Science.gov

Sample records for dynamics features caused

  1. Dynamic features of combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic features of combustion are discussed for four important cases: ignition, inflammation, explosion, and detonation. Ignition, the initiation of a self-sustained exothermic process, is considered in the simplest case of a closed thermodynamic system and its stochastic distribution. Inflammation, the initiation and propagation of self-sustained flames, is presented for turbulent flow. Explosion, the dynamic effects caused by the deposition of exothermic energy in a compressible medium, is illustrated by self-similar blast waves with energy deposition at the front and the adiabatic non-self-similar wave. Detonation, the most comprehensive illustration of all the dynamic effects of combustion, is discussed with a phenomenological account of the development and structure of the wave.

  2. Dynamic Features for Iris Recognition.

    PubMed

    da Costa, R M; Gonzaga, A

    2012-08-01

    The human eye is sensitive to visible light. Increasing illumination on the eye causes the pupil of the eye to contract, while decreasing illumination causes the pupil to dilate. Visible light causes specular reflections inside the iris ring. On the other hand, the human retina is less sensitive to near infra-red (NIR) radiation in the wavelength range from 800 nm to 1400 nm, but iris detail can still be imaged with NIR illumination. In order to measure the dynamic movement of the human pupil and iris while keeping the light-induced reflexes from affecting the quality of the digitalized image, this paper describes a device based on the consensual reflex. This biological phenomenon contracts and dilates the two pupils synchronously when illuminating one of the eyes by visible light. In this paper, we propose to capture images of the pupil of one eye using NIR illumination while illuminating the other eye using a visible-light pulse. This new approach extracts iris features called "dynamic features (DFs)." This innovative methodology proposes the extraction of information about the way the human eye reacts to light, and to use such information for biometric recognition purposes. The results demonstrate that these features are discriminating features, and, even using the Euclidean distance measure, an average accuracy of recognition of 99.1% was obtained. The proposed methodology has the potential to be "fraud-proof," because these DFs can only be extracted from living irises.

  3. Sedimentation dynamics about salt features

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrie, A.; Blake, D.W.

    1985-02-01

    Detailed side-scan sonar and gridded bathymetric surveys on continental margins reveal the existence of numerous submarine canyons. Recently published compilations of current velocities in submarine canyons indicate that alternating and undirectionaly flows often exceed 20-30 cm/sec with peak velocities ranging from 70 to 100 cm/sec. Current meters attached to the ocean floor have been lost at current velocities of 190 cm/sec. Such velocities are ample to transport sand-size sediments. The results of DSDP Leg 96 show the existence of massive sands and gravels on the Louisiana slope, deposited during the last glacial advance. Thus, present physical oceanographic data may be an analog to conditions during glacially induced lowered sea levels. Salt ridges and domes underlie much of the Louisiana slope, determining morphology. Submarine canyons lace the slope. Given a prograding shelf, the net sediment transport routes will be down the submarine canyons. Sediment deposition patterns around the salt ridges and domes include parallel-bedded foredrifts on the upslope side, lee drifts on the downslope side, and moats along the lateral flanks of the salt features. Major differences exist between the sedimentation patterns around a ridge and a dome. The size and shape of the flow pattern will determine whether there can be a flow over the salt feature with a resulting turbulent wave that may influence sedimentation. Sedimentation patterns about salt features on the present slope should be applicable to similar paleoenvironments.

  4. Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois; Farrar, Charles; Park, Gyuhae; Nishio, Mayuko; Worden, Keith; Takeda, Nobuo

    2010-11-08

    This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

  5. Feature Extraction for Structural Dynamics Model Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles; Nishio, Mayuko; Hemez, Francois; Stull, Chris; Park, Gyuhae; Cornwell, Phil; Figueiredo, Eloi; Luscher, D. J.; Worden, Keith

    2016-01-13

    As structural dynamics becomes increasingly non-modal, stochastic and nonlinear, finite element model-updating technology must adopt the broader notions of model validation and uncertainty quantification. For example, particular re-sampling procedures must be implemented to propagate uncertainty through a forward calculation, and non-modal features must be defined to analyze nonlinear data sets. The latter topic is the focus of this report, but first, some more general comments regarding the concept of model validation will be discussed.

  6. Dynamic feature analysis in bidirectional pedestrian flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xia, Yang; Winnie, Daamen; Serge, Paul Hoogendoorn; Hai-Rong, Dong; Xiu-Ming, Yao

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of dynamic features of pedestrian flows is one of the most exciting topics in pedestrian dynamics. This paper focuses on the effect of homogeneity and heterogeneity in three parameters of the social force model, namely desired velocity, reaction time, and body size, on the moving dynamics of bidirectional pedestrian flows in the corridors. The speed and its deviation in free flows are investigated. Simulation results show that the homogeneous higher desired speed which is less than a critical threshold, shorter reaction time or smaller body size results in higher speed of flows. The free dynamics is more sensitive to the heterogeneity in desired speed than that in reaction time or in body size. In particular, an inner lane formation is observed in normal lanes. Furthermore, the breakdown probability and the start time of breakdown are focused on. This study reveals that the sizes of homogeneous desired speed, reaction time or body size play more important roles in affecting the breakdown than the heterogeneities in these three parameters do. Project supported jointly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61233001) and the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2013JBZ007).

  7. Chaotic neuron dynamics, synchronization and feature binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arecchi, F. T.

    2004-07-01

    Neuroscience studies how a large collection of coupled neurons combines external data with internal memories into coherent patterns of meaning. Such a process is called “feature binding”, insofar as the coherent patterns combine together features which are extracted separately by specialized cells, but which do not make sense as isolated items. A powerful conjecture, with experimental confirmation, is that feature binding implies the mutual synchronization of axonal spike trains in neurons which can be far away and yet contribute to a well defined perception by sharing the same time code. Based on recent investigations of homoclinic chaotic systems, and how they mutually synchronize, a novel conjecture on the dynamics of the single neuron is formulated. Homoclinic chaos implies the recurrent return of the dynamical trajectory to a saddle focus, in whose neighbourhood the system susceptibility (response to an external perturbation) is very high and hence it is very easy to lock to an external stimulus. Thus homoclinic chaos appears as the easiest way to encode information by a train of equal spikes occurring at erratic times. In conventional measurements we read the number indicated by a meter's pointer and assign to the measured object a set position corresponding to that number. On the contrary, a time code requires a decision time T¯ sufficiently longer than the minimal interspike separation t1, so that the total number of different set elements is related in some way to the size T¯/t 1. In neuroscience it has been shown that T¯≃200 ms while t 1≃3 ms. In a sensory layer of the brain neocortex an external stimulus spreads over a large assembly of neurons building up a collective state, thus synchronization of trains of different individual neurons is the basis of a coherent perception. The percept space can be given a metric structure by introducing a distance measure. This distance is conjugate of the duration time in the sense that an uncertainty

  8. Simulating dynamical features of escape panic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk; Farkas, Illés; Vicsek, Tamás

    2000-09-01

    One of the most disastrous forms of collective human behaviour is the kind of crowd stampede induced by panic, often leading to fatalities as people are crushed or trampled. Sometimes this behaviour is triggered in life-threatening situations such as fires in crowded buildings; at other times, stampedes can arise during the rush for seats or seemingly without cause. Although engineers are finding ways to alleviate the scale of such disasters, their frequency seems to be increasing with the number and size of mass events. But systematic studies of panic behaviour and quantitative theories capable of predicting such crowd dynamics are rare. Here we use a model of pedestrian behaviour to investigate the mechanisms of (and preconditions for) panic and jamming by uncoordinated motion in crowds. Our simulations suggest practical ways to prevent dangerous crowd pressures. Moreover, we find an optimal strategy for escape from a smoke-filled room, involving a mixture of individualistic behaviour and collective `herding' instinct.

  9. [Epidemiological features and causes of railway traffic accidents].

    PubMed

    Zhou, D S

    1991-01-01

    This article reports on epidemiological features of railway traffic accidents and factors influencing traffic safety. An analysis of various kinds of railway traffic accidents over 30 years in Nanjing Railway Branch, Showed that railway traffic accidents have become a sort of modern social disease, and had particular epidemiological features. The peak of the epidemic curve appeared cyclically and had a close relation to social disturbances, Frequency of accident occurrence was the highest in the first season (period of spring transport) and the third season (period of high temperature) of the year thus most accidents happen in February and August. Most accidents occurred on Fridays and least on Mondays. Distribution of accidents had obvious "antenna" phenomenon in round graph which had a 24-hour cycle. Analysing the multiple factors influencing traffic safety, the results showed that the upper-limit-age of a train driver should not be more than 50 years old; The phenomenon "bathtub" between personage accident rate and age must be taken seriously. More attention should be paid to the psychological aspects when recruiting train drivers. In our country, it is urgent to set up standard of psychomovement function for choosing train locomotive drivers. Fatigue was one of the direct causes resulting in accident occurrences. No statistical correlation was found between biorhythm and accident occurrence.

  10. Interleukin-11 alters placentation and causes preeclampsia features in mice

    PubMed Central

    Winship, Amy L.; Koga, Kaori; Menkhorst, Ellen; Van Sinderen, Michelle; Rainczuk, Katarzyna; Nagai, Miwako; Cuman, Carly; Yap, Joanne; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Simmons, David; Young, Morag J.; Dimitriadis, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific disorder characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 wk gestation. Abnormal extravillous trophoblast (EVT) invasion and remodeling of uterine spiral arterioles is thought to contribute to PE development. Interleukin-11 (IL11) impedes human EVT invasion in vitro and is elevated in PE decidua in women. We demonstrate that IL11 administered to mice causes development of PE features. Immunohistochemistry shows IL11 compromises trophoblast invasion, spiral artery remodeling, and placentation, leading to increased systolic blood pressure (SBP), proteinuria, and intrauterine growth restriction, although nonpregnant mice were unaffected. Real-time PCR array analysis identified pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPPA2), associated with PE in women, as an IL11 regulated target. IL11 increased PAPPA2 serum and placental tissue levels in mice. In vitro, IL11 compromised primary human EVT invasion, whereas siRNA knockdown of PAPPA2 alleviated the effect. Genes regulating uterine natural killer (uNK) recruitment and differentiation were down-regulated and uNK cells were reduced after IL11 treatment in mice. IL11 withdrawal in mice at onset of PE features reduced SBP and proteinuria to control levels and alleviated placental labyrinth defects. In women, placental IL11 immunostaining levels increased in PE pregnancies and in serum collected from women before development of early-onset PE, shown by ELISA. These results indicate that elevated IL11 levels result in physiological changes at the maternal–fetal interface, contribute to abnormal placentation, and lead to the development of PE. Targeting placental IL11 may provide a new treatment option for PE. PMID:26655736

  11. Geomagnetic Disturbances Caused by Internal Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneman, G.

    1984-01-01

    It is commonly believed that geomagnetic disturbances are caused by external influences connected with the solar wind. The 27-day recurrence of perturbations seems to be a strong hint for this interaction. But frequently geomagnetic disturbances occur without any relation to sunspot numbers or radiowave fluxes. This was one of the reasons for introducing hypothetical M-regions on the Sun and their relation to solar wind activities. Only one half of the variance of the geomagnetic AL-index could be related to the solar wind. Therefore it is concluded that internal processes of the magnetosphere were responsible for additional geomagnetic activity. Arguments, which might lead to the suggestion of geomagnetic disturbances as being caused by internal atmospheric dynamics are discussed and a rather preliminary scenario of those processes is proposed.

  12. Influence of dynamic and thermodynamic features on Indian summer monsoon

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, C.A.; Leena, P.; Priya, P.

    1996-12-31

    Indian summer monsoon plays vital role in the economy of the country. Being an agricultural country, the onset phase of monsoon is important since beginning of cultivation depends on rain-fed irrigation. Summer heating of the Asian land mass and subsequent differential heating between peninsular and north India are considered to be the principal cause for the summer monsoon. An east-west synoptic scale zonal circulation is observed over the Indian region during monsoon period which is similar to the planetary scale circulation. The ascending branch of this circulation is over northwest India and the descending branch is over the northeast India. This east-west zonal circulation is closely related to the monsoon activity. During the onset phase of monsoon spectacular changes occur in the dynamical and thermodynamic structure of the atmosphere. In this paper an attempt is made to diagnose the features of the atmosphere over the Indian region employing dynamical and thermodynamical parameters to as to bring out the relationship between structure of atmosphere and strength of monsoon. Preliminary results indicate that the strength of monsoon and its various epochs are influenced by dynamic and thermodynamic features of the atmosphere.

  13. Interplay of static and dynamic features in biomimetic smart ears.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Mittu; Meymand, Sajjad Zeinoddini; Müller, Rolf

    2013-06-01

    Horseshoe bats (family Rhinolophidae) have sophisticated biosonar systems with outer ears (pinnae) that are characterized by static local shape features as well as dynamic non-rigid changes to their overall shapes. Here, biomimetic prototypes fabricated from elastic rubber sheets have been used to study the impact of these static and dynamic features on the acoustic device characteristics. The basic shape of the prototypes was an obliquely truncated horn augmented with three static local shape features: vertical ridge, pinna-rim incision and frontal flap (antitragus). The prototype shape was deformed dynamically using a one-point actuation mechanism to produce a biomimetic bending of the prototype's tip. In isolation, the local shape features had little impact on the device beampattern. However, strong interactions were observed between these features and the overall deformation. The further the prototype tip was bent down, the stronger the beampatterns associated with combinations of multiple features differed from the upright configuration in the prominence of sidelobes. This behavior was qualitatively similar to numerical predictions for horseshoe bats. Hence, the interplay between static and dynamic features could be a bioinspired principle for affecting large changes through the dynamic manipulations of interactions that are sensitive to small geometrical changes.

  14. Modeling Statistical and Dynamic Features of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydelek, P. A.; Suyehiro, K.; Sacks, S. I.; Smith, D. E.; Takanami, T.; Hatano, T.

    2015-12-01

    The cellular automaton earthquake model by Sacks and Rydelek (1995) is extended to explain spatio-temporal change in seismicity with the regional tectonic stress buildup. Our approach is to apply a simple Coulomb failure law to our model space of discrete cells, which successfully reproduces empirical laws (e.g. Gutenberg-Richter law) and dynamic failure characteristics (e.g. stress drop vs. magnitude and asperities) of earthquakes. Once the stress condition supersedes the Coulomb threshold on a discrete cell, its accumulated stress is transferred to only neighboring cells, which cascades to more neighboring cells to create various size ruptures. A fundamental point here is the cellular view of the continuous earth. We suggest the cell size varies regionally with the maturity of the faults of the region. Seismic gaps (e.g. Mogi, 1979) and changes in seismicity such as indicated by b-values have been known but poorly understood. There have been reports of magnitude dependent seismic quiescence before large event at plate boundaries and intraplate (Smith et al., 2013). Recently, decreases in b-value for large earthquakes have been reported (Nanjo et al., 2012) as anticipated from lab experiments (Mogi, 1963). Our model reproduces the b-value decrease towards eventual large earthquake (increasing tectonic stress and its heterogeneous distribution). We succeeded in reproducing the cut-off of larger events above some threshold magnitude (M3-4) by slightly increasing the Coulomb failure level for only 2 % or more of the highly stressed cells. This is equivalent to reducing the pore pressure in these distributed cells. We are working on the model to introduce the recovery of pore pressure incorporating the observed orders of magnitude higher permeability fault zones than the surrounding rock (Lockner, 2009) allowing for a large earthquake to be generated. Our interpretation requires interactions of pores and fluids. We suggest heterogeneously distributed patches hardened

  15. Massive posttraumatic bleeding: epidemiology, causes, clinical features, and therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2013-02-01

    Bleeding typically results as a consequence of derangements of primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis, or both, and can be dramatically amplified by the presence of other predisposing conditions, especially inherited bleeding disorders. Life-threatening hemorrhages are, however, almost exclusively caused by penetrating wounds, blunt traumas of chest and abdomen, suicide attempts, amputations, bone fractures with concomitant injury to internal organs and blood vessels, and shearing forces from sudden rotation, violent flexion, extension, or deceleration injuries. The pathogenesis of posttraumatic bleeding is complex and multifaceted. The most dramatic phenomenon that always accompanies major hemorrhages is the abrupt and considerable loss of intravascular volume, that further leads to hypovolemic shock, also known as hemorrhagic shock, culminating with peripheral ischemia, especially in those tissues where oxygen delivery is more critical (i.e., central nervous system and myocardium). The mortality rate of severe posttraumatic bleeding can be as high as 50%, especially when an appropriate treatment is not established in a timely manner. The damage control sequence basically entails a four-step approach including damage control surgery, damage control resuscitation with fluid restoration, and hemocomponents administration, as well as correction of the coagulopathy with platelets, antifibrinolytic (e.g., tranexamic acid), and/or procoagulant agents such as fresh frozen plasma, prothrombin complex concentrate, or recombinant-activated Factor VII.

  16. Dynamic feature analysis for Voyager at the Image Processing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagi, G. M.; Lorre, J. J.; Jepsen, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    Voyager 1 and 2 were launched from Cape Kennedy to Jupiter, Saturn, and beyond on September 5, 1977 and August 20, 1977. The role of the Image Processing Laboratory is to provide the Voyager Imaging Team with the necessary support to identify atmospheric features (tiepoints) for Jupiter and Saturn data, and to analyze and display them in a suitable form. This support includes the software needed to acquire and store tiepoints, the hardware needed to interactively display images and tiepoints, and the general image processing environment necessary for decalibration and enhancement of the input images. The objective is an understanding of global circulation in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. Attention is given to the Voyager imaging subsystem, the Voyager imaging science objectives, hardware, software, display monitors, a dynamic feature study, decalibration, navigation, and data base.

  17. Vascular Features of Nail Psoriasis Using Dynamic Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Aldahan, Adam S.; Chen, Lucy L.; Fertig, Raymond M.; Holmes, Jon; Shah, Vidhi V.; Mlacker, Stephanie; Hsu, Vincent M.; Nouri, Keyvan; Tosti, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Background Nail psoriasis is a painful and disfiguring nail disease that often leads to invasive biopsies. Dermoscopy of the hyponychium can be useful in the diagnosis showing twisted coiled vessels. Structural features of nail psoriasis have been described with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Objectives To investigate vascular features of nail psoriasis using dynamic OCT. Methods This was an observational, prospective, controlled study in which psoriasis patients with psoriatic nail changes and healthy control patients underwent OCT imaging of the distal nail plate and proximal nail fold. Vertical and horizontal OCT images were analyzed to describe structural and vascular features and to quantify blood flow at depth. Results Sixteen psoriatic nails and 16 control nails were included. Psoriatic nails had significantly increased blood flow in the proximal nail fold at depths of 0.72 mm (p = 0.035) and 0.76 mm (p = 0.027). Nail thickness was significantly greater in psoriatic nails compared to control nails (p = 0.0016). Compared to control nails, psoriatic nails had dilated, disorganized blood vessels superficially in the proximal nail fold. Limitations The main limitation of our study is the relatively small sample size. Conclusions OCT can identify structural and vascular features specific to nail psoriasis. PMID:28232916

  18. Unique Features and Spacecraft Applications of Dynamic Isotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, B.

    1982-01-01

    The dynamic isotope power system represents the most recent attempt to develop a heat-engine generator for space electric power. A major objective in this most recent effort was to increase the power and to reduce the cost of nuclear space power systems to the point where the unique features of this power source could be brought to bear for Earth-orbit missions which could benefit therefrom. This objective was largely achieved; both weight and cost of the dynamic isotope systems are comparable to solar power systems. The dynamic isotope power system, designed for spacecraft requiring prime power in the 500-2000 W range, has been successfully built and ground tested. A number of studies, summarized herein, have demonstrated the advantages of using such a power system instead of the conventional solar system for a variety of Earth-orbit missions. These advantages stem from the unique nature of the dynamic isotope system, different in kind from solar power systems. As a result, in many cases, the spacecraft design can be significantly simplified and more closely harmonized with mission requirements. This overall advantage can be crucial in missions which have stringent pointing, stability, viewing, and/or positioning requirements.

  19. Small bowel obstruction in the emergency department: MDCT features of common and uncommon causes.

    PubMed

    Tirumani, Harika; Vassa, Ravi; Fasih, Najla; Ojili, Vijayanadh

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction is a common condition encountered by the radiologist in the emergency department. Though intestinal adhesions and obstructed hernias are the most common causes of acute small bowel obstruction, a variety of uncommon and rare conditions can cause acute and subacute bowel obstruction. Imaging plays a key role in the workup of bowel obstruction by identifying the cause, level, and degree of bowel obstruction. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the multi-detector computed tomography features of common and uncommon causes of acute and subacute small bowel obstruction.

  20. The Dynamics, Causes and Possible Prevention of Hepatitis E Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Nannyonga, Betty; Sumpter, David J. T.; Mugisha, Joseph Y. T.; Luboobi, Livingstone S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly spreading infectious diseases are a serious risk to public health. The dynamics and the factors causing outbreaks of these diseases can be better understood using mathematical models, which are fit to data. Here we investigate the dynamics of a Hepatitis E outbreak in the Kitgum region of northern Uganda during 2007 to 2009. First, we use the data to determine that is approximately 2.25 for the outbreak. Secondly, we use a model to estimate that the critical level of latrine and bore hole coverages needed to eradicate the epidemic is at least and respectively. Lastly, we further investigate the relationship between the co-infection factor for malaria and Hepatitis E on the value of for Hepatitis E. Taken together, these results provide us with a better understanding of the dynamics and possible causes of Hepatitis E outbreaks. PMID:22911752

  1. Bloch's law and the dynamics of feature fusion.

    PubMed

    Scharnowski, Frank; Hermens, Frouke; Herzog, Michael H

    2007-08-01

    How the visual brain integrates temporally dispersed information is an open question. Often, it is assumed that the visual system simply sums light over a certain period of time (e.g. Bloch's law). However, in feature fusion, information presented later dominates, suggesting complex temporal dynamics that cannot be described by simple energy summation. For example, if two verniers are presented in rapid succession at the same location, they are not perceived individually but they fuse to one single vernier. The perceived offset of the fused vernier is a combination of the offsets of the two presented verniers, with the later one dominating. Here, we show that indeed, Bloch's law does not hold across verniers in a sequence. However, changes in the luminance of a single vernier can be compensated for by changes in its duration in accordance with Bloch's law. We present a simple model to demonstrate that these findings can be explained by decaying neural activation.

  2. Dynamical features of the wake behind a pitching foil.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jian; Sun, Liping; Shao, Xueming

    2015-12-01

    As an extension of the previous study on the three-dimensional transition of the wake behind a pitching foil [Deng and Caulfield, Phys. Rev. E 91, 043017 (2015)], this investigation draws a comprehensive map on the pitching frequency-amplitude phase space. First, by fixing the Reynolds number at Re=1700 and varying the pitching frequency and amplitude, we identify three key dynamical features of the wake: first, the transition from Bénard-von Kármán (BvK) vortex streets to reverse BvK vortex streets, and second, the symmetry breaking of this reverse BvK wake leading to a deflected wake, and a further transition from two-dimensional (2D) wakes to three-dimensional (3D) wakes. The transition boundary between the 2D and 3D wakes lies top right of the wake deflection boundary, implying a correlation between the wake deflection and the 2D to 3D wake transition, confirming that this transition occurs after the wake deflection. This paper supports the previous extensive numerical studies under two-dimensional assumption at low Reynolds number, since it is indeed two dimensional except for the cases at very high pitching frequencies or large amplitudes. Furthermore, by three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNSs), we confirm the previous statement about the physical realizability of the short wavelength mode at β=30 (or λ(z)=0.21) for Re=1500. By comparing the three-dimensional vortical structures by DNSs with that from the reconstruction of Floquet modes, we find a good consistency between them, both exhibiting clear streamwise structures in the wake.

  3. Vascular Dynamics Aid a Coupled Neurovascular Network Learn Sparse Independent Features: A Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Ryan T.; Chhabria, Karishma; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vascular dynamics are generally thought to be controlled by neural activity in a unidirectional fashion. However, both computational modeling and experimental evidence point to the feedback effects of vascular dynamics on neural activity. Vascular feedback in the form of glucose and oxygen controls neuronal ATP, either directly or via the agency of astrocytes, which in turn modulates neural firing. Recently, a detailed model of the neuron-astrocyte-vessel system has shown how vasomotion can modulate neural firing. Similarly, arguing from known cerebrovascular physiology, an approach known as “hemoneural hypothesis” postulates functional modulation of neural activity by vascular feedback. To instantiate this perspective, we present a computational model in which a network of “vascular units” supplies energy to a neural network. The complex dynamics of the vascular network, modeled by a network of oscillators, turns neurons ON and OFF randomly. The informational consequence of such dynamics is explored in the context of an auto-encoder network. In the proposed model, each vascular unit supplies energy to a subset of hidden neurons of an autoencoder network, which constitutes its “projective field.” Neurons that receive adequate energy in a given trial have reduced threshold, and thus are prone to fire. Dynamics of the vascular network are governed by changes in the reconstruction error of the auto-encoder network, interpreted as the neuronal demand. Vascular feedback causes random inactivation of a subset of hidden neurons in every trial. We observe that, under conditions of desynchronized vascular dynamics, the output reconstruction error is low and the feature vectors learnt are sparse and independent. Our earlier modeling study highlighted the link between desynchronized vascular dynamics and efficient energy delivery in skeletal muscle. We now show that desynchronized vascular dynamics leads to efficient training in an auto-encoder neural

  4. Vascular Dynamics Aid a Coupled Neurovascular Network Learn Sparse Independent Features: A Computational Model.

    PubMed

    Philips, Ryan T; Chhabria, Karishma; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vascular dynamics are generally thought to be controlled by neural activity in a unidirectional fashion. However, both computational modeling and experimental evidence point to the feedback effects of vascular dynamics on neural activity. Vascular feedback in the form of glucose and oxygen controls neuronal ATP, either directly or via the agency of astrocytes, which in turn modulates neural firing. Recently, a detailed model of the neuron-astrocyte-vessel system has shown how vasomotion can modulate neural firing. Similarly, arguing from known cerebrovascular physiology, an approach known as "hemoneural hypothesis" postulates functional modulation of neural activity by vascular feedback. To instantiate this perspective, we present a computational model in which a network of "vascular units" supplies energy to a neural network. The complex dynamics of the vascular network, modeled by a network of oscillators, turns neurons ON and OFF randomly. The informational consequence of such dynamics is explored in the context of an auto-encoder network. In the proposed model, each vascular unit supplies energy to a subset of hidden neurons of an autoencoder network, which constitutes its "projective field." Neurons that receive adequate energy in a given trial have reduced threshold, and thus are prone to fire. Dynamics of the vascular network are governed by changes in the reconstruction error of the auto-encoder network, interpreted as the neuronal demand. Vascular feedback causes random inactivation of a subset of hidden neurons in every trial. We observe that, under conditions of desynchronized vascular dynamics, the output reconstruction error is low and the feature vectors learnt are sparse and independent. Our earlier modeling study highlighted the link between desynchronized vascular dynamics and efficient energy delivery in skeletal muscle. We now show that desynchronized vascular dynamics leads to efficient training in an auto-encoder neural network.

  5. Mutations in Twinkle primase-helicase cause Perrault syndrome with neurologic features

    PubMed Central

    Morino, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Yukiko; Walsh, Tom; Ohsawa, Ryosuke; Newby, Marta; Hiraki-Kamon, Keiko; Kuramochi, Masahito; Lee, Ming K.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Martin, Alan; Maruyama, Hirofumi; King, Mary-Claire

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic cause in 2 families of progressive ataxia, axonal neuropathy, hyporeflexia, and abnormal eye movements, accompanied by progressive hearing loss and ovarian dysgenesis, with a clinical diagnosis of Perrault syndrome. Methods: Whole-exome sequencing was performed to identify causative mutations in the 2 affected sisters in each family. Family 1 is of Japanese ancestry, and family 2 is of European ancestry. Results: In family 1, affected individuals were compound heterozygous for chromosome 10 open reading frame 2 (C10orf2) p.Arg391His and p.Asn585Ser. In family 2, affected individuals were compound heterozygous for C10orf2 p.Trp441Gly and p.Val507Ile. C10orf2 encodes Twinkle, a primase-helicase essential for replication of mitochondrial DNA. Conservation and structural modeling support the causality of the mutations. Twinkle is known also to harbor multiple mutations, nearly all missenses, leading to dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia type 3 and to recessive mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome 7, also known as infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia. Conclusions: Our study identifies Twinkle mutations as a cause of Perrault syndrome accompanied by neurologic features and expands the phenotypic spectrum of recessive disease caused by mutations in Twinkle. The phenotypic heterogeneity of conditions caused by Twinkle mutations and the genetic heterogeneity of Perrault syndrome call for genomic definition of these disorders. PMID:25355836

  6. Causes, Features, and Outcomes of Drug-Induced Liver Injury in 69 Children from China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Li, Yong-gang; Wang, Jia-bo; Liu, Shu-hong; Wang, Li-fu; Zhao, Yan-ling; Bai, Yun-feng; Wang, Zhong-xia; Li, Jian-yu; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a frequent cause of pediatric liver disease; however, the data on DILI are remarkably limited. Methods All 69 children hospitalized with DILI between January 2009 and December 2011 were retrospectively studied. Results A total of 37.7% of the children had medical histories of respiratory infection. The clinical injury patterns were as follows: hepatocellular 89.9%, cholestatic 2.9%, and mixed 7.2%. Liver biopsies from 55 children most frequently demonstrated chronic (47.3%) and acute (27.3%) hepatitis. Hypersensitivity features, namely, fever (31.9%), rash (21.7%), and eosinophilia (1.4%), were found. Twenty-four children (34.8%) developed chronic DILI. Antibiotics (26.1%) were the most common Western medicines (WMs) causing DILI, and the major implicated herbs were Ephedra sinica and Polygonum multiflorum. Compared with WM, the children whose injuries were caused by Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) showed a higher level of total bilirubin (1.4 mg/dL vs 16.6 mg/dL, p=0.004) and a longer prothrombin time (11.8 seconds vs 17.3 seconds, p=0.012), but they exhibited less chronic DILI (2/15 vs 18/39, p=0.031). Conclusions Most cases of DILI in children are caused by antibiotics or CHM used to treat respiratory infection and present with hepatocellular injury. Compared with WM, CHM is more likely to cause severe liver injury, but liver injury caused by CHM is curable. PMID:25717050

  7. Electrophysiologic features of SYT2 mutations causing a treatable neuromuscular syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, David N.; Bansagi, Boglarka; Hasan, Bashar Awwad Shiekh; Lofra, Robert Muni; Logigian, Eric L.; Sowden, Janet E.; Almodovar, Jorge L.; Littleton, J. Troy; Zuchner, Stephan; Horvath, Rita; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the clinical and electrophysiologic features of synaptotagmin II (SYT2) mutations, a novel neuromuscular syndrome characterized by foot deformities and fatigable ocular and lower limb weakness, and the response to modulators of acetylcholine release. Methods: We performed detailed clinical and neurophysiologic assessment in 2 multigenerational families with dominant SYT2 mutations (c.920T>G [p.Asp307Ala] and c.923G>A [p.Pro308Leu]). Serial clinical and electrophysiologic assessments were performed in members of one family treated first with pyridostigmine and then with 3,4-diaminopyridine. Results: Electrophysiologic testing revealed features indicative of a presynaptic deficit in neurotransmitter release with posttetanic potentiation lasting up to 60 minutes. Treatment with 3,4-diaminopyridine produced both a clinical benefit and an improvement in neuromuscular transmission. Conclusion: SYT2 mutations cause a novel and potentially treatable complex presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome characterized by motor neuropathy causing lower limb wasting and foot deformities, with reflex potentiation following exercise and a uniquely prolonged period of posttetanic potentiation. PMID:26519543

  8. Infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae: risk factors, clinical features and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Paño Pardo, José Ramón; Serrano Villar, Sergio; Ramos Ramos, Juan Carlos; Pintado, Vicente

    2014-12-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) can present as several infectious syndromes, but they primarily present as respiratory, urinary and blood stream infections (primary or catheter-related) that are usually found as nosocomial or healthcare-associated infections. The risk of CPE infection is influenced by individual factors, such as the length of the hospital stay and their exposure to invasive procedures and/or to antimicrobials. Of note, exposure to several antimicrobials, not only carbapenems, has been linked to CPE colonization; the duration of antibiotic exposure is one of the primary drivers of CPE acquisition. Individual risk factors must be considered jointly with the local epidemiology of these microorganisms in healthcare institutions. Overall, these infections have a high associated mortality. Mortality is influenced by host factors (e.g., age, comorbidity and immune deficiency), infection-related variables (e.g., type and severity of the infection) and treatment-related factors such as the delay in the initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and the use or monotherapy or combined antimicrobial therapy. Gaining knowledge concerning the epidemiology, clinical features and prognostic features of CPE infection could be useful for improving infection prevention and for the management of patients with infections caused by these microorganisms.

  9. Glycine decarboxylase deficiency causes neural tube defects and features of non-ketotic hyperglycinemia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Yun Jin; Leung, Kit-Yi; Savery, Dawn; Hutchin, Tim; Prunty, Helen; Heales, Simon; Brosnan, Margaret E.; Brosnan, John T.; Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D.E.

    2015-01-01

    Glycine decarboxylase (GLDC) acts in the glycine cleavage system to decarboxylate glycine and transfer a one-carbon unit into folate one-carbon metabolism. GLDC mutations cause a rare recessive disease non-ketotic hyperglycinemia (NKH). Mutations have also been identified in patients with neural tube defects (NTDs); however, the relationship between NKH and NTDs is unclear. We show that reduced expression of Gldc in mice suppresses glycine cleavage system activity and causes two distinct disease phenotypes. Mutant embryos develop partially penetrant NTDs while surviving mice exhibit post-natal features of NKH including glycine accumulation, early lethality and hydrocephalus. In addition to elevated glycine, Gldc disruption also results in abnormal tissue folate profiles, with depletion of one-carbon-carrying folates, as well as growth retardation and reduced cellular proliferation. Formate treatment normalizes the folate profile, restores embryonic growth and prevents NTDs, suggesting that Gldc deficiency causes NTDs through limiting supply of one-carbon units from mitochondrial folate metabolism. PMID:25736695

  10. Molecular definition of a region of chromosome 21 that causes features of the Down syndrome phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Korenberg, Julie R.; Kawashima, Hiroko; Pulst, Stefan-M.; Ikeuchi, T.; Ogasawara, N.; Yamamoto, K.; Schonberg, Steven A.; West, Ruth; Allen, Leland; Magenis, Ellen; Ikawa, K.; Taniguchi, N.; Epstein, Charles J.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is a major cause of mental retardation and heart disease. Although it is usually caused by the presence of an extra chromosome 21, a subset of the diagnostic features may be caused by the presence of only band 21q22. We now present evidence that significantly narrows the chromosomal region responsible for several of the phenotypic features of DS. We report a molecular and cytogenetic analysis of a three-generation family containing four individuals with clinical DS as manifested by the characteristic facial appearance, endocardial cushion defect, mental retardation, and probably dermatoglyphic changes. Autoradiograms of quantitative Southern blots of DNAs from two affected sisters, their carrier father, and a normal control were analyzed after hybridization with two to six unique DNA sequences regionally mapped on chromosome 21. These include cDNA probes for the genes for CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mapping in 21q22.1 and for the amyloid precursor protein (APP) mapping in 21q11.2-21.05, in addition to six probes for single-copy sequences: D21S46 in 21q11.2-21.05, D21S47 and SF57 in 21q22.1-22.3, and D21S39, D21S42, and D21S43 in 21q22.3. All sequences located in 21q22.3 were present in three copies in the affected individuals, whereas those located proximal to this region were present in only two copies. In the carrier father, all DNA sequences were present in only two copies. Cytogenetic analysis of affected individuals employing R and G banding of prometaphase preparations combined with in situ hybridization revealed a translocation of the region from very distal 21q22.1 to 21qter to chromosome 4q. Except for a possible phenotypic contribution from the deletion of chromosome band 4q35, these data provide a molecular definition of the minimal region of chromosome 21 which, when duplicated, generates the facial features, heart defect, a component of the mental retardation, and probably several of the dermatoglyphic changes of DS. This region

  11. Qualitative Features of High Lift Hovering Dynamics and Inertial Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, K.; Leben, R.; McArthur, J.; Mundt, M.

    1996-03-01

    Hovering aerodynamics, such as that practiced by dragonflys, hummingbirds, and certain other small insects, utilizes special patterns of vorticity to generate high lift flows. Such lift as we measure it computationally on the airfoil surface is in good agreement with downstream thrust measured in the physical laboratory. In this paper we examine the qualitative signatures of this dynamical system. A connection to the theory of inertial manifolds, more specifically the instance of time-dependent slow manifolds, is initiated. Additional interest attaches to the fact that in our compact computational domain, the forcing is on the boundary. Because of its highly oscillatory nature, in this dynamics one proceeds rapidly up the bifurcation ladder at relatively low Reynolds numbers. Thus, aside from its intrinsic interest, the hover model provides an attractive vehicle for a better understanding of dynamical system attractor dynamics and inertial manifold theory.

  12. Causal information quantification of prominent dynamical features of biological neurons.

    PubMed

    Montani, Fernando; Baravalle, Roman; Montangie, Lisandro; Rosso, Osvaldo A

    2015-12-13

    Neurons tend to fire a spike when they are near a bifurcation from the resting state to spiking activity. It is a delicate balance between noise, dynamic currents and initial condition that determines the phase diagram of neural activity. Many possible ionic mechanisms can be accounted for as the source of spike generation. Moreover, the biophysics and the dynamics behind it can usually be described through a phase diagram that involves membrane voltage versus the activation variable of the ionic channel. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to characterize the dynamics of this system, which takes into account the fine temporal 'structures' of the complex neuronal signals. This allows us to accurately distinguish the most fundamental properties of neurophysiological neurons that were previously described by Izhikevich considering the phase-space trajectory, using a time causal space: statistical complexity versus Fisher information versus Shannon entropy.

  13. Endophthalmitis Caused by Enterococcus faecalis: Clinical Features, Antibiotic Sensitivities, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuriyan, Ajay E.; Sridhar, Jayanth; Flynn, Harry W.; Smiddy, William E.; Albini, Thomas A.; Berrocal, Audina M.; Forster, Richard K.; Belin, Peter J.; Miller, Darlene

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical features, antibiotic sensitivities, and visual acuity (VA) outcomes of endophthalmitis caused by Enterococcus faecalis. Study Design Retrospective, observational case series. Methods A consecutive case series of patients with culture-positive endophthalmitis caused by E. faecalis between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2012 at an academic referral center. Results Of 14 patients identified, clinical settings included bleb-associated (n=8), post-cataract surgery (n=4), and post-penetrating keratoplasty (n=2). All isolates were vancomycin sensitive. When comparing isolates in the current study to isolates from 1990–2001, the minimal inhibitory concentration required to inhibit 90% of isolates (MIC 90, μg/ml) increased for ciprofloxacin (4 from 1), erythromycin (256 from 4), and penicillin (8 from 4), indicating higher levels of resistance. The MIC 90 remained the same for vancomycin (2) and linezolid (2). Presenting VA ranged from hand motion to no light perception. Initial treatment strategies were vitreous tap and intravitreal antibiotic injection (n=12) and pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotic injection (n=2). VA outcomes were ≤ 20/400 in 13 (93%) of 14 patients. Conclusions Although all isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid, higher MIC 90s for isolates in the current study, compared to isolates from 1990 to 2001, occurred with ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and penicillin. Despite prompt treatment, most patients had poor outcomes. PMID:25089354

  14. Immunological Features of Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Caused Pneumonia—Implications for Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2017-01-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the causative agent for high rates of hospitalizations due to viral bronchiolitis and pneumonia worldwide. Such a disease is characterized by an infection of epithelial cells of the distal airways that leads to inflammation and subsequently to respiratory failure. Upon infection, different pattern recognition receptors recognize the virus and trigger the innate immune response against the hRSV. Further, T cell immunity plays an important role for virus clearance. Based on animal studies, it is thought that the host immune response to hRSV is based on a biased T helper (Th)-2 and Th17 T cell responses with the recruitment of T cells, neutrophils and eosinophils to the lung, causing inflammation and tissue damage. In contrast, human immunity against RSV has been shown to be more complex with no definitive T cell polarization profile. Nowadays, only a humanized monoclonal antibody, known as palivizumab, is available to protect against hRSV infection in high-risk infants. However, such treatment involves several injections at a significantly high cost. For these reasons, intense research has been focused on finding novel vaccines or therapies to prevent hRSV infection in the population. Here, we comprehensively review the recent literature relative to the immunological features during hRSV infection, as well as the new insights into preventing the disease caused by this virus. PMID:28273842

  15. Features of the Generalized Dynamics of Quasiparticles in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suprun, Anatol D.; Shmeleva, Liudmyla V.

    2017-03-01

    The general dynamic properties of the electron, as quasiparticle in conduction band of graphene, were analyzed. It is shown that in graphene, these properties essentially differ from similar base properties for crystals with a simple lattice, despite insignificant, on the first sight, difference of dispersion law ɛ( p). Primarily, crystals with an elementary cell of arbitrary complexity of structure were considered. The obtained general relations were applied further to graphene. Herewith two-dimensional lattice of graphene has been considered as consisting of elementary cells with two atoms. Typically, graphene is considered as crystals consisting of two simple nested sublattices. It has been shown that both considerations lead to the analogous basic results. On the basis of obtained wave Hamiltonian, all the dynamic characteristics of the injected electron, considered as a quasiparticle, were found: speed, tensor of effective dynamic mass, and wave Lagrangian. Also, for some physically actual situations, the dynamic characteristics of an alternative description have been found: a mechanical momentum p m , mechanical Hamiltonian, and mechanical Lagrangian. For these situations, a generalized Louis de Broglie relationship between mechanical p m and wave p momenta was found also.

  16. Correlated random walks caused by dynamical wavefunction collapse

    PubMed Central

    Bedingham, D. J.; Ulbricht, H.

    2015-01-01

    Wavefunction collapse models modify Schrödinger’s equation so that it describes the collapse of a superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states as a dynamical process. This provides a basis for the resolution of the quantum measurement problem. An additional generic consequence of the collapse mechanism is that it causes particles to exhibit a tiny random diffusive motion. Here it is shown that for the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model—one of the most well developed collapse models—the diffusions of two sufficiently nearby particles are positively correlated. An experimental test of this effect is proposed in which random displacements of pairs of free nanoparticles are measured after they have been simultaneously released from nearby traps. The experiment must be carried out at sufficiently low temperature and pressure in order for the collapse effects to dominate over the ambient environmental noise. It is argued that these constraints can be satisfied by current technologies for a large region of the viable parameter space of the CSL model. The effect disappears as the separation between particles exceeds the CSL length scale. The test therefore provides a means of bounding this length scale. PMID:26303388

  17. Static and Dynamic Features for Improved HMM based Visual Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajavel, R.; Sathidevi, P. S.

    Visual speech recognition refers to the identification of utterances through the movements of lips, tongue, teeth, and other facial muscles of the speaker without using the acoustic signal. This work shows the relative benefits of both static and dynamic visual speech features for improved visual speech recognition. Two approaches for visual feature extraction have been considered: (1) an image transform based static feature approach in which Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) is applied to each video frame and 6×6 triangle region coefficients are considered as features. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is applied over all 60 features corresponding to the video frame to reduce the redundancy; the resultant 21 coefficients are taken as the static visual features. (2) Motion segmentation based dynamic feature approach in which the facial movements are segmented from the video file using motion history images (MHI). DCT is applied to the MHI and triangle region coefficients are taken as the dynamic visual features. Two types of experiments were done one with concatenated features and another with dimension reduced feature by using PCA to identify the utterances. The left-right continuous HMMs are used as visual speech classifier to classify nine MPEG-4 standard viseme consonants. The experimental result shows that the concatenated as well as dimension reduced features improve te visual speech recognition with a high accuracy of 92.45% and 92.15% respectively.

  18. Neurocognitive Features Distinguishing Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma from Other Possible Causes of Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Mariel B.; Mendez, Mario F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Define the neurocognitive features of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) presenting with dementia, and compare with other causes of rapidly progressive dementia (RPD). Background PCNSL can present as an RPD. Differentiating PCNSL from other RPDs is critical because lymphomatous dementia may be reversible, and untreated PCNSL is fatal. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of case reports of dementia from PCNSL (between 1950 and 2013); 20 patients (14 with lymphomatosis cerebri) met our criteria. We compared these patients to a case series of patients with RPD from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and other non-PCNSL etiologies (Sala et al, 2012. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 26:267–271). Results Median age was 66 (range 41–81); 70% were men. Time from symptom onset to evaluation was < 6 months in 65%. No patients had seizures; 5% had headaches; 45% had non-aphasic speech difficulty. There was significantly more memory impairment in patients with PCNSL than other RPDs and significantly less myoclonus and parkinsonism. Behavioral changes and cerebellar signs were not significantly different. Significantly more patients with PCNSL than other RPDs had white matter changes; significantly fewer had atrophy. Elevated CSF protein and pleocytosis were more frequent in PCNSL; patients with other RPDs tended to have normal CSF ± 14-3-3 protein. Conclusions Unlike patients with RPD from other causes, those with PCNSL commonly present with impaired memory, apathy, and abnormal speech and gait, without headache, seizure, or myoclonus. White-matter changes and CSF abnormalities predominate. Improved clinical awareness of PCNSL can prompt earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25812125

  19. Behavioral-independent features of complex heartbeat dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nunes Amaral, L A; Ivanov, P C; Aoyagi, N; Hidaka, I; Tomono, S; Goldberger, A L; Stanley, H E; Yamamoto, Y

    2001-06-25

    We test whether the complexity of the cardiac interbeat interval time series is simply a consequence of the wide range of scales characterizing human behavior, especially physical activity, by analyzing data taken from healthy adult subjects under three conditions with controls: (i) a "constant routine" protocol where physical activity and postural changes are kept to a minimum, (ii) sympathetic blockade, and (iii) parasympathetic blockade. We find that when fluctuations in physical activity and other behavioral modifiers are minimized, a remarkable level of complexity of heartbeat dynamics remains, while for neuroautonomic blockade the multifractal complexity decreases.

  20. Behavioral-Independent Features of Complex Heartbeat Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes Amaral, Luís A.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Aoyagi, Naoko; Hidaka, Ichiro; Tomono, Shinji; Goldberger, Ary L.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2001-06-01

    We test whether the complexity of the cardiac interbeat interval time series is simply a consequence of the wide range of scales characterizing human behavior, especially physical activity, by analyzing data taken from healthy adult subjects under three conditions with controls: (i) a ``constant routine'' protocol where physical activity and postural changes are kept to a minimum, (ii) sympathetic blockade, and (iii) parasympathetic blockade. We find that when fluctuations in physical activity and other behavioral modifiers are minimized, a remarkable level of complexity of heartbeat dynamics remains, while for neuroautonomic blockade the multifractal complexity decreases.

  1. Dominant Mutations in KAT6A Cause Intellectual Disability with Recognizable Syndromic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Emma; Lindstrand, Anna; Santani, Avni; Malmgren, Helena; Nesbitt, Addie; Dubbs, Holly A.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Parker, Michael J.; Millan, Francisca; Rosenbaum, Kenneth; Wilson, Golder N.; Nordgren, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Through a multi-center collaboration study, we here report six individuals from five unrelated families, with mutations in KAT6A/MOZ detected by whole-exome sequencing. All five different de novo heterozygous truncating mutations were located in the C-terminal transactivation domain of KAT6A: NM_001099412.1: c.3116_3117 delCT, p.(Ser1039∗); c.3830_3831insTT, p.(Arg1278Serfs∗17); c.3879 dupA, p.(Glu1294Argfs∗19); c.4108G>T p.(Glu1370∗) and c.4292 dupT, p.(Leu1431Phefs∗8). An additional subject with a 0.23 MB microdeletion including the entire KAT6A reading frame was identified with genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization. Finally, by detailed clinical characterization we provide evidence that heterozygous mutations in KAT6A cause a distinct intellectual disability syndrome. The common phenotype includes hypotonia, intellectual disability, early feeding and oromotor difficulties, microcephaly and/or craniosynostosis, and cardiac defects in combination with subtle facial features such as bitemporal narrowing, broad nasal tip, thin upper lip, posteriorly rotated or low-set ears, and microretrognathia. The identification of human subjects complements previous work from mice and zebrafish where knockouts of Kat6a/kat6a lead to developmental defects. PMID:25728777

  2. Forensic Analysis of Digital Dynamic Signatures: New Methods for Data Treatment and Feature Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Linden, Jacques; Marquis, Raymond; Mazzella, Williams

    2017-03-01

    This study explored digital dynamic signatures containing quantifiable dynamic data. The change in data content and nature necessitates the development of new data treatment approaches. A SignPad Omega digitizing tablet was used to assess measurement reproducibility, as well as within-writer variation and the occurrence of correctly simulated features. Measurement reproducibility was found to be high except for pressure information. Within-writer variation was found to be higher between days than on a same day. Occurrence of correct simulation was low for features such as signature size, trajectory length, and total signature time. Feature discrimination factors combining within-writer variability and the occurrence of correctly simulated features were computed and show that signature size, trajectory length, and signature time are the features that perform the best for discriminating genuine from simulated signatures. A final experiment indicates that dynamic information can be used to create connections between simulation cases.

  3. Universal features in the growth dynamics of religious activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoli, S., Jr.; Mendes, R. S.

    2008-03-01

    We quantify and analyze the growth dynamics of a religious group in 140 countries for a 47-year period (1959-2005). We find that (i) the distribution of annual logarithmic growth rates exhibits the same functional form for distinct size scales and (ii) the standard deviation of growth rates scales with size as a power law. Both findings hold for distinct measures of religious activity. These results are in surprising agreement with those found in the study of economic activities and scientific research, suggesting that religious activities are governed by universal growth mechanisms. We also compare the empirical findings on religious activities with the predictions of general models recently proposed in the context of complex organizations. Our findings should provide useful information for a better understanding of the mechanisms governing the growth of religion.

  4. Nonobvious features of dynamics of circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leizerovich, G. S.; Taranukha, N. A.

    2008-04-01

    In the framework of the nonlinear theory of flexible shallow shells, we study free bending vibrations of a thin-walled circular cylindrical shell hinged at the end faces. The finite-dimensional shell model assumes that the excitation of large-amplitude bending vibrations inevitably results in the appearance of radial vibrations of the shell. The modal equations are obtained by the Bubnov-Galerkin method. The periodic solutions are found by the Krylov-Bogolyubov method. We show that if the tangential boundary conditions are satisfied "in the mean," then, for a shell of finite length, significant errors arise in determining its nonlinear dynamic characteristics. We prove that small initial irregularities split the bending frequency spectrum, the basic frequency being smaller than in the case of an ideal shell.

  5. The Effect of Dynamic Acoustical Features on Musical Timbre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajda, John M.

    Timbre has been an important concept for scientific exploration of music at least since the time of Helmholtz ([1877] 1954). Since Helmholtz's time, a number of studies have defined and investigated acoustical features of musical instrument tones to determine their perceptual importance, or salience (e.g., Grey, 1975, 1977; Kendall, 1986; Kendall et al., 1999; Luce and Clark, 1965; McAdams et al., 1995, 1999; Saldanha and Corso, 1964; Wedin and Goude, 1972). Most of these studies have considered only nonpercussive, or continuant, tones of Western orchestral instruments (or emulations thereof). In the past few years, advances in computing power and programming have made possible and affordable the definition and control of new acoustical variables. This chapter gives an overview of past and current research, with a special emphasis on the time-variant aspects of musical timbre. According to common observation, "music is made of tones in time" (Spaeth, 1933). We will also consider the fact that music is made of "time in tones."

  6. Extraction and evaluation of gas-flow-dependent features from dynamic measurements of gas sensors array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinowski, Paweł; Woźniak, Łukasz; Jasiński, Grzegorz; Jasiński, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    Gas analyzers based on gas sensors are the devices which enable recognition of various kinds of volatile compounds. They have continuously been developed and investigated for over three decades, however there are still limitations which slow down the implementation of those devices in many applications. For example, the main drawbacks are the lack of selectivity, sensitivity and long term stability of those devices caused by the drift of utilized sensors. This implies the necessity of investigations not only in the field of development of gas sensors construction, but also the development of measurement procedures or methods of analysis of sensor responses which compensate the limitations of sensors devices. One of the fields of investigations covers the dynamic measurements of sensors or sensor-arrays response with the utilization of flow modulation techniques. Different gas delivery patterns enable the possibility of extraction of unique features which improves the stability and selectivity of gas detecting systems. In this article three utilized flow modulation techniques are presented, together with the proposition of the evaluation method of their usefulness and robustness in environmental pollutants detecting systems. The results of dynamic measurements of an commercially available TGS sensor array in the presence of nitrogen dioxide and ammonia are shown.

  7. Chaotic features of nuclear structure and dynamics: selected topics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelevinsky, Vladimir; Volya, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Quantum chaos has become an important element of our knowledge about physics of complex systems. In typical mesoscopic systems of interacting particles the dynamics invariably become chaotic when the level density, growing by combinatorial reasons, leads to the increasing probability of mixing simple mean-field (particle-hole) configurations. The resulting stationary states have exceedingly complicated structures that are comparable to those in random matrix theory. We discuss the main properties of mesoscopic quantum chaos and show that it can serve as a justification for application of statistical mechanics to mesoscopic systems. We show that quantum chaos becomes a powerful instrument for experimental, theoretical and computational work. The generalization to open systems and effects in the continuum are discussed with the help of the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian; it is shown how to formulate this approach for numerous problems of quantum signal transmission. The artificially introduced randomness can also be helpful for a deeper understanding of physics. We indicate the problems that require more investigation so as to be understood further.

  8. Infection dynamics and clinical features of cryptosporidiosis in SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mead, J R; Ilksoy, N; You, X; Belenkaya, Y; Arrowood, M J; Fallon, M T; Schinazi, R F

    1994-01-01

    Cryptosporidial infections in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice produce a chronic disease state which in the later stages leads to extraintestinal involvement and hepatic dysfunction. To further characterize the infection dynamics in this model and monitor the changes in the hepatic system, a dose titration of the oocyst inoculum was performed and alkaline phosphatase levels in the sera were assayed. Ten SCID mice per dose were inoculated with 10(3), 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), or 10(7) oocysts. Oocyst shedding in the feces was quantified by microscopic enumeration. Mice inoculated with 10(6) oocysts and those inoculated with 10(7) oocysts demonstrated similar oocyst shedding patterns, but the 10(7)-oocyst group exhibited signs of distress (e.g., weight loss and icterus) earlier. The intensity of the infection increased markedly approximately 14 days postinoculation (p.i.) and continued to increase steadily over the next 6 weeks. Inoculation with lower oocyst doses produced a delay in patency (e.g., it occurred 7 days later with the 10(5)-oocyst inoculum and 14 days later with the 10(4)-oocyst inoculum). Mean serum alkaline phosphatase levels in the 10(7)-oocyst group were more than twice control values at 5 weeks p.i. and continued to increase over the next 8 weeks. Oocyst doses and alkaline phosphatase levels were positively correlated with hepatobiliary colonization (r = 0.71) and liver necrosis (r = 0.65) at 13 weeks p.i. A strong positive correlation between hepatobiliary colonization and liver necrosis at 13 weeks p.i. (r = 0.87) was observed. PMID:8168930

  9. Structural and dynamic features of geoeffective coronal ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasyants, G. S.; Minasyants, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    The structure and physical conditions in 104 coronal mass ejections (CMEs) with a clear-cut leading shock front have been considered using satellite data for 1996-2008. In 99% of cases, the action of increased shock front dynamic pressure on the Earth's magnetosphere resulted in the origination of geomagnetic storms with sudden commencement. It has been revealed that decreased magnetic field strength values correspond to denser plasma bunches in an ejection body and vice versa. As a result, gas pressure is decreased in regions with increased magnetic pressure. Thus, a self-consistent interrelationship between plasma parameters, which supports total pressure at mutual changes in gas and magnetic pressures, is observed in the ejection structure. Pronounced differences in variations in the physical parameters in different zones along the front in the Earth-Sun direction have not been detected for each ejection. The maximal distances between the compared ejection zones are 2 million kilometers. This indicates that the ejection structure is stable. The values of the shock front velocity ( V psf), temperature ( T psf), and density ( N psf), as well as the ejection geometrical extension ( L ae), have been compared for the considered ejections. Cases when ejections followed one another at intervals of 3-30 h have been studied. It has been established that a leading ejection is strongly decelerated during its motion, and the next ejection faster covers the distance to the Earth. The next ejections with larger values of the plasma physical parameters are more geoeffective as compared to the previous ejections.

  10. Early Visual Cortex Dynamics during Top-Down Modulated Shifts of Feature-Selective Attention.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias M; Trautmann, Mireille; Keitel, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Shifting attention from one color to another color or from color to another feature dimension such as shape or orientation is imperative when searching for a certain object in a cluttered scene. Most attention models that emphasize feature-based selection implicitly assume that all shifts in feature-selective attention underlie identical temporal dynamics. Here, we recorded time courses of behavioral data and steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), an objective electrophysiological measure of neural dynamics in early visual cortex to investigate temporal dynamics when participants shifted attention from color or orientation toward color or orientation, respectively. SSVEPs were elicited by four random dot kinematograms that flickered at different frequencies. Each random dot kinematogram was composed of dashes that uniquely combined two features from the dimensions color (red or blue) and orientation (slash or backslash). Participants were cued to attend to one feature (such as color or orientation) and respond to coherent motion targets of the to-be-attended feature. We found that shifts toward color occurred earlier after the shifting cue compared with shifts toward orientation, regardless of the original feature (i.e., color or orientation). This was paralleled in SSVEP amplitude modulations as well as in the time course of behavioral data. Overall, our results suggest different neural dynamics during shifts of attention from color and orientation and the respective shifting destinations, namely, either toward color or toward orientation.

  11. Dynamic-Feature Extraction, Attribution and Reconstruction (DEAR) Method for Power System Model Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaobu; Lu, Shuai; Zhou, Ning; Lin, Guang; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Pai, M. A.

    2014-09-04

    In interconnected power systems, dynamic model reduction can be applied on generators outside the area of interest to mitigate the computational cost with transient stability studies. This paper presents an approach of deriving the reduced dynamic model of the external area based on dynamic response measurements, which comprises of three steps, dynamic-feature extraction, attribution and reconstruction (DEAR). In the DEAR approach, a feature extraction technique, such as singular value decomposition (SVD), is applied to the measured generator dynamics after a disturbance. Characteristic generators are then identified in the feature attribution step for matching the extracted dynamic features with the highest similarity, forming a suboptimal ‘basis’ of system dynamics. In the reconstruction step, generator state variables such as rotor angles and voltage magnitudes are approximated with a linear combination of the characteristic generators, resulting in a quasi-nonlinear reduced model of the original external system. Network model is un-changed in the DEAR method. Tests on several IEEE standard systems show that the proposed method gets better reduction ratio and response errors than the traditional coherency aggregation methods.

  12. Legionnaires' disease caused by Legionella longbeachae and Legionella pneumophila: comparison of clinical features, host-related risk factors, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Amodeo, M R; Murdoch, D R; Pithie, A D

    2010-09-01

    Legionnaires' disease remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Disease caused by Legionella pneumophila has been extensively studied, and its clinical characteristics have been well described. There is, however, little information on disease caused by Legionella longbeachae, despite its importance in some countries. We undertook a retrospective review of culture-positive cases of Legionnaires' disease in the Canterbury region of New Zealand over 10 years, in order to compare the clinical features and outcomes of Legionnaires' disease caused by these two species.

  13. A Seasonal Feature in Mercury's Exosphere Caused by Meteoroids from Comet Encke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, M. H.; Christou, A.; Killen, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    The planet Mercury is enveloped in a tenuous atmosphere, the result of a delicate balance between poorly understood sources and sinks (Killen et al, 2007). Meteoroid impacts are a contributing source process (eg Wurz et al, 2010), but their importance compared to other production mechanisms is uncertain. Killen and Hahn (2015) found that seasonal variations in Mercury's calcium exosphere as observed by the MASCS spectrometer onboard the MESSENGER spacecraft (Burger et al, 2014) may be due to impact vaporization of surface material by the infall of interplanetary dust. However, an additional dust source was required to explain a Ca excess at a True Anomaly Angle (TAA) of 25±5 deg. Killen and Hahn suggested that dust from comet 2P/Encke, crossing Mercury's orbital plane at TAA=45 deg, may be the culprit. We have simulated numerically the stream of meteoroids ejected from Encke to test the Killen and Hahn conjecture. We find that Encke particles evolving solely under the gravity of the major planets and the Sun encounter Mercury at TAA=50-60 deg, well after the peak of the Ca excess emission. However, the addition of Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag in our model couples the age and size of the meteoroids to the TAA at encounter, causing smaller, older particles to encounter Mercury progressively earlier in the Hermean year. In particular, mm-sized grains ejected between 10 and 20 kyr ago impact on the nightside hemisphere of Mercury at TAA = 350-30 deg, near the observed peak time of the exospheric feature. During this presentation, we will describe our model results and discuss their implications for the physical mechanism that injects impact-liberated Ca into sunlight as well as the origin and evolution of the Encke stream of meteoroids. Astronomical research at the Armagh Observatory is funded by the Northern Ireland Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL). RMK was supported by NASA Grant NNX07AR78G-S01 as a Participating Scientist on the NASA MESSENGER

  14. A seasonal feature in Mercury’s exosphere caused by meteoroids from comet Encke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christou, Apostolos; Killen, Rosemary M.; Burger, Matthew H.

    2015-11-01

    The planet Mercury is enveloped in a tenuous atmosphere, the result of a delicate balance between poorly understood sources and sinks (Killen et al, 2007). Meteoroid impacts are a contributing source process (eg Wurz et al, 2010), but their importance compared to other production mechanisms is uncertain.Killen and Hahn (2015) found that seasonal variations in Mercury's calcium exosphere as observed by Mercury Atmospheric, and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) onboard the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft (Burger et al, 2014) may be attributed to impact vaporization of surface material by the infall of interplanetary dust. However, an additional dust source was required to explain a Ca excess at a True Anomaly Angle (TAA) of 25±5 deg. Killen and Hahn suggested that dust from comet 2P/Encke, crossing Mercury's orbital plane at TAA=45 deg, may be the culprit.We have simulated numerically the stream of meteoroids ejected from Encke in order to identify those particles that impact Mercury at the present epoch and test the Killen and Hahn conjecture. We find that Encke particles evolving solely under the gravity of the major planets and the Sun encounter Mercury at TAA=50-60 deg, well after the peak of the Ca excess emission. This result is independent of the time of ejection. However, the addition of Poynting-Robertson (P-R) drag in our model couples the age and size of the meteoroids to the TAA at encounter, causing smaller, older particles to encounter Mercury progressively earlier in the Hermean year. In particular, mm-sized grains ejected between 10 and 20 kyr ago impact on the nightside hemisphere of Mercury at TAA = 350-30 deg, near the observed peak time of the exospheric feature.During this presentation, we will describe our model results and discuss their implications for the physical mechanism that injects impact-liberated Ca into sunlight as well as the origin and evolution of the Encke stream of

  15. Identification of the feature that causes the I-band secondary maximum of a Type Ia supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jack, D.; Baron, E.; Hauschildt, P. H.

    2015-06-01

    We obtained a time series of spectra covering the secondary maximum in the I band of the bright Type Ia supernova 2014J in M82 with the TIGRE telescope. Comparing the observations with theoretical models calculated with the time dependent extension of the PHOENIX code, we identify the feature that causes the secondary maximum in the I-band light curve. Fe II 3d6(3D)4s-3d6(5D)4p and similar high-excitation transitions produce a blended feature at ˜7500 Å, which causes the rise of the light curve towards the secondary maximum. The series of observed spectra of SN 2014J and archival data of SN 2011fe confirm this conclusion. We further studied the plateau phase of the R-band light curve of SN 2014J and searched for features which contribute to the flux. The theoretical models do not clearly indicate a new feature that may cause the R-band plateau phase. However, Co II features in the range of 6500-7000 Å and the Fe II feature of the I band are clearly seen in the theoretical spectra, but do not appear to provide all of the flux necessary for the R-band plateau.

