure their characteristics via high harmonic generation. The wave packet is created using an intense, femtosecond laser pulse and its second harmonic. A delayed 800 nm pulse probes the wave packet, generating even-order high harmonics that arise from the broken symmetry induced by the orientation dynamics. The even-order harmonic radiation that we measure appears on a zero background, enabling us to accurately follow the temporal evolution of the wave packet. Our measurements reveal that, for the conditions optimum for harmonic generation, the orientation is produced by preferential ionization which depletes the sample of molecules of one orientation. PMID:23005628

  17. Triple photonic band-gap structure dynamically induced in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Jinwei; Bao Qianqian; Wan Rengang; Cui Cuili; Wu Jinhui

    2011-05-15

    We study a cold atomic sample coherently driven into the five-level triple-{Lambda} configuration for attaining a dynamically controlled triple photonic band-gap structure. Our numerical calculations show that three photonic band gaps with homogeneous reflectivities up to 92% can be induced on demand around the probe resonance by a standing-wave driving field in the presence of spontaneously generated coherence. All these photonic band gaps are severely malformed with probe reflectivities declining rapidly to very low values when spontaneously generated coherence is gradually weakened. The triple photonic band-gap structure can also be attained in a five-level chain-{Lambda} system of cold atoms in the absence of spontaneously generated coherence, which however requires two additional traveling-wave fields to couple relevant levels.

  18. Adiabatic passage for three-dimensional entanglement generation through quantum Zeno dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yan; Su, Shi-Lei; Wu, Qi-Cheng; Ji, Xin; Zhang, Shou

    2015-02-23

    We propose an adiabatic passage approach to generate two atoms three-dimensional entanglement with the help of quantum Zeno dynamics in a time-dependent interacting field. The atoms are trapped in two spatially separated cavities connected by a fiber, so that the individual addressing is needless. Because the scheme is based on the resonant interaction, the time required to generate entanglement is greatly shortened. Since the fields remain in vacuum state and all the atoms are in the ground states, the losses due to the excitation of photons and the spontaneous transition of atoms are suppressed efficiently compared with the dispersive protocols. Numerical simulation results show that the scheme is robust against the decoherences caused by the cavity decay and atomic spontaneous emission. Additionally, the scheme can be generalized to generate N-atom three-dimensional entanglement and high-dimensional entanglement for two spatially separated atoms.

  19. Dynamics and interactions of pulsed laser generated plasma bubbles in dusty plasma liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Hongyu; Liao Chenting; I Lin

    2005-10-31

    The plasma bubble with dust particle depletion can be generated by a nano-second laser pulse focused on one of the dust particles suspended in a strongly coupled dusty plasma liquid. The bubble dynamics at different time scales, including the initial forming and later traveling stages are investigated. In the first stage, dust particles are pushed outward by the outward ion flow associated with the plume generated by the more intensed plasma. The bubble then travels downward at a speed about 60 mm/s associated with a surrounding dipole-like dust flow field. Two bubbles can also be simultaneously generated at different locations by separated laser pulses to study their interactions. Strong coupling is observed between two vertical bubbles. However, two horizontal bubbles are weakly coupled. The possible mechanism is discussed.

  20. Two approaches for ultrafast random bit generation based on the chaotic dynamics of a semiconductor laser.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianqiang; Kim, Byungchil; Chizhevsky, V N; Locquet, A; Bloch, M; Citrin, D S; Pan, Wei

    2014-03-24

    This paper reports the experimental investigation of two different approaches to random bit generation based on the chaotic dynamics of a semiconductor laser with optical feedback. By computing high-order finite differences of the chaotic laser intensity time series, we obtain time series with symmetric statistical distributions that are more conducive to ultrafast random bit generation. The first approach is guided by information-theoretic considerations and could potentially reach random bit generation rates as high as 160 Gb/s by extracting 4 bits per sample. The second approach is based on pragmatic considerations and could lead to rates of 2.2 Tb/s by extracting 55 bits per sample. The randomness of the bit sequences obtained from the two approaches is tested against three standard randomness tests (ENT, Diehard, and NIST tests), as well as by calculating the statistical bias and the serial correlation coefficients on longer sequences of random bits than those used in the standard tests.

  1. Dynamic analysis of combined photovoltaic source and synchronous generator connected to power grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, Divya

    In the world of expanding economy and technology, the energy demand is likely to increase even with the global efforts of saving and increasing energy efficiency. Higher oil prices, effects of greenhouse gases, and concerns over other environmental impacts gave way to Distributed Generation (DG). With adequate awareness and support, DG's can meet these rising energy demands at lower prices compared to conventional methods. Extensive research is taking place in different areas like fuel cells, photovoltaic cells, wind turbines, and gas turbines. DG's when connected to a grid increase the overall efficiency of the power grid. It is believed that three-fifth of the world's electricity would account for renewable energy by middle of 21st century. This thesis presents the dynamic analysis of a grid connected photovoltaic (PV) system and synchronous generator. A grid is considered as an infinite bus. The photovol-taic system and synchronous generator act as small scale distributed energy resources. The output of the photovoltaic system depends on the light intensity, temperature, and irradiance levels of sun. The maximum power point tracking and DC/AC converter are also modeled for the photovoltaic system. The PV system is connected to the grid through DC/AC system. Different combinations of PV and synchronous generator are modeled with the grid to study the dynamics of the proposed system. The dynamics of the test system is analyzed by subjecting the system to several disturbances under various conditions. All modules are individually modeled and con-nected using MATLAB/Simulink software package. Results from the study show that, as the penetration of renewable energy sources like PV increases into the power system, the dynamics of the system becomes faster. When considering cases such as load switching, PV cannot deliver more power as the performance of PV depends on environmental conditions. Synchronous generator in power system can produce the required amount of

  2. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors.

    PubMed

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-19

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  3. Dynamics of the near response under natural viewing conditions with an open-view sensor

    PubMed Central

    Chirre, Emmanuel; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the temporal dynamics of the near response (accommodation, convergence and pupil constriction) in healthy subjects when accommodation was performed under natural binocular and monocular viewing conditions. A binocular open-view multi-sensor based on an invisible infrared Hartmann-Shack sensor was used for non-invasive measurements of both eyes simultaneously in real time at 25Hz. Response times for each process under different conditions were measured. The accommodative responses for binocular vision were faster than for monocular conditions. When one eye was blocked, accommodation and convergence were triggered simultaneously and synchronized, despite the fact that no retinal disparity was available. We found that upon the onset of the near target, the unblocked eye rapidly changes its line of sight to fix it on the stimulus while the blocked eye moves in the same direction, producing the equivalent to a saccade, but then converges to the (blocked) target in synchrony with accommodation. This open-view instrument could be further used for additional experiments with other tasks and conditions. PMID:26504666

  4. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-01

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  5. Phytoplankton community dynamics in an intermittently open hypereutrophic coastal lagoon in southern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Susana; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Gamito, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    Phytoplankton community' dynamics were studied in Salgados coastal lagoon in order to evaluate the effects of excessive organic loads and also physical stress caused by the irregular opening of the lagoon. Salgados is a hypereutrophic intermittently open coastal lagoon, which received freshwater inputs from small rivers and from a wastewater treatment plant. Cyanophyceae dominated the phytoplankton communities most of the time; Bacillariophyceae became the main taxonomic group in winter when the lagoon was closed; Chlorophyceae was the major class in early summer; pico-nano flagellate algae accounted for a high percentage of total phytoplankton during spring. Potentially harmful taxa were observed during most of the sampling periods, forming blooms and accounting for a considerable percentage of total phytoplankton abundance. A strong differentiation among dry and wet seasons could be noticed. The dry season was dominated by Microsystis aeruginosa, Rhodomonas sp., pico-nano flagellate algae, Cyclotella spp. and Planktothrix sp., while the wet season, although still with the presence of Microsystis aeruginosa, was dominated by Dolichospermum spiroides. The best environmental variables explaining stations patterns and based on phytoplankton taxa were days of isolation, pH, and salinity. Temperature, cumulative rain and total phosphorus were also related with species and stations patterns. The high nutrient load in Salgados lagoon promoted the development and persistence of harmful algae blooms. Proper management of coastal lagoons involves not only the control of direct discharges of nutrients, but also of other factors, including water level and communication with the sea.

  6. Photographic wound documentation of open fractures: an update for the digital generation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, B W; Read, J R; Solan, M C

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the availability of working cameras in UK emergency departments and to discuss the merits of digital imaging over Polaroid. Design This study was conducted by means of a telephone questionnaire to 50 UK emergency departments. Results It was found that 80% were able to produce either a working Polaroid or digital camera, and that 63% of emergency departments had a digital camera available. Conclusions We report a pronounced increase in the ability of emergency departments to photograph open fractures, due in part to the availability of digital cameras. We recommend the appropriate use of these tools in the management of open fractures. PMID:18029517

  7. FOREWORD: International Summer School for Advanced Studies 'Dynamics of open nuclear systems' (PREDEAL12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Zamfir, N. V.; Raduta, A. R.; Gulminelli, F.

    2013-02-01

    This proceedings volume contains the invited lectures and contributions presented at the International Summer School on Nuclear Physics held at Trei Brazi, a summer resort of the Bioterra University, near the city of Predeal, Romania, on 9-20 July 2012. The long tradition of International Summer Schools on Nuclear Physics in Romania dates as far back as 1964, with the event being scheduled every two years. During this period of almost 50 years, many outstanding nuclear scientists have lectured on various topics related to nuclear physics and particle physics. This year we celebrate the 80th birthday of Aureliu Sandulescu, one of the founders of the Romanian school of theoretical nuclear physics. He was Serban Titeica's PhD student, one of Werner Heisenberg's PhD students, and he organized the first edition of this event. Aureliu Sandulescu's major contributions to the field of theoretical nuclear physics are related in particular to the prediction of cluster radioactivity, the physics of open quantum systems and the innovative technique of detecting superheavy nuclei using the double magic projectile 48Ca (Calcium), nowadays a widely used method at the JINR—Dubna and GSI—Darmstadt laboratories. The title of the event, 'Dynamics of Open Nuclear Systems', is in recognition of Aureliu Sandulescu's great personality. The lectures were attended by Romanian and foreign Master and PhD students and young researchers in nuclear physics. About 25 reputable professors and researchers in nuclear physics delivered lectures during this period. According to a well-established tradition, an interval of two hours was allotted for each lecture (including discussions). Therefore we kept a balance between the school and conference format. Two lectures were held during the morning and afternoon sessions. After lecture sessions, three or four oral contributions were given by young scientists. This was a good opportunity for them to present the results of their research in front of

  8. Strong magnetic fields generated with a simple open-ended coil irradiated by high power laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B. J.; Li, Y. T.; Yuan, D. W.; Li, Y. F.; Li, F.; Liao, G. Q.; Zhao, J. R.; Zhong, J. Y.; Xue, F. B.; He, S. K.; Wang, W. W.; Lu, F.; Zhang, F. Q.; Yang, L.; Zhou, K. N.; Xie, N.; Hong, W.; Wei, H. G.; Zhang, K.; Han, B.; Pei, X. X.; Liu, C.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, W. M.; Zhu, J. Q.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhang, B. H.; Zhao, G.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    A simple scheme to produce strong magnetic fields due to cold electron flow in an open-ended coil heated by high power laser pulses is proposed. It differs from previous generation of magnetic fields driven by fast electron current in a capacitor-coil target [S. Fujioka et al., Sci. Rep. 3, 1170 (2013)]. The fields in our experiments are measured by B-dot detectors and proton radiography, respectively. A 205 T strong magnetic field at the center of the coil target is generated in the free space at Iλ2 of 6.85 × 1014 W cm-2 μm2, where I is the laser intensity, and λ is the laser wavelength. The magnetic field strength is proportional to Iλ2. Compared with the capacitor-coil target, the generation mechanism of the magnetic field is straightforward and the coil is easy to be fabricated.

  9. Crystal Nucleation in Liquids: Open Questions and Future Challenges in Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Chen, Ji; Cox, Stephen J; Fitzner, Martin; Pedevilla, Philipp; Zen, Andrea; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-06-22

    The nucleation of crystals in liquids is one of nature's most ubiquitous phenomena, playing an important role in areas such as climate change and the production of drugs. As the early stages of nucleation involve exceedingly small time and length scales, atomistic computer simulations can provide unique insights into the microscopic aspects of crystallization. In this review, we take stock of the numerous molecular dynamics simulations that, in the past few decades, have unraveled crucial aspects of crystal nucleation in liquids. We put into context the theoretical framework of classical nucleation theory and the state-of-the-art computational methods by reviewing simulations of such processes as ice nucleation and the crystallization of molecules in solutions. We shall see that molecular dynamics simulations have provided key insights into diverse nucleation scenarios, ranging from colloidal particles to natural gas hydrates, and that, as a result, the general applicability of classical nucleation theory has been repeatedly called into question. We have attempted to identify the most pressing open questions in the field. We believe that, by improving (i) existing interatomic potentials and (ii) currently available enhanced sampling methods, the community can move toward accurate investigations of realistic systems of practical interest, thus bringing simulations a step closer to experiments. PMID:27228560

  10. Controlling the Dynamics of an Open Many-Body Quantum System with Localized Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, G.; Labouvie, R.; Stubenrauch, F.; Vogler, A.; Guarrera, V.; Ott, H.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the action of a localized dissipative potential on a macroscopic matter wave, which we implement by shining an electron beam on an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We measure the losses induced by the dissipative potential as a function of the dissipation strength observing a paradoxical behavior when the strength of the dissipation exceeds a critical limit: for an increase of the dissipation rate the number of atoms lost from the BEC becomes lower. We repeat the experiment for different parameters of the electron beam and we compare our results with a simple theoretical model, finding excellent agreement. By monitoring the dynamics induced by the dissipative defect we identify the mechanisms which are responsible for the observed paradoxical behavior. We finally demonstrate the link between our dissipative dynamics and the measurement of the density distribution of the BEC allowing for a generalized definition of the Zeno effect. Because of the high degree of control on every parameter, our system is a promising candidate for the engineering of fully governable open quantum systems.

  11. Badlands: An open-source, flexible and parallel framework to study landscape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salles, T.; Hardiman, L.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a minimal numerical model which governing equations describe the following processes: erosion, sedimentation, diffusion and flexure. The model respects conservation laws for water and sediment. The implementation is based on a finite volume approach and the explicit solution stability is ensured by a CFL-like condition. This common core of accepted physical principles governing landscape evolution is ported into a distributed memory parallel environment. Badlands (acronym for BAsin anD LANdscape DynamicS) is an open-source, flexible, TIN-based landscape evolution model, built to simulate landform development and test source-to-sink concepts at regional to continental scale over thousands to millions of years. To illustrate the model capabilities, we first present an example of delta evolution under sea-level fluctuations. The model predicts the successive progradation and transgression phases, the development of depositional and erosional patterns as well as the associated stratigraphic formation. Then, we investigate the importance of climate, and in particular the spatial pattern of precipitation, on the topographic evolution of mountain belts. The simulation and associated quantitative analyses suggest that the main drainage divide migrates and asymmetric topography develops in response to orographic precipitation. This mechanism, documented in recent analogue and numerical experiments, results in a complex reorganisation of drainage networks that our model is able to reproduce.

  12. Crystal Nucleation in Liquids: Open Questions and Future Challenges in Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The nucleation of crystals in liquids is one of nature’s most ubiquitous phenomena, playing an important role in areas such as climate change and the production of drugs. As the early stages of nucleation involve exceedingly small time and length scales, atomistic computer simulations can provide unique insights into the microscopic aspects of crystallization. In this review, we take stock of the numerous molecular dynamics simulations that, in the past few decades, have unraveled crucial aspects of crystal nucleation in liquids. We put into context the theoretical framework of classical nucleation theory and the state-of-the-art computational methods by reviewing simulations of such processes as ice nucleation and the crystallization of molecules in solutions. We shall see that molecular dynamics simulations have provided key insights into diverse nucleation scenarios, ranging from colloidal particles to natural gas hydrates, and that, as a result, the general applicability of classical nucleation theory has been repeatedly called into question. We have attempted to identify the most pressing open questions in the field. We believe that, by improving (i) existing interatomic potentials and (ii) currently available enhanced sampling methods, the community can move toward accurate investigations of realistic systems of practical interest, thus bringing simulations a step closer to experiments. PMID:27228560

  13. Improving the convergence of closed and open path integral molecular dynamics via higher order Trotter factorization schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Alejandro; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2011-08-01

    Higher order factorization schemes are developed for path integral molecular dynamics in order to improve the convergence of estimators for physical observables as a function of the Trotter number. The methods are based on the Takahashi-Imada and Susuki decompositions of the Boltzmann operator. The methods introduced improve the averages of the estimators by using the classical forces needed to carry out the dynamics to construct a posteriori weighting factors for standard path integral molecular dynamics. The new approaches are straightforward to implement in existing path integral codes and carry no significant overhead. The Suzuki higher order factorization was also used to improve the end-to-end distance estimator in open path integral molecular dynamics. The new schemes are tested in various model systems, including an ab initio path integral molecular dynamics calculation on the hydrogen molecule and a quantum water model. The proposed algorithms have potential utility for reducing the cost of path integral molecular dynamics calculations of bulk systems.

  14. Abriendo Puertas: Opening Doors to Opportunity--A National Evaluation of Second-Generation Trainers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Margaret; Cohen, Shana R.; Fuller, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Abriendo Puertas/Opening Doors (AP/OD) is a comprehensive, 10-session parenting skills and advocacy program developed by and for low-income Latino parents with children ages 0 to 5. Drawing from the real-life experiences of Latino parents and local data about their schools and communities, sessions are filled with interactive activities that aim…

  15. Exploration of laser-driven electron-multirescattering dynamics in high-order harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Sheu, Yae-Lin; Jooya, Hossein Z; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Chu, Shih-I

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rescattering processes play an important role in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in an intense laser field. However, the underlying multi-rescattering dynamics are still largely unexplored. Here we investigate the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG associated with the odd and even number of returning times of the electron to the parent ion. We perform fully ab initio quantum calculations and extend the empirical mode decomposition method to extract the individual multiple scattering contributions in HHG. We find that the tunneling ionization regime is responsible for the odd number times of rescattering and the corresponding short trajectories are dominant. On the other hand, the multiphoton ionization regime is responsible for the even number times of rescattering and the corresponding long trajectories are dominant. Moreover, we discover that the multiphoton- and tunneling-ionization regimes in multiple rescattering processes occur alternatively. Our results uncover the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG for the first time. It also provides new insight regarding the control of the multiple rescattering processes for the optimal generation of ultrabroad band supercontinuum spectra and the production of single ultrashort attosecond laser pulse. PMID:27596056

  16. Optimal control landscape for the generation of unitary transformations with constrained dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Michael; Wu, Rebing; Rabitz, Herschel; Lidar, Daniel

    2010-06-15

    The reliable and precise generation of quantum unitary transformations is essential for the realization of a number of fundamental objectives, such as quantum control and quantum information processing. Prior work has explored the optimal control problem of generating such unitary transformations as a surface-optimization problem over the quantum control landscape, defined as a metric for realizing a desired unitary transformation as a function of the control variables. It was found that under the assumption of nondissipative and controllable dynamics, the landscape topology is trap free, which implies that any reasonable optimization heuristic should be able to identify globally optimal solutions. The present work is a control landscape analysis, which incorporates specific constraints in the Hamiltonian that correspond to certain dynamical symmetries in the underlying physical system. It is found that the presence of such symmetries does not destroy the trap-free topology. These findings expand the class of quantum dynamical systems on which control problems are intrinsically amenable to a solution by optimal control.

  17. Dynamic materials evaluation by confined plasma ablation and laser-generated shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paisley, Dennis L.; Swift, D. C.; Forsman, A. C.; Kyrala, George A.; Johnson, Randall P.; Kopp, Roger A.; Hauer, Allan A.; Wark, Justin S.; Loveridge, A.; Allen, A. M.; Kalantar, Daniel H.

    2000-08-01

    Laser-generated shocks can and have been used to study their effects on single crystal materials during shock compression. While a crystal undergoes shock compression and release, the transient x- ray diffraction (TXD) of the Bragg and Laue signals is indicative of the change in the crystal lattice spacing. The lattice spacing directly relates to the strain in the crystal. From the dynamic lattice data, strain, strain rate, and/or phase change in a material may be determined. Confined ablation plasmas can efficiently launch a flyer plate for direct impact on a target material imparting a well-characterized shock input and generate kilobar to megabar pressure pulses over a wide range of pulse duration (= 20 ns). The laser-launched flyer plates are analogous to those launched by gas guns, but the smaller size provides an experimental method not easily accessible by larger gas gun experiments. With lasers, diagnostic equipment can be easily synchronized to study dynamic material parameters, i.e., single crystal shock dynamics, interfacial bond strengths of thin coatings, grain-interfaces, texture, and high strain rates (106 - 109 sec-1).

  18. Exploration of laser-driven electron-multirescattering dynamics in high-order harmonic generation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Sheu, Yae-Lin; Jooya, Hossein Z.; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Chu, Shih-I

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rescattering processes play an important role in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in an intense laser field. However, the underlying multi-rescattering dynamics are still largely unexplored. Here we investigate the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG associated with the odd and even number of returning times of the electron to the parent ion. We perform fully ab initio quantum calculations and extend the empirical mode decomposition method to extract the individual multiple scattering contributions in HHG. We find that the tunneling ionization regime is responsible for the odd number times of rescattering and the corresponding short trajectories are dominant. On the other hand, the multiphoton ionization regime is responsible for the even number times of rescattering and the corresponding long trajectories are dominant. Moreover, we discover that the multiphoton- and tunneling-ionization regimes in multiple rescattering processes occur alternatively. Our results uncover the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG for the first time. It also provides new insight regarding the control of the multiple rescattering processes for the optimal generation of ultrabroad band supercontinuum spectra and the production of single ultrashort attosecond laser pulse. PMID:27596056

  19. Exploration of laser-driven electron-multirescattering dynamics in high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Sheu, Yae-Lin; Jooya, Hossein Z.; Zhou, Xiao-Xin; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple rescattering processes play an important role in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in an intense laser field. However, the underlying multi-rescattering dynamics are still largely unexplored. Here we investigate the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG associated with the odd and even number of returning times of the electron to the parent ion. We perform fully ab initio quantum calculations and extend the empirical mode decomposition method to extract the individual multiple scattering contributions in HHG. We find that the tunneling ionization regime is responsible for the odd number times of rescattering and the corresponding short trajectories are dominant. On the other hand, the multiphoton ionization regime is responsible for the even number times of rescattering and the corresponding long trajectories are dominant. Moreover, we discover that the multiphoton- and tunneling-ionization regimes in multiple rescattering processes occur alternatively. Our results uncover the dynamical origin of multiple rescattering processes in HHG for the first time. It also provides new insight regarding the control of the multiple rescattering processes for the optimal generation of ultrabroad band supercontinuum spectra and the production of single ultrashort attosecond laser pulse.

  20. Entanglement dynamics of quantum states generated by a Kerr medium and a beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohith, M.; Sudheesh, C.; Rajeev, R.

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the dynamics of entangled states created in a beam splitter with a nonlinear Kerr medium placed into one input arm. Entanglement dynamics of initial classical and nonclassical states are studied and compared. Signatures of revival and fractional revival phenomena exhibited during the time evolution of states in the Kerr medium are captured in the entangled states produced by the beam splitter. Dynamics of entanglement shows local minima at the instants of fractional revivals. These minima correspond to the generation of two-component Schrödinger cat states or multi-component Schrödinger cat-like states if the initial state considered is a coherent state. Maximum entanglement is obtained at the instants of collapses of wave packets in the medium. Our analysis shows increase in entanglement with increase in the degree of nonclassicality of the initial states considered. We show that the states generated at the output of the beam splitter using initial nonclassical states are more robust against decoherence due to photon absorption by an environment than those formed by an initial classical state.

  1. EEG dynamics reflects the partial and holistic effects in mental imagery generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Tang, Yi-yuan; Zhou, Li; Yu, Qing-bao; Li, Song; Sui, Dan-ni

    2010-12-01

    Mental imagery generation is essential in the retrieval and storage of knowledge. Previous studies have indicated that the holistic properties of mental imagery generation can be evaluated more easily than the partial properties. However, the relationship between partial and holistic mental imagery generations has not been clearly demonstrated. To address this issue, we designed a task to investigate the changes in the spectrum of the electroencephalogram (EEG) during partial or holistic imagery generation. EEG signals were obtained from 18 healthy subjects, and a statistical measure of spectral dynamics between two EEG signals in per frequency band was performed. Additionally, a bicoherence spectrum analysis was used to detect the phase coupling within these two imagery conditions. Our results indicated that EEG of the partial imagery appeared earlier and stronger than that of the holistic imagery in the theta (5-8 Hz) range in a time window around 220 to 300 ms after cue onset, and a slight decrease in the alpha (8-12 Hz) band was observed at around 270 ms. The scalp topography of these changes in the theta and alpha bands distributed overall significantly in the frontal and central-temporal areas. The significant phase coupling within two conditions was remarkable at high frequency. From these results, we infer that there are complex relations between partial and holistic imageries. The generation of partial mental imagery is not a subprocess of holistic imagery, but it is relevant to holistic imagery and requires correct modification from the holistic information.

  2. Photographic mark-recapture analysis of local dynamics within an open population of dolphins.

    PubMed

    Fearnbach, H; Durban, J; Parsons, K; Claridge, D

    2012-07-01

    Identifying demographic changes is important for understanding population dynamics. However, this requires long-term studies of definable populations of distinct individuals, which can be particularly challenging when studying mobile cetaceans in the marine environment. We collected photo-identification data from 19 years (1992-2010) to assess the dynamics of a population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) restricted to the shallow (<7 m) waters of Little Bahama Bank, northern Bahamas. This population was known to range beyond our study area, so we adopted a Bayesian mixture modeling approach to mark-recapture to identify clusters of individuals that used the area to different extents, and we specifically estimated trends in survival, recruitment, and abundance of a "resident" population with high probabilities of identification. There was a high probability (p= 0.97) of a long-term decrease in the size of this resident population from a maximum of 47 dolphins (95% highest posterior density intervals, HPDI = 29-61) in 1996 to a minimum of just 24 dolphins (95% HPDI = 14-37) in 2009, a decline of 49% (95% HPDI = approximately 5% to approximately 75%). This was driven by low per capita recruitment (average approximately 0.02) that could not compensate for relatively low apparent survival rates (average approximately 0.94). Notably, there was a significant increase in apparent mortality (approximately 5 apparent mortalities vs. approximately 2 on average) in 1999 when two intense hurricanes passed over the study area, with a high probability (p = 0.83) of a drop below the average survival probability (approximately 0.91 in 1999; approximately 0.94, on average). As such, our mark-recapture approach enabled us to make useful inference about local dynamics within an open population of bottlenose dolphins; this should be applicable to other studies challenged by sampling highly mobile individuals with heterogeneous space use.