  16. Invading parasites cause a structural shift in red fox dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Forchhammer, M C; Asferg, T

    2000-01-01

    The influence of parasites on host life histories and populations is pronounced. Among several diseases affecting animal populations throughout the world, sarcoptic mange has influenced many carnivore populations dramatically and during the latest epizootic in Fennoscandia reduced the abundance of red fox by over 70%. While the numerical responses of red fox populations, their prey and their competitors as well as clinical implications are well known, knowledge of how sarcoptic mange affects the structure of the dynamics of red fox populations is lacking. Integrating ecological theory and statistical modelling, we analysed the long-term dynamics (1955-1996) of 14 Danish red fox populations. As suggested by the model, invading sarcoptic mange significantly affected direct and delayed density dependence in red fox dynamics and concomitant shifts in fluctuation patterns were observed. Our statistical analyses also revealed that the spatial progressive spread of mange mites was mirrored in the autocovariate structures of red fox populations progressively exposed to sarcoptic mange. PMID:10819147

  17. Thinking Can Cause Forgetting: Memory Dynamics in Creative Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Benjamin C.; Angello, Genna; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2011-01-01

    Research on retrieval-induced forgetting has shown that retrieval can cause the forgetting of related or competing items in memory (Anderson, Bjork, & Bjork, 1994). In the present research, we examined whether an analogous phenomenon occurs in the context of creative problem solving. Using the Remote Associates Test (RAT; Mednick, 1962), we…

  18. Ambient response of a unique performance-based design building with dynamic response modification features

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Celebi, Mehmet; Huang, Moh; Shakal, Antony; Hooper, John; Klemencic, Ron

    2012-01-01

    A 64-story, performance-based design building with reinforced concrete core shear-walls and unique dynamic response modification features (tuned liquid sloshing dampers and buckling-restrained braces) has been instrumented with a monitoring array of 72 channels of accelerometers. Ambient vibration data recorded are analyzed to identify modes and associated frequencies and damping. The low-amplitude dynamic characteristics are considerably different than those computed from design analyses, but serve as a baseline against which to compare with future strong shaking responses. Such studies help to improve our understanding of the effectiveness of the added features to the building and help improve designs in the future.

  19. Short-Time Glassy-like Dynamics Observed in Viscous Protein Solutions with Competing Potential Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Norman; Godfrin, Doug; Liu, Yun

    Structures in concentrated protein solutions caused by the combination of short-range attraction (SA) and long-range repulsion (LR) have been extensively studied due to their importance in understanding therapeutic protein formulations and the phase behavior in general. Despite extensive studies of kinetically arrested states in colloidal systems with short-range attraction, less is understood for the effect of an additional longer-range repulsion on model colloidal systems with a SA interaction. Highly purified lysozyme is used a model experimental system due to its stable globular structure and SALR interactions at low ionic strength that can be quantitatively modeled. The fluid microstructure and protein short time self diffusion are measured across a broad range of conditions by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron spin echo (NSE), respectively. Newtonian liquid behavior is observed at all concentrations, even with an increase of zero shear viscosity by almost four orders of magnitude with increasing concentration. However, dynamic measurements demonstrate a sub-diffusive regime at relatively short time scales for concentrated samples at low temperature. The formation of a heterogeneous density distribution is shown to produce localized regions of high density that reduce protein motion, giving it a glassy-like behavior at the short time scale. This heterogeneity occurs at the length scale associated with the intermediate range order driven by the competing potential features, distinguishable from heterogeneous colloidal gels.

  20. Thinking can cause forgetting: memory dynamics in creative problem solving.

    PubMed

    Storm, Benjamin C; Angello, Genna; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2011-09-01

    Research on retrieval-induced forgetting has shown that retrieval can cause the forgetting of related or competing items in memory (Anderson, Bjork, & Bjork, 1994). In the present research, we examined whether an analogous phenomenon occurs in the context of creative problem solving. Using the Remote Associates Test (RAT; Mednick, 1962), we found that attempting to generate a novel common associate to 3 cue words caused the forgetting of other strong associates related to those cue words. This problem-solving-induced forgetting effect occurred even when participants failed to generate a viable solution, increased in magnitude when participants spent additional time problem solving, and was positively correlated with problem-solving success on a separate set of RAT problems. These results implicate a role for forgetting in overcoming fixation in creative problem solving.

  1. Pathogenic Features of Dysuria in Young Women with Secondary Amenorrhea Caused by Body Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Shelkovnikova, N V; Neimark, A I; Taranina, T S; Pichigina, A K; Molodyh, O P; Lushnikova, E L

    2016-12-01

    We examined 11 women aged 19-26 years (mean age 22.5±3.5 years) with secondary amenorrhea complaining frequent urination over 1.5 years and repeatedly, but unsuccessful treated for overactive bladder and chronic cystitis. The rare cause of sustained urination disorders in young female patients of reproductive age was established: development of secondary amenorrhea caused by weight loss ("cosmetic" amenorrhea) with subsequent estrogene deficit and urogenital atrophy. Morphological examination of the bladder mucosa, an important clue to the diagnosis, helps to identify the true cause of dysuria, urogenital atrophy of the bladder mucosa, in secondary ("cosmetic") amenorrhea, and determine future course of etiopathogenic treatment of sustained dysuria in young women. The treatment is often effective in case of proper and timely diagnosis and the absence of irreversible changes.

  2. Dynamic frequency feature selection based approach for classification of motor imageries.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jing; Feng, Zuren; Zhang, Jun; Lu, Na

    2016-08-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is one of the most popular techniques to record the brain activities such as motor imagery, which is of low signal-to-noise ratio and could lead to high classification error. Therefore, selection of the most discriminative features could be crucial to improve the classification performance. However, the traditional feature selection methods employed in brain-computer interface (BCI) field (e.g. Mutual Information-based Best Individual Feature (MIBIF), Mutual Information-based Rough Set Reduction (MIRSR) and cross-validation) mainly focus on the overall performance on all the trials in the training set, and thus may have very poor performance on some specific samples, which is not acceptable. To address this problem, a novel sequential forward feature selection approach called Dynamic Frequency Feature Selection (DFFS) is proposed in this paper. The DFFS method emphasized the importance of the samples that got misclassified while only pursuing high overall classification performance. In the DFFS based classification scheme, the EEG data was first transformed to frequency domain using Wavelet Packet Decomposition (WPD), which is then employed as the candidate set for further discriminatory feature selection. The features are selected one by one in a boosting manner. After one feature being selected, the importance of the correctly classified samples based on the feature will be decreased, which is equivalent to increasing the importance of the misclassified samples. Therefore, a complement feature to the current features could be selected in the next run. The selected features are then fed to a classifier trained by random forest algorithm. Finally, a time series voting-based method is utilized to improve the classification performance. Comparisons between the DFFS-based approach and state-of-art methods on BCI competition IV data set 2b have been conducted, which have shown the superiority of the proposed algorithm.

  3. De Novo Mutation in ABCC9 Causes Hypertrichosis Acromegaloid Facial Features Disorder.

    PubMed

    Afifi, Hanan H; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed S; Eid, Maha M; Mostafa, Inas S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old Egyptian girl with generalized hypertrichosis, gingival hyperplasia, coarse facial appearance, no cardiovascular or skeletal anomalies, keloid formation, and multiple labial frenula was referred to our clinic for counseling. Molecular analysis of the ABCC9 gene showed a de novo missense mutation located in exon 27, which has been described previously with Cantu syndrome. An overlap between Cantu syndrome, acromegaloid facial syndrome, and hypertrichosis acromegaloid facial features disorder is apparent at the phenotypic and molecular levels. The patient reported here gives further evidence that these syndromes are an expression of the ABCC9-related disorders, ranging from hypertrichosis and acromegaloid facies to the severe end of Cantu syndrome.

  4. RASGRP1 deficiency causes immunodeficiency with impaired cytoskeletal dynamics.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Cagdas, Deniz; Hons, Miroslav; Mace, Emily M; Garncarz, Wojciech; Petronczki, Özlem Yüce; Platzer, René; Pfajfer, Laurène; Bilic, Ivan; Ban, Sol A; Willmann, Katharina L; Mukherjee, Malini; Supper, Verena; Hsu, Hsiang Ting; Banerjee, Pinaki P; Sinha, Papiya; McClanahan, Fabienne; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Pickl, Winfried F; Gribben, John G; Stockinger, Hannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Huppa, Johannes B; Dupré, Loïc; Sanal, Özden; Jäger, Ulrich; Sixt, Michael; Tezcan, Ilhan; Orange, Jordan S; Boztug, Kaan

    2016-12-01

    RASGRP1 is an important guanine nucleotide exchange factor and activator of the RAS-MAPK pathway following T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling. The consequences of RASGRP1 mutations in humans are unknown. In a patient with recurrent bacterial and viral infections, born to healthy consanguineous parents, we used homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to identify a biallelic stop-gain variant in RASGRP1. This variant segregated perfectly with the disease and has not been reported in genetic databases. RASGRP1 deficiency was associated in T cells and B cells with decreased phosphorylation of the extracellular-signal-regulated serine kinase ERK, which was restored following expression of wild-type RASGRP1. RASGRP1 deficiency also resulted in defective proliferation, activation and motility of T cells and B cells. RASGRP1-deficient natural killer (NK) cells exhibited impaired cytotoxicity with defective granule convergence and actin accumulation. Interaction proteomics identified the dynein light chain DYNLL1 as interacting with RASGRP1, which links RASGRP1 to cytoskeletal dynamics. RASGRP1-deficient cells showed decreased activation of the GTPase RhoA. Treatment with lenalidomide increased RhoA activity and reversed the migration and activation defects of RASGRP1-deficient lymphocytes.

  5. Remote suspect identification and the impact of demographic features on keystroke dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dora, Robert A.; Schalk, Patrick D.; McCarthy, John E.; Young, Scott A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the research, development, and analysis performed during the Remote Suspect Identification (RSID) effort. The effort produced a keystroke dynamics sensor capable of authenticating, continuously verifying, and identifying masquerading users with equal error rates (EER) of approximately 0.054, 0.050, and 0.069, respectively. This sensor employs 11 distinct algorithms, each using between one and five keystroke features, that are fused (across features and algorithms) using a weighted majority ballot algorithm to produce rapid and accurate measurements. The RSID sensor operates discretely, quickly (using few keystrokes), and requires no additional hardware. The researchers also analyzed the difference in sensor performance across 10 demographic features using a keystroke dynamics dataset consisting of data from over 2,200 subjects. This analysis indicated that there are significant and discernible differences across age groups, ethnicities, language, handedness, height, occupation, sex, typing frequency, and typing style.

  6. Automatic segmentation of closed-contour features in ophthalmic images using graph theory and dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Stephanie J; Toth, Cynthia A; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a generalized framework for segmenting closed-contour anatomical and pathological features using graph theory and dynamic programming (GTDP). More specifically, the GTDP method previously developed for quantifying retinal and corneal layer thicknesses is extended to segment objects such as cells and cysts. The presented technique relies on a transform that maps closed-contour features in the Cartesian domain into lines in the quasi-polar domain. The features of interest are then segmented as layers via GTDP. Application of this method to segment closed-contour features in several ophthalmic image types is shown. Quantitative validation experiments for retinal pigmented epithelium cell segmentation in confocal fluorescence microscopy images attests to the accuracy of the presented technique.

  7. Clinical Features of Human Salmonellosis Caused by Bovine-Associated Subtypes in New York

    PubMed Central

    Warnick, Lorin D.; Gröhn, Yrjö T.; Hoelzer, Karin; Root, Timothy P.; Siler, Julie D.; McGuire, Suzanne M.; Wright, Emily M.; Zansky, Shelley M.; Wiedmann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to identify patient symptoms and case outcomes that were more likely to occur as a result of Salmonella infections caused by bovine-associated subtypes (isolates that matched contemporary bovine isolates from New York by serovar and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern), as compared to salmonellosis caused by non-bovine-associated subtypes. Data were collected in 34 counties of New York that comprise the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) catchment area of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program. Patients with specimen collection dates between March 1, 2008 and March 1, 2010 were included. Symptoms and outcomes of 40 cases infected with bovine-associated Salmonella subtypes were compared to those of 379 control-cases infected with Salmonella isolates that were not bovine-associated. Cases were significantly more likely to have invasive salmonellosis (odds ratio, 3.8; p-value=0.02), after adjusting for age group, gender, and race. In addition, there was a marginal association between case status and the presence of blood in the stool (p-value=0.1) while ill. These findings might have implications for patient management, as a history of consuming undercooked foods of bovine origin or having direct contact with cattle in the few days prior to illness could be useful for suggesting a more proactive diagnostic approach as well as close monitoring for the need to implement more aggressive therapy. PMID:22870888

  8. Clinical features of human salmonellosis caused by bovine-associated subtypes in New York.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Kevin J; Warnick, Lorin D; Gröhn, Yrjö T; Hoelzer, Karin; Root, Timothy P; Siler, Julie D; McGuire, Suzanne M; Wright, Emily M; Zansky, Shelley M; Wiedmann, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify patient symptoms and case outcomes that were more likely to occur as a result of Salmonella infections caused by bovine-associated subtypes (isolates that matched contemporary bovine isolates from New York by serovar and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern), as compared to salmonellosis caused by non-bovine-associated subtypes. Data were collected in 34 counties of New York that comprise the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) catchment area of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program. Patients with specimen collection dates between March 1, 2008 and March 1, 2010 were included. Symptoms and outcomes of 40 cases infected with bovine-associated Salmonella subtypes were compared to those of 379 control-cases infected with Salmonella isolates that were not bovine-associated. Cases were significantly more likely to have invasive salmonellosis (odds ratio, 3.8; p-value=0.02), after adjusting for age group, gender, and race. In addition, there was a marginal association between case status and the presence of blood in the stool (p-value=0.1) while ill. These findings might have implications for patient management, as a history of consuming undercooked foods of bovine origin or having direct contact with cattle in the few days prior to illness could be useful for suggesting a more proactive diagnostic approach as well as close monitoring for the need to implement more aggressive therapy.

  9. Speech recognition using Kohonen neural networks, dynamic programming, and multi-feature fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Francis S.

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop and evaluate the performance of a three-feature speech recognition system. The three features used were LPC spectrum, formants (F1/F2), and cepstrum. The system uses Kohonen neural networks, dynamic programming, and a rule-based, feature-fusion process which integrates the three input features into one output result. The first half of this research involved evaluating the system in a speaker-dependent atmosphere. For this, the 70 word F-16 cockpit command vocabulary was used and both isolated and connected speech was tested. Results obtained are compared to a two-feature system with the same system configuration. Isolated-speech testing yielded 98.7 percent accuracy. Connected-speech testing yielded 75/0 percent accuracy. The three-feature system performed an average of 1.7 percent better than the two-feature system for isolated-speech. The second half of this research was concerned with the speaker-independent performance of the system. First, cross-speaker testing was performed using an updated 86 word library. In general, this testing yielded less than 50 percent accuracy. Then, testing was performed using averaged templates. This testing yielded an overall average in-template recognition rate of approximately 90 percent and an out-of-template recognition rate of approximately 75 percent.

  10. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M; Hoppe, M; Rauber, K; Popella, C; Rau, W S

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard.

  11. Mutations in SPRTN cause early onset hepatocellular carcinoma, genomic instability and progeroid features.

    PubMed

    Lessel, Davor; Vaz, Bruno; Halder, Swagata; Lockhart, Paul J; Marinovic-Terzic, Ivana; Lopez-Mosqueda, Jaime; Philipp, Melanie; Sim, Joe C H; Smith, Katherine R; Oehler, Judith; Cabrera, Elisa; Freire, Raimundo; Pope, Kate; Nahid, Amsha; Norris, Fiona; Leventer, Richard J; Delatycki, Martin B; Barbi, Gotthold; von Ameln, Simon; Högel, Josef; Degoricija, Marina; Fertig, Regina; Burkhalter, Martin D; Hofmann, Kay; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Bahlo, Melanie; Martin, George M; Aalfs, Cora M; Oshima, Junko; Terzic, Janos; Amor, David J; Dikic, Ivan; Ramadan, Kristijan; Kubisch, Christian

    2014-11-01

    Age-related degenerative and malignant diseases represent major challenges for health care systems. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis and age-associated pathologies is thus of growing biomedical relevance. We identified biallelic germline mutations in SPRTN (also called C1orf124 or DVC1) in three patients from two unrelated families. All three patients are affected by a new segmental progeroid syndrome characterized by genomic instability and susceptibility toward early onset hepatocellular carcinoma. SPRTN was recently proposed to have a function in translesional DNA synthesis and the prevention of mutagenesis. Our in vivo and in vitro characterization of identified mutations has uncovered an essential role for SPRTN in the prevention of DNA replication stress during general DNA replication and in replication-related G2/M-checkpoint regulation. In addition to demonstrating the pathogenicity of identified SPRTN mutations, our findings provide a molecular explanation of how SPRTN dysfunction causes accelerated aging and susceptibility toward carcinoma.

  12. Cerebral coenurosis in a cat caused by Taenia serialis: neurological, magnetic resonance imaging and pathological features.

    PubMed

    Jull, Philip; Browne, Elizabeth; Boufana, Belgees S; Schöniger, Sandra; Davies, Emma

    2012-09-01

    CLINICAL SUMMARY: A 4-year-old Birman cat was presented with marked obtundation and non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Two well-demarcated, intra-axial T2-hyperintense, T1-hypointense structures, which did not contrast enhance, were evident on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Histopathology of the structures revealed metacestodes that were morphologically indicative of larval stages of Taenia species. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of a fragment within the 12S rRNA gene confirmed the subspecies as Taenia serialis. PRACTICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of MRI findings of cerebral coenurosis caused by T serialis in a cat. Early MRI should be considered an important part of the diagnostic work-up for this rare clinical disease, as it will help guide subsequent treatment and may improve the prognosis.

  13. Linguistic Labels, Dynamic Visual Features, and Attention in Infant Category Learning

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei (Sophia); Sloutsky, Vladimir M.

    2015-01-01

    How do words affect categorization? According to some accounts, even early in development, words are category markers and are different from other features. According to other accounts, early in development, words are part of the input and are akin to other features. The current study addressed this issue by examining the role of words and dynamic visual features in category learning in 8- to 12- month infants. Infants were familiarized with exemplars from one category in a label-defined or motion-defined condition and then tested with prototypes from the studied category and from a novel contrast category. Eye tracking results indicated that infants exhibited better category learning in the motion-defined than in the label-defined condition and their attention was more distributed among different features when there was a dynamic visual feature compared to the label-defined condition. These results provide little evidence for the idea that linguistic labels are category markers that facilitate category learning. PMID:25819100

  14. Induced chromosome deletions cause hypersociability and other features of Williams-Beuren syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong Hua; Roy, Madhuri; Kuscuoglu, Unsal; Spencer, Corinne M; Halm, Birgit; Harrison, Katharine C; Bayle, Joseph H; Splendore, Alessandra; Ding, Feng; Meltzer, Leslie A; Wright, Elena; Paylor, Richard; Deisseroth, Karl; Francke, Uta

    2009-04-01

    The neurodevelopmental disorder Williams-Beuren syndrome is caused by spontaneous approximately 1.5 Mb deletions comprising 25 genes on human chromosome 7q11.23. To functionally dissect the deletion and identify dosage-sensitive genes, we created two half-deletions of the conserved syntenic region on mouse chromosome 5G2. Proximal deletion (PD) mice lack Gtf2i to Limk1, distal deletion (DD) mice lack Limk1 to Fkbp6, and the double heterozygotes (D/P) model the complete human deletion. Gene transcript levels in brain are generally consistent with gene dosage. Increased sociability and acoustic startle response are associated with PD, and cognitive defects with DD. Both PD and D/P males are growth-retarded, while skulls are shortened and brains are smaller in DD and D/P. Lateral ventricle (LV) volumes are reduced, and neuronal cell density in the somatosensory cortex is increased, in PD and D/P. Motor skills are most impaired in D/P. Together, these partial deletion mice replicate crucial aspects of the human disorder and serve to identify genes and gene networks contributing to the neural substrates of complex behaviours and behavioural disorders.

  15. Adaptation to second order stimulus features by electrosensory neurons causes ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhubo D.; Chacron, Maurice J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the coding strategies used to process sensory input remains a central problem in neuroscience. Growing evidence suggests that sensory systems process natural stimuli efficiently by ensuring a close match between neural tuning and stimulus statistics through adaptation. However, adaptation causes ambiguity as the same response can be elicited by different stimuli. The mechanisms by which the brain resolves ambiguity remain poorly understood. Here we investigated adaptation in electrosensory pyramidal neurons within different parallel maps in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In response to step increases in stimulus variance, we found that pyramidal neurons within the lateral segment (LS) displayed strong scale invariant adaptation whereas those within the centromedial segment (CMS) instead displayed weaker degrees of scale invariant adaptation. Signal detection analysis revealed that strong adaptation in LS neurons significantly reduced stimulus discriminability. In contrast, weaker adaptation displayed by CMS neurons led to significantly lesser impairment of discriminability. Thus, while LS neurons display adaptation that is matched to natural scene statistics, thereby optimizing information transmission, CMS neurons instead display weaker adaptation and would instead provide information about the context in which these statistics occur. We propose that such a scheme is necessary for decoding by higher brain structures. PMID:27349635

  16. Adaptation to second order stimulus features by electrosensory neurons causes ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhubo D; Chacron, Maurice J

    2016-06-28

    Understanding the coding strategies used to process sensory input remains a central problem in neuroscience. Growing evidence suggests that sensory systems process natural stimuli efficiently by ensuring a close match between neural tuning and stimulus statistics through adaptation. However, adaptation causes ambiguity as the same response can be elicited by different stimuli. The mechanisms by which the brain resolves ambiguity remain poorly understood. Here we investigated adaptation in electrosensory pyramidal neurons within different parallel maps in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In response to step increases in stimulus variance, we found that pyramidal neurons within the lateral segment (LS) displayed strong scale invariant adaptation whereas those within the centromedial segment (CMS) instead displayed weaker degrees of scale invariant adaptation. Signal detection analysis revealed that strong adaptation in LS neurons significantly reduced stimulus discriminability. In contrast, weaker adaptation displayed by CMS neurons led to significantly lesser impairment of discriminability. Thus, while LS neurons display adaptation that is matched to natural scene statistics, thereby optimizing information transmission, CMS neurons instead display weaker adaptation and would instead provide information about the context in which these statistics occur. We propose that such a scheme is necessary for decoding by higher brain structures.

  17. Mutations in SPRTN cause early onset hepatocellular carcinoma, genomic instability and progeroid features

    PubMed Central

    Lessel, Davor; Vaz, Bruno; Halder, Swagata; Lockhart, Paul J; Marinovic-Terzic, Ivana; Lopez-Mosqueda, Jaime; Philipp, Melanie; Sim, Joe C H; Smith, Katherine R; Oehler, Judith; Cabrera, Elisa; Freire, Raimundo; Pope, Kate; Nahid, Amsha; Norris, Fiona; Leventer, Richard J; Delatycki, Martin B; Barbi, Gotthold; von Ameln, Simon; Högel, Josef; Degoricija, Marina; Fertig, Regina; Burkhalter, Martin D; Hofmann, Kay; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Bahlo, Melanie; Martin, George M; Aalfs, Cora M; Oshima, Junko; Terzic, Janos; Amor, David J; Dikic, Ivan; Ramadan, Kristijan; Kubisch, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Age-related degenerative and malignant diseases represent major challenges for health care systems. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis and age-associated pathologies is thus of growing biomedical relevance. We identified biallelic germline mutations in SPRTN (also called C1orf124 or DVC1)1–7 in three patients from two unrelated families. All three patients are affected by a new segmental progeroid syndrome characterized by genomic instability and susceptibility toward early onset hepatocellular carcinoma. SPRTN was recently proposed to have a function in translesional DNA synthesis and the prevention of mutagenesis1–7. Our in vivo and in vitro characterization of identified mutations has uncovered an essential role for SPRTN in the prevention of DNA replication stress during general DNA replication and in replication-related G2/M-checkpoint regulation. In addition to demonstrating the pathogenicity of identified SPRTN mutations, our findings provide a molecular explanation of how SPRTN dysfunction causes accelerated aging and susceptibility toward carcinoma. PMID:25261934

  18. Dynamic Features of the Highly Excited Vibrational States of the HOCl Non-Integrable System Based on the Dynamic Potential and Lyapunov Exponent Approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aixing; Fang, Chao; Liu, Yibao

    2017-01-07

    In this article the dynamic features of the highly excited vibrational states of the hypochlorous acid (HOCl) non-integrable system are studied using the dynamic potential and Lyapunov exponent approaches. On the condition that the 3:1 resonance between the H-O stretching and H-O-Cl bending modes accompany the 2:1 Fermi resonance between the O-Cl stretching and H-O-Cl bending modes, it is found that the dynamic potentials of the highly excited vibrational states vary regularly with different Polyad numbers (P numbers). As the P number increases, the dynamic potentials of the H-O stretching mode remain the same, but those of the H-O-Cl bending mode gradually become complex. In order to investigate the chaotic and stable features of the highly excited vibrational states of the HOCl non-integrable system, the Lyapunov exponents of different energy levels lying in the dynamic potentials of the H-O-Cl bending mode (P = 4 and 5) are calculated. It is shown that the Lyapunov exponents of the energy levels staying in the junction of Morse potential and inverse Morse potential are relative large, which indicates the degrees of chaos for these energy levels is relatively high, but the stabilities of the corresponding states are good. These results could be interpreted as the intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) acting strongly via the HOCl bending motion and causing energy transfers among different modes. Based on the previous studies, these conclusions seem to be generally valid to some extent for non-integrable triatomic molecules.

  19. Multifractal features of magnetospheric dynamics and their dependence on solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Sumesh

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, novel wavelet leaders (WL) based multifractal analysis has been used to get a better knowledge of the self-organization phenomena inherent in complex magnetospheric dynamics during disturbance and quiescent periods, focusing mainly on the intermittent features of auroral electrojet (AE) index. The results derived from the analysis certainly exhibit the phase transition property of magnetosphere system with respect to variabilities in the driving conditions. By using the novel WL method, solar activity dependence/independence of intermittency of magnetospheric proxies such as AE, SYM-H and Dst indices have been compared. The results indicate that the multifractality of AE index does not follow the solar activity cycle while intermittent features of SYM-H and Dst indices show high degree of solar activity dependence. This shows that along with the external solar wind perturbations, certain complex phenomena of internal origin also significantly modulate the dynamics of geomagnetic fluctuations in the auroral region.

  20. Comparison of the Causes and Clinical Features of Drug Rash With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jeung, Yun-Jin; Lee, Jin-Young; Oh, Mi-Jung; Choi, Dong-Chull

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) and the Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) are both severe drug reactions. Their pathogenesis and clinical features differ. This study compared the causes and clinical features of SJS and DRESS. Methods We enrolled 31 patients who were diagnosed with DRESS (number=11) and SJS (number=20). We retrospectively compared the clinical and laboratory data of patients with the two disorders. Results In both syndromes, the most common prodromal symptoms were itching, fever, and malaise. The liver was commonly involved in DRESS. The mucosal membrane of the oral cavity and eyes was often affected in SJS. The most common causative agents in both diseases were antibiotics (DRESS 4/11 (37%), SJS 8/20 (40%)), followed by anticonvulsants (DRESS 3/11 (27%), SJS 7/20 (35%)). In addition, dapsone, allopurinol, clopidogrel, sulfasalazine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were sporadic causes. Conclusions The most common causes of DRESS and SJS were antibiotics, followed by anticonvulsants, NSAIDs and sulfonamides. The increase in the use of antibiotics in Korea might explain this finding. PMID:20358026

  1. Dynamic feature extraction of coronary artery motion using DSA image sequences.

    PubMed

    Puentes, J; Roux, C; Garreau, M; Coatrieux, J L

    1998-12-01

    This paper aims to define and describe features of the motion of coronary arteries in two and three dimensions, presented as geometrical parameters that identify motion patterns. The main left coronary artery centerlines, obtained from digital subtraction angiography (DSA) image sequences, are first reconstructed. Thereafter, global and local motion features are evaluated along the sequence. The global attributes are centerline and point trajectory lengths, displacement amplitude, and virtual reference point, while local attributes are displacement direction, perpendicular/radial components, rotation direction, and curvature and torsion. These kinetic features allow us to obtain a detailed quantitative description of the displacements of arteries' centerlines, as well as associated epicardium deformations. Our modeling of local attributes as quasi-homogeneous on a segment analysis, enables us to propose a novel numeric to symbolic image transformation, which provides the required facts for knowledge-based motion interpretation. Experimental results using real data are consistent with cardiac dynamic behavior.

  2. Automatic tracking of linear features on SPOT images using dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnefon, Regis; Dherete, Pierre; Desachy, Jacky

    1999-12-01

    Detection of geographic elements on images is important in the perspective of adding new elements in geographic databases which are sometimes old and so, some elements are not represented. Our goal is to look for linear features like roads, rivers or railways on SPOT images with a resolution of 10 meters. Several methods allow this detection to be realized and may be classified in three categories: (1) Detection operators: the best known is the DUDA Road Operator which determine the belonging degree of a pixel to a linear feature from several 5 X 5 filters. Results are often unsatisfactory. It exists too the Infinite Size Exponential Filter (ISEF), which is a derivative filter and allows edge, valley or roof profile to be found on the image. It can be utilized as an additional information for others methods. (2) Structural tracking: from a starting point, an analysis in several directions is performed to determine the best next point (features may be: homogeneity of radiometry, contrast with environment, ...). From this new point and with an updated direction, the process goes on. Difficulty of these methods is the consideration of occlusions (bridges, tunnels, dense vegetation, ...). (3) Dynamic programming: F* algorithm and snakes are the best known. They allow a path with a minimal cost to be found in a search window. Occlusions are not a problem but two points or more near the searched linear feature must be known to define the window. The method described below is a mixture of structural tracking and dynamic programming (F* algorithm).

  3. Similar features that appear both on the dynamic spectra of the Sun and Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, G.; Konovalenko, A.; Zakharenko, V.; Vinogradov, V.; Dorovsky, V.; Melnik, V.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Rucker, H. O.; Zarka, Ph.

    2013-09-01

    At present, the physical nature of the basic components of the solar sporadic radiation has been well studied and reliably identified non-equilibrium particle emission mechanisms responsible for their origin [1, 2, and references therein]. Jupiter decameter emission (DAM) represents an extraordinary astrophysical phenomenon which is characterized by an unusual complexity of the frequency-temporal structure of its dynamic spectra. It should be noted that since of its discovering many problems in the theory of the Jovian decameter emission have been successfully investigated and solved [3, and references therein]. Nevertheless, a great number of physical features of this phenomenon still remain unclear. It should be noted that the quasi-similar in shape features appear in the dynamic spectra both in the Sun and the Jovian radio emission. We hope that future research of the similar properties in the emission spectra of Jupiter and the Sun and analogy between the plasma processes in the solar corona and magnetosphere of Jupiter can allow also define the similar features in the radiation mechanisms of these cosmic objects. One of the promising approaches to investigating features of the Jovian DAM emission and the decameter solar radiation is application of novel experimental techniques with a further detailed analysis of the obtained data.

  4. Catastrophic volcanism as a cause of shocked features found at the K/T boundary and in cryptoexplosion structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loper, D. E.; Mccartney, K.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of quartz grains containing shock lamellae at the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary is viewed by many as the single most compelling evidence of meteoritic or cometary impact because there is no known endogenous mechanism for producing these features. Similarly the presence of shocked quartz, shatter cones, coesite and stishovite at cryptoexplosion structures is comonly taken as conclusive evidence of impact. However, several recent studies have cast doubt on this interpretation. It is argued that basaltic volcanism, although not normally explosive, can under exceptional circumstances produce overpressures sufficiently high to produce shock features. The exceptional circumstances include a high content of volatiles, usually CO2, and no preestablished pathway to the surface. Rapid cooling of the saturated basaltic magma can occur if it underlies a cooler more evolved magma in a chamber. Initial slow cooling and partial exsolution of the volatiles will cause the density of the basaltic magma to become less than that of the overlying magma, leading to overturning and mixing. Gas will escape the magma chamber along planar cracks once the pressure becomes sufficiently high. In the vicinity of the crack tip there is a smallscale deviatoric stress pattern which is thought to be sufficiently high to produce transient cracks along secondary axes in the quartz crystals, causing the planar features. The CO2-rich fluid inclusions which have been found along planar elements of quartz in basement rocks of the Vredefort Dome were likely to have been emplaced by such a process. If the mechanism described is capable of producing shocked features as above, it would require a reassessment of the origin of many cryptoexplosion structures as well as seriously weakening the case for an impact origin of the K/T event.

  5. Features of lava lake filling and draining and their implications for eruption dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stovall, W.K.; Houghton, B.F.; Harris, A.J.L.; Swanson, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Lava lakes experience filling, circulation, and often drainage depending upon the style of activity and location of the vent. Features formed by these processes have proved difficult to document due to dangerous conditions during the eruption, inaccessibility, and destruction of features during lake drainage. Kilauea Iki lava lake, Kilauea, Hawai'i, preserves many such features, because lava ponded in a pre-existing crater adjacent to the vent and eventually filled to the level of, and interacted with, the vent and lava fountains. During repeated episodes, a cyclic pattern of lake filling to above vent level, followed by draining back to vent level, preserved features associated with both filling and draining. Field investigations permit us to describe the characteristic features associated with lava lakes on length scales ranging from centimeters to hundreds of meters in a fashion analogous to descriptions of lava flows. Multiple vertical rinds of lava coating the lake walls formed during filling as the lake deepened and lava solidified against vertical faces. Drainage of the lake resulted in uneven formation of roughly horizontal lava shelves on the lakeward edge of the vertical rinds; the shelves correlate with stable, staggered lake stands. Shelves either formed as broken relict slabs of lake crust that solidified in contact with the wall or by accumulation, accretion, and widening at the lake surface in a dynamic lateral flow regime. Thin, upper lava shelves reflect an initially dynamic environment, in which rapid lake lowering was replaced by slower and more staggered drainage with the formation of thicker, more laterally continuous shelves. At all lava lakes experiencing stages of filling and draining these processes may occur and result in the formation of similar sets of features. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  6. Dynamic feature analysis of vector-based images for neuropsychological testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Stephen L.; Cervantes, Basilio R.

    1998-07-01

    The dynamic properties of human motor activities, such as those observed in the course of drawing simple geometric shapes, are considerably more complex and often more informative than the goal to be achieved; in this case a static line drawing. This paper demonstrates how these dynamic properties may be used to provide a means of assessing a patient's visuo-spatial ability -- an important component of neuropsychological testing. The work described here provides a quantitative assessment of visuo-spatial ability, whilst preserving the conventional test environment. Results will be presented for a clinical population of long-term haemodialysis patients and test population comprises three groups of children (1) 7-8 years, (2) 9-10 years and (3) 11-12 years, all of which have no known neurological dysfunction. Ten new dynamic measurements extracted from patient responses in conjunction with one static feature deduced from earlier work describe a patient's visuo-spatial ability in a quantitative manner with sensitivity not previously attainable. The dynamic feature measurements in isolation provide a unique means of tracking a patient's approach to motor activities and could prove useful in monitoring a child' visuo-motor development.

  7. Community-Onset Bloodstream and Other Infections, Caused by Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae: Epidemiological, Microbiological, and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Paño-Pardo, José Ramón; López Quintana, Beatriz; Lázaro Perona, Fernando; Ruiz Carrascoso, Guillermo; Romero-Gómez, María Pilar; Loeches Yagüe, Belén; Díaz-Pollán, Beatriz; Martínez-Virto, Ana; Mingorance, Jesús; García Rodríguez, Julio; Arribas, José Ramón; Gómez-Gil, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Background. Because most infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) begin during hospitalization, there are limited data about community-onset (CO) infections caused by CPE. Our aim is to describe the frequency of CO infections caused by CPE as well as the clinical features of CO bloodstream infections (CO-BSIs). Methods. This study includes retrospective case series of CO infections caused by CPE in a tertiary hospital from January 2010 to July 2014. Any clinical sample with a positive culture for CPE that had been ordered by primary care doctors or by doctors at the emergency room (ER) were classified as CO. Epidemiological and microbiological features of CO cases were assessed as were clinical features of CO-BSIs. Results. Of 780 clinical samples with CPE, 180 were requested at the ER or by primary care doctors (22.9%), 150 of which were produced by Klebsiella pneumoniae (83.3%). The blaOXA−48 gene was detected in 149 isolates (82.8%) followed by the blaVIM gene, 29 (16.1%). Sixty-one patients (33.9%) had a prior history of CPE infection/colonization. Thirty-four of the 119 (28.6%) patients without prior history of CPE infection/colonization did not fulfill Friedman criteria for healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Considering previous hospitalization of up to 12 months as a criterion for defining HAI, only 16 (13.4%) cases were identified as community-acquired infections. The most frequent positive sample was urine (133 of 180; 73.9%). Twenty-one (11.7%) patients had a BSI, 9 of them secondary to urinary tract infections (42.9%). Thirty-day crude mortality among patients with BSI was 23.8% (5 of 21). Conclusions. Community-onset infections caused by CPE are an important subgroup of all CPE infections. The urinary tract is the main source. Bloodstream infections accounted for more than 10% of the cases. PMID:27703997

  8. Causes, Clinical Features, and Outcomes From a Prospective Study of Drug-Induced Liver Injury in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Chalasani, Naga; Fontana, Robert J.; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Watkins, Paul B.; Davern, Timothy; Serrano, Jose; Yang, Hongqiu; Rochon, James

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is among the most common causes of acute liver failure in the United States, accounting for approximately 13% of cases. A prospective study was begun in 2003 to recruit patients with suspected DILI and create a repository of biological samples for analysis. This report summarizes the causes, clinical features, and outcomes from the first 300 patients enrolled. Methods Patients with suspected DILI were enrolled based on predefined criteria and followed up for at least 6 months. Patients with acetaminophen liver injury were excluded. Results DILI was caused by a single prescription medication in 73% of the cases, by dietary supplements in 9%, and by multiple agents in 18%. More than 100 different agents were associated with DILI; antimicrobials (45.5%) and central nervous system agents (15%) were the most common. Causality was considered to be definite in 32%, highly likely in 41%, probable in 14%, possible in 10%, and unlikely in 3%. Acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was the final diagnosis in 4 of 9 unlikely cases. Six months after enrollment, 14% of patients had persistent laboratory abnormalities and 8% had died; the cause of death was liver related in 44% Conclusions DILI is caused by a wide array of medications, herbal supplements, and dietary supplements. Antibiotics are the single largest class of agents that cause DILI. Acute HCV infection should be excluded in patients with suspected DILI by HCV RNA testing. The overall 6-month mortality was 8%, but the majority of deaths were not liver related. PMID:18955056

  9. Biallelic Mutations in TBCD, Encoding the Tubulin Folding Cofactor D, Perturb Microtubule Dynamics and Cause Early-Onset Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Flex, Elisabetta; Niceta, Marcello; Cecchetti, Serena; Thiffault, Isabelle; Au, Margaret G; Capuano, Alessandro; Piermarini, Emanuela; Ivanova, Anna A; Francis, Joshua W; Chillemi, Giovanni; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Carpentieri, Giovanna; Haaxma, Charlotte A; Ciolfi, Andrea; Pizzi, Simone; Douglas, Ganka V; Levine, Kara; Sferra, Antonella; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Pfundt, Rolph R; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Farrow, Emily; Baas, Frank; Piemonte, Fiorella; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Graham, John M; Saunders, Carol J; Bertini, Enrico; Kahn, Richard A; Koolen, David A; Tartaglia, Marco

    2016-10-06

    Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal elements coordinating and supporting a variety of neuronal processes, including cell division, migration, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. Mutations in genes encoding tubulins and microtubule-associated proteins are known to cause neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. Growing evidence suggests that altered microtubule dynamics may also underlie or contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegeneration. We report that biallelic mutations in TBCD, encoding one of the five co-chaperones required for assembly and disassembly of the αβ-tubulin heterodimer, the structural unit of microtubules, cause a disease with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative features characterized by early-onset cortical atrophy, secondary hypomyelination, microcephaly, thin corpus callosum, developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, optic atrophy, and spastic quadriplegia. Molecular dynamics simulations predicted long-range and/or local structural perturbations associated with the disease-causing mutations. Biochemical analyses documented variably reduced levels of TBCD, indicating relative instability of mutant proteins, and defective β-tubulin binding in a subset of the tested mutants. Reduced or defective TBCD function resulted in decreased soluble α/β-tubulin levels and accelerated microtubule polymerization in fibroblasts from affected subjects, demonstrating an overall shift toward a more rapidly growing and stable microtubule population. These cells displayed an aberrant mitotic spindle with disorganized, tangle-shaped microtubules and reduced aster formation, which however did not alter appreciably the rate of cell proliferation. Our findings establish that defective TBCD function underlies a recognizable encephalopathy and drives accelerated microtubule polymerization and enhanced microtubule stability, underscoring an additional cause of altered microtubule dynamics with

  10. Extracting topological features from dynamical measures in networks of Kuramoto oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prignano, Luce; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-03-01

    The Kuramoto model for an ensemble of coupled oscillators provides a paradigmatic example of nonequilibrium transitions between an incoherent and a synchronized state. Here we analyze populations of almost identical oscillators in arbitrary interaction networks. Our aim is to extract topological features of the connectivity pattern from purely dynamical measures based on the fact that in a heterogeneous network the global dynamics is not only affected by the distribution of the natural frequencies but also by the location of the different values. In order to perform a quantitative study we focused on a very simple frequency distribution considering that all the frequencies are equal but one, that of the pacemaker node. We then analyze the dynamical behavior of the system at the transition point and slightly above it as well as very far from the critical point, when it is in a highly incoherent state. The gathered topological information ranges from local features, such as the single-node connectivity, to the hierarchical structure of functional clusters and even to the entire adjacency matrix.

  11. Epidemiology and Clinical Features of Bloodstream Infections Caused by AmpC-Type-β-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Hyunjoo; Kang, Cheol-In; Byeon, Jeong-Hum; Lee, Ki-Deok; Park, Wan Beom; Kim, Hong-Bin; Kim, Eui-Chong; Oh, Myoung-don; Choe, Kang-Won

    2004-01-01

    Cases of bacteremia caused by AmpC-type-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were retrospectively studied to determine the epidemiologic features and clinical outcomes of bloodstream infections. Among 389 blood isolates recovered from 1998 to 2002, 65 isolates (16.7%) were found to be extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) or AmpC β-lactamase producers. The β-lactamases from 61 of the 65 isolates were characterized; 28 of 61 isolates produced AmpC-type enzymes (14 isolates each produced DHA-1 and CMY-1-like enzymes), 32 isolates produced TEM or SHV-related ESBLs, and 1 isolate produced a CTX-M-14-like enzyme. To compare the clinical features and outcomes of bloodstream infections caused by AmpC producers with those caused by TEM- or SHV-related ESBL producers, 27 patients infected with isolates producing AmpC-type enzymes (AmpC group) and 25 patients infected with isolates producing TEM- or SHV-related enzymes (ESBL group) were analyzed. There was no significant difference between the AmpC and the ESBL groups in terms of risk factors. When the initial response was assessed at 72 h after antimicrobial therapy, the treatment failure rate for the AmpC group was 51.9% (14 of 27 patients) and the 7- and 30-day mortality rates were 14.8 and 29.6%, respectively, which were similar to those for the ESBL group. When the mortality rate for the patients who received extended-spectrum cephalosporins as definitive treatment was assessed, all four patients in the DHA-1 group and one of three patients in the CMY-1-like group died. In summary, the prevalence of AmpC enzyme-producing K. pneumoniae was high at the Seoul National University Hospital, and the clinical features and outcomes for the patients infected with AmpC-producing organisms were similar to those for the patients infected with TEM- or SHV-related ESBL producers. PMID:15388426

  12. Phobos and deimos: Analysis of surface features, ejecta dynamics and a volatile loss mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. R.; Chapman, C. R.; Greenberg, R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The question of whether the crater population on Phobos represents a production population or an equilibrium population is considered. The absolute ages of cratered surfaces are interpreted and analyzed. A computer program was developed to study the dynamics of material ejected from Martian satellites and to investigate the hypothesis that at least some of the extensive set of linear features discovered on the surface of Phobos could be the result of secondary cratering from the Stickney impact. The possibility that Deimos was catastrophically disrupted by a large impact but subsequently reaccreted is considered as well as the probability the Phobos had an impact nearly large enough to disrupt it are also discussed.

  13. Dynamical features and electric field strengths of double layers driven by currents. [in auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, a number of papers have been concerned with 'ion-acoustic' double layers. In the present investigation, results from numerical simulations are presented to show that the shapes and forms of current-driven double layers evolve dynamically with the fluctuations in the current through the plasma. It is shown that double layers with a potential dip can form even without the excitation of ion-acoustic modes. Double layers in two-and one-half-dimensional simulations are discussed, taking into account the simulation technique, the spatial and temporal features of plasma, and the dynamical behavior of the parallel potential distribution. Attention is also given to double layers in one-dimensional simulations, and electrical field strengths predicted by two-and one-half-dimensional simulations.

  14. Dynamic features analysis for the large-scale logistics system warehouse-out operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Can-Zhong; Lin, Ji-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Zheng, Xu-Zhou

    2014-12-01

    In the paper, we research on the behavior dynamics for the large-scale logistics system warehouse-out operation systematically. First, we discover that steel products warehouse-out of different warehouses in a large-scale logistics system can be characterized by burst, and the warehouse-out inter-event time follows the power-law distribution with exponents close to α=2.5, which differs from the two classical models proposed by Barabasi (2005) and Vazquez (2005) respectively. By analyzing the warehouse-out inter-event time distribution of the products in one certain large-scale logistics system, we further discuss burst features and mechanisms of logistics system. Additionally, we find that in population behaviors, burst features can be explained by the priority that rooted in holidays and interior task scheduling. However, warehouse-out behaviors of active individuals do not show any features of burst. Further, we find that warehouse-out quantity of steel products follows Fractal Brownian motion with the HURST exponent higher than 0.5 by means of R/S, which infers that the quantity of products in a logistics system is not only guided by prices in the present market, but also related closely to the previous quantity of warehouse-out. Based on V statistic, we compare memory length of different products in warehouses. Finally, we apply complex networks visibility graphs for further validation of fractal features in a logistics system and find that almost every visibility graph exhibits small-world and scale-free features. Both R/S and complex networks visibility graphs reinforce that the warehouse-out quantity of products in a logistics system is not a random walk process, but contains intrinsic regularities and long-term correlation between present and previous warehouse-out quantity.

  15. Intermittent foot claudication caused by a dynamic compression of the posterior tibial artery.

    PubMed

    Kaczynski, Jakub; Topliss, Claire; Fligelstone, Louis

    2016-07-14

    A young adult presented with an atypical intermittent foot claudication caused by a dynamic compression of the posterior tibial artery by a ganglion. This case highlights the diagnostic challenges when dealing with an entrapment syndrome. Subsequent open surgical treatment was successful, and the patient has made a good recovery.

  16. Studying the NDVI dynamics features for vegetation monitoring method development in the south of Central Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, Irina

    Monitoring of vegetation state can be based on studying their dynamics features. Effective methods of satellite data interpretation using spectral feature distinctions should be applied for this purpose. Studying the time series of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) during growth period is one of such approaches. The analysis of NDVI temporal profile shape allows to identify vegetation objects on satellite image. The NDVI curve transformation regularities during growth period are studied in the process of study carried out. Growth rate in specific phenological phases (growth of vegetative organs; maturation and fruiting) and extreme NDVI values during total growth period are detected. Growth rate is calculated as a NDVI curve slope. The NDVI dynamics of different vegetation types (agricultural crops - wheat, oats, buckwheat; abandoned fields of different age, meadow steppe, stony steppe, feather-grass steppe, flood meadow etc.), located in the south of Central Siberia (Krasnoyarsk krai, Khakasia), has been derived and analyzed. Results of this study are as the basis for developed software, which produces the automatic identification of canopy using Terra Modis satellite measurement data.

  17. IL1RAPL1 gene deletion as a cause of X-linked intellectual disability and dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Youngs, Erin L; Henkhaus, Rebecca; Hellings, Jessica A; Butler, Merlin G

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability affects approximately 2% of the population with males outnumbering females due to involvement of over 300 genes on the X chromosome. The most common form of X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is fragile X syndrome. We report a family with an apparent XLID pattern with the proband, his mother and maternal half brother having an Xp21.3 deletion detected with chromosomal microarray analysis involving the interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene. IL1RAPL1 is highly expressed in the postnatal brain, specifically hippocampus suggesting a specialized role in memory and learning abilities. The proband presented with intellectual disability, a broad face, prominent and wide nasal root, ptosis, a wide philtrum and a small mouth. XLID due to involvement of the IL1RAPL1 gene has been reported to cause nonsyndromic XLID. We report a new family with XLID due to partial deletion of IL1RAPL1, summarize reported literature and describe similar phenotypic similarities among the affected individuals in this family and those reported in the literature proposing that deletion of IL1RAPL1 may cause syndromic XLID. Additional reports are needed to further characterize whether syndromic features are related to disturbances of this gene.

  18. Comparative genome analyses of Mycobacterium avium reveal genomic features of its subspecies and strains that cause progression of pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Uchiya, Kei-ichi; Tomida, Shuta; Nakagawa, Taku; Asahi, Shoki; Nikai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary disease caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide. Mycobacterium avium is the most clinically significant NTM species in humans and animals, and comprises four subspecies: M. avium subsp. avium (MAA), M. avium subsp. silvaticum (MAS), M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), and M. avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH). To improve our understanding of the genetic landscape and diversity of M. avium and its role in disease, we performed a comparative genome analysis of 79 M. avium strains. Our analysis demonstrated that MAH is an open pan-genome species. Phylogenetic analysis based on single nucleotide variants showed that MAH had the highest degree of sequence variability among the subspecies, and MAH strains isolated in Japan and those isolated abroad possessed distinct phylogenetic features. Furthermore, MAP strains, MAS and MAA strains isolated from birds, and many MAH strains that cause the progression of pulmonary disease were grouped in each specific cluster. Comparative genome analysis revealed the presence of genetic elements specific to each lineage, which are thought to be acquired via horizontal gene transfer during the evolutionary process, and identified potential genetic determinants accounting for the pathogenic and host range characteristics of M. avium. PMID:28045086

  19. The magnitude and dynamics of interocular suppression affected by monocular boundary contour and conflicting local features

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yong R.; He, Zijiang J.; Ooi, Teng Leng

    2010-01-01

    A monocular boundary contour (MBC) rivalry stimulus has two half-images, a homogeneous grating and the same homogeneous grating with an additional disc region. The outline/frame of the MBC disc is created by relative phase-shift, or orientation difference. We found the increment contrast threshold and reaction time to detect a monocular Gabor probe elevated on the homogeneous half-image pedestal. The interocular suppression begins as early as 80 msec upon stimulus onset. Moreover, the suppression magnitude is larger when the MBC disc is defined by orientation difference rather than phase-shift, revealing the suppression caused by competing local features in addition to MBC. PMID:20624411

  20. Distinguishing features of flow in heterogeneous porous media: 4, Is a more general dynamic description required

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.

    1990-11-01

    Groundwater theory that applies to only homogeneous systems is often too restricted to adequately solve actual groundwater pollution problems. For adequate solutions, the more general theory for heterogeneous porous systems is needed. However, the present dynamic and kinematic descriptions in heterogeneous materials have evolved largely from the restricted and less general homogeneous theory. These descriptions are inadequate because they fail to account for all the energy dissipation in the system. The basic distinguishing dynamic feature of heterogeneous flow theory from the less general homogeneous-based theory is the macroscopic rotational flow component. Specifically, existence of rotational flow components and their independence from the translational flow components are the necessary and sufficient conditions that completely differentiate between the complex lamellar heterogeneous flow theory and the simpler lamellar flow of homogeneous theory. This paper proposes a more general dynamic form of the flow equation to include the added rotational dissipation that is missing from the present Darcian description of flow in heterogeneous media. 31 refs.

  1. PUF60 variants cause a syndrome of ID, short stature, microcephaly, coloboma, craniofacial, cardiac, renal and spinal features.

    PubMed

    Low, Karen J; Ansari, Morad; Abou Jamra, Rami; Clarke, Angus; El Chehadeh, Salima; FitzPatrick, David R; Greenslade, Mark; Henderson, Alex; Hurst, Jane; Keller, Kory; Kuentz, Paul; Prescott, Trine; Roessler, Franziska; Selmer, Kaja K; Schneider, Michael C; Stewart, Fiona; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Thevenon, Julien; Vigeland, Magnus D; Vogt, Julie; Willems, Marjolaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Study, D D D; Smithson, Sarah F

    2017-03-22

    PUF60 encodes a nucleic acid-binding protein, a component of multimeric complexes regulating RNA splicing and transcription. In 2013, patients with microdeletions of chromosome 8q24.3 including PUF60 were found to have developmental delay, microcephaly, craniofacial, renal and cardiac defects. Very similar phenotypes have been described in six patients with variants in PUF60, suggesting that it underlies the syndrome. We report 12 additional patients with PUF60 variants who were ascertained using exome sequencing: six through the Deciphering Developmental Disorders Study and six through similar projects. Detailed phenotypic analysis of all patients was undertaken. All 12 patients had de novo heterozygous PUF60 variants on exome analysis, each confirmed by Sanger sequencing: four frameshift variants resulting in premature stop codons, three missense variants that clustered within the RNA recognition motif of PUF60 and five essential splice-site (ESS) variant. Analysis of cDNA from a fibroblast cell line derived from one of the patients with an ESS variants revealed aberrant splicing. The consistent feature was developmental delay and most patients had short stature. The phenotypic variability was striking; however, we observed similarities including spinal segmentation anomalies, congenital heart disease, ocular colobomata, hand anomalies and (in two patients) unilateral renal agenesis/horseshoe kidney. Characteristic facial features included micrognathia, a thin upper lip and long philtrum, narrow almond-shaped palpebral fissures, synophrys, flared eyebrows and facial hypertrichosis. Heterozygote loss-of-function variants in PUF60 cause a phenotype comprising growth/developmental delay and craniofacial, cardiac, renal, ocular and spinal anomalies, adding to disorders of human development resulting from aberrant RNA processing/spliceosomal function.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 22 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2017.27.

  2. Young children's affective responses to another's distress: dynamic and physiological features.

    PubMed

    Fink, Elian; Heathers, James A J; de Rosnay, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Two descriptive studies set out a new approach for exploring the dynamic features of children's affective responses (sadness and interest-worry) to another's distress. In two samples (N(study1) = 75; N(study2) = 114), Kindergarten children were shown a video-vignette depicting another child in distress and the temporal pattern of spontaneous expressions were examined across the unfolding vignette. Results showed, in both study 1 and 2, that sadness and interest-worry had distinct patterns of elicitation across the events of the vignette narrative and there was little co-occurrence of these affects within a given child. Temporal heart rate changes (study 2) were closely aligned to the events of the vignette and, furthermore, affective responses corresponded to distinctive physiological response profiles. The implications of distinct temporal patterns of elicitation for the meaning of sadness and interest-worry are discussed within the framework of emotion regulation and empathy.

  3. Sunspot groups with high flare activity: Specific features of magnetic configuration, morphology, and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fursyak, Yu. A.

    2016-12-01

    Specific features of the magnetic configuration, morphological structure, dynamics, and evolution of sunspot groups of the current (24th) cycle of solar activity with high flare activity are considered. The gradients of longitudinal magnetic fields at places of δ-configuration are calculated. The main finding is a time delay of 24-30 h between the time when the magnetic field gradient reaches a critical level of 0.1 G/km and the time when the first of powerful flares occurs in the active region. The study is based on data from the SDO and GOES-15 spacecrafts and ground-based solar telescopes (TST-2 at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the 150-foot telescope at the Mount Wilson Observatory).

  4. Design of Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark Featuring Irregular, Dynamic Memory Accesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the design of a new method for the measurement of the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. The method involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem on an unstructured, adaptive grid. A Spectral Element Method (SEM) with an adaptive, nonconforming mesh is selected to discretize the transport equation. The relatively high order of the SEM lowers the fraction of wall clock time spent on inter-processor communication, which eases the load balancing task and allows us to concentrate on the memory accesses. The benchmark is designed to be three-dimensional. Parallelization and load balance issues of a reference implementation will be described in detail in future reports.

  5. Efficient and exact maximum likelihood quantisation of genomic features using dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingzhou; Haralick, Robert M; Boissinot, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    An efficient and exact dynamic programming algorithm is introduced to quantise a continuous random variable into a discrete random variable that maximises the likelihood of the quantised probability distribution for the original continuous random variable. Quantisation is often useful before statistical analysis and modelling of large discrete network models from observations of multiple continuous random variables. The quantisation algorithm is applied to genomic features including the recombination rate distribution across the chromosomes and the non-coding transposable element LINE-1 in the human genome. The association pattern is studied between the recombination rate, obtained by quantisation at genomic locations around LINE-1 elements, and the length groups of LINE-1 elements, also obtained by quantisation on LINE-1 length. The exact and density-preserving quantisation approach provides an alternative superior to the inexact and distance-based univariate iterative k-means clustering algorithm for discretisation.

  6. Young Children’s Affective Responses to Another’s Distress: Dynamic and Physiological Features

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Elian; Heathers, James A. J.; de Rosnay, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Two descriptive studies set out a new approach for exploring the dynamic features of children’s affective responses (sadness and interest-worry) to another’s distress. In two samples (Nstudy1 = 75; Nstudy2 = 114), Kindergarten children were shown a video-vignette depicting another child in distress and the temporal pattern of spontaneous expressions were examined across the unfolding vignette. Results showed, in both study 1 and 2, that sadness and interest-worry had distinct patterns of elicitation across the events of the vignette narrative and there was little co-occurrence of these affects within a given child. Temporal heart rate changes (study 2) were closely aligned to the events of the vignette and, furthermore, affective responses corresponded to distinctive physiological response profiles. The implications of distinct temporal patterns of elicitation for the meaning of sadness and interest-worry are discussed within the framework of emotion regulation and empathy. PMID:25874952

  7. Dynamic characterization of coupled nonlinear oscillators caused by the instability of ionization waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, T.; Okugawa, M.

    2017-03-01

    We have experimentally investigated the dynamic behavior of coupled nonlinear oscillators, including chaos caused by the instability of ionization waves in a glow discharge plasma. We studied the phase synchronization process of coupled asymmetric oscillators with increasing coupling strength. Coherence resonance and phase synchronization were observed in the coupled systems. The phase synchronization process revealed scaling laws with a tendency of Type-I intermittency in the relationships between the coupling strength and the average duration of successive laminar states interrupted by a phase slip. Coupled periodic oscillators changed from a periodic state to chaos caused by the interaction of nonlinear periodic waves at increasing coupling strength.

  8. Dynamic Encoding of Acoustic Features in Neural Responses to Continuous Speech.

    PubMed

    Khalighinejad, Bahar; Cruzatto da Silva, Guilherme; Mesgarani, Nima

    2017-02-22

    Humans are unique in their ability to communicate using spoken language. However, it remains unclear how the speech signal is transformed and represented in the brain at different stages of the auditory pathway. In this study, we characterized electroencephalography responses to continuous speech by obtaining the time-locked responses to phoneme instances (phoneme-related potential). We showed that responses to different phoneme categories are organized by phonetic features. We found that each instance of a phoneme in continuous speech produces multiple distinguishable neural responses occurring as early as 50 ms and as late as 400 ms after the phoneme onset. Comparing the patterns of phoneme similarity in the neural responses and the acoustic signals confirms a repetitive appearance of acoustic distinctions of phonemes in the neural data. Analysis of the phonetic and speaker information in neural activations revealed that different time intervals jointly encode the acoustic similarity of both phonetic and speaker categories. These findings provide evidence for a dynamic neural transformation of low-level speech features as they propagate along the auditory pathway, and form an empirical framework to study the representational changes in learning, attention, and speech disorders.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We characterized the properties of evoked neural responses to phoneme instances in continuous speech. We show that each instance of a phoneme in continuous speech produces several observable neural responses at different times occurring as early as 50 ms and as late as 400 ms after the phoneme onset. Each temporal event explicitly encodes the acoustic similarity of phonemes, and linguistic and nonlinguistic information are best represented at different time intervals. Finally, we show a joint encoding of phonetic and speaker information, where the neural representation of speakers is dependent on phoneme category. These findings provide compelling new evidence for

  9. Dynamic Encoding of Acoustic Features in Neural Responses to Continuous Speech

    PubMed Central

    Khalighinejad, Bahar; Cruzatto da Silva, Guilherme

    2017-01-01

    Humans are unique in their ability to communicate using spoken language. However, it remains unclear how the speech signal is transformed and represented in the brain at different stages of the auditory pathway. In this study, we characterized electroencephalography responses to continuous speech by obtaining the time-locked responses to phoneme instances (phoneme-related potential). We showed that responses to different phoneme categories are organized by phonetic features. We found that each instance of a phoneme in continuous speech produces multiple distinguishable neural responses occurring as early as 50 ms and as late as 400 ms after the phoneme onset. Comparing the patterns of phoneme similarity in the neural responses and the acoustic signals confirms a repetitive appearance of acoustic distinctions of phonemes in the neural data. Analysis of the phonetic and speaker information in neural activations revealed that different time intervals jointly encode the acoustic similarity of both phonetic and speaker categories. These findings provide evidence for a dynamic neural transformation of low-level speech features as they propagate along the auditory pathway, and form an empirical framework to study the representational changes in learning, attention, and speech disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We characterized the properties of evoked neural responses to phoneme instances in continuous speech. We show that each instance of a phoneme in continuous speech produces several observable neural responses at different times occurring as early as 50 ms and as late as 400 ms after the phoneme onset. Each temporal event explicitly encodes the acoustic similarity of phonemes, and linguistic and nonlinguistic information are best represented at different time intervals. Finally, we show a joint encoding of phonetic and speaker information, where the neural representation of speakers is dependent on phoneme category. These findings provide compelling new evidence for

  10. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin-Siris-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-03-02

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin-Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 2 March 2017; doi:10.1038/jhg.2017.24.

  11. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ([minus]60[degrees]F) temperatures.

  12. Dynamic impact and pressure analysis of the insensitive munitions container PA103 with modified design features

    SciTech Connect

    Handy, K.D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents analytical analyses of the insensitive munitions container PA103, with modified design features for a static internal pressure of 500 psi and for a dynamic impact resulting from a 7-ft free fall onto a rigid surface. The modified design features addressed by the analyses were the inclusion of a score pattern on the container cylindrical body and a plastic plate (fuse) sandwiched between metal flanges on the container end. The objectives of both the pressure and impact analyses were to determine if the induced stresses at the score patterns in the cylindrical body of the container were sufficient to induce failure. Analytical responses of the container to the imposed loads were obtained with finite element analysis methodology. The computer codes ABAQUS and VEC/DYNA3D were used to obtain the results. Results of the pressure analysis indicate that failure of the container body would be expected to occur at the score pattern for a static internal pressure of 500 psi. Also, results from three impact orientations for a 7-ft drop indicate that membrane stresses in the vicinity of the score pattern are above critical crack growth stress magnitudes, especially at low ({minus}60{degrees}F) temperatures.

  13. Emission features and expansion dynamics of nanosecond laser ablation plumes at different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, N.; Harilal, S. S. Hassanein, A.; Ding, H.

    2014-01-21

    The influence of ambient pressure on the spectral emission features and expansion dynamics of a plasma plume generated on a metal target has been investigated. The plasma plumes were generated by irradiating Cu targets using 6 ns, 1064 nm pulses from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The emission and expansion dynamics of the plasma plumes were studied by varying air ambient pressure levels ranging from vacuum to atmospheric pressure. The ambient pressure levels were found to affect both the line intensities and broadening along with the signal to background and signal to noise ratios and the optimum pressure conditions for analytical applications were evaluated. The characteristic plume parameters were estimated using emission spectroscopy means and noticed that the excitation temperature peaked ∼300 Torr, while the electron density showed a maximum ∼100 Torr. Fast-gated images showed a complex interaction between the plume and background air leading to changes in the plume geometry with pressure as well as time. Surface morphology of irradiated surface showed that the pressure of the ambient gas affects the laser-target coupling significantly.

  14. Structural and Dynamic Features of F-recruitment Site Driven Substrate Phosphorylation by ERK2

    PubMed Central

    Piserchio, Andrea; Ramakrishan, Venkatesh; Wang, Hsin; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Arshava, Boris; Dutta, Kaushik; Dalby, Kevin N.; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2015-01-01

    The F-recruitment site (FRS) of active ERK2 binds F-site (Phe-x-Phe-Pro) sequences found downstream of the Ser/Thr phospho-acceptor on cellular substrates. Here we apply NMR methods to analyze the interaction between active ERK2 (ppERK2), and a 13-residue F-site-bearing peptide substrate derived from its cellular target, the transcription factor Elk-1. Our results provide detailed insight into previously elusive structural and dynamic features of FRS/F-site interactions and FRS-driven substrate phosphorylation. We show that substrate F-site engagement significantly quenches slow dynamics involving the ppERK2 activation-loop and the FRS. We also demonstrate that the F-site phenylalanines make critical contacts with ppERK2, in contrast to the proline whose cis-trans isomerization has no significant effect on F-site recognition by the kinase FRS. Our results support a mechanism where phosphorylation of the disordered N-terminal phospho-acceptor is facilitated by its increased productive encounters with the ppERK2 active site due to docking of the proximal F-site at the kinase FRS. PMID:26054059

  15. The spatiotemporal dynamics and membranous features of the Plasmodium liver stage tubovesicular network.

    PubMed

    Grützke, Josephine; Rindte, Kerstin; Goosmann, Christian; Silvie, Olivier; Rauch, Carolin; Heuer, Dagmar; Lehmann, Maik J; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Brinkmann, Volker; Matuschewski, Kai; Ingmundson, Alyssa

    2014-04-01

    For membrane-bound intracellular pathogens, the surrounding vacuole is the portal of communication with the host cell. The parasitophorous vacuole (PV) harboring intrahepatocytic Plasmodium parasites satisfies the parasites' needs of nutrition and protection from host defenses to allow the rapid parasite growth that occurs during the liver stage of infection. In this study, we visualized the PV membrane (PVM) and the associated tubovesicular network (TVN) through fluorescent tagging of two PVM-resident Plasmodium berghei proteins, UIS4 and IBIS1. This strategy revealed previously unrecognized dynamics with which these membranes extend throughout the host cell. We observed dynamic vesicles, elongated clusters of membranes and long tubules that rapidly extend and contract from the PVM in a microtubule-dependent manner. Live microscopy, correlative light-electron microscopy and fluorescent recovery after photobleaching enabled a detailed characterization of these membranous features, including velocities, the distribution of UIS4 and IBIS1, and the connectivity of PVM and TVN. Labeling of host cell compartments revealed association of late endosomes and lysosomes with the elongated membrane clusters. Moreover, the signature host autophagosome protein LC3 was recruited to the PVM and TVN and colocalized with UIS4. Together, our data demonstrate that the membranes surrounding intrahepatic Plasmodium are involved in active remodeling of host cells.

  16. Spontaneous Rupture of Pyometra Causing Peritonitis in Elderly Female Diagnosed on Dynamic Transvaginal Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Malvadkar, Sharad M; Malvadkar, Madhuri S; Domkundwar, Shilpa V; Mohd, Shariq

    2016-01-01

    Pyometra is collection of pus within the uterine cavity and is usually associated with underlying gynaecological malignancy or other benign causes. Spontaneous rupture of pyometra is a rare complication. We report a case of a 65-year-old female who presented with acute abdomen and was diagnosed with a ruptured uterus secondary to pyometra and consequent peritonitis on dynamic transvaginal sonography (TVS) which was later confirmed on contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT). An emergency laparotomy was performed and about 800 cc of pus was drained from the peritoneal cavity. A rent was found in the anterior uterine wall and hence hysterectomy was performed. Histopathology revealed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with no evidence of malignancy. There are only 31 cases of ruptured pyometra reported till date, most of which were definitively diagnosed only on laparotomy. In only two of these cases the preoperative diagnosis was made on CECT. We report this case, as the correct and definitive diagnosis was made preoperatively on dynamic TVS. To our knowledge, this is the first case report revealing spontaneous ruptured pyometra being diagnosed preoperatively on dynamic TVS. This report is aimed at giving emphasis on the use of simple dynamic TVS for accurate diagnosis of rare spontaneous ruptured pyometra causing peritonitis.

  17. Spontaneous Rupture of Pyometra Causing Peritonitis in Elderly Female Diagnosed on Dynamic Transvaginal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Malvadkar, Sharad M.; Malvadkar, Madhuri S.; Domkundwar, Shilpa V.; Mohd, Shariq

    2016-01-01

    Pyometra is collection of pus within the uterine cavity and is usually associated with underlying gynaecological malignancy or other benign causes. Spontaneous rupture of pyometra is a rare complication. We report a case of a 65-year-old female who presented with acute abdomen and was diagnosed with a ruptured uterus secondary to pyometra and consequent peritonitis on dynamic transvaginal sonography (TVS) which was later confirmed on contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT). An emergency laparotomy was performed and about 800 cc of pus was drained from the peritoneal cavity. A rent was found in the anterior uterine wall and hence hysterectomy was performed. Histopathology revealed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrate with no evidence of malignancy. There are only 31 cases of ruptured pyometra reported till date, most of which were definitively diagnosed only on laparotomy. In only two of these cases the preoperative diagnosis was made on CECT. We report this case, as the correct and definitive diagnosis was made preoperatively on dynamic TVS. To our knowledge, this is the first case report revealing spontaneous ruptured pyometra being diagnosed preoperatively on dynamic TVS. This report is aimed at giving emphasis on the use of simple dynamic TVS for accurate diagnosis of rare spontaneous ruptured pyometra causing peritonitis. PMID:26989549

  18. Automatic ICD-10 multi-class classification of cause of death from plaintext autopsy reports through expert-driven feature selection

    PubMed Central

    Mujtaba, Ghulam; Shuib, Liyana; Raj, Ram Gopal; Rajandram, Retnagowri; Shaikh, Khairunisa; Al-Garadi, Mohammed Ali

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Widespread implementation of electronic databases has improved the accessibility of plaintext clinical information for supplementary use. Numerous machine learning techniques, such as supervised machine learning approaches or ontology-based approaches, have been employed to obtain useful information from plaintext clinical data. This study proposes an automatic multi-class classification system to predict accident-related causes of death from plaintext autopsy reports through expert-driven feature selection with supervised automatic text classification decision models. Methods Accident-related autopsy reports were obtained from one of the largest hospital in Kuala Lumpur. These reports belong to nine different accident-related causes of death. Master feature vector was prepared by extracting features from the collected autopsy reports by using unigram with lexical categorization. This master feature vector was used to detect cause of death [according to internal classification of disease version 10 (ICD-10) classification system] through five automated feature selection schemes, proposed expert-driven approach, five subset sizes of features, and five machine learning classifiers. Model performance was evaluated using precisionM, recallM, F-measureM, accuracy, and area under ROC curve. Four baselines were used to compare the results with the proposed system. Results Random forest and J48 decision models parameterized using expert-driven feature selection yielded the highest evaluation measure approaching (85% to 90%) for most metrics by using a feature subset size of 30. The proposed system also showed approximately 14% to 16% improvement in the overall accuracy compared with the existing techniques and four baselines. Conclusion The proposed system is feasible and practical to use for automatic classification of ICD-10-related cause of death from autopsy reports. The proposed system assists pathologists to accurately and rapidly determine underlying

  19. Dynamical features of deoxyribonucleic acid and configuration transition in the transcription process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Xiao-feng; Feng, Yuan Ping; Zhang, Huai-wu; Assad, S. M.

    2006-10-01

    Biological functions and genetic features of DNA, such as duplication, transcription and gene expression, are mainly determined by its structure, but depend also on the temperature and features of solution, such as salt concentration. We study the influence of temperature and salt concentration on the conformation changes and transcription of DNA by using a new dynamical model. This new model admits three degrees of freedom per base-pair: two displacement variables related to the vibrations of hydrogen atom in the hydrogen bonds and base (nucleotide), respectively, and an angular variable related to the rotation of base. The important role of motion of hydrogen atom in the hydrogen bonds is specially stressed in this model. This is helpful to reveal the mechanism of transcription of DNA. According to their properties of motion, we first give the Hamiltonian of the system, corresponding equations of motion and their soliton-solutions. The solitons are the excitation states formed by the displacements of hydrogen atoms and bases and the rotations of bases, arising from the energy absorbed by DNA, in the systems, respectively. By applying the transfer integral method we obtain the thermodynamic properties (e.g. free energy and entropy) of the thermal excitation state of DNA at the biological temperature in this model. According to the properties of these thermodynamic functions obtained we study the mechanism and processes of melting and transcription of DNA with the aid of the transforms of energy carried by the soliton in such a case. We further give the properties of the transcription of DNA with the help of the average value of the mean square of displacement of hydrogen atom, and the values of subcritical temperature and force of the phase transition are also found. Finally, we conclude that the transcription of DNA not only depends directly on the properties of its structure and of energy absorbed by it, but also is influenced by the temperature and salt

  20. Clinical and pathological features of familial frontotemporal dementia caused by C9ORF72 mutation on chromosome 9p.

    PubMed

    Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Feldman, Howard H; Sengdy, Pheth; Bouchard-Kerr, Phoenix; Dwosh, Emily; Butler, Rachel; Leung, Bonnie; Fok, Alice; Rutherford, Nicola J; Baker, Matt; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2012-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are closely related clinical syndromes with overlapping molecular pathogenesis. Several families have been reported with members affected by frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or both, which show genetic linkage to a region on chromosome 9p21. Recently, two studies identified the FTD/ALS gene defect on chromosome 9p as an expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72). In the present study, we provide detailed analysis of the clinical features and neuropathology for 16 unrelated families with frontotemporal dementia caused by the C9ORF72 mutation. All had an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Eight families had a combination of frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis while the other eight had a pure frontotemporal dementia phenotype. Clinical information was available for 30 affected members of the 16 families. There was wide variation in age of onset (mean = 54.3, range = 34-74 years) and disease duration (mean = 5.3, range = 1-16 years). Early diagnoses included behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15), progressive non-fluent aphasia (n = 5), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 9) and progressive non-fluent aphasia-amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 1). Heterogeneity in clinical presentation was also common within families. However, there was a tendency for the phenotypes to converge with disease progression; seven subjects had final clinical diagnoses of both frontotemporal dementia and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and all of those with an initial progressive non-fluent aphasia diagnosis subsequently developed significant behavioural abnormalities. Twenty-one affected family members came to autopsy and all were found to have transactive response DNA binding protein with M(r) 43 kD (TDP-43) pathology in a wide neuroanatomical distribution. All had involvement of the extramotor

  1. The primary research of climate change features and their causes for the recent 40 years in Xinjiang

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yujiang; He, Qing; Zhang, Jiabao; Mu, Guijin

    2003-07-01

    In the paper, the three outstanding features of climate change in Xinjiang for the recent 40 years are identified. Their causes are discussed primarily from two aspects of natural change and factitious influence. Results are as follows: (1)The warming trend of winter mean temperature in northern and southern Xinjiang are resulted from the controlling of macroclimate regularities of winter warming in The Northern Hemisphere and the local influence of factitious factors, the former is more important than the latter. (2)The increasing trend of summer precipitation in southern Xinjiang may have little to do with the change of macroclimate background, but mainly have to do with human activities, especially with increasing of real evaporation in oasis area, which are result from both the area under cultivation (or oasis) enlarging continually in southern Xinjiang between the south foot of Tianshan Mountains and the north foot of Kunlun Mountains and the amount of drawing water from Tarim River increasing continually. Furthermore, the warming trend of summer in southern Xinjiang for the recent 40 years coinciding with The Northern Hemisphere also helps to increase evaporation intensity, to form the increasing trend of real evaporation amount, and results in the increase of summer precipitation. But this is less important than the increase of available evaporation water amount and evaporation area that result from the acreage under cultivation (or oasis) enlarging. (3)The variability of annual mean temperature in Tianshan Mountainous area is the greatest, which maybe have to do with that the annul difference of early or later of forming or smelting, thick or thin and cover extent of seasonal stable snow is largely in the area.

  2. Feature analysis and primary causes of pre-flood season "cumulative effect" of torrential rain over South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Qu-cheng; Wang, Qi-guang; Qiao, Shao-bo; Feng, Guo-lin

    2016-10-01

    When persistent rainfall occurs frequently over South China, meso-scale and micro-scale synoptic systems persist and expand in space and time and eventually form meso-scale and long-scale weather processes. The accumulation of multiple torrential rain processes is defined as a "cumulative effect" of torrential rain (CETR) event. In this paper, daily reanalysis datasets collected by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) during 1979-2014 are used to study the anomalous features and causes of heavy CETR events over South China. The results show that there is a significant difference in the spatial distribution of the heavy CETR events. Based on the center position of the CETR, the middle region displayed middle-region-heavy CETR events while the western region displayed west-region-heavy CETR events. El Niño events in the previous period (December, January, February, March (DJFM)) are major extra-forcing factors of middle-region-heavy CETR events, which is beneficial for the continuous, anomalous Philippine Sea anticyclone and strengthens the West Pacific Subtropical High (WPSH), extending it more westward than normal. The primary water vapor source for precipitation in middle-region-heavy CETR events is the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean. The major extra-forcing factor of a west-region-heavy CETR is the negative anomaly in the southern Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) during the previous period (DJFM). This factor is beneficial for strengthening the cross-equatorial flow and westerly winds from the Bay of Bengal to the South China Sea (SCS) and early SCS summer monsoon onset. The primary water vapor source of precipitation in the west-region-heavy CETR is the southern TIO.

  3. The kinetic features of ion dynamics in the closed magnetic configurations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malykhin, Andrey; Grigorenko, Elena; Malova, Helmi

    2016-04-01

    A lot of spacecraft observations showed that the closed magnetic configurations such as plasmoids and magnetic islands are often observed in the Earth magnetotail. The purpose of our study is to analyze the kinetic features of nonadiabatic ion dynamics in the current sheet (CS) inside a plasmoid and the efficiency of ion acceleration in such configurations. Trajectories of test ions of different masses (H+ i O+) were studied in the prescribed magnetic configuration similar to the one observed by Cluster spacecraft (s/c). The magnetic configuration consists of a single stationary plasmoid in the tail side of a near-Earth magnetic X-line. Everywhere in the system there is the constant and uniform dawn-dusk electric field Ey ~ 0.1 mV/m. Cold ion beams with the characteristics similar to the ones observed in the lobe were launched in the system. In the absence of electromagnetic fluctuations the plasmoid localization in the dawn-dusk direction imposes a limit on the ion energy gain in the course of ion nonadiabatic interaction with the plasmoid's CS (in the region of minimum |B| field). The ion dynamics and energy gain changed dramatically when we introduced the low-frequency electromagnetic fluctuations into the plasmoid. The spectra of the magnetic and electric field fluctuations were similar to the ones observed inside the plasmoids by Cluster spacecraft. Our analysis showed that in the presence of fluctuations the ion dynamics and energy gain are defined by the resonant interaction of ions with the wave harmonics. Ions can gain energy hundred times larger than their energy gain in the system without electromagnetic fluctuations. The inclusion of a guide magnetic field (By) significantly affects the ion dynamics inside the plasmoid. The presence of a guide field generates the "north-south" asymmetry in the ejection of nonadiabatic ions from the CS. The effects of the "north-south" asymmetry in the spatial distribution of the nonadiabatic ions inside the plasmoid on

  4. Specific Features of the Nucleation and Growth of Fatigue Cracks in Steel under Cyclic Dynamic Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popelyukh, A. I.; Popelyukh, P. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Nikulina, A. A.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The processes of the fracture of 40Kh and U8 steels under cyclic dynamic compression are studied. It has been found that the main cause for the fracture of the cyclically compressed specimens is the propagation of cracks due to the effect of residual tensile stresses, which arise near the tips of the cracks at the stage of the unloading of the specimens. The growth rate of a crack has the maximum value at the initial stage of its propagation in the vicinity of the stress concentrator. As the crack propagates deep into the specimen, its growth rate decreases and depends only slightly on the real cross section of the specimen. The model of the process of the fatigue fracture of the steels under dynamic loading by a cyclically varied compressive force is proposed. It has been found that the high fatigue endurance is provided by tempering at 200°C for the 40Kh steel and at 300°C for the U8 steel.

  5. Nonlinear dynamic behaviors of permanent magnet synchronous motors in electric vehicles caused by unbalanced magnetic pull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Changle; Liu, Feng; Liu, Hui; Han, Lijin; Zhang, Xun

    2016-06-01

    Unbalanced magnetic pull (UMP) plays a key role in nonlinear dynamic behaviors of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM) in electric vehicles. Based on Jeffcott rotor model, the stiffness characteristics of the rotor system of the PMSM are analyzed and the nonlinear dynamic behaviors influenced by UMP are investigated. In free vibration study, eigenvalue-based stability analysis for multiple equilibrium points is performed which offers an insight in system stiffness. Amplitude modulation effects are discovered of which the mechanism is explained and the period of modulating signal is carried out by phase analysis and averaging method. The analysis indicates that the effects are caused by the interaction of the initial phases of forward and backward whirling motions. In forced vibration study, considering dynamic eccentricity, frequency characteristics revealing softening type are obtained by harmonic balance method, and the stability of periodic solution is investigated by Routh-Hurwitz criterion. The frequency characteristics analysis indicates that the response amplitude is limited in the range between the amplitudes of the two kinds of equilibrium points. In the vicinity of the continuum of equilibrium points, the system hardly provides resistance to bending, and hence external disturbances easily cause loss of stability. It is useful for the design of the PMSM with high stability and low vibration and acoustic noise.

  6. Causes and consequences of complex population dynamics in an annual plant, Cardamine pensylvanica

    SciTech Connect

    Crone, E.E.

    1995-11-08

    The relative importance of density-dependent and density-independent factors in determining the population dynamics of plants has been widely debated with little resolution. In this thesis, the author explores the effects of density-dependent population regulation on population dynamics in Cardamine pensylvanica, an annual plant. In the first chapter, she shows that experimental populations of C. pensylvanica cycled from high to low density in controlled constant-environment conditions. These cycles could not be explained by external environmental changes or simple models of direct density dependence (N{sub t+1} = f[N{sub t}]), but they could be explained by delayed density dependence (N{sub t+1} = f[N{sub t}, N{sub t+1}]). In the second chapter, she shows that the difference in the stability properties of population growth models with and without delayed density dependence is due to the presence of Hopf as well as slip bifurcations from stable to chaotic population dynamics. She also measures delayed density dependence due to effects of parental density on offspring quality in C. pensylvanica and shows that this is large enough to be the cause of the population dynamics observed in C. pensylvanica. In the third chapter, the author extends her analyses of density-dependent population growth models to include interactions between competing species. In the final chapter, she compares the effects of fixed spatial environmental variation and variation in population size on the evolutionary response of C. pensylvanica populations.

  7. Bloodstream infections caused by Escherichia coli producing AmpC β-lactamases: epidemiology and clinical features.

    PubMed

    Pascual, V; Alonso, N; Simó, M; Ortiz, G; Garcia, M C; Xercavins, M; Rivera, A; Morera, M A; Miró, E; Espejo, E; Navarro, F; Gurguí, M; Pérez, J; Rodríguez-Carballeira, M; Garau, J; Calbo, E

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the epidemiology and clinical features of bloodstream infections due to Escherichia coli producing AmpC β-lactamases (AmpC-Ec-BSI). In a multi-centre case-control study, all third-generation-cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli BSI (3GC-Ec-BSI) isolates were analysed. Acquired bla AmpC (bla ac-AmpC) detection was done by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Chromosomal bla AmpC (bla c-AmpC) expression was quantified by real-time PCR. Cases were patients with AmpC-Ec-BSI. Controls were patients with cephalosporin-susceptible E. coli BSI, matched 1:1 by sex and age. Demographics, comorbidities, intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for antimicrobial resistance, clinical presentation and outcomes were investigated. Among 841 E. coli BSI, 17 were caused by AmpC-Ec (2 %). Eleven isolates (58.8 %) had bla ac-AmpC and six were bla c-AmpC overproducers. The mean age of cases was 66.2 years and 71 % were men. Cases were more frequently healthcare-related (82 vs. 52 % controls, p < 0.05) and presented more intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. At least one risk factor was present in 94.1 % of cases vs. 41.7 % of controls (p = 0.002). Severity and length of stay (LOS) were higher among cases (mean Pitt Score 2.6 vs. 0.38 in controls, p = 0.03; LOS 17.5 days vs. 6 in controls, p = 0.02). Inappropriate empirical therapy (IET) was administered to 70.6 % of cases and 23.5 % of controls (p < 0.003). No differences were found in terms of cure rate at the 14th day and mortality. Bloodstream infections due to AmpC-Ec (mostly plasmid-mediated) are infrequent in our area. AmpC-Ec-BSI affects mainly patients with intrinsic risk factors and those with previous antibiotic exposure. A high proportion received IET.

  8. High borides: determining the features and details of lattice dynamics from neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    We review wide-ranging research that combines inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy with phenomenological and ab initio calculations to study the lattice dynamics and specifics of the electron-phonon interaction in three-dimensional boron cluster network systems M B_6 and M B12 ( M= {La}, {Sm}, and {Yb}, {Lu}, {Zr}). A close similarity is found between the atomic vibration spectra of these systems, which is fundamentally due to a strong hierarchy of interatomic interaction in these systems and which manifests itself both in the shape of the low-energy phonon dispersion and in the position of the high-energy edge of the spectrum. Manifestations of strong electron-phonon interactions in the lattice vibration spectra of borides are studied in detail and their relation to the nature and features of the valence-unstable state of rare-earth ions is examined. Resonance nonadiabaticity and magnetovibration interaction effects in spin- and valence-fluctuating systems are given special attention.

  9. Brownian dynamics simulation of directional sliding of histone octamers caused by DNA bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2006-05-01

    Chromatin-remodeling complexes such as SWI/SNF and RSC of yeast can perturb the structure of nucleosomes in an ATP-dependent manner. Experimental results prove that this chromatin remodeling process involves DNA bending. We simulate the effect of DNA bending, caused by chromatin-remodeling complexes, on directional sliding of histone octamers by Brownian dynamics simulation. The simulation results show that, after a DNA loop being generated at the side of a nucleosome, the histone octamer slides towards this DNA loop until the loop disappears. The DNA loop size is an important factor affecting the process of directional sliding of the histone octamer.

  10. Dynamic forces on agglomerated particles caused by high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Claas; Fritsching, Udo

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the acoustic forces on particles and agglomerates caused by high-intensity ultrasound in gaseous atmosphere are derived by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Sound induced forces cause an oscillating stress scenario where the primary particles of an agglomerate are alternatingly pressed together and torn apart with the frequency of the applied wave. A comparison of the calculated acoustic forces with respect to the inter particle adhesion forces from Van-der-Waals and liquid bridge interactions reveals that the separation forces may reach the same order of magnitude for 80 μm sized SiO2-particles. Hence, with finite probability acoustically agitated gases may de-agglomerate/disperse solid agglomerate structures. This effect is confirmed by dispersion experiments in an acoustic particle levitation setup.

  11. Is the emotion recognition deficit associated with frontotemporal dementia caused by selective inattention to diagnostic facial features?

    PubMed

    Oliver, Lindsay D; Virani, Karim; Finger, Elizabeth C; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2014-07-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severely impaired social and emotional behaviour, including emotion recognition deficits. Though fear recognition impairments seen in particular neurological and developmental disorders can be ameliorated by reallocating attention to critical facial features, the possibility that similar benefits can be conferred to patients with FTD has yet to be explored. In the current study, we examined the impact of presenting distinct regions of the face (whole face, eyes-only, and eyes-removed) on the ability to recognize expressions of anger, fear, disgust, and happiness in 24 patients with FTD and 24 healthy controls. A recognition deficit was demonstrated across emotions by patients with FTD relative to controls. Crucially, removal of diagnostic facial features resulted in an appropriate decline in performance for both groups; furthermore, patients with FTD demonstrated a lack of disproportionate improvement in emotion recognition accuracy as a result of isolating critical facial features relative to controls. Thus, unlike some neurological and developmental disorders featuring amygdala dysfunction, the emotion recognition deficit observed in FTD is not likely driven by selective inattention to critical facial features. Patients with FTD also mislabelled negative facial expressions as happy more often than controls, providing further evidence for abnormalities in the representation of positive affect in FTD. This work suggests that the emotional expression recognition deficit associated with FTD is unlikely to be rectified by adjusting selective attention to diagnostic features, as has proven useful in other select disorders.

  12. Explaining the features of the Bipolar Nebulae of η-Carinae through gas dynamical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gouveia dal Pino, E. M.; Gonzalez, R. F.; Raga, A. C.; Velezquez, P. F.

    2005-09-01

    Employing an alternative scenario to previous interacting stellar wind models that is supported both by theoretical and observational evidence, we let a nonspherical outburst wind (with a latitudinal velocity dependence that matches the observations of the large Homunculus) interact with a preeruptive slow wind also with a toroidal density distribution but with a much smaller equator-to-polar density contrast than that assumed in previous models. A second eruptive wind with spherical shape is ejected about 50 years after the first outburst and causes the development of the little internal nebula. We find that as a result of an appropriate combination of the parameters that control the degree of asymmetry of the interacting winds, the model is able to produce not only the structure and kinematics of both Homunculi but also the high-velocity components of the equatorial ejecta. These latter arise from the impact between the nonspherical outburst and the preoutburst winds in the equatorial plane (see Figs. 1 and 2 in Gonzalez, de Gouveia Dal Pino, Raga & Velazquez 2004a). Our model predicts that most of the features of the bipolar winds of eta-Carinae and the source ejection mechanism are directly linked to the central star only, therefore without requiring to invoke the secondary wind of the companion star to explain, e.g., the equatorial ejecta (Gonzalez, de Gouveia Dal Pino, Raga & Velazquez 2004b).

  13. [Landscape pattern gradient dynamics and desakota features in rapid urbanization area: a case study in Panyu of Guangzhou].

    PubMed

    Yu, Long-Sheng; Fu, Yi-Fu; Yu, Huai-Yi; Li, Zhi-Qin

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the landscape pattern gradient dynamics and desakota features in rapid urbanization area, this paper took the rapidly urbanizing Panyu District of Guangzhou City as a case, and analyzed its land use and land cover data, based on four Landsat TM images from 1990 to 2008. With the combination of gradient analysis and landscape pattern analysis, and by using the landscape indices in both class and landscape scales, the spatial dynamics and desakota feature of this rapidly urbanizing district were quantified. In the study district, there was a significant change in the landscape pattern, and a typical desakota feature presented along buffer gradient zones. Urban landscape increased and expanded annually, accompanied with serious fragmentation of agricultural landscape. The indices patch density, contagion, and landscape diversity, etc., changed regularly in the urbanization gradient, and the peak of landscape indices appeared in the gradient zone of 4-6 km away from the urban center. The landscape patterns at time series also reflected the differences among the dynamics in different gradient zones. The landscape pattern in desakota region was characterized by complex patch shape, high landscape diversity and fragmentation, and remarkable landscape dynamics. The peaks of landscape indices spread from the urban center to border areas, and desakota region was expanding gradually. The general trend of spatiotemporal dynamics in desakota region and its driving forces were discussed, which could be benefit to the regional land use policy-making and sustainable development planning.

  14. Dynamic genetic features of eukaryotic plankton diversity in the Nakdong River estuary of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jee Eun; Chung, Ik Kyo; Lee, Sang-Rae

    2016-08-01

    Estuaries are environments where freshwater and seawater mix and they display various salinity profiles. The construction of river barrages and dams has rapidly changed these environments and has had a wide range of impacts on plankton communities. To understand the dynamics of such communities, researchers need accurate and rapid techniques for detecting plankton species. We evaluated the diversity of eukaryotic plankton over a salinity gradient by applying a metagenomics tool at the Nakdong River estuary in Korea. Environmental samples were collected on three dates during summer and autumn of 2011 at the Eulsukdo Bridge at the mouth of that river. Amplifying the 18S rDNA allowed us to analyze 456 clones and 122 phylotypes. Metagenomic sequences revealed various taxonomic groups and cryptic genetic variations at the intra- and inter-specific levels. By analyzing the same station at each sampling date, we observed that the phylotypes presented a salinity-related pattern of diversity in assemblages. The variety of species within freshwater samples reflected the rapid environmental changes caused by freshwater inputs. Dinophyceae phylotypes accounted for the highest proportion of overall diversity in the seawater samples. Euryhaline diatoms and dinoflagellates were observed in the freshwater, brackish and seawater samples. The biological data for species composition demonstrate the transitional state between freshwater and seawater. Therefore, this metagenomics information can serve as a biological indicator for tracking changes in aquatic environments.

  15. Multi-Beam, High-Power Rayleigh Lidar for the Capture of 2D Dynamic Atmospheric Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S.; Swenson, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    While single-beam Rayleigh lidar have been in common usage for decades, their lack of horizontal resolution limits their ability to study the dynamic structure of the atmosphere to what can be observed in a single vertical profile. An experimental multi-beam lidar transmitter at the University of Illinois overcomes this problem by the simultaneous generation of a fan of closely-spaced near-vertical beams from a single high-power pulsed laser, allowing for the resolution of horizontal features on the order of tens of meters and the capture of dynamic events such as billows and overturnings. This transmitter is coupled with a digital receiver that allows for quickly variable vertical resolution that can be dynamically varied to match the scale of observed features.

  16. THE RELATION BETWEEN SOLAR ERUPTION TOPOLOGIES AND OBSERVED FLARE FEATURES. II. DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Savcheva, A.; McKillop, S.; McCauley, P.; Su, Y.; DeLuca, E. E.; Pariat, E.; Hanson, E.

    2016-01-20

    A long-established goal of solar physics is to build understanding of solar eruptions and develop flare and coronal mass ejection (CME) forecasting models. In this paper, we continue our investigation of nonlinear forces free field (NLFFF) models by comparing topological properties of the solutions to the evolution of the flare ribbons. In particular, we show that data-constrained NLFFF models of three erupting sigmoid regions (SOL2010-04-08, SOL2010-08-07, and SOL2012-05-12) built to reproduce the active region magnetic field in the pre-flare state can be rendered unstable and the subsequent sequence of unstable solutions produces quasi-separatrix layers that match the flare ribbon evolution as observed by SDO/AIA. We begin with a best-fit equilibrium model for the pre-flare active region. We then add axial flux to the flux rope in the model to move it across the stability boundary. At this point, the magnetofrictional code no longer converges to an equilibrium solution. The flux rope rises as the solutions are iterated. We interpret the sequence of magnetofrictional steps as an evolution of the active region as the flare/CME begins. The magnetic field solutions at different steps are compared with the flare ribbons. The results are fully consistent with the three-dimensional extension of the standard flare/CME model. Our ability to capture essential topological features of flaring active regions with a non-dynamic magnetofrictional code strongly suggests that the pre-flare, large-scale topological structures are preserved as the flux rope becomes unstable and lifts off.

  17. The hydraulic separator Multidune: preliminary tests on fluid-dynamic features and plastic separation feasibility.

    PubMed

    De Sena, Giulia; Nardi, Camillo; Cenedese, Antonio; La Marca, Floriana; Massacci, Paolo; Moroni, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Recycling of plastic materials is a rapidly developing discipline because of environmental awareness, the need to conserve materials and energy, and the growing demand to increase the production economy. The main problem in plastics recovery and recycling is related to the variety of plastic wastes, even if selective collection occurs. Therefore, plastic materials can be recycled either as mixtures or as single types, separating the different typologies by their physical (size, specific mass, etc.) and/or chemical properties. However, separation of plastics in single typologies by traditional processes and devices is difficult due to their typical low variability in properties. This paper presents a new research development for recycling industry: the Multidune separator. This is a device constructed from a sequence of parallel semi-cylindrical tubes of transparent plastic welded together in a plane. The lower half is shifted laterally and then fixed relative to the upper half. Flow is then induced in the lateral direction normal to the axis of the tubes, creating a main flow channel and two recirculation zones. This apparatus creates a differential transport of particles of low specific mass, near to 1g/cm3, allowing their separation. The flow field in the Multidune separator is studied via Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). Eulerian analysis of the data is performed to gather information about the fluid-dynamics features established by different hydraulic heads at the inlet of the Multidune. Preliminary tests on monomaterial samples have been performed, varying several operative parameters to determine the best set of values. Therefore, separation tests have been executed on composite samples, obtaining satisfactory results in terms of plastic separation feasibility.

  18. Nonlinear climate sensitivity caused by the ocean dynamics: implications for the Early Anthropogenic Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, F.; Vavrus, S. J.; Kutzbach, J. E.; Ruddiman, W. F.

    2012-12-01

    The climate sensitivity, i.e., the increase of global mean temperature with a doubling of atmospheric CO2, is almost always estimated using atmosphere models with a slab ocean, due to the computational challenges from equilibrium runs of coupled atmosphere-ocean models. The use of slab-ocean runs to approximate full-depth ocean runs requires that the slab-ocean runs, which lack ocean dynamics, can reproduce the sea ice changes from full-depth ocean runs. This might not be true, as numerous modelling studies show that ocean dynamics play an important role in rapid reductions of Arctic sea ice. In this study, we aim to quantify the role of ocean dynamics in climate sensitivity in CCSM4. Two sets of the CCSM4 experiments were conducted in either fully-coupled or slab-ocean configuration with greenhouse gas concentrations from the present-day (PD, CO2=355 ppm), pre-industrial (PI, CO2=280 ppm) and hypothetical non-anthropogenic (NA, CO2=245 ppm) pre-industrial scenario from Ruddiman's Early Anthropogenic Hypothesis. Our results show that the sensitivities of Northern Hemisphere permanent snow, Northern Hemisphere sea ice and global mean temperature are essentially linear in the slab-ocean runs, but highly non-linear in the fully-coupled simulations, with larger sensitivity during the transition of colder climates between PI and NA. The comparison between the fully-coupled and the slab-ocean simulations shows that ocean dynamics causes significantly larger increase of North Atlantic sea ice during the PI/NA transition than the PD/PI transition, suggesting a threshold might have been crossed during the PI/NA transition. Our results suggest that slab-ocean runs might underestimate the climate sensitivity due to the lack of ocean dynamics. The implication of this study is that a small increase of greenhouse gas concentration from the early agriculture several thousand years ago might have prevented the Earth from crossing this threshold that leads to glacial inceptions.

  19. Dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction: underestimated cause of hypotension and hemodynamic instability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, which is typically associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, is the third most frequent cause of unexplained hypotension. This underestimated problem may temporarily accompany various diseases (it is found in even <1% of patients with no tangible cardiac disease) and clinical situations (hypovolemia, general anesthesia). It is currently assumed that left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is a dynamic phenomenon, the occurrence of which requires the coexistence of predisposing anatomic factors and a physiological condition that induces it. The diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction should entail immediate implementation of the therapy to eliminate the factors that can potentially intensify the obstruction. Echocardiography is the basic modality in the diagnosis and treatment of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. This paper presents four patients in whom the immediate implementation of bedside echocardiography enabled a rapid diagnosis of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction and implementation of proper treatment. PMID:26674265

  20. Intraseasonal variability of organized convective systems in the Central Andes: Relationship to Regional Dynamical Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, K. I.; Slayback, D. A.; Nicholls, S.; Yager, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Andes extend from the west coast of Colombia (10N) to the southern tip of Chile (53S). In southern Peru and Bolivia, the Central Andes is split into separate eastern and western cordilleras, with a high plateau (≥ 3000 m), the Altiplano, between them. Because 90% of the Earth's tropical mountain glaciers are located in the Central Andes, our study focuses on this region, defining its zonal extent as 7S-21S and the meridional extent as the terrain 1000 m and greater. Although intense convection occurs during the wet season in the Altiplano, it is not included in the lists of regions with frequent or the most intense convection. The scarcity of in-situ observations with sufficient density and temporal resolution to resolve individual storms or even mesoscale-organized cloud systems and documented biases in microwave-based rainfall products in poorly gauged mountainous regions have impeded the development of an extensive literature on convection and convective systems in this region. With the tropical glaciers receding at unprecedented rates, leaving seasonal precipitation as an increasingly important input to the water balance in alpine valley ecosystems and streams, understanding the nature and characteristics of the seasonal precipitation becomes increasingly important for the rural economies in this region. Previous work in analyzing precipitation in the Central Andes has emphasized interannual variability with respect to ENSO, this is the first study to focus on shorter scale variability with respect to organized convection. The present study took advantage of the University of Utah's Precipitation Features database compiled from 14 years of TRMM observations (1998-2012), supplemented by field observations of rainfall and streamflow, historical gauge data, and long-term WRF-simulations, to analyze the intraseasonal variability of precipitating systems and their relationship regional dynamical features such as the Bolivian High. Through time series and

  1. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  2. Spectral Features and Charge Dynamics of Lead Halide Perovskites: Origins and Interpretations.

    PubMed

    Sum, Tze Chien; Mathews, Nripan; Xing, Guichuan; Lim, Swee Sien; Chong, Wee Kiang; Giovanni, David; Dewi, Herlina Arianita

    2016-02-16

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells are presently the forerunner among the third generation solution-processed photovoltaic technologies. With efficiencies exceeding 20% and low production costs, they are prime candidates for commercialization. Critical insights into their light harvesting, charge transport, and loss mechanisms have been gained through time-resolved optical probes such as femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy (fs-TAS), transient photoluminescence spectroscopy, and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. Specifically, the discoveries of long balanced electron-hole diffusion lengths and gain properties in halide perovskites underpin their significant roles in uncovering structure-function relations and providing essential feedback for materials development and device optimization. In particular, fs-TAS is becoming increasingly popular in perovskite characterization studies, with commercial one-box pump-probe systems readily available as part of a researcher's toolkit. Although TAS is a powerful probe in the study of charge dynamics and recombination mechanisms, its instrumentation and data interpretation can be daunting even for experienced researchers. This issue is exacerbated by the sensitive nature of halide perovskites where the kinetics are especially susceptible to pump fluence, sample preparation and handling and even degradation effects that could lead to disparate conclusions. Nonetheless, with end-users having a clear understanding of TAS's capabilities, subtleties, and limitations, cutting-edge work with deep insights can still be performed using commercial setups as has been the trend for ubiquitous spectroscopy instruments like absorption, fluorescence, and transient photoluminescence spectrometers. Herein, we will first briefly examine the photophysical processes in lead halide perovskites, highlighting their novel properties. Next, we proceed to give a succinct overview of the fundamentals of pump-probe spectroscopy in relation

  3. Reduction in wire tension caused by dynamic loading. An experimental Ilizarov frame study.

    PubMed

    La Russa, Valentina; Skallerud, Bjørn; Klaksvik, Jomar; Foss, Olav A

    2011-05-17

    Small diameter transosseous wires are main parts of the Ilizarov frame concept. Wire tensioning is essential to gain the necessary transversal stiffness, and the wire fixators are therefore important, coupling the wire to the ring. The ability of three different wire fixator designs to maintain wire tension under dynamic loading is described. The three fixator designs were combinations of two types of bolts and one washer. In a simplified frame set-up consisting of one ring and one wire, sixty wires were dynamically loaded in sequence with 200N for 450 times and wire tension was repeatedly measured. The tension loss employing the different fixator types at two wire pretension levels (883N, 1275N) was measured. Wire slippage in the fixators and the midpoint deflection angle of the wires were measured. Large differences in fixation ability were observed. Wire fixators holding a larger and rougher contact surface had significant smaller tension loss compared to fixators with a smaller and smother contact surface. Both plastic wire deformation and slippage causes tension loss with slippage as the main contributor. Wire fixators' design can be improved in order to maintain wire tension. Such improvement could be of clinical interest enhancing the mechanical stability of the fixator.

  4. Simplex-based wavefront control for the mitigation of dynamic distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Vladimir V.; Zhang, Dave

    2005-04-01

    Laser communication systems operating in the atmosphere require certain power and beam quality to establish and maintain a reliable communication link. Although such systems utilize the most advanced materials and technologies, their performance is adversely affected by optical turbulence, often posing a serious problem, even for short-range links. Atmospheric effects change optical properties of the propagation channel, causing signal fades, beam wander and scintillations. A common method of mitigating turbulence effects suggests dynamic wavefront control. In this paper the proposed technique is based on correction of the distorted beam using an electrically addressed programmable spatial light modulator (SLM). The phase profile that we impose on the distorted laser beam is described using Zernike formalism to calculate the wavefront OPD function. The Nelder-Mead simplex optimization algorithm is used as a correction procedure that provides fast results, required for real-time operation. In general, calculation of the required phase profile for an SLM with large number of pixels could be highly computationally intensive. Coupling modulator inputs to the first several Zernike coefficients allows significant reduction of the dimension of the optimization problem. The algorithm is tested in the simulation environment and its ability to compensate dynamic distortions is assessed. The results show that both dimension of the input space and the initial conditions affect the speed and convergence to a particular minimum. Recommendations for improving the system performance are also presented.

  5. Universal features of water dynamics in solutions of hydrophilic polymers, biopolymers, and small glass-forming materials.

    PubMed

    Cerveny, Silvina; Alegría, Angel; Colmenero, Juan

    2008-03-01

    A systematic investigation by dielectric spectroscopy of 18 different water-rich mixtures with very different hydrophilic substances shows universal features for the water dynamics. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times exhibits a crossover from non-Arrhenius to Arrhenius behavior at the T(g) range of the mixtures. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the relaxation times presents a universal behavior both above and below the crossover temperature. We also show that these features suggest that the observed crossover is associated with the emergence of confinement effects.

  6. Climatic conditions cause spatially dynamic polygyny thresholds in a large mammal.

    PubMed

    Manning, Jeffrey A; McLoughlin, Philip D

    2017-03-01

    The polygyny threshold (PT) is a critical transition point in the sexual selection process for many organisms in natural populations, characterizing when females choose to mate with an already mated male over an unmated one to improve fitness. Understanding its causes and consequences is therefore of high interest. While both theoretical and empirical work suggest that the degree of polygyny within a species is plastic and a function of male inequality, the functional relationship between underlying availability of resources occupied by breeding males under variable climatic conditions and the dynamics of PTs across space and time has received less attention. Here, we use a standardized measure of male mating inequality as the culmination of female mate choices to analyse how spatially dynamic PTs in a naturally regulated feral horse (Equus ferus caballus) population emerge along a geographic gradient in a known, limiting resource (freshwater) each year from variable climatic conditions. Polygyny threshold distance from permanent freshwater increased with increasing precipitation during the breeding season of each year, suggesting a relationship between annual resource availability and female mate choice. The mechanism by which climatic conditions underpin the spatial dynamics of PTs was likely through precipitation providing ephemeral freshwater sources across the study area that effectively weakened the gradient in availability of permanent freshwater, thereby providing mating males that occupied home ranges far from permanent water with access to this limiting resource and enabling them to attract and retain females. Increased precipitation also coincided with a decreased proportion of males in the population that experienced sexual selection pressure attributed to female mate choice in relation to the acquisition and/or defence of freshwater sources. Climatic conditions caused spatial shifts in PTs annually along the geographic gradient in resource availability

  7. The dynamics of spreading bacterial diseases and ilnesses caused by helminthosis in Adjara Autonomous Republic 2011.

    PubMed

    Lomtatidze, N; Chachnelidze, R; Chkaidze, M

    2013-01-01

    According to the data of past few years it has been determined that the general incidence and the prevalence of the bacterial and helminthosis diseases have increased. Epidemic Supervision has registered a slight increase of such diseases in data of 2011. Taking into consideration this fact, this research is quite important for the region of Adjara. The aim of our research is to study the dynamics of spreading some bacterial and helminthosis diseases in Adjara Autonomous Republic. In particular, the diseases caused by different bacterias of leptospira family - leptospirosis and illnesses caused by helminthosis - ascariasis, enterobiasis and trichocephalosis. according to the reseaches held it has been determined that there have been several cases of leptospirosis registered in Adjara. Specifically, 10 cases in 2008, 6 in 2009, 30 in 2010 and 31 cases in 2011 out of which 10 of the cases where laboratorily claimed. There were cases of ascariasis, enterobiasis and trichocephalosis. According to data, there are 5 times less cases of trichocephalosis than of ascariasis. As for enterobiasis, it's less than ascariasis (the difference is 205 cases). In therms of the aging, all the cases occur more frequently in the group of children below the age of 14.

  8. Wide clinical variability in conditions with coarse facial features and hypertrichosis caused by mutations in ABCC9.

    PubMed

    Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Voigt, Claudia; Goecke, Timm O; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Wagner, Nicholas; Kuechler, Alma; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    We present two previously unreported and unrelated female patients, one with the tentative diagnosis of acromegaloid facial appearance (AFA), the other with the tentative diagnosis of hypertrichosis with acromegaloid facial appearance (HAFF) with or without gingival hyperplasia. Main clinical features of HAFF were generalized hypertrichosis terminalis and coarse facial features. In both patients, pregnancy was complicated by polyhydramnios, and both had hyperbilirubinemia and persistent fetal circulation. Development was normal in one patient and slightly delayed in the other. At 13 years, both had round faces with full cheeks, thick scalp hair and eyebrows, a low frontal hairline, hirsutism, hyperextensible joints and deep palmar creases. One of them additionally showed gingival hypertrophy and epicanthus, the other one was macrocephalic at birth and at the age of 13 years and suffered from repeated swelling of the soft tissue. Array analysis excluded a 17q24.2-q24.3 microdeletion, which has been reported in patients with hypertrichosis terminalis with or without gingival hyperplasia. Sequencing of the mutational hotspots of the ABCC9 gene revealed two different de novo missense mutations in the two patients. Recently, identical mutations have been found recurrently in patients with Cantú syndrome. Therefore, we propose that ABCC9 mutations lead to a spectrum of phenotypes formerly known as Cantú syndrome, HAFF and AFA, which may not be clearly distinguishable by clinical criteria, and that all patients with clinical signs belonging to this spectrum should be revisited and offered ABCC9 mutation analysis.

  9. Deviations in the endocrine system and brain of patients with fibromyalgia: cause or consequence of pain and associated features?

    PubMed

    Geenen, Rinie; Bijlsma, Johannes W J

    2010-04-01

    The brain and endocrine system are crucial interfaces responding to pathological and psychological processes. This review discusses whether endocrine deviations and structural and functional changes in the brain are a cause or consequence of fibromyalgia. Studies in patients with fibromyalgia virtually uniformly observed subtle alterations in hypothalamic pituitary adrenal functioning, hyporeactive autonomic nervous system responsiveness to stressors, and structural and functional changes in the brain. Our model proposes that predisposing factors, such as genetic vulnerability and trauma, have led to an alteration of the nociceptive system including several neuroendocrine changes. The resulting pain and associated symptoms, such as sleep disturbance, low fitness, fatigue, stress, and distress, are a cause of new neuroendocrine changes. The model predicts that favorable neuroendocrine changes are to be expected after successful pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions that target pain and associated symptoms.

  10. A dynamic image recognition method for sleeper springs trouble of moving freight cars based on Haar features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuqiang; Jiang, Yuan; Zhang, Guangjun

    2006-11-01

    A novel conception of automatic recognition for free-trouble sleeper springs is proposed and Adaboost algorithm based on Haar features is applied for the sleeper springs recognition in Trouble of moving Freight car Detection System (TFDS). In the recognition system, feature set of sleeper springs is determined by Haar features and selected by Adaboost algorithm. In order to recognize and select the free-trouble sleeper springs from all the captured dynamic images, a cascade of classifier is established by searching dynamic images. The amount of detected images is drastically reduced and the recognition efficiency is improved due to the conception of free-trouble recognition. Experiments show that the proposed method is characterized by simple feature, high efficiency and robustness. It performs high robustness against noise as well as translation, rotation and scale transformations of objects and indicates high stability to images with poor quality such as low resolution, partial occlusion, poor illumination and overexposure etc. The recognition time of a 640×480 image is about 16ms, and Correct Detection Rate is high up to about 97%, while Miss Detection Rate and Error Detection Rate are very low. The proposed method can recognize sleeper springs in all-weather conditions, which advances the engineering application for TFDS.

  11. Association between dynamic features of breast DCE-MR imaging and clinical response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a preliminary analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lijuan; Fan, Ming; Li, Lihua; Zhang, Juan; Shao, Guoliang; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is being used increasingly in the management of patients with breast cancer for systemically reducing the size of primary tumor before surgery in order to improve survival. The clinical response of patients to NACT is correlated with reduced or abolished of their primary tumor, which is important for treatment in the next stage. Recently, the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used for evaluation of the response of patients to NACT. To measure this correlation, we extracted the dynamic features from the DCE- MRI and performed association analysis between these features and the clinical response to NACT. In this study, 59 patients are screened before NATC, of which 47 are complete or partial response, and 12 are no response. We segmented the breast areas depicted on each MR image by a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme, registered images acquired from the sequential MR image scan series, and calculated eighteen features extracted from DCE-MRI. We performed SVM with the 18 features for classification between patients of response and no response. Furthermore, 6 of the 18 features are selected to refine the classification by using Genetic Algorithm. The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity are 87%, 95.74% and 50%, respectively. The calculated area under a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is 0.79+/-0.04. This study indicates that the features of DCE-MRI of breast cancer are associated with the response of NACT. Therefore, our method could be helpful for evaluation of NACT in treatment of breast cancer.

  12. Genetic diversity and dynamic distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates causing pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srilohasin, Prapaporn; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nishida, Nao; Prammananan, Therdsak; Smittipat, Nat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chaiyasirinroje, Boonchai; Yanai, Hideki; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the genetic diversity and dynamicity of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Thailand using nearly neutral molecular markers. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotypes of 1,414 culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates from 1,282 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 132 extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) patients collected from 1995 to 2011 were characterized. Among the eight SNP cluster groups (SCG), SCG2 (44.1%), which included the Beijing (BJ) genotype, and SCG1 (39.4%), an East African Indian genotype, were dominant. Comparisons between the genotypes of M. tuberculosis isolates causing PTB and EPTB in HIV-negative cases revealed similar prevalence trends although genetic diversity was higher in the PTB patients. The identification of 10 reported sequence types (STs) and three novel STs was hypothesized to indicate preferential expansion of the SCG2 genotype, especially the modern BJ ST10 (15.6%) and ancestral BJ ST19 (13.1%). An association between SCG2 and SCG1 genotypes and particular patient age groups implies the existence of different genetic advantages among the bacterial populations. The results revealed that increasing numbers of young patients were infected with M. tuberculosis SCGs 2 and 5, which contrasts with the reduction of the SCG1 genotype. Our results indicate the selection and dissemination of potent M. tuberculosis genotypes in this population. The determination of heterogeneity and dynamic population changes of circulating M. tuberculosis strains in countries using the Mycobacterium bovis BCG (bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine are beneficial for vaccine development and control strategies.

  13. Human-caused mortality influences spatial population dynamics: pumas in landscapes with varying mortality risks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newby, Jesse R.; Mills, L. Scott; Ruth, Toni K.; Pletscher, Daniel H.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Quigley, Howard B.; Murphy, Kerry M.; DeSimone, Rich

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of how stressors affect dispersal attributes and the contribution of local populations to multi-population dynamics are of immediate value to basic and applied ecology. Puma (Puma concolor) populations are expected to be influenced by inter-population movements and susceptible to human-induced source–sink dynamics. Using long-term datasets we quantified the contribution of two puma populations to operationally define them as sources or sinks. The puma population in the Northern Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (NGYE) was largely insulated from human-induced mortality by Yellowstone National Park. Pumas in the western Montana Garnet Mountain system were exposed to greater human-induced mortality, which changed over the study due to the closure of a 915 km2 area to hunting. The NGYE’s population growth depended on inter-population movements, as did its ability to act as a source to the larger region. The heavily hunted Garnet area was a sink with a declining population until the hunting closure, after which it became a source with positive intrinsic growth and a 16× increase in emigration. We also examined the spatial and temporal characteristics of individual dispersal attributes (emigration, dispersal distance, establishment success) of subadult pumas (N = 126). Human-caused mortality was found to negatively impact all three dispersal components. Our results demonstrate the influence of human-induced mortality on not only within population vital rates, but also inter-population vital rates, affecting the magnitude and mechanisms of local population’s contribution to the larger metapopulation.

  14. Loss-of-function HDAC8 mutations cause a phenotypic spectrum of Cornelia de Lange syndrome-like features, ocular hypertelorism, large fontanelle and X-linked inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Frank J.; Ansari, Morad; Braunholz, Diana; Concepción Gil-Rodríguez, María; Decroos, Christophe; Wilde, Jonathan J.; Fincher, Christopher T.; Kaur, Maninder; Bando, Masashige; Amor, David J.; Atwal, Paldeep S.; Bahlo, Melanie; Bowman, Christine M.; Bradley, Jacquelyn J.; Brunner, Han G.; Clark, Dinah; Del Campo, Miguel; Di Donato, Nataliya; Diakumis, Peter; Dubbs, Holly; Dyment, David A.; Eckhold, Juliane; Ernst, Sarah; Ferreira, Jose C.; Francey, Lauren J.; Gehlken, Ulrike; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Gyftodimou, Yolanda; Hall, Bryan D.; Hennekam, Raoul; Hudgins, Louanne; Hullings, Melanie; Hunter, Jennifer M.; Yntema, Helger; Innes, A. Micheil; Kline, Antonie D.; Krumina, Zita; Lee, Hane; Leppig, Kathleen; Lynch, Sally Ann; Mallozzi, Mark B.; Mannini, Linda; Mckee, Shane; Mehta, Sarju G.; Micule, Ieva; Mohammed, Shehla; Moran, Ellen; Mortier, Geert R.; Moser, Joe-Ann S.; Noon, Sarah E.; Nozaki, Naohito; Nunes, Luis; Pappas, John G.; Penney, Lynette S.; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio; Petersen, Michael B.; Puisac, Beatriz; Revencu, Nicole; Roeder, Elizabeth; Saitta, Sulagna; Scheuerle, Angela E.; Schindeler, Karen L.; Siu, Victoria M.; Stark, Zornitza; Strom, Samuel P.; Thiese, Heidi; Vater, Inga; Willems, Patrick; Williamson, Kathleen; Wilson, Louise C.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Quintero-Rivera, Fabiola; Wierzba, Jolanta; Musio, Antonio; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Ramos, Feliciano J.; Jackson, Laird G.; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Pié, Juan; Christianson, David W.; Krantz, Ian D.; Fitzpatrick, David R.; Deardorff, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem genetic disorder with distinct facies, growth failure, intellectual disability, distal limb anomalies, gastrointestinal and neurological disease. Mutations in NIPBL, encoding a cohesin regulatory protein, account for >80% of cases with typical facies. Mutations in the core cohesin complex proteins, encoded by the SMC1A, SMC3 and RAD21 genes, together account for ∼5% of subjects, often with atypical CdLS features. Recently, we identified mutations in the X-linked gene HDAC8 as the cause of a small number of CdLS cases. Here, we report a cohort of 38 individuals with an emerging spectrum of features caused by HDAC8 mutations. For several individuals, the diagnosis of CdLS was not considered prior to genomic testing. Most mutations identified are missense and de novo. Many cases are heterozygous females, each with marked skewing of X-inactivation in peripheral blood DNA. We also identified eight hemizygous males who are more severely affected. The craniofacial appearance caused by HDAC8 mutations overlaps that of typical CdLS but often displays delayed anterior fontanelle closure, ocular hypertelorism, hooding of the eyelids, a broader nose and dental anomalies, which may be useful discriminating features. HDAC8 encodes the lysine deacetylase for the cohesin subunit SMC3 and analysis of the functional consequences of the missense mutations indicates that all cause a loss of enzymatic function. These data demonstrate that loss-of-function mutations in HDAC8 cause a range of overlapping human developmental phenotypes, including a phenotypically distinct subgroup of CdLS. PMID:24403048

  15. Infection dynamics in frog populations with different histories of decline caused by a deadly disease.

    PubMed

    Sapsford, Sarah J; Voordouw, Maarten J; Alford, Ross A; Schwarzkopf, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Pathogens can drive host population dynamics. Chytridiomycosis is a fungal disease of amphibians that is caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). This pathogen has caused declines and extinctions in some host species whereas other host species coexist with Bd without suffering declines. In the early 1990s, Bd extirpated populations of the endangered common mistfrog, Litoria rheocola, at high-elevation sites, while populations of the species persisted at low-elevation sites. Today, populations have reappeared at many high-elevation sites where they presently co-exist with the fungus. We conducted a capture-mark-recapture (CMR) study of six populations of L. rheocola over 1 year, at high and low elevations. We used multistate CMR models to determine which factors (Bd infection status, site type, and season) influenced rates of frog survival, recapture, infection, and recovery from infection. We observed Bd-induced mortality of individual frogs, but did not find any significant effect of Bd infection on the survival rate of L. rheocola at the population level. Survival and recapture rates depended on site type and season. Infection rate was highest in winter when temperatures were favourable for pathogen growth, and differed among site types. The recovery rate was high (75.7-85.8%) across seasons, and did not differ among site types. The coexistence of L. rheocola with Bd suggests that (1) frog populations are becoming resistant to the fungus, (2) Bd may have evolved lower virulence, or (3) current environmental conditions may be inhibiting outbreaks of the fatal disease.

  16. Heterozygous Pathogenic Variant in DACT1 Causes an Autosomal-Dominant Syndrome with Features Overlapping Townes–Brocks Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Bryn D.; Metikala, Sanjeeva; Wheeler, Patricia G.; Sherpa, Mingma D.; Houten, Sander M.; Horb, Marko E.; Schadt, Eric E.

    2017-01-01

    A heterozygous nonsense variant was identified in dapper, antagonist of beta-catenin, 1 (DACT1) via whole-exome sequencing in family members with imperforate anus, structural renal abnormalities, genitourinary anomalies, and/or ear anomalies. The DACT1 c.1256G>A;p.Trp419* variant segregated appropriately in the family consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. DACT1 is a member of the Wnt-signaling pathway, and mice homozygous for null alleles display multiple congenital anomalies including absent anus with blind-ending colon and genitourinary malformations. To investigate the DACT1 c.1256G>A variant, HEK293 cells were transfected with mutant DACT1 cDNA plasmid, and immunoblotting revealed stability of the DACT1 p.Trp419* protein. Overexpression of DACT1 c.1256G>A mRNA in Xenopus embryos revealed a specific gastrointestinal phenotype of enlargement of the proctodeum. Together, these findings suggest that the DACT1 c.1256G>A nonsense variant is causative of a specific genetic syndrome with features overlapping Townes–Brocks syndrome. PMID:28054444

  17. Ambient noise causes independent changes in distinct spectro-temporal features of echolocation calls in horseshoe bats.

    PubMed

    Hage, Steffen R; Jiang, Tinglei; Berquist, Sean W; Feng, Jiang; Metzner, Walter

    2014-07-15

    One of the most efficient mechanisms to optimize signal-to-noise ratios is the Lombard effect - an involuntary rise in call amplitude due to ambient noise. It is often accompanied by changes in the spectro-temporal composition of calls. We examined the effects of broadband-filtered noise on the spectro-temporal composition of horseshoe bat echolocation calls, which consist of a constant-frequency component and initial and terminal frequency-modulated components. We found that the frequency-modulated components became larger for almost all noise conditions, whereas the bandwidth of the constant-frequency component increased only when broadband-filtered noise was centered on or above the calls' dominant or fundamental frequency. This indicates that ambient noise independently modifies the associated acoustic parameters of the Lombard effect, such as spectro-temporal features, and could significantly affect the bat's ability to detect and locate targets. Our findings may be of significance in evaluating the impact of environmental noise on echolocation behavior in bats.

  18. Heterozygous Pathogenic Variant in DACT1 Causes an Autosomal-Dominant Syndrome with Features Overlapping Townes-Brocks Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Webb, Bryn D; Metikala, Sanjeeva; Wheeler, Patricia G; Sherpa, Mingma D; Houten, Sander M; Horb, Marko E; Schadt, Eric E

    2017-01-05

    A heterozygous nonsense variant was identified in dapper, antagonist of beta-catenin, 1 (DACT1) via whole-exome sequencing in family members with imperforate anus, structural renal abnormalities, genitourinary anomalies, and/or ear anomalies. The DACT1 c.1256G>A;p.Trp419(*) variant segregated appropriately in the family consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. DACT1 is a member of the Wnt-signaling pathway, and mice homozygous for null alleles display multiple congenital anomalies including absent anus with blind-ending colon and genitourinary malformations. To investigate the DACT1 c.1256G>A variant, HEK293 cells were transfected with mutant DACT1 cDNA plasmid, and immunoblotting revealed stability of the DACT1 p.Trp419(*) protein. Overexpression of DACT1 c.1256G>A mRNA in Xenopus embryos revealed a specific gastrointestinal phenotype of enlargement of the proctodeum. Together, these findings suggest that the DACT1 c.1256G>A nonsense variant is causative of a specific genetic syndrome with features overlapping Townes-Brocks syndrome.

  19. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  20. Time-varying coupling functions: Dynamical inference and cause of synchronization transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankovski, Tomislav

    2017-02-01

    Interactions in nature can be described by their coupling strength, direction of coupling, and coupling function. The coupling strength and directionality are relatively well understood and studied, at least for two interacting systems; however, there can be a complexity in the interactions uniquely dependent on the coupling functions. Such a special case is studied here: synchronization transition occurs only due to the time variability of the coupling functions, while the net coupling strength is constant throughout the observation time. To motivate the investigation, an example is used to present an analysis of cross-frequency coupling functions between delta and alpha brain waves extracted from the electroencephalography recording of a healthy human subject in a free-running resting state. The results indicate that time-varying coupling functions are a reality for biological interactions. A model of phase oscillators is used to demonstrate and detect the synchronization transition caused by the varying coupling functions during an invariant coupling strength. The ability to detect this phenomenon is discussed with the method of dynamical Bayesian inference, which was able to infer the time-varying coupling functions. The form of the coupling function acts as an additional dimension for the interactions, and it should be taken into account when detecting biological or other interactions from data.

  1. Monitoring of Freezing Dynamics in Trees: A Simple Phase Shift Causes Complexity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Charra-Vaskou, Katline

    2017-01-01

    During winter, trees have to cope with harsh conditions, including extreme freeze-thaw stress. This study focused on ice nucleation and propagation, related water shifts and xylem cavitation, as well as cell damage and was based on in situ monitoring of xylem (thermocouples) and surface temperatures (infrared imaging), ultrasonic emissions, and dendrometer analysis. Field experiments during late winter on Picea abies growing at the alpine timberline revealed three distinct freezing patterns: (1) from the top of the tree toward the base, (2) from thin branches toward the main stem’s top and base, and (3) from the base toward the top. Infrared imaging showed freezing within branches from their base toward distal parts. Such complex freezing causes dynamic and heterogenous patterns in water potential and probably in cavitation. This study highlights the interaction between environmental conditions upon freezing and thawing and demonstrates the enormous complexity of freezing processes in trees. Diameter shrinkage, which indicated water fluxes within the stem, and acoustic emission analysis, which indicated cavitation events near the ice front upon freezing, were both related to minimum temperature and, upon thawing, related to vapor pressure deficit and soil temperature. These complex patterns, emphasizing the common mechanisms between frost and drought stress, shed new light on winter tree physiology. PMID:28242655

  2. On the Causes and Dynamics of the Early Twentieth Century North American Pluvial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Seager, Richard; Miller, Ron L.

    2011-01-01

    The early twentieth century North American pluvial (1905-1917) was one of the most extreme wet periods of the last five hundred years and directly led to overly generous water allotments in the water-limited American West. Here we examine the causes and dynamics of the pluvial event using a combination of observation-based data sets and general circulation model (GCM) experiments. The character of the moisture surpluses during the pluvial differed by region, alternately driven by increased precipitation (the Southwest), low evaporation from cool temperatures (the Central Plains), or a combination of the two (the Pacific Northwest). Cool temperature anomalies covered much of the west and persisted through most months, part of a globally extensive period of cooler land and sea surface temperatures (SST). Circulation during boreal winter favored increased moisture import and precipitation in the southwest, while other regions and seasons were characterized by near normal or reduced precipitation. Anomalies in the mean circulation, precipitation, and SST fields are partially consistent with the relatively weak El Nino forcing during the pluvial, and also reflect the impact of positive departures in the Arctic Oscillation that occurred in ten of the thirteen pluvial winters. Differences between the reanalysis dataset, an independent statistical drought model, and GCM simulations highlight some of the remaining uncertainties in understanding the full extent of SST forcing of North American hydroclimatic variability.