  3. Assessing uncertainties in a second-generation dynamic vegetation model caused by ecological scale limitations.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Rosie; McDowell, Nate; Purves, Drew; Moorcroft, Paul; Sitch, Stephen; Cox, Peter; Huntingford, Chris; Meir, Patrick; Woodward, F Ian

    2010-08-01

    *Second-generation Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) have recently been developed that explicitly represent the ecological dynamics of disturbance, vertical competition for light, and succession. Here, we introduce a modified second-generation DGVM and examine how the representation of demographic processes operating at two-dimensional spatial scales not represented by these models can influence predicted community structure, and responses of ecosystems to climate change. *The key demographic processes we investigated were seed advection, seed mixing, sapling survival, competitive exclusion and plant mortality. We varied these parameters in the context of a simulated Amazon rainforest ecosystem containing seven plant functional types (PFTs) that varied along a trade-off surface between growth and the risk of starvation induced mortality. *Varying the five unconstrained parameters generated community structures ranging from monocultures to equal co-dominance of the seven PFTs. When exposed to a climate change scenario, the competing impacts of CO(2) fertilization and increasing plant mortality caused ecosystem biomass to diverge substantially between simulations, with mid-21st century biomass predictions ranging from 1.5 to 27.0 kg C m(-2). *Filtering the results using contemporary observation ranges of biomass, leaf area index (LAI), gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary productivity (NPP) did not substantially constrain the potential outcomes. We conclude that demographic processes represent a large source of uncertainty in DGVM predictions. PMID:20618912

  4. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Open Days at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, Jason; Cenedese, Claudia; Jensen, Anders

    2015-11-01

    This event was hosted for one week for two consecutive years in 2013 and 2014. It targeted postdocs, graduate students, K-12 students and local community participation. The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution hosted 10 hands-on demonstrations and displays, with something for all ages, to share the excitement of fluid mechanics and oceanography. The demonstrations/experiments spanned as many fluid mechanics problems as possible in all fields of oceanography and gave insight into using fluids laboratory experiments as a research tool. The chosen experiments were `simple' yet exciting for a 6 year old child, a high school student, a graduate student, and a postdoctoral fellow from different disciplines within oceanography. The laboratory is a perfect environment in which to create excitement and stimulate curiosity. Even what we consider `simple' experiments can fascinate and generate interesting questions from both a 6 year old child and a physics professor. How does an avalanche happen? How does a bath tub vortex form? What happens to waves when they break? How does a hurricane move? Hands-on activities in the fluid dynamics laboratory helped students of all ages in answering these and other intriguing questions. The laboratory experiments/demonstrations were accompanied by `live' videos to assist in the interpretation of the demonstrations. Posters illustrated the oceanographic/scientific applicability and the location on Earth where the dynamics in the experiments occur. Support was given by the WHOI Doherty Chair in Education.

  5. Ultrafast dynamics and structure at aqueous interfaces by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Borguet, E.; Tarnovsky, A. N.; Eisenthal, K. B.

    1996-04-01

    Femtosecond time-resolved second harmonic generation studies of the barrierless isomerization of an organic dye, malachite green (MG), have been carried out at several aqueous interfaces. A comparison of the dynamics at the air/aqeous, alkane/aqueous and silica/aqueous interafces, indicates increased friction and increased water structure at the aqueous interfaces relative to bulk water, in support of molecular simulations, with the silica/aqueous interface being the most structured. The dynamics are slower at all of these interfaces than in bulk water, by a factor of three of five in the case of the air/aqueous and alkane/aqueous interfaces, and almost an order of magnitude in the case of the silica/aqueous interface. These investigations also indicate that the generally accepted isomerization model of twisting of the three aromatic rings about the central carbon atom requires modification in that the synchronous twisting of all three aromatic rings is not necessary for rapid internal conversion from the excited to ground electronic state. In contrast to MG, the dynamics of the activated photoisomerization of the cyanine dye, 3,3'-diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide (DODCI), is faster at the air/aqueous interface tha in bulk aqueous solution. The different dynamics of MG and DODCI suggest that the interface friction must be described in terms of the orientation and solvent structure in the vicinity of the chromophores involved in the isomerization process.

  6. Subspace learning of dynamics on a shape manifold: a generative modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sheng; Krim, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel subspace learning algorithm of shape dynamics. Compared to the previous works, our method is invertible and better characterizes the nonlinear geometry of a shape manifold while retaining a good computational efficiency. In this paper, using a parallel moving frame on a shape manifold, each path of shape dynamics is uniquely represented in a subspace spanned by the moving frame, given an initial condition (the starting point and starting frame). Mathematically, such a representation may be formulated as solving a manifold-valued differential equation, which provides a generative modeling of high-dimensional shape dynamics in a lower dimensional subspace. Given the parallelism and a path on a shape manifold, the parallel moving frame along the path is uniquely determined up to the choice of the starting frame. With an initial frame, we minimize the reconstruction error from the subspace to shape manifold. Such an optimization characterizes well the Riemannian geometry of the manifold by imposing parallelism (equivalent as a Riemannian metric) constraints on the moving frame. The parallelism in this paper is defined by a Levi-Civita connection, which is consistent with the Riemannian metric of the shape manifold. In the experiments, the performance of the subspace learning is extensively evaluated using two scenarios: 1) how the high dimensional geometry is characterized in the subspace and 2) how the reconstruction compares with the original shape dynamics. The results demonstrate and validate the theoretical advantages of the proposed approach. PMID:25248183

  7. Deterministic generation of a three-dimensional entangled state via quantum Zeno dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li Wenan; Huang Guangyao

    2011-02-15

    A scheme is proposed for the generation of a three-dimensional entangled state for two atoms trapped in a cavity via quantum Zeno dynamics. Because the scheme is based on the resonant interaction, the time required to produce entanglement is very short compared with the dispersive protocols. We show that the resulting effective dynamics allows for the creation of robust qutrit-qutrit entanglement. The influence of various decoherence processes such as spontaneous emission and photon loss on the fidelity of the entangled state is investigated. Numerical results show that the scheme is robust against the cavity decay since the evolution of the system is restricted to a subspace with null-excitation cavity fields. Furthermore, the present scheme has been generalized to realize N-dimensional entanglement for two atoms.

  8. Generation of spin-polarized currents via cross-relaxation with dynamically pumped paramagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Meriles, Carlos A.; Doherty, Marcus W.

    2014-07-14

    Key to future spintronics and spin-based information processing technologies is the generation, manipulation, and detection of spin polarization in a solid state platform. Here, we theoretically explore an alternative route to spin injection via the use of dynamically polarized nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. We focus on the geometry where carriers and NV centers are confined to proximate, parallel layers and use a “trap-and-release” model to calculate the spin cross-relaxation probabilities between the charge carriers and neighboring NV centers. We identify near-unity regimes of carrier polarization depending on the NV spin state, applied magnetic field, and carrier g-factor. In particular, we find that unlike holes, electron spins are distinctively robust against spin-lattice relaxation by other, unpolarized paramagnetic centers. Further, the polarization process is only weakly dependent on the carrier hopping dynamics, which makes this approach potentially applicable over a broad range of temperatures.

  9. All-digital signal-processing open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope with enlarged dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Yang, Chuanchuan; Wang, Xinyue; Wang, Ziyu

    2013-12-15

    We propose and realize a new open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope (FOG) with an all-digital signal-processing (DSP) system where an all-digital phase-locked loop is employed for digital demodulation to eliminate the variation of the source intensity and suppress the bias drift. A Sagnac phase-shift tracking method is proposed to enlarge the dynamic range, and, with its aid, a new open-loop FOG, which can achieve a large dynamic range and high sensitivity at the same time, is realized. The experimental results show that compared with the conventional open-loop FOG with the same fiber coil and optical devices, the proposed FOG reduces the bias instability from 0.259 to 0.018 deg/h, and the angle random walk from 0.031 to 0.006 deg/h(1/2), moreover, enlarges the dynamic range to ±360 deg/s, exceeding the maximum dynamic range ±63 deg/s of the conventional open-loop FOG.

  10. Global sensitivity analysis of the BSM2 dynamic influent disturbance scenario generator.

    PubMed

    Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Gernaey, Krist V; Jeppsson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a global sensitivity analysis (GSA) of a phenomenological model that generates dynamic wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent disturbance scenarios. This influent model is part of the Benchmark Simulation Model (BSM) family and creates realistic dry/wet weather files describing diurnal, weekend and seasonal variations through the combination of different generic model blocks, i.e. households, industry, rainfall and infiltration. The GSA is carried out by combining Monte Carlo simulations and standardized regression coefficients (SRC). Cluster analysis is then applied, classifying the influence of the model parameters into strong, medium and weak. The results show that the method is able to decompose the variance of the model predictions (R(2)> 0.9) satisfactorily, thus identifying the model parameters with strongest impact on several flow rate descriptors calculated at different time resolutions. Catchment size (PE) and the production of wastewater per person equivalent (QperPE) are two parameters that strongly influence the yearly average dry weather flow rate and its variability. Wet weather conditions are mainly affected by three parameters: (1) the probability of occurrence of a rain event (Llrain); (2) the catchment size, incorporated in the model as a parameter representing the conversion from mm rain · day(-1) to m(3) · day(-1) (Qpermm); and, (3) the quantity of rain falling on permeable areas (aH). The case study also shows that in both dry and wet weather conditions the SRC ranking changes when the time scale of the analysis is modified, thus demonstrating the potential to identify the effect of the model parameters on the fast/medium/slow dynamics of the flow rate. The paper ends with a discussion on the interpretation of GSA results and of the advantages of using synthetic dynamic flow rate data for WWTP influent scenario generation. This section also includes general suggestions on how to use the proposed

  11. Vision Egg: an Open-Source Library for Realtime Visual Stimulus Generation

    PubMed Central

    Straw, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    Modern computer hardware makes it possible to produce visual stimuli in ways not previously possible. Arbitrary scenes, from traditional sinusoidal gratings to naturalistic 3D scenes can now be specified on a frame-by-frame basis in realtime. A programming library called the Vision Egg that aims to make it easy to take advantage of these innovations. The Vision Egg is a free, open-source library making use of OpenGL and written in the high-level language Python with extensions in C. Careful attention has been paid to the issues of luminance and temporal calibration, and several interfacing techniques to input devices such as mice, movement tracking systems, and digital triggers are discussed. Together, these make the Vision Egg suitable for many psychophysical, electrophysiological, and behavioral experiments. This software is available for free download at visionegg.org. PMID:19050754

  12. Data Assimilation of Space-Based Passive Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals and the Correction for a Dynamic Open Water Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouweleeuw, Ben T.; van Dijik, Albert I. J. M.; Renzullo, Luigi J.

    2011-01-01

    The large observation footprint of low-frequency satellite microwave emissions complicates the interpretation of near-surface soil moisture retrievals. Temporal changes in the extent of smaller water bodies can cause significant and dynamic biases. We analysed the influence of open water on near-surface soil moisture retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) for three areas in Oklahoma, USA. Differences between on-ground observations or model estimates and AMSR-E retrievals were compared to dynamic estimates of open water fraction derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The comparison indicates that seasonally varying biases of up to 20% soil water content can be attributed to the presence of relatively small areas (<5%) of open water in or near the sensor footprint. The results presented here feed into the discussion if the retrieved variable or the observed microwave brightness temperature is most suitable for assimilation with simulated fields from land surface models.

  13. Parallel, staged opening switch power conditioning techniques for flux compression generator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reinovsky, R.E.; Levi, P.S.; Bueck, J.C.; Goforth, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Air Force Weapons Laboratory, working jointly with Los Alamos National Laboratory, has conducted a series of experiments directed at exploring composite, or staged, switching techniques for use in opening switches in applications which require the conduction of very high currents (or current densities) with very low losses for relatively long times (several tens of microseconds), and the interruption of these currents in much shorter times (ultimately a few hundred nanoseconds). This paper reports the results of those experiments.

  14. Open Source Seismic Software in NOAA's Next Generation Tsunami Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, S. B.; Baker, B. I.; Hagerty, M. T.; Leifer, J. M.; Lisowski, S.; Thies, D. A.; Donnelly, B. K.; Griffith, F. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Tsunami Information technology Modernization (TIM) is a project spearheaded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to update the United States' Tsunami Warning System software currently employed at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (Eva Beach, Hawaii) and the National Tsunami Warning Center (Palmer, Alaska). This entirely open source software project will integrate various seismic processing utilities with the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office's core software, AWIPS2. For the real-time and near real-time seismic processing aspect of this project, NOAA has elected to integrate the open source portions of GFZ's SeisComP 3 (SC3) processing system into AWIPS2. To provide for better tsunami threat assessments we are developing open source tools for magnitude estimations (e.g., moment magnitude, energy magnitude, surface wave magnitude), detection of slow earthquakes with the Theta discriminant, moment tensor inversions (e.g. W-phase and teleseismic body waves), finite fault inversions, and array processing. With our reliance on common data formats such as QuakeML and seismic community standard messaging systems, all new facilities introduced into AWIPS2 and SC3 will be available as stand-alone tools or could be easily integrated into other real time seismic monitoring systems such as Earthworm, Antelope, etc. Additionally, we have developed a template based design paradigm so that the developer or scientist can efficiently create upgrades, replacements, and/or new metrics to the seismic data processing with only a cursory knowledge of the underlying SC3.

  15. Use of Aria to simulate laser weld pool dynamics for neutron generator production.

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, David R.; Notz, Patrick K.; Martinez, Mario J.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-09-01

    This report documents the results for the FY07 ASC Integrated Codes Level 2 Milestone number 2354. The description for this milestone is, 'Demonstrate level set free surface tracking capabilities in ARIA to simulate the dynamics of the formation and time evolution of a weld pool in laser welding applications for neutron generator production'. The specialized boundary conditions and material properties for the laser welding application were implemented and verified by comparison with existing, two-dimensional applications. Analyses of stationary spot welds and traveling line welds were performed and the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) level set algorithm is assessed by comparison with 3D moving mesh calculations.

  16. Improved efficiency of heat generation in nonlinear dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rácz, J; de Châtel, P F; Szabó, I A; Szunyogh, L; Nándori, I

    2016-01-01

    The deterministic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation has been used to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of magnetization and the specific loss power in magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy driven by a rotating magnetic field. We propose a new type of applied field, which is "simultaneously rotating and alternating," i.e., the direction of the rotating external field changes periodically. We show that a more efficient heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is possible with this new type of applied field and we suggest its possible experimental realization in cancer therapy which requires the enhancement of loss energies. PMID:26871122

  17. Connection and coordination: the interplay between architecture and dynamics in evolved model pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Psujek, Sean; Ames, Jeffrey; Beer, Randall D

    2006-03-01

    We undertake a systematic study of the role of neural architecture in shaping the dynamics of evolved model pattern generators for a walking task. First, we consider the minimum number of connections necessary to achieve high performance on this task. Next, we identify architectural motifs associated with high fitness. We then examine how high-fitness architectures differ in their ability to evolve. Finally, we demonstrate the existence of distinct parameter subgroups in some architectures and show that these subgroups are characterized by differences in neuron excitabilities and connection signs. PMID:16483415

  18. Dynamical gap generation in graphene with frequency-dependent renormalization effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrington, M. E.; Fischer, C. S.; von Smekal, L.; Thoma, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    We study the frequency dependencies in the renormalization of the fermion Green's function for the π -band electrons in graphene and their influence on the dynamical gap generation at sufficiently strong interaction. Adopting the effective QED-like description for the low-energy excitations within the Dirac-cone region, we self-consistently solve the fermion Dyson-Schwinger equation in various approximations for the photon propagator and the vertex function with special emphasis on frequency-dependent Lindhard screening and retardation effects.

  19. Dynamic optical arbitrary waveform generation with amplitude controlled by interference of two FBG arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ailing; Li, Changxiu

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a novel structure of dynamic optical arbitrary waveform generation (O-AWG) with amplitude controlled by interference of two fiber Bragg grating (FBG) arrays is proposed. The FBG array consists of several FBGs and fiber stretchers (FSs). The amplitude is controlled by FSs through interference of two FBG arrays. The phase is controlled by FSs simultaneously. As a result, optical pulse trains with various waveforms as well as pulse trains with nonuniform pulse intensity, pulse spacing and pulse width in each period are obtained via FSs adjustment to change the phase shift of signal in each array. PMID:23188271

  20. Improved efficiency of heat generation in nonlinear dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rácz, J.; de Châtel, P. F.; Szabó, I. A.; Szunyogh, L.; Nándori, I.

    2016-01-01

    The deterministic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation has been used to investigate the nonlinear dynamics of magnetization and the specific loss power in magnetic nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy driven by a rotating magnetic field. We propose a new type of applied field, which is "simultaneously rotating and alternating," i.e., the direction of the rotating external field changes periodically. We show that a more efficient heat generation by magnetic nanoparticles is possible with this new type of applied field and we suggest its possible experimental realization in cancer therapy which requires the enhancement of loss energies.

  1. Generating a Pulsatile Pulmonary Flow after Fontan Operation by Means of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoreyshi, Mostafa

    2011-03-01

    This study considers blood flow in total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) morphology, which is created in Fontan surgical procedure in patients with single ventricle heart disease. Ordinary process of TCPC operation reduces pulmonary blood flow pulsatility; because of right ventricle being bypassed. This phenomenon causes a lot of side effects for patients. A cardiac surgeon has suggested that keeping main pulmonary artery (MPA) partially open, would increase pulmonary flow pulsations. MPA gets closed in ordinary TCPC operation. The purpose of current study is to verify the effects of keeping MPA partially open on pulmonary flow pulsations, by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). 3D geometry is reconstructed from CT Angiography (CTA) scan of a patient who has undergone an ordinary TCPC procedure. The stenosed MPA or pulmonary stenosis (PS) is virtually added to the original geometry. Flow field is studied in six different models in which average antegrade flow (AF) -coming through PS- increases gradually. Results show that adding AF increases flow pulsations in both pulmonary arteries. Moreover, power loss increases with respect to average AF. We conclude that adding AF is an impressive way to increase pulsations of pulmonary flow, but energy losses should be considered too.

  2. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    SciTech Connect

    Garbett, K; Mendler, O J; Gardner, G C; Garnsey, R; Young, M Y

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated.

  3. Dynamics of a Flywheel Energy Storage System Supporting a Wind Turbine Generator in a Microgrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair S, Gayathri; Senroy, Nilanjan

    2016-02-01

    Integration of an induction machine based flywheel energy storage system with a wind energy conversion system is implemented in this paper. The nonlinear and linearized models of the flywheel are studied, compared and a reduced order model of the same simulated to analyze the influence of the flywheel inertia and control in system response during a wind power change. A quantification of the relation between the inertia of the flywheel and the controller gain is obtained which allows the system to be considered as a reduced order model that is more controllable in nature. A microgrid setup comprising of the flywheel energy storage system, a two mass model of a DFIG based wind turbine generator and a reduced order model of a diesel generator is utilized to analyse the microgrid dynamics accurately in the event of frequency variations arising due to wind power change. The response of the microgrid with and without the flywheel is studied.

  4. Dynamic generation of Ince-Gaussian modes with a digital micromirror device

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Yu-Xuan; Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Chen, Yue; Lu, Rong-De; Gong, Lei; Huang, Kun

    2015-04-07

    Ince-Gaussian (IG) beam with elliptical profile, as a connection between Hermite-Gaussian (HG) and Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, has showed unique advantages in some applications such as quantum entanglement and optical micromanipulation. However, its dynamic generation with high switching frequency is still challenging. Here, we experimentally reported the quick generation of Ince-Gaussian beam by using a digital micro-mirror device (DMD), which has the highest switching frequency of 5.2 kHz in principle. The configurable properties of DMD allow us to observe the quasi-smooth variation from LG (with ellipticity ε=0) to IG and HG (ε=∞) beam. This approach might pave a path to high-speed quantum communication in terms of IG beam. Additionally, the characterized axial plane intensity distribution exhibits a 3D mould potentially being employed for optical micromanipulation.

  5. Generation and propagation dynamics of Airy beam with the tunable tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huilong; Lü, Yanfei; Xia, Jing; Pu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Li

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a new kind of Airy beam called Airy beam with the tunable tail, which can be generated from the elliptical flat-topped Gaussian beam. The analytical formula of Airy beam with the tunable tail is derived. Airy beam with the single tail can be obtained by adjusting the ration of the beam width of elliptical flat-topped Gaussian beam. The tail length of Airy beam can be controlled by the order N of incident beam. The normalized intensity distributions of Airy beam with the tunable tail propagating in free space are studied, and the propagation dynamics of Airy beam with the single tail are investigated. Compared with the Airy beam generated from the fundamental Gaussian beam or the flat-topped Gaussian beam, some interesting and useful information has been found.

  6. Dynamics of a semiconductor laser with polarization-rotated feedback and its utilization for random bit generation.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Neus; Soriano, Miguel C; Sukow, David W; Fischer, Ingo

    2011-12-01

    Chaotic semiconductor lasers have been proven attractive for fast random bit generation. To follow this strategy, simple robust systems and a systematic approach determining the required dynamical properties and most suitable conditions for this application are needed. We show that dynamics of a single mode laser with polarization-rotated feedback are optimal for random bit generation when characterized simultaneously by a broad power spectrum and low autocorrelation. We observe that successful random bit generation also is sensitive to digitization and postprocessing procedures. Applying the identified criteria, we achieve fast random bit generation rates (up to 4 Gbit/s) with minimal postprocessing.

  7. An overview of the use of Open Source in the NASA Langley Atmospheric Science Data Center Archive Next Generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, R. A.; Perez, J.; Piatko, P. J.; Coogan, S. P.; Parker, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center is responsible for the archive and distribution of Earth science data in the areas of radiation budget, clouds, aerosols, and tropospheric chemistry. Over the past several years the ASDC has developed and implemented the Archive Next Generation (ANGe) system, a state-of-the-art data ingest, archival, and distribution system to serve the atmospheric sciences data provider and user communities. ANGe employs Open Source technologies including the JBoss Application Server, a PostGIS-enabled PostgreSQL database system to store geospatial metadata, modules from the GeoTools Open Source Java GIS Toolkit including the Java Topology Suite (JTS) and GeoAPI libraries, and other libraries such as the Spring framework. ANGe was developed using a suite of several Open Source tools comprised of Eclipse, Ant, Subversion and Jenkins. ANGe is also deployed into an operational environment that leverages Open Source technologies from the Linux Operating system to tools such as Ganglia for monitoring. This presentation provides an overview of ANGe with a focus on the Open Source technologies employed in the implementation and deployment of the system. The ASDC is part of Langley's Science Directorate. The Data Center was established in 1991 to support NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. It is unique among NASA data centers in the size of its archive, cutting edge computing technology, and full range of data services. For more information regarding ASDC data holdings, documentation, tools and services, visit http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov.

  8. Programmable personality interface for the dynamic infrared scene generator (IRSG2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buford, James A., Jr.; Mobley, Scott B.; Mayhall, Anthony J.; Braselton, William J.

    1998-07-01

    As scene generator platforms begin to rely specifically on commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware and software components, the need for high speed programmable personality interfaces (PPIs) are required for interfacing to Infrared (IR) flight computer/processors and complex IR projectors in the hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation facilities. Recent technological advances and innovative applications of established technologies are beginning to allow development of cost effective PPIs to interface to COTS scene generators. At the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC) researchers have developed such a PPI to reside between the AMCOM MRDEC IR Scene Generator (IRSG) and either a missile flight computer or the dynamic Laser Diode Array Projector (LDAP). AMCOM MRDEC has developed several PPIs for the first and second generation IRSGs (IRSG1 and IRSG2), which are based on Silicon Graphics Incorporated (SGI) Onyx and Onyx2 computers with Reality Engine 2 (RE2) and Infinite Reality (IR/IR2) graphics engines. This paper provides an overview of PPIs designed, integrated, tested, and verified at AMCOM MRDEC, specifically the IRSG2's PPI.

  9. Synthetic ECG Generation and Bayesian Filtering Using a Gaussian Wave-Based Dynamical Model

    PubMed Central

    Sayadi, Omid; Shamsollahi, Mohammad B.; Clifford, Gari D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a Gaussian wave-based state space to model the temporal dynamics of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. It is shown that this model may be effectively used for generating synthetic ECGs as well as separate characteristic waves (CWs) such as the atrial and ventricular complexes. The model uses separate state variables for each CW, i.e. P, QRS and T, and hence is capable of generating individual synthetic CWs as well as realistic ECG signals. The model is therefore useful for generating arrhythmias. Simulations of sinus bradycardia, sinus tachycardia, ventricular flutter, atrial fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia are presented. In addition, discrete versions of the equations are presented for a model-based Bayesian framework for denoising. This framework, together with an extended Kalman filter (EKF) and extended Kalman smoother (EKS), were used for denoising the ECG for both normal rhythms and arrhythmias. For evaluating the denoising performance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement of the filter outputs and clinical parameter stability were studied. The results demonstrate superiority over a wide range of input SNRs, achieving a maximum 12.7 dB improvement. Results indicate that preventing clinically relevant distortion of the ECG is sensitive to the number of model parameters. Models are presented which do not exhibit such distortions. The approach presented in this paper may therefore serve as an effective framework for synthetic ECG generation and model-based filtering of noisy ECG recordings. PMID:20720288

  10. Post-scram Liquid Metal cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) neat transport system dynamics and steam generator control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brukx, J. F. L. M.

    1982-06-01

    Loop type LMFBR heat transport system dynamics after reactor shutdown and during subsequent decay heat removal are considered with emphasis on steam generator dynamics including the development and evaluation of various post-scram steam generator control systems, and natural circulation of the sodium coolant, including the influence of superimposed free convection on forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop. The normal operating and decay heat removal functions of the overall heat transport system are described.

  11. To Be or not to Be a Source of Shot Noise: an Open Problem of Generation Recombination Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomila, G.; Reggiani, L.

    2003-05-01

    We address the fundamental question wether generation recombination noise can transform into shot noise at increasing values of the applied bias (current or voltage). From the seminal work of Van Vliet and Fassett (1965) the analytical answer to this question is affirmative. By contrast, recent numerical results by Bonani and Ghione (1999) provided a negative answer. For a simple semiconductor two level model consisting of a conducting band and an impurity level which provides charge carriers we solve exactly the appropriate second order stochastic differential equation self-consistently coupled with the Poisson solver. The effect of the diffusion current, neglected in the first analytical approach, is found to inhibit the cross-over between generation-recombination and shot noise, thus confirming more recent numerical results. Open problems related to the microscopic interpretation of these new results are pointed out.

  12. Piezo-earpiece for micro-power generation from ear canal dynamic motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delnavaz, Aidin; Voix, Jérémie

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on improving the past performance of ear canal energy harvesting by developing a piezo-earpiece prototype and a multiphysics finite element method to integrate more complex and effective piezoelectric structures. The proposed handmade piezo-earpiece prototype is a custom-moulded soft earpiece wrapped in a layer of flexible polyvinylidene fluoride. A finite element model is developed in order to estimate the energy harvesting capability of the piezoelectric layer. A prototype of the energy harvester is fabricated and tested. The experimental results show that the proposed device is able to generate 44 μJ of energy corresponding to an average value of 70 μW per jaw opening and closing cycle. Simulation of energy harvesting based on the finite element method is validated by the experimental results, thus confirming it as a versatile tool to model, optimize and evaluate the performance of other types of flexible piezoelectric structures for in-ear energy harvesting applications.

  13. Molecular Dynamics of Channelrhodopsin at the Early Stages of Channel Opening.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Mizuki; Kato, Hideaki E; Koyama, Michio; Ito, Jumpei; Kamiya, Motoshi; Hayashi, Shigehiko; Maturana, Andrés D; Deisseroth, Karl; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin (ChR) is a light-gated cation channel that responds to blue light. Since ChR can be readily expressed in specific neurons to precisely control their activities by light, it has become a powerful tool in neuroscience. Although the recently solved crystal structure of a chimeric ChR, C1C2, provided the structural basis for ChR, our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ChR still remains limited. Here we performed electrophysiological analyses and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to investigate the importance of the intracellular and central constrictions of the ion conducting pore observed in the crystal structure of C1C2. Our electrophysiological analysis revealed that two glutamate residues, Glu122 and Glu129, in the intracellular and central constrictions, respectively, should be deprotonated in the photocycle. The simulation results suggested that the deprotonation of Glu129 in the central constriction leads to ion leakage in the ground state, and implied that the protonation of Glu129 is important for preventing ion leakage in the ground state. Moreover, we modeled the 13-cis retinal bound; i.e., activated C1C2, and performed MD simulations to investigate the conformational changes in the early stage of the photocycle. Our simulations suggested that retinal photoisomerization induces the conformational change toward channel opening, including the movements of TM6, TM7 and TM2. These insights into the dynamics of the ground states and the early photocycle stages enhance our understanding of the channel function of ChR.

  14. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Jin, Xiaogang; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses. PMID:27187068

  15. Dynamical mass generation in QED with magnetic fields: Arbitrary field strength and coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Eduardo; Ayala, Alejandro; Bashir, Adnan; Raya, Alfredo

    2008-05-01

    We study the dynamical generation of masses for fundamental fermions in quenched quantum electrodynamics, in the presence of magnetics fields of arbitrary strength, by solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion self-energy in the rainbow approximation. We employ the Ritus eigenfunction formalism which provides a neat solution to the technical problem of summing over all Landau levels. It is well known that magnetic fields catalyze the generation of fermion mass m for arbitrarily small values of electromagnetic coupling α. For intense fields it is also well known that m∝eB. Our approach allows us to span all regimes of parameters α and eB. We find that m∝eB provided α is small. However, when α increases beyond the critical value αc which marks the onslaught of dynamical fermion masses in vacuum, we find m∝Λ, the cutoff required to regularize the ultraviolet divergences. Our method permits us to verify the results available in literature for the limiting cases of eB and α. We also point out the relevance of our work for possible physical applications.

  16. MSEBAG: a dynamic classifier ensemble generation based on `minimum-sufficient ensemble' and bagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Kamel, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic classifier system, MSEBAG, which is characterised by searching for the 'minimum-sufficient ensemble' and bagging at the ensemble level. It adopts an 'over-generation and selection' strategy and aims to achieve a good bias-variance trade-off. In the training phase, MSEBAG first searches for the 'minimum-sufficient ensemble', which maximises the in-sample fitness with the minimal number of base classifiers. Then, starting from the 'minimum-sufficient ensemble', a backward stepwise algorithm is employed to generate a collection of ensembles. The objective is to create a collection of ensembles with a descending fitness on the data, as well as a descending complexity in the structure. MSEBAG dynamically selects the ensembles from the collection for the decision aggregation. The extended adaptive aggregation (EAA) approach, a bagging-style algorithm performed at the ensemble level, is employed for this task. EAA searches for the competent ensembles using a score function, which takes into consideration both the in-sample fitness and the confidence of the statistical inference, and averages the decisions of the selected ensembles to label the test pattern. The experimental results show that the proposed MSEBAG outperforms the benchmarks on average.

  17. Monitoring the Photocleaving Dynamics of Colloidal MicroRNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Using Second Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Kumal, Raju R; Landry, Corey R; Abu-Laban, Mohammad; Hayes, Daniel J; Haber, Louis H

    2015-09-15

    Photoactivated drug delivery systems using gold nanoparticles provide the promise of spatiotemporal control of delivery that is crucial for applications ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In this study, we use second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy to monitor the light-activated controlled release of oligonucleotides from the surface of colloidal gold nanoparticles. MicroRNA is functionalized to spherical gold nanoparticles using a nitrobenzyl linker that undergoes photocleaving upon ultraviolet irradiation. The SHG signal generated from the colloidal nanoparticle sample is shown to be a sensitive probe for monitoring the photocleaving dynamics in real time. The photocleaving irradiation wavelength is scanned to show maximum efficiency on resonance at 365 nm, and the kinetics are investigated at varying irradiation powers to demonstrate that the nitrobenzyl photocleaving is a one-photon process. Additional characterization methods including electrophoretic mobility measurements, extinction spectroscopy, and fluorimetry are used to verify the SHG results, leading to a better understanding of the photocleaving dynamics for this model oligonucleotide therapeutic delivery system.

  18. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses. PMID:27187068

  19. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J.; Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S.

    2014-06-28

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ≈50 fs, 800 nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (≈90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (≈10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  20. Simulating Flying Insects Using Dynamics and Data-Driven Noise Modeling to Generate Diverse Collective Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiaping; Wang, Xinjie; Jin, Xiaogang; Manocha, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    We present a biologically plausible dynamics model to simulate swarms of flying insects. Our formulation, which is based on biological conclusions and experimental observations, is designed to simulate large insect swarms of varying densities. We use a force-based model that captures different interactions between the insects and the environment and computes collision-free trajectories for each individual insect. Furthermore, we model the noise as a constructive force at the collective level and present a technique to generate noise-induced insect movements in a large swarm that are similar to those observed in real-world trajectories. We use a data-driven formulation that is based on pre-recorded insect trajectories. We also present a novel evaluation metric and a statistical validation approach that takes into account various characteristics of insect motions. In practice, the combination of Curl noise function with our dynamics model is used to generate realistic swarm simulations and emergent behaviors. We highlight its performance for simulating large flying swarms of midges, fruit fly, locusts and moths and demonstrate many collective behaviors, including aggregation, migration, phase transition, and escape responses.

  1. Monitoring the Photocleaving Dynamics of Colloidal MicroRNA-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles Using Second Harmonic Generation.

    PubMed

    Kumal, Raju R; Landry, Corey R; Abu-Laban, Mohammad; Hayes, Daniel J; Haber, Louis H

    2015-09-15

    Photoactivated drug delivery systems using gold nanoparticles provide the promise of spatiotemporal control of delivery that is crucial for applications ranging from regenerative medicine to cancer therapy. In this study, we use second harmonic generation (SHG) spectroscopy to monitor the light-activated controlled release of oligonucleotides from the surface of colloidal gold nanoparticles. MicroRNA is functionalized to spherical gold nanoparticles using a nitrobenzyl linker that undergoes photocleaving upon ultraviolet irradiation. The SHG signal generated from the colloidal nanoparticle sample is shown to be a sensitive probe for monitoring the photocleaving dynamics in real time. The photocleaving irradiation wavelength is scanned to show maximum efficiency on resonance at 365 nm, and the kinetics are investigated at varying irradiation powers to demonstrate that the nitrobenzyl photocleaving is a one-photon process. Additional characterization methods including electrophoretic mobility measurements, extinction spectroscopy, and fluorimetry are used to verify the SHG results, leading to a better understanding of the photocleaving dynamics for this model oligonucleotide therapeutic delivery system. PMID:26313536

  2. Generation of Look-Up Tables for Dynamic Job Shop Scheduling Decision Support Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oktaviandri, Muchamad; Hassan, Adnan; Mohd Shaharoun, Awaluddin

    2016-02-01

    Majority of existing scheduling techniques are based on static demand and deterministic processing time, while most job shop scheduling problem are concerned with dynamic demand and stochastic processing time. As a consequence, the solutions obtained from the traditional scheduling technique are ineffective wherever changes occur to the system. Therefore, this research intends to develop a decision support tool (DST) based on promising artificial intelligent that is able to accommodate the dynamics that regularly occur in job shop scheduling problem. The DST was designed through three phases, i.e. (i) the look-up table generation, (ii) inverse model development and (iii) integration of DST components. This paper reports the generation of look-up tables for various scenarios as a part in development of the DST. A discrete event simulation model was used to compare the performance among SPT, EDD, FCFS, S/OPN and Slack rules; the best performances measures (mean flow time, mean tardiness and mean lateness) and the job order requirement (inter-arrival time, due dates tightness and setup time ratio) which were compiled into look-up tables. The well-known 6/6/J/Cmax Problem from Muth and Thompson (1963) was used as a case study. In the future, the performance measure of various scheduling scenarios and the job order requirement will be mapped using ANN inverse model.

  3. Next Generation Air Quality Platform: Openness and Interoperability for the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Kotsev, Alexander; Schade, Sven; Craglia, Massimo; Gerboles, Michel; Spinelle, Laurent; Signorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The widespread diffusion of sensors, mobile devices, social media and open data are reconfiguring the way data underpinning policy and science are being produced and consumed. This in turn is creating both opportunities and challenges for policy-making and science. There can be major benefits from the deployment of the IoT in smart cities and environmental monitoring, but to realize such benefits, and reduce potential risks, there is an urgent need to address current limitations, including the interoperability of sensors, data quality, security of access and new methods for spatio-temporal analysis. Within this context, the manuscript provides an overview of the AirSensEUR project, which establishes an affordable open software/hardware multi-sensor platform, which is nonetheless able to monitor air pollution at low concentration levels. AirSensEUR is described from the perspective of interoperable data management with emphasis on possible use case scenarios, where reliable and timely air quality data would be essential. PMID:26999160

  4. Next Generation Air Quality Platform: Openness and Interoperability for the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Kotsev, Alexander; Schade, Sven; Craglia, Massimo; Gerboles, Michel; Spinelle, Laurent; Signorini, Marco

    2016-03-18

    The widespread diffusion of sensors, mobile devices, social media and open data are reconfiguring the way data underpinning policy and science are being produced and consumed. This in turn is creating both opportunities and challenges for policy-making and science. There can be major benefits from the deployment of the IoT in smart cities and environmental monitoring, but to realize such benefits, and reduce potential risks, there is an urgent need to address current limitations, including the interoperability of sensors, data quality, security of access and new methods for spatio-temporal analysis. Within this context, the manuscript provides an overview of the AirSensEUR project, which establishes an affordable open software/hardware multi-sensor platform, which is nonetheless able to monitor air pollution at low concentration levels. AirSensEUR is described from the perspective of interoperable data management with emphasis on possible use case scenarios, where reliable and timely air quality data would be essential.

  5. Next Generation Air Quality Platform: Openness and Interoperability for the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Kotsev, Alexander; Schade, Sven; Craglia, Massimo; Gerboles, Michel; Spinelle, Laurent; Signorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The widespread diffusion of sensors, mobile devices, social media and open data are reconfiguring the way data underpinning policy and science are being produced and consumed. This in turn is creating both opportunities and challenges for policy-making and science. There can be major benefits from the deployment of the IoT in smart cities and environmental monitoring, but to realize such benefits, and reduce potential risks, there is an urgent need to address current limitations, including the interoperability of sensors, data quality, security of access and new methods for spatio-temporal analysis. Within this context, the manuscript provides an overview of the AirSensEUR project, which establishes an affordable open software/hardware multi-sensor platform, which is nonetheless able to monitor air pollution at low concentration levels. AirSensEUR is described from the perspective of interoperable data management with emphasis on possible use case scenarios, where reliable and timely air quality data would be essential. PMID:26999160

  6. FOREWORD: International Summer School for Advanced Studies 'Dynamics of open nuclear systems' (PREDEAL12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Zamfir, N. V.; Raduta, A. R.; Gulminelli, F.

    2013-02-01

    This proceedings volume contains the invited lectures and contributions presented at the International Summer School on Nuclear Physics held at Trei Brazi, a summer resort of the Bioterra University, near the city of Predeal, Romania, on 9-20 July 2012. The long tradition of International Summer Schools on Nuclear Physics in Romania dates as far back as 1964, with the event being scheduled every two years. During this period of almost 50 years, many outstanding nuclear scientists have lectured on various topics related to nuclear physics and particle physics. This year we celebrate the 80th birthday of Aureliu Sandulescu, one of the founders of the Romanian school of theoretical nuclear physics. He was Serban Titeica's PhD student, one of Werner Heisenberg's PhD students, and he organized the first edition of this event. Aureliu Sandulescu's major contributions to the field of theoretical nuclear physics are related in particular to the prediction of cluster radioactivity, the physics of open quantum systems and the innovative technique of detecting superheavy nuclei using the double magic projectile 48Ca (Calcium), nowadays a widely used method at the JINR—Dubna and GSI—Darmstadt laboratories. The title of the event, 'Dynamics of Open Nuclear Systems', is in recognition of Aureliu Sandulescu's great personality. The lectures were attended by Romanian and foreign Master and PhD students and young researchers in nuclear physics. About 25 reputable professors and researchers in nuclear physics delivered lectures during this period. According to a well-established tradition, an interval of two hours was allotted for each lecture (including discussions). Therefore we kept a balance between the school and conference format. Two lectures were held during the morning and afternoon sessions. After lecture sessions, three or four oral contributions were given by young scientists. This was a good opportunity for them to present the results of their research in front of

  7. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  8. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; Jo, Sunhwan; Pande, Vijay S.; Case, David A.; Brooks, Charles L.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Im, Wonpil

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find the optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.

  9. Open Quantum Dynamics Calculations with the Hierarchy Equations of Motion on Parallel Computers.

    PubMed

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-14

    Calculating the evolution of an open quantum system, i.e., a system in contact with a thermal environment, has presented a theoretical and computational challenge for many years. With the advent of supercomputers containing large amounts of memory and many processors, the computational challenge posed by the previously intractable theoretical models can now be addressed. The hierarchy equations of motion present one such model and offer a powerful method that remained under-utilized so far due to its considerable computational expense. By exploiting concurrent processing on parallel computers the hierarchy equations of motion can be applied to biological-scale systems. Herein we introduce the quantum dynamics software PHI, that solves the hierarchical equations of motion. We describe the integrator employed by PHI and demonstrate PHI's scaling and efficiency running on large parallel computers by applying the software to the calculation of inter-complex excitation transfer between the light harvesting complexes 1 and 2 of purple photosynthetic bacteria, a 50 pigment system. PMID:23105920

  10. Dynamic online surveys and experiments with the free open-source software dynQuest.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Jens D M; Lippke, Sonia

    2007-08-01

    With computers and the World Wide Web widely available, collecting data through Web browsers is an attractive method utilized by the social sciences. In this article, conducting PC- and Web-based trials with the software package dynQuest is described. The software manages dynamic questionnaire-based trials over the Internet or on single computers, possibly as randomized control trials (RCT), if two or more groups are involved. The choice of follow-up questions can depend on previous responses, as needed for matched interventions. Data are collected in a simple text-based database that can be imported easily into other programs for postprocessing and statistical analysis. The software consists of platform-independent scripts written in the programming language PERL that use the common gateway interface between Web browser and server for submission of data through HTML forms. Advantages of dynQuest are parsimony, simplicity in use and installation, transparency, and reliability. The program is available as open-source freeware from the authors.

  11. DCEMRI.jl: a fast, validated, open source toolkit for dynamic contrast enhanced MRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Welch, E. Brian

    2015-01-01

    We present a fast, validated, open-source toolkit for processing dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data. We validate it against the Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers Alliance (QIBA) Standard and Extended Tofts-Kety phantoms and find near perfect recovery in the absence of noise, with an estimated 10–20× speedup in run time compared to existing tools. To explain the observed trends in the fitting errors, we present an argument about the conditioning of the Jacobian in the limit of small and large parameter values. We also demonstrate its use on an in vivo data set to measure performance on a realistic application. For a 192 × 192 breast image, we achieved run times of <1 s. Finally, we analyze run times scaling with problem size and find that the run time per voxel scales as O(N1.9), where N is the number of time points in the tissue concentration curve. DCEMRI.jl was much faster than any other analysis package tested and produced comparable accuracy, even in the presence of noise. PMID:25922795

  12. Simulating open quantum dynamics with time-dependent variational matrix product states: Towards microscopic correlation of environment dynamics and reduced system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Florian A. Y. N.; Chin, Alex W.

    2016-02-01

    We report the development of an efficient many-body algorithm for simulating open quantum system dynamics that utilizes a time-dependent variational principle for matrix product states to evolve large system-environment states. Capturing all system-environment correlations, we reproduce the nonperturbative, quantum-critical dynamics of the zero-temperature spin-boson model, and then exploit the many-body information to visualize the complete time-frequency spectrum of the environmental excitations. Our "environmental spectra" reveal correlated vibrational motion in polaronic modes which preserve their vibrational coherence during incoherent spin relaxation, demonstrating how environment information could yield valuable insights into complex quantum dissipative processes.

  13. Generation of random microstructures and prediction of sound velocity and absorption for open foams with spherical pores.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Tomasz G

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes and discusses an approach for the design and quality inspection of the morphology dedicated for sound absorbing foams, using a relatively simple technique for a random generation of periodic microstructures representative for open-cell foams with spherical pores. The design is controlled by a few parameters, namely, the total open porosity and the average pore size, as well as the standard deviation of pore size. These design parameters are set up exactly and independently, however, the setting of the standard deviation of pore sizes requires some number of pores in the representative volume element (RVE); this number is a procedure parameter. Another pore structure parameter which may be indirectly affected is the average size of windows linking the pores, however, it is in fact weakly controlled by the maximal pore-penetration factor, and moreover, it depends on the porosity and pore size. The proposed methodology for testing microstructure-designs of sound absorbing porous media applies the multi-scale modeling where some important transport parameters-responsible for sound propagation in a porous medium-are calculated from microstructure using the generated RVE, in order to estimate the sound velocity and absorption of such a designed material. PMID:25920832

  14. Effect of indoor-generated airborne particles on radon progeny dynamics.

    PubMed

    Trassierra, C Vargas; Stabile, L; Cardellini, F; Morawska, L; Buonanno, G

    2016-08-15

    In order to investigate the interaction between radon progeny and particles, an experimental campaign was carried out in a radon chamber at the Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, quantifying the amount of attached and unattached radon daughters present in air, as well as the equilibrium factor in the presence of particles generated through indoor sources. A fixed radon concentration was maintained, while particles were generated using incense sticks, mosquito coils and gas combustion. Aerosols were characterized in terms of particle concentrations and size distributions. Simultaneously, radon concentration and attached/unattached potential alpha energy concentration in the air were continuously monitored by two different devices, based on alpha spectroscopy techniques. The presence of particles was found to affect the attached fraction of radon decay products, in such a way that the particles acted as a sink for radionuclides. In terms of sources which emit large particles (e.g. incense, mosquito coils), which greatly increase particle surface area concentrations, the Equilibrium Factor was found to double with respect to the background level before particle generation sessions. On the contrary, the radon decay product dynamics were not influenced by gas combustion processes, mainly due to the small surface area of the particles emitted. PMID:27131455

  15. Dynamics of adaptation and diversification: a 10,000-generation experiment with bacterial populations.

    PubMed Central

    Lenski, R E; Travisano, M

    1994-01-01

    We followed evolutionary change in 12 populations of Escherichia coli propagated for 10,000 generations in identical environments. Both morphology (cell size) and fitness (measured in competition with the ancestor) evolved rapidly for the first 2000 generations or so after the populations were introduced into the experimental environment, but both were nearly static for the last 5000 generations. Although evolving in identical environments, the replicate populations diverged significantly from one another in both morphology and mean fitness. The divergence in mean fitness was sustained and implies that the populations have approached different fitness peaks of unequal height in the adaptive landscape. Although the experimental time scale and environment were microevolutionary in scope, our experiments were designed to address questions concerning the origin as well as the fate of genetic and phenotypic novelties, the repeatability of adaptation, the diversification of lineages, and thus the causes and consequences of the uniqueness of evolutionary history. In fact, we observed several hallmarks of macroevolutionary dynamics, including periods of rapid evolution and stasis, altered functional relationships between traits, and concordance of anagenetic and cladogenetic trends. Our results support a Wrightian interpretation, in which chance events (mutation and drift) play an important role in adaptive evolution, as do the complex genetic interactions that underlie the structure of organisms. PMID:8041701

  16. Advanced real-time dynamic scene generation techniques for improved performance and fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mark H.; Buford, James A.; Mayhall, Anthony J.

    2000-07-01

    Recent advances in real-time synthetic scene generation for Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing at the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM) Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) improve both performance and fidelity. Modeling ground target scenarios requires tradeoffs because of limited texture memory for imagery and limited main memory for elevation data. High- resolution insets have been used in the past to provide better fidelity in specific areas, such as in the neighborhood of a target. Improvements for ground scenarios include smooth transitions for high-resolution insets to reduce high spatial frequency artifacts at the borders of the inset regions and dynamic terrain paging to support large area databases. Transport lag through the scene generation system, including sensor emulation and interface components, has been dealt with in the past through the use of sub-window extraction from oversize scenes. This compensates for spatial effects of transport lag but not temporal effects. A new system has been developed and used successfully to compensate for a flashing coded beacon in the scene. Other techniques have been developed to synchronize the scene generator with the seeker under test (SUT) and to model atmospheric effects, sensor optic and electronics, and angular emissivity attenuation.

  17. Zeeman splitting and dynamical mass generation in Dirac semimetal ZrTe5

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanwen; Yuan, Xiang; Zhang, Cheng; Jin, Zhao; Narayan, Awadhesh; Luo, Chen; Chen, Zhigang; Yang, Lei; Zou, Jin; Wu, Xing; Sanvito, Stefano; Xia, Zhengcai; Li, Liang; Wang, Zhong; Xiu, Faxian

    2016-01-01

    Dirac semimetals have attracted extensive attentions in recent years. It has been theoretically suggested that many-body interactions may drive exotic phase transitions, spontaneously generating a Dirac mass for the nominally massless Dirac electrons. So far, signature of interaction-driven transition has been lacking. In this work, we report high-magnetic-field transport measurements of the Dirac semimetal candidate ZrTe5. Owing to the large g factor in ZrTe5, the Zeeman splitting can be observed at magnetic field as low as 3 T. Most prominently, high pulsed magnetic field up to 60 T drives the system into the ultra-quantum limit, where we observe abrupt changes in the magnetoresistance, indicating field-induced phase transitions. This is interpreted as an interaction-induced spontaneous mass generation of the Dirac fermions, which bears resemblance to the dynamical mass generation of nucleons in high-energy physics. Our work establishes Dirac semimetals as ideal platforms for investigating emerging correlation effects in topological matters. PMID:27515493

  18. Zeeman splitting and dynamical mass generation in Dirac semimetal ZrTe5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanwen; Yuan, Xiang; Zhang, Cheng; Jin, Zhao; Narayan, Awadhesh; Luo, Chen; Chen, Zhigang; Yang, Lei; Zou, Jin; Wu, Xing; Sanvito, Stefano; Xia, Zhengcai; Li, Liang; Wang, Zhong; Xiu, Faxian

    2016-08-01

    Dirac semimetals have attracted extensive attentions in recent years. It has been theoretically suggested that many-body interactions may drive exotic phase transitions, spontaneously generating a Dirac mass for the nominally massless Dirac electrons. So far, signature of interaction-driven transition has been lacking. In this work, we report high-magnetic-field transport measurements of the Dirac semimetal candidate ZrTe5. Owing to the large g factor in ZrTe5, the Zeeman splitting can be observed at magnetic field as low as 3 T. Most prominently, high pulsed magnetic field up to 60 T drives the system into the ultra-quantum limit, where we observe abrupt changes in the magnetoresistance, indicating field-induced phase transitions. This is interpreted as an interaction-induced spontaneous mass generation of the Dirac fermions, which bears resemblance to the dynamical mass generation of nucleons in high-energy physics. Our work establishes Dirac semimetals as ideal platforms for investigating emerging correlation effects in topological matters.

  19. Opportunity to test non-Newtonian gravity using interferometric sensors with dynamic gravity field generators

    SciTech Connect

    Raffai, Peter; Szeifert, Gabor; Matone, Luca; Bartos, Imre; Marka, Zsuzsa; Aso, Yoichi; Ricci, Fulvio; Marka, Szabolcs

    2011-10-15

    We present an experimental opportunity for the future to measure possible violations to Newton's 1/r{sup 2} law in the 0.1-10 m range using dynamic gravity field generators (DFG) and taking advantage of the exceptional sensitivity of modern interferometric techniques. The placement of a DFG in proximity to one of the interferometer's suspended test masses generates a change in the local gravitational field that can be measured at a high signal to noise ratio. The use of multiple DFGs in a null-experiment configuration allows us to test composition-independent non-Newtonian gravity significantly beyond the present limits. Advanced and third-generation gravitational-wave detectors are representing the state-of-the-art in interferometric distance measurement today, therefore, we illustrate the method through their sensitivity to emphasize the possible scientific reach. Nevertheless, it is expected that due to the technical details of gravitational-wave detectors, DFGs shall likely require dedicated custom-configured interferometry. However, the sensitivity measure we derive is a solid baseline indicating that it is feasible to consider probing orders of magnitude into the pristine parameter well beyond the present experimental limits significantly cutting into the theoretical parameter space.