  3. Monitoring of Freezing Dynamics in Trees: A Simple Phase Shift Causes Complexity.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Guillaume; Nolf, Markus; Leitinger, Georg; Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Losso, Adriano; Tappeiner, Ulrike; Améglio, Thierry; Mayr, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    During winter, trees have to cope with harsh conditions, including extreme freeze-thaw stress. This study focused on ice nucleation and propagation, related water shifts and xylem cavitation, as well as cell damage and was based on in situ monitoring of xylem (thermocouples) and surface temperatures (infrared imaging), ultrasonic emissions, and dendrometer analysis. Field experiments during late winter on Picea abies growing at the alpine timberline revealed three distinct freezing patterns: (1) from the top of the tree toward the base, (2) from thin branches toward the main stem's top and base, and (3) from the base toward the top. Infrared imaging showed freezing within branches from their base toward distal parts. Such complex freezing causes dynamic and heterogenous patterns in water potential and probably in cavitation. This study highlights the interaction between environmental conditions upon freezing and thawing and demonstrates the enormous complexity of freezing processes in trees. Diameter shrinkage, which indicated water fluxes within the stem, and acoustic emission analysis, which indicated cavitation events near the ice front upon freezing, were both related to minimum temperature and, upon thawing, related to vapor pressure deficit and soil temperature. These complex patterns, emphasizing the common mechanisms between frost and drought stress, shed new light on winter tree physiology.

  4. Time-varying coupling functions: Dynamical inference and cause of synchronization transitions.

    PubMed

    Stankovski, Tomislav

    2017-02-01

    Interactions in nature can be described by their coupling strength, direction of coupling, and coupling function. The coupling strength and directionality are relatively well understood and studied, at least for two interacting systems; however, there can be a complexity in the interactions uniquely dependent on the coupling functions. Such a special case is studied here: synchronization transition occurs only due to the time variability of the coupling functions, while the net coupling strength is constant throughout the observation time. To motivate the investigation, an example is used to present an analysis of cross-frequency coupling functions between delta and alpha brain waves extracted from the electroencephalography recording of a healthy human subject in a free-running resting state. The results indicate that time-varying coupling functions are a reality for biological interactions. A model of phase oscillators is used to demonstrate and detect the synchronization transition caused by the varying coupling functions during an invariant coupling strength. The ability to detect this phenomenon is discussed with the method of dynamical Bayesian inference, which was able to infer the time-varying coupling functions. The form of the coupling function acts as an additional dimension for the interactions, and it should be taken into account when detecting biological or other interactions from data.

  5. Investigation of special features of parameters of Schottky barrier contacts caused by a nonlinear bias dependence of the barrier height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhkov, V. G.; Shmargunov, A. V.

    2012-03-01

    The results of studying the IV-characteristics (IVCs) of the contact Au-n-GaAs obtained by electrochemical deposition are presented. The observed characteristics - the bias dependence of the ideality factor (n), the measured (ϕbm) and effective (ϕbI) barrier heights, an inverse relationship between the measured barrier height and ideality factor, and the edge effects (the dependence of n, ϕbm, and ϕbI on the contact diameter) are explained by the nonlinear bias dependence on the effective barrier height. The explanation is given on the basis of the contact model with an intermediate layer and interface states (Bardeen model), and the intimate contact model with the subsurface states. The nonlinearity of the bias dependence on the barrier height is due to the inhomogeneous energy distribution of the interface states (a decrease in density from the edges to the middle of the bandgap) and the inhomogeneous energy and coordinate (from the surface to the depth) distribution of the subsurface states. An essential feature for every model is also the condition that the barrier height and ideality factor are measured at a constant current (or in a constant range of currents) while studying contacts with different diameters or when measuring the IVCs at different temperatures. This condition is not difficult to achieve, but gives the necessary certainty to different barrier height values used in examining experimental results. Some limitations and shortcomings of the widely used model of inhomogeneous Schottky barrier contact with the "saddle points" are also discussed.

  6. DYNAMICS OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR EMISSION FEATURES FROM NANOSECOND, FEMTOSECOND LASER AND FILAMENT PRODUCED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-08-08

    In this presentation, the persistence of atomic, and molecular emission features and its relation to fundamental properties (temperature and density) of ablation plumes generated using various irradiation methods (ns, fs, filaments) will be discussed in detail along with its implications for remote sensing applications.

  7. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M.; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B.; Mishra, Sasmita; EI-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J.; Hill, R. Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N.; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N.; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A. James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Housman, David E.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Morrow, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  8. TGFB2 mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections associated with mild systemic features of Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth K; Li, Alexander H; d'Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2012-07-08

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease followed by whole-exome sequencing of affected relatives identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations-a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4-segregated with disease with a combined logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified 2 additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2, and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2; however, aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency for TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting that the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta.

  9. Unique Features of Dynamic Isotope Power Systems for High-Requirements Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Raab, Bernard

    1980-08-01

    The Dynamic Isotope Power System, designed for spacecraft requiring prime power in the 500-to-2000 watt range, has been successfully built and ground tested. A number of studies, summarized herein, have demonstrated the advantages of using such a power system instead of the conventional solar system, for a variety of earth-orbit missions. These advantages stem from the unique nature of the dynamic isotope system, different in kind from solar power systems. As a result, in many cases, the spacecraft design can be significantly simplified and more closely harmonized with mission requirements. This overall advantage can be crucial in missions which have stringent pointing, stability, viewing and/or positioning requirements.

  10. Clinical and pathological features of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis caused by mutation in the C9ORF72 gene on chromosome 9p.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Heather; Rutherford, Nicola J; Briemberg, Hannah; Krieger, Charles; Cashman, Neil; Fabros, Marife; Baker, Matt; Fok, Alice; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Eisen, Andrew; Rademakers, Rosa; Mackenzie, Ian R A

    2012-03-01

    Two studies recently identified a GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in a non-coding region of the chromosome 9 open-reading frame 72 gene (C9ORF72) as the cause of chromosome 9p-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). In a cohort of 231 probands with ALS, we identified the C9ORF72 mutation in 17 familial (27.4%) and six sporadic (3.6%) cases. Patients with the mutation presented with typical motor features of ALS, although subjects with the C9ORF72 mutation had more frequent bulbar onset, compared to those without this mutation. Dementia was significantly more common in ALS patients and families with the C9ORF72 mutation and was usually early-onset FTD. There was striking clinical heterogeneity among the members of individual families with the mutation. The associated neuropathology was a combination of ALS with TDP-ir inclusions and FTLD-TDP. In addition to TDP-43-immunoreactive pathology, a consistent and specific feature of cases with the C9ORF72 mutation was the presence of ubiquitin-positive, TDP-43-negative inclusions in a variety of neuroanatomical regions, such as the cerebellar cortex. These findings support the C9ORF72 mutation as an important newly recognized cause of ALS, provide a more detailed characterization of the associated clinical and pathological features and further demonstrate the clinical and molecular overlap between ALS and FTD.

  11. Dissimilar receiver functions observed at very close stations in the Kii Peninsula, central Japan: features and causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Katsuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Receiver function analysis is one of the most powerful methods for modeling the subsurface structure beneath a seismograph station. Based on the assumption that similar receiver functions should be observed at stations located close to each other, we can construct a spatial distribution of a seismic velocity interface, such as the Moho discontinuity, to trace the distribution of P-to- S ( Ps) converted phases in receiver functions. After more than 15 years of observation by the seismograph networks, we confirmed that receiver functions observed at two stations very close to each other in the Kii Peninsula, central Japan, show significantly different characteristics from each other. The backazimuth dependence of later phase arrivals within 4 s after the direct P wave was strong, especially for transverse components. Because the Ps converted phases at the Moho discontinuity arrived around 4 s after the direct P wave, we assume that the dissimilarity is caused by a localized structural anomaly in the crust. This assumption is supported by the fact that only the cross-correlation coefficients for the short-period transverse component of teleseismic waveforms were small. According to the geological map, the two stations are located in the accretionary complex along the Pacific coast, and the strikes of the geological boundaries show an abrupt change around the stations. Based on forward modeling with the anisotropic subsurface models, we confirmed that the characteristics of the observed receiver functions can be explained roughly by considering a localized anomaly in the upper and middle crust.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. The Philosophical Underpinnings and Key Features of the Dynamic Learning Maps Alternate Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Neal M.; Karvonen, Meagan; Bechard, Sue; Erickson, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    The Dynamic Learning Maps™ Alternate Assessment is based on a different set of guiding principles than other assessments. In this article we describe characteristics of the alternate assessment population and we look at the history of alternate assessment and the problems that have been faced in implementing useful assessment programs for students…

  13. Extraction of Dynamic Features from Hand Drawn Data for the Identification of Children with Handwriting Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalid, Puspa Inayat; Yunus, Jasmy; Adnan, Robiah

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that differences between children with and without handwriting difficulties lie not only in the written product (static data) but also in dynamic data of handwriting process. Since writing system varies among countries and individuals, this study was conducted to determine the feasibility of using quantitative outcome measures…

  14. Interactions Between Large Bedrock Features and Ice Sheet Dynamics Interpreted From Deep-Penetrating Radar Along the US-ITASE Traverse Routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, B. C.; Jacobel, R. W.; Christianson, K.; Cofell-Dwyer, K.

    2003-12-01

    Ice-penetrating radar studies depicting the structure of internal stratigraphy in ice sheets can be used to infer information about past ice dynamics and changes in ice flow over time. To date, most radar studies in the interior of major ice sheets have shown internal layers draped smoothly over bed topography with decreasing relief toward the surface. This result is one consequence of ice frozen to the bed and accumulation patterns that do not vary substantially in space or time. In contrast, areas that show significant deformation of internal layers are typically found in ice streams, where sliding can cause large strains. Deep-penetrating radar profiles from the 2001 and 2002 US-ITASE traverses show several areas in the interior of West Antarctica and the transition region between the East and West Antarctic Ice Sheets where internal stratigraphy is disrupted and discontinuous in the vicinity of large topographic bed features with relief >50% of regional ice thickness. Ice in these areas is presumably frozen to the bed. In some locations these disruptions in internal layers appear to result from surface wind scouring and redeposition. The influence of bed features on surface topography evidently causes local changes in snow accumulation and the interactions between wind and snow surface may facilitate the development of wind ablation regions. In another area near Byrd Surface Camp a significant bed feature, "Mt. Resnik," appears to be causing breaks in internal stratigraphy imaged in a grid of 4 radar profiles oriented across the flow direction and several kilometers downstream. We hypothesize that there is a ratio of mountain height to regional ice thickness where the ice above the mountain will effectively decouple from the surrounding ice flow and crevasses will develop. Such a scenario would cause a seam to form and disruption of internal layers that is similar to what we have observed. The fact that deeper layers in the same region are continuous implies

  15. Preface: Special issue featuring papers from the International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, L.; Bordone, P.; Brunetti, R.

    2004-02-01

    The International Conference on Nonequilibrium Carrier Dynamics in Semiconductors (HCIS-13) celebrates 30 years since it first took place in Modena. Nonequilibrium dynamics of charge carriers, pioneered by the hot-electron concept, is an important issue for understanding electro-optic transport properties in semiconductor materials and structures. In these 30 years several topics have matured, and new ones have emerged thus fertilizing the field with a variety of physical problems and new ideas. The history of the conference is summarized in the opening paper `30 years of HCIS'. The future of the conference seems secure considering the continued lively interest of the participants. The conference addressed eleven major topics which constitute the backbone of the proceedings and are summarized as follows: carrier transport in low dimensional and nanostructure systems, nonequilibrium carriers in superlattices and devices, small devices and related phenomena, carrier dynamics and fluctuations, carrier quantum dynamics, coherent/incoherent carrier dynamics of optical excitations and ultra-fast optical phenomena, nonlinear optical effects, transport in organic matter, semiconductor-based spintronics, coherent dynamics in solid state systems for quantum processing and communication, novel materials and devices. Nanometric space scale and femtosecond time scale represent the ultimate domains of theoretical, experimental and practical interest. Traditional fields such as bulk properties, quantum transport, fluctuations and chaotic phenomena, etc, have received thorough and continuous attention. Emerging fields from previous conferences, such as quantum processing and communication, have been better assessed. New fields, such as spintronics and electron transport in organic matter, have appeared for the first time. One plenary talk, 11 invited talks, 230 submitted abstracts covering all these topics constituted a single-session conference. Following scientific selection

  16. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features.

    PubMed

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer's disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may be

  17. Dynamic Measurements of Greenhouse Gas Respirations Caused by Changing Oxygen Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, D.; Saad, N.

    2015-12-01

    The necessity for constant monitoring of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is clearly evident now more than ever. Moreover, interpreting and understanding the processes that dictate the production and consumption of these gases will allow for proper management of GHGs in order to mitigate its detrimental climate effects. Presence of oxygen, or lack of it, is the driving force for determining pathways within biochemical redox reactions. Experiments to find correlations between oxygen and greenhouse gases have helped us understand photosynthesis, denitrification and beyond. Within the past few years measurements of O2 and nitrous oxide have been used over a wide ranging array of disciplines; from studying avenues for redox chemistry to characterizing gas profiles in sputum of cystic fibrosis patients. We present a full analysis solution, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy, for simultaneous measurements of N2O, CO2, CH4, H2O, NH3, and O2 concentrations in soil flux, in order to better understand dynamics of ecological and biogeochemical processes. The stability and high temporal resolution of the five-species CRDS analyzer, coupled with a continuous high-precision O2 measurement (1-σ <200ppm) produces a complete picture of biogeochemical processes, for which a multitude of additional research experiments can be conceived. Adding another dimension to explore to help determine the rate at which these greenhouse gases are produced or consumed, allows scientists to further address fundamental scientific questions. Data is presented showing precision, drift and limitations of the O2 sensor measurement as well as the validity of spectroscopic corrections with the CRDS analyzer caused by changing O2. Experimental data is also presented to explore correlations of soil respiration rates of N2O, CO2 and CH4 due to differing soil O2 contents at varying timescales from minutes to days.

  18. Causes, Dynamics and Impacts of Lahars Generated by the April, 2015 Calbuco Eruption, Chile.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A. J.; Dussaillant, A. R.; Meier, C. I.; Rivera, A.; Barra, M. M.; Urzua, N. G.; Hernandez, J. F.; Napoleoni, F.; Gonzalez, C.

    2015-12-01

    Calbuco is a 2015m high, glacier capped, stratovolcano in the heavily populated Los Lagos district of southern Chile with a history of large volcanic eruptions in 1893-95, 1906-7, 1911-12, 1917, 1932, 1945, 1961 and 1972. Calbuco experienced a powerful 90 minute eruption at 18:04h on 22 April, 2015 followed by additional major eruptions at 01:00h and 13:10h on 23 & 30 April, respectively, resulting in the evacuation of 6500 people and the imposition of a 20 km radius exclusion zone. Pyroclastic flows descended into several river catchments radiating from the volcano with lahars travelling distances of up to 14 km, reaching populated areas. We present preliminary findings regarding the causes, dynamics and impacts of lahars generated by the April 2015 eruption. Pyroclastic flows melted glacier ice and snow generating the largest lahars in the Rio Este and Rio Blanco Sur on the southern flanks of the volcano. Lahar deposits in the Rio Blanco Norte were buried by pyroclastic flow deposits with measured temperatures of up to 282°C three months after emplacement. Lahar erosional impacts included bedrock erosion, alluvial channel incision, erosion of surficial deposits and the felling of large areas of forest. Depositional landforms included boulder run-ups on the outsides of channel bends, boulder clusters and large woody debris jams. Lahars deposited up to 8m of sediment within distal reaches. Deposits on the southern flanks of Calbuco indicate the passage of multiple pulses of contrasting rheology. Lahar occurrence and magnitude was controlled by the pre-eruption distribution of snow and ice on the volcano. Pre-existing lahar channels controlled flows to lower piedmont zones where routing was determined by palaeo lahar geomorphology. Ongoing erosion of proximal pyroclastic flow and lahar deposits provides large volumes of sediment to distal portions of fluvial systems radiating from Calbuco.

  19. Universal Features of the Nonequilibrium Dynamics of Many-Body Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Lea; Torres-Herrera, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    We describe the nonequilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum systems with two-body interactions. In these systems, the energy shell is a Gaussian of width σ and it gives the maximum possible spreading of the energy distribution of any initial state. When the distribution achieves this shape, the fidelity decay is Gaussian until saturation. This establishes a lower bound for the fidelity decay in realistic systems. We find excellent agreement between our numerics and the analytical expression for the fidelity. We also provide the general conditions under which the short-time dynamics of few-body observables is controlled by σ. The analyses are developed for systems, initial states, and observables accessible to experiments with cold atoms in optical lattices. This work was supported by the NSF grant No. DMR-1147430 and CONACyT, Mexico.

  20. Structural features of binary mixtures of supercritical CO2 with polar entrainers by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurina, D. L.; Antipova, M. L.; Petrenko, V. E.

    2013-10-01

    Computer simulations of supercritical carbon dioxide and its mixtures with polar cosolvents: water, methanol, and ethanol (concentration, 0.125 mole fractions) at T = 318 K and ρ = 0.7 g/cm3 are performed. Atom-atom radial distribution functions are calculated by classical molecular dynamics, while the probability distributions of relative orientation of CO2 molecules in the first and second coordination spheres describing the geometry of the nearest environment of CO2 molecules and the trajectories of cosolvent molecules are found using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. Based on the latter, the conclusions regarding structure and interactions of polar entrainers in their mixtures with supercritical CO2 are made. It is shown that the microstructure of carbon dioxide varies only slightly upon the introduction of cosolvents.

  1. Mitochondrial Dynamics is a Distinguishing Feature of Skeletal Muscle Fiber Types and Regulates Organellar Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Prashant; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Pham, Anh H; Chan, David C

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers differentiate into specific fiber types with distinct metabolic properties determined by their reliance on oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Using in vivo approaches, we find that OXPHOS-dependent fibers, compared to glycolytic fibers, contain elongated mitochondrial networks with higher fusion rates that are dependent on the mitofusins Mfn1 and Mfn2. Switching of a glycolytic fiber to an oxidative IIA type is associated with elongation of mitochondria, suggesting that mitochondrial fusion is linked to metabolic state. Furthermore, we reveal that mitochondrial proteins are compartmentalized to discrete domains centered around their nuclei of origin. The domain dimensions are dependent on fiber type and are regulated by the mitochondrial dynamics proteins Mfn1, Mfn2, and Mff. Our results indicate that mitochondrial dynamics is tailored to fiber type physiology and provides a rationale for the segmental defects characteristic of aged and diseased muscle fibers.

  2. Quasi-similar decameter emission features appearing in the solar and jovian dynamic spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, G. V.; Shaposhnikov, V. E.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Panchenko, M.; Dorovsky, V. V.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Rucker, H. O.; Vinogradov, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the dynamic spectra of the Sun and jovian decametric radiation obtained by the authors with the radio telescopes UTR-2 and URAN-2 (Kharkov, Poltava, Ukraine). We focus on the similar structures that appear on the dynamic spectra of those objects: S-bursts, drifting pairs, absorption bursts and zebra patterns. Similarity in structures allows us to assume that the plasma processes in the solar corona and in the jovian magnetosphere might have similar properties. We analyze and compare the main parameters of those structures and describe briefly some mechanisms of their generation that have already discussed in publications. We selected the mechanisms which, in our opinion, most completely and consistently explain the properties of the structures under consideration.

  3. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  4. Vanishing amplitude of backbone dynamics causes a true protein dynamical transition: 2H NMR studies on perdeuterated C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Kämpf, Kerstin; Kremmling, Beke; Vogel, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using a combination of H2 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, we study internal rotational dynamics of the perdeuterated protein C-phycocyanin (CPC) in dry and hydrated states over broad temperature and dynamic ranges with high angular resolution. Separating H2 NMR signals from methyl deuterons, we show that basically all backbone deuterons exhibit highly restricted motion occurring on time scales faster than microseconds. The amplitude of this motion increases when a hydration shell exists, while it decreases upon cooling and vanishes near 175 K. We conclude that the vanishing of the highly restricted motion marks a dynamical transition, which is independent of the time window and of a fundamental importance. This conclusion is supported by results from experimental and computational studies of the proteins myoglobin and elastin. In particular, we argue based on findings in molecular dynamics simulations that the behavior of the highly restricted motion of proteins at the dynamical transition resembles that of a characteristic secondary relaxation of liquids at the glass transition, namely the nearly constant loss. Furthermore, H2 NMR studies on perdeuterated CPC reveal that, in addition to highly restricted motion, small fractions of backbone segments exhibit weakly restricted dynamics when temperature and hydration are sufficiently high.

  5. Features of the phase dynamics in a ring solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, Nikolai V; Lariontsev, E G

    2005-07-31

    The peculiarities of the phase dynamics are studied in a ring solid-state laser operating in transient quasi-sinusoidal oscillation regimes of the first and second kinds (QS-1 and QS-2) appearing upon periodic modulation of the pump power. It is shown that recording of a change in the phase difference of counterpropagating waves in the QS-2 regime under certain conditions makes it possible to determine directly the mutual nonreciprocity of the laser resonator. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  6. Influence of Pretreatment Factors on Two-dimensional Correlation Dynamic Mechanical Spectroscopy Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoan; Xiang, Kewei; Zhang, Dian; Wu, Jinrong; Huang, Guangsu

    The practical computation process of 2D correlation spectra and the influence of pretreatment factors such as noise reduction, peak position shift have been discussed in this paper. The excessive noise reduction and peak position shift would lead to erroneous interpretation of 2D spectra. Two-dimensional correlation dynamic mechanical spectroscopy is suitable for the analysis of relaxation processes if with appropriate external perturbation.

  7. The Dynamic Regulation of Microcirculatory Conduit Function: Features Relevant to Transfusion Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Marie E; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    The microcirculation is not merely a passive conduit for red cell transport, nutrient and gas exchange, but is instead a dynamic participant contributing to the multiple processes involved in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis and optimal end-organ function. The microcirculation’s angioarchitechture and surface properties influence conduit function and flow dynamics over a wide spectrum of conditions, accommodating many different mechanical, pathological or organ-specific responses. The endothelium itself plays a critical role as the interface between tissues and blood components, participating in the regulation of coagulation, inflammation, vascular tone, and permeability. The complex nitric oxide pathways affect vasomotor tone and influence vascular conduit caliber and distribution density, alter thrombotic propensity, and modify adhesion molecule expression. Nitric oxide pathways also interact with red blood cells and free hemoglobin moieties in normal and pathological conditions. Red blood cells themselves may affect flow dynamics. Altered rheology and compromised NO bioavailability from medical storage or disease states impede microcirculatory flow and adversely modulate vasodilation. The integration of the microcirculation as a system with respect to flow modulation is delicately balanced, and can be readily disrupted in disease states such as sepsis. This review will provide a comprehensive description of these varied and intricate functions of the microvasculature. PMID:20580315

  8. Combination of Whole Genome Sequencing, Linkage, and Functional Studies Implicates a Missense Mutation in Titin as a Cause of Autosomal Dominant Cardiomyopathy With Features of Left Ventricular Noncompaction

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Robert; de Villiers, Carin P.; Hooper, Charlotte; Ormondroyd, Liz; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Lise, Stefano; Salatino, Silvia; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Thomson, Kate L.; Arnold, Linda; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D.; Konarev, Petr V.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Ehler, Elisabeth; Ghisleni, Andrea; Gautel, Mathias; Blair, Edward; Watkins, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Background— High throughput next-generation sequencing techniques have made whole genome sequencing accessible in clinical practice; however, the abundance of variation in the human genomes makes the identification of a disease-causing mutation on a background of benign rare variants challenging. Methods and Results— Here we combine whole genome sequencing with linkage analysis in a 3-generation family affected by cardiomyopathy with features of autosomal dominant left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. A missense mutation in the giant protein titin is the only plausible disease-causing variant that segregates with disease among the 7 surviving affected individuals, with interrogation of the entire genome excluding other potential causes. This A178D missense mutation, affecting a conserved residue in the second immunoglobulin-like domain of titin, was introduced in a bacterially expressed recombinant protein fragment and biophysically characterized in comparison to its wild-type counterpart. Multiple experiments, including size exclusion chromatography, small-angle x ray scattering, and circular dichroism spectroscopy suggest partial unfolding and domain destabilization in the presence of the mutation. Moreover, binding experiments in mammalian cells show that the mutation markedly impairs binding to the titin ligand telethonin. Conclusions— Here we present genetic and functional evidence implicating the novel A178D missense mutation in titin as the cause of a highly penetrant familial cardiomyopathy with features of left ventricular noncompaction. This expands the spectrum of titin’s roles in cardiomyopathies. It furthermore highlights that rare titin missense variants, currently often ignored or left uninterpreted, should be considered to be relevant for cardiomyopathies and can be identified by the approach presented here. PMID:27625337

  9. Face recognition based on matching of local features on 3D dynamic range sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeagaray-Patrón, B. A.; Kober, Vitaly

    2016-09-01

    3D face recognition has attracted attention in the last decade due to improvement of technology of 3D image acquisition and its wide range of applications such as access control, surveillance, human-computer interaction and biometric identification systems. Most research on 3D face recognition has focused on analysis of 3D still data. In this work, a new method for face recognition using dynamic 3D range sequences is proposed. Experimental results are presented and discussed using 3D sequences in the presence of pose variation. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of conventional face recognition algorithms based on descriptors.

  10. Correlation spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to study the structural features of proteins.

    PubMed

    Varriale, Antonio; Marabotti, Anna; Mei, Giampiero; Staiano, Maria; D'Auria, Sabato

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we used a combination of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methodologies to acquire structural information on pH-induced unfolding of the maltotriose-binding protein from Thermus thermophilus (MalE2). FCS has emerged as a powerful technique for characterizing the dynamics of molecules and it is, in fact, used to study molecular diffusion on timescale of microsecond and longer. Our results showed that keeping temperature constant, the protein diffusion coefficient decreased from 84±4 µm(2)/s to 44±3 µm(2)/s when pH was changed from 7.0 to 4.0. An even more marked decrease of the MalE2 diffusion coefficient (31±3 µm(2)/s) was registered when pH was raised from 7.0 to 10.0. According to the size of MalE2 (a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of 43 kDa) as well as of its globular native shape, the values of 44 µm(2)/s and 31 µm(2)/s could be ascribed to deformations of the protein structure, which enhances its propensity to form aggregates at extreme pH values. The obtained fluorescence correlation data, corroborated by circular dichroism, fluorescence emission and light-scattering experiments, are discussed together with the MD simulations results.

  11. Paranoid personality disorder: a synthesis of developmental, dynamic, and descriptive features.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S

    1990-01-01

    Suspiciousness, feeling persecuted, and grandiosity constitute the classical triad associated with paranoid personality. However, a more important feature appears to be the discrepancy between the outer persona and the inner world of such individuals. The split is pervasive and involves self-concept, object-relations, affects, morality, sexuality, and cognitive style. Outwardly, paranoid individuals are demanding, arrogant, mistrustful, driven, unromantic, moralistic, and acutely vigilant towards the external environment. Internally, however, they are frightened, timid, self-doubting, gullible, inconsiderate, vulnerable to erotomania, and cognitively unable to grasp the totality of actual events. This way of conceptualizing the paranoid symptomatology is superior to ordinary check-list methods since it (1) links the phenomenological and psychostructural aspects of the condition, (2) helps in a more meaningful differential diagnosis of paranoid from other personality disorders, and most importantly, (3) hints at areas that require exploration in the psychotherapeutic management or psychoanalysis of such individuals.

  12. Dynamical phenomena in sunspots. I - Observing procedures and oscillatory phenomena. II - A moving magnetic feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. H.; Cram, L. E.; Nye, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution spectra consisting of at least 1 hr periods were obtained of the sunpost atmosphere. The Ca II H and K lines were scanned to characterize umbral oscillations and flashes. The former displayed peaks lasting 150-197 sec, while penumbral oscillations peaked in the 197-300 sec range. Quiet sun oscillations exhibited no peaks under 300 sec. The Ca II K line umbral flashes were ubiquitous for all observational periods and were associated with light bridges in the umbra. Magnetic field, vertical velocity, and chromospheric intensity measurements taken during the 1 hr scans covered moving magnetic features (MMF), which traversed the moats around sunspots. MMF areas increased while the magnetic field intensity decreased with MMF movement away from a sunspot. Bright Ca II K line wings were apparent in the MMFs, but cores of the lines were not observed, suggesting that flux loops generating the line are low in the photosphere.

  13. Injurious mechanical ventilation in the normal lung causes a progressive pathologic change in dynamic alveolar mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Lucio A; Albert, Scott; Carney, David; Gatto, Louis A; Halter, Jeffrey M; Nieman, Gary F

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Acute respiratory distress syndrome causes a heterogeneous lung injury, and without protective mechanical ventilation a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury can occur. To ventilate noncompliant lung regions, high inflation pressures are required to 'pop open' the injured alveoli. The temporal impact, however, of these elevated pressures on normal alveolar mechanics (that is, the dynamic change in alveolar size and shape during ventilation) is unknown. In the present study we found that ventilating the normal lung with high peak pressure (45 cmH20) and low positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP of 3 cmH2O) did not initially result in altered alveolar mechanics, but alveolar instability developed over time. Methods Anesthetized rats underwent tracheostomy, were placed on pressure control ventilation, and underwent sternotomy. Rats were then assigned to one of three ventilation strategies: control group (n = 3, Pcontrol = 14 cmH2O, PEEP = 3 cmH2O), high pressure/low PEEP group (n = 6, Pcontrol = 45 cmH2O, PEEP = 3 cmH2O), and high pressure/high PEEP group (n = 5, Pcontrol = 45 cmH2O, PEEP = 10 cmH2O). In vivo microscopic footage of subpleural alveolar stability (that is, recruitment/derecruitment) was taken at baseline and than every 15 minutes for 90 minutes following ventilator adjustments. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was determined by measuring the area of individual alveoli at peak inspiration (I) and end expiration (E) by computer image analysis. Alveolar recruitment/derecruitment was quantified by the percentage change in alveolar area during tidal ventilation (%I – EΔ). Results Alveoli were stable in the control group for the entire experiment (low %I – EΔ). Alveoli in the high pressure/low PEEP group were initially stable (low %I – EΔ), but with time alveolar recruitment/derecruitment developed. The development of alveolar instability in the high pressure/low PEEP group was associated with histologic lung injury. Conclusion A

  14. Protecting persistent dynamic oceanographic features: transboundary conservation efforts are needed for the critically endangered Balearic shearwater.

    PubMed

    Louzao, Maite; Delord, Karine; García, David; Boué, Amélie; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2012-01-01

    The protection of key areas for biodiversity at sea is not as widespread as on land and research investment is necessary to identify biodiversity hotspots in the open ocean. Spatially explicit conservation measures such as the creation of representative networks of marine protected areas (MPAs) is a critical step towards the conservation and management of marine ecosystems, as well as to improve public awareness. Conservation efforts in ecologically rich and threatened ecosystems are specially needed. This is particularly urgent for the Mediterranean marine biodiversity, which includes highly mobile marine vertebrates. Here, we studied the at sea distribution of one of the most endangered Mediterranean seabird, the critically endangered Balearic shearwater Puffinus mauretanicus. Present knowledge, from vessel-based surveys, suggests that this species has a coastal distribution over the productive Iberian shelf in relation to the distribution of their main prey, small pelagic fish. We used miniaturised satellite transmitters to determine the key marine areas of the southern population of Balearic shearwaters breeding on Eivissa and spot the spatial connections between breeding and key marine areas. Our tracking study indicates that Balearic shearwaters do not only forage along the Iberian continental shelf but also in more distant marine areas along the North African coast, in particular W of Algeria, but also NE coast of Morocco. Birds recurrently visit these shelf areas at the end of the breeding season. Species distribution modelling identified chlorophyll a as the most important environmental variable in defining those oceanographic features characterizing their key habitats in the western Mediterranean. We identified persistent oceanographic features across time series available in the study area and discuss our results within the current conservation scenario in relation to the ecology of the species.

  15. Protecting Persistent Dynamic Oceanographic Features: Transboundary Conservation Efforts Are Needed for the Critically Endangered Balearic Shearwater

    PubMed Central

    Louzao, Maite; Delord, Karine; García, David; Boué, Amélie; Weimerskirch, Henri

    2012-01-01

    The protection of key areas for biodiversity at sea is not as widespread as on land and research investment is necessary to identify biodiversity hotspots in the open ocean. Spatially explicit conservation measures such as the creation of representative networks of marine protected areas (MPAs) is a critical step towards the conservation and management of marine ecosystems, as well as to improve public awareness. Conservation efforts in ecologically rich and threatened ecosystems are specially needed. This is particularly urgent for the Mediterranean marine biodiversity, which includes highly mobile marine vertebrates. Here, we studied the at sea distribution of one of the most endangered Mediterranean seabird, the critically endangered Balearic shearwater Puffinus mauretanicus. Present knowledge, from vessel-based surveys, suggests that this species has a coastal distribution over the productive Iberian shelf in relation to the distribution of their main prey, small pelagic fish. We used miniaturised satellite transmitters to determine the key marine areas of the southern population of Balearic shearwaters breeding on Eivissa and spot the spatial connections between breeding and key marine areas. Our tracking study indicates that Balearic shearwaters do not only forage along the Iberian continental shelf but also in more distant marine areas along the North African coast, in particular W of Algeria, but also NE coast of Morocco. Birds recurrently visit these shelf areas at the end of the breeding season. Species distribution modelling identified chlorophyll a as the most important environmental variable in defining those oceanographic features characterizing their key habitats in the western Mediterranean. We identified persistent oceanographic features across time series available in the study area and discuss our results within the current conservation scenario in relation to the ecology of the species. PMID:22590510

  16. Frozen debris lobe morphology and movement: an overview of eight dynamic features, southern Brooks Range, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrow, Margaret M.; Gyswyt, Nora L.; Simpson, Jocelyn M.; Daanen, Ronald P.; Hubbard, Trent D.

    2016-05-01

    Frozen debris lobes (FDLs) are elongated, lobate permafrost features that mostly move through shear in zones near their bases. We present a comprehensive overview of eight FDLs within the Dalton Highway corridor (southern Brooks Range, Alaska), including their catchment geology and rock strengths, lobe soil characteristics, surface movement measurements collected between 2012 and 2015, and analysis of historic and modern imagery from 1955 to 2014. Field mapping and rock strength data indicate that the metasedimentary and metavolcanic bedrock forming the majority of the lobe catchments has very low to medium strength and is heavily fractured, thus easily contributing to FDL formation. The eight investigated FDLs consist of platy rocks typical of their catchments, organic debris, and an ice-poor soil matrix; massive ice, however, is present within FDLs as infiltration ice, concentrated within cracks open to the surface. Exposure of infiltration ice in retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) and associated debris flows leads to increased movement and various stages of destabilization, resulting in morphological differences among the lobes. Analysis of historic imagery indicates that movement of the eight investigated FDLs has been asynchronous over the study period, and since 1955, there has been an overall increase in movement rates of the investigated FDLs. The formation of surface features, such as cracks, scarps, and RTSs, suggests that the increased movement rates correlate to general instability, and even at their current distances, FDLs are impacting infrastructure through increased sediment mobilization. FDL-A is the largest of the investigated FDLs. As of August 2015, FDL-A was 39.2 m from the toe of the Dalton Highway embankment. Based on its current distance and rate of movement, we predict that FDL-A will reach the Dalton Highway alignment by 2023.

  17. Mapping and Monitoring of Dynamic Seafloor Features with Hydroacoustic Devices in Sandy Coastal Areas (German Bight, North Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papenmeier, S.; Mielck, F.; Hass, H. C.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand marine ecosystems and to provide basic data for a sustainable management in these vulnerable areas, seafloor mapping has become increasingly important. Since the knowledge regarding the seabed environments and their dynamics are still sparse, new mapping techniques have evolved in the last years and hydroacoustic devices became an important tool for quick and reliable mapping. In 2007 we started a monitoring program in the German Bight (North Sea) using sidescan sonar (Imagenex YellowFin, 330 kHz) in a study site comprising approximately 1,500 km2. In subsequent years, the area was mapped repeatedly with a resolution of ~25 cm. For ground truthing, several hundred sediment samples were taken. The investigations reveal that the area is mainly characterized by fine to coarse sand which is arranged in different seafloor features such as subaquatic dunes or relicts of Pleistocene moraines. While the alignment and position of the moraines was stable throughout the years, the dunes can be highly dynamic. Their migration indicates the amount of sediment transport in these areas. Some seafloor features could be identified as so-called sorted bedforms, which are spatially-grain-size-sorted patterns on the seafloor consisting of small rippled medium sand surrounded by smooth fine sand. These flow-transverse features are morphological linked to ridges and depressions and are further maintained by ebb and flood currents of almost equal strengths. The medium sand is separated from the fine sand by sharp boundaries in all directions which were generated by the bidirectional flow field. The extend and alignment of the sorted bedforms seem to be relatively stable in a time frame of 6 years, however small-scale variabilities up to serveral meters could be detected. We suppose that these processes mainly occur during storm surges while the fine-sand layers are winnowed away and hence the shapes of the bedforms changes.

  18. An efficient overset grid technique for computational fluid dynamics based on method coupling and feature tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Richard Dean

    A new overset grid method that permits different fluid models to be coupled in a single simulation is presented. High fidelity methods applied in regions of complex fluid flow can be coupled with simpler methods to save computer simulation time without sacrificing accuracy. A mechanism for automatically moving grid zones to track unsteady flow features complements the method. The coupling method is quite general and will support a variety of governing equations and discretization methods. Furthermore, there are no restrictions on the geometrical layout of the coupling. Four sets of governing equations have been implemented to date: the Navier-Stokes, full Euler, Cartesian Euler, and linearized Euler equations. In all cases, the MacCormack explicit predictor-corrector scheme was used to discretize the equations. The overset coupling technique was applied to a variety of configurations in one, two, and three dimensions. Steady configurations include the flow over a bump, a NACA0012 airfoil, and an F-5 wing. Unsteady configurations include two aeroacoustic benchmark problems and a NACA64A006 airfoil with an oscillating simple flap. Solutions obtained with the overset coupling method are compared with other numerical results and, when available, with experimental data. Results from the NACA0012 airfoil and F-5 wing show a 30% reduction in simulation time without a loss of accuracy when the linearized Euler equations were coupled with the full Euler equations. A 25% reduction was recorded for the NACA0012 airfoil when the Euler equations were solved together with the Navier-Stokes equations. Feature tracking was used in the aeroacoustic benchmark and NACA64A006 problems and was found to be very effective in minimizing the dispersion error in the vicinity of shocks. The computer program developed to implement the overset grid method coupling technique was written entirely in C++, an object-oriented programming language. The principles of object-oriented programming were

  19. Features of the non-contact carotid pressure waveform: Cardiac and vascular dynamics during rebreathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casaccia, S.; Sirevaag, E. J.; Richter, E. J.; O'Sullivan, J. A.; Scalise, L.; Rohrbaugh, J. W.

    2016-10-01

    This report amplifies and extends prior descriptions of the use of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) as a method for assessing cardiovascular activity, on a non-contact basis. A rebreathing task (n = 35 healthy individuals) was used to elicit multiple effects associated with changes in autonomic drive as well as blood gases including hypercapnia. The LDV pulse was obtained from two sites overlying the carotid artery, separated by 40 mm. A robust pulse signal was obtained from both sites, in accord with the well-described changes in carotid diameter over the blood pressure cycle. Emphasis was placed on extracting timing measures from the LDV pulse, which could serve as surrogate measures of pulse wave velocity (PWV) and the associated arterial stiffness. For validation purposes, a standard measure of pulse transit time (PTT) to the radial artery was obtained using a tonometric sensor. Two key measures of timing were extracted from the LDV pulse. One involved the transit time along the 40 mm distance separating the two LDV measurement sites. A second measure involved the timing of a late feature of the LDV pulse contour, which was interpreted as reflection wave latency and thus a measure of round-trip travel time. Both LDV measures agreed with the conventional PTT measure, in disclosing increased PWV during periods of active rebreathing. These results thus provide additional evidence that measures based on the non-contact LDV technique might provide surrogate measures for those obtained using conventional, more obtrusive assessment methods that require attached sensors.

  20. Self-organizing feature maps for dynamic control of radio resources in CDMA microcellular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    1998-03-01

    The application of artificial neural networks to the channel assignment problem for cellular code-division multiple access (CDMA) cellular networks has previously been investigated. CDMA takes advantage of voice activity and spatial isolation because its capacity is only interference limited, unlike time-division multiple access (TDMA) and frequency-division multiple access (FDMA) where capacities are bandwidth-limited. Any reduction in interference in CDMA translates linearly into increased capacity. To satisfy the high demands for new services and improved connectivity for mobile communications, microcellular and picocellular systems are being introduced. For these systems, there is a need to develop robust and efficient management procedures for the allocation of power and spectrum to maximize radio capacity. Topology-conserving mappings play an important role in the biological processing of sensory inputs. The same principles underlying Kohonen's self-organizing feature maps (SOFMs) are applied to the adaptive control of radio resources to minimize interference, hence, maximize capacity in direct-sequence (DS) CDMA networks. The approach based on SOFMs is applied to some published examples of both theoretical and empirical models of DS/CDMA microcellular networks in metropolitan areas. The results of the approach for these examples are informally compared to the performance of algorithms, based on Hopfield- Tank neural networks and on genetic algorithms, for the channel assignment problem.

  1. Simple dynamical models capturing the key features of the Central Pacific El Niño.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Majda, Andrew J

    2016-10-18

    The Central Pacific El Niño (CP El Niño) has been frequently observed in recent decades. The phenomenon is characterized by an anomalous warm sea surface temperature (SST) confined to the central Pacific and has different teleconnections from the traditional El Niño. Here, simple models are developed and shown to capture the key mechanisms of the CP El Niño. The starting model involves coupled atmosphere-ocean processes that are deterministic, linear, and stable. Then, systematic strategies are developed for incorporating several major mechanisms of the CP El Niño into the coupled system. First, simple nonlinear zonal advection with no ad hoc parameterization of the background SST gradient is introduced that creates coupled nonlinear advective modes of the SST. Secondly, due to the recent multidecadal strengthening of the easterly trade wind, a stochastic parameterization of the wind bursts including a mean easterly trade wind anomaly is coupled to the simple atmosphere-ocean processes. Effective stochastic noise in the wind burst model facilitates the intermittent occurrence of the CP El Niño with realistic amplitude and duration. In addition to the anomalous warm SST in the central Pacific, other major features of the CP El Niño such as the rising branch of the anomalous Walker circulation being shifted to the central Pacific and the eastern Pacific cooling with a shallow thermocline are all captured by this simple coupled model. Importantly, the coupled model succeeds in simulating a series of CP El Niño that lasts for 5 y, which resembles the two CP El Niño episodes during 1990-1995 and 2002-2006.

  2. Simple dynamical models capturing the key features of the Central Pacific El Niño

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan; Majda, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The Central Pacific El Niño (CP El Niño) has been frequently observed in recent decades. The phenomenon is characterized by an anomalous warm sea surface temperature (SST) confined to the central Pacific and has different teleconnections from the traditional El Niño. Here, simple models are developed and shown to capture the key mechanisms of the CP El Niño. The starting model involves coupled atmosphere–ocean processes that are deterministic, linear, and stable. Then, systematic strategies are developed for incorporating several major mechanisms of the CP El Niño into the coupled system. First, simple nonlinear zonal advection with no ad hoc parameterization of the background SST gradient is introduced that creates coupled nonlinear advective modes of the SST. Secondly, due to the recent multidecadal strengthening of the easterly trade wind, a stochastic parameterization of the wind bursts including a mean easterly trade wind anomaly is coupled to the simple atmosphere–ocean processes. Effective stochastic noise in the wind burst model facilitates the intermittent occurrence of the CP El Niño with realistic amplitude and duration. In addition to the anomalous warm SST in the central Pacific, other major features of the CP El Niño such as the rising branch of the anomalous Walker circulation being shifted to the central Pacific and the eastern Pacific cooling with a shallow thermocline are all captured by this simple coupled model. Importantly, the coupled model succeeds in simulating a series of CP El Niño that lasts for 5 y, which resembles the two CP El Niño episodes during 1990–1995 and 2002–2006. PMID:27698122

  3. Features of exciton dynamics in molecular nanoclusters (J-aggregates): Exciton self-trapping (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyukin, Yu. V.; Sorokin, A. V.; Semynozhenko, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    We present thoroughly analyzed experimental results that demonstrate the anomalous manifestation of the exciton self-trapping effect, which is already well-known in bulk crystals, in ordered molecular nanoclusters called J-aggregates. Weakly-coupled one-dimensional (1D) molecular chains are the main structural feature of J-aggregates, wherein the electron excitations are manifested as 1D Frenkel excitons. According to the continuum theory of Rashba-Toyozawa, J-aggregates can have only self-trapped excitons, because 1D excitons must adhere to barrier-free self-trapping at any exciton-phonon coupling constant g = ɛLR/2β, wherein ɛLR is the lattice relaxation energy, and 2β is the half-width of the exciton band. In contrast, very often only the luminescence of free, mobile excitons would manifest in experiments involving J-aggregates. Using the Urbach rule in order to analyze the low-frequency region of the low-temperature exciton absorption spectra has shown that J-aggregates can have both a weak (g < 1) and a strong (g > 1) exciton-phonon coupling. Moreover, it is experimentally demonstrated that under certain conditions, the J-aggregate excited state can have both free and self-trapped excitons, i.e., we establish the existence of a self-trapping barrier for 1D Frenkel excitons. We demonstrate and analyze the reasons behind the anomalous existence of both free and self-trapped excitons in J-aggregates, and demonstrate how exciton-self trapping efficiency can be managed in J-aggregates by varying the values of g, which is fundamentally impossible in bulk crystals. We discuss how the exciton-self trapping phenomenon can be used as an alternate interpretation of the wide band emission of some J-aggregates, which has thus far been explained by the strongly localized exciton model.

  4. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer’s disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may

  5. Cantilever tilt causing amplitude related convolution in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Sun, Jielin; Itoh, Hiroshi; Shen, Dianhong; Hu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the topography in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a convolution of the tip's shape and the sample's geometry. The classical convolution model was established in contact mode assuming a static probe, but it is no longer valid in dynamic mode AFM. It is still not well understood whether or how the vibration of the probe in dynamic mode affects the convolution. Such ignorance complicates the interpretation of the topography. Here we propose a convolution model for dynamic mode by taking into account the typical design of the cantilever tilt in AFMs, which leads to a different convolution from that in contact mode. Our model indicates that the cantilever tilt results in a dynamic convolution affected by the absolute value of the amplitude, especially in the case that corresponding contact convolution has sharp edges beyond certain angle. The effect was experimentally demonstrated by a perpendicular SiO(2)/Si super-lattice structure. Our model is useful for quantitative characterizations in dynamic mode, especially in probe characterization and critical dimension measurements.

  6. Study on dynamic characteristics' change of hippocampal neuron reduced models caused by the Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yueping; Wang, Jue; Zheng, Chongxun

    2016-01-01

    In the paper, based on the electrophysiological experimental data, the Hippocampal neuron reduced model under the pathology condition of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been built by modifying parameters' values. The reduced neuron model's dynamic characteristics under effect of AD are comparatively studied. Under direct current stimulation, compared with the normal neuron model, the AD neuron model's dynamic characteristics have obviously been changed. The neuron model under the AD condition undergoes supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation from the rest state to the continuous discharge state. It is different from the neuron model under the normal condition, which undergoes saddle-node bifurcation. So, the neuron model changes into a resonator with monostable state from an integrator with bistable state under AD's action. The research reveals the neuron model's dynamic characteristics' changing under effect of AD, and provides some theoretic basis for AD research by neurodynamics theory.

  7. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations linking molecular features of polycations to polycation-polyanion complexation for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeland, Anna; Johnson, Daniel; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2014-03-01

    Gene therapy is a method involving transfection or delivery of therapeutic DNA to target cells for expression of proteins that can cure diseases. Polycations have shown tremendous potential as DNA delivery vectors because the positive charges along the polycation interact with the negatively charged DNA backbone to form a polyplex that protects and transfects the DNA. Past work has shown that the structure and chemistry of the polycation affects DNA transfection efficiency. In this work, we use coarse grained models that are mapped from atomistic simulations, along with molecular dynamics simulations to study the binding of polycations and polyanions into polyplexes. We characterize the structure, surface composition and shape of the polyplex, features that impact DNA delivery, as a function of polycation chemistry, architecture (linear versus grafted), and molecular weight. The results from these simulations serve as valuable guidelines for experimentalists on what molecular characteristics they need to incorporate in the polycations to achieve higher transfection efficiency.

  8. Features of the Jovian DAM radiation dynamic spectra as observed by modern receivers with high frequency-temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, G.; Konovalenko, A.; Zakharenko, V.; Vinogradov, V.; Shaposhnikov, V.; Zarka, Ph.

    2012-09-01

    One of the promising approaches to investigating features of the Jovian decameter radio emission (DAM) is application of novel experimental techniques with a further detailed analysis of the obtained data using both well-known and modern mathematical methods. Several observational campaigns were performed in November 2009 with the use of the UTR-2 radio telescope (Kharkov, Ukraine) and efficient registration systems with high frequency and temporal resolutions (the antenna effective area is about 105 m2, the frequency resolution is 4 kHz, the temporal resolution is 0.25 ms, and the dynamic range is 70 dB) [1]. The main goal of these campaigns was to experimentally investigate new properties of the Jovian DAM emission which could be detected using the above mentioned equipment. Also an original software package was developed for control the digital receiver and for off-line data analysis at the postprocessing stage.

  9. Autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegia caused by AP4M1 and AP4B1 gene mutation: expansion of the facial and neuroimaging features.

    PubMed

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Bilguvar, Kaya; Koçer, Naci; Yalçınkaya, Cengiz; Çağlayan, Okay; Gül, Ece; Sahin, Sezgin; Çomu, Sinan; Günel, Murat

    2014-07-01

    Adaptor protein complex-4 (AP4) is a component of intracellular transportation of proteins, which is thought to have a unique role in neurons. Recently, mutations affecting all four subunits of AP4 (AP4M1, AP4E1, AP4S1, and AP4B1) have been found to cause similar autosomal recessive phenotype consisting of tetraplegic cerebral palsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was analyzing AP4 genes in three new families with this phenotype, and discussing their clinical findings with an emphasis on neuroimaging and facial features. Using homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing, we identified two novel homozygous mutations in AP4M1 and a homozygous deletion in AP4B1 in three pairs of siblings. Spastic tetraplegia, microcephaly, severe intellectual disability, limited speech, and stereotypic laughter were common findings in our patients. All patients also had similar facial features consisting of coarse and hypotonic face, bitemporal narrowing, bulbous nose with broad nasal ridge, and short philtrum which were not described in patients with AP4M1 and AP4B1 mutations previously. The patients presented here and previously with AP4M1, AP4B1, and AP4E1 mutations shared brain abnormalities including asymmetrical ventriculomegaly, thin splenium of the corpus callosum, and reduced white matter volume. The patients also had hippocampal globoid formation and thin hippocampus. In conclusion, disorders due to mutations in AP4 complex have similar neurological, facial, and cranial imaging findings. Thus, these four genes encoding AP4 subunits should be screened in patients with autosomal recessive spastic tetraplegic cerebral palsy, severe intellectual disability, and stereotypic laughter, especially with the described facial and cranial MRI features.

  10. Tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus spatial dynamics in a malaria mosquito, Anopheles atroparvus

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Semen M.; Artemov, Gleb N.; Stegniy, Vladimir N.

    2017-01-01

    Spatial organization of chromosome territories is important for maintenance of genomic stability and regulation of gene expression. Recent studies have shown tissue-specific features of chromosome attachments to the nuclear envelope in various organisms including malaria mosquitoes. However, other spatial characteristics of nucleus organization, like volume and shape of chromosome territories, have not been studied in Anopheles. We conducted a thorough analysis of tissue-specific features of the X chromosome and nucleolus volume and shape in follicular epithelium and nurse cells of the Anopheles atroparvus ovaries using a modern open-source software. DNA of the polytene X chromosome from ovarian nurse cells was obtained by microdissection and was used as a template for amplification with degenerate oligo primers. A fluorescently labeled X chromosome painting probe was hybridized with formaldehyde-fixed ovaries of mosquitoes using a 3D-FISH method. The nucleolus was stained by immunostaining with an anti-fibrillarin antibody. The analysis was conducted with TANGO—a software for a chromosome spatial organization analysis. We show that the volume and position of the X chromosome have tissue-specific characteristics. Unlike nurse cell nuclei, the growth of follicular epithelium nuclei is not accompanied with the proportional growth of the X chromosome. However, the shape of the X chromosome does not differ between the tissues. The dynamics of the X chromosome attachment regions location is tissue-specific and it is correlated with the process of nucleus growth in follicular epithelium and nurse cells. PMID:28158219

  11. De Novo Mutations of RERE Cause a Genetic Syndrome with Features that Overlap Those Associated with Proximal 1p36 Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Fregeau, Brieana; Kim, Bum Jun; Hernández-García, Andrés; Jordan, Valerie K.; Cho, Megan T.; Schnur, Rhonda E.; Monaghan, Kristin G.; Juusola, Jane; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H.; Sacharow, Stephanie; Barañano, Kristin; Bosch, Daniëlle G.M.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Lindstrom, Kristin; Schroeder, Audrey; James, Philip; Kulch, Peggy; Lalani, Seema R.; van Haelst, Mieke M.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Barkovich, A. James; Scott, Daryl A.; Sherr, Elliott H.

    2016-01-01

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and defects involving the brain, eye, ear, heart, and kidney. Arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats (RERE) is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region. RERE is a widely-expressed nuclear receptor coregulator that positively regulates retinoic acid signaling. Animal models suggest that RERE deficiency might contribute to many of the structural and developmental birth defects and medical problems seen in individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome, although human evidence supporting this role has been lacking. In this report, we describe ten individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and/or autism spectrum disorder who carry rare and putatively damaging changes in RERE. In all cases in which both parental DNA samples were available, these changes were found to be de novo. Associated features that were recurrently seen in these individuals included hypotonia, seizures, behavioral problems, structural CNS anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. The spectrum of defects documented in these individuals is similar to that of a cohort of 31 individuals with isolated 1p36 deletions that include RERE and are recapitulated in RERE-deficient zebrafish and mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that mutations in RERE cause a genetic syndrome and that haploinsufficiency of RERE might be sufficient to cause many of the phenotypes associated with proximal 1p36 deletions. PMID:27087320

  12. De Novo Mutations of RERE Cause a Genetic Syndrome with Features that Overlap Those Associated with Proximal 1p36 Deletions.

    PubMed

    Fregeau, Brieana; Kim, Bum Jun; Hernández-García, Andrés; Jordan, Valerie K; Cho, Megan T; Schnur, Rhonda E; Monaghan, Kristin G; Juusola, Jane; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine H; Sacharow, Stephanie; Barañano, Kristin; Bosch, Daniëlle G M; de Vries, Bert B A; Lindstrom, Kristin; Schroeder, Audrey; James, Philip; Kulch, Peggy; Lalani, Seema R; van Haelst, Mieke M; van Gassen, Koen L I; van Binsbergen, Ellen; Barkovich, A James; Scott, Daryl A; Sherr, Elliott H

    2016-05-05

    Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and defects involving the brain, eye, ear, heart, and kidney. Arginine-glutamic acid dipeptide repeats (RERE) is located in the proximal 1p36 critical region. RERE is a widely-expressed nuclear receptor coregulator that positively regulates retinoic acid signaling. Animal models suggest that RERE deficiency might contribute to many of the structural and developmental birth defects and medical problems seen in individuals with 1p36 deletion syndrome, although human evidence supporting this role has been lacking. In this report, we describe ten individuals with intellectual disability, developmental delay, and/or autism spectrum disorder who carry rare and putatively damaging changes in RERE. In all cases in which both parental DNA samples were available, these changes were found to be de novo. Associated features that were recurrently seen in these individuals included hypotonia, seizures, behavioral problems, structural CNS anomalies, ophthalmologic anomalies, congenital heart defects, and genitourinary abnormalities. The spectrum of defects documented in these individuals is similar to that of a cohort of 31 individuals with isolated 1p36 deletions that include RERE and are recapitulated in RERE-deficient zebrafish and mice. Taken together, our findings suggest that mutations in RERE cause a genetic syndrome and that haploinsufficiency of RERE might be sufficient to cause many of the phenotypes associated with proximal 1p36 deletions.

  13. BEEHAVE: a systems model of honeybee colony dynamics and foraging to explore multifactorial causes of colony failure

    PubMed Central

    Becher, Matthias A; Grimm, Volker; Thorbek, Pernille; Horn, Juliane; Kennedy, Peter J; Osborne, Juliet L

    2014-01-01

    A notable increase in failure of managed European honeybee Apis mellifera L. colonies has been reported in various regions in recent years. Although the underlying causes remain unclear, it is likely that a combination of stressors act together, particularly varroa mites and other pathogens, forage availability and potentially pesticides. It is experimentally challenging to address causality at the colony scale when multiple factors interact. In silico experiments offer a fast and cost-effective way to begin to address these challenges and inform experiments. However, none of the published bee models combine colony dynamics with foraging patterns and varroa dynamics. We have developed a honeybee model, BEEHAVE, which integrates colony dynamics, population dynamics of the varroa mite, epidemiology of varroa-transmitted viruses and allows foragers in an agent-based foraging model to collect food from a representation of a spatially explicit landscape. We describe the model, which is freely available online (www.beehave-model.net). Extensive sensitivity analyses and tests illustrate the model's robustness and realism. Simulation experiments with various combinations of stressors demonstrate, in simplified landscape settings, the model's potential: predicting colony dynamics and potential losses with and without varroa mites under different foraging conditions and under pesticide application. We also show how mitigation measures can be tested. Synthesis and applications. BEEHAVE offers a valuable tool for researchers to design and focus field experiments, for regulators to explore the relative importance of stressors to devise management and policy advice and for beekeepers to understand and predict varroa dynamics and effects of management interventions. We expect that scientists and stakeholders will find a variety of applications for BEEHAVE, stimulating further model development and the possible inclusion of other stressors of potential importance to honeybee

  14. Automatic sleep staging using empirical mode decomposition, discrete wavelet transform, time-domain, and nonlinear dynamics features of heart rate variability signals.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Farideh; Setarehdan, Seyed-Kamaledin; Ayala-Moyeda, Jose; Nazeran, Homer

    2013-10-01

    The conventional method for sleep staging is to analyze polysomnograms (PSGs) recorded in a sleep lab. The electroencephalogram (EEG) is one of the most important signals in PSGs but recording and analysis of this signal presents a number of technical challenges, especially at home. Instead, electrocardiograms (ECGs) are much easier to record and may offer an attractive alternative for home sleep monitoring. The heart rate variability (HRV) signal proves suitable for automatic sleep staging. Thirty PSGs from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS) database were used. Three feature sets were extracted from 5- and 0.5-min HRV segments: time-domain features, nonlinear-dynamics features and time-frequency features. The latter was achieved by using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) methods. Normalized energies in important frequency bands of HRV signals were computed using time-frequency methods. ANOVA and t-test were used for statistical evaluations. Automatic sleep staging was based on HRV signal features. The ANOVA followed by a post hoc Bonferroni was used for individual feature assessment. Most features were beneficial for sleep staging. A t-test was used to compare the means of extracted features in 5- and 0.5-min HRV segments. The results showed that the extracted features means were statistically similar for a small number of features. A separability measure showed that time-frequency features, especially EMD features, had larger separation than others. There was not a sizable difference in separability of linear features between 5- and 0.5-min HRV segments but separability of nonlinear features, especially EMD features, decreased in 0.5-min HRV segments. HRV signal features were classified by linear discriminant (LD) and quadratic discriminant (QD) methods. Classification results based on features from 5-min segments surpassed those obtained from 0.5-min segments. The best result was obtained from features using 5-min HRV

  15. Fraunhofer diffraction of Laguerre-Gaussian beam caused by a dynamic superposed dual-triangular aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinzhong; Tai, Yuping; Nie, Zhaogang; Wang, Hui; Li, Hehe; Wang, Jingge; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Fraunhofer diffraction of a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam incident on a dynamic superposed dual-triangular aperture. The evolution of the diffraction pattern from this aperture is analyzed experimentally and theoretically. A special aperture, called the hex-star triangular aperture, demonstrates interesting diffraction patterns. Further, the diffraction properties of integer, half-integer, and fractional orders of topological charges at the Fraunhofer zone are studied by using the hex-star triangular aperture. This study can provide additional information to enhance the understanding of the diffraction properties of the LG beam transmitted through a complex aperture.

  16. Venom ophthalmia caused by venoms of spitting elapid and other snakes: Report of ten cases with review of epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Chu, Edward R; Weinstein, Scott A; White, Julian; Warrell, David A

    2010-09-01

    Venom ophthalmia caused by venoms of spitting elapid and other snakes: report of ten cases with review of epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiology and management. Chu, ER, Weinstein, SA, White, J and Warrell, DA. Toxicon XX:xxx-xxx. We present ten cases of ocular injury following instillation into the eye of snake venoms or toxins by spitting elapids and other snakes. The natural history of spitting elapids and the toxinology of their venoms are reviewed together with the medical effects and management of venom ophthalmia in humans and domestic animals including both direct and allergic effects of venoms. Although the clinical features and management of envenoming following bites by spitting elapids (genera Naja and Hemachatus) are well documented, these snakes are also capable of "spraying" venom towards the eyes of predators, a defensive strategy that causes painful and potentially blinding ocular envenoming (venom ophthalmia). Little attention has been given to the detailed clinical description, clinical evolution and efficacy of treatment of venom ophthalmia and no clear management guidelines have been formulated. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of ocular envenoming is based largely on animal studies and a limited body of clinical information. A few cases of ocular exposure to venoms from crotaline viperids have also been described. Venom ophthalmia often presents with pain, hyperemia, blepharitis, blepharospasm and corneal erosions. Delay or lack of treatment may result in corneal opacity, hypopyon and/or blindness. When venom is "spat" into the eye, cranial nerve VII may be affected by local spread of venom but systemic envenoming has not been documented in human patients. Management of venom ophthalmia consists of: 1) urgent decontamination by copious irrigation 2) analgesia by vasoconstrictors with weak mydriatic activity (e.g. epinephrine) and limited topical administration of local anesthetics (e.g. tetracaine) 3) exclusion of corneal abrasions

  17. Dynamics of the Development of Amnesia Caused by Disruption of Memory Reconsolidation by Neurotransmitter Receptors Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V P; Solntseva, S V; Kozyrev, S A

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of amnesia development under conditions of memory reconsolidation disruption by serotonin receptor antagonist methiothepin or NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 was studied in snails trained in conventional food aversion. In 2 days after training, injection of methiothepin or MK-801 before reminder induced amnesia development. During repeated training in 3 days after amnesia induction, the skill was formed more rapidly than during the initial training. During repeated training in 10 days after administration of methiothepin and reminder, the dynamics of habit formation was similar to that during initial learning. At the same time, repeated training in 10 days after MK-801 administration and reminder did not result in long-term memory formation. Disruption of reconsolidation of conditioned food aversion memory by antagonists of serotonin or NMDA glutamate receptors led to the development of different types of amnesia that had similar strengthening gradient at the early stages, but differed by the possibility of memory formation during re-training at the late stage.

  18. Theoretical calculations and experimental verification for the pumping effect caused by the dynamic micro-tapered angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yufei; Zhang, Jianhui; Zhu, Chunling; Huang, Jun; Jiang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    The atomizer with micro cone apertures has advantages of ultra-fine atomized droplets, low power consumption and low temperature rise. The current research of this kind of atomizer mainly focuses on the performance and its application while there is less research of the principle of the atomization. Under the analysis of the dispenser and its micro-tapered aperture's deformation, the volume changes during the deformation and vibration of the micro-tapered aperture on the dispenser are calculated by coordinate transformation. Based on the characters of the flow resistance in a cone aperture, it is found that the dynamic cone angle results from periodical changes of the volume of the micro-tapered aperture of the atomizer and this change drives one-way flows. Besides, an experimental atomization platform is established to measure the atomization rates with different resonance frequencies of the cone aperture atomizer. The atomization performances of cone aperture and straight aperture atomizers are also measured. The experimental results show the existence of the pumping effect of the dynamic tapered angle. This effect is usually observed in industries that require low dispersion and micro- and nanoscale grain sizes, such as during production of high-pressure nozzles and inhalation therapy. Strategies to minimize the pumping effect of the dynamic cone angle or improve future designs are important concerns. This research proposes that dynamic micro-tapered angle is an important cause of atomization of the atomizer with micro cone apertures.