  20. Zeeman splitting and dynamical mass generation in Dirac semimetal ZrTe5.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanwen; Yuan, Xiang; Zhang, Cheng; Jin, Zhao; Narayan, Awadhesh; Luo, Chen; Chen, Zhigang; Yang, Lei; Zou, Jin; Wu, Xing; Sanvito, Stefano; Xia, Zhengcai; Li, Liang; Wang, Zhong; Xiu, Faxian

    2016-01-01

    Dirac semimetals have attracted extensive attentions in recent years. It has been theoretically suggested that many-body interactions may drive exotic phase transitions, spontaneously generating a Dirac mass for the nominally massless Dirac electrons. So far, signature of interaction-driven transition has been lacking. In this work, we report high-magnetic-field transport measurements of the Dirac semimetal candidate ZrTe5. Owing to the large g factor in ZrTe5, the Zeeman splitting can be observed at magnetic field as low as 3 T. Most prominently, high pulsed magnetic field up to 60 T drives the system into the ultra-quantum limit, where we observe abrupt changes in the magnetoresistance, indicating field-induced phase transitions. This is interpreted as an interaction-induced spontaneous mass generation of the Dirac fermions, which bears resemblance to the dynamical mass generation of nucleons in high-energy physics. Our work establishes Dirac semimetals as ideal platforms for investigating emerging correlation effects in topological matters. PMID:27515493

  1. Effects of Student-Generated Diagrams versus Student-Generated Summaries on Conceptual Understanding of Causal and Dynamic Knowledge in Plate Tectonics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gobert, Janice D.; Clement, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Grade five students' (n=58) conceptual understanding of plate tectonics was measured by analysis of student-generated summaries and diagrams, and by posttest assessment of both the spatial/static and causal/dynamic aspects of the domain. The diagram group outperformed the summary and text-only groups on the posttest measures. Discusses the effects…

  2. Nanosecond pulsed laser induced generation of open macro porosity on sintered ZnO pellet surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. K.; Samanta, Soumen; Sinha, Sucharita

    2015-01-01

    Surface porosity and pore size distribution of sensing material greatly influence performance parameters such as sensitivity, reproducibility and response time of sensors. Various approaches have been employed to generate surface porosity having varying pore size distribution. This paper presents our results on pulsed laser irradiation based surface microstructuring of sintered zinc oxide (ZnO) pellets leading to generation of enhanced surface porosity. ZnO targets have been surface treated using a frequency doubled nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser at laser fluence levels ranging between 2 and 9 J/cm2. Our observations establish that laser irradiation provides an effective technique for generation of surface macro porosity in case of ZnO pellets. Also, extent of surface porosity and the mean pore size could be controlled by appropriately varying the incident laser fluence. Such laser treated ZnO surfaces with enhanced surface porosity and large size pores can serve as potential candidate for humidity sensors with high sensitivity and fast response time, particularly in high humidity range.

  3. Particle dynamics in discs with turbulence generated by the vertical shear instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, Moritz H. R.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2016-10-01

    Context. Among the candidates for generating turbulence in accretion discs in situations with low intrinsic ionization, the vertical shear instability (VSI) has become an interesting candidate, since it relies purely on a vertical gradient in the angular velocity. Existing numerical simulations have shown that α-values a few times 10-4 can be generated. Aims: The particle growth in the early planet formation phase is determined by the dynamics of embedded dust particles. Here, we address, in particular, the efficiency of VSI-turbulence in concentrating particles to generate overdensities and low collision velocities. Methods: We perform three-dimensional (3D) numerical hydrodynamical simulations of accretion discs around young stars that include radiative transport and irradiation from the central star. The motion of embedded particles within a size range of a fraction of mm up to several m is followed using standard drag formula. Results: We confirm that, under realistic conditions, the VSI is able to generate turbulence in full 3D protoplanetary discs. The irradiated disc shows turbulence within 10 to 60 au. The mean radial motion of the gas is such that it is directed inward near the midplane and outward in the surface layers. We find that large particles drift inward with the expected speed, while small particles can experience phases of outward drift. Additionally, the particles show bunching behaviour with overdensities reaching five times the average value, which is strongest for dimensionless stopping times around unity. Conclusions: Particles in a VSI-turbulent discs are concentrated in large-scale turbulent eddies and show low relative speeds that allow for growing collisions. The reached overdensities will also enable the onset of streaming instabilities, further enhancing particle growth. The outward drift for small particles at higher disk elevations enable the transport of processed high temperature material in the solar system to greater distances.

  4. Recollision dynamics of electron wave packets in high-order harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2009-11-01

    We numerically investigate the dynamics of recollision of an electron in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) for an H atom and a molecular ion H2+ using a short (ten optical cycles), and intense (I0≥1014W/cm2) , z -polarized linear laser pulse with wavelength 800 nm by accurately solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation. A time-frequency analysis obtained via Gabor transforms is employed to identify electron recollision and recombination times responsible for the generation of harmonics. We find that the HHG spectra are mainly attributed to the recollision of an inner electron wave packet with the parent ion in agreement with the classical recollision model. A time delay of the electron recollision occurs between wave packets in inner and outer regions, near to and far from the parent ion, due to different phase of the acceleration (as well as dipole velocity) of the electron. Inner wave packets at recollision contain mainly short and long trajectories whereas outer wave packets contain only single trajectories. Lower-order harmonics are generated mainly by single recollisions near field extrema, i.e., in strong electric fields whereas higher-order harmonics are generated by double trajectories with different intensities. In the case of H2+ at a critical nuclear distance for charge resonance enhanced ionization, we also find that HHG mainly comes from contributions of the inner electron wave packet, but with more complex recollision trajectories due to the presence of more than one Coulomb center. Triple recollision trajectories are shown to occur generally for the latter.

  5. Some aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and dynamic instabilities in medium and high pressure steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, H. C.

    1981-03-01

    Experimental data for void fraction, incipient point of boiling, initial point of net vapor generation, bubble dynamics, dryout, two-phase flow pressure drop and density-wave oscillations were obtained in long, sodium heated steam generator tubes of different geometries for a wide range of operating conditions and at medium and high pressures. These data and data from literature taken in sodium and electrically heated steam generator tubes were correlated. Aspects of two-phase flow, heat transfer and density-wave oscillations in these steam generators disclosed include the distribution factor in small- and medium-size diameter steam generator tubes, the characteristic of the transitions at the incipient point of boiling and initial point of net vapor generation, bubble growth during subcooled nucleate flow boiling, the importance of the equivalent length for dryout in non-uniformly heated steam generator tubes and the mechanisms of density-wave oscillations in once-through steam generator tubes.

  6. Hydration Gibbs free energies of open and closed shell trivalent lanthanide and actinide cations from polarizable molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marjolin, Aude; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ren, Pengyu Y; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Dognon, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The hydration free energies, structures, and dynamics of open- and closed-shell trivalent lanthanide and actinide metal cations are studied using molecular dynamics simulations (MD) based on a polarizable force field. Parameters for the metal cations are derived from an ab initio bottom-up strategy. MD simulations of six cations solvated in bulk water are subsequently performed with the AMOEBA polarizable force field. The calculated first-and second shell hydration numbers, water residence times, and free energies of hydration are consistent with experimental/theoretical values leading to a predictive modeling of f-elements compounds.

  7. Collaboration-Centred Cities through Urban Apps Based on Open and User-Generated Data

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Unai; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Pérez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the IES Cities platform conceived to streamline the development of urban apps that combine heterogeneous datasets provided by diverse entities, namely, government, citizens, sensor infrastructure and other information data sources. This work pursues the challenge of achieving effective citizen collaboration by empowering them to prosume urban data across time. Particularly, this paper focuses on the query mapper; a key component of the IES Cities platform devised to democratize the development of open data-based mobile urban apps. This component allows developers not only to use available data, but also to contribute to existing datasets with the execution of SQL sentences. In addition, the component allows developers to create ad hoc storages for their applications, publishable as new datasets accessible by other consumers. As multiple users could be contributing and using a dataset, our solution also provides a data level permission mechanism to control how the platform manages the access to its datasets. We have evaluated the advantages brought forward by IES Cities from the developers’ perspective by describing an exemplary urban app created on top of it. In addition, we include an evaluation of the main functionalities of the query mapper. PMID:27376300

  8. Experimental and analytical investigation of acoustic streaming generated by standing ultrasonic waves in an open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, K.; Loh, B.-G.; Lee, D.-R.

    2007-12-01

    Acoustic streaming patterns, velocity fields, which is induced by a cylindrical ultrasonic exciter vibrating at 28.4kHz in an open physical boundaries, is analytically and experimentally investigated using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). Induced acoustic streaming patterns and velocity fields for the gaps of 18mm at which the irrotational tangential velocity becomes a maximum, resulting in a substantial increase in the acoustic streaming velocity and pronounced visualization of streaming patterns between the vibrator and quiescent glass plate are presented. The overall air flow patterns at the gaps of 24, 30, 36mm are similar to the gap of 18 mm but as the gap increases the frequency of occurrence and irregularity of vortices in the gap appear to increase. The symmetric definite steady circular flow with local vortices is observed. The maximum streaming velocity measured stands at 0.16 cm/s with a vibration amplitude of 50 micrometers. Theoretical analysis indicates that the pattern of air flow in the gap is determined by the top and bottom limiting velocities induced by acoustic streaming within the Stokes boundary layer and that the streaming pattern is symmetrical with respect to the center axis of the vibrator by reason of symmetry. The comparison between the experimental data and the theoretical estimation based on Nyborg and Jackson is performed.

  9. Collaboration-Centred Cities through Urban Apps Based on Open and User-Generated Data.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Unai; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Pérez, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the IES Cities platform conceived to streamline the development of urban apps that combine heterogeneous datasets provided by diverse entities, namely, government, citizens, sensor infrastructure and other information data sources. This work pursues the challenge of achieving effective citizen collaboration by empowering them to prosume urban data across time. Particularly, this paper focuses on the query mapper; a key component of the IES Cities platform devised to democratize the development of open data-based mobile urban apps. This component allows developers not only to use available data, but also to contribute to existing datasets with the execution of SQL sentences. In addition, the component allows developers to create ad hoc storages for their applications, publishable as new datasets accessible by other consumers. As multiple users could be contributing and using a dataset, our solution also provides a data level permission mechanism to control how the platform manages the access to its datasets. We have evaluated the advantages brought forward by IES Cities from the developers' perspective by describing an exemplary urban app created on top of it. In addition, we include an evaluation of the main functionalities of the query mapper.

  10. Improvement of dem Generation from Aster Images Using Satellite Jitter Estimation and Open Source Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girod, L.; Nuth, C.; Kääb, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) system embarked on the Terra (EOS AM-1) satellite has been a source of stereoscopic images covering the whole globe at a 15m resolution at a consistent quality for over 15 years. The potential of this data in terms of geomorphological analysis and change detection in three dimensions is unrivaled and needs to be exploited. However, the quality of the DEMs and ortho-images currently delivered by NASA (ASTER DMO products) is often of insufficient quality for a number of applications such as mountain glacier mass balance. For this study, the use of Ground Control Points (GCPs) or of other ground truth was rejected due to the global "big data" type of processing that we hope to perform on the ASTER archive. We have therefore developed a tool to compute Rational Polynomial Coefficient (RPC) models from the ASTER metadata and a method improving the quality of the matching by identifying and correcting jitter induced cross-track parallax errors. Our method outputs more accurate DEMs with less unmatched areas and reduced overall noise. The algorithms were implemented in the open source photogrammetric library and software suite MicMac.

  11. Collaboration-Centred Cities through Urban Apps Based on Open and User-Generated Data.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Unai; López-de-Ipiña, Diego; Pérez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the IES Cities platform conceived to streamline the development of urban apps that combine heterogeneous datasets provided by diverse entities, namely, government, citizens, sensor infrastructure and other information data sources. This work pursues the challenge of achieving effective citizen collaboration by empowering them to prosume urban data across time. Particularly, this paper focuses on the query mapper; a key component of the IES Cities platform devised to democratize the development of open data-based mobile urban apps. This component allows developers not only to use available data, but also to contribute to existing datasets with the execution of SQL sentences. In addition, the component allows developers to create ad hoc storages for their applications, publishable as new datasets accessible by other consumers. As multiple users could be contributing and using a dataset, our solution also provides a data level permission mechanism to control how the platform manages the access to its datasets. We have evaluated the advantages brought forward by IES Cities from the developers' perspective by describing an exemplary urban app created on top of it. In addition, we include an evaluation of the main functionalities of the query mapper. PMID:27376300

  12. Molecular dynamics study of two-dimensional sum frequency generation spectra at vapor/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro; Tahara, Tahei

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional heterodyne-detected vibrational sum frequency generation (2D HD-VSFG) spectra at vapor/water interface were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with a classical flexible and nonpolarizable model. The present model well describes the spectral diffusion of 2D infrared spectrum of bulk water as well as 2D HD-VSFG at the interface. The effect of isotopic dilution on the 2D HD-VSFG was elucidated by comparing the normal (H{sub 2}O) water and HOD water. We further performed decomposition analysis of 2D HD-VSFG into the hydrogen-bonding and the dangling (or free) OH vibrations, and thereby disentangled the different spectral responses and spectral diffusion in the 2D HD-VSFG. The present MD simulation demonstrated the role of anharmonic coupling between these modes on the cross peak in the 2D HD-VSFG spectrum.

  13. The default network and self-generated thought: component processes, dynamic control, and clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Andrews-Hanna, Jessica R.; Smallwood, Jonathan; Spreng, R. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Though only a decade has elapsed since the default network was first emphasized as being a large-scale brain system, recent years have brought great insight into the network’s adaptive functions. A growing theme highlights the default network as playing a key role in internally-directed—or self-generated—thought. Here, we synthesize recent findings from cognitive science, neuroscience, and clinical psychology to focus attention on two emerging topics as current and future directions surrounding the default network. First, we present evidence that self-generated thought is a multi-faceted construct whose component processes are supported by different subsystems within the network. Second, we highlight the dynamic nature of the default network, emphasizing its interaction with executive control systems when regulating aspects of internal thought. We conclude by discussing clinical implications of disruptions to the integrity of the network, and consider disorders when thought content becomes polarized or network interactions become disrupted or imbalanced. PMID:24502540

  14. The experimenters' regress reconsidered: Replication, tacit knowledge, and the dynamics of knowledge generation.

    PubMed

    Feest, Uljana

    2016-08-01

    This paper revisits the debate between Harry Collins and Allan Franklin, concerning the experimenters' regress. Focusing my attention on a case study from recent psychology (regarding experimental evidence for the existence of a Mozart Effect), I argue that Franklin is right to highlight the role of epistemological strategies in scientific practice, but that his account does not sufficiently appreciate Collins's point about the importance of tacit knowledge in experimental practice. In turn, Collins rightly highlights the epistemic uncertainty (and skepticism) surrounding much experimental research. However, I will argue that his analysis of tacit knowledge fails to elucidate the reasons why scientists often are (and should be) skeptical of other researchers' experimental results. I will present an analysis of tacit knowledge in experimental research that not only answers to this desideratum, but also shows how such skepticism can in fact be a vital enabling factor for the dynamic processes of experimental knowledge generation. PMID:27474184

  15. Influence of an Internally-Generated QBO on Modeled Stratospheric Dynamics and Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Newman, P. A.; Song, I. S.

    2011-01-01

    A GEOS V2 CCM simulation with an internally generated quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) signal is compared to an otherwise identical simulation without a QBO. In a present-day climate, inclusion of the modeled QBO makes a significant difference to stratospheric dynamics and ozone throughout the year. The QBO enhances variability in the tropics, as expected, but also in the polar stratosphere in some seasons. The modeled QBO also affects the mean stratospheric climate. Because tropical zonal winds in the baseline simulation are generally easterly, there is a relative increase in zonal wind magnitudes in tropical lower and middle stratosphere in the QBO simulation. Extra-tropical differences between the QBO and 'no QBO' simulations thus reflect a bias toward the westerly phase of the QBO: a relative strengthening and poleward shifting the polar stratospheric jets, and a reduction in Arctic lower stratospheric ozone.

  16. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  17. Sequence-Specific Protein Aggregation Generates Defined Protein Knockdowns in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vuylsteke, Marnik; Aesaert, Stijn; Rombaut, Debbie; De Smet, Frederik; Xu, Jie; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Rousseau, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is determined by short (5–15 amino acids) aggregation-prone regions (APRs) of the polypeptide sequence that self-associate in a specific manner to form β-structured inclusions. Here, we demonstrate that the sequence specificity of APRs can be exploited to selectively knock down proteins with different localization and function in plants. Synthetic aggregation-prone peptides derived from the APRs of either the negative regulators of the brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, the glycogen synthase kinase 3/Arabidopsis SHAGGY-like kinases (GSK3/ASKs), or the starch-degrading enzyme α-glucan water dikinase were designed. Stable expression of the APRs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays) induced aggregation of the target proteins, giving rise to plants displaying constitutive BR responses and increased starch content, respectively. Overall, we show that the sequence specificity of APRs can be harnessed to generate aggregation-associated phenotypes in a targeted manner in different subcellular compartments. This study points toward the potential application of induced targeted aggregation as a useful tool to knock down protein functions in plants and, especially, to generate beneficial traits in crops. PMID:27208282

  18. Dynamic control of a central pattern generator circuit: a computational model of the snail feeding network.

    PubMed

    Vavoulis, Dimitris V; Straub, Volko A; Kemenes, Ildikó; Kemenes, György; Feng, Jianfeng; Benjamin, Paul R

    2007-05-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are networks underlying rhythmic motor behaviours and they are dynamically regulated by neuronal elements that are extrinsic or intrinsic to the rhythmogenic circuit. In the feeding system of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, the extrinsic slow oscillator (SO) interneuron controls the frequency of the feeding rhythm and the N3t (tonic) has a dual role; it is an intrinsic CPG interneuron, but it also suppresses CPG activity in the absence of food, acting as a decision-making element in the feeding circuit. The firing patterns of the SO and N3t neurons and their synaptic connections with the rest of the CPG are known, but how these regulate network function is not well understood. This was investigated by building a computer model of the feeding network based on a minimum number of cells (N1M, N2v and N3t) required to generate the three-phase motor rhythm together with the SO that was used to activate the system. The intrinsic properties of individual neurons were represented using two-compartment models containing currents of the Hodgkin-Huxley type. Manipulations of neuronal activity in the N3t and SO neurons in the model produced similar quantitative effects to food and electrical stimulation in the biological network indicating that the model is a useful tool for studying the dynamic properties of the feeding circuit. The model also predicted novel effects of electrical stimulation of two CPG interneurons (N1M and N2v). When tested experimentally, similar effects were found in the biological system providing further validation of our model.

  19. Lower extremity control and dynamics during backward angular impulse generation in forward translating tasks.

    PubMed

    Mathiyakom, W; McNitt-Gray, J L; Wilcox, R

    2006-01-01

    Observation of complex whole body movements suggests that the nervous system coordinates multiple operational subsystems using some type of hierarchical control. When comparing two forward translating tasks performed with and without backward angular impulse, we have learned that both trunk-leg coordination and reaction force-time characteristics are significantly different between tasks. This led us to hypothesize that differences in trunk-leg coordination and reaction force generation would induce between-task differences in the control of the lower extremity joints during impulse generation phase of the tasks. Eight highly skilled performers executed a series of forward jumps with and without backward rotation (reverse somersault and reverse timer, respectively). Sagittal plane kinematics, reaction forces, and electromyograms of lower extremity muscles were acquired during the take-off phase of both tasks. Lower extremity joint kinetics were calculated using inverse dynamics. The results demonstrated between-task differences in the relative angles between the lower extremity segments and the net joint forces/reaction force and the joint angular velocity profiles. Significantly less knee extensor net joint moments and net joint moment work and greater hip extensor net joint moments and net joint moment work were observed during the push interval of the reverse somersault as compared to the reverse timer. Between-task differences in lower extremity joint kinetics were regulated by selectively activating the bi-articular muscles crossing the knee and hip. These results indicate that between-task differences in the control of the center of mass relative to the reaction force alters control and dynamics of the multijoint lower extremity subsystem. PMID:15878165

  20. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, C. Gonzalo E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Valenzuela, Vicente E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Veloso, Felipe E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Favre, Mario E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl; Wyndham, Edmund E-mail: fveloso@fis.puc.cl

    2014-12-15

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25μ diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (∼350kA in ∼350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ∼5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed.

  1. Microfluidic platforms for generating dynamic environmental perturbations to study the responses of single yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Bisaria, Anjali; Hersen, Pascal; McClean, Megan N

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms are ideal for generating dynamic temporal and spatial perturbations in extracellular environments. Single cells and organisms can be trapped and maintained in microfluidic platforms for long periods of time while their responses to stimuli are measured using appropriate fluorescence reporters and time-lapse microscopy. Such platforms have been used to study problems as diverse as C. elegans olfaction (Chronis et al. Nature Methods 4:727-731, 2007), cancer cell migration (Huang et al. Biomicrofluidics 5:13412, 2011), and E. coli chemotaxis (Ahmed et al. Integr Biol 2:604-629, 2010). In this paper we describe how to construct and use a microfluidic chip to study the response of single yeast cells to dynamic perturbations of their fluid environment. The method involves creation of a photoresist master mold followed by subsequent creation of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip for maintaining live yeast cells in a channel with two inputs for stimulating the cells. We emphasize simplicity and the methods discussed here are accessible to the average biological laboratory. We cover the basic toolbox for making microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices, and the techniques discussed serve as a starting point for creating sophisticated microfluidic devices capable of implementing more complicated experimental protocols.

  2. ADEPT, a dynamic next generation sequencing data error-detection program with trimming

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Feng, Shihai; Lo, Chien-Chi; Li, Po-E; Chain, Patrick S. G.

    2016-02-29

    Illumina is the most widely used next generation sequencing technology and produces millions of short reads that contain errors. These sequencing errors constitute a major problem in applications such as de novo genome assembly, metagenomics analysis and single nucleotide polymorphism discovery. In this study, we present ADEPT, a dynamic error detection method, based on the quality scores of each nucleotide and its neighboring nucleotides, together with their positions within the read and compares this to the position-specific quality score distribution of all bases within the sequencing run. This method greatly improves upon other available methods in terms of the truemore » positive rate of error discovery without affecting the false positive rate, particularly within the middle of reads. We conclude that ADEPT is the only tool to date that dynamically assesses errors within reads by comparing position-specific and neighboring base quality scores with the distribution of quality scores for the dataset being analyzed. The result is a method that is less prone to position-dependent under-prediction, which is one of the most prominent issues in error prediction. The outcome is that ADEPT improves upon prior efforts in identifying true errors, primarily within the middle of reads, while reducing the false positive rate.« less

  3. The fluid dynamic approach to equidistribution methods for grid generation and adaptation

    SciTech Connect

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Finn, John M

    2009-01-01

    The equidistribution methods based on L{sub p} Monge-Kantorovich optimization [Finn and Delzanno, submitted to SISC, 2009] and on the deformation [Moser, 1965; Dacorogna and Moser, 1990, Liao and Anderson, 1992] method are analyzed primarily in the context of grid generation. It is shown that the first class of methods can be obtained from a fluid dynamic formulation based on time-dependent equations for the mass density and the momentum density, arising from a variational principle. In this context, deformation methods arise from a fluid formulation by making a specific assumption on the time evolution of the density (but with some degree of freedom for the momentum density). In general, deformation methods do not arise from a variational principle. However, it is possible to prescribe an optimal deformation method, related to L{sub 1} Monge-Kantorovich optimization, by making a further assumption on the momentum density. Some applications of the L{sub p} fluid dynamic formulation to imaging are also explored.

  4. Further evidence for a dynamically generated secondary bow in 13C+12C rainbow scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Ogloblin, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    The existence of a secondary bow is confirmed for 13C+12C nuclear rainbow scattering in addition to the 16O+12C system. This is found by studying the experimental angular distribution of 13C+12C scattering at the incident 13C energy EL=250 MeV with an extended double-folding (EDF) model that describes all the diagonal and off-diagonal coupling potentials derived from the microscopic wave functions for 12C using a density-dependent nucleon-nucleon force. The Airy minimum at θ ≈70°, which is not reproduced by a conventional folding potential, is revealed to be a secondary bow generated dynamically by a coupling to the excited state 2+ (4.44 MeV) of 12C. The essential importance of the quadruple Y 2 term (reorientation term) of potential of the excited state 2+ of 12C for the emergence of a secondary bow is found. The mechanism of the secondary bow is intuitively explained by showing how the trajectories are refracted dynamically into the classically forbidden angular region beyond the rainbow angle of the primary rainbow.

  5. A Theory of Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Molecular Rotations by High Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, F. H. M.; Abdurrouf, A.

    A dynamic theory of mapping coherent molecular motions from high harmonic generation signals is presented. Application to mapping of coherent rotational motions of linear molecules is made. Results of concrete calculations for N2, O2 and CO2 are analyzed both in time and frequency domains. A "magic angle" for the polarization geometry is predicted at which the HHG signals for all pump-probe delay times become equal for linear molecules of σg orbital symmetry. In contrast only a "crossing neighborhood" near the magic angle is predicted for molecules with orbitals of π symmetry. They are expected to help in identifying the orbital symmetry in the inverse problem of orbital reconstruction from experimental data. Comparison with available experimental data show remarkable agreement with all the salient properties of dynamic HHG signals of linear diatomic molecules, N2 and O2, and some simple organic molecules. Additional results for the triatomic molecule CO2 are discussed that might help to test the theory further.

  6. Plasma formation and dynamics in conical wire arrays in the Llampudken pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, C. Gonzalo; Valenzuela, Vicente; Veloso, Felipe; Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmund

    2014-12-01

    Plasma formation and dynamics from conical wire array is experimentally studied. Ablation from the wires is observed, forming plasma accumulation at the array axis and subsequently a jet outflow been expelled toward the top of the array. The arrays are composed by 16 equally spaced 25μ diameter tungsten wires. Their dimensions are 20mm height, with base diameters of 8mm and 16mm top diameter. The array loads are design to be overmassed, hence no complete ablation of the wires is observed during the current rise. The experiments have been carried out in the Llampudken. pulsed power generator (˜350kA in ˜350ns). Plasma dynamics is studied in both side-on and end-on directions. Laser probing (shadowgraphy) is achieved using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (532nm, 12ps FWHM) captured by CCD cameras. Pinhole XUV imaging is captured using gated microchannel plate cameras with time resolution ˜5ns. Results on the jet velocity and the degree of collimation indicating the plausibility on the use of these jets as comparable to the study astrophysically produced jets are presented and discussed.

  7. Dynamics Of α-Helix Proteins: Highly Structured Noise Generated By Soliton Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Marcelo; Lindgârd, Per-Anker

    2005-11-01

    The great advantages of using the new pump-probe techniques and free electron tunable lasers for studying dynamics in proteins, has renewed the interest in more realistic modeling and theories for the non-linear phenomena in bio-molecules. In particular effects originating from solitonic behavior and/or trapped modes may give distinct signatures in the measured spectra (pioneered by Austin et al and Hamm et al). We have constructed a fairly realistic 3D α-helix model and studied the dynamics, including the effect of thermal noise by means of computer simulations. We use various perturbations to create excitations; in particular a kick at one residue — simulating a local lattice deformation caused by the chemical stimulus from a molecule changing quantum states. This generates a multitude of modes, including at least two kinds of solitons: one moving on the Hydrogen-chains along the extremities of the helix, and one Davidov-like soliton moving along the back bone and carrying along a packet of the peptide-bond excitations (Amino-I C-O stretch mode), as well as phononic modes. The unsolved problem with respect to noise is to understand and describe the highly structured propagation of energy, which is found to occur in the model α-helix — and which is probably also present in real α-helix proteins.

  8. FtsZ protofilaments use a hinge-opening mechanism for constrictive force generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Hsin, Jen; Zhao, Lingyun; Cheng, Yiwen; Shang, Weina; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ye, Sheng

    2013-07-26

    The essential bacterial protein FtsZ is a guanosine triphosphatase that self-assembles into a structure at the division site termed the "Z ring". During cytokinesis, the Z ring exerts a constrictive force on the membrane by using the chemical energy of guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis. However, the structural basis of this constriction remains unresolved. Here, we present the crystal structure of a guanosine diphosphate-bound Mycobacterium tuberculosis FtsZ protofilament, which exhibits a curved conformational state. The structure reveals a longitudinal interface that is important for function. The protofilament curvature highlights a hydrolysis-dependent conformational switch at the T3 loop that leads to longitudinal bending between subunits, which could generate sufficient force to drive cytokinesis.

  9. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Open Source Generation I and II Compliant Hydrodynamic Gas Foil Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Radil, Kevin C.; Bruckner, Robert J.; Howard, S. Adam

    2007-01-01

    Foil gas bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings made from sheet metal foils comprised of at least two layers. The innermost top foil layer traps a gas pressure film that supports a load while a layer or layers underneath provide an elastic foundation. Foil bearings are used in many lightly loaded, high-speed turbo-machines such as compressors used for aircraft pressurization, and small micro-turbines. Foil gas bearings provide a means to eliminate the oil system leading to reduced weight and enhanced temperature capability. The general lack of familiarity of the foil bearing design and manufacturing process has hindered their widespread dissemination. This paper reviews the publicly available literature to demonstrate the design, fabrication and performance testing of both first and second generation bump style foil bearings. It is anticipated that this paper may serve as an effective starting point for new development activities employing foil bearing technology.

  10. System dynamics model for hospital waste characterization and generation in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Eleyan, Derar; Al-Khatib, Issam A; Garfield, Joy

    2013-10-01

    Waste management policy makers always face the problem of how to predict the future amount and composition of medical solid waste, which, in turn, helps to determine the most appropriate treatment, recycling and disposal strategy. An accurate prediction can assist in both the planning and design of medical solid waste management systems. Insufficient budget and unavailable management capacity are the main reasons for the scarcity of medical solid waste quantities and components historical records, which are so important in long-term system planning and short-term expansion programs. This article presents a new technique, using System Dynamics modeling, to predict generated medical solid waste in a developing urban area, based on a set of limited samples from Jenin District hospitals, Palestine. The findings of the model present the trend of medical solid waste generation together with its different components and indicate that a new forecasting approach may cover a variety of possible causative models and track inevitable uncertainties when traditional statistical least-squared regression methods are unable to handle such issues.

  11. Molecular dynamics generation of nonarbitrary membrane models reveals lipid orientational correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Takaoka, Y; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, M; Miyagawa, H; Kitamura, K; Tamura, Y; Kusumi, A

    2000-01-01

    This report addresses the following problems associated with the generation of computer models of phospholipid bilayer membranes using molecular dynamics simulations: arbitrary initial structures and short equilibration periods, an Ewald-induced strong coupling of phospholipids, uncertainty regarding which value should be used for surface tension to alleviate the problem of the small size of the membrane, and simultaneous realization of both order parameters and the surface area. We generated a computer model of the liquid-crystalline L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer, starting from a configuration based on a crystal structure (rather than from an arbitrary structure). To break the crystalline structure, a 20-ps high-temperature pulse of 510 K (but not 450 or 480 K) was effective. The system finally obtained is an all-atom model, with Ewald summation to evaluate Coulombic interactions and a constant surface tension of 35 dynes/cm/water-membrane interface, equilibrated for 12 ns (over 50 ns total calculation time), which reproduces all of the experimentally observed parameters examined in this work. Furthermore, this model shows the presence of significant orientational correlations between neighboring alkyl chains and between shoulder vectors (which show the orientations of the lipids about their long axes) of neighboring DMPCs. PMID:11106617

  12. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics to investigate the generation of soluble bedrock forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myre, J. M.; Covington, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The roles and interactions of processes that generate bedforms in soluble bedrock settings are not yet fully understood. One outstanding puzzle is the morphogenesis of scallops. Current chemical theory does not allow dissolution rate to spatially vary under many of the conditions at which scallops are thought to form. This lack of variation in dissolution rate disagrees with the creation and existence of scallops for a large portion of the range of scallop sizes that are found in nature. Previous studies that have examined processes that generate bedforms using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have made simplifying assumptions to ensure tractability. Consequently, tractability is sacrificed and some fine scale effects associated with the driving processes are not modeled. We incorporate Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and adaptive meshing into a lattice-Boltzmann CFD method for fluid flow, chemical dissolution, and solute transport allowing relaxation of simplifying assumptions employed in previous models. These methods can model sub-grid scale turbulence and resolve the dissolution and precipitation processes occurring at the fluid-solid interface. We use this CFD model to simulate flow and dissolution over scallops and flutes to investigate the formational processes responsible for variations in dissolution rate that drive the spatio-temporal evolution of these features.

  13. Nonlinear dynamics and global indeterminacy in an overlapping generations model with environmental resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoci, Angelo; Gori, Luca; Sodini, Mauro

    2016-09-01

    We analyse the dynamics of an economy formed of overlapping generations of individuals whose well-being depends on leisure, consumption of a private good and a free access environmental resource. The production activity of the private good deteriorates the environmental resource. Individuals may defend themselves from environmental degradation by increasing consumption of the private good, which may be perceived as a "substitute" for services provided by the environmental resource. However, the resulting increase in production and consumption of the private good generates a further increase in environmental deterioration leading economic agents to increase production and consumption of the private good itself. This substitution mechanism is clearly self-reinforcing and may fuel an undesirable economic growth process according to which an increase in consumption of the private good - and the resulting increase in Gross Domestic Product - is associated with a reduction in individuals' well-being. The article shows the emergence of several global phenomena, and individuals' expectations about the future evolution of the environmental quality can give rise to (local and global) indeterminacy about the growth path the economy will follow starting from a given initial position.

  14. DNA Multiphoton Absorption Generates Localized Damage for Studying Repair Dynamics in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Daddysman, Matthew K.; Fecko, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations into the spatiotemporal dynamics of DNA repair using live-cell imaging are aided by the ability to generate well defined regions of ultravioletlike photolesions in an optical microscope. We demonstrate that multiphoton excitation of DNA in live cells with visible femtosecond pulses produces thymine cyclopyrimidine dimers (CPDs), the primary ultraviolet DNA photoproduct. The CPDs are produced with a cubic to supercubic power dependence using pulses in the wavelength range from at least 400 to 525 nm. We show that the CPDs are confined in all three spatial dimensions, making multiphoton excitation of DNA with visible light an ideal technique for generating localized DNA photolesions in a wide variety of samples, from cultured cells to thicker tissues. We demonstrate the utility of this method by applying it to investigate the spatiotemporal recruitment of GFP-tagged topoisomerase I (TopI) to sites of localized DNA damage in polytene chromosomes within live cells of optically thick Drosophila salivary glands. PMID:22067170

  15. Point vortex modelling of the wake dynamics behind asymmetric vortex generator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldacchino, D.; Ferreira, C.; Ragni, D.; van Bussel, G. J. W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a simple inviscid point vortex model to study the dynamics of asymmetric vortex rows, as might appear behind misaligned vortex generator vanes. Starting from the existing solution of the infinite vortex cascade, a numerical model of four base-vortices is chosen to represent two primary counter-rotating vortex pairs and their mirror plane images, introducing the vortex strength ratio as a free parameter. The resulting system of equations is also defined in terms of the vortex row separation and the qualitative features of the ensuing motion are mapped. A translating and orbiting regime are identified for different cascade separations. The latter occurs for all unequal strength vortex pairs. Thus, the motion is further classified by studying the cyclic behaviour of the orbiting regime and it is shown that for small mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting length and time scales are sufficiently large as to appear, in the near wake, as translational (non-orbiting). However, for larger mismatches in vortex strength, the orbiting motion approaches the order of the starting height of the vortex. Comparisons between experimental data and the potential flow model show qualitative agreement whilst viscous effects account for the major discrepancies. Despite this, the model captures the orbital mode observed in the measurements and provides an impetus for considering the impact of these complex interactions on vortex generator designs.

  16. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Horacio G.; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling.

  17. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Horacio G; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-14

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling. PMID:22979891

  18. Experimental studies of vertical mixing patterns in open channel flow generated by two delta wings side-by-side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Garrett

    Open channel raceway bioreactors are a low-cost system used to grow algae for biofuel production. Microalgae have many promises when it comes to renewable energy applications, but many economic hurdles must be overcome to achieve an economic fuel source that is competitive with petroleum-based fuels. One way to make algae more competitive is to improve vertical mixing in algae raceway bioreactors. Previous studies show that mixing may be increased by the addition of mechanisms such as airfoils. The circulation created helps move the algae from the bottom to top surface for necessary photosynthetic exchange. This improvement in light utilization allowed a certain study to achieve 2.2-2.4 times the amount of biomass relative to bioreactors without airfoils. This idea of increasing mixing in open channel raceways has been the focus of the Utah State University (USU) raceway hydraulics group. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are all methods used at USU to computationally and experimentally quantify mixing in an open channel raceway. They have also been used to observe the effects of using delta wings (DW) in increasing vertical mixing in the raceway. These efforts showed great potential in the DW in increasing vertical mixing in the open channel bioreactor. However, this research begged the question, does the DW help increase algae growth? Three algae growth experiments comparing growth in a raceway with and without DW were completed. These experiments were successful, yielding an average 27.1% increase in the biomass. The DW appears to be a promising method of increasing algae biomass production. The next important step was to quantify vertical mixing and understand flow patterns due to two DWs side-by-side. Raceway channels are wider as they increase in size; and arrays of DWs will need to be installed to achieve quality mixing throughout the bioreactor. Quality mixing was attained for

  19. Improvement of deoxidization efficiency of nitric monoxide by shortening pulse width of semiconductor opening switch pulse power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuta, Takatoshi; Yagi, Ippei; Takaki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The deoxidization efficiency of nitric monoxide (NO) was improved by shortening the pulse width of the voltage applied to a corona reactor. The deoxidization efficiency of NO was evaluated as the NO removal efficiency in nitrogen (N2) gas containing 200 ppm NO. The corona reactor had a coaxial geometry and consisted of center high-voltage wire and outer grounded cylinder electrodes. A nanosecond high-voltage pulse was generated using an inductive energy storage pulse power circuit with a semiconductor opening switch and was applied to the center wire electrode in the corona reactor. Fast recovery diodes were utilized as a semiconductor opening switch. The pulse width of the applied voltage was reduced from 21 to 14 ns with the arrester connected in parallel to the reactor. The energy efficiency for NO removal was improved from 8.2 to 35.7 g kW-1 h-1 with the arrester connected. The pulse width was also reduced to 8 ns by optimizing the circuit parameters. It was confirmed from observation with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera that the streamer corona discharge transited to a glowlike discharge after the streamer propagated from the center wire electrode to the outer cylinder electrode. The duration of the glowlike phase was reduced with the arrester connected. The energy consumed in the glowlike phase was also reduced from 15.7 to 4.6 mJ with the arrester connected.

  20. Relative fascicle excursion effects on dynamic strength generation during gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Martín Lorenzo, T; Lerma Lara, S; Martínez-Caballero, I; Rocon, E

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of muscle structure gives us a better understanding of how muscles contribute to force generation which is significantly altered in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While most muscle structure parameters have shown to be significantly correlated to different expressions of strength development in children with CP and typically developing (TD) children, conflicting results are found for muscle fascicle length. Muscle fascicle length determines muscle excursion and velocity, and contrary to what might be expected, correlations of fascicle length to rate of force development have not been found for children with CP. The lack of correlation between muscle fascicle length and rate of force development in children with CP could be due, on the one hand, to the non-optimal joint position adopted for force generation on the isometric strength tests as compared to the position of TD children. On the other hand, the lack of correlation could be due to the erroneous assumption that muscle fascicle length is representative of sarcomere length. Thus, the relationship between muscle architecture parameters reflecting sarcomere length, such as relative fascicle excursions and dynamic power generation, should be assessed. Understanding of the underlying mechanisms of weakness in children with CP is key for individualized prescription and assessment of muscle-targeted interventions. Findings could imply the detection of children operating on the descending limb of the sarcomere length-tension curve, which in turn might be at greater risk of developing crouch gait. Furthermore, relative muscle fascicle excursions could be used as a predictive variable of outcomes related to crouch gait prevention treatments such as strength training. PMID:26138625

  1. Relative fascicle excursion effects on dynamic strength generation during gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Martín Lorenzo, T; Lerma Lara, S; Martínez-Caballero, I; Rocon, E

    2015-10-01

    Evaluation of muscle structure gives us a better understanding of how muscles contribute to force generation which is significantly altered in children with cerebral palsy (CP). While most muscle structure parameters have shown to be significantly correlated to different expressions of strength development in children with CP and typically developing (TD) children, conflicting results are found for muscle fascicle length. Muscle fascicle length determines muscle excursion and velocity, and contrary to what might be expected, correlations of fascicle length to rate of force development have not been found for children with CP. The lack of correlation between muscle fascicle length and rate of force development in children with CP could be due, on the one hand, to the non-optimal joint position adopted for force generation on the isometric strength tests as compared to the position of TD children. On the other hand, the lack of correlation could be due to the erroneous assumption that muscle fascicle length is representative of sarcomere length. Thus, the relationship between muscle architecture parameters reflecting sarcomere length, such as relative fascicle excursions and dynamic power generation, should be assessed. Understanding of the underlying mechanisms of weakness in children with CP is key for individualized prescription and assessment of muscle-targeted interventions. Findings could imply the detection of children operating on the descending limb of the sarcomere length-tension curve, which in turn might be at greater risk of developing crouch gait. Furthermore, relative muscle fascicle excursions could be used as a predictive variable of outcomes related to crouch gait prevention treatments such as strength training.

  2. Revealing molecular structure and dynamics through high harmonic generation driven by mid-IR fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marangos, Jonathan

    2010-03-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) from molecules has recently been shown to be a promising tool for measuring instantaneous molecular structure, sub-femtosecond domain structural rearrangements in molecules and even hole dynamics initiated by laser field ionisation. To fully exploit this promise it is essential that we can; (1) systematically decouple structural and dynamic effects so that both may simultaneously be determined in the measurement, (2) can extend the method of molecular HHG imaging to a wide range of molecules. Here we demonstrate important steps towards both these objectives. Up until now HHG imaging measurements have been restricted to drive laser wavelengths close to 800nm, due to the availability of CPA titanium sapphire lasers, which dictates the use of relatively high intensities (> 2.5 x 10^14 Wcm-2) if a harmonic spectrum spanning to ˜70 eV is to be observed which is required for extracting structural data from most small molecules. By using a mid-IR laser (at 1300 nm) we show that with an intensity ˜ 1 x 10^14 W cm-2 we can observe a wide molecular harmonic spectrum spanning to ˜ 70 eV even in molecules where ionization saturation would clamp the cut-off to much lower energies if an 800nm field were used. Thus we have been able to observe evidence for two-centre interference in two new molecules, N2O and C2H2 for the first time. Moreover we can use the ability to observe a broad harmonic spectrum over a large range of intensities to reveal the subtle interplay between structural and dynamic effects in CO2 and so provide a new window into hole dynamics. [4pt] In collaboration with R. Torres, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London; O. Smirnova, Max-Born-Institute, Berlin; T. Siegel and L. Brugnera, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London; I. Procino and Jonathan G. Underwood, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London; C. Altucci and R. Velotta, CNSIM and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli

  3. New numerical methods for open-loop and feedback solutions to dynamic optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pradipto

    The topic of the first part of this research is trajectory optimization of dynamical systems via computational swarm intelligence. Particle swarm optimization is a nature-inspired heuristic search method that relies on a group of potential solutions to explore the fitness landscape. Conceptually, each particle in the swarm uses its own memory as well as the knowledge accumulated by the entire swarm to iteratively converge on an optimal or near-optimal solution. It is relatively straightforward to implement and unlike gradient-based solvers, does not require an initial guess or continuity in the problem definition. Although particle swarm optimization has been successfully employed in solving static optimization problems, its application in dynamic optimization, as posed in optimal control theory, is still relatively new. In the first half of this thesis particle swarm optimization is used to generate near-optimal solutions to several nontrivial trajectory optimization problems including thrust programming for minimum fuel, multi-burn spacecraft orbit transfer, and computing minimum-time rest-to-rest trajectories for a robotic manipulator. A distinct feature of the particle swarm optimization implementation in this work is the runtime selection of the optimal solution structure. Optimal trajectories are generated by solving instances of constrained nonlinear mixed-integer programming problems with the swarming technique. For each solved optimal programming problem, the particle swarm optimization result is compared with a nearly exact solution found via a direct method using nonlinear programming. Numerical experiments indicate that swarm search can locate solutions to very great accuracy. The second half of this research develops a new extremal-field approach for synthesizing nearly optimal feedback controllers for optimal control and two-player pursuit-evasion games described by general nonlinear differential equations. A notable revelation from this development

  4. Open, Dynamic Content and e-Learning Management Infrastructure for Engineering and Natural Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stav, John B.; Tsalapatas, Hariklia

    2004-01-01

    NS-eCMS is developing an open web-based content management, communication, and collaboration eLearning platform that addresses the specialized requirements for distance education in natural sciences. The federated architecture enables straightforward development, exchange, and publication of material through open standards like XML/MathML. The…

  5. PET2OGS: Algorithms to link the static model of Petrel with the dynamic model of OpenGeoSys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.-H.; Shinn, Y. J.; Park, Y.-C.; Huh, D.-G.; Lee, S. K.

    2014-01-01

    A set of three algorithms named PET2OGS is developed to integrate the static model (Petrel) with the dynamic model (OpenGeoSys). PET2OGS consists of three sub-algorithms that convert finite difference methods (FDMs) grids to finite element methods (FEMs) grids. The algorithms and the workflow of the integration procedures are described in detail. After the proposed algorithms are tested on a variety of grids both in homogeneous and heterogeneous media, the integrated platform of the static and dynamic models is applied to model CO2 storage in a saline aquifer. A successful demonstration of the proposed algorithms proved a robust integration of the platform. With some minor modifications of the algorithms in the part of input and output, the proposed algorithms can be extended to integrate different combinations of FDM-based static models and FEM-based dynamic models beyond the example combination in the paper.

  6. Dynamic Characteristics of X-pinch Experiments Conducted in a Small Capacitive Generator:Refractive Optical Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepúlveda, Adolfo; Pavez, Cristian; Pedreros, José; Avaria, Gonzalo; San Martín, Patricio; Soto, Leopoldo

    2016-05-01

    Among the dense plasmas configurations of interest for applications as a portable intense source of X-rays, the X-pinches are the most attractive by their brightness, source size, short duration and space localization, being particularly reproducible when they are conducted with fast pulsed power generators. In recent time, several characteristics of the dynamics and emission have been reproduced in compact generators (typically capacitive generators) of low current rise-rate (less than 0.5 kA/ns). In this work, a preliminary characterization of the dynamic of X-pinch plasma conducted in a small capacitive generator is reported. In order to obtain the plasma dynamics and quantitative information of the plasma density, the dark field Schlieren technique and interferometry were implemented. The experiments were carried out on the multipurpose generator (1.2 μF, 345 J, 47.5 nH, T/4=375 ns and Z = 0.2 Ω in short circuit) capable to produce currents up to 122 kA with 500 ns quarter period, when a charging voltage of 24 kV and metallic X-pinches are used as load. The electrical behavior of the discharge and the X-ray emission are monitored with a Rogowski coil and filtered PIN diodes respectively. For the refractive optical diagnostics a 532 nm frequency- doubled Nd-YAG laser was used. As from a single Schlieren record per shot, a sequence with the time evolution of the plasma is constructed. From the images, a similar dynamic of X- pinches conducted in fast generators of high current is observed, where structures such as coronal plasma, plasma flares and plasma jets are identified. The plasma dynamics observed from a VUV gated pinhole image system is compared with registered dynamic with refractive optical techniques.

  7. Investigating the moisture sorption behavior of amorphous sucrose using a dynamic humidity generating instrument.

    PubMed

    Yu, X; Kappes, S M; Bello-Perez, L A; Schmidt, S J

    2008-01-01

    The moisture sorption behavior of freeze-dried amorphous sucrose was investigated using a dynamic humidity generating instrument, the Dynamic Vapor Sorption (DVS) instrument. The kinetic moisture sorption profiles of freeze-dried amorphous sucrose samples with 29% crystalline content were obtained using the DVS instrument at 9 relative humidity (RH) values, ranging from 10% to 90%, at 25 degrees C. Moisture-induced crystallization was observed for %RH values between 40% and 80%, where the crystallization onset time decreased as %RH increased. The moisture sorption behavior of freeze-dried amorphous sucrose with 3 crystalline contents, 23%, 29%, and 80%, was also compared, revealing that the crystalline content had a significant impact on the pseudo-sorption isotherm of freeze-dried amorphous sucrose. In general, for %RH values below 90%, samples that had a lower percent crystalline content had a higher pseudo-equilibrium moisture content, with the difference becoming most pronounced for the 60% to 80% RH values. The moisture-induced crystallization results as a function of %RH obtained in this study were compared to those previously reported in the literature, leading to an extensive discussion of both the experimental protocols used and the hypothesized mechanisms governing the long-term stability of amorphous materials. The hypothesized mechanisms discussed included the glass transition temperature boundary, the zero mobility temperature, and the hydration limit. Based on the dissimilarity in these hypothesized mechanisms, additional theoretical and experimental exploration is still merited in order to adequately predict the conditions (for example, moisture content, %RH, and temperature) required to ensure long-term stability of amorphous solids.

  8. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions.