  19. Spatio-temporal dynamics and laterality effects of face inversion, feature presence and configuration, and face outline

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Ksenija; Courtney, Maureen G.; Witzel, Thomas; Dale, Anders M.; Halgren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although a crucial role of the fusiform gyrus (FG) in face processing has been demonstrated with a variety of methods, converging evidence suggests that face processing involves an interactive and overlapping processing cascade in distributed brain areas. Here we examine the spatio-temporal stages and their functional tuning to face inversion, presence and configuration of inner features, and face contour in healthy subjects during passive viewing. Anatomically-constrained magnetoencephalography (aMEG) combines high-density whole-head MEG recordings and distributed source modeling with high-resolution structural MRI. Each person's reconstructed cortical surface served to constrain noise-normalized minimum norm inverse source estimates. The earliest activity was estimated to the occipital cortex at ~100 ms after stimulus onset and was sensitive to an initial coarse level visual analysis. Activity in the right-lateralized ventral temporal area (inclusive of the FG) peaked at ~160 ms and was largest to inverted faces. Images containing facial features in the veridical and rearranged configuration irrespective of the facial outline elicited intermediate level activity. The M160 stage may provide structural representations necessary for downstream distributed areas to process identity and emotional expression. However, inverted faces additionally engaged the left ventral temporal area at ~180 ms and were uniquely subserved by bilateral processing. This observation is consistent with the dual route model and spared processing of inverted faces in prosopagnosia. The subsequent deflection, peaking at ~240 ms in the anterior temporal areas bilaterally, was largest to normal, upright faces. It may reflect initial engagement of the distributed network subserving individuation and familiarity. These results support dynamic models suggesting that processing of unfamiliar faces in the absence of a cognitive task is subserved by a distributed and interactive neural circuit. PMID

  20. Pharmacophore modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to identify the critical chemical features against human sirtuin 2 inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Baek, Ayoung; Lee, Keun Woo

    2012-03-01

    Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is one of the emerging targets in chemotherapy field and mainly associated with many diseases such as cancer and Parkinson's. Hence, quantitative hypothesis was developed using Discovery Studio v2.5. Top ten resultant hypotheses were generated, among them Hypo1 was selected as a best hypothesis based on the statistical parameters like high cost difference (52), lowest RMS (0.71), and good correlation coefficient (0.96). Hypo1 has been validated by using well known methodologies such as Fischer's randomization method (95% confidence level), test set which has shown the correlation coefficient of 0.93 as well as the goodness of hit (0.65), and enrichment factor (8.80). All the above statistical validations confirm that the chemical features in Hypo1 (1 hydrogen bond acceptor, 1 hydrophobic, and 2 ring aromatic features) was able to inhibit the function of SIRT2. Hence, Hypo1 was used as a query in virtual screening to find a novel scaffolds by screening the various chemical databases. The screened molecules from the databases were checked for the ADMET as well as the drug-like properties. Due to the lack of SIRT2-ligand complex structure in PDB, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out to find the suitable orientation of ligand in the active site. The representative structure from MD simulations was used as a receptor to dock the molecules which passed the drug-like properties from the virtual screening. Finally, 29 compounds were selected as a potent candidate leads based on the interactions with the active site residues of SIRT2. Thus, the resultant pharmacophore can be used to discover and design the SIRT2 inhibitors with desired biological activity.

  1. Dynamical model of financial markets: fluctuating ‘temperature’ causes intermittent behavior of price changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozuki, Naoki; Fuchikami, Nobuko

    2003-11-01

    We present a model of financial markets originally proposed for a turbulent flow, as a dynamic basis of its intermittent behavior. Time evolution of the price change is assumed to be described by Brownian motion in a power-law potential, where the ‘temperature’ fluctuates slowly. The model generally yields a fat-tailed distribution of the price change. Specifically a Tsallis distribution is obtained if the inverse temperature is χ2-distributed, which qualitatively agrees with intraday data of foreign exchange market. The so-called ‘volatility’, a quantity indicating the risk or activity in financial markets, corresponds to the temperature of markets and its fluctuation leads to intermittency.

  2. Paradoxes in dynamic stability of mechanical systems: investigating the causes and detecting the nonlinear behaviors.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Angelo; Ferretti, Manuel; D'Annibale, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A critical review of three paradoxical phenomena, occurring in the dynamic stability of finite-dimensional autonomous mechanical systems, is carried out. In particular, the well-known destabilization paradoxes of Ziegler, due to damping, and Nicolai, due to follower torque, and the less well known failure of the so-called 'principle of similarity', as a control strategy in piezo-electro-mechanical systems, are discussed. Some examples concerning the uncontrolled and controlled Ziegler column and the Nicolai beam are discussed, both in linear and nonlinear regimes. The paper aims to discuss in depth the reasons of paradoxes in the linear behavior, sometimes by looking at these problems in a new perspective with respect to the existing literature. Moreover, it represents a first attempt to investigate also the post-critical regime.

  3. Characterizing Thermal features in Norris Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Using Multi- spectral Remote Sensing Data and Dynamic Calibration Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, C. C.; Queen, L. P.; Heasler, H. P.; Jaworowski, C.

    2007-12-01

    A thermal infrared remote sensing project was implemented to develop methods for identifying, classifying, and mapping thermal features. This study is directed at geothermal features, with the expectation that new protocols developed here will apply to the wildland fire thermal environment. Airborne multi-spectral digital imagery were acquired over the geothermally active Norris Basin region of Yellowstone National Park, USA. Two image acquisitions were flown, with one acquisition near solar noon and the other at night. Raw data from the five sensors were uncalibrated, so a vicarious calibration procedure was developed to compute reflectance for the visible and NIR bands using an independently calibrated hyperspectral dataset. Calibration of the thermal sensor band utilized a dynamic, in-scene calibration procedure that exploited natural, pseudo-invariant thermal reference targets instrumented with in situ kinetic temperature recorders. The calibrated reflectance and radiant temperature data from each acquisition were processed and analyzed to develop a suite of thermal attributes, including radiant temperatures, a daytime-nighttime temperature difference (DeltaT), albedo, an albedo derivative (one minus albedo), and apparent thermal inertia (ATI). The albedo terms were computed using a published weighed-average albedo algorithm based on ratios of the narrowband red and near-infrared (NIR) reflectances to total solar irradiance for the respective red and NIR bandpasses. The weighing factors for each band were the proportion of total solar irradiance incident on the surface within each segment represented by a respective bandpass. In the absence of verifiable "truth," a step-wise chain of unsupervised classification and multivariate analysis exercises was performed, drawing heavily on "fuzzy truth" to assess the quality, efficiency, and efficacy of classification procedures and results. A final classification synthesizes a "geothermal phenomenology" comprised of

  4. Pharmacophore feature-based virtual screening for finding potent GSK-3 inhibitors using molecular docking and dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Navneet; Gajjar, Anuradha; Basha, Syed Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a multitasking serine/threonine protein kinase, which is associated with the pathophysiology of several diseases such as diabetes, cancer, psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. Tideglusib is a potent, selective, and irreversible GSK-3 inhibitor that has been investigated in phase II clinical trials for the treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy and Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we performed pharmacophore feature-based virtual screening for identifying potent targetspecific GSK-3 inhibitors. We found 64 compounds that show better GSK-3 binding potentials compared with those of Tideglusib. We further validated the obtained binding potentials by performing 20-ns molecular dynamics simulations for GSK-3 complexed with Tideglusib and with the best compound found via virtual screening in this study. Several interesting molecular-level interactions were identified, including a covalent interaction with Cys199 residue at the entrance of the GSK-3 active site. These findings are expected to play a crucial role in the binding of target-specific GSK-3 inhibitors. PMID:28293069

  5. Dynamic causes of the relation between area and age of the ocean floor.

    PubMed

    Coltice, N; Rolf, T; Tackley, P J; Labrosse, S

    2012-04-20

    The distribution of seafloor ages determines fundamental characteristics of Earth such as sea level, ocean chemistry, tectonic forces, and heat loss from the mantle. The present-day distribution suggests that subduction affects lithosphere of all ages, but this is at odds with the theory of thermal convection that predicts that subduction should happen once a critical age has been reached. We used spherical models of mantle convection to show that plate-like behavior and continents cause the seafloor area-age distribution to be representative of present-day Earth. The distribution varies in time with the creation and destruction of new plate boundaries. Our simulations suggest that the ocean floor production rate previously reached peaks that were twice the present-day value.

  6. Diseases and Causes of Death in European Bats: Dynamics in Disease Susceptibility and Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mühldorfer, Kristin; Speck, Stephanie; Kurth, Andreas; Lesnik, René; Freuling, Conrad; Müller, Thomas; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    Background Bats receive increasing attention in infectious disease studies, because of their well recognized status as reservoir species for various infectious agents. This is even more important, as bats with their capability of long distance dispersal and complex social structures are unique in the way microbes could be spread by these mammalian species. Nevertheless, infection studies in bats are predominantly limited to the identification of specific pathogens presenting a potential health threat to humans. But the impact of infectious agents on the individual host and their importance on bat mortality is largely unknown and has been neglected in most studies published to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Between 2002 and 2009, 486 deceased bats of 19 European species (family Vespertilionidae) were collected in different geographic regions in Germany. Most animals represented individual cases that have been incidentally found close to roosting sites or near human habitation in urban and urban-like environments. The bat carcasses were subjected to a post-mortem examination and investigated histo-pathologically, bacteriologically and virologically. Trauma and disease represented the most important causes of death in these bats. Comparative analysis of pathological findings and microbiological results show that microbial agents indeed have an impact on bats succumbing to infectious diseases, with fatal bacterial, viral and parasitic infections found in at least 12% of the bats investigated. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate the importance of diseases and infectious agents as cause of death in European bat species. The clear seasonal and individual variations in disease prevalence and infection rates indicate that maternity colonies are more susceptible to infectious agents, underlining the possible important role of host physiology, immunity and roosting behavior as risk factors for infection of bats. PMID:22216354

  7. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    DOE PAGES

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; ...

    2015-12-23

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has notmore » yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. In this paper, we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. Lastly, this magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.« less

  8. Podocyte-Specific Deletion of Dicer Alters Cytoskeletal Dynamics and Causes Glomerular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Scott J.; Jarad, George; Cunningham, Jeanette; Goldberg, Seth; Schermer, Bernhard; Harfe, Brian D.; McManus, Michael T.; Benzing, Thomas; Miner, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding the 3′ untranslated region of mRNAs. To define their role in glomerular function, miRNA biogenesis was disrupted in mouse podocytes using a conditional Dicer allele. Mutant mice developed proteinuria by 3 wk after birth and progressed rapidly to end-stage kidney disease. Podocyte pathology included effacement, vacuolization, and hypertrophy with crescent formation. Despite normal expression of WT1, podocytes underwent dedifferentiation, exemplified by cytoskeletal disruption with early transcriptional downregulation of synaptopodin. These abnormalities differed from Cd2ap−/− mice, indicating they were not a general consequence of glomerular disease. Glomerular labeling of ezrin, moesin, and gelsolin was altered at 3 wk, but expression of nestin and α-actinin was unchanged. Abnormal cell proliferation or apoptosis was not responsible for the glomerular injury. Mutant podocytes were incapable of synthesizing mature miRNA, as revealed by their loss of miR-30a. In contrast, expression of glomerular endothelial and mesangial cell miRNAs (miR-126 and miR-145, respectively) was unchanged. These findings demonstrate a critical role for miRNA in glomerular function and suggest a pathway that may participate in the pathogenesis of kidney diseases of podocyte origin. The unique architecture of podocytes may make them especially susceptible to cytoskeletal alterations initiated by aberrant miRNA dynamics. PMID:18776121

  9. Impaired dynamics and function of mitochondria caused by mtDNA toxicity leads to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, Knut H; Kleppa, Liv; Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Eide, Lars; Carlsen, Harald; Haugen, Øyvind P; Sjaastad, Ivar; Klungland, Arne; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Attramadal, Håvard; Storm-Mathisen, Jon; Bergersen, Linda H

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in heart failure of diverse etiologies. Generalized mitochondrial disease also leads to cardiomyopathy with various clinical manifestations. Impaired mitochondrial homeostasis may over time, such as in the aging heart, lead to cardiac dysfunction. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), close to the electron transport chain and unprotected by histones, may be a primary pathogenetic site, but this is not known. Here, we test the hypothesis that cumulative damage of cardiomyocyte mtDNA leads to cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Transgenic mice with Tet-on inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific expression of a mutant uracil-DNA glycosylase 1 (mutUNG1) were generated. The mutUNG1 is known to remove thymine in addition to uracil from the mitochondrial genome, generating apyrimidinic sites, which obstruct mtDNA function. Following induction of mutUNG1 in cardiac myocytes by administering doxycycline, the mice developed hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, leading to congestive heart failure and premature death after ∼2 mo. The heart showed reduced mtDNA replication, severely diminished mtDNA transcription, and suppressed mitochondrial respiration with increased Pgc-1α, mitochondrial mass, and antioxidative defense enzymes, and finally failing mitochondrial fission/fusion dynamics and deteriorating myocardial contractility as the mechanism of heart failure. The approach provides a model with induced cardiac-restricted mtDNA damage for investigation of mtDNA-based heart disease.

  10. Changes in Proton Dynamics in Articular Cartilage Caused by Phosphate Salts and Fixation Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shaokuan; Xia, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to study the effect of phosphate salts and fixation solutions on the proton dynamics in articular cartilage in vitro. Microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) T(2) anisotropy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) double quantum-filtered (DQF) spectroscopy were used to study the full-thickness articular cartilage from several canine humeral heads. The in-plane pixel size across the depth of the cartilage tissue was 13 μm. The acid phosphate salt was an effective exchange catalyst for proton exchange in the cartilage with an organized structure of collagen fibrils, while the alkaline phosphate salt was not. For cartilage tissue containing less organized collagen fibrils, both acid and alkaline phosphate salts have no significant effect on the T(2) value at low concentration but decrease the T(2) value at high concentration. The solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), and D-PBS were found to have no significant effect on T(2) and DQF in cartilage. This study demonstrates the ability to modify the proton exchange in articular cartilage using the solutions of phosphate salts. The ability to modify the proton exchange in articular cartilage can be used to modulate the laminar appearance of articular cartilage in MRI.

  11. Single Cell Dynamics Causes Pareto-Like Effect in Stimulated T Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Cosette, Jérémie; Moussy, Alice; Onodi, Fanny; Auffret-Cariou, Adrien; Neildez-Nguyen, Thi My Anh; Paldi, Andras; Stockholm, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cell fate choice during the process of differentiation may obey to deterministic or stochastic rules. In order to discriminate between these two strategies we used time-lapse microscopy of individual murine CD4 + T cells that allows investigating the dynamics of proliferation and fate commitment. We observed highly heterogeneous division and death rates between individual clones resulting in a Pareto-like dominance of a few clones at the end of the experiment. Commitment to the Treg fate was monitored using the expression of a GFP reporter gene under the control of the endogenous Foxp3 promoter. All possible combinations of proliferation and differentiation were observed and resulted in exclusively GFP–, GFP+ or mixed phenotype clones of very different population sizes. We simulated the process of proliferation and differentiation using a simple mathematical model of stochastic decision-making based on the experimentally observed parameters. The simulations show that a stochastic scenario is fully compatible with the observed Pareto-like imbalance in the final population. PMID:26648396

  12. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; Deluca, Edward E.

    2015-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun’s corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such ‘failed torus’ events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  13. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions.

    PubMed

    Myers, Clayton E; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E

    2015-12-24

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. Here we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. This magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  14. A dynamic magnetic tension force as the cause of failed solar eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Clayton E.; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Yoo, Jongsoo; Fox, William; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Savcheva, Antonia; DeLuca, Edward E.

    2015-12-23

    Coronal mass ejections are solar eruptions driven by a sudden release of magnetic energy stored in the Sun's corona. In many cases, this magnetic energy is stored in long-lived, arched structures called magnetic flux ropes. When a flux rope destabilizes, it can either erupt and produce a coronal mass ejection or fail and collapse back towards the Sun. The prevailing belief is that the outcome of a given event is determined by a magnetohydrodynamic force imbalance called the torus instability. This belief is challenged, however, by observations indicating that torus-unstable flux ropes sometimes fail to erupt. This contradiction has not yet been resolved because of a lack of coronal magnetic field measurements and the limitations of idealized numerical modelling. In this paper, we report the results of a laboratory experiment that reveal a previously unknown eruption criterion below which torus-unstable flux ropes fail to erupt. We find that such 'failed torus' events occur when the guide magnetic field (that is, the ambient field that runs toroidally along the flux rope) is strong enough to prevent the flux rope from kinking. Under these conditions, the guide field interacts with electric currents in the flux rope to produce a dynamic toroidal field tension force that halts the eruption. Lastly, this magnetic tension force is missing from existing eruption models, which is why such models cannot explain or predict failed torus events.

  15. Seasonal Dynamics of Phlebotomine Sand Fly Species Proven Vectors of Mediterranean Leishmaniasis Caused by Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Alten, Bulent; Maia, Carla; Afonso, Maria Odete; Campino, Lenea; Jiménez, Maribel; González, Estela; Molina, Ricardo; Bañuls, Anne Laure; Prudhomme, Jorian; Vergnes, Baptiste; Toty, Celine; Cassan, Cécile; Rahola, Nil; Thierry, Magali; Sereno, Denis; Bongiorno, Gioia; Bianchi, Riccardo; Khoury, Cristina; Tsirigotakis, Nikolaos; Dokianakis, Emmanouil; Antoniou, Maria; Christodoulou, Vasiliki; Mazeris, Apostolos; Karakus, Mehmet; Ozbel, Yusuf; Arserim, Suha K.; Erisoz Kasap, Ozge; Gunay, Filiz; Oguz, Gizem; Kaynas, Sinan; Tsertsvadze, Nikoloz; Tskhvaradze, Lamzira; Gramiccia, Marina; Volf, Petr; Gradoni, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background The recent geographical expansion of phlebotomine vectors of Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean subregion has been attributed to ongoing climate changes. At these latitudes, the activity of sand flies is typically seasonal; because seasonal phenomena are also sensitive to general variations in climate, current phenological data sets can provide a baseline for continuing investigations on sand fly population dynamics that may impact on future scenarios of leishmaniasis transmission. With this aim, in 2011–2013 a consortium of partners from eight Mediterranean countries carried out entomological investigations in sites where L. infantum transmission was recently reported. Methods/Principal Findings A common protocol for sand fly collection included monthly captures by CDC light traps, complemented by sticky traps in most of the sites. Collections were replicated for more than one season in order to reduce the effects of local weather events. In each site, the trapping effort was left unchanged throughout the survey to legitimate inter-seasonal comparisons. Data from 99,000 collected specimens were analyzed, resulting in the description of seasonal dynamics of 56,000 sand flies belonging to L. infantum vector species throughout a wide geographical area, namely P. perniciosus (Portugal, Spain and Italy), P. ariasi (France), P. neglectus (Greece), P. tobbi (Cyprus and Turkey), P. balcanicus and P. kandelakii (Georgia). Time of sand fly appearance/disappearance in collections differed between sites, and seasonal densities showed variations in each site. Significant correlations were found between latitude/mean annual temperature of sites and i) the first month of sand fly appearance, that ranged from early April to the first half of June; ii) the type of density trend, varying from a single peak in July/August to multiple peaks increasing in magnitude from May through September. A 3-modal trend, recorded for P. tobbi in Cyprus, represents a novel

  16. Statistical Investigations on Solar Wind Dynamic Pressure Pulses:Basic features and Their Impacts on Geosynchronous Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang

    2016-07-01

    Solar wind dynamic pressure pulse (DPP) structures, across which the dynamic pressure abruptly changes over timescales from a few seconds to several minutes, are often observed in the near-Earth space environment. Recently we have developed a novel procedure that is able to rapidly identify the DPPs from the plasma data stream, and simultaneously define the transition region and smartly select the upstream and downstream region for analysis. The plasma data with high time-resolution from 3DP instrument on board the WIND spacecraft are inspected with this automatic DPP-searching code, and a complete list of solar wind DPPs of historic WIND observations are built up. We perform a statistical survey on the properties of DPPs near 1 AU based on this event list. It is found that overwhelming majority of DPPs are associated with the solar wind disturbances including the CME-related flows, the corotating interaction regions, as well as the complex ejecta. The annual variations of the averaged occurrence rate of DPPs are roughly in phase with the solar activities. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here we also study the decompression/compression effects of very strong negative/positive DPPs on GMFs under northward IMFs. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on dayside, near the dawn and dusk on nightside are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that on certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Statistically, both the decompression effect of

  17. Do Woody Plants Operate Near the Point of Catastrophic Xylem Dysfunction Caused by Dynamic Water Stress? 1

    PubMed Central

    Tyree, Melvin T.; Sperry, John S.

    1988-01-01

    We discuss the relationship between the dynamically changing tension gradients required to move water rapidly through the xylem conduits of plants and the proportion of conduits lost through embolism as a result of water tension. We consider the implications of this relationship to the water relations of trees. We have compiled quantitative data on the water relations, hydraulic architecture and vulnerability of embolism of four widely different species: Rhizophora mangle, Cassipourea elliptica, Acer saccharum, and Thuja occidentalis. Using these data, we modeled the dynamics of water flow and xylem blockage for these species. The model is specifically focused on the conditions required to generate `runaway embolism,' whereby the blockage of xylem conduits through embolism leads to reduced hydraulic conductance causing increased tension in the remaining vessels and generating more tension in a vicious circle. The model predicted that all species operate near the point of catastrophic xylem failure due to dynamic water stress. The model supports Zimmermann's plant segmentation hypothesis. Zimmermann suggested that plants are designed hydraulically to sacrifice highly vulnerable minor branches and thus improve the water balance of remaining parts. The model results are discussed in terms of the morphology, hydraulic architecture, eco-physiology, and evolution of woody plants. PMID:16666351

  18. Long-term change in tidal dynamics and its cause in the Pearl River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ruan, Xiaohong; Zheng, Jinhai; Zhu, Yuliang; Wu, Hongxu

    2010-08-01

    This paper focuses on identifying changes in the tidal range and the duration of the flood tide in the Pearl River Delta region, China. Mann-Kendall test and regression methods are employed to verify the existence of trends in the annual tidal range and duration series (from the 1950s to 2005) at 17 stations in the 3 major tributaries of the delta. The research results indicate that generally there is an increasing trend in the tidal range and flood tide duration at most of the stations in the channel network. Moreover, the more upstream the location of the station, the more obvious the change in trend is, and these increasing trends are all significant at the stations in the upper part of the delta. Specifically, the tidal range at Shilong station in the East River has increased abruptly since the middle of the 1980s such that the mean level of post-1990 data is approximately three times that for pre-1985. Most stations near the mouth of the estuary show significant downward trends in the tidal range and flood tide duration. Results of the intersection point of the Mann-Kendall test curves for these Pearl River Delta stations appear mostly in 1980s-1990s, indicating that a noticeable change point occurs during this period. Human activities in the Pearl River Delta reached their peak during the 1980s. Among these, large-scale and long-term sand excavation modified the hydrodynamic regime dramatically in a way that increased the water depth and lowered the level of the riverbed, leading to an increased tidal prism and upstream movement of the tidal limit. Land reclamation is also likely to have had a relatively large effect on the tidal range and flood tide duration at stations near to the estuary mouth. Changes in other factors, such as freshwater flow and sea-level rise, seem to be of relatively minor importance. It is noteworthy that in a dry season the tidal dynamics are greatly enhanced and has resulted in strong saltwater intrusion into the estuary in recent

  19. Water-level oscillations caused by volumetric and deviatoric dynamic strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalev, Eyal; Kurzon, Ittai; Doan, Mai-Linh; Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    2016-02-01

    Travelling seismic waves and Earth tides are known to cause oscillations in well water levels due to the volumetric strain characteristics of the ground motion. Although the response of well water levels to S and Love waves has been reported, it has not yet been quantified. In this paper we describe and explain the behaviour of a closed artesian water well (Gomè 1) in response to teleseismic earthquakes. This well is located within a major fault zone and screened at a highly damaged (cracked) sandstone layer. We adopt the original Skempton approach where both volumetric and deviatoric stresses (and strains) affect pore pressure. Skempton's coefficients < tex - mathid = "IM0001" > B and < tex - mathid = "IM0002" > A couple the volumetric and deviatoric stresses respectively with pore pressure and < tex - mathid = "IM0003" > BKu and < tex - mathid = "IM0004" > N are the equivalent coupling terms to volumetric and deviatoric strains. The water level in this well responds dramatically to volumetric strain (P and Rayleigh waves) as well as to deviatoric strain (S and Love waves). This response is explained by the nonlinear elastic behaviour of the highly damaged rocks. The water level response to deviatoric strain depends on the damage in the rock; deviatoric strain loading on damaged rock results in high water level amplitudes, and no response in undamaged rock. We find high values of < tex - mathid = "IM0005" > N= 8.5 GPa that corresponds to -0.5 < A < -0.25 expected at highly damaged rocks. We propose that the Gomè 1 well is located within fractured rocks, and therefore, dilatency is high, and the response of water pressure to deviatoric deformation is high. This analysis is supported by the agreement between the estimated compressibility of the aquifer, independently calculated from Earth tides, seismic response of the water pressure and other published data.

  20. Statistical perturbations in personal exposure meters caused by the human body in dynamic outdoor environments.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Begoña; Blas, Juan; Lorenzo, Rubén M; Fernández, Patricia; Abril, Evaristo J

    2011-04-01

    Personal exposure meters (PEM) are routinely used for the exposure assessment to radio frequency electric or magnetic fields. However, their readings are subject to errors associated with perturbations of the fields caused by the presence of the human body. This paper presents a novel analysis method for the characterization of this effect. Using ray-tracing techniques, PEM measurements have been emulated, with and without an approximation of this shadowing effect. In particular, the Global System for Mobile Communication mobile phone frequency band was chosen for its ubiquity and, specifically, we considered the case where the subject is walking outdoors in a relatively open area. These simulations have been contrasted with real PEM measurements in a 35-min walk. Results show a good agreement in terms of root mean square error and E-field cumulative distribution function (CDF), with a significant improvement when the shadowing effect is taken into account. In particular, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test provides a P-value of 0.05 when considering the shadowing effect, versus a P-value of 10⁻¹⁴ when this effect is ignored. In addition, although the E-field levels in the absence of a human body have been found to follow a Nakagami distribution, a lognormal distribution fits the statistics of the PEM values better than the Nakagami distribution. As a conclusion, although the mean could be adjusted by using correction factors, there are also other changes in the CDF that require particular attention due to the shadowing effect because they might lead to a systematic error.

  1. Evaluation of bridge instability caused by dynamic scour based on fractal theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Kang; Wu, Rih-Teng; Chang, Kuo-Chun; Shian Chang, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Given their special structural characteristics, bridges are prone to suffer from the effects of many hazards, such as earthquakes, wind, or floods. As most of the recent unexpected damage and destruction of bridges has been caused by hydraulic issues, monitoring the scour depth of bridges has become an important topic. Currently, approaches to scour monitoring mainly focus on either installing sensors on the substructure of a bridge or identifying the physical parameters of a bridge, which commonly face problems of system survival or reliability. To solve those bottlenecks, a novel structural health monitoring (SHM) concept was proposed by utilizing the two dominant parameters of fractal theory, including the fractal dimension and the topothesy, to evaluate the instability condition of a bridge structure rapidly. To demonstrate the performance of this method, a series of experiments has been carried out. The function of the two parameters was first determined using data collected from a single bridge column scour test. As the fractal dimension gradually decreased, following the trend of the scour depth, it was treated as an alternative to the fundamental frequency of a bridge structure in the existing methods. Meanwhile, the potential of a positive correlation between the topothesy and the amplitude of vibration data was also investigated. The excellent sensitivity of the fractal parameters related to the scour depth was then demonstrated in a full-bridge experiment. Moreover, with the combination of these two parameters, a safety index to detect the critical scour condition was proposed. The experimental results have demonstrated that the critical scour condition can be predicted by the proposed safety index. The monitoring system developed greatly advances the field of bridge scour health monitoring and offers an alternative choice to traditional scour monitoring technology.

  2. Salient Features of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal Earthquake in Relation to Earthquake Cycle and Dynamic Rupture Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, J. P.; Meng, L.; Hough, S. E.; Martin, S. S.; Asimaki, D.

    2015-12-01

    Two salient features of the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake provide new opportunities to evaluate models of earthquake cycle and dynamic rupture. The Gorkha earthquake broke only partially across the seismogenic depth of the Main Himalayan Thrust: its slip was confined in a narrow depth range near the bottom of the locked zone. As indicated by the belt of background seismicity and decades of geodetic monitoring, this is an area of stress concentration induced by deep fault creep. Previous conceptual models attribute such intermediate-size events to rheological segmentation along-dip, including a fault segment with intermediate rheology in between the stable and unstable slip segments. We will present results from earthquake cycle models that, in contrast, highlight the role of stress loading concentration, rather than frictional segmentation. These models produce "super-cycles" comprising recurrent characteristic events interspersed by deep, smaller non-characteristic events of overall increasing magnitude. Because the non-characteristic events are an intrinsic component of the earthquake super-cycle, the notion of Coulomb triggering or time-advance of the "big one" is ill-defined. The high-frequency (HF) ground motions produced in Kathmandu by the Gorkha earthquake were weaker than expected for such a magnitude and such close distance to the rupture, as attested by strong motion recordings and by macroseismic data. Static slip reached close to Kathmandu but had a long rise time, consistent with control by the along-dip extent of the rupture. Moreover, the HF (1 Hz) radiation sources, imaged by teleseismic back-projection of multiple dense arrays calibrated by aftershock data, was deep and far from Kathmandu. We argue that HF rupture imaging provided a better predictor of shaking intensity than finite source inversion. The deep location of HF radiation can be attributed to rupture over heterogeneous initial stresses left by the background seismic activity

  3. Biphasic toxicodynamic features of some antimicrobial agents on microbial growth: a dynamic mathematical model and its implications on hormesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the present work, we describe a group of anomalous dose-response (DR) profiles and develop a dynamic model that is able to explain them. Responses were obtained from conventional assays of three antimicrobial agents (nisin, pediocin and phenol) against two microorganisms (Carnobacterium piscicola and Leuconostoc mesenteroides). Results Some of these anomalous profiles show biphasic trends which are usually attributed to hormetic responses. But they can also be explained as the result of the time-course of the response from a microbial population with a bimodal distribution of sensitivity to an effector, and there is evidence suggesting this last origin. In light of interest in the hormetic phenomenology and the possibility of confusing it with other phenomena, especially in the bioassay of complex materials we try to define some criteria which allow us to distinguish between sensu stricto hormesis and biphasic responses due to other causes. Finally, we discuss some problems concerning the metric of the dose in connection with the exposure time, and we make a cautionary suggestion about the use of bacteriocins as antimicrobial agents. Conclusions The mathematical model proposed, which combines the basis of DR theory with microbial growth kinetics, can generate and explain all types of anomalous experimental profiles. These profiles could also be described in a simpler way by means of bisigmoidal equations. Such equations could be successfully used in a microbiology and toxicology context to discriminate between hormesis and other biphasic phenomena. PMID:20723220

  4. A fault diagnosis scheme for planetary gearboxes using modified multi-scale symbolic dynamic entropy and mRMR feature selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongbo; Yang, Yuantao; Li, Guoyan; Xu, Minqiang; Huang, Wenhu

    2017-07-01

    Health condition identification of planetary gearboxes is crucial to reduce the downtime and maximize productivity. This paper aims to develop a novel fault diagnosis method based on modified multi-scale symbolic dynamic entropy (MMSDE) and minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) to identify the different health conditions of planetary gearbox. MMSDE is proposed to quantify the regularity of time series, which can assess the dynamical characteristics over a range of scales. MMSDE has obvious advantages in the detection of dynamical changes and computation efficiency. Then, the mRMR approach is introduced to refine the fault features. Lastly, the obtained new features are fed into the least square support vector machine (LSSVM) to complete the fault pattern identification. The proposed method is numerically and experimentally demonstrated to be able to recognize the different fault types of planetary gearboxes.

  5. Recent calving dynamics of Glaciar Jorge Montt (Southern Patagonia Icefield) based on feature tracking techniques and oceanographic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bown, F.; Moffat, C. F.; Rivera, A.; Cisternas, S.; Kohoutek, T.

    2013-12-01

    Glaciers in the Southern Patagonia Icefield (SPI) have been retreating, thinning and accelerating in recent decades. Most of the SPI is comprised of temperate ice, therefore melting is the dominant wasting factor, however, calving is also playing a very important role, especially because calving is enhancing ice dynamic responses, mainly when glaciers calve into deep waters. Some of the most exacerbated responses are connected to the well documented and long-term tidewater calving cycle (TCC) overlapped by recent climate-related glacier responses. Glaciar Jorge Montt (48S/73W), is a tidewater glacier (~500 km2) which has experienced the maximum frontal retreat of the whole SPI (near 20 km in 112 years) while retreating up to 400 m water depth. Dead trees found in areas recently open by the glacier's retreat prove a date for the previous advancing cycle which took place during the Little Ice Age (250-400 years BP). This result indicates that the glacier is experiencing the retreating phase of the TCC in centennial time-scales. However, very little is known if this phase will stop or will continue, or how do climate change dynamcis will affect it. In order to understand the present behaviour of the glacier, several surveys have recently been conducted in the area, including airborne lidar and radar surveys, water depth measurements and ice dynamic studies. In order to survey the ice dynamic of the glacier front in connection with tides at the inner fjord, a camera pointing to the glacier terminus and collecting up to 8 photographs per day was installed in April 2012. The camera was continuously working for 60 days, allowing to study in detail the ice velocities, calving fluxes and tides near the ice. Thanks to the geo-location of the oblique photographs, feature tracking techniques were applied to the series in order to determine ice velocities and frontal retreat during the operational period. The resulting average velocities are lower than 10 m d-1, which are

  6. Dynamical instability as the cause of the massive outbursts in Eta Carinae and other luminous blue variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1993-01-01

    A new type of stellar envelope structure has been computationally discovered at very high stellar masses. The outer part of the envelope resembles a nearly detached, diffusely filled shell overlying an ultrahot surface of small radius. This structural anomaly is caused by a large iron bump occurring in the new opacities of Iglesias et al. (1992). The new stellar models with normal metallicity encounter a strong ionization-induced dynamical instability in the outer envelope as they rapidly transit the H-R diagram after the end of central hydrogen burning. Preliminary evolutionary and hydrodynamical calculations successfully mimic the most basic observed properties of Eta Carinae and other very luminous blue variables. The Humphreys-Davidson sloped line in the H-R diagram, however, seems to be unrelated to these variables, and is instead the observed terminus of the main-sequence phase of evolution if convective core overshooting is insignificant.

  7. High-frequency vibration energy harvesting from impulsive excitation utilizing intentional dynamic instability caused by strong nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remick, Kevin; Dane Quinn, D.; Michael McFarland, D.; Bergman, Lawrence; Vakakis, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The authors investigate a vibration-based energy harvesting system utilizing essential (nonlinearizable) nonlinearities and electromagnetic coupling elements. The system consists of a grounded, weakly damped linear oscillator (primary system) subjected to a single impulsive load. This primary system is coupled to a lightweight, damped oscillating attachment (denoted as nonlinear energy sink, NES) via a neodymium magnet and an inductance coil, and a piano wire, which generates an essential geometric cubic stiffness nonlinearity. Under impulsive input, the transient damped dynamics of this system exhibit transient resonance captures (TRCs) causing intentional large-amplitude and high-frequency instabilities in the response of the NES. These TRCs result in strong energy transfer from the directly excited primary system to the light-weight attachment. The energy is harvested by the electromagnetic elements in the coupling and, in the present case, dissipated in a resistive element in the electrical circuit. The primary goal of this work is to numerically, analytically, and experimentally demonstrate the efficacy of employing this type of intentional high-frequency dynamic instability to achieve enhanced vibration energy harvesting under impulsive excitation.

  8. 18F-FDG PET imaging for identifying the dynamics of intestinal disease caused by SFTSV infection in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hayasaka, Daisuke; Nishi, Kodai; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Shiogama, Kazuya; Onouchi, Takanori; Shimada, Satoshi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Morita, Kouichi

    2016-01-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging disease that causes fever, enteritis, thrombocytopenia, and leucopenia and can be fatal in up to 30% of cases. However, the mechanism of severe disease is not fully understood. Molecular imaging approaches, such as positron-emission tomography (PET), are functional in vivo imaging techniques that provide real-time dynamics of disease progression, assessments of pharmacokinetics, and diagnoses for disease progression. Molecular imaging also potentially provides useful approaches to explore the pathogenesis of viral infections. Thus, the purpose of this study was to image the pathological features of SFTSV infection in vivo by PET imaging. In a mouse model, we showed that 18F-FDG accumulations clearly identified the intestinal tract site as a pathological site. We also demonstrated that 18F-FDG PET imaging can assess disease progression and response to antiserum therapy within the same individual. This is the first report demonstrating a molecular imaging strategy for SFTSV infection. Our results provide potentially useful information for preclinical studies such as the elucidation of the mechanism of SFTSV infection in vivo and the assessment of drugs for SFTS treatment. PMID:26700962

  9. Is the 21-micron Feature Observed in Some Post-AGB Stars Caused by the Interaction Between Ti Atoms and Fullerenes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A. III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    Recent measurements of fullerenes and Ti atoms recorded in our laboratory have demonstrated the presence of an infrared feature near 21 pm. The feature observed has nearly the same shape and position as is observed for one of the most enigmatic features in post-asymptotic giant blanch (AGB) stars. In our experimental system large cage carbon particles, such as large fullerenes, were produced from CO gas by the Boudouard reaction. Large-cage carbon particles intermixed with Ti atoms were produced by the evaporation of a Ti metal wrapped carbon electrode in CO gas. The infrared spectra of large fullerenes interacting with Ti atoms show a characteristic feature at 20.3 micron that closely corresponds to the 20.1 micron feature observed in post-AGB stars. Both the lab- oratory and stellar spectra also show a small but significant peak at 19.0 micron, which is attributed to fullerenes. Here, we propose that the interaction between fullerenes and Ti atoms may be a plausible explanation for the 21-micron feature seen in some post-AGB stars.

  10. Ocean dynamic processes causing spatially heterogeneous distribution of sedimentary caesium-137 massively released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, H.; Morino, Y.; Furuichi, N.; Ohara, T.

    2015-12-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radiocaesium 137Cs that were released into the environment by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 are widely known to have extensively migrated to Pacific Ocean sediment off of eastern Japan. Several recent reports have stated that the sedimentary 137Cs is now stable with a remarkably heterogeneous distribution. The present study elucidates ocean dynamic processes causing this heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution in and around the shelf off Fukushima and adjacent prefectures. We performed a numerical simulation of oceanic 137Cs behaviour for about 10 months after the accident, using a comprehensive dynamic model involving advection-diffusion transport in seawater, adsorption and desorption to and from particulate matter, sedimentation and suspension on and from the bottom, and vertical diffusion transport in the sediment. A notable simulated result was that the sedimentary 137Cs significantly accumulated in a swath just offshore of the shelf break (along the 50-100 m isobath) as in recent observations, although the seabed in the entire simulation domain was assumed to have ideal properties such as identical bulk density, uniform porosity, and aggregation of particles with a single grain diameter. This result indicated that the heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution was not necessarily a result of the spatial distribution of 137Cs sediment adsorptivity. The present simulation suggests that the shape of the swath is mainly associated with spatiotemporal variation between bottom shear stress in the shallow shelf (< 50 m depths) and that offshore of the shelf break. In a large part of the shallow shelf, the simulation indicated that strong bottom friction suspending particulate matter from the seabed frequently occurred via a periodic spring tide about every 2 weeks and via occasional strong wind. The sedimentary 137Cs thereby could hardly stay on the surface of the seabed with the result that

  11. Dynamic GLUT4 sorting through a syntaxin-6 compartment in muscle cells is derailed by insulin resistance-causing ceramide.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kevin P; Klip, Amira

    2014-04-04

    GLUT4 constitutively recycles between the plasma membrane and intracellular depots. Insulin shifts this dynamic equilibrium towards the plasma membrane by recruiting GLUT4 to the plasma membrane from insulin-responsive vesicles. Muscle is the primary site for dietary glucose deposition; however, how GLUT4 sorts into insulin-responsive vesicles, and if and how insulin resistance affects this process, is unknown. In L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4, we analyzed the intracellular itinerary of GLUT4 as it internalizes from the cell surface and examined if such sorting is perturbed by C2-ceramide, a lipid metabolite causing insulin resistance. Surface-labeled GLUT4myc that internalized for 30 min accumulated in a Syntaxin-6 (Stx6)- and Stx16-positive perinuclear sub-compartment devoid of furin or internalized transferrin, and displayed insulin-responsive re-exocytosis. C2-ceramide dispersed the Stx6-positive sub-compartment and prevented insulin-responsive re-exocytosis of internalized GLUT4myc, even under conditions not affecting insulin-stimulated signaling towards Akt. Microtubule disruption with nocodazole prevented pre-internalized GLUT4myc from reaching the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment and from undergoing insulin-responsive exocytosis. Removing nocodazole allowed both parameters to recover, suggesting that the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment was required for GLUT4 insulin-responsiveness. Accordingly, Stx6 knockdown inhibited by ∼50% the ability of internalized GLUT4myc to undergo insulin-responsive re-exocytosis without altering its overall perinuclear accumulation. We propose that Stx6 defines the insulin-responsive compartment in muscle cells. Our data are consistent with a model where ceramide could cause insulin resistance by altering intracellular GLUT4 sorting.

  12. Dynamic GLUT4 sorting through a syntaxin-6 compartment in muscle cells is derailed by insulin resistance-causing ceramide

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Kevin P.; Klip, Amira

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT GLUT4 constitutively recycles between the plasma membrane and intracellular depots. Insulin shifts this dynamic equilibrium towards the plasma membrane by recruiting GLUT4 to the plasma membrane from insulin-responsive vesicles. Muscle is the primary site for dietary glucose deposition; however, how GLUT4 sorts into insulin-responsive vesicles, and if and how insulin resistance affects this process, is unknown. In L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4, we analyzed the intracellular itinerary of GLUT4 as it internalizes from the cell surface and examined if such sorting is perturbed by C2-ceramide, a lipid metabolite causing insulin resistance. Surface-labeled GLUT4myc that internalized for 30 min accumulated in a Syntaxin-6 (Stx6)- and Stx16-positive perinuclear sub-compartment devoid of furin or internalized transferrin, and displayed insulin-responsive re-exocytosis. C2-ceramide dispersed the Stx6-positive sub-compartment and prevented insulin-responsive re-exocytosis of internalized GLUT4myc, even under conditions not affecting insulin-stimulated signaling towards Akt. Microtubule disruption with nocodazole prevented pre-internalized GLUT4myc from reaching the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment and from undergoing insulin-responsive exocytosis. Removing nocodazole allowed both parameters to recover, suggesting that the Stx6-positive perinuclear sub-compartment was required for GLUT4 insulin-responsiveness. Accordingly, Stx6 knockdown inhibited by ∼50% the ability of internalized GLUT4myc to undergo insulin-responsive re-exocytosis without altering its overall perinuclear accumulation. We propose that Stx6 defines the insulin-responsive compartment in muscle cells. Our data are consistent with a model where ceramide could cause insulin resistance by altering intracellular GLUT4 sorting. PMID:24705014

  13. E-photosynthesis: a comprehensive modeling approach to understand chlorophyll fluorescence transients and other complex dynamic features of photosynthesis in fluctuating light.

    PubMed

    Nedbal, Ladislav; Cervený, Jan; Rascher, Uwe; Schmidt, Henning

    2007-01-01

    Plants are exposed to a temporally and spatially heterogeneous environment, and photosynthesis is well adapted to these fluctuations. Understanding of the complex, non-linear dynamics of photosynthesis in fluctuating light requires novel-modeling approaches that involve not only the primary light and dark biochemical reactions, but also networks of regulatory interactions. This requirement exceeds the capacity of the existing molecular models that are typically reduced to describe a partial process, dynamics of a specific complex or its particular dynamic feature. We propose a concept of comprehensive model that would represent an internally consistent, integral framework combining information on the reduced models that led to its construction. This review explores approaches and tools that exist in engineering, mathematics, and in other domains of biology that can be used to develop a comprehensive model of photosynthesis. Equally important, we investigated techniques by which one can rigorously reduce such a comprehensive model to models of low dimensionality, which preserve dynamic features of interest and, thus, contribute to a better understanding of photosynthesis under natural and thus fluctuating conditions. The web-based platform www.e-photosynthesis.org is introduced as an arena where these concepts and tools are being introduced and tested.

  14. A comparative study of molecular dynamics in Cartesian and in internal coordinates: dynamical instability in the latter caused by nonlinearity of the equations of motion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Palmo, Kim; Krimm, Samuel

    2007-04-30

    The stability of a general molecular dynamics (MD) integration scheme is examined for simulations in generalized (internal plus external) coordinates (GCs). An analytic expression is derived for the local error in energy during each integration time step. This shows that the explicit dependence of the mass-matrix on GCs, which makes the system's Lagrange equations of motion nonlinear, causes MD simulations in GCs to be less stable than those in Cartesian coordinates (CCs). In terms of CCs, the corresponding mass-matrix depends only on atomic masses and thus atomistic motion is subject to the linear Newton equations, which makes the system more stable. Also investigated are two MD methods in GCs that utilize nonzero elements of the vibrational spectroscopic B-matrices. One updates positions and velocities in GCs that are iteratively adjusted so as to conform to the velocity Verlet equivalent in GCs. The other updates positions in GCs and velocities in CCs that are adjusted to satisfy the internal constraints of the new constrained WIGGLE MD scheme. The proposed methods are applied to an isolated n-octane molecule and their performances are compared with those of several CCMD schemes. The simulation results are found to be consistent with the analytic stability analysis. Finally, a method is presented for computing nonzero elements of B-matrices for external rotations without imposing the Casimir-Eckart conditions.

  15. Evolutionary and Ecological Dynamics of Transboundary Disease Caused by H5N1 Virus in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Wei, K; Lin, Y; Xie, D

    2015-06-01

    Southeast Asia has been the breeding ground for many emerging diseases in the past decade, and it is in this region that new genetic variants of HPAI H5N1 viruses have been emerging. Cross-border movement of animals accelerates the spread of H5N1, and the changing environmental conditions also exert strong selective pressure on the viruses. The transboundary zoonotic diseases caused by H5N1 pose a serious and continual threat to global economy and public health. Here, we divided the H5N1 viruses isolated in Southeast Asia during 2003-2009 into four groups according to their phylogenetic relationships among HA gene sequences. Molecular evolution analysis suggests populations in expansion rather than a positive selection for group 2 and group 3, yet group 4 is under strong positive selection. Site 193 was found to be a potential glycosylation site and located in receptor-binding domain. Note that site 193 tends to appear in avian isolates instead of human strains. Population dynamics analysis reveals that the effective population size of infections in Southeast Asia has undergone three obvious increases, and the results are consistent with the epidemiological analysis. Ecological and phylogeographical analyses show that agro-ecological environments, migratory birds, domestic waterfowl, especially free-ranging ducks, are crucial in the occurrence, maintenance and spread of H5N1 virus. The epidemiological links between Indonesia and Suphanburi observed suggest that viruses in Indonesia were originated from multiple introductions.

  16. Single Active Site Mutation Causes Serious Resistance of HIV Reverse Transcriptase to Lamivudine: Insight from Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Moonsamy, Suri; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Walker, Ross C; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations, binding free energy calculations, principle component analysis (PCA), and residue interaction network analysis were employed in order to investigate the molecular mechanism of M184I single mutation which played pivotal role in making the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) totally resistant to lamivudine. Results showed that single mutations at residue 184 of RT caused (1) distortion of the orientation of lamivudine in the active site due to the steric conflict between the oxathiolane ring of lamivudine and the side chain of beta-branched amino acids Ile at position 184 which, in turn, perturbs inhibitor binding, (2) decrease in the binding affinity by (~8 kcal/mol) when compared to the wild-type, (3) variation in the overall enzyme motion as evident from the PCA for both systems, and (4) distortion of the hydrogen bonding network and atomic interactions with the inhibitor. The comprehensive analysis presented in this report can provide useful information for understanding the drug resistance mechanism against lamivudine. The results can also provide some potential clues for further design of novel inhibitors that are less susceptible to drug resistance.

  17. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

    2011-05-01

    Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

  18. Diversity and dynamics of algal Megaviridae members during a harmful brown tide caused by the pelagophyte, Aureococcus anophagefferens.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; Gann, Eric R; LeCleir, Gary R; Kang, Yoonja; Gobler, Christopher J; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2016-05-01

    Many giant dsDNA algal viruses share a common ancestor with Mimivirus--one of the largest viruses, in terms of genetic content. Together, these viruses form the proposed 'Megaviridae' clade of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses. To gauge Megaviridae diversity, we designed degenerate primers targeting the major capsid protein genes of algae-infecting viruses within this group and probed the clade's diversity during the course of a brown tide bloom caused by the harmful pelagophyte,Aureococcus anophagefferens We amplified target sequences in water samples from two distinct locations (Weesuck Creek and Quantuck Bay, NY) covering 12 weeks concurrent with the proliferation and demise of a bloom. In total, 475 amplicons clustered into 145 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at 97% identity. One OTU contained 19 sequences with ≥97% identity to AaV, a member of the Megaviridae clade that infects A. anophagefferens, suggesting AaV was present during the bloom. Unifrac analysis showed clear temporal patterns in algal Megaviridae dynamics, with a shift in the virus community structure that corresponded to the Aureococcus bloom decline in both locations. Our data provide insights regarding the environmental relevance of algal Megaviridae members and raise important questions regarding their phylodynamics across different environmental gradients.

  19. The MECP2 variant c.925C>T (p.Arg309Trp) causes intellectual disability in both males and females without classic features of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schönewolf-Greulich, B; Tejada, M-I; Stephens, K; Hadzsiev, K; Gauthier, J; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Pfundt, R; Ravn, K; Maortua, H; Gener, B; Martínez-Bouzas, C; Piton, A; Rouleau, G; Clayton-Smith, J; Kleefstra, T; Bisgaard, A-M; Tümer, Z

    2016-06-01

    Missense MECP2 variants can have various phenotypic effects ranging from a normal phenotype to typical Rett syndrome (RTT). In females, the phenotype can also be influenced by the X-inactivation pattern. In this study, we present detailed clinical descriptions of six patients with a rare base-pair substitution affecting Arg309 at the C-terminal end of the transcriptional repression domain (TRD). All patients have intellectual disability and present with some RTT features, but they do not fulfill the clinical criteria for typical or atypical RTT. Most of the patients also have mild facial dysmorphism. Intriguingly, the mother of an affected male patient is an asymptomatic carrier of this variant. It is therefore likely that the p.(Arg309Trp) variation does not necessarily lead to male lethality, and it results in a wide range of clinical features in females, probably influenced by different X-inactivation patterns in target tissues.

  20. Impact of dynamic bottom-up features and top-down control on the visual exploration of moving real-world scenes in hemispatial neglect.

    PubMed

    Machner, Björn; Dorr, Michael; Sprenger, Andreas; von der Gablentz, Janina; Heide, Wolfgang; Barth, Erhardt; Helmchen, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    Patients with hemispatial neglect are severely impaired in orienting their attention to contralesional hemispace. Although motion is one of the strongest attentional cues in humans, it is still unknown how neglect patients visually explore their moving real-world environment. We therefore recorded eye movements at bedside in 19 patients with hemispatial neglect following acute right hemisphere stroke, 14 right-brain damaged patients without neglect and 21 healthy control subjects. Videos of naturalistic real-world scenes were presented first in a free viewing condition together with static images, and subsequently in a visual search condition. We analyzed number and amplitude of saccades, fixation durations and horizontal fixation distributions. Novel computational tools allowed us to assess the impact of different scene features (static and dynamic contrast, colour, brightness) on patients' gaze. Independent of the different stimulus conditions, neglect patients showed decreased numbers of fixations in contralesional hemispace (ipsilesional fixation bias) and increased fixation durations in ipsilesional hemispace (disengagement deficit). However, in videos left-hemifield fixations of neglect patients landed on regions with particularly high dynamic contrast. Furthermore, dynamic scenes with few salient objects led to a significant reduction of the pathological ipsilesional fixation bias. In visual search, moving targets in the neglected hemifield were more frequently detected than stationary ones. The top-down influence (search instruction) could neither reduce the ipsilesional fixation bias nor the impact of bottom-up features. Our results provide evidence for a strong impact of dynamic bottom-up features on neglect patients' scanning behaviour. They support the neglect model of an attentional priority map in the brain being imbalanced towards ipsilesional hemispace, which can be counterbalanced by strong contralateral motion cues. Taking into account the lack of

  1. Dynamics of speckles with a small number of scattering events: specific features of manifestation of the Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Ulyanov, Sergey S

    2014-04-01

    Spectra of intensity fluctuations of dynamic non-Gaussian speckles formed with a small number of scattering events have been studied theoretically and experimentally. A new type of manifestation of the Doppler effect has been observed. The dependence of frequency position of the Doppler peak and the shape of the Doppler spectrum on the number of scatterers has been analyzed.

  2. Gene discovery for Mendelian conditions via social networking: de novo variants in KDM1A cause developmental delay and distinctive facial features

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Yu, Joon-Ho; Lorentzen, Peter; Park, Karen M.; Jamal, Seema M.; Tabor, Holly K.; Rauch, Anita; Saenz, Margarita Sifuentes; Boltshauser, Eugen; Patterson, Karynne E.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pace of Mendelian gene discovery is slowed by the “n-of-1 problem” – the difficulty of establishing causality of a putatively pathogenic variant in a single person or family. Identification of an unrelated person with an overlapping phenotype and suspected pathogenic variant in the same gene can overcome this barrier but is often impeded by lack of a convenient or widely-available way to share data on candidate variants / genes among families, clinicians and researchers. Methods Social networking among families, clinicians and researchers was used to identify three children with variants of unknown significance in KDM1A and similar phenotypes. Results De novo variants in KDM1A underlie a new syndrome characterized by developmental delay and distinctive facial features. Conclusion Social networking is a potentially powerful strategy to discover genes for rare Mendelian conditions, particularly those with non-specific phenotypic features. To facilitate the efforts of families to share phenotypic and genomic information with each other, clinicians, and researchers, we developed the Repository for Mendelian Genomics Family Portal (RMD-FP). Design and development of a web-based tool, MyGene2, that enables families, clinicians and researchers to search for gene matches based on analysis of phenotype and exome data deposited into the RMD-FP is underway. PMID:26656649

  3. The temporal-spatial dynamics of feature maps during monocular deprivation revealed by chronic imaging and self-organization model simulation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lei; Xie, Yang; Yu, Hongbo

    2016-12-17

    Experiments on the adult visual cortex of cats, ferrets and monkeys have revealed organized spatial relationships between multiple feature maps which can also be reproduced by the Kohonen and elastic net self-organization models. However, attempts to apply these models to simulate the temporal kinetics of monocular deprivation (MD) during the critical period, and their effects on the spatial arrangement of feature maps, have led to conflicting results. In this study, we performed MD and chronic imaging in the ferret visual cortex during the critical period of ocular dominance (OD) plasticity. We also used the Kohonen model to simulate the effects of MD on OD and orientation map development. Both the experiments and simulations demonstrated two general parameter-insensitive findings. Specifically, our first finding demonstrated that the OD index shift resulting from MD, and its subsequent recovery during binocular vision (BV), were both nonlinear, with a significantly stronger shift occurring during the initial period. Meanwhile, spatial reorganization of feature maps led to globally unchanged but locally shifted map patterns. In detail, we found that the periodicity of OD and orientation maps remained unchanged during, and after, deprivation. Relationships between OD and orientation maps remained similar but were significantly weakened due to OD border shifts. These results indicate that orthogonal gradient relationships between maps may be preset and are only mildly modifiable during the critical period. The Kohonen model was able to reproduce these experimental results, hence its role is further extended to the description of cortical feature map dynamics during development.

  4. Subsurface Dynamical Properties of Variable Features Seen in Satellite IR Imagery off Point Sur and Their Acoustic Significance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    JOHNSON UNCLASSIFIED NI. MENOEOEEEEEiiiiiui MEl. "- III " l- 11 MICROCOPY RESOLUJTION TESI CHART NAKIONAM HLILALI O S1ANL)AI I~A3.A •L 6 IIII.L 1,2.0 nI...Dynamics of the Coastal Upwelling Frontal Zone off Oregon. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida. 232 U im l aB m i m ll l -lr

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Features of the phase dynamics in a ring solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Nikolai V.; Lariontsev, E. G.

    2005-07-01

    The peculiarities of the phase dynamics are studied in a ring solid-state laser operating in transient quasi-sinusoidal oscillation regimes of the first and second kinds (QS-1 and QS-2) appearing upon periodic modulation of the pump power. It is shown that recording of a change in the phase difference of counterpropagating waves in the QS-2 regime under certain conditions makes it possible to determine directly the mutual nonreciprocity of the laser resonator.

  6. Structural features and interfacial properties of WH2, β-thymosin domains and other intrinsically disordered domains in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Renault, Louis; Deville, Célia; van Heijenoort, Carine

    2013-11-01

    Many actin-binding proteins (ABPs) use complex multidomain architectures to integrate and coordinate multiple signals and interactions with the dynamic remodeling of actin cytoskeleton. In these proteins, small segments that are intrinsically disordered in their unbound native state can be functionally as important as identifiable folded units. These functional intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) are however difficult to identify and characterize in vitro. Here, we try to summarize the state of the art in understanding the structural features and interfacial properties of IDRs involved in actin self-assembly dynamics. Recent structural and functional insights into the regulation of widespread, multifunctional WH2/β-thymosin domains, and of other IDRs such as those associated with WASP/WAVE, formin or capping proteins are examined. Understanding the functional versatility of IDRs in actin assembly requires apprehending by multiple structural and functional approaches their large conformational plasticity and dynamics in their interactions. In many modular ABPs, IDRs relay labile interactions with multiple partners and act as interaction hubs in interdomain and protein-protein interfaces. They thus control multiple conformational transitions between the inactive and active states or between various active states of multidomain ABPs, and play an important role to coordinate the high turnover of interactions in actin self-assembly dynamics.

  7. Carcinoma of two parathyroid glands caused by a novel MEN1 gene mutation - a rare feature of the MEN 1 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Juodelė, Linas; Serapinas, Danielius; Sabaliauskas, Gintaras; Krasauskienė, Aurelija; Krasauskas, Virgilijus; Verkauskienė, Rasa; Barkauskienė, Diana; Juozaitytė, Elona

    2011-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) is a rare syndrome inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, characterized by combinations of tumors of the parathyroid glands, pituitary gland, and pancreatic islet cells and more rare tumors of endocrine organs and nonendocrine tissues. Germline mutations in the MEN1 gene are responsible for the MEN 1 syndrome, leading to an inactive form of menin protein. Benign lesions of the parathyroid glands are characteristic in patients with the MEN 1 syndrome; however, patients can develop parathyroid carcinomas very rarely. This report presents a clinical case of the MEN 1 syndrome: a 39-year-old woman underwent surgery for carcinoma of two parathyroid glands as well as was treated for pituitary prolactinoma, which caused infertility, and malignant insulinoma; the patient had multiple subcutaneous lipomas as well. Genetic analysis revealed a novel germline mutation in the MEN1 gene - a nucleotide insertion at codon 43 in exon 2 (c.129insA), which caused the occurrence of the MEN1 syndrome. The clinical case of the MEN 1 syndrome presented here is relevant in gathering the data on etiopathogenesis of not only MEN 1 syndrome, but an extremely rare pathology - parathyroid carcinoma - as well.

  8. Hepatic Lesions Caused by Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia in Fischer 344 Rats: Similar Morphologic Features and Morphogenesis to Those of Nodular Regenerative Hyperplasia (NRH) in the Human Liver.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Atsushi; Narama, Isao

    2015-08-01

    To characterize the hepatic lesions in Fischer 344 (F344) rats afflicted with large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia, the livers of rats with LGL leukemia at various stages were examined histopathologically and immunohistochemically. The morphologic features in the livers of rats afflicted with LGL leukemia were diffuse, uniform-sized, granular, or micronodular lesions consisting of hepatocytes showing centrilobular atrophy and perilobular hypertrophy (CAPH) without fibrosis. With progression in the stage of the LGL leukemia, the severity of the CAPH of hepatocytes increased resulting in fatty change and/or single-cell necrosis, along with compensatory hyperplasia of the hepatocytes, finally resulting in lesions similar to those seen in nodular regenerative hyperplasia (NRH) in the human liver. The CAPH of hepatocytes was a nonspecific tissue adaptation against ischemia or hypoxemia and/or imbalance in blood supply due to disturbance in the portal circulation and hemolytic anemia induced by the leukemia cells. In addition, direct and/or indirect hepatocellular injuries by leukemia cells were considered to be necessary for the formation of human NRH-like lesions. Morphogenetic investigation of the livers of rats afflicted with LGL leukemia may be helpful to clarify the pathogenesis of NRH in the human liver.

  9. Causes, Dynamics and Impacts of Lahar Mass Flows due to the April 2015 Eruption of Calbuco Volcano, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussaillant, Alejandro; Russell, Andy; Meier, Claudio; Rivera, Andres; Mella, Mauricio; Garrido, Natalia; Hernandez, Jorge; Napoleoni, Felipe; Gonzalez, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    Calbuco is a 2015m high, glacier capped, stratovolcano in the heavily populated Los Lagos region of southern Chile with a history of large volcanic eruptions in 1893-95, 1906-7, 1911-12, 1917, 1932, 1945, 1961 and 1972. Calbuco volcano experienced a powerful 90 minute eruption at 18:04h on 22 April, 2015 followed by additional major eruptions at 01:00h and 13:10h on 23 & 30 April, respectively, resulting in the evacuation of 6500 people and the imposition of a 20 km radius exclusion zone. Pyroclastic flows descended into several river catchments radiating from the volcano with lahars travelling distances of up to 14 km, reaching populated areas. We present findings from detailed field observations from April and July 2015, and January 2016, regarding the causes, dynamics and impacts of lahars generated by the April 2015 eruption, supported by satellite imagery, LiDAR and detailed rtkGPS & TLS surveys, as well as sediment sampling. Pyroclastic flows melted glacier ice and snow generating the largest lahars in the Rio Este and Rio Blanco Sur on the southern flanks of the volcano. Lahar deposits in the Rio Blanco Norte were buried by pyroclastic flow deposits with measured temperatures of up to 282°C three months after emplacement. Lahar erosional impacts included bedrock erosion, alluvial channel incision, erosion of surficial deposits and the felling of large areas of forest. Depositional landforms included boulder run-ups on the outsides of channel bends, boulder clusters and large woody debris jams. Lahars deposited up to 8m of sediment within distal reaches. Deposits on the southern flanks of Calbuco indicate the passage of multiple pulses of contrasting rheology. Lahar occurrence and magnitude was controlled by the pre-eruption distribution of snow and ice on the volcano. Pre-existing lahar channels controlled flows to lower piedmont zones where routing was determined by palaeo-lahar geomorphology. Ongoing erosion of proximal pyroclastic flow and lahar deposits

  10. [Age features of the dynamics of the oscillation amplitudes of the peripheral skin blood flow during the postocclusive reactive hyperemia].

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, I V; Tankanag, A V; Chemeris, N K

    2010-01-01

    The study of age-related changes of peripheral microhemodynamics was performed by laser Doppler flowmetry in 60 healthy volunteers. To determine the reaction of the microvascular system in response to short-term ischemia an occlusion test was used. To study the dynamics of the oscillation amplitudes of the peripheral blood flow the time-amplitude analysis on the basis of continuous adaptive wavelet filtration was used. It was found that the amplitudes of the oscillation in the range of heart rate in each age group reached its maxima with a delay after the occlusion stopping, whereas in the range of respiratory rhythm such delay was not observed. It is assumed that the formation ofhyperemic response to short-term ischemia occurs due to the preferential effect of arterio-arteriolar level, and the dynamics of the amplitudes in the range of respiratory rhythm reflects the devastation ofvenular level after occlusion stop. The observed age-related decreases of the maximum amplitudes in the range of myogenic, neurogenic and endothelial rhythms in response to shortterm ischemia demonstrate an age reduction limits of the peripheral blood flow regulation by related systems.

  11. Decreased chondrocyte proliferation and dysregulated apoptosis in the cartilage growth plate are key features of a murine model of epiphyseal dysplasia caused by a matn3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Leighton, Matthew P; Nundlall, Seema; Starborg, Tobias; Meadows, Roger S; Suleman, Farhana; Knowles, Lynette; Wagener, Raimund; Thornton, David J; Kadler, Karl E; Boot-Handford, Raymond P; Briggs, Michael D

    2007-07-15

    Disruption to endochondral ossification leads to delayed and irregular bone formation and can result in a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders known as the chondrodysplasias. One such disorder, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), is characterized by mild dwarfism and early-onset osteoarthritis and can result from mutations in the gene encoding matrilin-3 (MATN3). To determine the disease mechanisms that underpin the pathophysiology of MED we generated a murine model of epiphyseal dysplasia by knocking-in a matn3 mutation. Mice that are homozygous for the mutation develop a progressive dysplasia and have short-limbed dwarfism that is consistent in severity with the relevant human phenotype. Mutant matrilin-3 is retained within the rough endoplasmic reticulum of chondrocytes and is associated with an unfolded protein response. Eventually, there is reduced proliferation and spatially dysregulated apoptosis of chondrocytes in the cartilage growth plate, which is likely to be the cause of disrupted linear bone growth and the resulting short-limbed dwarfism in the mutant mice.