  9. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions

  10. Dynamic Characteristics of Positive Pulsed Dielectric Barrier Discharge for Ozone Generation in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Linsheng; Peng, Bangfa; Li, Ming; Zhang, Yafang; Hu, Zhaoji

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive dynamic model consisting of 66 reactions and 24 species is developed to investigate the dynamic characteristics of ozone generation by positive pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) using parallel-plate reactor in air. The electron energy conservation equation is coupled to the electron continuity equation, the heavy species continuity equation, and Poisson's equation for a better description. The reliability of the model is experimentally confirmed. The model can be used to predict the temporal and spatial evolution of species, as well as streamer propagation. The simulation results show that electron density increases nearly exponentially in the direction to the anode at the electron avalanche. Streamer propagation velocity is about 5.26 × 104 m/s from anode to cathode in the simulated condition. The primary positive ion, negative ion, and excited species are O2+, O3- and O2(1Δg) in pulsed DBD in air, respectively. N2O has the largest density among nitrogen oxides. e and N2+ densities in the streamer head increase gradually to maximum values with the development of the streamer. Meanwhile, the O2+, O, O3, N2(A3Σ) and N2O densities reach maximum values in the vicinity of the anode. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51366012 and 11105067), Jiangxi Province Young Scientists (Jinggang Star) Cultivation Plan of China (No. 20133BCB23008), Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi, China (No. 20151BAB206047) and Jiangxi Province Higher School Science and Technology Landing Plan of China (No. KJLD-14015)

  11. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network

    PubMed Central

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M.; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions

  12. QuTiP 2: A Python framework for the dynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, J. R.; Nation, P. D.; Nori, Franco

    2013-04-01

    We present version 2 of QuTiP, the Quantum Toolbox in Python. Compared to the preceding version [J.R. Johansson, P.D. Nation, F. Nori, Comput. Phys. Commun. 183 (2012) 1760.], we have introduced numerous new features, enhanced performance, and made changes in the Application Programming Interface (API) for improved functionality and consistency within the package, as well as increased compatibility with existing conventions used in other scientific software packages for Python. The most significant new features include efficient solvers for arbitrary time-dependent Hamiltonians and collapse operators, support for the Floquet formalism, and new solvers for Bloch-Redfield and Floquet-Markov master equations. Here we introduce these new features, demonstrate their use, and give a summary of the important backward-incompatible API changes introduced in this version. Catalog identifier: AEMB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMB_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 33625 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 410064 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: i386, x86-64. Operating system: Linux, Mac OSX. RAM: 2+ Gigabytes Classification: 7. External routines: NumPy, SciPy, Matplotlib, Cython Catalog identifier of previous version: AEMB_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 1760 Does the new version supercede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Dynamics of open quantum systems Solution method: Numerical solutions to Lindblad, Floquet-Markov, and Bloch-Redfield master equations, as well as the Monte Carlo wave function method. Reasons for new version: Compared to the preceding version we have introduced numerous new features, enhanced performance, and made changes in

  13. Reduced short term adaptation to robot generated dynamic environment in children affected by Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is known that healthy adults can quickly adapt to a novel dynamic environment, generated by a robotic manipulandum as a structured disturbing force field. We suggest that it may be of clinical interest to evaluate to which extent this kind of motor learning capability is impaired in children affected by cerebal palsy. Methods We adapted the protocol already used with adults, which employs a velocity dependant viscous field, and compared the performance of a group of subjects affected by Cerebral Palsy (CP group, 7 subjects) with a Control group of unimpaired age-matched children. The protocol included a familiarization phase (FA), during which no force was applied, a force field adaptation phase (CF), and a wash-out phase (WO) in which the field was removed. During the CF phase the field was shut down in a number of randomly selected "catch" trials, which were used in order to evaluate the "learning index" for each single subject and the two groups. Lateral deviation, speed and acceleration peaks and average speed were evaluated for each trajectory; a directional analysis was performed in order to inspect the role of the limb's inertial anisotropy in the different experimental phases. Results During the FA phase the movements of the CP subjects were more curved, displaying greater and variable directional error; over the course of the CF phase both groups showed a decreasing trend in the lateral error and an after-effect at the beginning of the wash-out, but the CP group had a non significant adaptation rate and a lower learning index, suggesting that CP subjects have reduced ability to learn to compensate external force. Moreover, a directional analysis of trajectories confirms that the control group is able to better predict the force field by tuning the kinematic features of the movements along different directions in order to account for the inertial anisotropy of arm. Conclusions Spatial abnormalities in children affected by cerebral palsy may be

  14. Dynamic Strain Aging in New Generation Cr-Mo-V Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, C.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2010-12-01

    A new generation nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel (CrMoV type) having compositional similarities with thick section 3Cr-Mo class of low alloy steels and adapted for nuclear applications was investigated for various manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA) using uniaxial tests. The steel investigated herein has undergone quenched and tempered treatment such that a tempered bainite microstructure with Cr-rich carbides was formed. The scope of the uniaxial experiments included tensile tests over a temperature range of 298 K to 873 K (25 °C to 600 °C) at two strain rates (10-3 and 10-4 s-1), as well as suitably designed transient strain rate change tests. The flow behavior displayed serrated flow, negative strain rate sensitivity, plateau behavior of yield, negative temperature ( T), and strain rate left( {dot{\\varepsilon }} right) dependence of flow stress over the temperature range of 523 K to 673 K (250 °C to 400 °C) and strain rate range of 5 × 10-3 s-1 to 3 × 10-6 s-1, respectively. While these trends attested to the presence of DSA, a lack of work hardening and near negligible impairment of ductility point to the fact that manifestations of embrittling features of DSA were significantly enervated in the new generation pressure vessel steel. In order to provide a mechanistic understanding of these unique combinations of manifestations of DSA in the steel, a new approach for evaluation of responsible solutes from strain rate change tests was adopted. From these experiments and calculation of activation energy by application of vacancy-based models, the solutes responsible for DSA were identified as carbon/nitrogen. The lack of embrittling features of DSA in the steel was rationalized as being due to the beneficial effects arising from the presence of dynamic recovery effects, presence of alloy carbides in the tempered bainitic structure, and formation of solute clusters, all of which hinder the possibilities for strong aging of dislocations.

  15. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2011-04-12

    efficiency of 49.3 %. The other approach involves reducing the minimum cycle pressure significantly below the critical pressure such that the temperature drop in the turbine is increased while the minimum cycle temperature is maintained above the critical temperature to prevent the formation of a liquid phase. The latter approach also involves the addition of a precooler and a third compressor before the main compressor to retain the benefits of compression near the critical point with the main compressor. For a minimum cycle pressure of 1 MPa, a cycle efficiency of 49.5% is achieved. Either approach opens up the door to applying the SCO{sub 2} cycle to the VHTR. In contrast, the SFR system typically has a core outlet-inlet temperature difference of about 150 C such that the standard recompression cycle is ideally suited for direct application to the SFR. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code has been modified for application to the VHTR and SFR when the reactor side dynamic behavior is calculated with another system level computer code such as SAS4A/SYSSYS-1 in the SFR case. The key modification involves modeling heat exchange in the RHX, accepting time dependent tabular input from the reactor code, and generating time dependent tabular input to the reactor code such that both the reactor and S-CO{sub 2} cycle sides can be calculated in a convergent iterative scheme. This approach retains the modeling benefits provided by the detailed reactor system level code and can be applied to any reactor system type incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} cycle. This approach was applied to the particular calculation of a scram scenario for a SFR in which the main and intermediate sodium pumps are not tripped and the generator is not disconnected from the electrical grid in order to enhance heat removal from the reactor system thereby enhancing the cooldown rate of the Na-to-CO{sub 2} RHX. The reactor side is calculated with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 while the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is calculated with the Plant Dynamics

  16. Lower extremity control and dynamics during backward angular impulse generation in backward translating tasks.

    PubMed

    Mathiyakom, W; McNitt-Gray, J L; Wilcox, R

    2006-03-01

    Observation of complex whole-body movements suggests that the nervous system coordinates multiple operational subsystems using some type of hierarchical control. When comparing two backward translating tasks performed with and without backward angular impulse, we have learned that task-specific modifications in trunk-leg coordination contribute to the regulation of total-body center of mass (CoM) position relative to the reaction force (RF). In this study, we hypothesized that task-specific differences in trunk-leg coordination would affect the control of the lower extremity joints during the impulse-generation phase of the tasks. Eight highly skilled performers executed a series of backward translating jumps with and without backward rotation (back somersault and back timer, respectively). Sagittal plane kinematics, RFs and electromyograms of lower extremity muscles were acquired during the take-off phase of both tasks. Lower extremity joint kinetics was calculated using inverse dynamics. The results indicate that between-task differences in the relative angles between the lower extremity segments and the net joint forces/RF contributed to significant reductions in knee-extensor net joint moments and increases in hip-extensor net joint moments during the push interval of the back somersault as compared to the back timer. Between-task differences in backward trunk angular velocity also contributed to the re-distribution of work done by the lower extremity net joint moments. Between-task differences in lower extremity joint kinetics were associated with synergistic activation of the bi-articular muscles crossing the knee and hip. These results indicated that task-specific control of CoM relative to the RF in order to regulate the backward angular-impulse-involved modification in the control and dynamics of the knee and hip joints. These results indicate that between-task differences in the control objectives at the total-body level (position of CoM relative to the

  17. Application of computer generated color graphic techniques to the processing and display of three dimensional fluid dynamic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.; Putt, C. W.; Giamati, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Color coding techniques used in the processing of remote sensing imagery were adapted and applied to the fluid dynamics problems associated with turbofan mixer nozzles. The computer generated color graphics were found to be useful in reconstructing the measured flow field from low resolution experimental data to give more physical meaning to this information and in scanning and interpreting the large volume of computer generated data from the three dimensional viscous computer code used in the analysis.

  18. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Hoellinger, Thomas; Petieau, Mathieu; Duvinage, Matthieu; Castermans, Thierry; Seetharaman, Karthik; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Bengoetxea, Ana; Ivanenko, Yuri; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996) was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009) by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator (CPG) processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  19. Generation and dynamics of single-electrode nanosecond pulsed microplasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chunqi; Lane, Jamie; Song, Shutong; Plasma; Pulsed Power Lab at ODU-CBE Team

    2015-11-01

    Several millimeter long, 160 - 260 micrometer-in-width, helium plasma jets were generated in ambient atmosphere when a needle electrode was excited with nanosecond high voltage pulses at single shot or up to 500 Hz. This single-electrode system does not require the use of ground electrode for plasma generation, and thus has advantages in simplicity and small-dimension for a variety of biomedical applications. Dynamics of the microplasma jet powered by high voltage pulses with two different nanosecond pulses - 5 ns and 164 ns, was studied with high speed imaging, and spatiotemporally resolved optical emission spectroscopy. Whereas the plasma jet exhibits three different modes including a positive-streamer mode, a stochastic transition, and a negative streamer-like mode when it was excited with 164 ns kilovolt pulses, such modes and transitions in the plasma development were not observed for the 5 ns pulsed excitation. Shorter pulses with shorter rise times allowed higher energy deposition into the plasma and promote rapid acceleration of the plasma wavefronts; 5 ns pulsed excitation resulted in 4 times increase in the wavefront velocity compared with the 164 ns pulsed excitation. Importantly, the production of excited atomic oxygen increased by a factor of 2 for the 5 ns pulsed plasma jet when compared with that for a 164 ns pulsed plasma jet, whereas the other excited species including He, O, H, OH, N2(C-B) and N2+(B-X) were produced at comparable rates for the two plasma jets. Work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR Award No. FA9550-11-1-0190).

  20. Causes, Dynamics and Impacts of Lahars Generated by the April, 2015 Calbuco Eruption, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J.; Dussaillant, A. R.; Meier, C. I.; Rivera, A.; Barra, M. M.; Urzua, N. G.; Hernandez, J. F.; Napoleoni, F.; Gonzalez, C.

    2015-12-01

    Calbuco is a 2015m high, glacier capped, stratovolcano in the heavily populated Los Lagos district of southern Chile with a history of large volcanic eruptions in 1893-95, 1906-7, 1911-12, 1917, 1932, 1945, 1961 and 1972. Calbuco experienced a powerful 90 minute eruption at 18:04h on 22 April, 2015 followed by additional major eruptions at 01:00h and 13:10h on 23 & 30 April, respectively, resulting in the evacuation of 6500 people and the imposition of a 20 km radius exclusion zone. Pyroclastic flows descended into several river catchments radiating from the volcano with lahars travelling distances of up to 14 km, reaching populated areas. We present preliminary findings regarding the causes, dynamics and impacts of lahars generated by the April 2015 eruption. Pyroclastic flows melted glacier ice and snow generating the largest lahars in the Rio Este and Rio Blanco Sur on the southern flanks of the volcano. Lahar deposits in the Rio Blanco Norte were buried by pyroclastic flow deposits with measured temperatures of up to 282°C three months after emplacement. Lahar erosional impacts included bedrock erosion, alluvial channel incision, erosion of surficial deposits and the felling of large areas of forest. Depositional landforms included boulder run-ups on the outsides of channel bends, boulder clusters and large woody debris jams. Lahars deposited up to 8m of sediment within distal reaches. Deposits on the southern flanks of Calbuco indicate the passage of multiple pulses of contrasting rheology. Lahar occurrence and magnitude was controlled by the pre-eruption distribution of snow and ice on the volcano. Pre-existing lahar channels controlled flows to lower piedmont zones where routing was determined by palaeo lahar geomorphology. Ongoing erosion of proximal pyroclastic flow and lahar deposits provides large volumes of sediment to distal portions of fluvial systems radiating from Calbuco.

  1. Employing Nested OpenMP for the Parallelization of Multi-Zone Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayguade, Eduard; Gonzalez, Marc; Martorell, Xavier; Jost, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe the parallelization of the multi-zone code versions of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks employing multi-level OpenMP parallelism. For our study we use the NanosCompiler, which supports nesting of OpenMP directives and provides clauses to control the grouping of threads, load balancing, and synchronization. We report the benchmark results, compare the timings with those of different hybrid parallelization paradigms and discuss OpenMP implementation issues which effect the performance of multi-level parallel applications.

  2. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Cellulose Synthase Gene Superfamily in Grasses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schwerdt, Julian G.; Wright, Frank; Oehme, Daniel; Wagner, John M.; Shirley, Neil J.; Burton, Rachel A.; Schreiber, Miriam; Zimmer, Jochen; Marshall, David F.; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of cellulose synthase (CesA) and cellulose synthase-like (Csl) families from the cellulose synthase gene superfamily were used to reconstruct their evolutionary origins and selection histories. Counterintuitively, genes encoding primary cell wall CesAs have undergone extensive expansion and diversification following an ancestral duplication from a secondary cell wall-associated CesA. Selection pressure across entire CesA and Csl clades appears to be low, but this conceals considerable variation within individual clades. Genes in the CslF clade are of particular interest because some mediate the synthesis of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan, a polysaccharide characteristic of the evolutionarily successful grasses that is not widely distributed elsewhere in the plant kingdom. The phylogeny suggests that duplication of either CslF6 and/or CslF7 produced the ancestor of a highly conserved cluster of CslF genes that remain located in syntenic regions of all the grass genomes examined. A CslF6-specific insert encoding approximately 55 amino acid residues has subsequently been incorporated into the gene, or possibly lost from other CslFs, and the CslF7 clade has undergone a significant long-term shift in selection pressure. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics of the CslF6 protein were used to define the three-dimensional dispositions of individual amino acids that are subject to strong ongoing selection, together with the position of the conserved 55-amino acid insert that is known to influence the amounts and fine structures of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans synthesized. These wall polysaccharides are attracting renewed interest because of their central roles as sources of dietary fiber in human health and for the generation of renewable liquid biofuels. PMID:25999407

  3. The force generated by biological membranes on a polymer rod and its response: Statics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, D. R.; Turner, M. S.

    2004-10-01

    We propose a theory for the force exerted by a fluctuating membrane on a polymer rod tip. Using statistical mechanical methods, the expression for the generated force is written in terms of the distance of the rod tip from the membrane "frame." We apply the theory in calculating the stall force and membrane displacement required to cease the growth of a growing fiber induced by membrane fluctuations, as well as the membrane force and membrane displacement required for rod/fiber buckling. We also consider the dynamics of a growing fiber tip under the influence of a fluctuation-induced membrane force. We discuss the importance of our results in various biological contexts. Finally, we present a method to simultaneously extract both the rigidity of the semiflexible rod and the force applied by, e.g., the membrane from the measurements of the bending fluctuations of the rod. Such a measurement of the force would give information about the thermodynamics of the rod polymerization that involves the usual Brownian ratchet mechanism.

  4. Exergetic analysis of a thermo-generator for automotive application: A dynamic numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatskaya, O.; Goupil, C.; Bakkali, A. El; Shonda, O.

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that, when using a passenger car with an ICE (Internal Combustion Engine), only a fraction of the burnt fuel energy actually contributes to drive the vehicle. Typical passenger vehicle engines run about 25% efficiency while a great part of the remaining energy (about 40%), is lost through the exhaust gases. This latter has a significant energy conversion potential since the temperature (more than 300°C) and the mass flow rate are high enough. Thus, direct conversion of heat into electricity is a credible option if the overall system is optimized. This point is crucial since the heat conversion into work process is very sensible to any mismatching of the different parts of the system, and very sensible significant to the possible varying working conditions. All these effects constitute irreversibility sources that degrade the overall efficiency. The exergetic analysis is known to be an efficient tool for finding the root causes of theses irreversible processes. In order to investigate the performance of our automotive thermo-generator we propose an analysis of the exergy flow through the system under dynamic conditions. Taking into account the different irreversible sources such as thermal conduction and Joule effect, we are able to localize and quantify the exergy losses. Then, in order to optimize the thermoelectric converter for a given vehicle, correct actions in term of design and working conditions can be proposed.

  5. Dynamical hologram generation for high speed optical trapping of smart droplet microtools.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, P M P; Munro, I; Grace, E J; Casey, D R; Phillips, J; Klug, D R; Ces, O; Neil, M A A

    2012-07-01

    This paper demonstrates spatially selective sampling of the plasma membrane by the implementation of time-multiplexed holographic optical tweezers for Smart Droplet Microtools (SDMs). High speed (>1000fps) dynamical hologram generation was computed on the graphics processing unit of a standard display card and controlled by a user friendly LabView interface. Time multiplexed binary holograms were displayed in real time and mirrored to a ferroelectric Spatial Light Modulator. SDMs were manufactured with both liquid cores (as previously described) and solid cores, which confer significant advantages in terms of stability, polydispersity and ease of use. These were coated with a number of detergents, the most successful based upon lipids doped with transfection reagents. In order to validate these, trapped SDMs were maneuvered up to the plasma membrane of giant vesicles containing Nile Red and human biliary epithelial (BE) colon cancer cells with green fluorescent labeled protein (GFP)-labeled CAAX (a motif belonging to the Ras protein). Bright field and fluorescence images showed that successful trapping and manipulation of multiple SDMs in x, y, z was achieved with success rates of 30-50% and that subsequent membrane-SDM interactions led to the uptake of Nile Red or GFP-CAAX into the SDM.

  6. A dynamic isotope power system portable generator for the moon or Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Richard A.; Hunt, Maribeth E.; Pepping, Richard E.; Mason, Lee S.

    The dynamic isotope power systems (DIPS) demonstration program is focused on a standardized 2.5 kWe portable generator for multiple uses on the lunar or Martian surface. A variety of potential remote or mobile applications has been identified by NASA. These applications include remote power to science packages, surface rovers for both short and extended duration missions, and backup to central base power. Reviews conducted on alternative power sources for these applications are described. These include the comparison of DIPS to regenerative fuel cells (RFCs). Recent work is presented refining the 2.5 kWe design to assure compatibility with the Martian environment while imposing only a minor mass penalty on lunar operations. This was accomplished by limiting temperatures, except in the heat source unit (HSU), to the nonrefractory materials regime and protecting the necessary refractories in the HSU from the environment. Design changes to the HSU are described. Work related to recent concerns regarding astronaut radiation doses is described. This work includes the bases for the calculations to determine the necessary shielding or operational limitations.

  7. Theoretical study of the KKK¯ system and dynamical generation of the K(1460) resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Torres, A.; Jido, D.; Kanada-En'Yo, Y.

    2011-06-01

    The KKK¯ system is investigated with a coupled-channel approach based on solving the Faddeev equations considering the KKK¯, Kππ, and Kπη channels and using as input two-body t matrices that generate dynamically the f0(980) and a0(980) resonances. In the present calculation, a quasibound state around 1420 MeV with total isospin I=1/2 and spin-parity Jπ=0- is found below the three-kaon threshold. This state can be identified with the K(1460) resonance listed by the Particle Data Group. We also study the KKK¯ system in a single-channel three-body potential model with two-body effective KK and KK¯ interactions, in which the KK¯ interaction is adjusted to reproduce the properties of the f0(980) and a0(980) resonances as KK¯ bound states, obtaining a very similar result to the one found in the Faddeev approach.

  8. Theoretical study of the KKK system and dynamical generation of the K(1460) resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Torres, A.; Jido, D.; Kanada-En'yo, Y.

    2011-06-15

    The KKK system is investigated with a coupled-channel approach based on solving the Faddeev equations considering the KKK, K{pi}{pi}, and K{pi}{eta} channels and using as input two-body t matrices that generate dynamically the f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980) resonances. In the present calculation, a quasibound state around 1420 MeV with total isospin I=1/2 and spin-parity J{sup {pi}=}0{sup -} is found below the three-kaon threshold. This state can be identified with the K(1460) resonance listed by the Particle Data Group. We also study the KKK system in a single-channel three-body potential model with two-body effective KK and KK interactions, in which the KK interaction is adjusted to reproduce the properties of the f{sub 0}(980) and a{sub 0}(980) resonances as KK bound states, obtaining a very similar result to the one found in the Faddeev approach.

  9. Dynamical hologram generation for high speed optical trapping of smart droplet microtools.

    PubMed

    Lanigan, P M P; Munro, I; Grace, E J; Casey, D R; Phillips, J; Klug, D R; Ces, O; Neil, M A A

    2012-07-01

    This paper demonstrates spatially selective sampling of the plasma membrane by the implementation of time-multiplexed holographic optical tweezers for Smart Droplet Microtools (SDMs). High speed (>1000fps) dynamical hologram generation was computed on the graphics processing unit of a standard display card and controlled by a user friendly LabView interface. Time multiplexed binary holograms were displayed in real time and mirrored to a ferroelectric Spatial Light Modulator. SDMs were manufactured with both liquid cores (as previously described) and solid cores, which confer significant advantages in terms of stability, polydispersity and ease of use. These were coated with a number of detergents, the most successful based upon lipids doped with transfection reagents. In order to validate these, trapped SDMs were maneuvered up to the plasma membrane of giant vesicles containing Nile Red and human biliary epithelial (BE) colon cancer cells with green fluorescent labeled protein (GFP)-labeled CAAX (a motif belonging to the Ras protein). Bright field and fluorescence images showed that successful trapping and manipulation of multiple SDMs in x, y, z was achieved with success rates of 30-50% and that subsequent membrane-SDM interactions led to the uptake of Nile Red or GFP-CAAX into the SDM. PMID:22808432

  10. A dynamic isotope power system portable generator for the moon or Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Richard A.; Hunt, Maribeth E.; Pepping, Richard E.; Mason, Lee S.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic isotope power systems (DIPS) demonstration program is focused on a standardized 2.5 kWe portable generator for multiple uses on the lunar or Martian surface. A variety of potential remote or mobile applications has been identified by NASA. These applications include remote power to science packages, surface rovers for both short and extended duration missions, and backup to central base power. Reviews conducted on alternative power sources for these applications are described. These include the comparison of DIPS to regenerative fuel cells (RFCs). Recent work is presented refining the 2.5 kWe design to assure compatibility with the Martian environment while imposing only a minor mass penalty on lunar operations. This was accomplished by limiting temperatures, except in the heat source unit (HSU), to the nonrefractory materials regime and protecting the necessary refractories in the HSU from the environment. Design changes to the HSU are described. Work related to recent concerns regarding astronaut radiation doses is described. This work includes the bases for the calculations to determine the necessary shielding or operational limitations.

  11. The Role of Rac1 in the Growth Cone Dynamics and Force Generation of DRG Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sayyad, Wasim A.; Fabris, Paolo; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We used optical tweezers, video imaging, immunocytochemistry and a variety of inhibitors to analyze the role of Rac1 in the motility and force generation of lamellipodia and filopodia from developing growth cones of isolated Dorsal Root Ganglia neurons. When the activity of Rac1 was inhibited by the drug EHop-016, the period of lamellipodia protrusion/retraction cycles increased and the lamellipodia retrograde flow rate decreased; moreover, the axial force exerted by lamellipodia was reduced dramatically. Inhibition of Arp2/3 by a moderate amount of the drug CK-548 caused a transient retraction of lamellipodia followed by a complete recovery of their usual motility. This recovery was abolished by the concomitant inhibition of Rac1. The filopodia length increased upon inhibition of both Rac1 and Arp2/3, but the speed of filopodia protrusion increased when Rac1 was inhibited and decreased instead when Arp2/3 was inhibited. These results suggest that Rac1 acts as a switch that activates upon inhibition of Arp2/3. Rac1 also controls the filopodia dynamics necessary to explore the environment. PMID:26766136

  12. Dynamic linear model for the identification of miRNAs in next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, W. Evan; Welker, Noah C.; Bass, Brenda L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Next generation sequencing technologies are poised to revolutionize the field of biomedical research. The increased resolution of these data promise to provide a greater understanding of the molecular processes that control the morphology and behavior of a cell. However, the increased amounts of data require innovative statistical procedures that are powerful while still being computationally feasible. In this research, we present a method for identifying small RNA molecules, called miRNAs, which regulate genes by targeting their mRNAs for degradation or translational repression. In the first step of our modeling procedure, we apply an innovative dynamic linear model that identifies candidate miRNA genes in high-throughput sequencing data. The model is flexible and can accurately identify interesting biological features while accounting for both the read count, read spacing, and sequencing depth. Additionally, miRNA candidates are also processed using a modified Smith-Waterman sequence alignment that scores the regions for potential RNA hairpins, one of the defining features of miRNAs. We illustrate our method on simulated data sets as well as on a small RNA Caenorhabditis elegans data set from the Illumina sequencing platform. These examples show that our method is highly sensitive for identifying known and novel miRNA genes. PMID:21385162

  13. A hybrid programming model for compressible gas dynamics using openCL

    SciTech Connect

    Bergen, Benjamin Karl; Daniels, Marcus G; Weber, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    The current trend towards multicore/manycore and accelerated architectures presents challenges, both in portability, and also in the choices that developers must make on how to use the resources that these architectures provide. This paper explores some of the possibilities that are enabled by the Open Computing Language (OpenCL), and proposes a programming model that allows developers and scientists to more fully subscribe hybrid compute nodes, while, at the same time, reducing the impact of system failure.

  14. Dynamic impact of urbanization, economic growth, energy consumption, and trade openness on CO 2 emissions in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hamisu Sadi; Law, Siong Hook; Zannah, Talha Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the dynamic impact of urbanization, economic growth, energy consumption, and trade openness on CO 2 emissions in Nigeria based on autoregressive distributed lags (ARDL) approach for the period of 1971-2011. The result shows that variables were cointegrated as null hypothesis was rejected at 1 % level of significance. The coefficients of long-run result reveal that urbanization does not have any significant impact on CO 2 emissions in Nigeria, economic growth, and energy consumption has a positive and significant impact on CO 2 emissions. However, trade openness has negative and significant impact on CO 2 emissions. Consumption of energy is among the main determinant of CO 2 emissions which is directly linked to the level of income. Despite the high level of urbanization in the country, consumption of energy still remains low due to lower income of the majority populace and this might be among the reasons why urbanization does not influence emissions of CO 2 in the country. Initiating more open economy policies will be welcoming in the Nigerian economy as the openness leads to the reduction of pollutants from the environment particularly CO 2 emissions which is the major gases that deteriorate physical environment. PMID:26983914

  15. Dynamic impact of urbanization, economic growth, energy consumption, and trade openness on CO 2 emissions in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ali, Hamisu Sadi; Law, Siong Hook; Zannah, Talha Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the dynamic impact of urbanization, economic growth, energy consumption, and trade openness on CO 2 emissions in Nigeria based on autoregressive distributed lags (ARDL) approach for the period of 1971-2011. The result shows that variables were cointegrated as null hypothesis was rejected at 1 % level of significance. The coefficients of long-run result reveal that urbanization does not have any significant impact on CO 2 emissions in Nigeria, economic growth, and energy consumption has a positive and significant impact on CO 2 emissions. However, trade openness has negative and significant impact on CO 2 emissions. Consumption of energy is among the main determinant of CO 2 emissions which is directly linked to the level of income. Despite the high level of urbanization in the country, consumption of energy still remains low due to lower income of the majority populace and this might be among the reasons why urbanization does not influence emissions of CO 2 in the country. Initiating more open economy policies will be welcoming in the Nigerian economy as the openness leads to the reduction of pollutants from the environment particularly CO 2 emissions which is the major gases that deteriorate physical environment.

  16. Next Generation Online: Advancing Learning through Dynamic Design, Virtual and Web 2.0 Technologies, and Instructor "Attitude"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of web 2.0 and virtual technologies and new understandings about learning within a global, networked environment, online course design has moved beyond the constraints of text readings, papers, and discussion boards. This next generation of online courses needs to dynamically and actively integrate the wide-ranging distribution of…

  17. A system dynamic modeling approach for evaluating municipal solid waste generation, landfill capacity and related cost management issues

    SciTech Connect

    Kollikkathara, Naushad; Feng Huan; Yu Danlin

    2010-11-15

    As planning for sustainable municipal solid waste management has to address several inter-connected issues such as landfill capacity, environmental impacts and financial expenditure, it becomes increasingly necessary to understand the dynamic nature of their interactions. A system dynamics approach designed here attempts to address some of these issues by fitting a model framework for Newark urban region in the US, and running a forecast simulation. The dynamic system developed in this study incorporates the complexity of the waste generation and management process to some extent which is achieved through a combination of simpler sub-processes that are linked together to form a whole. The impact of decision options on the generation of waste in the city, on the remaining landfill capacity of the state, and on the economic cost or benefit actualized by different waste processing options are explored through this approach, providing valuable insights into the urban waste-management process.

  18. Identification and classification of dynamic event tree scenarios via possibilistic clustering: application to a steam generator tube rupture event.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, D; Podofillini, L; Zio, E; Dang, V N

    2009-11-01

    This paper illustrates a method to identify and classify scenarios generated in a dynamic event tree (DET) analysis. Identification and classification are carried out by means of an evolutionary possibilistic fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm which takes into account not only the final system states but also the timing of the events and the process evolution. An application is considered with regards to the scenarios generated following a steam generator tube rupture in a nuclear power plant. The scenarios are generated by the accident dynamic simulator (ADS), coupled to a RELAP code that simulates the thermo-hydraulic behavior of the plant and to an operators' crew model, which simulates their cognitive and procedures-guided responses. A set of 60 scenarios has been generated by the ADS DET tool. The classification approach has grouped the 60 scenarios into 4 classes of dominant scenarios, one of which was not anticipated a priori but was "discovered" by the classifier. The proposed approach may be considered as a first effort towards the application of identification and classification approaches to scenarios post-processing for real-scale dynamic safety assessments. PMID:19819366

  19. Training the Next Generation of Scientists: System Dynamics Modeling of Chagas Disease (American Trypanosomiasis) transmission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, P.; Hulse, A.; Harder, H. R.; Pierce, L. A.; Rizzo, D.; Hanley, J.; Orantes, L.; Stevens, L.; Justi, S.; Monroy, C.

    2015-12-01

    A computational simulation has been designed as an investigative case study by high school students to introduce system dynamics modeling into high school curriculum. This case study approach leads users through the forensics necessary to diagnose an unknown disease in a Central American village. This disease, Chagas, is endemic to 21 Latin American countries. The CDC estimates that of the 110 million people living in areas with the disease, 8 million are infected, with as many as 300,000 US cases. Chagas is caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, and is spread via blood feeding insect (vectors), that feed on vertebrates and live in crevasses in the walls and roofs of adobe homes. One-third of the infected people will develop chronic Chagas who are asymptomatic for years before their heart or GI tract become enlarged resulting in death. The case study has three parts. Students play the role of WHO field investigators and work collaboratively to: 1) use genetics to identify the host(s) and vector of the disease 2) use a STELLA™ SIR (Susceptible, Infected, Recovered) system dynamics model to study Chagas at the village scale and 3) develop management strategies. The simulations identify mitigation strategies known as Ecohealth Interventions (e.g., home improvements using local materials) to help stakeholders test and compare multiple optima. High school students collaborated with researchers from the University of Vermont, Loyola University and Universidad de San Carlos, Guatemala, working in labs, interviewing researchers, and incorporating mulitple field data as part of a NSF-funded multiyear grant. The model displays stable equilibria of hosts, vectors, and disease-states. Sensitivity analyses show measures of household condition and presence of vertebrates were significant leverage points, supporting other findings by the University research team. The village-scale model explores multiple solutions to disease mitigation for the purpose of producing

  20. Electrolyte negative differential resistance, nanoparticle dynamics in nanopores, and nanobubble generation at nanoelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Long

    This dissertation presents experimental and computational investigations of electrolyte negative differential resistance, nanoparticle dynamics in nanopores, and nanobubble formation at nanoelectrodes. Chapter 1 provides an introduction to negative differential resistance and other nonlinear electrical responses in nanopores, an overview of resistive pulse analysis of nanoparticles using nanopores, and current nanobubble research. Chapter 2 describes the first example of electrolyte negative differential resistance (NDR) discovered in nanopores, where the current decreases as the voltage is increased. The NDR turn-on voltage was found to be tunable over a ˜1 V window by adjusting the applied external pressure. Finite-element simulations yielded predictions of the NDR behavior that are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. Chapter 3 presents the extension of NDR to an aqueous system and demonstrates the potential for chemical sensing based on NDR behavior. Solution pH and Ca2+ in the solution were separately employed as the stimulus to investigate the surface charge density dependence of the NDR behavior. The NDR turn-on voltage was found to be exceedingly sensitive to the nanopore surface charge density, suggesting possible analytical applications in detecting as few as several hundred of molecules. Chapter 4 discusses the technique of controlling the dynamics of single 8 nm diameter gold nanoparticles in nanopores, which is extended from traditional resistive pulse analysis of nanoparticles. A pressure was applied to balance electrokinetic forces acting on the charged Au nanoparticles as they translocate through a ˜10 nm diameter orifice at an electric field. This force balance provides a means to vary the velocity of nanoparticles by three orders of magnitude. Finite-element simulations yielded predictions in semiquantitative agreement with the experimental results. Chapter 5 reports the electrochemical generation of individual H 2

  1. Time and space in the middle paleolithic: Spatial structure and occupation dynamics of seven open-air sites.

    PubMed

    Clark, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    The spatial structure of archeological sites can help reconstruct the settlement dynamics of hunter-gatherers by providing information on the number and length of occupations. This study seeks to access this information through a comparison of seven sites. These sites are open-air and were all excavated over large spatial areas, up to 2,000 m(2) , and are therefore ideal for spatial analysis, which was done using two complementary methods, lithic refitting and density zones. Both methods were assessed statistically using confidence intervals. The statistically significant results from each site were then compiled to evaluate trends that occur across the seven sites. These results were used to assess the "spatial consistency" of each assemblage and, through that, the number and duration of occupations. This study demonstrates that spatial analysis can be a powerful tool in research on occupation dynamics and can help disentangle the many occupations that often make up an archeological assemblage.

  2. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering study of the dynamics of a multipolar plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, M.; Péalat, M.; Taran, J.-P.; Bacal, M.; Berlemont, P.; Skinner, D. A.; Bretagne, J.; Hutcheon, R. J.

    1992-03-01

    A Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) study of the hydrogen plasma generated by a discharge with magnetic multipolar confinement has been conducted at pressures in the range 0.5-5 Pa. The steady-state radial distribution of the rovibrational populations has been measured. The vibrational temperature is always uniformly distributed and so is the rotational temperature at the lower pressures, while a strong gradient is seen at 5 Pa for the rotation. Time-resolved measurements with the discharge operated in a square-pulse mode give additional insight into the dynamics of the discharge. Some results are compared with the predictions of two computer models of the plasma kinetics. We observe H{2} vibrational excitation by the Joule-heated filament alone (in the absence of the discharge) and show it to be caused primarily by the confined discharge between the filament and its cold positive copper connector. Another interpretation of the presence of vibrationally excited H{2} by recombinative desorption (Hall R.I. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 60 (1988) 337) is not comforted by our results, within instrumental sensitivity. The densities of the first rotational levels that the ortho and para forms of H{2} have different electron collisional cross-sections. Under pulsed excitation, the vibrational temperature rises on a time scale of 1-2 ms in agreement with numerical predictions. At switch-off, we show by matching the experimental and theoretical decays that vibrational state v=1 survives 16± 5 wall collisions; meanwhile, the rotation cools very rapidly, probably because of superelastic electronic collisions.

  3. Mechanism of generation of the emission bands in the dynamic spectrum of the Crab pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, Houshang; Ardavan, Arzhang; Singleton, John; Perez, Mario R.

    2008-08-01

    We show that the proportionately spaced emission bands in the dynamic spectrum of the Crab pulsar fit the oscillations of the square of a Bessel function whose argument exceeds its order. This function has already been encountered in the analysis of the emission from a polarization current with a superluminal distribution pattern: a current whose distribution pattern rotates (with an angular frequency ω) and oscillates (with a frequency Ω > ω differing from an integral multiple of ω) at the same time. Using the results of our earlier analysis, we find that the dependence on frequency of the spacing and width of the observed emission bands can be quantitatively accounted for by an appropriate choice of the value of the single free parameter Ω/ω. In addition, the value of this parameter, thus implied by Hankins & Eilek's data, places the last peak in the amplitude of the oscillating Bessel function in question at a frequency (~Ω3/ω2) that agrees with the position of the observed ultraviolet peak in the spectrum of the Crab pulsar. We also show how the suppression of the emission bands by the interference of the contributions from differing polarizations can account for the differences in the time and frequency signatures of the interpulse and the main pulse in the Crab pulsar. Finally, we put the emission bands in the context of the observed continuum spectrum of the Crab pulsar by fitting this broad-band spectrum (over 16 orders of magnitude of frequency) with that generated by an electric current with a superluminally rotating distribution pattern.

  4. Dynamical generation of a repulsive vector contribution to the quark pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Tulio E.; Macias, Juan Camilo; Pinto, Marcus Benghi; Ferrari, Gabriel N.

    2015-03-01

    Lattice QCD results for the coefficient c2 appearing in the Taylor expansion of the pressure show that this quantity increases with the temperature towards the Stefan-Boltzmann limit. On the other hand, model approximations predict that when a vector repulsion, parametrized by GV, is present this coefficient reaches a maximum just after Tc and then deviates from the lattice predictions. Recently, this discrepancy has been used as a guide to constrain the (presently unknown) value of GV within the framework of effective models at large Nc (LN). In the present investigation we show that, due to finite Nc effects, c2 may also develop a maximum even when GV=0 since a vector repulsive term can be dynamically generated by exchange-type radiative corrections. Here we apply the optimized perturbation theory (OPT) method to the two-flavor Polyakov-Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model (at GV=0 ) and compare the results with those furnished by lattice simulations and by the LN approximation at GV=0 and also at GV≠0 . The OPT numerical results for c2 are impressively accurate for T ≲1.2 Tc but, as expected, they predict that this quantity develops a maximum at high T . After identifying the mathematical origin of this extremum we argue that such a discrepant behavior may naturally arise within this type of effective quark theories (at GV=0 ) whenever the first 1 /Nc corrections are taken into account. We then interpret this hypothesis as an indication that beyond the large-Nc limit the correct high-temperature (perturbative) behavior of c2 will be faithfully described by effective models only if they also mimic the asymptotic freedom phenomenon.

  5. Effect of a high strength chemical industry wastewater on microbial community dynamics and mesophilic methane generation.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Harish; Tan, Youming; Majid, Maszenan Bin Abdul; Pathak, Santosh; Sendjaja, Antonius Yudi; Li, Dongzhe; Liu, Jerry Jian Lin; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2014-04-01

    A high strength chemical industry wastewater was assessed for its impact on anaerobic microbial community dynamics and consequently mesophilic methane generation. Cumulative methane production was 251 mL/g total chemical oxygen demand removed at standard temperature and pressure at the end of 30 days experimental period with a highest recorded methane percentage of 80.6% of total biogas volume. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) analysis revealed that acetic acid was the major intermediate VFAs produced with propionic acid accumulating over the experimental period. Quantitative analysis of microbial communities in the test and control groups with quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction highlighted that in the test group, Eubacteria (96.3%) was dominant in comparison with methanogens (3.7%). The latter were dominated by Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales while Methanosarcinaceae in test groups increased over the experimental period, reaching a maximum on day 30. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profile was performed, targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Eubacteria and Archaea, with the DNA samples extracted at 3 different time points from the test groups. A phylogenetic tree was constructed for the sequences using the neighborhood joining method. The analysis revealed that the presence of organisms resembling Syntrophomonadaceae could have contributed to increased production of acetic and propionic acid intermediates while decrease of organisms resembling Pelotomaculum sp. could have most likely contributed to accumulation of propionic acid. This study suggested that the degradation of organic components within the high strength industrial wastewater is closely linked with the activity of certain niche microbial communities within eubacteria and methanogens.

  6. Dislocation generation, slip systems, and dynamic recrystallization in experimentally deformed plagioclase single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stünitz, H.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.; Tullis, J.

    2003-09-01

    Three samples of gem quality plagioclase crystals of An60 were experimentally deformed at 900 °C, 1 GPa confining pressure and strain rates of 7.5-8.7×10 -7 s -1. The starting material is effectively dislocation-free so that all observed defects were introduced during the experiments. Two samples were shortened normal to one of the principal slip planes (010), corresponding to a "hard" orientation, and one sample was deformed with a Schmid factor of 0.45 for the principal slip system [001](010), corresponding to a "soft" orientation. Several slip systems were activated in the "soft" sample: dislocations of the [001](010) and <110>(001) system are about equally abundant, whereas <110>{111} and [101] in (1¯31) to (2¯42) are less common. In the "soft" sample plastic deformation is pervasive and deformation bands are abundant. In the "hard" samples the plastic deformation is concentrated in rims along the sample boundaries. Deformation bands and shear fractures are common. Twinning occurs in close association with fracturing, and the processes are clearly interrelated. Glissile dislocations of all observed slip systems are associated with fractures and deformation bands indicating that deformation bands and fractures are important sites of dislocation generation. Grain boundaries of tiny, defect-free grains in healed fracture zones have migrated subsequent to fracturing. These grains represent former fragments of the fracture process and may act as nuclei for new grains during dynamic recrystallization. Nucleation via small fragments can explain a non-host-controlled orientation of recrystallized grains in plagioclase and possibly in other silicate materials which have been plastically deformed near the semi-brittle to plastic transition.

  7. Effect of a high strength chemical industry wastewater on microbial community dynamics and mesophilic methane generation.

    PubMed

    Venkatakrishnan, Harish; Tan, Youming; Majid, Maszenan Bin Abdul; Pathak, Santosh; Sendjaja, Antonius Yudi; Li, Dongzhe; Liu, Jerry Jian Lin; Zhou, Yan; Ng, Wun Jern

    2014-04-01

    A high strength chemical industry wastewater was assessed for its impact on anaerobic microbial community dynamics and consequently mesophilic methane generation. Cumulative methane production was 251 mL/g total chemical oxygen demand removed at standard temperature and pressure at the end of 30 days experimental period with a highest recorded methane percentage of 80.6% of total biogas volume. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) analysis revealed that acetic acid was the major intermediate VFAs produced with propionic acid accumulating over the experimental period. Quantitative analysis of microbial communities in the test and control groups with quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction highlighted that in the test group, Eubacteria (96.3%) was dominant in comparison with methanogens (3.7%). The latter were dominated by Methanomicrobiales and Methanobacteriales while Methanosarcinaceae in test groups increased over the experimental period, reaching a maximum on day 30. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profile was performed, targeting the 16S rRNA gene of Eubacteria and Archaea, with the DNA samples extracted at 3 different time points from the test groups. A phylogenetic tree was constructed for the sequences using the neighborhood joining method. The analysis revealed that the presence of organisms resembling Syntrophomonadaceae could have contributed to increased production of acetic and propionic acid intermediates while decrease of organisms resembling Pelotomaculum sp. could have most likely contributed to accumulation of propionic acid. This study suggested that the degradation of organic components within the high strength industrial wastewater is closely linked with the activity of certain niche microbial communities within eubacteria and methanogens. PMID:25079418

  8. The sensitivities of high-harmonic generation and strong-field ionization to coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Baykusheva, Denitsa; Kraus, Peter M; Zhang, Song Bin; Rohringer, Nina; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivities of high-harmonic generation (HHG) and strong-field ionization (SFI) to coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics are studied, using the nitric oxide (NO) molecule as an example. A coherent superposition of electronic and rotational states of NO is prepared by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering and probed by simultaneous detection of HHG and SFI yields. We observe a fourfold higher sensitivity of high-harmonic generation to electronic dynamics and attribute it to the presence of inelastic quantum paths connecting coherently related electronic states [Kraus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.111, 243005 (2013)]. Whereas different harmonic orders display very different sensitivities to rotational or electronic dynamics, strong-field ionization is found to be most sensitive to electronic motion. We introduce a general theoretical formalism for high-harmonic generation from coupled nuclear-electronic wave packets. We show that the unequal sensitivities of different harmonic orders to electronic or rotational dynamics result from the angle dependence of the photorecombination matrix elements which encode several autoionizing and shape resonances in the photoionization continuum of NO. We further study the dependence of rotational and electronic coherences on the intensity of the excitation pulse and support the observations with calculations.

  9. Method for generating all uniform π -pulse sequences used in deterministic dynamical decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haoyu; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2015-09-01

    Dynamical decoupling has been actively investigated since Viola first suggested using a pulse sequence to protect a qubit from decoherence. Since then, many schemes of dynamical decoupling have been proposed to achieve high-order suppression, both analytically and numerically. However, hitherto, there has not been a systematic framework to understand all existing uniform π -pulse dynamical decoupling schemes. In this report, we use the projection pulse sequences as basic building blocks and concatenation as a way to combine them. We derived a concatenated-projection dynamical decoupling, a framework in which we can systematically construct pulse sequences to achieve arbitrary high suppression order. All previously known uniform dynamical decoupling sequences using π pulse can be fit into this framework. Understanding uniform dynamical decoupling as successive projections on the Hamiltonian will also give insights on how to invent new ways to construct better pulse sequences.

  10. Localization of central rhythm generator involved in cortically induced rhythmical masticatory jaw-opening movement in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, S; Iriki, A; Nakamura, Y

    1986-04-01

    The location of the central rhythm generator involved in the cortically induced rhythmical masticatory jaw-opening movement was studied in the ketamine-anesthetized guinea pig. These studies show that a population of neurons is activated by a nonrhythmical input from the cortical masticatory area (CMA) and produces a rhythmical output to the trigeminal motoneurons innervating the jaw-opening muscles. Repetitive stimulation (30 Hz) of the pyramidal tract (PT) rostral to the middle level of the medulla oblongata, in the animal with a precollicular transection as well as with an intact neuraxis, induced a rhythmical reciprocal EMG activity in the anterior digastric and masseter muscles. The rhythmical activity could be monitored by a rhythmical burst in the efferent discharge in the mylohyoid nerve innervating the anterior digastric muscle. Essentially the same pattern was observed when stimulating the PT as that induced by repetitive stimulation of the CMA. The rhythmical efferent burst in the mylohyoid nerve could still be induced after paralyzing the animal. Repetitive PT stimulation in the isolated brain stem after precollicular and bulbospinal transections induced a rhythmical pattern in the anterior digastric EMG and an efferent activity in the mylohyoid nerve. The rhythmical mylohyoid nerve burst could be induced after paralyzing the animal. After section of the medial part of the brain stem at the pontobulbar junction, including the PT, repetitive PT stimulation at the pontine level did not induce any masticatory activity either in the digastric EMG or in the efferent discharge in the mylohyoid nerve, while stimulation at the rostral bulbar level still induced a rhythmicity that was essentially the same pattern as before the section. By testing the effects of total and partial transections of the brain stem in coronal and sagittal planes at various locations, we found that the medial bulbar reticular formation, the lateral pons including the trigeminal motor

  11. Automatic Generation of Wide Dynamic Range Image without Pseudo-Edge Using Integration of Multi-Steps Exposure Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migiyama, Go; Sugimura, Atsuhiko; Osa, Atsushi; Miike, Hidetoshi

    Recently, digital cameras are offering technical advantages rapidly. However, the shot image is different from the sight image generated when that scenery is seen with the naked eye. There are blown-out highlights and crushed blacks in the image that photographed the scenery of wide dynamic range. The problems are hardly generated in the sight image. These are contributory cause of difference between the shot image and the sight image. Blown-out highlights and crushed blacks are caused by the difference of dynamic range between the image sensor installed in a digital camera such as CCD and CMOS and the human visual system. Dynamic range of the shot image is narrower than dynamic range of the sight image. In order to solve the problem, we propose an automatic method to decide an effective exposure range in superposition of edges. We integrate multi-step exposure images using the method. In addition, we try to erase pseudo-edges using the process to blend exposure values. Afterwards, we get a pseudo wide dynamic range image automatically.

  12. Molecular dynamics of ion transport through the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel.

    PubMed

    Ulmschneider, Martin B; Bagnéris, Claire; McCusker, Emily C; Decaen, Paul G; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E; Ulmschneider, Jakob P; Wallace, B A

    2013-04-16

    The crystal structure of the open conformation of a bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel pore from Magnetococcus sp. (NaVMs) has provided the basis for a molecular dynamics study defining the channel's full ion translocation pathway and conductance process, selectivity, electrophysiological characteristics, and ion-binding sites. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulations permitted a complete time-course characterization of the protein in a membrane system, capturing the plethora of conductance events and revealing a complex mixture of single and multi-ion phenomena with decoupled rapid bidirectional water transport. The simulations suggest specific localization sites for the sodium ions, which correspond with experimentally determined electron density found in the selectivity filter of the crystal structure. These studies have also allowed us to identify the ion conductance mechanism and its relation to water movement for the NavMs channel pore and to make realistic predictions of its conductance properties. The calculated single-channel conductance and selectivity ratio correspond closely with the electrophysiology measurements of the NavMs channel expressed in HEK 293 cells. The ion translocation process seen in this voltage-gated sodium channel is clearly different from that exhibited by members of the closely related family of voltage-gated potassium channels and also differs considerably from existing proposals for the conductance process in sodium channels. These studies simulate sodium channel conductance based on an experimentally determined structure of a sodium channel pore that has a completely open transmembrane pathway and activation gate.

  13. Peptide-induced membrane curvature in edge-stabilized open bilayers: A theoretical and molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannuzzo, Martina; Raudino, Antonio; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2014-07-01

    Peptide- or protein-induced curvatures of lipid membranes may be studied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In these, membranes are usually modeled as infinitely extended bilayers by using periodic boundary conditions. However, the enforced periodicity results in an underestimation of the bending power of peptides, unless the patch size is much larger than the induced curvature radii. In this letter, we propose a novel approach to evaluate the bending power of a given distribution and/or density of peptides based on the use of flat open-edged lipid patches. To ensure long-lived metastable structures, the patch rim is stabilized in MD simulations by a local enrichment with short-chain lipids. By combining the theory of continuum elastic media with MD simulations, we prove that open-edged patches evolve from a planar state to a closed vesicle, with a transition rate that strongly depends on the concentration of lipid soluble peptides. For close-to-critical values for the patch size and edge energy, the response to even small changes in peptide concentration adopts a transition-like behavior (buckling instability). The usage of open-edged membrane patches amplifies the bending power of peptides, thereby enabling the analysis of the structural properties of membrane-peptide systems. We applied the presented method to investigate the curvature induced by aggregating β -amyloid peptides, unraveling a strong sensitivity of membrane deformation to the peptide concentration.

  14. FeynDyn: A MATLAB program for fast numerical Feynman integral calculations for open quantum system dynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2013-12-01

    This MATLAB program calculates the dynamics of the reduced density matrix of an open quantum system modeled either by the Feynman-Vernon model or the Caldeira-Leggett model. The user gives the program a Hamiltonian matrix that describes the open quantum system as if it were in isolation, a matrix of the same size that describes how that system couples to its environment, and a spectral distribution function and temperature describing the environment’s influence on it, in addition to the open quantum system’s initial density matrix and a grid of times. With this, the program returns the reduced density matrix of the open quantum system at all moments specified by that grid of times (or just the last moment specified by the grid of times if the user makes this choice). This overall calculation can be divided into two stages: the setup of the Feynman integral, and the actual calculation of the Feynman integral for time propagation of the density matrix. When this program calculates this propagation on a multi-core CPU, it is this propagation that is usually the rate-limiting step of the calculation, but when it is calculated on a GPU, the propagation is calculated so quickly that the setup of the Feynman integral can actually become the rate-limiting step. The overhead of transferring information from the CPU to the GPU and back seems to have a negligible effect on the overall runtime of the program. When the required information cannot fit on the GPU, the user can choose to run the entire program on a CPU. Catalogue identifier: AEPX_v1_0. Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPX_v1_0.html. Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 703. No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11026. Distribution format: tar.gz. Programming

  15. Dynamic two-center interference in high-order harmonic generation from molecules with attosecond nuclear motion.

    PubMed

    Baker, S; Robinson, J S; Lein, M; Chirilă, C C; Torres, R; Bandulet, H C; Comtois, D; Kieffer, J C; Villeneuve, D M; Tisch, J W G; Marangos, J P

    2008-08-01

    We report a new dynamic two-center interference effect in high-harmonic generation from H2, in which the attosecond nuclear motion of H2+ initiated at ionization causes interference to be observed at lower harmonic orders than would be the case for static nuclei. To enable this measurement we utilize a recently developed technique for probing the attosecond nuclear dynamics of small molecules. The experimental results are reproduced by a theoretical analysis based upon the strong-field approximation which incorporates the temporally dependent two-center interference term.

  16. Robust Generation of Dynamic Data Structure Visualizations with Multiple Interaction Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, James H., II; Hendrix, T. Dean; Umphress, David A.; Barowski, Larry A.; Jain, Jhilmil; Montgomery, Lacey N.

    2009-01-01

    jGRASP has three integrated approaches for interacting with its dynamic viewers for data structures: debugger, workbench, and text-based interactions that allow individual Java statements and expressions to be executed/evaluated. These approaches can be used together to provide a complementary set of interactions with the dynamic viewers. Data…

  17. Stem cell research funding policies and dynamic innovation: a survey of open access and commercialization requirements.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Maroussia; Kim, Jihyun Rosel; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha Maria; Plomer, Aurora; Joly, Yann

    2014-08-01

    This article compares and contrasts the pressures of both open access data sharing and commercialization policies in the context of publicly funded embryonic stem cell research (SCR). First, normative guidelines of international SCR organizations were examined. We then examined SCR funding guidelines and the project evaluation criteria of major funding organizations in the EU, the United Kingdom (UK), Spain, Canada and the United States. Our survey of policies revealed subtle pressures to commercialize research that include: increased funding availability for commercialization opportunities, assistance for obtaining intellectual property rights (IPRs) and legislation mandating commercialization. In lieu of open access models, funders are increasingly opting for limited sharing models or "protected commons" models that make the research available to researchers within the same region or those receiving the same funding. Meanwhile, there still is need for funding agencies to clarify and standardize terms such as "non-profit organizations" and "for-profit research," as more universities are pursuing for-profit or commercial opportunities.