  12. Toxic epidermal necrolysis caused by acetaminophen featuring almost 100% skin detachment: Acetaminophen is associated with a risk of severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hideaki; Kamiyama, Taisuke; Sasaki, Shun; Kobayashi, Kae; Fukuda, Kenichiro; Miyake, Yasufumi; Aruga, Tohru; Sueki, Hirohiko

    2016-03-01

    Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is an adverse reaction that can be induced by various drugs; the associated mortality rate is 20-25%. A previous report showed a weak association between TEN and acetaminophen. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration declared that acetaminophen is associated with a risk of serious skin reactions, including TEN. Here, we describe the case of a 43-year-old Japanese woman with TEN caused by acetaminophen. She had poorly controlled ulcerative colitis and was treated with high doses of prednisolone, infliximab, acetaminophen and lansoprazole. Nine days after administrating acetaminophen, targetoid erythematous and bullous lesions appeared on the patient's trunk, palms and the soles of her feet. The skin lesions expanded rapidly; within 3 weeks, skin detachment was detected across nearly 100% of the patient's body. However, no mucosal involvement of the eyes, oral cavity or genitalia was found. We performed lymphocyte transformation tests using various drugs; however, a high stimulation index was obtained only with acetaminophen. The patient recovered following treatment with plasmapheresis, i.v. immunoglobulin therapy, topical medication and supportive therapy. Acetaminophen is included in many prescription and over-the-counter products; thus, clinicians should monitor their patients for severe drug reactions, including TEN.

  13. TGFB2 loss of function mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections associated with mild systemic features of the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S.; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth; Li, Alexander H.; d’Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C.; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S.; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M.; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J.; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease, followed by whole exome sequencing of affected relatives, identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations, a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4, segregated with disease with a combined LOD score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified two additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes the transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-β2) and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2, but aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency of TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta. PMID:22772371

  14. Case of polycythemia vera with unusual organizing pneumonia mimicking the clinical features of military tuberculosis and possibly caused by the involvement of neoplastic megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yoshizo; Imamura, Yutaka; Higaki, Koichi; Ohno, Yuju; Hashiguchi, Namiko; Seki, Rituko; Okamura, Takashi; Arakawa, Fumiko; Kiyasu, Junichi; Takeuchi, Masanori; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Maki; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Niino, Daisuke; Sugita, Yasuo; Ohshima, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV) is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) of hematopoietic stem cells. Although the management of MPN patients generally focuses on the prevention of thromboembolic events caused by hypercoagulability, it is true that the patients with hematological malignancy often suffer from pulmonary diseases with atypical radiological patterns. We present here a 56-year-old woman with PV harboring a JAK2(V617F) mutation that had a diffuse reticulonodular pattern on chest radiography and was initially suspected of having military tuberculosis. Pathological assessment of a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lung biopsy revealed that the lesions were in fact organizing pneumonia (OP). Interestingly, pulmonary extramedullary hematopoiesis with a diffuse plugging of the alveolar blood capillaries by numerous atypical megakaryocytes was also observed around the granulation components. The histological findings of our case of unusual OP suggest that local activated neoplastic megakaryocytes and platelets played an important role in the development of spreading fibrotic lesions. JAK2 mutation or the preleukemic phase of MPN may accelerate the activation of megakaryocytes and result in the proliferative process of fibrosis.

  15. Features of the Growth Dynamics of Plasma Jets in Laser-Induced Vacuum Discharges with High Rates of Current Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobkin, Yu. V.; Romanov, I. V.; Paperny, V. L.

    2017-01-01

    An experimental study of the dynamics of formation of plasma jets and ion beams in laser-induced low-voltage discharges with high rates of current rise has been performed. It has been found that for given discharge characteristics (energy store voltage, discharge current, current rise rate, and discharge gap spacing) there exist optimum initial conditions, determined by the characteristics of the laser radiation, that provide stable single pinching of the cathode plasma jet at its maximum compression. Increasing the ion density and decreasing the temperature of the foreplasma by reducing the laser radiation power density at the cathode due to an increase in laser pulse duration improves the stability of the plasma pinching at a lower energy input.

  16. Specific features of low-frequency vibrational dynamics and low-temperature heat capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramenko, M. V.; Roshal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    A continuous model has been constructed for low-frequency dynamics of a double-walled carbon nanotube. The formation of the low-frequency part of the phonon spectrum of a double-walled nanotube from phonon spectra of its constituent single-walled nanotubes has been considered in the framework of the proposed approach. The influence of the environment on the phonon spectrum of a single double-walled carbon nanotube has been analyzed. A combined method has been proposed for estimating the coefficients of the van der Waals interaction between the walls of the nanotube from the spectroscopic data and the known values of the elastic moduli of graphite. The low-temperature specific heat has been calculated for doublewalled carbon nanotubes, which in the field of applicability of the model ( T < 35 K) is substantially less than the sum of specific heats of two individual single-walled nanotubes forming it.

  17. Effects of temperature, particle features and vent geometry on volcanic jet dynamics, a shock-tube investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cigala, Valeria; Kueppers, Ulrich; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The lowermost part of an eruptive plume commonly shows characteristics of an underexpanded jet. The dynamics of this gas-thrust region are likely to be a direct consequence of intrinsic (magma properties, overpressure) and extrinsic (vent geometry, weather) eruption conditions. Additionally, they affect the subsequent evolution of the eruptive column and have, therefore, important hazard assessment implications for both near- and far-field. Direct observation of eruptive events is possible, but often insufficient for complete characterization. Important complementary data can be achieved using controlled and calibrated laboratory experiments. Loose natural particles were ejected from a shock-tube while controlling temperature (25° and 500°C), overpressure (15MPa), starting grain size distribution (1-2 mm, 0.5-1 mm and 0.125-0.250 mm), density (basaltic and phonolitic), gas-particle ratio and vent geometry (nozzle, cylindrical, funnel with a flaring of 15° and 30°, respectively). For each experiment, we quantified the velocity of individual particles, the jet spreading angle, the presence of electric discharges and the production of fines and analysed their dynamic evolution. Data shows velocity of up to 296 m/s and deceleration patterns following nonlinear paths. Gas spreading angles range between 21° and 41° while the particle spreading angles between 3° and 32°. Electric discharges, in the form of lightning, are observed, quantified and described. Moreover, a variation in the production of fines is recognized during the course of single experiments. This experimental investigation, which mechanistically mimics the process of pyroclast ejection, is shown to be capable of constraining the effects of input parameters and conduit/vent geometry on pyroclastic plumes. Therefore, the results should greatly enhance the ability of numerically model explosive ejecta in nature.

  18. Emotional Intolerance and Core Features of Anorexia Nervosa: A Dynamic Interaction during Inpatient Treatment? Results from a Longitudinal Diary Study

    PubMed Central

    Stroe-Kunold, Esther; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Stadnitski, Tatjana; Wesche, Daniela; Herzog, Wolfgang; Schwab, Michael; Wild, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role of emotion dysregulation with regard to the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa (AN) is increasingly discussed. It is both assumed that AN symptoms have an impact on difficulties in tolerating aversive emotions and that—conversely—emotion dysregulation influences AN. To date, such conclusions are drawn on the basis of cross-sectional data not allowing for inferences on the temporal dynamics. The current study investigates the longitudinal interaction between emotional intolerance and core AN symptoms over the course of inpatient treatment by comparing patients with high (BMI<15 kg/m2) vs. low symptom severity (HSS vs. LSS). Method The study adopted a longitudinal, process-oriented design with N = 16 analysed electronic diaries. Throughout the course of their inpatient treatment, the patients answered questions daily about emotional intolerance and their AN-specific cognitions and behaviours. The temporal dynamics between emotional intolerance and these variables were analysed using a multivariate time series approach. Results The time series of the processes under investigation adequately reflected the individual treatment courses. The majority of significant linear time trends was found for HSS patients. Most importantly, analysis revealed significant temporal interactions between emotional intolerance and AN symptoms in almost 70% of HSS patients. Thereby, up to 37% of variance in eating restraint and up to 23% in weight concern could be attributed to changes in emotional intolerance. Conclusions The findings support the notion that intolerable unpleasant emotions in severely affected AN patients influence their psychopathology. Additionally, time series analysis outlined the inter-individual heterogeneity of psychosomatic treatment courses of AN patients. PMID:27191959

  19. An Effective Approach for Clustering InhA Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Using Substrate-Binding Cavity Features.

    PubMed

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V; Ruiz, Duncan D A; Norberto de Souza, Osmar

    2015-01-01

    Protein receptor conformations, obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have become a promising treatment of its explicit flexibility in molecular docking experiments applied to drug discovery and development. However, incorporating the entire ensemble of MD conformations in docking experiments to screen large candidate compound libraries is currently an unfeasible task. Clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce such ensembles to a manageable size. Most studies investigate different algorithms using pairwise Root-Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) values for all, or part of the MD conformations. Nevertheless, the RMSD only may not be the most appropriate gauge to cluster conformations when the target receptor has a plastic active site, since they are influenced by changes that occur on other parts of the structure. Hence, we have applied two partitioning methods (k-means and k-medoids) and four agglomerative hierarchical methods (Complete linkage, Ward's, Unweighted Pair Group Method and Weighted Pair Group Method) to analyze and compare the quality of partitions between a data set composed of properties from an enzyme receptor substrate-binding cavity and two data sets created using different RMSD approaches. Ensembles of representative MD conformations were generated by selecting a medoid of each group from all partitions analyzed. We investigated the performance of our new method for evaluating binding conformation of drug candidates to the InhA enzyme, which were performed by cross-docking experiments between a 20 ns MD trajectory and 20 different ligands. Statistical analyses showed that the novel ensemble, which is represented by only 0.48% of the MD conformations, was able to reproduce 75% of all dynamic behaviors within the binding cavity for the docking experiments performed. Moreover, this new approach not only outperforms the other two RMSD-clustering solutions, but it also shows to be a promising strategy to distill

  20. An Effective Approach for Clustering InhA Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Using Substrate-Binding Cavity Features

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Duncan D. A.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar

    2015-01-01

    Protein receptor conformations, obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have become a promising treatment of its explicit flexibility in molecular docking experiments applied to drug discovery and development. However, incorporating the entire ensemble of MD conformations in docking experiments to screen large candidate compound libraries is currently an unfeasible task. Clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce such ensembles to a manageable size. Most studies investigate different algorithms using pairwise Root-Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) values for all, or part of the MD conformations. Nevertheless, the RMSD only may not be the most appropriate gauge to cluster conformations when the target receptor has a plastic active site, since they are influenced by changes that occur on other parts of the structure. Hence, we have applied two partitioning methods (k-means and k-medoids) and four agglomerative hierarchical methods (Complete linkage, Ward’s, Unweighted Pair Group Method and Weighted Pair Group Method) to analyze and compare the quality of partitions between a data set composed of properties from an enzyme receptor substrate-binding cavity and two data sets created using different RMSD approaches. Ensembles of representative MD conformations were generated by selecting a medoid of each group from all partitions analyzed. We investigated the performance of our new method for evaluating binding conformation of drug candidates to the InhA enzyme, which were performed by cross-docking experiments between a 20 ns MD trajectory and 20 different ligands. Statistical analyses showed that the novel ensemble, which is represented by only 0.48% of the MD conformations, was able to reproduce 75% of all dynamic behaviors within the binding cavity for the docking experiments performed. Moreover, this new approach not only outperforms the other two RMSD-clustering solutions, but it also shows to be a promising strategy to distill

  1. A smart dynamic self-induced orientable multiple size nano-roughness with amphiphilic feature as a stain-repellent hydrophilic surface.

    PubMed

    Dastjerdi, Roya; Montazer, Majid; Stegmaier, Thomas; Moghadam, M B

    2012-03-01

    Recently developing bioinspired super-hydrophobic surfaces to achieve self-cleaning properties has been driving numerous researches. However, hydrophilicity is one of the most important features of garment comfort. Therefore, accomplishing self-cleaning and stain repellency on hydrophilic surfaces would be a high topic of interest. This research is concerned with wettability mechanism; static and dynamic study of contact angle through water droplet absorption on the multiple scale nano-roughness covered by different weight ratio of oppositely charged inorganic nanoparticles and amino-functionalized polysiloxane. The results revealed that the second layer of the resin formed on the surface can show an amphiphilic hybrid block copolymer-like feature whose dual action can be intensified during water droplet absorption by the created multiple size nano-roughness. This unique structure can create a stain repellent but hydrophilic surface with exceptional advantages. The mechanism has been deeply discussed according to the evidence on droplet edge interfacial energy changes as a driving force to overcome meta-stable Cassie state on the multiple size nano-roughness with amphiphilic feature. A lotus-like nano-roughness has been also observed on the SEM micrographs. Based on a statistically approached experimental design, the effect of variant factors on droplet absorption time, static, advancing, receding contact angles and self-cleaning properties has been mathematically modeled according to the response surface methodology (RSM).

  2. Slow dynamic diagnosis of asphalt concrete specimen to determine level of damage caused by static low temperature conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Abiy; Birgisson, Björn; Ryden, Nils; Gudmarsson, Anders

    2017-02-01

    The phenomenon of slow dynamics has been observed in a variety of materials which are considered as relatively homogeneous that exhibit nonlinearity due to the presence of defects or cracks within them. Experimental realizations in previous work suggest that slow dynamics can be in response to acoustic drives with relatively larger amplitude as well as rapid change of temperature. Slow dynamics as a nonlinear elastic response of damaged materials is manifested as a sharp drop and then recovery of resonance frequency linearly with logarithmic time. In this work, slow dynamics recovery is intended to be used as a means of identifying and evaluating thermal damage on an asphalt concrete specimen. The experimental protocol for measuring slow dynamics is based on the technique of nonlinear resonance spectroscopy and is set up with non-contact excitation using a loud speaker and the data acquisition tool box of Matlab. Sweeps of frequency with low amplitude are applied in order to probe the specimen at its linear viscoelastic state. The drop and then recovery in fundamental axially symmetric resonance frequency is observed after the specimen is exposed to sudden temperature change. The investigation of the viscoelastic contribution to the change in resonance frequency and slow dynamics can help identify micro-damage in asphalt concrete samples.

  3. Cardiac arrhythmia and late-onset muscle weakness caused by a myofibrillar myopathy with unusual histopathological features due to a novel missense mutation in FLNC.

    PubMed

    Avila-Smirnow, D; Gueneau, L; Batonnet-Pichon, S; Delort, F; Bécane, H-M; Claeys, K; Beuvin, M; Goudeau, B; Jais, J-P; Nelson, I; Richard, P; Ben Yaou, R; Romero, N B; Wahbi, K; Mathis, S; Voit, T; Furst, D; van der Ven, P; Gil, R; Vicart, P; Fardeau, M; Bonne, G; Behin, A

    2016-10-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies (MFM) are mostly adult-onset diseases characterized by progressive morphological alterations of the muscle fibers beginning in the Z-disk and the presence of protein aggregates in the sarcoplasm. They are mostly caused by mutations in different genes that encode Z-disk proteins, including DES, CRYAB, LDB3, MYOT, FLNC and BAG3. A large family of French origin, presenting an autosomal dominant pattern, characterized by cardiac arrhythmia associated to late-onset muscle weakness, was evaluated to clarify clinical, morphological and genetic diagnosis. Muscle weakness began during adult life (over 30 years of age), and had a proximal distribution. Histology showed clear signs of a myofibrillar myopathy, but with unusual, large inclusions. Subsequently, genetic testing was performed in MFM genes available for screening at the time of clinical/histological diagnosis, and desmin (DES), αB-crystallin (CRYAB), myotilin (MYOT) and ZASP (LDB3), were excluded. LMNA gene screening found the p.R296C variant which did not co-segregate with the disease. Genome wide scan revealed linkage to 7q.32, containing the FLNC gene. FLNC direct sequencing revealed a heterozygous c.3646T>A p.Tyr1216Asn change, co-segregating with the disease, in a highly conserved amino acid of the protein. Normal filamin C levels were detected by Western-blot analysis in patient muscle biopsies and expression of the mutant protein in NIH3T3 showed filamin C aggregates. This is an original FLNC mutation in a MFM family with an atypical clinical and histopathological presentation, given the presence of significantly focal lesions and prominent sarcoplasmic masses in muscle biopsies and the constant heart involvement preceding significantly the onset of the myopathy. Though a rare etiology, FLNC gene should not be excluded in early-onset arrhythmia, even in the absence of myopathy, which occurs later in the disease course.

  4. A nonlinear control scheme based on dynamic evolution path theory for improved dynamic performance of boost PFC converter working on nonlinear features.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pratap Ranjan; Panda, Anup Kumar

    2016-11-01

    This paper is concerned to performance improvement of boost PFC converter under large random load fluctuation, ensuring unity power factor (UPF) at source end and regulated voltage at load side. To obtain such performance, a nonlinear controller based on dynamic evolution path theory is designed and its robustness is examined under both heavy and light loading condition. In this paper, %THD and zero-cross-over dead-zone of input current is significantly reduced. Also, very less response time of input current and output voltage to that of load and reference variation is remarked. A simulation model of proposed system is designed and it is realized using dSPACE 1104 signal processor for a 390VDC, 500W prototype. The relevant experimental and simulation waveforms are presented.

  5. Predator-prey coevolution driven by size selective predation can cause anti-synchronized and cryptic population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mougi, Akihiko

    2012-03-01

    Population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics can occur on similar time scales, and a coupling of these two processes can lead to novel population dynamics. Recent theoretical studies of coevolving predator-prey systems have concentrated more on the stability of such systems than on the characteristics of cycles when they are unstable. Here I explore the characteristics of the cycles that arise due to coevolution in a system in which prey can increase their ability to escape from predators by becoming either significantly larger or significantly smaller in trait value (i.e., a bidirectional trait axis). This is a reasonable model of body size evolution in some systems. The results show that antiphase population cycles and cryptic cycles (large population fluctuation in one species but almost no change in another species) can occur in the coevolutionary system but not systems where only a single species evolves. Previously, those dynamical patterns have only been theoretically shown to occur in single species evolutionary models and the coevolutionary model which do not involve a bi-directional axis of adaptation. These unusual dynamics may be observed in predator-prey interactions when the density dependence in the prey species is strong.

  6. Circular dichroism and site-directed spin labeling reveal structural and dynamical features of high-pressure states of myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Lerch, Michael T.; Horwitz, Joseph; McCoy, John; Hubbell, Wayne L.

    2013-01-01

    Excited states of proteins may play important roles in function, yet are difficult to study spectroscopically because of their sparse population. High hydrostatic pressure increases the equilibrium population of excited states, enabling their characterization [Akasaka K (2003) Biochemistry 42:10875–85]. High-pressure site-directed spin-labeling EPR (SDSL-EPR) was developed recently to map the site-specific structure and dynamics of excited states populated by pressure. To monitor global secondary structure content by circular dichroism (CD) at high pressure, a modified optical cell using a custom MgF2 window with a reduced aperture is introduced. Here, a combination of SDSL-EPR and CD is used to map reversible structural transitions in holomyoglobin and apomyoglobin (apoMb) as a function of applied pressure up to 2 kbar. CD shows that the high-pressure excited state of apoMb at pH 6 has helical content identical to that of native apoMb, but reversible changes reflecting the appearance of a conformational ensemble are observed by SDSL-EPR, suggesting a helical topology that fluctuates slowly on the EPR time scale. Although the high-pressure state of apoMb at pH 6 has been referred to as a molten globule, the data presented here reveal significant differences from the well-characterized pH 4.1 molten globule of apoMb. Pressure-populated states of both holomyoglobin and apoMb at pH 4.1 have significantly less helical structure, and for the latter, that may correspond to a transient folding intermediate. PMID:24248390

  7. Using Consumer Electronics and Apps in Industrial Environments - Development of a Framework for Dynamic Feature Deployment and Extension by Using Apps on Field Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Mathias

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a preliminary insight regarding the current work in the field of mobile interaction in industrial environments by using established interaction technologies and metaphors from the consumer goods industry. The major objective is the development and implementation of a holistic app-framework, which enables dynamic feature deployment and extension by using mobile apps on industrial field devices. As a result, field device functionalities can be updated and adapted effectively in accordance with well-known appconcepts from consumer electronics to comply with the urgent requirements of more flexible and changeable factory systems of the future. In addition, a much more user-friendly and utilizable interaction with field devices can be realized. Proprietary software solutions and device-stationary user interfaces can be overcome and replaced by uniform, cross-vendor solutions

  8. Rainfall Enhancement by Dynamic Cloud Modification: Massive silver iodide seeding causes rainfall increases from single clouds over southern Florida.

    PubMed

    Woodley, W L

    1970-10-09

    In summary, the following points are made: 1) There are essentially two approaches to seeding for rain inducement, static and dynamic. 2) The dynamic approach is effective in inducing growth and increasing precipitation from individually seeded convective clouds under specifiable conditions. 3) The static approach to seeding for precipitation increases is apparently not relevant to the summer cumuli of Florida and Missouri. 4) Regional seeding climatologies, including studies of natural freezing processes in convective clouds, should be completed before commencement of a seeding operation. 5) The results of a seeding operation are frequently better understood by stratification of the data, especially with respect to weather conditions. Precipitation increases from seeding are usually found under fair weather regimes with isolated showers, whereas decreases are often noted under naturally rainy conditions.

  9. RNA-Seq reveals the dynamic and diverse features of digestive enzymes during early development of Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiankai; Zhang, Xiaojun; Yu, Yang; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2014-09-01

    The Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei), with high commercial value, has a typical metamorphosis pattern by going through embryo, nauplius, zoea, mysis and postlarvae during early development. Its diets change continually in this period, and a high mortality of larvae also occurs in this period. Since there is a close relationship between diets and digestive enzymes, a comprehensive investigation about the types and expression patterns of all digestive enzyme genes during early development of L. vannamei is of considerable significance for shrimp diets and larvae culture. Using RNA-Seq data, the types and expression characteristics of the digestive enzyme genes were analyzed during five different development stages (embryo, nauplius, zoea, mysis and postlarvae) in L. vannamei. Among the obtained 66,815 unigenes, 296 were annotated as 16 different digestive enzymes including five types of carbohydrase, seven types of peptidase and four types of lipase. Such a diverse suite of enzymes illustrated the capacity of L. vannamei to exploit varied diets to fit their nutritional requirements. The analysis of their dynamic expression patterns during development also indicated the importance of transcriptional regulation to adapt to the diet transition. Our study revealed the diverse and dynamic features of digestive enzymes during early development of L. vannamei. These results would provide support to better understand the physiological changes during diet transition.

  10. Prediction of ground motion and dynamic stress change in Baekdusan (Changbaishan) volcano caused by a North Korean nuclear explosion.

    PubMed

    Hong, Tae-Kyung; Choi, Eunseo; Park, Seongjun; Shin, Jin Soo

    2016-02-17

    Strong ground motions induce large dynamic stress changes that may disturb the magma chamber of a volcano, thus accelerating the volcanic activity. An underground nuclear explosion test near an active volcano constitutes a direct treat to the volcano. This study examined the dynamic stress changes of the magma chamber of Baekdusan (Changbaishan) that can be induced by hypothetical North Korean nuclear explosions. Seismic waveforms for hypothetical underground nuclear explosions at North Korean test site were calculated by using an empirical Green's function approach based on a source-spectral model of a nuclear explosion; such a technique is efficient for regions containing poorly constrained velocity structures. The peak ground motions around the volcano were estimated from empirical strong-motion attenuation curves. A hypothetical M7.0 North Korean underground nuclear explosion may produce peak ground accelerations of 0.1684 m/s(2) in the horizontal direction and 0.0917 m/s(2) in the vertical direction around the volcano, inducing peak dynamic stress change of 67 kPa on the volcano surface and ~120 kPa in the spherical magma chamber. North Korean underground nuclear explosions with magnitudes of 5.0-7.6 may induce overpressure in the magma chamber of several tens to hundreds of kilopascals.

  11. Prediction of ground motion and dynamic stress change in Baekdusan (Changbaishan) volcano caused by a North Korean nuclear explosion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Tae-Kyung; Choi, Eunseo; Park, Seongjun; Shin, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Strong ground motions induce large dynamic stress changes that may disturb the magma chamber of a volcano, thus accelerating the volcanic activity. An underground nuclear explosion test near an active volcano constitutes a direct treat to the volcano. This study examined the dynamic stress changes of the magma chamber of Baekdusan (Changbaishan) that can be induced by hypothetical North Korean nuclear explosions. Seismic waveforms for hypothetical underground nuclear explosions at North Korean test site were calculated by using an empirical Green’s function approach based on a source-spectral model of a nuclear explosion; such a technique is efficient for regions containing poorly constrained velocity structures. The peak ground motions around the volcano were estimated from empirical strong-motion attenuation curves. A hypothetical M7.0 North Korean underground nuclear explosion may produce peak ground accelerations of 0.1684 m/s2 in the horizontal direction and 0.0917 m/s2 in the vertical direction around the volcano, inducing peak dynamic stress change of 67 kPa on the volcano surface and ~120 kPa in the spherical magma chamber. North Korean underground nuclear explosions with magnitudes of 5.0–7.6 may induce overpressure in the magma chamber of several tens to hundreds of kilopascals. PMID:26884136

  12. Time-dependent density functional theory for charge-transfer dynamics: review of the causes of failure and success*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Johanna I.

    2016-10-01

    The present study is an effort to unveil and characterize the failure and success of real-time Time-dependent density functional theory simulated charge transfer dynamics. To this aim, we study two distinct examples found in the literature: a dramatic failure is reported in [S. Raghunathan, M. Nest, J. Chem. Theor. Comput. 7, 2492 (2011)] whereas in [C.A. Rozzi et al., Nat. Commun. 4, 1602 (2013)] the simulations show good agreement with experiments. We find that the choice of Single Slater Determinant for the Kohn Sham initial state renders the simulation of charge transfer dynamics starting in the ground state very challenging. In contrast, starting the simulation in a photo-excited state facilitates the description and we show that even a simple functional can perform well. We formulate exact conditions to be satisfied by the exchange-correlation functional in order to keep the resonances of the system constant and relate the degree of their violation to the performance of a given functional approximation. We show that even the best possible ground state approximation to the exchange-correlation density functional violates the exact conditions, resulting in inaccurate dynamics. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Ψk Volker Heine Young Investigator Award - 2015 Finalists", edited by Angel Rubio and Risto Nieminen.

  13. Brine Flow Up a Borehole Caused by Pressure Perturbation From CO2 Storage: Static and Dynamic Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial-scale storage of CO2 in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO2 plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards al...

  14. NMR investigations of structural and dynamics features of natively unstructured drug peptide - salmon calcitonin: implication to rational design of potent sCT analogs.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Atul; Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Backbone dynamics and conformational properties of drug peptide salmon calcitonin have been studied in aqueous solution using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Although salmon calcitonin (sCT) is largely unfolded in solution (as has been reported in several circular dichroism studies), the secondary H(α) chemical shifts and three bond H(N) -H(α) coupling constants indicated that most of the residues of the peptide are populating the α-helical region of the Ramachandran (ϕ, ψ) map. Further, the peptide in solution has been found to exhibit multiple conformational states exchanging slowly on the NMR timescale (10(2) -10(3)  s(-1) ), inferred by the multiple chemical shift assignments in the region Leu4-Leu12 and around Pro23 (for residues Gln20-Tyr22 and Arg24). Possibly, these slowly exchanging multiple conformational states might inhibit symmetric self-association of the peptide and, in part, may account for its reduced aggregation propensity compared with human calcitonin (which lacks this property). The (15) N NMR-relaxation data revealed (i) the presence of slow (microsecond-to-millisecond) timescale dynamics in the N-terminal region (Cys1-Ser5) and core residues His17 and Asn26 and (ii) the presence of high frequency (nanosecond-to-picosecond) motions in the C-terminal arm. Put together, the various results suggested that (i) the flexible C-terminal of sCT (from Thr25-Thr31) is involved in identification of specific target receptors, (ii) whereas the N-terminal of sCT (from Cys1-Gln20) in solution - exhibiting significant amount of conformational plasticity and strong bias towards biologically active α-helical structure - facilitates favorable conformational adaptations while interacting with the intermembrane domains of these target receptors. Thus, we believe that the structural and dynamics features of sCT presented here will be useful guiding attributes for the rational design of biologically active sCT analogs.

  15. What Causes Sarcoidosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Sarcoidosis? The cause of sarcoidosis isn't known. More ... Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Living With and Managing Sarcoidosis 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  16. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  17. Computational model for calculating the dynamical behaviour of generators caused by unbalanced magnetic pull and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennacchi, Paolo

    2008-04-01

    The modelling of the unbalanced magnetic pull (UMP) in generators and the experimental validation of the proposed method are presented in this paper. The UMP is one of the most remarkable effects of electromechanical interactions in rotating machinery. As a consequence of the rotor eccentricity, the imbalance of the electromagnetic forces acting between rotor and stator generates a net radial force. This phenomenon can be avoided by means of a careful assembly and manufacture in small and stiff machines, like electrical motors. On the contrary, the eccentricity of the active part of the rotor with respect to the stator is unavoidable in big generators of power plants, because they operate above their first critical speed and are supported by oil-film bearings. In the first part of the paper, a method aimed to calculate the UMP force is described. This model is more general than those available in literature, which are limited to circular orbits. The model is based on the actual position of the rotor inside the stator, therefore on the actual air-gap distribution, regardless of the orbit type. The closed form of the nonlinear UMP force components is presented. In the second part, the experimental validation of the proposed model is presented. The dynamical behaviour in the time domain of a steam turbo-generator of a power plant is considered and it is shown that the model is able to reproduce the dynamical effects due to the excitation of the magnetic field in the generator.

  18. Intramolecular SN2 reaction caused by photoionization of benzene chloride-NH3 complex: direct ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2006-01-12

    Ionization processes of chlorobenzene-ammonia 1:1 complex (PhCl-NH3) have been investigated by means of full dimensional direct ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) method, static ab initio calculations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The static ab initio and DFT calculations of neutral PhCl-NH3 complex showed that one of the hydrogen atoms of NH3 orients toward a carbon atom in the para-position of PhCl. The dynamics calculation for ionization of PhCl-NH3 indicated that two reaction channels are competitive with each other as product channels: one is an intramolecular SN2 reaction expressed by a reaction scheme [PhCl-NH3]+-->SN2 intermediate complex-->PhNH3++Cl, and the other is ortho-NH3 addition complex (ortho complex) in which NH3 attacks the ortho-carbon of PhCl+ and the trajectory leads to a bound complex expressed by (PhCl-NH3)+. The mechanism of the ionization of PhCl-NH3 is discussed on the basis of the theoretical results.

  19. Specific cation interactions as the cause of slow dynamics and hysteresis in dye and perovskite solar cells: a small-perturbation study.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Lidia; Idígoras, Jesús; Todinova, Anna; Salado, Manuel; Kazim, Samrana; Ahmad, Shahzada; Anta, Juan A

    2016-11-16

    Hysteresis is one of the most remarkable features of perovskite solar cells; however, it is also present in other kinds of devices such as dye-sensitized solar cells. Hysteresis is due to underlying slow dynamic processes that interfere with the process of charge separation which depends critically on the selective contacts used. In this work we focus on the low-frequency (0.1-10 Hz) dynamics using impedance and intensity-modulated photocurrent spectroscopy and found that both perovskite solar cells (PSCs) and "viscous electrolyte containing" dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) can be described on the same fundamental grounds. By comparing different electrolyte compositions in DSSCs and both methylammonium and formamidinium-based PSCs, we find a connection between the polar nature of the cations and the low-frequency component of these solar cells. There is evidence that in both cases ion transport and specific chemical interactions with the TiO2 surface give rise to the slow dynamics and the hysteresis. This is mainly inferred from the slope of the capacitance vs. applied voltage which shows accumulation behavior for the formulations with higher dipole moments only.

  20. Wolf population dynamics in the U.S. Northern Rocky Mountains are affected by recruitment and human-caused mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gude, J.A.; Mitchell, M.S.; Russell, R.E.; Sime, C.A.; Bangs, E.E.; Mech, L.D.; Ream, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable analyses can help wildlife managers make good decisions, which are particularly critical for controversial decisions such as wolf (Canis lupus) harvest. Creel and Rotella (2010) recently predicted substantial population declines in Montana wolf populations due to harvest, in contrast to predictions made by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP). We replicated their analyses considering only those years in which field monitoring was consistent, and we considered the effect of annual variation in recruitment on wolf population growth. Rather than assuming constant rates, we used model selection methods to evaluate and incorporate models of factors driving recruitment and human-caused mortality rates in wolf populations in the Northern Rocky Mountains. Using data from 27 area-years of intensive wolf monitoring, we show that variation in both recruitment and human-caused mortality affect annual wolf population growth rates and that human-caused mortality rates have increased with the sizes of wolf populations. We document that recruitment rates have decreased over time, and we speculate that rates have decreased with increasing population sizes and/or that the ability of current field resources to document recruitment rates has recently become less successful as the number of wolves in the region has increased. Estimates of positive wolf population growth in Montana from our top models are consistent with field observations and estimates previously made by MFWP for 2008-2010, whereas the predictions for declining wolf populations of Creel and Rotella (2010) are not. Familiarity with limitations of raw data, obtained first-hand or through consultation with scientists who collected the data, helps generate more reliable inferences and conclusions in analyses of publicly available datasets. Additionally, development of efficient monitoring methods for wolves is a pressing need, so that analyses such as ours will be possible in future years when fewer resources

  1. A study on the structural features of SELK, an over-expressed protein in hepatocellular carcinoma, by molecular dynamics simulations in a lipid-water system.

    PubMed

    Polo, Andrea; Guariniello, Stefano; Colonna, Giovanni; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Costantini, Susan

    2016-10-20

    Human SELK is a small trans-membrane selenoprotein characterized by a single trans-membrane helix, while the N-terminal region protrudes into the lumen and the long C-terminal domain into the cytoplasm. SELK is over-expressed in some cancers, like hepatocellular carcinoma; however its precise role in cancer development is presently unknown. SELK is involved in promoting the calcium flux, catalyzing palmitoylation reactions and protein degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Therefore, this protein should bind many different proteins like p97/VCP in the supramolecular complex involved in the ER degradation pathway. To study the structural features of SELK in the membrane, we have modeled the protein and then subjected it to molecular dynamics simulations in a lipid-water system. The model shows a N-terminal domain with three β-strands and a short helix, a well-defined trans-membrane helix and a C-terminal domain that lacks a persistent secondary structure and contains long disordered regions. The trajectory analysis during the simulation evidences that: (i) the N-terminal region explores a limited conformational space and is stabilized by intra-peptide H-bonds as well with membrane lipids and water, (ii) the trans-membrane helix was found to be quite stable and (iii) the disordered C-terminal region is stabilized by H-bonds with clustered water molecules as well as by rapidly interchanging intra-peptidic H-bonds, with a structural tendency to compact around the four HUB residues found for this domain. Moreover, N-terminal and C-terminal clusters are distributed differently in the conformational space suggesting that their dynamics are coupled complicatedly through the membrane. Further analyses have shown that the N-terminal has a tendency to pivot around the insertion with the TM-helix through the fluctuations of the three β-strands, which, in turn, show features similar to WW-domains. These results will be useful to study the SELK, SELS and VCP complex

  2. Dynamic model for kinesin-mediated long-range transport and its local traffic jam caused by tau proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Woochul; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2017-01-01

    In neurons, several intracellular cargoes are transported by motor proteins (kinesins) which walk on microtubules (MTs). However, kinesins can possibly unbind from the MTs before they reach their destinations. The unbound kinesins randomly diffuse in neurons until they bind to MTs. Then, they walk again along the MTs to continue their tasks. Kinesins repeat this cycle of motion until they transport their cargoes to the destinations. However, most previous models mainly focused on the motion of kinesins when they walk on MTs. Thus, a new model is required to encompass the various types of kinesin motion. We developed a comprehensive model and studied the long-range axonal transport of neurons using the model. To enhance reliability of the model, it was constructed based on multiphysics on kinesin motion (i.e., chemical kinetics, diffusion, fluid dynamics, nonlinear dynamics, and stochastic characteristics). Also, parameter values for kinesin motions are carefully obtained by comparing the model predictions and several experimental observations. The axonal transport can be degraded when a large number of binding sites on MTs are blocked by excessive tau proteins. By considering the interference between walking kinesins and tau molecules on MTs, effects of tau proteins on the axonal transport are studied. One of the meaningful predictions obtained from the model is that the velocity is not an effective metric to estimate the degradation of the transport because the decrease in velocity is not noticeable when the concentration of tau protein is not high. However, our model shows that the transport locally changes near tau molecules on MTs even when the change in the velocity is not significant. Thus, a statistical method is proposed to detect this local change effectively. The advantage of this method is that a value obtained from this method is highly sensitive to the concentration of tau protein. Another benefit of this method is that this highly sensitive value can

  3. Dynamic model for kinesin-mediated long-range transport and its local traffic jam caused by tau proteins.

    PubMed

    Nam, Woochul; Epureanu, Bogdan I

    2017-01-01

    In neurons, several intracellular cargoes are transported by motor proteins (kinesins) which walk on microtubules (MTs). However, kinesins can possibly unbind from the MTs before they reach their destinations. The unbound kinesins randomly diffuse in neurons until they bind to MTs. Then, they walk again along the MTs to continue their tasks. Kinesins repeat this cycle of motion until they transport their cargoes to the destinations. However, most previous models mainly focused on the motion of kinesins when they walk on MTs. Thus, a new model is required to encompass the various types of kinesin motion. We developed a comprehensive model and studied the long-range axonal transport of neurons using the model. To enhance reliability of the model, it was constructed based on multiphysics on kinesin motion (i.e., chemical kinetics, diffusion, fluid dynamics, nonlinear dynamics, and stochastic characteristics). Also, parameter values for kinesin motions are carefully obtained by comparing the model predictions and several experimental observations. The axonal transport can be degraded when a large number of binding sites on MTs are blocked by excessive tau proteins. By considering the interference between walking kinesins and tau molecules on MTs, effects of tau proteins on the axonal transport are studied. One of the meaningful predictions obtained from the model is that the velocity is not an effective metric to estimate the degradation of the transport because the decrease in velocity is not noticeable when the concentration of tau protein is not high. However, our model shows that the transport locally changes near tau molecules on MTs even when the change in the velocity is not significant. Thus, a statistical method is proposed to detect this local change effectively. The advantage of this method is that a value obtained from this method is highly sensitive to the concentration of tau protein. Another benefit of this method is that this highly sensitive value can

  4. Phase matching of high order harmonic generation using dynamic phase modulation caused by a non-collinear modulation pulse

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Oren; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Mumane, Margaret M.

    2010-02-16

    Phase matching high harmonic generation (HHG) uses a single, long duration non-collinear modulating pulse intersecting the driving pulse. A femtosecond driving pulse is focused into an HHG medium (such as a noble gas) to cause high-harmonic generation (HHG), for example in the X-ray region of the spectrum, via electrons separating from and recombining with gas atoms. A non-collinear pulse intersects the driving pulse within the gas, and modulates the field seen by the electrons while separated from their atoms. The modulating pulse is low power and long duration, and its frequency and amplitude is chosen to improve HHG phase matching by increasing the areas of constructive interference between the driving pulse and the HHG, relative to the areas of destructive interference.

  5. Understanding the Dynamic and Thermodynamic Causes of Historical Trends in the Intraseasonal Variability of the South Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Horton, D. E.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon directly affects the lives of over 1/6th of the world's population, being critical for agriculture (>50% of the agricultural lands are still rainfed) and water availability in the subcontinent. The summer monsoon is characterized by a dominant 30-60 day mode of intraseasonal variability causing the occurrence of wet and dry spells over a substantial portion of India during the peak-monsoon months (July-August). We use a 1°x1° gridded rainfall dataset (1951-2011) from the Indian Meteorological Department to quantify changes in the mean and intraseasonal variability of daily summer monsoon rainfall across India. Using a non-parametric statistical methodology to account for temporal correlation in the time-series, we find a statistically significant decreasing trend in rainfall and increasing trend in variability in many regions, and changes in the characteristics of wet and dry spells.Using geopotential heights from the NCEP reanalysis dataset, we apply the Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) approach (cluster analysis) to define typical upper (200mb) and lower-level (850mb) atmospheric patterns associated with extreme wet and dry conditions in the different sub-regions within India. We identify the extreme wet and dry spell patterns from the precipitation composites associated with the SOM patterns. Next, we link the contribution of the changing frequency of occurrence of the associated atmospheric patterns and increasing moisture availability in response to atmospheric warming to observed trends in these extremes. Lastly, we compare the changes in the frequency of occurrence of these atmospheric patterns in the historical and pre-industrial simulations from a single GCM to examine the influence of global warming on these extremes. Understanding the causes of these observed changes in wet and dry extremes during the monsoon season and responses to increasing global warming are relevant for managing climate-related risks, with particular relevance

  6. The raft of the Saint-Jean River, Gaspé (Québec, Canada): A dynamic feature trapping most of the wood transported from the catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Maxime; Buffin-Bélanger, Thomas; Piégay, Hervé

    2015-02-01

    The rivers of the Gaspé Peninsula, Québec (Canada), a coastal drainage system of the St. Lawrence River, receive and transport vast quantities of large wood. The rapid rate of channel shifting caused by high-energy flows and noncohesive banks allows wood recruitment that in turn greatly influences river dynamics. The delta of the Saint-Jean River has accumulated wood since 1960, leading to frequent avulsions over that time period. The wood raft there is now more than 3-km in length, which is unusual but natural. This jam configuration allows a unique opportunity to estimate a wood budget at the scale of a long river corridor and to better understand the dynamics of large wood (LW) in rivers. A wood budget includes the evaluation of wood volumes (i) produced by bank erosion (input), (ii) still in transit in the river corridor (deposited on sand bars or channel edges), and (iii) accumulated in the delta (output). The budget is based on an analysis of aerial photos dating back to 1963 as well as surveys carried out in 2010, all of which were used to locate and describe large wood accumulations along a 60-km river section. The main results of this paper show that the raft formation in the delta is dynamic and can be massive, but it is a natural process. Considering the estimated wood volume trapped in the delta from 1963 to 2013 (≈ 25,000 m3), two important points are revealed by the quantification of the wood recruitment volume from 1963 to 2004 (≈ 27,000 m3 ± 400 m3) and of the wood volume stored on the bars in 2010 (≈ 5950 m3). First, the recruitment of large wood from lateral migration for the 40-year period can account for the volume of large wood in the delta and in transit. Second, the excess wood volume produced by lateral migration and avulsion represents a minimum estimation of the large wood trapped on the floodplain owing to wood volume that has decomposed and large wood that exited the river system. Rafts are major trapping structures that provide

  7. Energetic changes caused by antigenic module insertion in a virus-like particle revealed by experiment and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K; Lua, Linda H L; Chuan, Yap P; Middelberg, Anton P J; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The success of recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) for human papillomavirus and hepatitis B demonstrates the potential of VLPs as safe and efficacious vaccines. With new modular designs emerging, the effects of antigen module insertion on the self-assembly and structural integrity of VLPs should be clarified so as to better enabling improved design. Previous work has revealed insights into the molecular energetics of a VLP subunit, capsomere, comparing energetics within various solution conditions known to drive or inhibit self-assembly. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method were performed to examine the molecular interactions and energetics in a modular capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP designed to protect against influenza. Insertion of an influenza antigenic module is found to lower the binding energy within the capsomere, and a more active state is observed in Assembly Buffer as compared with that in Stabilization Buffer, which has been experimentally validated through measurements using differential scanning calorimetry. Further in-depth analysis based on free-energy decomposition indicates that destabilized binding can be attributed to electrostatic interaction induced by the chosen antigen module. These results provide molecular insights into the conformational stability of capsomeres and their abilities to be exploited for antigen presentation, and are expected to be beneficial for the biomolecular engineering of VLP vaccines.

  8. Energetic Changes Caused by Antigenic Module Insertion in a Virus-Like Particle Revealed by Experiment and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K.; Lua, Linda H. L.; Chuan, Yap P.; Middelberg, Anton P. J.; Sun, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The success of recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs) for human papillomavirus and hepatitis B demonstrates the potential of VLPs as safe and efficacious vaccines. With new modular designs emerging, the effects of antigen module insertion on the self-assembly and structural integrity of VLPs should be clarified so as to better enabling improved design. Previous work has revealed insights into the molecular energetics of a VLP subunit, capsomere, comparing energetics within various solution conditions known to drive or inhibit self-assembly. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method were performed to examine the molecular interactions and energetics in a modular capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP designed to protect against influenza. Insertion of an influenza antigenic module is found to lower the binding energy within the capsomere, and a more active state is observed in Assembly Buffer as compared with that in Stabilization Buffer, which has been experimentally validated through measurements using differential scanning calorimetry. Further in-depth analysis based on free-energy decomposition indicates that destabilized binding can be attributed to electrostatic interaction induced by the chosen antigen module. These results provide molecular insights into the conformational stability of capsomeres and their abilities to be exploited for antigen presentation, and are expected to be beneficial for the biomolecular engineering of VLP vaccines. PMID:25215874

  9. Airflow behavior changes in upper airway caused by different head and neck positions: Comparison by computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Huang, Shi-Wei; Chen, Lian-Hua; Qi, Yang; Qiu, Yi-Min; Li, Shi-Tong

    2017-02-08

    The feasibility of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to evaluate airflow characteristics in different head and neck positions has not been established. This study compared the changes in volume and airflow behavior of the upper airway by CFD simulation to predict the influence of anatomical and physiological airway changes due to different head-neck positions on mechanical ventilation. One awake volunteer with no risk of difficult airway underwent computed tomography in neutral position, extension position (both head and neck extended), and sniffing position (head extended and neck flexed). Three-dimensional airway models of the upper airway were reconstructed. The total volume (V) and narrowest area (Amin) of the airway models were measured. CFD simulation with an Spalart-Allmaras model was performed to characterize airflow behavior in neutral, extension, and sniffing positions of closed-mouth and open-mouth ventilation. The comparison result for V was neutral

  10. Joint X-ray crystallographic and molecular dynamics study of cellobiohydrolase I from Trichoderma harzianum: deciphering the structural features of cellobiohydrolase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Textor, Larissa C; Colussi, Francieli; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Serpa, Viviane; de Mello, Bruno L; Muniz, João Renato C; Squina, Fabio M; Pereira, Nei; Skaf, Munir S; Polikarpov, Igor

    2013-01-01

    Aiming to contribute toward the characterization of new, biotechnologically relevant cellulolytic enzymes, we report here the first crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase I) from the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum IOC 3844. Our structural studies and molecular dynamics simulations show that the flexibility of Tyr260, in comparison with Tyr247 from the homologous Trichoderma reesei Cel7A, is enhanced as a result of the short side-chains of adjacent Val216 and Ala384 residues and creates an additional gap at the side face of the catalytic tunnel. T. harzianum cellobiohydrolase I also has a shortened loop at the entrance of the cellulose-binding tunnel, which has been described to interact with the substrate in T. reesei Cel7A. These structural features might explain why T. harzianum Cel7A displays higher k(cat) and K(m) values, and lower product inhibition on both glucoside and lactoside substrates, compared with T. reesei Cel7A.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of tandem repeats in Tribolium castaneum genome reveals abundant and highly dynamic tandem repeat families with satellite DNA features in euchromatic chromosomal arms.

    PubMed

    Pavlek, Martina; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Plohl, Miroslav; Meštrović, Nevenka

    2015-12-01

    Although satellite DNAs are well-explored components of heterochromatin and centromeres, little is known about emergence, dispersal and possible impact of comparably structured tandem repeats (TRs) on the genome-wide scale. Our bioinformatics analysis of assembled Tribolium castaneum genome disclosed significant contribution of TRs in euchromatic chromosomal arms and clear predominance of satellite DNA-typical 170 bp monomers in arrays of ≥5 repeats. By applying different experimental approaches, we revealed that the nine most prominent TR families Cast1-Cast9 extracted from the assembly comprise ∼4.3% of the entire genome and reside almost exclusively in euchromatic regions. Among them, seven families that build ∼3.9% of the genome are based on ∼170 and ∼340 bp long monomers. Results of phylogenetic analyses of 2500 monomers originating from these families show high-sequence dynamics, evident by extensive exchanges between arrays on non-homologous chromosomes. In addition, our analysis shows that concerted evolution acts more efficiently on longer than on shorter arrays. Efficient genome-wide distribution of nine TR families implies the role of transposition only in expansion of the most dispersed family, and involvement of other mechanisms is anticipated. Despite similarities in sequence features, FISH experiments indicate high-level compartmentalization of centromeric and euchromatic tandem repeats.

  12. Tissue loss (white syndrome) in the coral Montipora capitata is a dynamic disease with multiple host responses and potential causes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Russell, Robin; Aeby, Greta S.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue loss diseases or white syndromes (WS) are some of the most important coral diseases because they result in significant colony mortality and morbidity, threatening dominant Acroporidae in the Caribbean and Pacific. The causes of WS remain elusive in part because few have examined affected corals at the cellular level. We studied the cellular changes associated with WS over time in a dominant Hawaiian coral, Montipora capitata, and showed that: (i) WS has rapidly progressing (acute) phases mainly associated with ciliates or slowly progressing (chronic) phases mainly associated with helminths or chimeric parasites; (ii) these phases interchanged and waxed and waned; (iii) WS could be a systemic disease associated with chimeric parasitism or a localized disease associated with helminths or ciliates; (iv) corals responded to ciliates mainly with necrosis and to helminths or chimeric parasites with wound repair; (v) mixed infections were uncommon; and (vi) other than cyanobacteria, prokaryotes associated with cell death were not seen. Recognizing potential agents associated with disease at the cellular level and the host response to those agents offers a logical deductive rationale to further explore the role of such agents in the pathogenesis of WS in M. capitata and helps explain manifestation of gross lesions. This approach has broad applicability to the study of the pathogenesis of coral diseases in the field and under experimental settings.

  13. A Forward Dynamic Modelling Investigation of Cause-and-Effect Relationships in Single Support Phase of Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Michael; Howard, David; Baker, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical gait models often fall into one of two categories: simple and complex. There is a large leap in complexity between model types, meaning the effects of individual gait mechanisms get overlooked. This study investigated the cause-and-effect relationships between gait mechanisms and resulting kinematics and kinetics, using a sequence of mathematical models of increasing complexity. The focus was on sagittal plane and single support only. Starting with an inverted pendulum (IP), extended to include a HAT (head-arms-trunk) segment and an actuated hip moment, further complexities were added one-by-one. These were a knee joint, an ankle joint with a static foot, heel rise, and finally a swing leg. The presence of a knee joint and an ankle moment (during foot flat) were shown to largely influence the initial peak in the vertical GRF curve. The second peak in this curve was achieved through a combination of heel rise and the presence of a swing leg. Heel rise was also shown to reduce errors in the horizontal GRF prediction in the second half of single support. The swing leg is important for centre-of-mass (CM) deceleration in late single support. These findings provide evidence for the specific effects of each gait mechanism. PMID:26175797

  14. Control of plasmon fields via irreversible ultrafast dynamics caused by interaction of infrared laser pulses with quantum-dot-metallic-nanoparticle molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.; Wing, W. J.; Gutha, R. R.

    2015-08-01

    We study irreversible ultrafast dynamics caused by interaction of a semiconductor quantum-dot-metallic-nanorod system with an infrared laser field. We show that when this system supports exciton-plasmon coupling, by just varying the amplitude of this laser for a short period of time (several nanoseconds), one can decide the instance when the plasmon field of the nanorod becomes significant and its duration. This is done by showing that a sudden rise in the amplitude of the infrared laser (positive pulse) can induce irreversible transition from one of the collective molecular states of this system to another, making the plasmon field significant. When this amplitude reduces for a short period of time (negative pulse), the system returns back to its initial state, suppressing this field. We provide a detailed description of how, depending on the location, the infrared-induced dynamics can lend itself to different time-dependent plasmon fields around the nanorod. Our results show that at a given moment of time at each location we can have dramatically different types of dynamics for the phase and amplitude of the plasmon field. Using these we show that a quantum-dot-metallic-nanoparticle system can act as an all-optical and logic gate.

  15. Dynamics of vertical ionospheric inhomogeneities over Irkutsk during 06:00-06:20UT 11/03/2011 caused by Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berngardt, O. I.; Kotovich, G. V.; Mikhailov, S. Ya.; Podlesnyi, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    We study dynamics of vertical ionospheric irregularities caused by Tohoku earthquake 11/03/2011 (38.3N, 142.4E) at a distance of 3400 km from the epicenter. Equivalent horizontal velocities of propagation in the ionosphere and vertical quasi-wavelength of the wave-like ionospheric irregularities, generated by the earthquake, are calculated. Based on the data of quasi-vertical sounding at Usolie-Tory path (midpoint - 52.3N, 103E, 120 km distance), dynamics of vertical mid-scale inhomogeneities of the plasma frequency profile was reconstructed with a fine temporal resolution (60 s). As a result of numerical simulation involving the data from TALAYA seismic station (TLY, 51.7N, 103.7E) and comparison with the experiment it is shown that vertical ionospheric irregularities of 5-40 km quasi-wavelength observed from 06:00 to 06:20 UT are qualitatively explained by traveling of the acoustic shock wave cone (Mach cone) from a supersonic ground source - the seismic wave. It is demonstrated that the most likely sources of the shock wave were Z and E components of the seismic oscillations observed at TLY station. Irregularities observed after 06:20UT were apparently linked with other mechanisms. It is found that current temporal resolution of CHIRP ionosonde (60 s) and accuracy of the ionogram inversion technique used are not enough for detailed diagnosis of dynamics of the fine spatial vertical structures generated by the earthquake.

  16. Plastic larval development in a butterfly has complex environmental and genetic causes and consequences for population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Saastamoinen, Marjo; Ikonen, Suvi; Wong, Swee C; Lehtonen, Rainer; Hanski, Ilkka

    2013-05-01

    natural metapopulation of the Glanville fritillary. 6. Our results highlight the importance of the physiological condition of individuals in shaping subsequent life-history events and even population dynamics.

  17. Vascular disease-causing mutation R258C in ACTA2 disrupts actin dynamics and interaction with myosin

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hailong; Fagnant, Patricia M.; Bookwalter, Carol S.; Joel, Peteranne; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Point mutations in vascular smooth muscle α-actin (SM α-actin), encoded by the gene ACTA2, are the most prevalent cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). Here, we provide the first molecular characterization, to our knowledge, of the effect of the R258C mutation in SM α-actin, expressed with the baculovirus system. Smooth muscles are unique in that force generation requires both interaction of stable actin filaments with myosin and polymerization of actin in the subcortical region. Both aspects of R258C function therefore need investigation. Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy was used to quantify the growth of single actin filaments as a function of time. R258C filaments are less stable than WT and more susceptible to severing by cofilin. Smooth muscle tropomyosin offers little protection from cofilin cleavage, unlike its effect on WT actin. Unexpectedly, profilin binds tighter to the R258C monomer, which will increase the pool of globular actin (G-actin). In an in vitro motility assay, smooth muscle myosin moves R258C filaments more slowly than WT, and the slowing is exacerbated by smooth muscle tropomyosin. Under loaded conditions, small ensembles of myosin are unable to produce force on R258C actin-tropomyosin filaments, suggesting that tropomyosin occupies an inhibitory position on actin. Many of the observed defects cannot be explained by a direct interaction with the mutated residue, and thus the mutation allosterically affects multiple regions of the monomer. Our results align with the hypothesis that defective contractile function contributes to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:26153420

  18. Sediment-phosphorus dynamics can shift aquatic ecology and cause downstream legacy effects after wildfire in large river systems.

    PubMed

    Emelko, Monica B; Stone, Micheal; Silins, Uldis; Allin, Don; Collins, Adrian L; Williams, Chris H S; Martens, Amanda M; Bladon, Kevin D

    2016-03-01

    Global increases in the occurrence of large, severe wildfires in forested watersheds threaten drinking water supplies and aquatic ecology. Wildfire effects on water quality, particularly nutrient levels and forms, can be significant. The longevity and downstream propagation of these effects as well as the geochemical mechanisms regulating them remain largely undocumented at larger river basin scales. Here, phosphorus (P) speciation and sorption behavior of suspended sediment were examined in two river basins impacted by a severe wildfire in southern Alberta, Canada. Fine-grained suspended sediments (<125 μm) were sampled continuously during ice-free conditions over a two-year period (2009-2010), 6 and 7 years after the wildfire. Suspended sediment samples were collected from upstream reference (unburned) river reaches, multiple tributaries within the burned areas, and from reaches downstream of the burned areas, in the Crowsnest and Castle River basins. Total particulate phosphorus (TPP) and particulate phosphorus forms (nonapatite inorganic P, apatite P, organic P), and the equilibrium phosphorus concentration (EPC0 ) of suspended sediment were assessed. Concentrations of TPP and the EPC0 were significantly higher downstream of wildfire-impacted areas compared to reference (unburned) upstream river reaches. Sediments from the burned tributary inputs contained higher levels of bioavailable particulate P (NAIP) - these effects were also observed downstream at larger river basin scales. The release of bioavailable P from postfire, P-enriched fine sediment is a key mechanism causing these effects in gravel-bed rivers at larger basin scales. Wildfire-associated increases in NAIP and the EPC0 persisted 6 and 7 years after wildfire. Accordingly, this work demonstrated that fine sediment in gravel-bed rivers is a significant, long-term source of in-stream bioavailable P that contributes to a legacy of wildfire impacts on downstream water quality, aquatic ecology, and

  19. Effects of disturbances caused by coastal constructions on spatial structure, growth dynamics and photosynthesis of the seagrass Posidonia oceanica.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J M; Romero, J

    2003-12-01

    The light-limitation hypothesis was tested to assess whether water turbidity had caused the decline of a Mediterranean Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile meadow in an area affected by a harbor. The annual growth, photosynthesis and rhizome starch concentrations of seagrass were measured and related to changes in light availability and dissolved nutrient concentration along a gradient of meadow degradation from areas close to the harbor outwards. Environmental and plant variables were measured in three stations placed along this gradient and compared with a reference station at an undisturbed meadow. The light attenuation coefficient (k) increased toward the inner harbor area, mainly due to sediment resuspension. The shoot density and leaf productivity of P. oceanica shoots were much lower in disturbed stations of the inner harbor area than in the outer, less disturbed station and the reference meadow. However, daily leaf carbon gains, calculated from the photosynthetic rates at saturating irradiance (P(max)) and the daily period in which seagrass receives light higher than its saturating irradiance (H(sat)), suggested positive C-balance in all stations. This was partly explained by photo-acclimatization of seagrass to the reduced light availability at the disturbed harbor stations (inner and intermediate), as indicated by the lengthening of H(sat) and the decrease in saturating irradiance (I(sat)) and respiratory demands. Despite photo-acclimatization, disturbed harbor stations showed less positive C-balance, seen not only in their lower leaf growth and biomass but also in a decrease in rhizome carbohydrate reserves (starch). Our results suggest that light reduction account for the reduced seagrass productivity and abundance. However, meadow decline (in terms of shoot mortality) in the harbor area is well above that predicted from similar light environments of nearby meadows or simulated in shading experiments. Thus, there are other factors than light limitation

  20. In-Silico Analysis of Binding Site Features and Substrate Selectivity in Plant Flavonoid-3-O Glycosyltransferases (F3GT) through Molecular Modeling, Docking and Dynamics Simulation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ranu; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Suresh, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of plant secondary metabolites that act as storage molecules, chemical messengers, as well as participate in homeostasis and defense processes. They possess pharmaceutical properties important for cancer treatment such as antioxidant and anti-tumor activities. The drug-related properties of flavonoids can be improved by glycosylation. The enzymes glycosyltransferases (GTs) glycosylate acceptor molecules in a regiospecific manner with the help of nucleotide sugar donor molecules. Several plant GTs have been characterized and their amino acid sequences determined. However, three-dimensional structures of only a few are reported. Here, phylogenetic analysis using amino acid sequences have identified a group of GTs with the same regiospecific activity. The structures of these closely related GTs were modeled using homologous GT structures. Their substrate binding sites were elaborated by docking flavonoid acceptor and UDP-sugar donor molecules in the modeled structures. Eight regions near the acceptor binding site in the N- and C- terminal domain of GTs have been identified that bind and specifically glycosylate the 3-OH group of acceptor flavonoids. Similarly, a conserved motif in the C-terminal domain is known to bind a sugar donor substrate. In certain GTs, the substitution of a specific glutamine by histidine in this domain changes the preference of sugar from glucose to galactose as a result of changed pattern of interactions. The molecular modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies have revealed the chemical and topological features of the binding site and thus provided insights into the basis of acceptor and donor recognition by GTs. PMID:24667893

  1. Cellular Composition of the Spleen and Changes in Splenic Lysosomes in the Dynamics of Dyslipidemia in Mice Caused by Repeated Administration of Poloxamer 407.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, N V; Shurlygina, A V; Mel'nikova, E V; Karmatskikh, O L; Avrorov, P A; Loktev, K V; Korolenko, T A

    2015-11-01

    We studied the effect of dyslipidemia induced by poloxamer 407 (300 mg/kg twice a week for 30 days) on cellular composition of the spleen and splenocyte lysosomes in mice. Changes in blood lipid profile included elevated concentrations of total cholesterol, aterogenic LDL, and triglycerides most pronounced in 24 h after the last poloxamer 407 injection; gradual normalization of lipid profile was observed in 4 days (except triglycerides) and 10 days. The most pronounced changes in the spleen (increase in organ weight and number of cells, inhibition in apoptosis, and reduced accumulation of vital dye acridine orange in lysosomes) were detected on day 4; on day 10, the indices returned to normal. Cathepsin D activity in the spleen also increased at these terms. The relationship between changes in the cellular composition of the spleen and dynamics of serum lipid profile in mice in dyslipidemia caused by repeated administrations of relatively low doses of poloxamer 407 is discussed.

  2. Gaining insight into crizotinib resistance mechanisms caused by L2026M and G2032R mutations in ROS1 via molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Wu, XiaoYun; Fu, Yu; Wang, YuanYuan; Wan, ShanHe; Zhang, JiaJie

    2017-04-01

    ROS1 fusion kinase-highly expressed in a variety of human cancers-has emerged as an important and attractive target for anticancer drug design. Crizotinib, a well-known drug approved by the FDA as an ALK inhibitor to treat advanced NSCLC, also shows potent inhibitoy activity against ROS1. However, the development of serious resistance due to secondary mutations has been observed in clinical studies. To provide insight into the mechanisms of this drug resistance, molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations were carried out for complexes of crizotinib with wild-type (WT) ROS1 as well as the mutated L2026M and G2032R forms. MD simulations indicated that the L2026M and G2032R systems are slightly less flexible than the WT system. Binding free energy calculations showed that the L2026M and G2032R mutations significantly reduce the binding affinity of crizotinib for ROS1, and that the resistance to crizotinib caused by the L2026M and G2032R mutations arises mostly from increases in entropic terms. Furthermore, calculations of per-residue binding free energies highlighted increased and decreased contributions of some residues in the L2026M and G2032R systems relative to those in the WT system. The present study therefore yielded detailed insight into the mechanisms of resistance to crizotinib caused by the L2026M and G2032R mutations, which should provide the basis for rational drug design to combat crizotinib resistance. Graphical Abstract Superposition of the average structures obtained from the last 10 ns of the molecular dynamics simulation trajectoriy for WT (green) and mutated ROS1 (cyan).

  3. Population dynamics and damage caused by the leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis Blanchard (Diptera: Agromyzidae), on seven potato processing varieties grown in temperate environment.