  18. Mechanisms of mindfulness: The dynamics of affective adaptation during open monitoring.

    PubMed

    Uusberg, Helen; Uusberg, Andero; Talpsep, Teri; Paaver, Marika

    2016-07-01

    Mindfulness - the nonjudgmental awareness of the present experience - is thought to facilitate affective adaptation through increased exposure to emotions and faster extinction of habitual responses. To test this framework, the amplification of the Late Positive Potential (LPP) by negative relative to neutral images was analyzed across stimulus repetitions while 37 novices performed an open monitoring mindfulness exercise. Compared to two active control conditions where attention was either diverted to a distracting task or the stimuli were attended without mindfulness instructions, open monitoring enhanced the initial LPP response to negative stimuli, indicating increased emotional exposure. Across successive repetitions, mindfulness reduced and ultimately removed the affective LPP amplification, suggesting extinction of habitual emotional reactions. This effect arose from reduced negative as well enlarged neutral LPPs. Unlike stimuli from control conditions, the images previously viewed with mindfulness instructions did not elicit affective LPP amplification during subsequent re-exposure, suggesting reconsolidation of stimulus meaning.

  19. Mechanisms of mindfulness: The dynamics of affective adaptation during open monitoring.

    PubMed

    Uusberg, Helen; Uusberg, Andero; Talpsep, Teri; Paaver, Marika

    2016-07-01

    Mindfulness - the nonjudgmental awareness of the present experience - is thought to facilitate affective adaptation through increased exposure to emotions and faster extinction of habitual responses. To test this framework, the amplification of the Late Positive Potential (LPP) by negative relative to neutral images was analyzed across stimulus repetitions while 37 novices performed an open monitoring mindfulness exercise. Compared to two active control conditions where attention was either diverted to a distracting task or the stimuli were attended without mindfulness instructions, open monitoring enhanced the initial LPP response to negative stimuli, indicating increased emotional exposure. Across successive repetitions, mindfulness reduced and ultimately removed the affective LPP amplification, suggesting extinction of habitual emotional reactions. This effect arose from reduced negative as well enlarged neutral LPPs. Unlike stimuli from control conditions, the images previously viewed with mindfulness instructions did not elicit affective LPP amplification during subsequent re-exposure, suggesting reconsolidation of stimulus meaning. PMID:27211913

  20. Dynamical origin of near- and below-threshold harmonic generation of Cs in an intense mid-infrared laser field

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng-Cheng; Sheu, Yae-Lin; Laughlin, Cecil; Chu, Shih-I

    2015-01-01

    Near- and below-threshold harmonic generation provides a potential approach to generate vacuum-ultraviolet frequency comb. However, the dynamical origin of in these lower harmonics is less understood and largely unexplored. Here we perform an ab initio quantum study of the near- and below-threshold harmonic generation of caesium (Cs) atoms in an intense 3,600-nm mid-infrared laser field. Combining with a synchrosqueezing transform of the quantum time-frequency spectrum and an extended semiclassical analysis, the roles of multiphoton and multiple rescattering trajectories on the near- and below-threshold harmonic generation processes are clarified. We find that the multiphoton-dominated trajectories only involve the electrons scattered off the higher part of the combined atom-field potential followed by the absorption of many photons in near- and below-threshold regime. Furthermore, only the near-resonant below-threshold harmonic is exclusive to exhibit phase locked features. Our results shed light on the dynamic origin of the near- and below-threshold harmonic generation. PMID:25990452

  1. Control of dispatch dynamics for lowering the cost of distributed generation in the built environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Robert Joseph

    Distributed generation can provide many benefits over traditional central generation such as increased reliability and efficiency while reducing emissions. Despite these potential benefits, distributed generation is generally not purchased unless it reduces energy costs. Economic dispatch strategies can be designed such that distributed generation technologies reduce overall facility energy costs. In this thesis, a microturbine generator is dispatched using different economic control strategies, reducing the cost of energy to the facility. Several industrial and commercial facilities are simulated using acquired electrical, heating, and cooling load data. Industrial and commercial utility rate structures are modeled after Southern California Edison and Southern California Gas Company tariffs and used to find energy costs for the simulated buildings and corresponding microturbine dispatch. Using these control strategies, building models, and utility rate models, a parametric study examining various generator characteristics is performed. An economic assessment of the distributed generation is then performed for both the microturbine generator and parametric study. Without the ability to export electricity to the grid, the economic value of distributed generation is limited to reducing the individual costs that make up the cost of energy for a building. Any economic dispatch strategy must be built to reduce these individual costs. While the ability of distributed generation to reduce cost depends of factors such as electrical efficiency and operations and maintenance cost, the building energy demand being serviced has a strong effect on cost reduction. Buildings with low load factors can accept distributed generation with higher operating costs (low electrical efficiency and/or high operations and maintenance cost) due to the value of demand reduction. As load factor increases, lower operating cost generators are desired due to a larger portion of the building load

  2. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of aerosol in a U-shaped steam generator tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmire, Pamela

    To quantify primary side aerosol retention, an Eulerian/Lagrangian approach was used to investigate aerosol transport in a compressible, turbulent, adiabatic, internal, wall-bounded flow. The ARTIST experimental project (Phase I) served as the physical model replicated for numerical simulation. Realizable k-epsilon and standard k-o turbulence models were selected from the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, FLUENT, to provide the Eulerian description of the gaseous phase. Flow field simulation results exhibited: (a) onset of weak secondary flow accelerated at bend entrance towards the inner wall; (b) flow separation zone development on the convex wall that persisted from the point of onset; (c) centrifugal force concentrated high velocity flow in the direction of the concave wall; (d) formation of vortices throughout the flow domain resulted from rotational (Dean-type) flow; (e) weakened secondary flow assisted the formation of twin vortices in the outflow cross section; and (f) perturbations induced by the bend influenced flow recovery several pipe diameters upstream of the bend. These observations were consistent with those of previous investigators. The Lagrangian discrete random walk model, with and without turbulent dispersion, simulated the dispersed phase behavior, incorrectly. Accurate deposition predictions in wall-bounded flow require modification of the Eddy Impaction Model (EIM). Thus, to circumvent shortcomings of the EIM, the Lagrangian time scale was changed to a wall function and the root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuating velocities were modified to account for the strong anisotropic nature of flow in the immediate vicinity of the wall (boundary layer). Subsequent computed trajectories suggest a precision that ranges from 0.1% to 0.7%, statistical sampling error. The aerodynamic mass median diameter (AMMD) at the inlet (5.5 mum) was consistent with the ARTIST experimental findings. The geometric standard deviation (GSD) varied depending on the

  3. Dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial photoinduced electron transfer processes of third generation photovoltaics and photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Christophe; Teuscher, Joël; Brauer, Jan C; Punzi, Angela; Marchioro, Arianna; Ghadiri, Elham; De Jonghe, Jelissa; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Banerji, Natalie; Moser, Jacques E

    2011-01-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) across molecular/bulk interfaces has gained attention only recently and is still poorly understood. These interfaces offer an excellent case study, pertinent to a variety of photovoltaic systems, photo- and electrochemistry, molecular electronics, analytical detection, photography, and quantum confinement devices. They play in particular a key role in the emerging fields of third-generation photovoltaic energy converters and artificial photosynthetic systems aimed at the production of solar fuels, creating a need for a better understanding and theoretical treatment of the dynamics and mechanisms of interfacial PET processes. We aim to achieve a fundamental understanding of these phenomena by designing experiments that can be used to test and alter modern theory and computational modeling. One example illustrating recent investigations into the details of the ultrafast processes that form the basis for photoinduced charge separation at a molecular/bulk interface relevant to dye-sensitized solar cells is briefly presented here: Kinetics of interfacial PET and charge recombination processes were measured by fs and ns transient spectroscopy in a heterogeneous donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) system, where D is a Ru(II)(terpyridyl-PO3)(NCS)3 complex, B an oligo-p-phenylene bridge, and A nanocrystalline TiO2. The forward ET reaction was found to be faster than vibrational relaxation of the vibronic excited state of the donor. Instead, the back ET occurred on the micros time scale and involved fully thermalized species. The D-A distance dependence of the electron transfer rate was studied by varying the number of p-phenylene units contained in the bridge moiety. The remarkably low damping factor beta = 0.16 angstroms(-1) observed for the ultrafast charge injection from the dye excited state into the conduction band of TiO2 is attributed to the coupling of electron tunneling with nonequilibrium vibrations redistributed on the bridge

  4. The electron-furfural scattering dynamics for 63 energetically open electronic states.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Romarly F; do N Varella, Márcio T; Bettega, Márcio H F; Neves, Rafael F C; Lopes, Maria Cristina A; Blanco, Francisco; García, Gustavo; Jones, Darryl B; Brunger, Michael J; Lima, Marco A P

    2016-03-28

    We report on integral-, momentum transfer- and differential cross sections for elastic and electronically inelastic electron collisions with furfural (C5H4O2). The calculations were performed with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (N(open)) at either the static-exchange (N(open) ch-SE) or the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (N(open) ch-SEP) approximation was employed to calculate the scattering amplitudes at impact energies lying between 5 eV and 50 eV, using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from the 1ch-SEP up to the 63ch-SE level of approximation depending on the energy considered. For elastic scattering, we found very good overall agreement at higher energies among our SMCPP cross sections, our IAM-SCAR+I cross sections and the experimental data for furan (a molecule that differs from furfural only by the substitution of a hydrogen atom in furan with an aldehyde functional group). This is a good indication that our elastic cross sections are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for most of the investigated intermediate energies. However, although the present application represents the most sophisticated calculation performed with the SMCPP method thus far, the inelastic cross sections, even for the low lying energy states, are still not completely converged for intermediate and higher energies. We discuss possible reasons leading to this discrepancy and point out what further steps need to be undertaken in order to improve the agreement between the calculated and measured cross sections. PMID:27036451

  5. Planar wire array dynamics and radiation scaling at multi-MA levels on the Saturn pulsed power generator.

    SciTech Connect

    Chuvatin, Alexander S.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Ampleford, David J.; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rudakov, Leonid I.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S.; Jones, Michael C.

    2008-08-01

    Planar wire arrays are studied at 3-6 MA on the Saturn pulsed power generator as potential drivers of compact hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion studies. Comparison with zero-dimensional modeling suggests that there is significant trailing mass. The modeled energy coupled from the generator cannot generally explain the energy in the main x-ray pulse. Preliminary comparison at 1-6 MA indicates sub-quadratic scaling of x-ray power in a manner similar to compact cylindrical wire arrays. Time-resolved pinhole images are used to study the implosion dynamics.

  6. Planar Wire Array Dynamics and Radiation Scaling at Multi-MA Levels on the Saturn Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ampleford, D. J.; Coverdale, C. A.; Waisman, E. M.; Vesey, R. A.; Jones, M. C.; Esaulov, A. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2009-01-21

    Planar wire arrays are studied at 3-6 MA on the Saturn pulsed power generator as potential drivers of compact hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion studies. Comparison with zero-dimensional modeling suggests that there is significant trailing mass. The modeled energy coupled from the generator cannot generally explain the energy in the main x-ray pulse. Preliminary comparison at 1-6 MA indicates sub-quadratic scaling of x-ray power in a manner similar to compact cylindrical wire arrays. Time-resolved pinhole images are used to study the implosion dynamics.

  7. Eldecalcitol improves muscle strength and dynamic balance in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis: an open-label randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kimio; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Hongo, Michio; Kasukawa, Yuji; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-09-01

    The antifracture efficacy of vitamin D in osteoporosis is due to its direct action on bones and indirect extraskeletal effects to prevent falls. Eldecalcitol is an analog of active vitamin D3 that improves bone mineral density and reduces the risk of osteoporotic fractures. However, the effects of eldecalcitol on muscle strength and static and dynamic postural balance are unclear. In this open-label randomized controlled study, we assessed the effects of eldecalcitol on muscle strength and static and dynamic postural balance in 50 postmenopausal women (mean age 74 years) with osteoporosis treated with bisphosphonate. Participants were randomly divided into a bisphosphonate group (alendronate at 35 mg/week; n = 25) or an eldecalcitol group (eldecalcitol at 0.75 μg/day and alendronate at 35 mg/week; n = 25) and were followed up for 6 months. Trunk muscle strength, including back extensor strength and iliopsoas muscle strength, was measured. Static standing balance was evaluated and the one leg standing test was performed to assess static postural balance. Dynamic sitting balance was evaluated and the 10-m walk test, functional reach test, and timed up and go test were performed to assess dynamic postural balance. At 6 months, there were no significant changes in any measure of muscle strength or balance in the bisphosphonate group, whereas eldecalcitol significantly increased back extensor strength (p = 0.012) and iliopsoas muscle strength (p = 0.035). Eldecalcitol also significantly improved findings on the timed up and go test (p = 0.001) and dynamic sitting balance (p = 0.015) at 6 months. These results with eldecalcitol may have an impact on prevention of falls.

  8. Libra: An open-Source "methodology discovery" library for quantum and classical dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Alexey V

    2016-06-30

    The "methodology discovery" library for quantum and classical dynamics simulations is presented. One of the major foci of the code is on nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations with model and atomistic Hamiltonians treated on the same footing. The essential aspects of the methodology, design philosophy, and implementation are discussed. The code capabilities are demonstrated on a number of model and atomistic test cases. It is demonstrated how the library can be used to study methodologies for quantum and classical dynamics, as well as a tool for performing detailed atomistic studies of nonadiabatic processes in molecular systems. The source code and additional information are available on the Web at http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~alexeyak/libra/index.html. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27016373

  9. Dynamic fracture-toughness evaluation by measurement of CTOD (Crack Tip Opening Displacement). Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, W.N.; Douglas, A.S.; Shapiro, J.M.

    1988-03-15

    Quantification of the dynamic fracture toughness of structural materials is essential to a wide range of problems - from nuclear accidents to ordnance applications. However, the difficulties associated with accurate measurements of cracks under dynamic loading are considerable. Thus there are no standardized procedures and few reliable results. This work describes a systematic study of the dynamic fracture toughness of SAE-01 tool steel, 4340 and HY100 steels and a tungsten, using the ISDG (Interferometric Strain/Displacement Gage) system which has very-high-frequency resolution. The major advantage of the method is that information is obtained very close to the crack tip, so that stress wave loading effects are accounted for. A detailed error analysis gives an uncertainty of -10% to +20% in the determination of fracture toughness, which compares with + or - 20% for published work.

  10. Dynamic Server-Based KML Code Generator Method for Level-of-Detail Traversal of Geospatial Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxes, Gregory; Mixon, Brian; Linger, TIm

    2013-01-01

    Web-based geospatial client applications such as Google Earth and NASA World Wind must listen to data requests, access appropriate stored data, and compile a data response to the requesting client application. This process occurs repeatedly to support multiple client requests and application instances. Newer Web-based geospatial clients also provide user-interactive functionality that is dependent on fast and efficient server responses. With massively large datasets, server-client interaction can become severely impeded because the server must determine the best way to assemble data to meet the client applications request. In client applications such as Google Earth, the user interactively wanders through the data using visually guided panning and zooming actions. With these actions, the client application is continually issuing data requests to the server without knowledge of the server s data structure or extraction/assembly paradigm. A method for efficiently controlling the networked access of a Web-based geospatial browser to server-based datasets in particular, massively sized datasets has been developed. The method specifically uses the Keyhole Markup Language (KML), an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGS) standard used by Google Earth and other KML-compliant geospatial client applications. The innovation is based on establishing a dynamic cascading KML strategy that is initiated by a KML launch file provided by a data server host to a Google Earth or similar KMLcompliant geospatial client application user. Upon execution, the launch KML code issues a request for image data covering an initial geographic region. The server responds with the requested data along with subsequent dynamically generated KML code that directs the client application to make follow-on requests for higher level of detail (LOD) imagery to replace the initial imagery as the user navigates into the dataset. The approach provides an efficient data traversal path and mechanism that can be

  11. Dynamics of the microstructure of current channels and the generation of high-energy electrons in nanosecond discharges in air

    SciTech Connect

    Karelin, V. I.; Trenkin, A. A. Fedoseev, I. G.

    2015-12-15

    The results of the three-dimensional numerical simulation of the dynamics of the microstructure of high-voltage nanosecond discharges in air at atmospheric pressure are presented. It is established that the fast (at a time of ≈10 ns) broadening and significant decrease in the gas concentration in the microchannels occur as a result of the ohmic heating of microchannels with the diameter of 1–30 μm. It was shown that the broadening of microchannels in a nanosecond diffusive discharge provides an increase in the ratio of the electric field strength to the gas concentration in microchannels to values sufficient for the generation highenergy electron beams and X-ray bremsstrahlung in them. Features of the dynamics of the system of microchannels and its effect on the efficiency of the generation of high-energy electrons in discharges developing in the microstructuring regime of the current channels are considered.

  12. Hybrid MPI/OpenMP Implementation of the ORAC Molecular Dynamics Program for Generalized Ensemble and Fast Switching Alchemical Simulations.

    PubMed

    Procacci, Piero

    2016-06-27

    We present a new release (6.0β) of the ORAC program [Marsili et al. J. Comput. Chem. 2010, 31, 1106-1116] with a hybrid OpenMP/MPI (open multiprocessing message passing interface) multilevel parallelism tailored for generalized ensemble (GE) and fast switching double annihilation (FS-DAM) nonequilibrium technology aimed at evaluating the binding free energy in drug-receptor system on high performance computing platforms. The production of the GE or FS-DAM trajectories is handled using a weak scaling parallel approach on the MPI level only, while a strong scaling force decomposition scheme is implemented for intranode computations with shared memory access at the OpenMP level. The efficiency, simplicity, and inherent parallel nature of the ORAC implementation of the FS-DAM algorithm, project the code as a possible effective tool for a second generation high throughput virtual screening in drug discovery and design. The code, along with documentation, testing, and ancillary tools, is distributed under the provisions of the General Public License and can be freely downloaded at www.chim.unifi.it/orac . PMID:27231982

  13. Storage Dynamics and Non-Linear Connectivity between Landscape Units Control Runoff Generation and Stream Water Age Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulsby, C.; Birkel, C.; Geris, J.; Tetzlaff, D.

    2015-12-01

    We assess the influence of storage dynamics and non-linearities in hydrological connectivity on runoff generation and stream water ages, using a long-term record of daily isotopes in precipitation and stream flow. These were used to test a parsimonious tracer-aided runoff model for a Scottish catchment. The model tracks tracers and the ages of water fluxes through and between conceptual stores representing steeper hillslopes, dynamically saturated riparian peatlands and deeper groundwater (i.e. the main landscape units involved in runoff generation). Storage is largest in groundwater and on the steep hillslopes, though most dynamic mixing occurs in smaller stores in the riparian peat. The model also couples the ecohydrological effects of different vegetation communities in contrasting landscape units, by estimating evaporation, resulting moisture deficits and the ages of evaporated waters, which also affect the generation and age of runoff. Both stream flow and isotope variations are well-captured by the model, and the simulated storage and tracer dynamics in the main landscape units are consistent with independent measurements. The model predicts the mean age of runoff as ~1.8 years. On a daily basis, this varies from ~1 month in storm events, when younger waters draining the riparian peatland dominate, to around 4 years in dry periods, when groundwater sustains flow. Hydrological connectivity between the units varies non-linearly with storage which depends upon antecedent conditions and event characteristics. This, in turn, determines the spatial distribution of flow paths and the integration of their contrasting non-stationary ages. Improving the representation of storage dynamics and quantifying the ages of water fluxes in such models gives a more complete conceptualisation of the importance of the soil water fluxes in critical zone processes and a framework for tracking diffuse pollutants in water quality assessment.

  14. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ventturini, M.; Corlett, J.; Emma, P.; Papadopoulos, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Qiang, J.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Steier, C.; Sun, C.; Wells, R.

    2012-05-18

    We present recent progress toward the design of a super-conducting linac driver for a high-repetition rate FEL-based soft x-ray light source. The machine is designed to accept beams generated by the APEX photo-cathode gun operating with MHz-range repetition rate and deliver them to an array of SASE and seeded FEL beamlines. We review the current baseline design and report results of beam dynamics studies.

  15. The EF-Hand Ca2+ Binding Protein MICU Choreographs Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carraretto, Luca; Teardo, Enrico; Cendron, Laura; Füßl, Magdalena; Doccula, Fabrizio G.; Szabò, Ildikò

    2015-01-01

    Plant organelle function must constantly adjust to environmental conditions, which requires dynamic coordination. Ca2+ signaling may play a central role in this process. Free Ca2+ dynamics are tightly regulated and differ markedly between the cytosol, plastid stroma, and mitochondrial matrix. The mechanistic basis of compartment-specific Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here, we studied the function of At-MICU, an EF-hand protein of Arabidopsis thaliana with homology to constituents of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter machinery in mammals. MICU binds Ca2+ and localizes to the mitochondria in Arabidopsis. In vivo imaging of roots expressing a genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor in the mitochondrial matrix revealed that lack of MICU increased resting concentrations of free Ca2+ in the matrix. Furthermore, Ca2+ elevations triggered by auxin and extracellular ATP occurred more rapidly and reached higher maximal concentrations in the mitochondria of micu mutants, whereas cytosolic Ca2+ signatures remained unchanged. These findings support the idea that a conserved uniporter system, with composition and regulation distinct from the mammalian machinery, mediates mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in plants under in vivo conditions. They further suggest that MICU acts as a throttle that controls Ca2+ uptake by moderating influx, thereby shaping Ca2+ signatures in the matrix and preserving mitochondrial homeostasis. Our results open the door to genetic dissection of mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling in plants. PMID:26530087

  16. Nonequilibrium evolution of a {open_quotes}tsunami,{close_quotes} a high multiplicity initial quantum state: Dynamical symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; de Vega, H.J.; Holman, R.; Kumar, S.P.; Pisarski, R.D.

    1998-03-01

    We propose to study the nonequilibrium features of heavy-ion collisions by following the evolution of an initial state with a large number of quanta with a distribution around a momentum {vert_bar}{rvec k}{sub 0}{vert_bar} corresponding to a {ital thin spherical shell} in momentum space, a {open_quotes}tsunami.{close_quotes} An O(N)({rvec {Phi}}{sup 2}){sup 2} model field theory in the large N limit is used as a framework to study the nonperturbative aspects of the nonequilibrium dynamics including a resummation of the effects of the medium (the initial particle distribution). In a theory where the symmetry is spontaneously broken in the absence of the medium, when the initial number of particles per correlation volume is chosen to be larger than a critical value the medium effects can restore the symmetry of the initial state. We show that if one begins with such a symmetry-restored, nonthermal, initial state, nonperturbative effects automatically induce spinodal instabilities leading to a {ital dynamical} breaking of the symmetry. As a result there is explosive particle production and a redistribution of the particles towards low momentum due to the nonlinearity of the dynamics. The asymptotic behavior displays the onset of Bose condensation of pions and the equation of state at long times is that of an ultrarelativistic gas although the momentum distribution is {ital nonthermal}. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Efficient Use of an Adapting Database of Ab Initio Calculations To Generate Accurate Newtonian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, M C; Jones, R E

    2016-02-01

    We develop and demonstrate a method to efficiently use density functional calculations to drive classical dynamics of complex atomic and molecular systems. The method has the potential to scale to systems and time scales unreachable with current ab initio molecular dynamics schemes. It relies on an adapting dataset of independently computed Hellmann-Feynman forces for atomic configurations endowed with a distance metric. The metric on configurations enables fast database lookup and robust interpolation of the stored forces. We discuss mechanisms for the database to adapt to the needs of the evolving dynamics, while maintaining accuracy, and other extensions of the basic algorithm.

  18. Efficient Use of an Adapting Database of Ab Initio Calculations To Generate Accurate Newtonian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, M C; Jones, R E

    2016-02-01

    We develop and demonstrate a method to efficiently use density functional calculations to drive classical dynamics of complex atomic and molecular systems. The method has the potential to scale to systems and time scales unreachable with current ab initio molecular dynamics schemes. It relies on an adapting dataset of independently computed Hellmann-Feynman forces for atomic configurations endowed with a distance metric. The metric on configurations enables fast database lookup and robust interpolation of the stored forces. We discuss mechanisms for the database to adapt to the needs of the evolving dynamics, while maintaining accuracy, and other extensions of the basic algorithm. PMID:26669825

  19. An Open-Access Educational Tool for Teaching Motion Dynamics in Multi-Axis Servomotor Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Guillen, J. R.; de Jesus Rangel-Magdaleno, J.; de Jesus Romero-Troncoso, R.; Osornio-Rios, R. A.; Guevara-Gonzalez, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Servomotors are widely used in computerized numerically controlled (CNC) machines, hence motion control is a major topic covered in undergraduate/graduate engineering courses. Despite the fact that several syllabi include the motion dynamics topic in their courses, there are neither suitable tools available for designing and simulating multi-axis…

  20. Direct observation of magnetization dynamics generated by nanocontact spin-torque vortex oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keatley, P. S.; Sani, S. R.; Hrkac, G.; Mohseni, S. M.; Dürrenfeld, P.; Loughran, T. H. J.; Åkerman, J.; Hicken, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    Time-resolved scanning Kerr microscopy has been used to directly image the magnetization dynamics of nanocontact (NC) spin-torque vortex oscillators (STVOs) when phase locked to an injected microwave (rf) current. The Kerr images reveal free-layer magnetization dynamics that extend outside the NC footprint, where they cannot be detected electrically, but which are crucial to phase-lock STVOs that share common magnetic layers. For a single NC, dynamics were observed not only when the STVO frequency was fully locked to that of the rf current, but also for a partially locked state characterized by periodic changes in the core trajectory at the rf frequency. For a pair of NCs, we explore the correlation between the spatial character of injection-locked dynamics and the free-running spectra. Insight gained from these images may improve understanding of the conditions required for mutual phase locking of multiple STVOs, and hence enhanced microwave power emission.