    PubMed

    López, R; Carmona, D; Vincini, A M; Monterubbianesi, G; Caldiz, D

    2010-01-01

    The leafminer Liriomyza huidobrensis Blanchard is considered a key pest for potatoes in Argentina. Population dynamics and leaf damage caused by the leafminer on seven selected potato processing varieties were assessed at Balcarce during the 2002 and 2003 growing seasons. Adult population dynamic was monitored using yellow sticky traps, while leaf damage (punctures and mines) was assessed using a damage index scale from low to severe. Liriomyza huidobrensis adults were present throughout the growing season and the population increased along crop development. The same was true for all varieties regarding larval damage, being low on early crop stages and severe late in the season. Varieties were grouped in two different categories according to damage scale index. Shepody, Kennebec, Frital and Innovator showed a higher damage index when compared with Santana, Ranger Russet and Russet Burbank, which exhibited a lower damage. Moreover, it could be assumed that damage was related to the foliage greenness, with light green colored varieties (Shepody, Kennebec, Frital and Innovator) being more attractive and affected by L. huidobrensis.

  4. Structural characterization of disease-causing mutations on SAP and the functional impact on the SLAM peptide: a molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, P; Rajasekaran, R

    2014-07-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP) syndrome is an extremely rare inherited immunodeficiency disease characterized by severe immune dysregulation caused by mutations in signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) associated protein (SAP) gene. The XLP syndrome was manifested due to dysfunction of SAP as a result of amino acid substitution. Hence, to understand the molecular aspects of the XLP syndrome, we structurally characterized two observed mutations, R32Q and T53I on SAP through the systematic molecular dynamics (MD) approach. Our MD analysis showed that mutant structures elucidated an atomic level variation influenced by mutations that substantially altered the residual flexibility and more importantly the hot spot residues as well in unbound and bound systems. In addition, change in residual flexibility of mutant structures showed an unusual conformational behavior associated with their molecular recognition function compared to the wild-type SAP in both systems. Besides, both mutant structures established different secondary structural profiles during the course of the simulation period in both systems. Moreover, the docking analysis revealed that mutant R32Q and T53I structures displayed remarkably reduced levels of binding affinity to the unphosphorylated SLAM peptide with respect to their docking scores. Collectively, our findings provide knowledge to understand the structural and functional relationship of disease-causing mutations, R32Q and T53I on SAP as well as gain further insights into the molecular pathogenesis of the XLP syndrome.

  5. Modeling the dynamics of a plasma bulge with a high specific energy in the upper atmosphere. 2. Numerical simulation and physical features of a large-scale plasma flow at its late development stage: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupitsky, E. L.; Kholodov, A. S.

    2012-09-01

    The results of three-dimensional calculations of a plasma flow caused by a cosmic nuclear explosion, performed in an MHD approximation, are presented. The main regularities and specific features of the development of a large-scale plasma flow have been analyzed for a later stage (up to several hundreds of seconds) depending on the altitude and plasma bulge energy.

  6. Seismological features of the Pernicana-Provenzana Fault System (Mt. Etna, Italy) and implications for the dynamics of northeastern flank of the volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparone, S.; Cocina, O.; Gambino, S.; Mostaccio, A.; Spampinato, S.; Tuvè, T.; Ursino, A.

    2013-02-01

    The Pernicana-Provenzana Fault System is one of the most active tectonic systems of Mt. Etna and it plays an important role in the dynamic of the eastern flank of the volcano. Earthquakes occurring close to this structural trend have reached magnitudes up to 4.2, sometimes with coseismic surface faulting, and have caused severe damages to tourist resorts and villages in the vicinity of this structure. In the last decade, a large number of shocks, sometimes in the form of swarms, linked to Pernicana-Provenzana Fault System movements have been detected by the permanent local seismic network operating in eastern Sicily. In this paper, we report on the detailed study of the seismic activity occurring during the 2000-2009 time span in the Pernicana-Provenzana Fault System area. Firstly, we located 407 earthquakes using a standard location code and a 1D crustal velocity model. We then applied two different approaches to calculate precise hypocenter locations of the events. In particular, a non-linear code was adopted to obtain an estimate of the a posteriori Probability Density Function in 3D space for the hypocenter location. Moreover, a relative location of correlated event pairs was performed, using the double-difference method. These two different location approaches allowed defining with good accuracy, the most active and hazarding sectors of the structure. The results of these precise locations showed a tighter clustering in the epicenters and in focal depths, in comparison with standard locations. Earthquakes are located along the Pernicana-Provenzana Fault System, and are mainly clustered in two zones, separated by an area with very low rate of earthquakes occurrence, but characterized by the highest energy release. Depths of the foci are very shallow, ranging between the surface and about 3 km b.s.l. Kinematics of the Pernicana-Provenzana Fault System, revealed by the fault plane solutions computed for the most energetic earthquakes, highlights a predominant dip

  7. Theoretical study of different features of the fission process of excited nuclei in the framework of the modified statistical model and four-dimensional dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslamizadeh, H.

    2017-02-01

    Evaporation residue cross section, fission probability, anisotropy of fission fragment angular distribution, mass and energy distributions of fission fragments and the pre-scission neutron multiplicity for the excited compound nuclei {}168{{Y}}{{b}}, {}172{{Y}}{{b}}, {}178{{W}} and {}227{{P}}{{a}} produced in fusion reactions have been calculated in the framework of the modified statistical model and multidimensional dynamical model. In the dynamical calculations, the dynamics of fission of excited nuclei has been studied by solving three- and four-dimensional Langevin equations with dissipation generated through the chaos-weighted wall and window friction formula. Three collective shape coordinates plus the projection of total spin of the compound nucleus to the symmetry axis, K, were considered in the four-dimensional dynamical model. A non-constant dissipation coefficient of K, {γ }k, was applied in the four-dimensional dynamical calculations. A comparison of the results of the three- and four-dimensional dynamical models with the experimental data showed that the results of the four-dimensional dynamical model for the evaporation residue cross section, fission probability, anisotropy of fission fragment angular distribution, mass and energy distributions of fission fragments and the pre-scission neutron multiplicity are in better agreement with the experimental data. It was also shown that the modified statistical model can reproduce the above-mentioned experimental data by choosing appropriate values of the temperature coefficient of the effective potential, λ , and the scaling factor of the fission-barrier height, {r}s.

  8. Collisional Features in Saturn's F Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attree, Nicholas; Murray, Carl D; Cooper, Nicholas; Williams, Gareth

    2014-05-01

    Saturn’s F ring is a highly dynamic environment; changeable over timescales from hours to years and displaying a variety of features caused by both gravitational and collisional interactions with local objects. These objects range from the ‘shepherding’ moons Prometheus and Pandora down to small (radius < 1 km) moonlets, embedded in the ring or on nearby orbits. Previously (Attree et al. 2014) we catalogued nearly 900 small-scale collisional features (“mini-jets”) from Cassini images, placing constraints on the size and orbital distribution of the local colliding population. Here we will present the latest work on F ring collisions; updating the catalogue with new Cassini images to further refine our statistics of the population as well as discussing specific, interesting features which shed light on the collision process. We will also present the results of N-body simulations of the collisions and discuss ongoing work to survey the larger “jet” features. These are caused by higher velocity collisions 30m/s) with more distant objects like S/2004 S 6 which may represent the upper end of the moonlet population in size and in orbit.

  9. The reflectivity, wettability and scratch durability of microsurface features molded in the injection molding process using a dynamic tool tempering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Sascha; Burr, August; Kübler, Michael; Deckert, Matthias; Bleesen, Christoph

    2011-02-01

    In this paper the replication qualities of periodically and randomly arranged micro-features molded in the injection molding process and their effects on surface properties are studied. The features are molded in PC, PMMA and PP at different mold wall temperatures in order to point out the necessity and profitability of a variotherm mold wall temperature control system. A one-dimensional heat conduction model is proposed to predict the cycle times of the variotherm injection molding processes. With regard to these processes, the molding results are compared to the molded surface feature heights using an atomic force microscope. In addition, the effects of the molded surface features on macroscopic surfaces are characterized in terms of light reflection using a spectrometer and in terms of water wettability by measuring the static contact angle. Furthermore, due to the sensitivity of the surface features on the molded parts, their durability is compared in a scratch test with a diamond tip. This leads to successful implementation in applications in which the optical appearance, in terms of gloss and reflection, and the water repellence, in terms of drag flow and adhesion, are of importance.

  10. A green fluorescent protein fusion to actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis fimbrin highlights new features of a dynamic actin cytoskeleton in live plant cells.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, Michael B; Staiger, Chris J; Rose, Ray J; McCurdy, David W

    2004-12-01

    The actin cytoskeleton coordinates numerous cellular processes required for plant development. The functions of this network are intricately linked to its dynamic arrangement, and thus progress in understanding how actin orchestrates cellular processes relies on critical evaluation of actin organization and turnover. To investigate the dynamic nature of the actin cytoskeleton, we used a fusion protein between green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the second actin-binding domain (fABD2) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin, AtFIM1. The GFP-fABD2 fusion protein labeled highly dynamic and dense actin networks in diverse species and cell types, revealing structural detail not seen with alternative labeling methods, such as the commonly used mouse talin GFP fusion (GFP-mTalin). Further, we show that expression of the GFP-fABD2 fusion protein in Arabidopsis, unlike GFP-mTalin, has no detectable adverse effects on plant morphology or development. Time-lapse confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analyses of the actin cytoskeleton labeled with GFP-fABD2 revealed that lateral-filament migration and sliding of individual actin filaments or bundles are processes that contribute to the dynamic and continually reorganizing nature of the actin scaffold. These new observations of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in plant cells using GFP-fABD2 reveal the value of this probe for future investigations of how actin filaments coordinate cellular processes required for plant development.

  11. Ocean dynamic processes causing spatially heterogeneous distribution of sedimentary caesium-137 massively released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, H.; Morino, Y.; Furuichi, N.; Ohara, T.

    2015-08-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radiocaesium 137Cs that was released into the environment by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 2011 are widely known to have extensively migrated to Pacific oceanic sediment off of east Japan. Several recent reports have stated that the sedimentary 137Cs is now stable with a remarkably heterogeneous distribution. The present study elucidates ocean dynamic processes causing this heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution in and around the shelf off Fukushima and adjacent prefectures. We performed a numerical simulation of oceanic 137Cs behaviour for about 10 months after the accident, using a comprehensive dynamic model involving advection-diffusion transport in seawater, adsorption and desorption to and from particulate matter, sedimentation and suspension on and from the bottom, and vertical diffusion transport in the sediment. A notable simulated result was that the sedimentary 137Cs significantly accumulated in a swath just offshore of the shelf break (along the 50-100 m isobath) as in recent observations, although the seabed in the entire simulation domain was assumed to have ideal properties such as identical bulk density, uniform porosity, and aggregation of particles with a single grain diameter. This result indicated that the heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution was not necessarily a result of the spatial distribution of 137Cs sediment adsorptivity. The present simulation suggests that the shape of the swath is mainly associated with spatiotemporal variation between bottom shear stress in the shallow shelf (< 50 m depths) and that offshore of the shelf break. In a large part of the shallow shelf, the simulation indicated that strong bottom friction suspending particulate matter from the seabed frequently occurred via a periodic spring tide about every 2 weeks and via occasional strong wind. The sedimentary 137Cs thereby could hardly stay on the surface of the seabed with the result that

  12. Flexible Feature-Based Inhibition in Visual Search Mediates Magnified Impairments of Selection: Evidence from Carry-Over Effects under Dynamic Preview-Search Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Lucy S.; Watson, Derrick G.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Braithwaite, Jason J.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for inhibitory processes in visual search comes from studies using preview conditions, where responses to new targets are delayed if they carry a featural attribute belonging to the old distractor items that are currently being ignored--the negative carry-over effect (Braithwaite, Humphreys, & Hodsoll, 2003). We examined whether…

  13. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  14. Time Varying Feature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex

  15. A Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Images Based on Level Set Segmentation and ReliefF Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dongmei; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study established a fully automated computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for the classification of malignant and benign masses via breast magnetic resonance imaging (BMRI). A breast segmentation method consisting of a preprocessing step to identify the air-breast interfacing boundary and curve fitting for chest wall line (CWL) segmentation was included in the proposed CAD system. The Chan-Vese (CV) model level set (LS) segmentation method was adopted to segment breast mass and demonstrated sufficiently good segmentation performance. The support vector machine (SVM) classifier with ReliefF feature selection was used to merge the extracted morphological and texture features into a classification score. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity measurements for the leave-half-case-out resampling method were 92.3%, 98.2%, and 76.2%, respectively. For the leave-one-case-out resampling method, the measurements were 90.0%, 98.7%, and 73.8%, respectively. PMID:25628755

  16. Did clockwise rotation of Antarctica cause the break-up of Gondwanaland? An investigation in the 'deep-keeled cratons' frame for global dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmaston, M. F.

    2012-04-01

    Introduction. The 'deep-keeled cratons' frame for global dynamics is the result of seeking Earth-behaviour answers to the following outside-the-box proposition:- "If cratons have tectospheric keels that reach or approach the 660 km discontinuity, AND the 660 level is an effective barrier to mantle circulation, then obviously (i) when two cratons separate, the upper mantle to put under the nascent ocean must arrive by a circuitous route and, conversely, (ii) if they approach one another, the mantle volume that was in between them must get extruded sideways." Surprisingly it has turned out [1 - 4] that Earth dynamical behaviour for at least the past 150 Ma provides persuasive affirmation of both these expectations and that there is a rational petrological explanation for the otherwise-unexpected immobility of subcratonic material to such depths [5 - 7]. Clockwise rotation of Antarctica? This contribution greatly amplifies my original plate dynamical arguments for suggesting [8] that such rotation is ongoing. Convection is unsuited to causing rotation about a pole within the plate so, as noted then, a gearwheel-like linkage to Africa at the SWIR would provide its clearly CCW (Biscay-Caucasus) relationship to the Mediterranean belt for the past 100 Ma, also seen in its separation from South America. Gearwheel-like linkage of motion requires the presence of some kind of E-W restraint further north. In that case it was the N Africa/Arabia involvement in the Alpide belt, but the earlier opening of the central Atlantic by the eastward motion of Africa, suggests its rigid Gondwanan attachment to Antarctica rotation at that time, with little constraint in the north. Further east, the seafloor data show that Australia-Antarctica separation involved no such opposite rotational linkage, so, with no E-W mechanical constraint in the north by Indonesia, they must have rotated together, as is recorded by Australia's eastward motion to generate the Mesozoic seafloor at its western

  17. Time variant analysis of large scale constrained rotorcraft systems dynamics - An exploitation of IBM-3090 vector-processor's pipe-lining feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amirouche, F. M. L.; Shareef, N. H.; Xie, M.

    1991-01-01

    A generalized algorithmic procedure is presented for handling the constraints in transmissions, which are treated as a multibody system of interconnected rigid/flexible bodies. The type of constraints are classified based on the interconnection of the bodies, assuming one or more points of contact to exist between them. The method is explained through flow charts and configuration/interaction tables. A significant increase in speed of execution is achieved by vectorizing the developed code in computationally intensive areas. The study of an example consisting of two meshing disks rotating at high angular velocity is carried out. The dynamic behavior of the constraint forces associated with the generalized coordinates of the system are plotted by selecting various modes. Applications are intended for the study of dynamic and subsequent prediction of constraint forces at the gear teeth contacting points in helicopter transmissions with the aim of improving performance dependability.

  18. Chemical Theory and Computation Special Feature: Static and dynamic quantum effects in molecular liquids: A linearized path integral description of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aage Poulsen, Jens; Nyman, Gunnar; Rossky, Peter J.

    2005-05-01

    Structure, transport properties, and IR spectra including quantum effects are calculated for a flexible simple point charge model of liquid water. A recently introduced combination of a variational local harmonic description of the liquid potential surface and the classical Wigner approximation for the dynamics is used. The potential energy and interatomic radial distribution functions are in good agreement with accurate results from the literature and are significantly closer to experiment than predictions found from classical theory. The oxygen and hydrogen velocity correlation functions are also calculated, and the corresponding molecular diffusion coefficient is in good accord with existing theoretical estimates including quantum effects. Of most interest, an ab initio quantum correction factor is obtained to correct the far IR spectrum of water. When corrected, a spectrum based on a classical simulation yields results that agree well with experiment. Combined with internal tests of consistency, these observations indicate that this quite flexible approach will be effective for a variety of molecular problems involving the dynamics of light nuclei. computer simulation | liquid dynamics

  19. Hydrochemistry dynamics in remote mountain lakes and its relation to catchment and atmospheric features: the case study of Sabocos Tarn, Pyrenees.

    PubMed

    Santolaria, Zoe; Arruebo, Tomas; Urieta, José Santiago; Lanaja, Francisco Javier; Pardo, Alfonso; Matesanz, José; Rodriguez-Casals, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the understanding of high mountain lake dynamics is essential to use these remote aquatic ecosystems as proxies of global environmental changes. With this aim, at Sabocos, a Pyrenean cirque glacial lake or tarn, this study shows the main results of a morphological and catchment characterization, along with statistical analyses of its hydrochemical trends and their concomitant driving factors from 2010 to 2013. Dissolved oxygen, water temperature stratification, and its snow and ice cover composition and dynamics have been also investigated. According to morphological analyses, Sabocos can be classified as a medium-large and deep lake, having a circular contour and a long water retention time as compared to Pyrenean glacial lake average values. Sabocos hydrochemistry is mainly determined by very high alkalinity, pH and conductivity levels, and high Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and SO4(2-) content, coming from the easily weatherable limestone-dolomite bedrock. Thus, lake water is well buffered, and therefore, Sabocos tarn is non-sensitive to acidification processes. On the other hand, the main source of K(+), Na(+), and Cl(-) (sea salts) and nutrients (NH4(+), NO3(-), and phosphorous) to lake water appears to be atmospheric deposition. Primary production is phosphorous limited, and due to the N-saturation stage of the poorly developed soils of Sabocos catchment, NO3(-) is the chief component in the total nitrogen pool. External temperature seems to be the major driver regulating lake productivity, since warm temperatures boot primary production. Although precipitation might also play an important role in lake dynamics, especially regarding to those parameters influenced by the weathering of the bedrock, its influence cannot be easily assessed due to the seasonal isolation produced by the ice cover. Also, as occurs in the whole Pyrenean lake district, chemical composition of bulk deposition is highly variable due to the contribution of air masses with different origin.

  20. Development of a new microparticle-enhanced turbidimetric assay for C-reactive protein with superior features in analytical sensitivity and dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Eda, S; Kaufmann, J; Roos, W; Pohl, S

    1998-01-01

    Novel assay techniques were applied to a newly developed microparticle-based assay for C-reactive protein (CRP). By using two different sized microparticles covalently coated with two monoclonal antibodies of different reactivity, high analytical sensitivity and a high upper measuring limit could be simultaneously attained, resulting in a remarkably wide dynamic range. This range was further increased by calculating the signal (reaction rate) optimally with a new software capability of COBAS INTEGRA, a clinical chemistry analyzer. The assay showed high precision between 2 mg/l and 160 mg/l with use of only 2.5 microl specimen. The detection limit was estimated as 0.3 mg/l CRP. The assay was four to eight times more sensitive and precise than existing turbidimetric or nephelometric assays with comparable upper measuring limits. The assay also showed good linearity and correlated well with commercial assays. This new microparticle-based CRP assay provides the accuracy and precision that are required to determine CRP at low concentrations where new clinical implications such as prognosis of cardiovascular diseases are envisaged. The assay's wide dynamic range will additionally lead to a reduction in the number of repeated analyses, thus improving the efficiency of CRP determinations in clinical laboratories.

  1. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  2. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  3. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  4. Birth dates vary with fixed and dynamic maternal features, offspring sex, and extreme climatic events in a high-latitude marine mammal.

    PubMed

    Rotella, Jay J; Paterson, J Terrill; Garrott, Robert A

    2016-04-01

    Reproductive synchrony tends to be widespread in diverse species of plants and animals, especially at higher latitudes. However, for long-lived mammals, birth dates for different individuals can vary by weeks within a population. A mother's birth timing can reveal useful information about her reproductive abilities and have important implications for the characteristics and survival of her offspring. Despite this, our current knowledge of factors associated with variation in birth dates is modest. We used long-term data for known-age Weddell seals in Antarctica and a Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach to study how birth dates varied with fixed and temporally varying features of mothers, whether sex allocation varied with birth timing, and annual variation in birth dates. Based on birth dates for 4465 pups born to 1117 mothers aged 4-31, we found that diverse features of mothers were associated with variation in birth dates. Maternal identity was the most important among these. Unlike most studies, which have reported that birth dates occur earlier as mothers age, we found that birth dates progressively occurred earlier in the year in the early part of a mother's reproductive life, reached a minimum at age 16, and then occurred later at later ages. Birth dates were positively related to a mother's age at primiparity and recent reproductive effort. The earliest birth dates were for pups born to prime-age mothers who did not reproduce in the previous year but began reproduction early in life, suggesting that females in the best condition gave birth earlier than others. If so, our finding that male pups tended to be born earlier than females provides support for the Trivers-Willard sex-allocation model. Average birth dates were quite consistent across years, except for 2 years that had notable delays and occurred during the period when massive icebergs were present and disrupted the ecosystem.

  5. Mechanisms of Disease and Clinical Features of Mutations of the Gene for Mitofusin 2: An Important Cause of Hereditary Peripheral Neuropathy with Striking Clinical Variability in Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouvrier, Robert; Grew, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Mitofusin 2, a large transmembrane GTPase located in the outer mitochondrial membrane, promotes membrane fusion and is involved in the maintenance of the morphology of axonal mitochondria. Mutations of the gene encoding mitofusin 2 ("MFN2") have recently been identified as the cause of approximately one-third of dominantly inherited cases of the…

  6. On structural features of fullerene C60 dissolved in carbon disulfide: Complementary study by small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, M. V.; Tropin, T. V.; Bodnarchuk, I. A.; Yaradaikin, S. P.; Rosta, L.; Aksenov, V. L.; Bulavin, L. A.

    2010-04-01

    The parameters of fullerene C60 dissolved in carbon disulfide CS2 are analyzed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) in a wide interval of momentum transfer. To exclude the influence of nonequilibrium conditions, the solutions are prepared without applying shaking, stirring or ultrasound. No indication of the equilibrium cluster state of C60 (with the cluster size below 60 nm) in the final solutions is revealed. Molecular dynamic simulations are complementary used to find out the partial volume of C60 in CS2 and the scattering contribution of the solvent organization at the interface with the fullerene molecule, which is shown to be small. Among several approaches for describing SANS data the preference is given to the model, which takes into account the presence of stable C60 dimers (comprising 10% of the total particle number density) in the solution.

  7. Dynamics of Back Electron Transfer in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Featuring 4-tert-Butyl-Pyridine and Atomic-Layer-Deposited Alumina as Surface Modifiers.

    PubMed

    Katz, Michael J; Vermeer, Michael J DeVries; Farha, Omar K; Pellin, Michael J; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-06-18

    A series of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) was constructed with TiO2 nanoparticles and N719 dye. The standard I3(-)/I(-) redox shuttle and the Co(1,10-phenanthroline)3(3+/2+) shuttle were employed. DSCs were modified with atomic-layered-deposited (ALD) coatings of Al2O3 and/or with the surface-adsorbing additive 4-tert-butyl-pyridine. Current-voltage data were collected to ascertain the influence of each modification upon the back electron transfer (ET) dynamics of the DSCs. The primary effect of the additives alone or in tandem is to increase the open-circuit voltage. A second is to alter the short-circuit current density, JSC. With dependence on the specifics of the system examined, any of a myriad of dynamics-related effects were observed to come into play, in both favorable (efficiency boosting) and unfavorable (efficiency damaging) ways. These effects include modulation of (a) charge-injection yields, (b) rates of interception of injected electrons by redox shuttles, and (c) rates of recombination of injected electrons with holes on surface-bound dyes. In turn, these influence charge-collection lengths, charge-collection yields, and onset potentials for undesired dark current. The microscopic origins of the effects appear to be related mainly to changes in driving force and/or electronic coupling for underlying component redox reactions. Perhaps surprisingly, only a minor role for modifier-induced shifts in conduction-band-edge energy was found. The combination of DSC-efficiency-relevant effects engendered by the modifiers was found to vary substantially as a function of the chemical identity of the redox shuttle employed. While types of modifiers are effective, a challenge going forward will be to construct systems in ways in which the benefits of organic and inorganic modifiers can be exploited in fully additive, or even synergistic, fashion.

  8. Dynamic Association with Donor Cell Filopodia and Lipid-Modification Are Essential Features of Wnt8a during Patterning of the Zebrafish Neuroectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Marta; Spannl-Müller, Stephanie; Özhan, Günes; Kagermeier-Schenk, Birgit; Rhinn, Muriel; Weidinger, Gilbert; Brand, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Wnt proteins are conserved signaling molecules that regulate pattern formation during animal development. Many Wnt proteins are post-translationally modified by addition of lipid adducts. Wnt8a provides a crucial signal for patterning the anteroposterior axis of the developing neural plate in vertebrates. However, it is not clear how this protein propagates from its source, the blastoderm margin, to the target cells in the prospective neural plate, and how lipid-modifications might influence Wnt8a propagation and activity. Results We have dynamically imaged biologically active, fluorescently tagged Wnt8a in living zebrafish embryos. We find that Wnt8a localizes to membrane-associated, punctate structures in live tissue. In Wnt8a expressing cells, these puncta are found on filopodial cellular processes, from where the protein can be released. In addition, Wnt8a is found colocalized with Frizzled receptor-containing clusters on signal receiving cells. Combining in vitro and in vivo assays, we compare the roles of conserved Wnt8a residues in cell and non-cell-autonomous signaling activity and secretion. Non-signaling Wnt8 variants show these residues can regulate Wnt8a distribution in producing cell membranes and filopodia as well as in the receiving tissue. Conclusions Together, our results show that Wnt8a forms dynamic clusters found on filopodial donor cell and on signal receiving cell membranes. Moreover, they demonstrate a differential requirement of conserved residues in Wnt8a protein for distribution in producing cells and receiving tissue and signaling activity during neuroectoderm patterning. PMID:24427298

  9. Dynamics of States in the Nonlinear Interaction Regime Between a Three-Level Atom and Generalized Coherent States and Their Non-Classical Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoly, M. K.; Yadollahi, F.

    The present study investigates the interaction of an equidistant three-level atom and a single-mode cavity field that has been initially prepared in a generalized coherent state. The atom-field interaction is considered to be, in general, intensity-dependent. We suppose that the nonlinearity of the initial generalized coherent state of the field and the intensity-dependent coupling between atom and field are distinctly chosen. Interestingly, an exact analytical solution for the time evolution of the state of atom-field system can be found in this general regime in terms of the nonlinearity functions. Finally, the presented formalism has been applied to a few known physical systems such as Gilmore-Perelomov and Barut-Girardello coherent states of SU(1,1) group, as well as a few special cases of interest. Mean photon number and atomic population inversion will be calculated, in addition to investigating particular non-classicality features such as revivals, sub-Poissonian statistics and quadratures squeezing of the obtained states of the entire system. Also, our results will be compared with some of the earlier works in this particular subject.

  10. Universal Features of Electron Dynamics in Solar Cells with TiO2 Contact: From Dye Solar Cells to Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Todinova, Anna; Idígoras, Jesús; Salado, Manuel; Kazim, Samrana; Anta, Juan A

    2015-10-01

    The electron dynamics of solar cells with mesoporous TiO2 contact is studied by electrochemical small-perturbation techniques. The study involved dye solar cells (DSC), solid-state perovskite solar cells (SSPSC), and devices where the perovskite acts as sensitizer in a liquid-junction device. Using a transport-recombination continuity equation we found that mid-frequency time constants are proper lifetimes that determine the current-voltage curve. This is not the case for the SSPSC, where a lifetime of ∼1 μs, 1 order of magnitude longer, is required to reproduce the current-voltage curve. This mismatch is attributed to the dielectric response on the mid-frequency component. Correcting for this effect, lifetimes lie on a common exponential trend with respect to open-circuit voltage. Electron transport times share a common trend line too. This universal behavior of lifetimes and transport times suggests that the main difference between the cells is the power to populate the mesoporous TiO2 contact with electrons.

  11. Experimental and molecular dynamics studies of dysprosium(III) salt solutions for a better representation of the microscopic features used within the binding mean spherical approximation theory.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Guilbaud, Philippe; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moulin, Christophe; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Moisy, Philippe

    2006-10-19

    This work is aimed at a predictive description of the thermodynamic properties of actinide(III) salt solutions at high concentration and 25 degrees C. A new solution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, based on the Wertheim formalism, for taking into account 1:1 and also 1:2 complex formation, is used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental osmotic coefficient variation with concentration for three binary salt solutions of the same lanthanide(III) cation: dysprosium(III) perchlorate, nitrate, and chloride. The relevance of the fitted parameters is discussed, and their values are compared with available literature values. UV-vis/near-IR, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy experiments, and molecular dynamics (MD) calculations were conducted for dilute to concentrated solutions (ca. 3 mol.kg-1) for a study of the microscopic behavior of DyCl3 binary solutions. Coupling MD calculations and extended X-ray absorption fine structure led to the determination of reliable distances. The MD results were used for a discussion of the parameters used in the BIMSA.

  12. Feature integration across space, time, and orientation

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Thomas U.; Öğmen, Haluk; Herzog, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    The perception of a visual target can be strongly influenced by flanking stimuli. In static displays, performance on the target improves when the distance to the flanking elements increases- proposedly because feature pooling and integration vanishes with distance. Here, we studied feature integration with dynamic stimuli. We show that features of single elements presented within a continuous motion stream are integrated largely independent of spatial distance (and orientation). Hence, space based models of feature integration cannot be extended to dynamic stimuli. We suggest that feature integration is guided by perceptual grouping operations that maintain the identity of perceptual objects over space and time. PMID:19968428

  13. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-02: Evaluation of Textural Feature Extraction for Radiotherapy Response Assessment of Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients Using Diffusion Weighted MRI and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y; Wang, C; Horton, J; Chang, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using classic textural feature extraction in radiotherapy response assessment, we studied a unique cohort of early stage breast cancer patients with paired pre - and post-radiation Diffusion Weighted MRI (DWI-MRI) and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). Methods: 15 female patients from our prospective phase I trial evaluating preoperative radiotherapy were included in this retrospective study. Each patient received a single-fraction radiation treatment, and DWI and DCE scans were conducted before and after the radiotherapy. DWI scans were acquired using a spin-echo EPI sequence with diffusion weighting factors of b = 0 and b = 500 mm{sup 2} /s, and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated. DCE-MRI scans were acquired using a T{sub 1}-weighted 3D SPGR sequence with a temporal resolution of about 1 minute. The contrast agent (CA) was intravenously injected with a 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight dose at 2 ml/s. Two parameters, volume transfer constant (K{sup trans} ) and k{sub ep} were analyzed using the two-compartment Tofts kinetic model. For DCE parametric maps and ADC maps, 33 textural features were generated from the clinical target volume (CTV) in a 3D fashion using the classic gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCOM) and gray level run length matrix (GLRLM). Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine the significance of each texture feature’s change after the radiotherapy. The significance was set to 0.05 with Bonferroni correction. Results: For ADC maps calculated from DWI-MRI, 24 out of 33 CTV features changed significantly after the radiotherapy. For DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters, all 33 CTV features of K{sup trans} and 33 features of k{sub ep} changed significantly. Conclusion: Initial results indicate that those significantly changed classic texture features are sensitive to radiation-induced changes and can be used for assessment of radiotherapy response in breast cancer.

  14. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  15. Dynamics of the large-scale open solar magnetic field and its specific features in the zone of the main active longitudes in 2006-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, K. G.; Kharshiladze, A. F.

    2013-11-01

    The dynamics of the absolute global values (Φ) of the large-scale open solar magnetic field (LOSMF) fluxes at an interval of one solar rotation in 2006-2012 has been studied based on the Wilcox Solar Observatory data and using the ISOPAK original package for modeling the solar magnetic field. The reference points and the duration of the final quasi-biennial interval in cycle 23 (January 2006-May 2007; 17 months) and the phases of the cycle 24 minimum (May 2007-November 2009; 30 months), growth (November 2009-May 2012; 30 months), and the beginning of the maximum (May 2012-January 2013) have been determined. It has been indicated that the absolute values (Φ) decreased sharply at the beginning of the minimum, growth, and the maximum phases to ˜(2, 1.25, 0.75) × 1022 Mx, respectively. During the entire minimum phase, LOSMF corotated super-quasi-rigidly westward in the direction of solar rotation; at the beginning of the growth phase, this field started corotating mostly eastward. The LOSMF polarity reversal in the current cycle 24 started in May-June 2012 (CR 2123-2124), when fields of southern polarity rushed from the Sun's southern hemisphere toward the north. The statement that the solar cycle is a continuous series of quasi-biennial LOSMF intervals is confirmed. In particular, the minimum and growth phases are characterized by opposite LOSMF rotation directions, i.e., super-quasi-rigid corotation (twisting) and detwisting, with identical duration at least in cycle 24.

  16. Cybersecurity Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-20

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: In the course of seeking fundamental concepts that can drive the study of cybersecurity for the many years to come...of Cybersecurity Dynamics emerged. Intuitively, Cybersecurity Dynamics describes the evolution of cybersecurity state as caused by cyber attack...defense interactions. By studying Cybersecurity Dynamics, we can characterize the cybersecurity phenomena exhibited in the evolution of cybersecurity

  17. Discrepant imaging findings of portal vein thrombosis with dynamic computed tomography and computed tomography during arterial portography in hepatocellular carcinoma: possible cause leading to inappropriate treatment selection.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Tada, Toshifumi; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Inukai, Yosuke; Takeda, Akira; Sone, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    We encountered a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had discrepant imaging findings on portal vein thrombosis with portal phase dynamic computed tomography (CT) and CT during arterial portography (CTAP). CTAP, via the superior mesenteric artery and via the splenic artery, both showed a portal perfusion defect in the right hepatic lobe, indicating portal vein thrombosis in the main trunk of the right portal vein. Portal phase dynamic CT clearly depicted portal perfusion of the same hepatic area. Transarterial chemoembolization was successfully performed, but it was associated with severe liver injury. Clinicians should be cautious about this possible discrepancy based on imaging technique. The inaccurate evaluation of portal vein thrombosis may result in inappropriate treatment selection, which can worsen patient prognosis.

  18. Cerebral Arterial Stenoses and Stroke: Novel Features of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome Caused by the Arg164X Mutation in SAMHD1 Are Associated with Altered Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Holger; du Moulin, Marcel; Barczyk, Katarzyna; George, Christel; Schwindt, Wolfram; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Frosch, Michael; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Roth, Johannes; Nürnberg, Peter; Rutsch, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a rare inborn multisystemic disease, resembling intrauterine viral infection and resulting in psychomotor retardation, spasticity and chilblain-like skin lesions. Diagnostic criteria include intracerebral calcifications and elevated interferon-alpha and pterin levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We report on four adult siblings with unknown neurodegenerative disease presenting with cerebrovascular stenoses, stroke and glaucoma in childhood, two of whom died at the age of 40 and 29 years. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping identified 170 candidate genes embedded in a common haplotype of 8Mb on chromosome 20q11-13. Next generation sequencing of the entire region identified the c.490C>T (p.Arg164X) mutation in SAMHD1, a gene most recently described in AGS, on both alleles in all affected siblings. Clinical diagnosis of AGS was then confirmed by demonstrating intracerebral calcifications on cranial computed tomography in all siblings and elevated pterin levels in CSF in three of them. In patient fibroblasts, lack of SAMHD1 protein expression was associated with increased basal expression of IL8, while stimulated expression of IFNB1 was reduced. We conclude that cerebrovascular stenoses and stroke associated with the Arg164X mutation in SAMHD1 extend the phenotypic spectrum of AGS. The observed vascular changes most likely reflect a vasculitis caused by dysregulated inflammatory stress response. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20842748

  19. Online feature selection with streaming features.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xindong; Yu, Kui; Ding, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xingquan

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new online feature selection framework for applications with streaming features where the knowledge of the full feature space is unknown in advance. We define streaming features as features that flow in one by one over time whereas the number of training examples remains fixed. This is in contrast with traditional online learning methods that only deal with sequentially added observations, with little attention being paid to streaming features. The critical challenges for Online Streaming Feature Selection (OSFS) include 1) the continuous growth of feature volumes over time, 2) a large feature space, possibly of unknown or infinite size, and 3) the unavailability of the entire feature set before learning starts. In the paper, we present a novel Online Streaming Feature Selection method to select strongly relevant and nonredundant features on the fly. An efficient Fast-OSFS algorithm is proposed to improve feature selection performance. The proposed algorithms are evaluated extensively on high-dimensional datasets and also with a real-world case study on impact crater detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithms achieve better compactness and higher prediction accuracy than existing streaming feature selection algorithms.

  20. Microbial dynamics during shelf-life of industrial Ricotta cheese and identification of a Bacillus strain as a cause of a pink discolouration.

    PubMed

    Sattin, E; Andreani, N A; Carraro, L; Fasolato, L; Balzan, S; Novelli, E; Squartini, A; Telatin, A; Simionati, B; Cardazzo, B

    2016-08-01

    Dairy products are perishable and have to be preserved from spoilage during the food chain to achieve the desired shelf-life. Ricotta is a typical Italian soft dairy food produced by heat coagulation of whey proteins and is considered to be a light and healthy product. The shelf-life of Ricotta could be extended, as required by the international food trade market; however, heat resistant microflora causes spoilage and poses issues regarding the safety of the product. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) applied to the Ricotta samples defined the composition of the microbial community in-depth during the shelf-life. The analysis demonstrated the predominance of spore-forming bacteria throughout the shelf-life, mostly belonging to Bacillus, Paenibacillus and Clostridium genera. A strain involved in spoilage and causing a pink discolouration of Ricotta was isolated and characterised as Bacillus mycoides/weihenstephanensis. This is the first report of a food discolouration caused by a toxigenic strain belonging to the Bacillus cereus group that resulted the predominant strain in the community of the defective ricotta. These results suggest that the processing of raw materials to eliminate spores and residual microflora could be essential for improving the quality and the safety of the product and to extend the shelf-life of industrial Ricotta.

  1. The Unique Ability of the Electron-Positron (Epo) Lattice (Epola) Model of Space to Explain the Natural Causes of All Known Physical Features and Phenomena, Extrinsic to Nuclear Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhony, Menahem

    1999-10-01

    The binding energy _bE of an epo pair in the epola is 1.02 MeV. In an epola spot, deformed by a "guest" nucleus, such a quantum can be absorbed; this frees an epo pair off bonds, making it appear to our detection. The epo lattice constant is 4.4 fm, 50 R_e. Thus atomic bodies can move in the epola, sweeping their constituent nuclei and electrons between epola particles, creating EM de Broglie waves in the epola space, but no winds or currents. Starting a motion provides the energy of the bound epola particles that vibrate in the waves. This led us to answer the question WHY there is inertia. Epola deformations by masses of constituent nuclear particles of atomic bodies led us to answer the question WHY there is gravity. Epola deformations by electric charges and magnetism of the particles lead to answer the questions of HOW and WHY does space carry and transfer with the speed c of light the tremendous gravitational and EM interaction forces, energies, and radiations. The lattice structure per se causes all quantizations, and the applicability of the otherwise "divine" principles of uncertainty, exclusion, particle-wave duality, universality of our backyard findings, etc. 1.M.Simhony, The Epola Space, 1990, 160 pp, and The Story of Matter and Space, 1999, 70 pp (available from the author). M.Simhony, Invitation to the Natural Physics or Matter, Space, and Radiation, World Scientific, 1994. See the website: http://come.to/natural_physics

  2. Computational diagnosis of protein conformational diseases: short molecular dynamics simulations reveal a fast unfolding of r-LDL mutants that cause familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Cuesta-López, S; Falo, F; Sancho, J

    2007-01-01

    The molecular basis of conformational diseases frequently resides in mutant proteins constituting a subset of the vast mutational space. While the subtleties of protein structure point to molecular dynamics (MD) techniques as promising tools for an efficient exploration of such a space, the average size of proteins and the time scale of unfolding events make this goal difficult with present computational capabilities. We show here, nevertheless, that an efficient approach is already feasible for modular proteins. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a conformational disease linked to mutations in the gene encoding the low density lipoprotein receptor. A high percentage of these mutations has been found in the seven small modular binding repeats of the receptor. Taking advantage of its small size, we have performed an in depth MD study of the fifth binding repeat. Fast unfolding dynamics have been observed in the absence of a structural bound calcium ion, which agrees with its reported essential role in the stability of the module. In addition, several mutations detected in FH patients have been analyzed, starting from the native conformation. Our results indicate that in contrast with the wild type protein and an innocuous control mutant, disease-related mutants experience, in short simulation times (2-8 ns), gross departures from the native state that lead to unfolded conformations and, in some cases, to binding site desorganization deriving in calcium release. Computational diagnosis of mutations leading to conformational diseases seems thus feasible, at least for small or modular pathogenic proteins.

  3. Hydrogen-bond-dynamics-based switching of conductivity and magnetism: a phase transition caused by deuterium and electron transfer in a hydrogen-bonded purely organic conductor crystal.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Akira; Yamada, Shota; Isono, Takayuki; Kamo, Hiromichi; Nakao, Akiko; Kumai, Reiji; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Nishio, Yutaka; Mori, Hatsumi

    2014-08-27

    A hydrogen bond (H-bond) is one of the most fundamental and important noncovalent interactions in chemistry, biology, physics, and all other molecular sciences. Especially, the dynamics of a proton or a hydrogen atom in the H-bond has attracted increasing attention, because it plays a crucial role in (bio)chemical reactions and some physical properties, such as dielectricity and proton conductivity. Here we report unprecedented H-bond-dynamics-based switching of electrical conductivity and magnetism in a H-bonded purely organic conductor crystal, κ-D3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-D). This novel crystal κ-D, a deuterated analogue of κ-H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-H), is composed only of a H-bonded molecular unit, in which two crystallographically equivalent catechol-fused ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (Cat-EDT-TTF) skeletons with a +0.5 charge are linked by a symmetric anionic [O···D···O](-1)-type strong H-bond. Although the deuterated and parent hydrogen systems, κ-D and κ-H, are isostructural paramagnetic semiconductors with a dimer-Mott-type electronic structure at room temperature (space group: C2/c), only κ-D undergoes a phase transition at 185 K, to change to a nonmagnetic insulator with a charge-ordered electronic structure (space group: P1). The X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrates that this dramatic switching of the electronic structure and physical properties originates from deuterium transfer or displacement within the H-bond accompanied by electron transfer between the Cat-EDT-TTF π-systems, proving that the H-bonded deuterium dynamics and the conducting TTF π-electron are cooperatively coupled. Furthermore, the reason why this unique phase transition occurs only in κ-D is qualitatively discussed in terms of the H/D isotope effect on the H-bond geometry and potential energy curve.

  4. Dynamics of large-scale ionospheric inhomogeneities caused by a powerful radio emission of the Sura facility from the data collected onto ground-based GNSS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogogin, D. A.; Nasyrov, I. A.; Grach, S. M.; Shindin, A. V.; Zagretdinov, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    The measurements of variations in the total electron content of the Earth's ionosphere along the GPS satellite signal propagation path are described. The signal parameters were measured at a network of receivers at three distant sites: Sura (Vasilsursk), Zelenodolsk, and Kazan. They are arranged along the geomagnetic latitude of the Sura Facility under short-wave radio irradiation of the ionosphere. One feature of the experiment is the crossing of a disturbed region by the radio path between a GPS satellite and Vasilsursk. This resulted from the angular sizes of the Sura array pattern; the radio paths between a GPS satellite and Zelenodolsk and a GPS satellite and Kazan did not cross. Variations in the total electron content of up to 0.15-0.3 TECU were revealed at all three sites during four experimental campaigns (March 2010, March 2013, May 2013, and November 2013). The lateral scale of an ionospheric disturbance stimulated by a high-power radio wave and the velocity of its west-to-east propagation along the geomagnetic latitude were 30-60 km and 270-350 m/s, respectively. A decrease in the total electron content (down to 0.55 TECU) was recorded along the Kazan-Zelenodolsk-Vasilsurks line, which is connected with the solar terminator transit; the lateral scale of the related ionospheric inhomogeneities was 65-80 km.

  5. Dynamics of change of lipid and monoamine metabolisms and the blood coagulation system during experimental atherosclerosis caused by restriction of movement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gvishiani, G. S.; Kobakhidze, N. G.

    1980-01-01

    Shifts in lipid, catecholamine, and blood coagulation systems following various periods (1, 2, 3, and 4 months) of experimentally induced atherosclerosis were studied. The same indices were studied in the tissues of the myocardium, liver, and brain stem-reticular formation after decapitation of the animals at the end of the experiment. Periodic motion restriction caused an increase in blood beta-lipoproteins in the rabbits at the beginning of the experiment. An increase in general cholesterol content and a decrease in the lecithincholesterol index were established at the end of the experiment. Myocardial beta-lipoprotein and brain stem reticular formation general cholesterol contents were elevated; catecholamine content was increased at the end of the experiment. In the initial months, free adrenaline basically increased, while in later months blood adrenaline decreased and blood noradrenaline increased.

  6. Rates, causes, and dynamic of long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic "passive continental margin", Brazil and Namibia, as revealed by thermo-kinematic numerical modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Stippich; Anton, Glasmacher Ulrich; Peter, Christian, Hackspacher

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the research is to quantify the long-term landscape evolution of the South Atlantic passive continental margin (SAPCM) in SE-Brazil and NW-Namibia. Excellent onshore outcrop conditions and complete rift to post-rift archives between Sao Paulo and Porto Alegre and in the transition from Namibia to Angola (onshore Walvis ridge) allow a high precision quantification of exhumation, and uplift rates, influencing physical parameters, long-term acting forces, and process-response systems. Research will integrate the published and partly published thermochronological data from Brazil and Namibia, and test lately published new concepts on causes of long-term landscape evolution at rifted margins. The climate-continental margin-mantle coupled process-response system is caused by the interaction between endogenous and exogenous forces, which are related to the mantle-process driven rift - drift - passive continental margin evolution of the South Atlantic, and the climate change since the Early/Late Cretaceous climate maximum. Special emphasis will be given to the influence of long-living transform faults such as the Florianopolis Fracture Zone (FFZ) on the long-term topography evolution of the SAPCM's. A long-term landscape evolution model with process rates will be achieved by thermo-kinematic 3-D modeling (software code PECUBE and FastCape). Testing model solutions obtained for a multidimensional parameter space against the real thermochronological and geomorphological data set, the most likely combinations of parameter rates, and values can be constrained. The data and models will allow separating the exogenous and endogenous forces and their process rates.

  7. The sexually driven epidemic in youths in China’s southwestern border region was caused by dynamic emerging multiple recombinant HIV-1 strains

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Huamian; Xing, Hui; Hsi, Jenny H.; Jia, Manhong; Feng, Yi; Duan, Song; He, Cui; Yao, Shitang; Ruan, Yuhua; He, Xiang; Liao, Lingjie; Ma, Yanling; Huang, Yunda; Lu, Lin; Shao, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    Dehong prefecture, Yunnan province on China’s southwestern border was the gateway of the country’s AIDS epidemic. Studies on HIV-1 molecular epidemiology will provide key information on virus transmission dynamics and help to inform HIV prevention strategies. HIV-1 infected youths (age 16–25 years) diagnosed in the continuous 3 months in 2009 to 2012 were enrolled. By means of phylogenetic and statistical analyses, It was showed that two thirds (133/205) of youths in Dehong, of which 74.1% were infected sexually, were infected by uncharacterized recombinant HIV-1 strains. Among them about 59.4% (79/131) were unique recombinant forms (URFs) and 40.6% (54/131) formed 11 transmission clusters, termed potential circulating recombinant forms (pCRFs). The emergence of recombinants was statistically significant related with people of low education, residents outside the capital city of Dehong and being Myanmar residents. It was the first report with ongoing HIV-1 recombinant strains in a sexually driven epidemic area in China. Great efforts should be put on reducing multiple risk exposures behavior in local young people, containing the spread of pCRFs to other regions, and preventing the URFs from evolving into future CRFs. Collaborative prevention across border is needed to better control the local AIDS epidemic. PMID:26133091

  8. A novel microtubule inhibitor, MT3-037, causes cancer cell apoptosis by inducing mitotic arrest and interfering with microtubule dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling-Chu; Yu, Yung-Luen; Hsieh, Min-Tsang; Wang, Sheng-Hung; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Huang, Wei-Chien; Lin, Hui-Yi; Hung, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the anticancer potential of a new synthetic compound, 7-(3-fluorophenyl)-4-methylpyrido-[2,3-d]pyrimidin-5(8H)-one (MT3-037). We found that MT3-037 effectively decreased the cancer cell viability by inducing apoptosis. MT3-037 treatments led to cell cycle arrest at M phase, with a marked increase in both expression of cyclin B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) as well as in CDK1 kinase activity. Key proteins that regulate mitotic spindle dynamics, including survivin, Aurora A/B kinases, and polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), were activated in MT3-037-treated cells. MT3-037-induced apoptosis was accompanied by activation of a pro-apoptotic factor, FADD, and the inactivation of apoptosis inhibitors, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, resulting in the cleavage/activation of caspases. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) was associated with MT3-037-induced CDK1 and Aurora A/B activation and apoptosis. Immunofluorescence staining of tubulin indicated that MT3-037 altered tubulin networks in cancer cells. Moreover, an in vitro tubulin polymerization assay revealed that MT3-037 inhibited the tubulin polymerization by direct binding to tubulin. Molecular docking studies and binding site completion assays revealed that MT3-037 binds to the colchicine-binding site. Furthermore, MT3-037 significantly inhibited the tumor growth in both MDAMB-468 and Erlotinib-resistant MDA-MB-468 xenograft mouse models. In addition, MT3-037 inhibited the angiogenesis and disrupted the tube formation by human endothelial cells. Our study demonstrates that MT3-037 is a potential tubulin-disrupting agent for antitumor therapy. PMID:27186428

  9. Structural and dynamical instability of DNA caused by high occurrence of d5SICS and dNaM unnatural nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Barroso-Flores, Joaquín

    2017-04-10

    In vivo inclusion of unnatural base pairs (UBPs) into functional DNA was recently reported for compounds 2,6-dimethyl-2H-isoquiniline-1-thione (d5SICS, X) and 2-methoxy-3-methylnaphthalene (dNaM, Y) in a modified E. coli strand, for which high-fidelity replication was observed. Yet, little is known about possible genetic consequences they have in largely substituted DNA. Using a converged microsecond long molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the sequences 5'-GCGCAAXTTGCGC-3' and 5'-GCGCXAXTXGCGC-3', where X represents the UBP, we show that in the system with only a single XY UBP pair present, the global RMS deviation from canonical B-DNA in our control simulations is ∼3 Å and a fully converged ensemble is achieved within 2 µs. With three UBPs, deviation increases to ∼5 Å and convergence is not achieved within 10 µs of sampling time. With five UBPs, no convergence is observed and the double helix collapses into a globular structure. A fully optimized structure of the trimer d(GXC) was obtained using the density functional theory method B97D/cc-pVTZ and resulted in an RMSD value of ∼2 Å when compared to the most populated structure obtained from the MD simulations. Their calculated interaction energy is -3.7 kcal mol(-1). It is thus unlikely that d5SICS and dNaM could be useful as tools in DNA manipulation. This theoretical methodology can be used in the de novo design of UBPs.

  10. Economic inequality caused by feedbacks between poverty and the dynamics of a rare tropical disease: the case of Buruli ulcer in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N.; Guegan, Jean-Francois; Texier, Gaëtan; Bellanger, Martine; Bonds, Matthew; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have received increasing attention in recent years by the global heath community, as they cumulatively constitute substantial burdens of disease as well as barriers for economic development. A number of common tropical diseases such as malaria, hookworm or schistosomiasis have well-documented economic impacts. However, much less is known about the population-level impacts of diseases that are rare but associated with high disability burden, which represent a great number of tropical diseases. Using an individual-based model of Buruli ulcer (BU), we demonstrate that, through feedbacks between health and economic status, such NTDs can have a significant impact on the economic structure of human populations even at low incidence levels. While average wealth is only marginally affected by BU, the economic conditions of certain subpopulations are impacted sufficiently to create changes in measurable population-level inequality. A reduction of the disability burden caused by BU can thus maximize the economic growth of the poorest subpopulations and reduce significantly the economic inequalities introduced by the disease in endemic regions. PMID:26538592

  11. Economic inequality caused by feedbacks between poverty and the dynamics of a rare tropical disease: the case of Buruli ulcer in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Garchitorena, Andrés; Ngonghala, Calistus N; Guegan, Jean-Francois; Texier, Gaëtan; Bellanger, Martine; Bonds, Matthew; Roche, Benjamin

    2015-11-07

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have received increasing attention in recent years by the global heath community, as they cumulatively constitute substantial burdens of disease as well as barriers for economic development. A number of common tropical diseases such as malaria, hookworm or schistosomiasis have well-documented economic impacts. However, much less is known about the population-level impacts of diseases that are rare but associated with high disability burden, which represent a great number of tropical diseases. Using an individual-based model of Buruli ulcer (BU), we demonstrate that, through feedbacks between health and economic status, such NTDs can have a significant impact on the economic structure of human populations even at low incidence levels. While average wealth is only marginally affected by BU, the economic conditions of certain subpopulations are impacted sufficiently to create changes in measurable population-level inequality. A reduction of the disability burden caused by BU can thus maximize the economic growth of the poorest subpopulations and reduce significantly the economic inequalities introduced by the disease in endemic regions.

  12. Water erosion as a cause for agricultural soil loss: modeling of dynamic processes using high-resolution ground based LiDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Imri; Filin, Sagi; Assouline, Shmuel; Shtain, Zachi; Furman, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion by rainfall and water flow is a frequent natural geomorphic process shaping the earth's surface at various scales. Conventional agrotechnical methods enhance soil erosion at the field scale and are at the origin of the reduction of the upper soil layer depth. This reduction is expressed in two aspects: decrease of soil depth, mainly due to erosion, and the diminution of soil quality, mainly due to the loss of fine material, nutrients and organic matter. Rain events, not even the most extremes, cause detachment and transport of fertile soil rich in organic matter and nutrients away from the fields, filling and plugging drainage channels, blocking infrastructure and contaminating water sources. Empirical, semi-empirical and mechanistic models are available to estimate soil erosion by water flow and sediment transport (e.g. WEPP, KINEROSS, EUROSEM). Calibration of these models requires data measured at high spatial and temporal resolutions. Development of high-resolution measurement tools (for both spatial and temporal aspects) should improve the calibration of functions related to particles detachment and transport from the soil surface. In addition, despite the great impact of different tillage systems on the soil erosion process, the vast majority of the models ignore this fundamental factor. The objective of this study is to apply high-resolution ground-based LiDAR measurements to different tillage schemes and scales to improve the ability of models to accurately describe the process of soil erosion induced by rainfall and overland flow. Ground-based laser scans provide high resolution accurate and subtle geomorphic changes, as well as larger-scale deformations. As such, it allows frequent monitoring, so that even the effect of a single storm can be measured, thus improving the calibration of the erosion models. Preliminary results for scans made in the field show the potential and limitations of ground-based LiDAR, and at this point qualitatively can

  13. Observation and prediction of dynamic ground strains, tilts, and torsions caused by the Mw 6.0 2004 Parkfield, California, earthquake and aftershocks, derived from UPSAR array observations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spudich, P.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2008-01-01

    The 28 September 2004 Parkfield, California, earthquake (Mw 6.0) and four aftershocks (Mw 4.7-5.1) were recorded on 12 accelerograph stations of the U.S. Geological Survey Parkfield seismic array (UPSAR), an array of three-component accelerographs occupying an area of about 1 km2 located 8.8 km from the San Andreas fault. Peak horizontal acceleration and velocity at UPSAR during the mainshock were 0.45g and 27 cm/sec, respectively. We determined both time-varying and peak values of ground dilatations, shear strains, torsions, tilts, torsion rates, and tilt rates by applying a time-dependent geodetic analysis to the observed array displacement time series. Array-derived dilatations agree fairly well with point measurements made on high sample rate recordings of the Parkfield-area dilatometers (Johnston et al., 2006). Torsion Fourier amplitude spectra agree well with ground velocity spectra, as expected for propagating plane waves. A simple predictive relation, using the predicted peak velocity from the Boore-Atkinson ground-motion prediction relation (Boore and Atkinson, 2007) scaled by a phase velocity of 1 km/sec, predicts observed peak Parkfield and Chi-Chi rotations (Huang, 2003) well. However, rotation rates measured during Mw 5 Ito, Japan, events observed on a gyro sensor (Takeo, 1998) are factors of 5-60 greater than those predicted by our predictive relation. This discrepancy might be caused by a scale dependence in rotation, with rotations measured over a short baseline exceeding those measured over long baselines. An alternative hypothesis is that events having significant non-double-couple mechanisms, like the Ito events, radiate much stronger rotations than double-couple events. If this is true, then rotational observations might provide an important source of new information for monitoring seismicity in volcanic areas.

  14. Rare causes of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Gemma; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by loss of bone mass and strength, resulting in increased risk of fractures. It is classically divided into primary (post-menopausal or senile), secondary and idiopathic forms. There are many rare diseases, that cause directly or indirectly osteoporosis. The identification and classification of most of these rare causes of osteoporosis is crucial for the specialists in endocrinology and not, in order to prevent this bone complication and to provide for an early therapy. Several pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including various aspects of bone metabolism such as: decreased bone formation, increased bone resorption, altered calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D homeostasis, and abnormal collagen synthesis. In this review, less common forms of primary and secondary osteoporosis are described, specifying, if applicable: genetic causes, epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenic mechanisms causing osteoporosis. A greater awareness of all rare causes of osteoporosis could reduce the number of cases classified as idiopathic osteoporosis and allow the introduction of appropriate and timely treatments. PMID:26604941

  15. Designing using manufacturing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsi, T.; Hoque, A. S. M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design system that enables the composition of a part using manufacturing features. Features are selected from feature libraries. Upon insertion, the system ensures that the feature does not contradict the design-for-manufacture rules. This helps eliminating costly manufacturing problems. The system is developed as an extension to a commercial CAD/CAM system Pro/Engineer.

  16. High resolution cloud feature tracking on Venus by Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toigo, Anthony; Gierasch, Peter J.; Smith, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    The Venus cloud deck was monitored in February 1990 for 16 hours at 400 nanometers wavelength by the Galileo imaging system, with a spatial resolution of about 15 km and with image time separations as small as 10 minutes. Velocities are deduced by following the motion of small cloud features. In spite of the high temporal frequence is capable of being detected, no dynamical phenomena are apparent in the velocity data except the already well-known solar tides, possibly altered by the slow 4-day wave and the Hadley circulation. There is no evidence, to a level of approximately 4 m/s, of eddy or wavelike activity. The dominant size of sub-global scale albedo features is 200-500 km, and their contrast is approximately 5%. At low altitudes there are patches of blotchy, cell-like structures but at most locations the markings are streaky. The patterns are similar to those discovered by Mariner 10 and Pioneer Venus (M. J. S. Belton et al., 1976, W. B. Rossow et al., 1980). Scaling arguments are presented to argue that the mesoscale blotchy cell-like cloud patterns are caused by local dynamics driven in a shallow layer by differential absorption of sunlight. It is also argued that mesoscale albedo features are either streaky or cell-like simply depending on whether the horizontal shear of the large scale flow exceeds a certain critical value.

  17. Clustering granulometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Marcel; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Barrera, Junior; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2002-05-01

    Granulometric features have been widely used for classification, segmentation and recently in estimation of parameters in shape models. In this paper we study the inference of clustering based on granulometric features for a collection of structuring probes in the context of random models. We use random Boolean models to represent grains of different shapes and structure. It is known that granulometric features are excellent descriptors of shape and structure of grains. Inference based on clustering these features helps to analyze the consistency of these features and clustering algorithms. This greatly aids in classifier design and feature selection. Features and the order of their addition play a role in reducing the inference errors. We study four different types of feature addition methods and the effect of replication in reducing the inference errors.

  18. Continued Studies of Polar Cap Thermospheric Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    with a clear Plexi - glass dome placed over it. In November, 1988, an all sky camera system was placed under this dome. The detection system for this...amongst other factors . The The dynamics, thermodynamics, and compositional effect of these high-latitude ion-neutral collision pro- structure of the... frictional heating of the ions, due with ionospheric morphology. A particular feature of to the large ion-neutral difference velocities, caused interest

  19. Persuasion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbuch, Gérard; Deffuant, Guillaume; Amblard, Frédéric

    2005-08-01

    We here discuss a model of continuous opinion dynamics in which agents adjust continuous opinions as a result of random binary encounters whenever their difference in opinion is below a given threshold. We concentrate on the version of the model in the presence of few extremists which might drive the dynamics to generalized extremism. A network version of the dynamics is presented here, and its results are compared to those previously obtained for the full-mixing case. The same dynamical regimes are observed, but in rather different parameter regions. We here show that the combination of meso-scale features resulting from the first interaction steps determines the asymptotic state of the dynamics.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation and free energy landscape methods in probing L215H, L217R and L225M βI-tubulin mutations causing paclitaxel resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Shubhandra; Srivastava, Gaurava; Sharma, Ashok

    2016-08-05

    Drug resistance poses a threatening challenge for mankind, as the development of resistance to already well-established drugs causes serious therapeutic problems. Resistance to paclitaxel (Ptxl), a complex diterpenoid working as microtubule stabilizer, is one such issue in cancer treatment. Microtubule stabilizer drugs, stabilises microtubules upon binding to β-tubulin subunit of tubulin heterodimer thus causing mitotic arrest leading to death of cancer cell. Leucine point mutations viz. L215H, L217R, and L225M were reported for Ptxl resistance in various cancers. In the current study, molecular mechanism of these resistance causing mutations was explored using molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, binding energy estimation (MMPBSA), free energy decomposition, principle component analysis (PCA) and free energy landscape (FEL) methods. A total of five systems including unbound βI-tubulin (Apo), docked wild+Ptxl, L215H+Ptxl, L217R+Ptxl and L225M+Ptxl were prepared, and 50 ns MD simulation was performed for each system. Binding energy estimation indicated that leucine mutation reduces the binding affinity of Ptxl in mutant types (MTs) as compared to wild type (WT). Further, in contrast to WT Ptxl interactions with the M-loop (PHE270-VAL286), S6-S7 loop and H9-H10 were significantly altered in MTs. Results showed that in MTs, Ptxl had weak interaction with M-loop residues, while having strong affinity with S6-S7 loop and H6-H7 loop. Moreover, PCA and FEL analysis revealed that M-loop flexible region (THR274-LEU284) was strongly bound with Ptxl in WT preventing its flexible movement and the causing factor for microtubule stabilization. In MTs due to poor interaction with Ptxl, M-loop flexible region retains its flexibility, therefore unable to stabilize microtubule. This study will give an insight into the importance of M-loop flexible region interaction with Ptxl for microtubule stabilization. In addition, it clearly provides the molecular basis of

  1. Development of an underwater target classifier using target specific features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supriya, M. H.; Pillai, P. R. Saseendran

    2003-04-01

    In Sonar, the detection and estimation functions are performed by signal processors, which involve the computation of various statistics, for enhancing the overall performance of the system. This also takes into account all the undesirable propagation effects caused by the underwater channel. Underwater targets can be classified by using certain target specific features such as target strength, target dynamics, and the signatures of the noise generated by the targets. Rough identification of the targets is carried out with target strength values at known aspects while for precise identification, classification clues from target dynamics and target signatures are generated. Databases for the engine noise spectra of various underwater targets, propeller noises, machinery noises and cavitation noises, speed-noise characteristics, etc., have been developed. The signal energy estimated within a finite-time interval is compared with the earlier detection/estimation decisions, which are stored in the target data record and the relevant target data are updated. The algorithm for identification of target from the most matching signature patterns in the database will generate the classification clues, which will help in target identification. Salient highlights of an underwater target classifier using the above-discussed target specific features are presented in this paper.

  2. Fishing for Features

    ScienceCinema

    Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cort, John; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-08-24

    The Fishing for Features Signature Discovery project developed a framework for discovering signature features in challenging environments involving large and complex data sets or where phenomena may be poorly characterized or understood. Researchers at PNNL have applied the framework to the optimization of biofuels blending and to discover signatures of climate change on microbial soil communities.

  3. Fishing for Features

    SciTech Connect

    Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cort, John; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-07-21

    The Fishing for Features Signature Discovery project developed a framework for discovering signature features in challenging environments involving large and complex data sets or where phenomena may be poorly characterized or understood. Researchers at PNNL have applied the framework to the optimization of biofuels blending and to discover signatures of climate change on microbial soil communities.

  4. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  5. Deep Feature Transfer Learning in Combination with Traditional Features Predicts Survival Among Patients with Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Rahul; Hawkins, Samuel H.; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Schabath, Matthew B.; Gillies, Robert J.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. It can be detected and diagnosed using computed tomography images. For an automated classifier, identifying predictive features from medical images is a key concern. Deep feature extraction using pretrained convolutional neural networks (CNNs) has recently been successfully applied in some image domains. Here, we applied a pretrained CNN to extract deep features from 40 computed tomography images, with contrast, of non-small cell adenocarcinoma lung cancer, and combined deep features with traditional image features and trained classifiers to predict short- and long-term survivors. We experimented with several pretrained CNNs and several feature selection strategies. The best previously reported accuracy when using traditional quantitative features was 77.5% (area under the curve [AUC], 0.712), which was achieved by a decision tree classifier. The best reported accuracy from transfer learning and deep features was 77.5% (AUC, 0.713) using a decision tree classifier. When extracted deep neural network features were combined with traditional quantitative features, we obtained an accuracy of 90% (AUC, 0.935) with the 5 best post-rectified linear unit features extracted from a vgg-f pretrained CNN and the 5 best traditional features. The best results were achieved with the symmetric uncertainty feature ranking algorithm followed by a random forests classifier. PMID:28066809

  6. Deep Feature Transfer Learning in Combination with Traditional Features Predicts Survival Among Patients with Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rahul; Hawkins, Samuel H; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Schabath, Matthew B; Gillies, Robert J; Hall, Lawrence O; Goldgof, Dmitry B

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the USA. It can be detected and diagnosed using computed tomography images. For an automated classifier, identifying predictive features from medical images is a key concern. Deep feature extraction using pretrained convolutional neural networks (CNNs) has recently been successfully applied in some image domains. Here, we applied a pretrained CNN to extract deep features from 40 computed tomography images, with contrast, of non-small cell adenocarcinoma lung cancer, and combined deep features with traditional image features and trained classifiers to predict short- and long-term survivors. We experimented with several pretrained CNNs and several feature selection strategies. The best previously reported accuracy when using traditional quantitative features was 77.5% (area under the curve [AUC], 0.712), which was achieved by a decision tree classifier. The best reported accuracy from transfer learning and deep features was 77.5% (AUC, 0.713) using a decision tree classifier. When extracted deep neural network features were combined with traditional quantitative features, we obtained an accuracy of 90% (AUC, 0.935) with the 5 best post-rectified linear unit features extracted from a vgg-f pretrained CNN and the 5 best traditional features. The best results were achieved with the symmetric uncertainty feature ranking algorithm followed by a random forests classifier.

  7. Defeating feature fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rust, Roland T; Thompson, Debora Viana; Hamilton, Rebecca W

    2006-02-01

    Consider a coffeemaker that offers 12 drink options, a car with more than 700 features on the dashboard, and a mouse pad that's also a clock, calculator, and FM radio. All are examples of "feature bloat", or "featuritis", the result of an almost irresistible temptation to load products with lots of bells and whistles. The problem is that the more features a product boasts, the harder it is to use. Manufacturers that increase a product's capability--the number of useful functions it can perform--at the expense of its usability are exposing their customers to feature fatigue. The authors have conducted three studies to gain a better understanding of how consumers weigh a product's capability relative to its usability. They found that even though consumers know that products with more features are harder to use, they initially choose high-feature models. They also pile on more features when given the chance to customize a product for their needs. Once consumers have actually worked with a product, however, usability starts to matter more to them than capability. For managers in consumer products companies, these findings present a dilemma: Should they maximize initial sales by designing high-feature models, which consumers consistently choose, or should they limit the number of features in order to enhance the lifetime value of their customers? The authors' analytical model guides companies toward a happy middle ground: maximizing the net present value of the typical customer's profit stream. The authors also advise companies to build simpler products, help consumers learn which products suit their needs, develop products that do one thing very well, and design market research in which consumers use actual products or prototypes.

  8. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  9. Exploring strategies for classification of external stimuli using statistical features of the plant electrical response

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Shre Kumar; Das, Saptarshi; Maharatna, Koushik; Masi, Elisa; Santopolo, Luisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Vitaletti, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Plants sense their environment by producing electrical signals which in essence represent changes in underlying physiological processes. These electrical signals, when monitored, show both stochastic and deterministic dynamics. In this paper, we compute 11 statistical features from the raw non-stationary plant electrical signal time series to classify the stimulus applied (causing the electrical signal). By using different discriminant analysis-based classification techniques, we successfully establish that there is enough information in the raw electrical signal to classify the stimuli. In the process, we also propose two standard features which consistently give good classification results for three types of stimuli—sodium chloride (NaCl), sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and ozone (O3). This may facilitate reduction in the complexity involved in computing all the features for online classification of similar external stimuli in future. PMID:25631569

  10. Exploring strategies for classification of external stimuli using statistical features of the plant electrical response.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Shre Kumar; Das, Saptarshi; Maharatna, Koushik; Masi, Elisa; Santopolo, Luisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Vitaletti, Andrea

    2015-03-06

    Plants sense their environment by producing electrical signals which in essence represent changes in underlying physiological processes. These electrical signals, when monitored, show both stochastic and deterministic dynamics. In this paper, we compute 11 statistical features from the raw non-stationary plant electrical signal time series to classify the stimulus applied (causing the electrical signal). By using different discriminant analysis-based classification techniques, we successfully establish that there is enough information in the raw electrical signal to classify the stimuli. In the process, we also propose two standard features which consistently give good classification results for three types of stimuli--sodium chloride (NaCl), sulfuric acid (H₂SO₄) and ozone (O₃). This may facilitate reduction in the complexity involved in computing all the features for online classification of similar external stimuli in future.

  11. Iris recognition based on key image feature extraction.

    PubMed

    Ren, X; Tian, Q; Zhang, J; Wu, S; Zeng, Y

    2008-01-01

    In iris recognition, feature extraction can be influenced by factors such as illumination and contrast, and thus the features extracted may be unreliable, which can cause a high rate of false results in iris pattern recognition. In order to obtain stable features, an algorithm was proposed in this paper to extract key features of a pattern from multiple images. The proposed algorithm built an iris feature template by extracting key features and performed iris identity enrolment. Simulation results showed that the selected key features have high recognition accuracy on the CASIA Iris Set, where both contrast and illumination variance exist.

  12. New features in MEDM.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K., Jr.

    1999-04-13

    MEDM, which is derived from Motif Editor and Display Manager, is the primary graphical interface to the EPICS control system. This paper describes new features that have been added to MEDM in the last two years. These features include new editing capabilities, a PV Info dialog box, a means of specifying limits and precision, a new implementation of the Cartesian Plot, new features for several objects, new capability for the Related Display, help, a user-configurable Execute Menu, reconfigured start-up options, and availability for Windows 95/98/NT. Over one hundred bugs have been fixed, and the program is quite stable and in extensive use.

  13. Automated Extraction of Flow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne (Technical Monitor); Haimes, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely performed as part of the design process of most fluid handling devices. In order to efficiently and effectively use the results of a CFD simulation, visualization tools are often used. These tools are used in all stages of the CFD simulation including pre-processing, interim-processing, and post-processing, to interpret the results. Each of these stages requires visualization tools that allow one to examine the geometry of the device, as well as the partial or final results of the simulation. An engineer will typically generate a series of contour and vector plots to better understand the physics of how the fluid is interacting with the physical device. Of particular interest are detecting features such as shocks, recirculation zones, and vortices (which will highlight areas of stress and loss). As the demand for CFD analyses continues to increase the need for automated feature extraction capabilities has become vital. In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required in understanding the physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like; iso-surface, cuts and streamlines, were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of a great deal of interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snapshot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for (co-processing environments). Methods must be developed to abstract the feature of interest and display it in a manner that physically makes sense.

  14. Automated Extraction of Flow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne (Technical Monitor); Haimes, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely performed as part of the design process of most fluid handling devices. In order to efficiently and effectively use the results of a CFD simulation, visualization tools are often used. These tools are used in all stages of the CFD simulation including pre-processing, interim-processing, and post-processing, to interpret the results. Each of these stages requires visualization tools that allow one to examine the geometry of the device, as well as the partial or final results of the simulation. An engineer will typically generate a series of contour and vector plots to better understand the physics of how the fluid is interacting with the physical device. Of particular interest are detecting features such as shocks, re-circulation zones, and vortices (which will highlight areas of stress and loss). As the demand for CFD analyses continues to increase the need for automated feature extraction capabilities has become vital. In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required in understanding the physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like; isc-surface, cuts and streamlines, were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of a great deal of interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snapshot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments). Methods must be developed to abstract the feature of interest and display it in a manner that physically makes sense.

  15. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  16. AQUATOX Features and Tools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Numerous features have been included to facilitate the modeling process, from model setup and data input, presentation and analysis of results, to easy export of results to spreadsheet programs for additional analysis.

  17. Feature Leads That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    Presents advice to scholastic journalists on writing leads for feature stories. Discusses using a summary, a question, a direct quote, a first-person account, alliteration, a shocking statement, contrast, historical reference, descriptions, narratives, metaphors, and similes. (RS)

  18. Feature Characterization Library

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Wendy; Gentile, Ann; McCoy, Renata

    2006-08-03

    FCLib is a data analysis toolkit constructed to meet the needs of data discovery in large-scale, spatio-temporal data such as finite element simulation data. FCLib is a C library toolkit of building blocks that can be assembled into complex analyses. Important features of FCLib include the following: (1) Support of feature-based analysis, (2) minimization of low-oevel processing, (3) ease of use, and (4) applicable to the wide variety of science domains.

  19. Segmentation of Infant Hippocampus Using Common Feature Representations Learned for Multimodal Longitudinal Data

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yanrong; Wu, Guorong; Yap, Pew-Thian; Jewells, Valerie; Lin, Weili

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant development of the human brain during the first year after birth is known to cause critical implications in later stages of life. In particular, neuropsychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), have been linked with abnormal early development of the hippocampus. Despite its known importance, studying the hippocampus in infant subjects is very challenging due to the significantly smaller brain size, dynamically varying image contrast, and large across-subject variation. In this paper, we present a novel method for effective hippocampus segmentation by using a multi-atlas approach that integrates the complementary multimodal information from longitudinal T1 and T2 MR images. In particular, considering the highly heterogeneous nature of the longitudinal data, we propose to learn their common feature representations by using hierarchical multi-set kernel canonical correlation analysis (CCA). Specifically, we will learn (1) within-time-point common features by projecting different modality features of each time point to its own modality-free common space, and (2) across-time-point common features by mapping all time-point-specific common features to a global common space for all time points. These final features are then employed in patch matching across different modalities and time points for hippocampus segmentation, via label propagation and fusion. Experimental results demonstrate the improved performance of our method over the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:27019875

  20. MCNP4A: Features and philosophy

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes MCNP, states its philosophy, introduces a number of new features becoming available with version MCNP4A, and answers a number of questions asked by participants in the workshop. MCNP is a general-purpose three-dimensional neutron, photon and electron transport code. Its philosophy is ``Quality, Value and New Features.`` Quality is exemplified by new software quality assurance practices and a program of benchmarking against experiments. Value includes a strong emphasis on documentation and code portability. New features are the third priority. MCNP4A is now available at Los Alamos. New features in MCNP4A include enhanced statistical analysis, distributed processor multitasking, new photon libraries, ENDF/B-VI capabilities, X-Windows graphics, dynamic memory allocation, expanded criticality output, periodic boundaries, plotting of particle tracks via SABRINA, and many other improvements. 23 refs.

  1. Three featured plenary sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    The conference included three plenary sessions. The plenary on Governance, Security, Economy, and the Ecosystem of the Changing Arctic featured Vera Alexander, president, Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.; Alan Thornhill, chief environmental officer, U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; and Fran Ulmer, chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission. A plenary on the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea featured Ambassador David Balton, deputy assistant secretary for oceans and fisheries, U.S. Department of State; and Rear Admiral Frederick Kenney Jr., judge advocate general and chief counsel, U.S. Coast Guard. The plenary on Science and the 21st Century featured Phil Keslin, chief technology officer, small lab within Google.

  2. Infectious causes of fever of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alastair C; Moore, David A

    2015-06-01

    The causes of fever of unknown origin (FUO) are changing because advances in clinical practice and diagnostics have facilitated the identification of some infections. A variety of bacterial infections can cause FUO, and these can be divided into those that are easy to identify using culture and those that require serological or molecular tests for identification. A number of viral, parasitic and fungal infections can also cause prolonged fever. This article summarises the clinical features and diagnostic strategy of these infections.

  3. Escalator design features evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Deshpande, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Escalators are available with design features such as dual speed (90 and 120 fpm), mat operation and flat steps. These design features were evaluated based on the impact of each on capital and operating costs, traffic flow, and safety. A human factors engineering model was developed to analyze the need for flat steps at various speeds. Mat operation of escalators was found to be cost effective in terms of energy savings. Dual speed operation of escalators with the higher speed used during peak hours allows for efficient operation. A minimum number of flat steps required as a function of escalator speed was developed to ensure safety for the elderly.

  4. What Causes Cardiomyopathy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and can damage the organs, including the heart. Sarcoidosis : A disease that causes inflammation and can affect ... believe that an abnormal immune response may cause sarcoidosis. This abnormal response causes tiny lumps of cells ...

  5. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Robert; Novack, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Space Launch System (SLS) Agenda: Objective; Key Definitions; Calculating Common Cause; Examples; Defense against Common Cause; Impact of varied Common Cause Failure (CCF) and abortability; Response Surface for various CCF Beta; Takeaways.

  6. Measuring CT scanner variability of radiomics features

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Dennis; Fave, Xenia; Zhang, Lifei; Fried, David; Yang, Jinzhong; Taylor, Brian; Rodriguez-Rivera, Edgardo; Dodge, Cristina; Jones, A. Kyle; Court, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of inter-scanner variability in CT image radiomics studies. Materials and Methods We compared the radiomics features calculated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors from 20 patients with those calculated for 17 scans of a specially designed radiomics phantom. The phantom comprised 10 cartridges, each filled with different materials to produce a wide range of radiomics feature values. The scans were acquired using General Electric, Philips, Siemens, and Toshiba scanners from four medical centers using their routine thoracic imaging protocol. The radiomics feature studied included the mean and standard deviations of the CT numbers as well as textures derived from the neighborhood gray-tone difference matrix. To quantify the significance of the inter-scanner variability, we introduced the metric feature noise. To look for patterns in the scans, we performed hierarchical clustering for each cartridge. Results The mean CT numbers for the 17 CT scans of the phantom cartridges spanned from -864 to 652 Hounsfield units compared with a span of -186 to 35 Hounsfield units for the CT scans of the NSCLC tumors, showing that the phantom’s dynamic range includes that of the tumors. The inter-scanner variability of the feature values depended on both the cartridge material and the feature, and the variability was large relative to the inter-patient variability in the NSCLC tumors for some features. The feature inter-scanner noise was greatest for busyness and least for texture strength. Hierarchical clustering produced different clusters of the phantom scans for each cartridge, although there was some consistent clustering by scanner manufacturer. Conclusions The variability in the values of radiomics features calculated on CT images from different CT scanners can be comparable to the variability in these features found in CT images of NSCLC tumors. These inter-scanner differences should be

  7. What Causes COPD? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: The Challenge of COPD What Causes COPD? Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of Contents Long- ... and the airways usually is the cause of COPD. In the United States, the most common irritant ...

  8. Special Feature: Graphic Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidhazy, Andrew; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Special feature includes "There's More to Blur than Meets the Eye" (Davidhazy), about photographic imaging; "Photography Lab's Silver Lining" (Borchers), about recycling silver; "Budget-Priced Layout Programs for School Publishing with DPT [Desktop Publishing]" (Dose); and "Good Learning and Good PR--All in One…

  9. Assistive Technologies, Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wobschall, Rachel, Ed.; Lakin, Charlie, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This feature issue of a newsletter on community integration of individuals with developmental disabilities considers the role of assistive technologies. It describes efforts to utilize consumer direction, public policy, creativity, energy, and professional know-how in the pursuit of technology-based opportunities to enhance community inclusion,…

  10. Integrated Education. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Jennifer, Ed.; Vandercook, Terri, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This "feature issue" provides various perspectives on a number of integrated education topics, including successful integration practices and strategies, the changing roles of teachers, the appropriate role of research, the history and future of integrated education, and the realization of dreams of life in the mainstream for children with severe…

  11. Main features of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 17, outlines the main features of meiosis, beginning with its significance and proceeding through the meiotic stages. Meiosis is the most important modification of mitosis because it is the reduction division that gives rise to the haploid generation in the life cycle. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Transition. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of a quarterly bulletin on community integration addresses the topic of transition services for preparing youth with disabilities for adult community living. It contains articles with the following titles and authors: "Transition: The Next Five Years" (David R. Johnson and others); "Transition Policy in the 1990s:…

  13. CATS Featured Articles

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-31

      CATS Featured Articles       A Slice of Cirrus: Image of ... just hours before by the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) onboard the International Space Station. Nighttime View of Raung Volcanic Plume : Natural Hazards  - The CATS instrument slices through darkness to reveal the vertical structure of a ...

  14. Diagnostic Dilemmas: Overlapping Features of Brugada Syndrome and Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hoogendijk, Mark G.

    2012-01-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) and Brugada syndrome are distinct clinical entities which diagnostic criteria exclude their coexistence in individual patients. ARVC is a myocardial disorder characterized by fibro-fatty replacement of the myocardium and ventricular arrhythmias. In contrast, the Brugada syndrome has long been considered a functional cardiac disorder: no gross structural abnormalities can be identified in the majority of patients and its electrocardiographic hallmark of coved-type ST-segment elevation in right precordial leads is dynamic. Nonetheless, a remarkable overlap in clinical features has been demonstrated between these conditions. This review focuses on this overlap and discusses its potential causes and consequences. PMID:22654761

  15. Feature Selection in the Tensor Product Feature Space

    PubMed Central

    Smalter, Aaron; Huan, Jun; Lushington, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Classifying objects that are sampled jointly from two or more domains has many applications. The tensor product feature space is useful for modeling interactions between feature sets in different domains but feature selection in the tensor product feature space is challenging. Conventional feature selection methods ignore the structure of the feature space and may not provide the optimal results. In this paper we propose methods for selecting features in the original feature spaces of different domains. We obtained sparsity through two approaches, one using integer quadratic programming and another using L1-norm regularization. Experimental studies on biological data sets validate our approach. PMID:24632658

  16. Uncommon neurodegenerative causes of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Alexander F

    2005-01-01

    A group of neurodegenerative diseases is outlined that affect cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. These diseases give rise to atypical forms of dementia and, unlike Alzheimer's disease (AD), are often associated with neurological symptoms. Clinical symptoms reflect the localization of the degenerative process rather than the nature of the underlying histopathology. Degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobe presents initially with behavioral alterations, but later in the course, impairment of cognition and activities of daily living develops. Posterior cortical atrophy affects the parietal and occipital association cortices and causes complex visual disturbances. In corticobasal degeneration (CBD) the focus of pathology includes the frontoparietal cortex and several subcortical nuclei, causing symmetrical rigidity, bradykinesia, myoclonus and dystonia. Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) involves the frontal, temporal and parietal cortex as well as parts of the brain stem. Clinical features include a hypokinetic rigid syndrome with nuchal dystonia and vertical gaze palsy. Huntington's disease is a prototypical autosomal dominant disorder that affects the extrapyramidal system and causes choreatic movements in combination with personality changes and cognitive deterioration. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with dementia is a neurodegeneration of the frontotemporal cortex and of the anterior horn of the spinal cord. Behavioral change similar to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is paralleled or followed by the classic features of motor neuron disease.

  17. Major depression with psychotic features

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000933.htm Major depression with psychotic features To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Major depression with psychotic features is a mental disorder in ...

  18. North Polar Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows banded terrain of the north polar region of Mars. The bands are exposures of layered material, possibly composed of dust and ice. The dark, rounded to elliptical mounds in this image might be the locations of ancient sand dunes that were completely buried in the north polar layered material. In more recent times, these mounds have been exhumed from within the layered material. Alternatively, the dark features are not ancient, exhumed dunes, but perhaps the remnants of a dark layer of material that once covered the entire area shown in the image. These features are located near 79.9oN, 31.4oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  19. Ceraunius Tholus Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    11 December 2004 Today's Mars Picture of the Day features two images. The top picture is a mosaic of Viking orbiter images acquired in the late 1970s. The lower image is a high resolution picture from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The Viking mosaic shows Ceraunius Tholus, a volcano in the Tharsis region that was first viewed in images obtained by Mariner 9 in 1972. Several channels run down the slope of the Ceraunius Tholus volcano. The deepest of those channels ends in an elliptical crater. The elliptical crater was formed by a very oblique meteor impact. Where the channel meets the floor of the elliptical crater, there is a small mound of material. Presumably, this material was deposited in the elliptical crater after running down through the channel on the volcano's northwest flank.

    Near the top/center of the mound in the elliptical crater is a small, circular depression. Some have speculated for years that this depression is related to volcanism, others thought that it may be an impact crater. The MGS MOC image (lower of the two images) shows that crater. It is not the source of lava flows or any other volcanic features. Most likely, it is an old impact crater. This feature is located near 25.2oN, 97.7oW. The MOC image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  20. Isidis Planitia Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the most typical features of Isidis Planitia at full (1.5 meters -- 5 feet -- per pixel) resolution. The typical features are: (1) light-toned, ripple-like dunes and (2) mounds with summit pits. The dunes are formed by wind. The double-cone feature in the lower right quarter of the image is similar to many mounds and chains of mounds or cones found all across Isidis Planitia. These were seen at lower resolution in Viking orbiter images in the 1970s and were generally considered to be either small volcanoes or ice-cored mounds known as pingoes. With high resolution MOC images, it became apparent that many of these mounds may simply be the remnants of crater and pit chain floors, elevated above the surrounding plains as the layers of rock into which they formed were stripped away. Like much of Mars, there are more questions than answers. This image is located near 8.6oN, 268.2oW, and covers an area about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  1. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  2. Dynamic Environmental Qualification Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    ORGANISATION DU TRAITE DE L’ATLANTIQUE NORD) AGARD Report No.682 DYNAMIC ENVIRONMENTAL QUALIFICATION TECHNIQUES II¥ ,n . r-,, q - .j, i ~Papers present d at...better the knowledge of sources of excitation, transmission paths, dynamic system behaviour , the better the understanding and establishment of appropriate...featuring resonance dwell have poor similarity to the dynamic equipment behaviour in the A/C. As a specific example, a vibration test with a

  3. The dynamic of the splicing of bZIP60 and the proteins encoded by the spliced and unspliced mRNAs reveals some unique features during the activation of UPR in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Parra-Rojas, Juan; Moreno, Adrian A; Mitina, Irina; Orellana, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a signaling pathway that is activated when the workload of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is surpassed. IRE1 is a sensor involved in triggering the UPR and plays a key role in the unconventional splicing of an mRNA leading to the formation of a transcription factor that up-regulates the transcription of genes that play a role in restoring the homeostasis in the ER. In plants, bZIP60 is the substrate for IRE1; however, questions such as what is the dynamics of the splicing of bZIP60 and the fate of the proteins encoded by the spliced and unspliced forms of the mRNA, remain unanswered. In the present work, we analyzed the processing of bZIP60 by determining the levels of the spliced form mRNA in plants exposed to different conditions that trigger UPR. The results show that induction of ER stress increases the content of the spliced form of bZIP60 (bZIP60s) reaching a maximum, that depending on the stimuli, varied between 30 min or 2 hrs. In most cases, this was followed by a decrease in the content. In contrast to other eukaryotes, the splicing never occurred to full extent. The content of bZIP60s changed among different organs upon induction of the UPR suggesting that splicing is regulated differentially throughout the plant. In addition, we analyzed the distribution of a GFP-tagged version of bZIP60 when UPR was activated. A good correlation between splicing of bZIP60 and localization of the protein in the nucleus was observed. No fluorescence was observed under basal conditions, but interestingly, the fluorescence was recovered and found to co-localize with an ER marker upon treatment with an inhibitor of the proteasome. Our results indicate that the dynamics of bZIP60, both the mRNA and the protein, are highly dynamic processes which are tissue-specific and stimulus-dependent.

  4. Electronic Nose Feature Extraction Methods: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jia; Guo, Xiuzhen; Duan, Shukai; Jia, Pengfei; Wang, Lidan; Peng, Chao; Zhang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    Many research groups in academia and industry are focusing on the performance improvement of electronic nose (E-nose) systems mainly involving three optimizations, which are sensitive material selection and sensor array optimization, enhanced feature extraction methods and pattern recognition method selection. For a specific application, the feature extraction method is a basic part of these three optimizations and a key point in E-nose system performance improvement. The aim of a feature extraction method is to extract robust information from the sensor response with less redundancy to ensure the effectiveness of the subsequent pattern recognition algorithm. Many kinds of feature extraction methods have been used in E-nose applications, such as extraction from the original response curves, curve fitting parameters, transform domains, phase space (PS) and dynamic moments (DM), parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), energy vector (EV), power density spectrum (PSD), window time slicing (WTS) and moving window time slicing (MWTS), moving window function capture (MWFC), etc. The object of this review is to provide a summary of the various feature extraction methods used in E-noses in recent years, as well as to give some suggestions and new inspiration to propose more effective feature extraction methods for the development of E-nose technology. PMID:26540056

  5. Megaloblastic Anemias: Nutritional and Other Causes.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph; Datta Mitra, Ananya

    2017-03-01

    Vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies are major causes of megaloblastic anemia. Causes of B12 deficiency include pernicious anemia, gastric surgery, intestinal disorders, dietary deficiency, and inherited disorders of B12 transport or absorption. The prevalence of folate deficiency has decreased because of folate fortification, but deficiency still occurs from malabsorption and increased demand. Other causes include drugs and inborn metabolic errors. Clinical features of megaloblastic anemia include anemia, cytopenias, jaundice, and megaloblastic marrow morphology. Neurologic symptoms occur in B12 deficiency, but not in folate deficiency. Management includes identifying any deficiency, establishing its cause, and replenishing B12 or folate parenterally or orally.

  6. Automated Extraction of Secondary Flow Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Suzanne M.; Haimes, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become standard practice in the design and development of the major components used for air and space propulsion. To aid in the post-processing and analysis phase of CFD many researchers now use automated feature extraction utilities. These tools can be used to detect the existence of such features as shocks, vortex cores and separation and re-attachment lines. The existence of secondary flow is another feature of significant importance to CFD engineers. Although the concept of secondary flow is relatively understood there is no commonly accepted mathematical definition for secondary flow. This paper will present a definition for secondary flow and one approach for automatically detecting and visualizing secondary flow.

  7. Feature isolation and quantification of evolving datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Identifying and isolating features is an important part of visualization and a crucial step for the analysis and understanding of large time-dependent data sets (either from observation or simulation). In this proposal, we address these concerns, namely the investigation and implementation of basic 2D and 3D feature based methods to enhance current visualization techniques and provide the building blocks for automatic feature recognition, tracking, and correlation. These methods incorporate ideas from scientific visualization, computer vision, image processing, and mathematical morphology. Our focus is in the area of fluid dynamics, and we show the applicability of these methods to the quantification and tracking of three-dimensional vortex and turbulence bursts.

  8. Features of MCNP6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goorley, T.; James, M.; Booth, T.; Brown, F.; Bull, J.; Cox, L. J.; Durkee, J.; Elson, J.; Fensin, M.; Forster, R. A.; Hendricks, J.; Hughes, H. G.; Johns, R.; Kiedrowski, B.; Martz, R.; Mashnik, S.; McKinney, G.; Pelowitz, D.; Prael, R.; Sweezy, J.; Waters, L.; Wilcox, T.; Zukaitis, T.

    2014-06-01

    MCNP6 is simply and accurately described as the merger of MCNP5 and MCNPX capabilities, but it is much more than the sum of these two computer codes. MCNP6 is the result of six years of effort by the MCNP5 and MCNPX code development teams. These groups of people, residing in Los Alamos National Laboratory's X Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group (XCP-3) and Nuclear Engineering and Nonproliferation Division, Radiation Transport Modeling Team (NEN-5) respectively, have combined their code development efforts to produce the next evolution of MCNP. While maintenance and major bug fixes will continue for MCNP5 1.60 and MCNPX 2.7.0 for upcoming years, new code development capabilities only will be developed and released in MCNP6. In fact, the initial release of MCNP6 contains numerous new features not previously found in either code. These new features are summarized in this document. Packaged with MCNP6 is also the new production release of the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data files usable by MCNP. The high quality of the overall merged code, usefulness of these new features, along with the desire in the user community to start using the merged code, have led us to make the first MCNP6 production release: MCNP6 version 1. High confidence in the MCNP6 code is based on its performance with the verification and validation test suites, comparisons to its predecessor codes, our automated nightly software debugger tests, the underlying high quality nuclear and atomic databases, and significant testing by many beta testers.

  9. Epignathus with Fetiform Features

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil Y; Shrikrishna, U; Shetty, Jayaprakash; Sitaram, Aishwarya

    2011-01-01

    Epignathus is an extremely rare oropharyngeal teratoma that commonly arises from the palate, leading to a high mortality (80–100%) due to airway obstruction in the neonatal period. We present a case of epignathus immature teratoma with fetiform features, originating from basisphenoid in a 28-week preterm male baby, who succumbed to death immediately after birth. Since epignathus is a life-threatening condition at the time of delivery, a prenatal diagnosis is essential to coordinate the treatment and appropriate management by securing the airway, either by endotracheal intubation or tracheostomy followed by complete resection of the tumor. PMID:21701667

  10. Tectonic features on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, C.; Barnes, J.

    2011-10-01

    This research is based on the exploration of tectonic patterns on Titan from a global perspective. Several moons in the outer solar system display known stress fields driven or modified by global forces which affect patterns of tectonism. Patterns such as these are seen in Europa's tidal forces, Enceladus' tiger strips, and Ganymede's global expansion. Given its proximity to Saturn, as well as its eccentric orbit, tectonic features and global stresses may be present on Titan as well. Titan displays visible tectonic structures, such as mountain chains along its equator (Radebaugh et al. 2007), as well as the unexplored Virgae.

  11. qFeature

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-14

    This package contains statistical routines for extracting features from multivariate time-series data which can then be used for subsequent multivariate statistical analysis to identify patterns and anomalous behavior. It calculates local linear or quadratic regression model fits to moving windows for each series and then summarizes the model coefficients across user-defined time intervals for each series. These methods are domain agnostic—but they have been successfully applied to a variety of domains, including commercial aviation and electric power grid data.

  12. The religious features of scientific medicine.

    PubMed

    Vanderpool, Harold Y

    2008-09-01

    Against the common assumption that modern medicine is altogether secular and scientific, this article argues that the practice of medicine manifests characteristic features of religion. This exposition is predicated upon a delineation of the phenomenological characteristics of religion and upon a critical analysis of the ways scientific medicine does or does not manifest these characteristics. Insofar as medical practice is unknowingly religious, that practice can cause harm and delusion. An acknowledgment that scientific medicine embodies features of religion is a beginning point for scholarly reflection, criticism, and research from a variety of academic perspectives.

  13. The dynamics behind Titan's methane clouds.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan L; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Frierson, Dargan M W; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2006-12-05

    We present results of an axisymmetric global circulation model of Titan with a simplified suite of atmospheric physics forced by seasonally varying insolation. The recent discovery of midlatitude tropospheric clouds on Titan has caused much excitement about the roles of surface sources of methane and the global circulation in forming clouds. Although localized surface sources, such as methane geysers or "cryovolcanoes," have been invoked to explain these clouds, we find in this work that clouds appear in regions of convergence by the mean meridional circulation and over the poles during solstices, where the solar forcing reaches its seasonal maximum. Other regions are inhibited from forming clouds because of dynamical transports of methane and strong subsidence. We find that for a variety of moist regimes, i.e., with the effect of methane thermodynamics included, the observed cloud features can be explained by the large-scale dynamics of the atmosphere. Clouds at the solsticial pole are found to be a robust feature of Titan's dynamics, whereas isolated midlatitude clouds are present exclusively in a variety of moist dynamical regimes. In all cases, even without including methane thermodynamics, our model ceases to produce polar clouds approximately 4-6 terrestrial years after solstices.

  14. The dynamics behind Titan's methane clouds

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.; Frierson, Dargan M. W.; Caballero, Rodrigo

    2006-01-01

    We present results of an axisymmetric global circulation model of Titan with a simplified suite of atmospheric physics forced by seasonally varying insolation. The recent discovery of midlatitude tropospheric clouds on Titan has caused much excitement about the roles of surface sources of methane and the global circulation in forming clouds. Although localized surface sources, such as methane geysers or “cryovolcanoes,” have been invoked to explain these clouds, we find in this work that clouds appear in regions of convergence by the mean meridional circulation and over the poles during solstices, where the solar forcing reaches its seasonal maximum. Other regions are inhibited from forming clouds because of dynamical transports of methane and strong subsidence. We find that for a variety of moist regimes, i.e., with the effect of methane thermodynamics included, the observed cloud features can be explained by the large-scale dynamics of the atmosphere. Clouds at the solsticial pole are found to be a robust feature of Titan's dynamics, whereas isolated midlatitude clouds are present exclusively in a variety of moist dynamical regimes. In all cases, even without including methane thermodynamics, our model ceases to produce polar clouds ≈4–6 terrestrial years after solstices. PMID:17121992

  15. Dynamics of Entropy and Nonclassicality Features of the Interaction between a ⋄-type Four-Level Atom and a Single-Mode Field in the Presence of Intensity-Dependent Coupling and Kerr Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H. R., Baghshahi; M. K., Tavassoly; Behjat, A.

    2014-09-01

    The interaction between a ⋄-type four-level atom and a single-mode field in the presence of Kerr medium with intensity-dependent coupling involving multi-photon processes has been studied. Using the generalized (nonlinear) Jaynes—Cummings model, the exact analytical solution of the wave function for the considered system under particular condition, has been obtained when the atom is initially excited to the topmost level and the field is in a coherent state. Some physical properties of the atom-field entangled state such as linear entropy showing the entanglement degree, Mandel parameter, mean photon number and normal squeezing of the resultant state have been calculated. The effects of Kerr medium, detuning and the intensity-dependent coupling on the temporal behavior of the latter mentioned nonclassical properties have been investigated. It is shown that by appropriately choosing the evolved parameters in the interaction process, each of the above nonclassicality features, which are of special interest in quantum optics as well as quantum information processing, can be revealed.

  16. Recursive Feature Extraction in Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    2014-08-14

    ReFeX extracts recursive topological features from graph data. The input is a graph as a csv file and the output is a csv file containing feature values for each node in the graph. The features are based on topological counts in the neighborhoods of each nodes, as well as recursive summaries of neighbors' features.

  17. Pynamic: the Python Dynamic Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G L; Ahn, D H; de Supinksi, B R; Gyllenhaal, J C; Miller, P J

    2007-07-10

    Python is widely used in scientific computing to facilitate application development and to support features such as computational steering. Making full use of some of Python's popular features, which improve programmer productivity, leads to applications that access extremely high numbers of dynamically linked libraries (DLLs). As a result, some important Python-based applications severely stress a system's dynamic linking and loading capabilities and also cause significant difficulties for most development environment tools, such as debuggers. Furthermore, using the Python paradigm for large scale MPI-based applications can create significant file IO and further stress tools and operating systems. In this paper, we present Pynamic, the first benchmark program to support configurable emulation of a wide-range of the DLL usage of Python-based applications for large scale systems. Pynamic has already accurately reproduced system software and tool issues encountered by important large Python-based scientific applications on our supercomputers. Pynamic provided insight for our system software and tool vendors, and our application developers, into the impact of several design decisions. As we describe the Pynamic benchmark, we will highlight some of the issues discovered in our large scale system software and tools using Pynamic.

  18. What Causes Polycythemia Vera?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Polycythemia Vera? Primary Polycythemia Polycythemia vera (PV) also is known as primary ... may play a role in causing PV. Secondary Polycythemia Another type of polycythemia, called secondary polycythemia, isn' ...

  19. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pumping enough oxygen-rich blood to the body. Heart Attack Most heart attacks occur as a result of ... or completely block blood flow. Conditions Caused by Heart Attack Heart attacks can cause some serious heart conditions ...

  20. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  1. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Anemia? The three main causes of anemia are: Blood ... the blood and can lead to anemia. Aplastic Anemia Some infants are born without the ability to ...

  2. Temporomandibular disorders: associated features.

    PubMed

    Auvenshine, Ronald C

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) encompasses a number of clinical problems involving the masticatory muscles or the temporomandibular joints. These disorders are a major cause of nondental pain in the orofacial region, and are considered to be a subclassification of musculoskeletal disorders. Orofacial pain and TMD can be associated with pathologic conditions or disorders related to somatic and neurologic structures. When patients present to the dental office with a chief complaint of pain or headaches, it is vital for the practitioner to understand the cause of the complaint and to perform a thorough examination that will lead to the correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment. A complete understanding of the associated medical conditions with symptomology common to TMD and orofacial pain is necessary for a proper diagnosis.

  3. Feature Engineering for Drug Name Recognition in Biomedical Texts: Feature Conjunction and Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shengyu; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Drug name recognition (DNR) is a critical step for drug information extraction. Machine learning-based methods have been widely used for DNR with various types of features such as part-of-speech, word shape, and dictionary feature. Features used in current machine learning-based methods are usually singleton features which may be due to explosive features and a large number of noisy features when singleton features are combined into conjunction features. However, singleton features that can only capture one linguistic characteristic of a word are not sufficient to describe the information for DNR when multiple characteristics should be considered. In this study, we explore feature conjunction and feature selection for DNR, which have never been reported. We intuitively select 8 types of singleton features and combine them into conjunction features in two ways. Then, Chi-square, mutual information, and information gain are used to mine effective features. Experimental results show that feature conjunction and feature selection can improve the performance of the DNR system with a moderate number of features and our DNR system significantly outperforms the best system in the DDIExtraction 2013 challenge. PMID:25861377

  4. Feature engineering for drug name recognition in biomedical texts: feature conjunction and feature selection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengyu; Tang, Buzhou; Chen, Qingcai; Wang, Xiaolong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Drug name recognition (DNR) is a critical step for drug information extraction. Machine learning-based methods have been widely used for DNR with various types of features such as part-of-speech, word shape, and dictionary feature. Features used in current machine learning-based methods are usually singleton features which may be due to explosive features and a large number of noisy features when singleton features are combined into conjunction features. However, singleton features that can only capture one linguistic characteristic of a word are not sufficient to describe the information for DNR when multiple characteristics should be considered. In this study, we explore feature conjunction and feature selection for DNR, which have never been reported. We intuitively select 8 types of singleton features and combine them into conjunction features in two ways. Then, Chi-square, mutual information, and information gain are used to mine effective features. Experimental results show that feature conjunction and feature selection can improve the performance of the DNR system with a moderate number of features and our DNR system significantly outperforms the best system in the DDIExtraction 2013 challenge.

  5. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: ...

  6. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  7. Feature Tracking Using Reeb Graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.; Pascucci, Valerio

    2010-08-02

    Tracking features and exploring their temporal dynamics can aid scientists in identifying interesting time intervals in a simulation and serve as basis for performing quantitative analyses of temporal phenomena. In this paper, we develop a novel approach for tracking subsets of isosurfaces, such as burning regions in simulated flames, which are defined as areas of high fuel consumption on a temperature isosurface. Tracking such regions as they merge and split over time can provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. However, the convoluted nature of the temperature isosurface and its rapid movement make this analysis particularly challenging. Our approach tracks burning regions by extracting a temperature isovolume from the four-dimensional space-time temperature field. It then obtains isosurfaces for the original simulation time steps and labels individual connected 'burning' regions based on the local fuel consumption value. Based on this information, a boundary surface between burning and non-burning regions is constructed. The Reeb graph of this boundary surface is the tracking graph for burning regions.

  8. Causes for "ghost" manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borok, S.; Goldfarb, I.; Gol'dshtein, V.

    2009-05-01

    The paper concerns intrinsic low-dimensional manifold (ILDM) method suggested in [Maas U, Pope SB. Simplifying chemical kinetics: intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds in composition space, combustion and flame 1992;88:239-64] for dimension reduction of models describing kinetic processes. It has been shown in a number of publications [Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. Comparative analysis of two asymptotic approaches based on integral manifolds. IMA J Appl Math 2004;69:353-74; Kaper HG, Kaper TJ, Asymptotic analysis of two reduction methods for systems of chemical reactions. Phys D 2002;165(1-2):66-93; Rhodes C, Morari M, Wiggins S. Identification of the low order manifolds: validating the algorithm of Maas and Pope. Chaos 1999;9(1):108-23] that the ILDM-method works successfully and the intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds belong to a small vicinity of invariant slow manifolds. The ILDM-method has a number of disadvantages. One of them is appearance of so-called "ghost"-manifolds, which do not have connection to the system dynamics [Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. "Ghost" ILDM - manifolds and their discrimination. In: Twentieth Annual Symposium of the Israel Section of the Combustion Institute, Beer-Sheva, Israel; 2004. p. 55-7; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. About non-coincidence of invariant manifolds and intrinsic low-dimensional manifolds (ILDM). CNSNS 2008;71:1029-38; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. In: Gorban AN, Kazantzis N, Kevrekidis YG, Ottinger HC, Theodoropoulos C, editors. "Ghost" ILDM-manifolds and their identification: model reduction and coarse-graining approaches for multiscale phenomena. Berlin-Heidelberg-New York: Springer; 2006. p. 55-80; Borok S, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V. On a modified version of ILDM method and its asymptotic analysis. IJPAM 2008; 44(1): 125-50; Bykov V, Goldfarb I, Gol'dshtein V, Maas U. On a modified version of ILDM approach: asymptotic analysis based on integral manifolds. IMA J Appl Math 2006

  9. Colonization of cashew plants by Lasiodiplodia theobromae: Microscopical features

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lasiodiplodia theobromae is a phytopathogenic fungus causing gummosis, a threatening disease for cashew plants in Brazil. In an attempt to investigate the ultrastructural features of the pathogen colonization and its response to immunofluorescence labeling, light, confocal and electron microscope st...

  10. Conformational features of cepacian: the exopolysaccharide produced by clinical strains of Burkholderia cepacia.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Carlos E Sampaio; Ruggiero, Jose R; Sist, Paola; Cescutti, Paola; Urbani, Ranieri; Rizzo, Roberto

    2005-04-11

    Conformational energy calculations and molecular dynamics investigations, both in water and in dimethyl sulfoxide, were carried out on the exopolysaccharide cepacian produced by the majority of the clinical strains of Burkholderia cepacia, an opportunistic pathogen causing serious lung infection in patients affected by cystic fibrosis, The investigation was aimed at defining the structural and conformational features, which might be relevant for clarification of the structure-function relationships of the polymer. The molecular dynamics calculations were carried out by Ramachandran-type energy plots of the disaccharides that constitute the polymer repeating unit. The dynamics of an oligomer composed of three repeating units were investigated in water and in Me2SO, a non-aggregating solvent. Analysis of the time persistence of hydrogen bonds showed the presence of a large number of favourable interactions in water, which were less evident in Me2SO. The calculations on the cepacian chain indicated that polymer conformational features in water were affected by the lateral chains, but were also largely dictated by the presence of solvent. Moreover, the large number of intra-chain hydrogen bonds in water disappeared in Me2SO solution, increasing the average dimension of the polymer chains.

  11. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  12. What Causes Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... through menopause. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video All of Our Stories Are Red: Yaskary's Story 04/ ... part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). All of Our Stories Are Red: Eileen's Story 04/ ...

  13. Fatal methanol poisoning: features of liver histopathology.

    PubMed

    Akhgari, Maryam; Panahianpour, Mohammad Hadi; Bazmi, Elham; Etemadi-Aleagha, Afshar; Mahdavi, Amirhosein; Nazari, Saeed Hashemi

    2013-03-01

    Methanol poisoning has become a considerable problem in Iran. Liver can show some features of poisoning after methanol ingestion. Therefore, our concern was to examine liver tissue histopathology in fatal methanol poisoning cases in Iranian population. In this study, 44 cases of fatal methanol poisoning were identified in a year. The histological changes of the liver were reviewed. The most striking features of liver damage by light microscopy were micro-vesicular steatosis, macro-vesicular steatosis, focal hepatocyte necrosis, mild intra-hepatocyte bile stasis, feathery degeneration and hydropic degeneration. Blood and vitreous humor methanol concentrations were examined to confirm the proposed history of methanol poisoning. The majority of cases were men (86.36%). In conclusion, methanol poisoning can cause histological changes in liver tissues. Most importantly in cases with mean blood and vitreous humor methanol levels greater than 127 ± 38.9 mg/dL more than one pathologic features were detected.

  14. A prototype feature system for feature retrieval using relationships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Usery, E.L.

    2009-01-01

    Using a feature data model, geographic phenomena can be represented effectively by integrating space, theme, and time. This paper extends and implements a feature data model that supports query and visualization of geographic features using their non-spatial and temporal relationships. A prototype feature-oriented geographic information system (FOGIS) is then developed and storage of features named Feature Database is designed. Buildings from the U.S. Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina and subways in Chicago, Illinois are used to test the developed system. The results of the applications show the strength of the feature data model and the developed system 'FOGIS' when they utilize non-spatial and temporal relationships in order to retrieve and visualize individual features.

  15. 3. VIEW OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 7), FACING NORTH. OFFICE (FEATURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 7), FACING NORTH. OFFICE (FEATURE 11) VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Duplex, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  16. 1. VIEW OF RESIDENCE (FEATURE 12), FACING SOUTHWEST. DUPLEX (FEATURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF RESIDENCE (FEATURE 12), FACING SOUTHWEST. DUPLEX (FEATURE 9) IS VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Residence, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  17. TU-CD-304-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION and BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY): Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Development of Novel Arc Delivery Techniques Integrating Dynamic Table Motion for Extended Volume Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, E; Hoppe, R; Million, L; Loo, B; Koong, A; Xing, L; Hsu, A; Fahimian, B; Otto, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Integration of coordinated robotic table motion with inversely-planned arc delivery has the potential to resolve table-top delivery limitations of large-field treatments such as Total Body Irradiation (TBI), Total Lymphoid Irradiation (TLI), and Cranial-Spinal Irradiation (CSI). We formulate the foundation for Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy (TMAT), and using Varian Developer Mode capabilities, experimentally investigate its practical implementation for such techniques. Methods: A MATLAB algorithm was developed for inverse planning optimization of the table motion, MLC positions, and gantry motion under extended-SSD geometry. To maximize the effective field size, delivery trajectories for TMAT TBI were formed with the table rotated at 270° IEC and dropped vertically to 152.5cm SSD. Preliminary testing of algorithm parameters was done through retrospective planning analysis. Robotic delivery was programmed using custom XML scripting on the TrueBeam Developer Mode platform. Final dose was calculated using the Eclipse AAA algorithm. Initial verification of delivery accuracy was measured using OSLDs on a solid water phantom of varying thickness. Results: A comparison of DVH curves demonstrated that dynamic couch motion irradiation was sufficiently approximated by static control points spaced in intervals of less than 2cm. Optimized MLC motion decreased the average lung dose to 68.5% of the prescription dose. The programmed irradiation integrating coordinated table motion was deliverable on a TrueBeam STx linac in 6.7 min. With the couch translating under an open 10cmx20cm field angled at 10°, OSLD measurements along the midline of a solid water phantom at depths of 3, 5, and 9cm were within 3% of the TPS AAA algorithm with an average deviation of 1.2%. Conclusion: A treatment planning and delivery system for Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy of extended volumes has been established and experimentally demonstrated for TBI. Extension to other treatment

  18. Causes and effects.

    PubMed

    Cone, Carol L; Feldman, Mark A; DaSilva, Alison T

    2003-07-01

    Most companies make charitable donations, but few approach their contributions with an eye toward enhancing their brands. Those that do take such an approach commit talent and know-how, not just dollars, to a pressing but carefully chosen social need and then tell the world about the cause and their service to it. Through the association, both the business and the cause benefit in ways they could not otherwise. Organizations such as Avon, ConAgra Foods, and Chevrolet have recognized that a sustained cause-branding program can improve their reputations, boost their employees' morale, strengthen relations with business partners, and drive sales. And the targeted causes receive far more money than they could have from direct corporate gifts alone. The authors examine these best practices and offer four principles for building successful cause-branding programs. First, they say, a company should select a cause that advances its corporate goals. That is, unless the competitive logic for supporting the cause is clear, a company shouldn't even consider putting its finite resources behind it. Second, a business should commit to a cause before picking its charitable partners. Otherwise, a cause-branding program may become too dependent on its partners. Third, a company should put all its assets to work, especially its employees. It should leverage the professional skills of its workers as well as its other assets such as distribution networks. And fourth, a company should promote its philanthropic initiatives through every possible channel. In addition to using the media, it should communicate its efforts through the Web, annual reports, direct mail, and so on. Cause branding is a way to turn the obligations of corporate citizenship into a valuable asset. When the cause is well chosen, the commitment genuine, and the program well executed, the cause helps the company, and the company helps the cause.

  19. Selecting Salient Features in High Feature to Exemplar Ratio Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    We present an approach for identifying salient input features in high feature to exemplar ratio conditions. Basically we modify the SNR saliency...screening algorithm to improve the solution of the optimal salient feature subset problem. We propose that applying the SNR method to randomly selected...subsets (SRSS) has a superior potential to identify the salient features than the traditional SNR algorithm has. Two experimental studies are provided

  20. Tarsal tunnel syndrome: ultrasonographic and MRI features.

    PubMed

    Machiels, F; Shahabpour, M; De Maeseneer, M; Schmedding, E; Wylock, P; Osteaux, M

    1999-04-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome is a well-known but rare entrapment neuropathy involving the posterior tibial nerve in the tarsal tunnel, a fibro-osseous channel extending from the medial aspect of the ankle to the midfoot. Posttraumatic fibrosis, ganglion cyst, tenosynovitis, tumor of the nerves or other structures, dilated or tortuous veins can cause significant nerve compression in this anatomic region. Herein, we present the typical ultrasonographic and magnetic resonance features of this disorder in patient with a ganglion cyst.

  1. Vehicle Dynamics and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajamani, Rajesh

    Vehicle Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive coverage of vehicle control systems and the dynamic models used in the development of these control systems. The control system topics covered in the book include cruise control, adaptive cruise control, ABS, automated lane keeping, automated highway systems, yaw stability control, engine control, passive, active and semi-active suspensions, tire models and tire-road friction estimation. In developing the dynamic model for each application, an effort is made to both keep the model simple enough for control system design but at the same time rich enough to capture the essential features of the dynamics.

  2. Drawing on Text Features for Reading Comprehension and Composing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risko, Victoria J.; Walker-Dalhouse, Doris

    2011-01-01

    Students read multiple-genre texts such as graphic novels, poetry, brochures, digitized texts with videos, and informational and narrative texts. Features such as overlapping illustrations and implied cause-and-effect relationships can affect students' comprehension. Teaching with these texts and drawing attention to organizational features hold…

  3. [Family dynamics of autistic children].

    PubMed

    Sprovieri, M H; Assumpção, F B

    2001-06-01

    We studied 15 families with autistics, 15 with Down's syndrome and 15 asymptomatic children. Patients' age ranged from 5 to 15 years-old. The parents of these three families' groups were appraised in regard to their family dynamics, to relate those symptoms to the functioning of an autistic family, in a comparative study. Details were provided of the families, the overall autistic features, the autistic's family, the family and the mental health, their limitations and difficulties throughout the vital cycle. An attempt was made to locate the factors that aid the family in hindering the healthy emotional development of its members. The field research was achieved by use of the instruments of the Family Dynamics Evaluation, (Carneiro, 1983). The data gathered were statistically compared. Considering the family population studied (n = 45), we found that the autistics' families and victims of Down's syndrome made it difficult to sustain the emotional health of group members. We conclude that the autistic's family dynamics caused difficulties to the emotional health of the group's members.

  4. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  5. Automated Fluid Feature Extraction from Transient Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert; Lovely, David

    1999-01-01

    In the past, feature extraction and identification were interesting concepts, but not required to understand the underlying physics of a steady flow field. This is because the results of the more traditional tools like iso-surfaces, cuts and streamlines were more interactive and easily abstracted so they could be represented to the investigator. These tools worked and properly conveyed the collected information at the expense of much interaction. For unsteady flow-fields, the investigator does not have the luxury of spending time scanning only one "snap-shot" of the simulation. Automated assistance is required in pointing out areas of potential interest contained within the flow. This must not require a heavy compute burden (the visualization should not significantly slow down the solution procedure for co-processing environments like pV3). And methods must be developed to abstract the feature and display it in a manner that physically makes sense. The following is a list of the important physical phenomena found in transient (and steady-state) fluid flow: (1) Shocks, (2) Vortex cores, (3) Regions of recirculation, (4) Boundary layers, (5) Wakes. Three papers and an initial specification for the (The Fluid eXtraction tool kit) FX Programmer's guide were included. The papers, submitted to the AIAA Computational Fluid Dynamics Conference, are entitled : (1) Using Residence Time for the Extraction of Recirculation Regions, (2) Shock Detection from Computational Fluid Dynamics results and (3) On the Velocity Gradient Tensor and Fluid Feature Extraction.

  6. Image feature localization by multiple hypothesis testing of Gabor features.

    PubMed

    Ilonen, Jarmo; Kamarainen, Joni-Kristian; Paalanen, Pekka; Hamouz, Miroslav; Kittler, Josef; Kälviäinen, Heikki

    2008-03-01

    Several novel and particularly successful object and object category detection and recognition methods based on image features, local descriptions of object appearance, have recently been proposed. The methods are based on a localization of image features and a spatial constellation search over the localized features. The accuracy and reliability of the methods depend on the success of both tasks: image feature localization and spatial constellation model search. In this paper, we present an improved algorithm for image feature localization. The method is based on complex-valued multi resolution Gabor features and their ranking using multiple hypothesis testing. The algorithm provides very accurate local image features over arbitrary scale and rotation. We discuss in detail issues such as selection of filter parameters, confidence measure, and the magnitude versus complex representation, and show on a large test sample how these influence the performance. The versatility and accuracy of the method is demonstrated on two profoundly different challenging problems (faces and license plates).

  7. Seismic features of Winnipegosis mounds in Saskatchewan

    SciTech Connect

    Gendzwill, D.J.

    1988-07-01

    The Winnipegosis Formation of southern Saskatchewan is characterized by reefs or reeflike mounds in its upper member. Several characteristic features of the mounds permit their identification from seismic-reflection data. These features include reflections from the flanks of the mound, a change in the reflection continuity in the middle and base of the mound, a velocity pullup under the mound, and subsidence of strata over the mound. Dissolution of the salt which surrounds the mounds sometimes occurs, resulting in a drape structure. Some or all of these features may be present at the correct seismic stratigraphic level for Winnipegosis mounds, depending on the local conditions. Subsidence of strata over the mounds indicates compaction and porosity loss from the original mound or possibly the degree of dolomitization or pressure dissolution. Salt-removal features over or adjacent to the mounds indicate fluid movements. Approximate ages can be estimated from stratigraphic thinning and thickening relationships above such features. Complications in identifying Winnipegosis mounds may arise from thin-bed effects if the mounds are not very thick compared to a seismic wavelength. Confusion may also arise from anhydrite, which may encase the mounds or which may form a thick horizontal layer at the tops of the mounds, causing an interfering signal.

  8. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  9. Causes of Paralysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by a virus that attacks the nerves which control motor function. > Spina bifida A neural tube defect that causes incomplete closure in the spinal column. > Spinal cord injury Involves damage to the nerves within the bony protection of the spinal canal. > ...

  10. What Causes Bad Breath?

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? A A A en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  11. What Causes Angina?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a clot blocks an artery. Variant Angina A spasm in a coronary artery causes variant angina. The spasm causes the walls of the artery to tighten ... those who don’t. The coronary arteries can spasm as a result of: Exposure to cold Emotional ...

  12. Clinical features of actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Bonnefond, Simon; Catroux, Mélanie; Melenotte, Cléa; Karkowski, Ludovic; Rolland, Ludivine; Trouillier, Sébastien; Raffray, Loic

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Actinomycosis is a rare heterogeneous anaerobic infection with misleading clinical presentations that delay diagnosis. A significant number of misdiagnosed cases have been reported in specific localizations, but studies including various forms of actinomycosis have rarely been published. We performed a multicenter retrospective chart review of laboratory-confirmed actinomycosis cases from January 2000 until January 2014. We described clinical characteristics, diagnostic procedures, differential diagnosis, and management of actinomycosis of clinical significance. Twenty-eight patients were included from 6 hospitals in France. Disease was diagnosed predominately in the abdomen/pelvis (n = 9), orocervicofacial (n = 5), cardiothoracic (n = 5), skeletal (n = 3), hematogenous (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 2), and intracranially (n = 1). Four patients (14%) were immunocompromised. In most cases (92 %), the diagnosis of actinomycosis was not suspected on admission, as clinical features were not specific. Diagnosis was obtained from either microbiology (50%, n = 14) or histopathology (42%, n = 12), or from both methods (7%, n = 2). Surgical biopsy was needed for definite diagnosis in 71% of cases (n = 20). Coinfection was found in 13 patients (46%), among which 3 patients were diagnosed from histologic criteria only. Two-thirds of patients were treated with amoxicillin. Median duration of antibiotics was 120 days (interquartile range 60–180), whereas the median follow-up time was 12 months (interquartile range 5.25–18). Two patients died. This study highlights the distinct and miscellaneous patterns of actinomycosis to prompt accurate diagnosis and earlier treatments, thus improving the outcome. Surgical biopsy should be performed when possible while raising histologist's and microbiologist's awareness of possible actinomycosis to enhance the chance of diagnosis and use specific molecular methods. PMID:27311002

  13. Slim Battery Modelling Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borthomieu, Y.; Prevot, D.

    2011-10-01

    Saft has developed a life prediction model for VES and MPS cells and batteries. The Saft Li-ion Model (SLIM) is a macroscopic electrochemical model based on energy (global at cell level). The main purpose is to predict the battery performances during the life for GEO, MEO and LEO missions. This model is based on electrochemical characteristics such as Energy, Capacity, EMF, Internal resistance, end of charge voltage. It uses fading and calendar law effects on energy and internal impedance vs. time, temperature, End of Charge voltage. Based on the mission profile, satellite power system characteristics, the model proposes the various battery configurations. For each configuration, the model gives the battery performances using mission figures and profiles: power, duration, DOD, end of charge voltages, temperatures during eclipses and solstices, thermal dissipations and cell failures. For the GEO/MEO missions, eclipse and solstice periods can include specific profile such as plasmic propulsion fires and specific balancing operations. For LEO missions, the model is able to simulate high power peaks to predict radar pulses. Saft's main customers have been using the SLIM model available in house for two years. The purpose is to have the satellite builder power engineers able to perform by themselves in the battery pre-dimensioning activities their own battery simulations. The simulations can be shared with Saft engineers to refine the power system designs. This model has been correlated with existing life and calendar tests performed on all the VES and MPS cells. In comparing with more than 10 year lasting life tests, the accuracy of the model from a voltage point of view is less than 10 mV at end Of Life. In addition, thethe comparison with in-orbit data has been also done. b This paper will present the main features of the SLIM software and outputs comparison with real life tests. b0

  14. Selective Audiovisual Semantic Integration Enabled by Feature-Selective Attention.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Huang, Biao; Yu, Tianyou; Wu, Wei; Li, Peijun; Fang, Fang; Sun, Pei

    2016-01-13

    An audiovisual object may contain multiple semantic features, such as the gender and emotional features of the speaker. Feature-selective attention and audiovisual semantic integration are two brain functions involved in the recognition of audiovisual objects. Humans often selectively attend to one or several features while ignoring the other features of an audiovisual object. Meanwhile, the human brain integrates semantic information from the visual and auditory modalities. However, how these two brain functions correlate with each other remains to be elucidated. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we explored the neural mechanism by which feature-selective attention modulates audiovisual semantic integration. During the fMRI experiment, the subjects were presented with visual-only, auditory-only, or audiovisual dynamical facial stimuli and performed several feature-selective attention tasks. Our results revealed that a distribution of areas, including heteromodal areas and brain areas encoding attended features, may be involved in audiovisual semantic integration. Through feature-selective attention, the human brain may selectively integrate audiovisual semantic information from attended features by enhancing functional connectivity and thus regulating information flows from heteromodal areas to brain areas encoding the attended features.

  15. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  16. Confidence-Based Feature Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; desJardins, Marie; MacGlashan, James

    2010-01-01

    Confidence-based Feature Acquisition (CFA) is a novel, supervised learning method for acquiring missing feature values when there is missing data at both training (learning) and test (deployment) time. To train a machine learning classifier, data is encoded with a series of input features describing each item. In some applications, the training data may have missing values for some of the features, which can be acquired at a given cost. A relevant JPL example is that of the Mars rover exploration in which the features are obtained from a variety of different instruments, with different power consumption and integration time costs. The challenge is to decide which features will lead to increased classification performance and are therefore worth acquiring (paying the cost). To solve this problem, CFA, which is made up of two algorithms (CFA-train and CFA-predict), has been designed to greedily minimize total acquisition cost (during training and testing) while aiming for a specific accuracy level (specified as a confidence threshold). With this method, it is assumed that there is a nonempty subset of features that are free; that is, every instance in the data set includes these features initially for zero cost. It is also assumed that the feature acquisition (FA) cost associated with each feature is known in advance, and that the FA cost for a given feature is the same for all instances. Finally, CFA requires that the base-level classifiers produce not only a classification, but also a confidence (or posterior probability).

  17. Distributed feature extraction for event identification.

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Nina M.; Ko, Teresa H.

    2004-05-01

    An important component of ubiquitous computing is the ability to quickly sense the dynamic environment to learn context awareness in real-time. To pervasively capture detailed information of movements, we present a decentralized algorithm for feature extraction within a wireless sensor network. By approaching this problem in a distributed manner, we are able to work within the real constraint of wireless battery power and its effects on processing and network communications. We describe a hardware platform developed for low-power ubiquitous wireless sensing and a distributed feature extraction methodology which is capable of providing more information to the user of events while reducing power consumption. We demonstrate how the collaboration between sensor nodes can provide a means of organizing large networks into information-based clusters.

  18. Why Is Parkinsonism Not a Feature of Human Methamphetamine Users?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moszczynska, Anna; Fitzmaurice, Paul; Ang, Lee; Kalasinsky, Kathryn S.; Schmunk, Gregory A.; Peretti, Frank J.; Aiken, Sally S.; Wickham, Dennis J.; Kish, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    For more than 50 years, methamphetamine has been a widely used stimulant drug taken to maintain wakefulness and performance and, in high doses, to cause intense euphoria. Animal studies show that methamphetamine can cause short-term and even persistent depletion of brain levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine. However, the clinical features of…

  19. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  20. Dynamic model for biospeckle.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Crysttian Arantes; da Costa, Antonio Tavares

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the development of a simple dynamic microscopic model to describe the main features of the phenomenon known as dynamic speckle, or biospeckle. Biospeckle is an interference pattern formed when a biological surface is illuminated with coherent light. The dynamic characteristics of biospeckle have been investigated as possible tools for assessing the quality of biological products. Our model, despite its simplicity, was able to reproduce qualitatively the main features of biospeckle. We were able to correlate variations in a microscopic parameter associated with movement of the particles comprising the organic surface with changes in a macroscopic parameter that measures the change rate of a dynamic interference pattern. We showed that this correlation occurs only within a limited range of parameter microscope values. We also showed how our model was able to describe nonuniform surfaces composed of more than one type of particles.

  1. Dynamics at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvia Ceyer, Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-05-04

    The 2009 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 30th anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state dynamics, non-adiabatic interactions in molecule-metal systems, photon induced desorption from semiconductor and metal surfaces, ultrafast x-ray and electron diffraction as probes of the dynamics of ablation, ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy of water surface dynamics, dynamics of a single adsorbate, growth at nano-scale mineral surfaces, dynamics of atom recombination on interstellar dust grains and the dynamics of the interaction of water with lipid bilayers. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology and biophysics.

  2. Computational Modeling of Multi-Scale Material Features in Cement Paste - An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-25

    from nanoscale material features through material chemistry modeling via molecular dynamics (MD); modeling of complete three-dimensional virtual...material features through material chemistry modeling via molecular dynamics (MD); modeling of complete three-dimensional virtual microstructure...including the evolution of microstructure due to hydration of cementitious materials are briefly highlighted. Material chemistry modeling discussions from

  3. What Causes Hemochromatosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... each parent), you're at risk for iron overload and signs and symptoms of hemochromatosis. If you ... of another disease or condition that causes iron overload. Examples of such diseases and conditions include: Certain ...